National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for reporting time period

  1. Time-periodic universes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De-Xing Kong; Kefeng Liu; Ming Shen

    2008-08-30

    In this letter we construct a new time-periodic solution of the vacuum Einstein's field equations whose Riemann curvature norm takes the infinity at some points. We show that this solution is intrinsically time-periodic and describes a time-periodic universe with the "black hole". New physical phenomena are investigated and new singularities are analyzed for this universal model.

  2. ANDERSON LOCALIZATION FOR TIME PERIODIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    disorder, Anderson localization in Z d is stable un- der localized time-periodic perturbations by proving random Schrodinger operators at large disorder has been well known since the seminal work of Fr is approximated by the potential V . The equation governing the system is (1.5) i @ @t = (#1; + V ) on Z d #2

  3. Property:TimePeriod | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report Url JumpTechnology Jump to: navigation, search ThisTimePeriod

  4. Emissions from Idling Trucks for Extended Time Periods | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Idling Trucks for Extended Time Periods Emissions from Idling Trucks for Extended Time Periods 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2002deerlewis.pdf...

  5. 03.612 Time Off for Voting. 1. Purpose. To provide staff members a reasonable period of time off

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    03.612 Time Off for Voting. 1. Purpose. To provide staff members a reasonable period of time off a reasonable period of time off during the regular work day for voting on an official election day. This time should be reported as time worked and is not charged against vacation leave, comp time or salary

  6. Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: December 31, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Cast Stone Replacement 901833 Quarterly Construction Status Report for Period Ending: December 31, 2014

  7. Time and Attendance Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-10-22

    DOE O 535.1 establishes the Department's requirements and responsibilities governing time and attendance reporting. The purpose of this revision is to reflect the transition of payroll processing from the Capital Accounting Center to the Defense Finance and Accounting System. Cancels DOE O 3600.1B. Canceled by DOE O 322.1C.

  8. Real-time Multi-period truckload routing problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limpaitoon, Tanachai

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we consider a multi-period truckload pick-up and delivery problem dealing with real-time requests over a finite time horizon. We introduce the notion of postponement of requests, whereby the company can ...

  9. Efficient Mining of Partial Periodic Patterns in Time Series Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Guozhu

    Efficient Mining of Partial Periodic Patterns in Time Series Database In ICDE 99 Jiawei Han \\Lambda peri­ odic patterns in time­series databases, is an interesting data mining problem. Previous studies several algorithms for efficient mining of par­ tial periodic patterns, by exploring some interesting

  10. Time-Periodic Solutions of the Einstein's Field Equations II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De-Xing Kong; Kefeng Liu; Ming Shen

    2008-07-31

    In this paper, we construct several kinds of new time-periodic solutions of the vacuum Einstein's field equations whose Riemann curvature tensors vanish, keep finite or take the infinity at some points in these space-times, respectively. The singularities of these new time-periodic solutions are investigated and some new physical phenomena are found. The applications of these solutions in modern cosmology and general relativity can be expected.

  11. Particle energization through time-periodic helical magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Dasgupta, Brahmananda; Niklasson, Eyvind; Ram, Abhay

    2013-01-01

    We solve for the motion of charged particles in a helical time-periodic ABC (Arnold-Beltrami-Childress) magnetic field. The magnetic field lines of a stationary ABC field with $A=B=C=1$ are chaotic, and we show that the motion of a charged particle in such a field is also chaotic at late time with positive Lyapunov exponent. We further show that in time-periodic (frequency $\\omega$) ABC fields the kinetic energy of a charged particle can increase indefinitely with time. At late times the mean kinetic energy grows as a power law in time with exponent $\\xi$ that approaches unity. For an initial distribution of particles, whose kinetic energy is uniformly distributed within some interval, the PDF of kinetic energy is, at late time, close to a Gaussian but with steeper tails.

  12. Particle energization through time-periodic helical magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhrubaditya Mitra; Axel Brandenburg; Brahmananda Dasgupta; Eyvind Niklasson; Abhay Ram

    2014-04-30

    We solve for the motion of charged particles in a helical time-periodic ABC (Arnold-Beltrami-Childress) magnetic field. The magnetic field lines of a stationary ABC field with coefficients $A=B=C=1$ are chaotic, and we show that the motion of a charged particle in such a field is also chaotic at late times with positive Lyapunov exponent. We further show that in time-periodic ABC fields, the kinetic energy of a charged particle can increase indefinitely with time. At late times the mean kinetic energy grows as a power law in time with an exponent that approaches unity. For an initial distribution of particles, whose kinetic energy is uniformly distributed within some interval, the PDF of kinetic energy is, at late times, close to a Gaussian but with steeper tails.

  13. Particle energization through time-periodic helical magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    We solve for the motion of charged particles in a helical time-periodic ABC (Arnold-Beltrami-Childress) magnetic field. The magnetic field lines of a stationary ABC field with coefficients A=B=C=1 are chaotic, and we show ...

  14. Local Lyapunov Functions for periodic and finite-time ODEs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hafstein, Sigurður Freyr

    Local Lyapunov Functions for periodic and finite-time ODEs Peter Giesl and Sigurdur Hafstein Abstract Lyapunov functions for general systems are difficult to construct. How- ever, for autonomous Lyapunov function by solving a matrix equa- tion. Consequently, the same function is a local Lyapunov

  15. Time-periodic solutions of the Benjamin-Ono equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrose , D.M.; Wilkening, Jon

    2008-04-01

    We present a spectrally accurate numerical method for finding non-trivial time-periodic solutions of non-linear partial differential equations. The method is based on minimizing a functional (of the initial condition and the period) that is positive unless the solution is periodic, in which case it is zero. We solve an adjoint PDE to compute the gradient of this functional with respect to the initial condition. We include additional terms in the functional to specify the free parameters, which, in the case of the Benjamin-Ono equation, are the mean, a spatial phase, a temporal phase and the real part of one of the Fourier modes at t = 0. We use our method to study global paths of non-trivial time-periodic solutions connecting stationary and traveling waves of the Benjamin-Ono equation. As a starting guess for each path, we compute periodic solutions of the linearized problem by solving an infinite dimensional eigenvalue problem in closed form. We then use our numerical method to continue these solutions beyond the realm of linear theory until another traveling wave is reached (or until the solution blows up). By experimentation with data fitting, we identify the analytical form of the solutions on the path connecting the one-hump stationary solution to the two-hump traveling wave. We then derive exact formulas for these solutions by explicitly solving the system of ODE's governing the evolution of solitons using the ansatz suggested by the numerical simulations.

  16. Strategic Sourcing Dashboard Reporting Period: January 2010 through December 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    We have accomplished $10.8 million in annual savings through our Strategic Sourcing efforts over below. Strategic Sourcing continues to have a significant emphasis for Purchasing Services, but savings/Activities/Risks for this Reporting Period Annual savings of over $200,000 was booked in the last quarter in the office and lab supply

  17. Use and Finance BiAnnual Reporting Form Reporting Period: July 2013 through December 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    Use and Finance BiAnnual Reporting Form Reporting Period: July 2013 through December 2013 $ Other (Professional Fees, Telecommunications, Moving) 538,200$ Other (Finance resources services center will be established for finance and human resources transaction processing activities

  18. Technical Letter Report: Evaluation and Analysis of a Few International Periodic Safety Review Summary Reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chopra, Omesh K.; Diercks, Dwight R.; Ma, David Chia-Chiun; Garud, Yogendra S.

    2013-12-17

    At the request of the United States (U.S.) government, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) assembled a team of 20 senior safety experts to review the regulatory framework for the safety of operating nuclear power plants in the United States. This review focused on the effectiveness of the regulatory functions implemented by the NRC and on its commitment to nuclear safety and continuous improvement. One suggestion resulting from that review was that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) incorporate lessons learned from periodic safety reviews (PSRs) performed in other countries as an input to the NRC’s assessment processes. In the U.S., commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) are granted an initial 40-year operating license, which may be renewed for additional 20-year periods, subject to complying with regulatory requirements. The NRC has established a framework through its inspection, and operational experience processes to ensure the safe operation of licensed nuclear facilities on an ongoing basis. In contrast, most other countries do not impose a specific time limit on the operating licenses for NPPs, they instead require that the utility operating the plant perform PSRs, typically at approximately 10-year intervals, to assure continued safe operation until the next assessment. The staff contracted with Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to perform a pilot review of selected translated PSR assessment reports and related documentation from foreign nuclear regulatory authorities to identify any potential new regulatory insights regarding license renewal-related topics and NPP operating experience (OpE). A total of 14 PSR assessment documents from 9 countries were reviewed. For all of the countries except France, individual reports were provided for each of the plants reviewed. In the case of France, three reports were provided that reviewed the performance assessment of thirty-four 900-MWe reactors of similar design commissioned between 1978 and 1988. All of the reports reviewed were the regulator’s assessment of the PSR findings rather than the original PSR report, and all but one were English translations from the original language. In these reviews, it was found that most of the countries base their regulatory guidance to some extent (and often to a large extent) on U.S. design codes and standards, NRC regulatory guidance, and U.S. industry guidance. In addition, many of the observed operational technical issues and OpE events reported for U.S. reactors are also cited in the PSR reports. The PSR reports also identified a number of potential technical material/component performance issues and OpE events that are not commonly reported for U.S. plants.

  19. the past 150-year period of reported global Second, historical information on solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    compared with the radia- tive relaxation time of layers storing the heat blocked by sunspots. This timethe past 150-year period of reported global warming. Second, historical information on solar increase in solar activity beyond present levels might make the sun dimmer, decreasing its average out- put

  20. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1985-01-01

    The research activities of the Division are centered primarily in three areas: experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The largest of these efforts, experimental nuclear physics, is dominated by the heavy ion research program. A major responsibility under this program is the operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. During the period of this report, the facility has begun routine operation for the experimental program. The experimental atomic physics program has two components: the accelerator-based studies of basic collisional phenomena and the studies in support of the controlled fusion program. Also associated with the fusion-related studies are a plasma diagnostics program and the operation of an atomic physics data center. The theoretical physics program, both nuclear and atomic, is covered. This program has benefited this year from the success of the VAX-AP computer system and from the increase in manpower provided by the ORNL/University of Tennessee Distinguished Scientist Program. Smaller programs in applications and high-energy physics are summarized. During the period of this report, we continued to explore possible future extensions of the Holifield Facility. We retain a strong interest in a relativistic heavy-ion collider in the 10 x 10 GeV/nuclear energy range. The ideas for such a facility, described in last year's report, have been modified to utilize the HHIRF 25 MV tandem accelerator as the first stage. Finally, the report concludes with some general information on publications, Division activities, and personnel changes.

  1. Does syntactic priming in children persist across significant time periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Louisa

    2013-07-02

    Using a ‘snap’ paradigm, we investigated the time course effects of syntactic priming in both adults and children. The research was done over a one week time frame in order to see whether priming is a long lived effect and ...

  2. Time asymptotics of the Schroedinger wave function in time-periodic potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Costin; R. D. Costin; J. L. Lebowitz

    2006-08-13

    We study the transition to the continuum of an initially bound quantum particle in $\\RR^d$, $d=1,2,3$, subjected, for $t\\ge 0$, to a time periodic forcing of arbitrary magnitude. The analysis is carried out for compactly supported potentials, satisfying certain auxiliary conditions. It provides complete analytic information on the time Laplace transform of the wave function. From this, comprehensive time asymptotic properties (Borel summable transseries) follow. We obtain in particular a criterion for whether the wave function gets fully delocalized (complete ionization). This criterion shows that complete ionization is generic and provides a convenient test for particular cases. When satisfied it implies absence of discrete spectrum and resonances of the associated Floquet operator. As an illustration we show that the parametric harmonic perturbation of a potential chosen to be any nonzero multiple of the characteristic function of a measurable compact set has this property.

  3. Physics division. Progress report for period ending September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, S.J. [ed.

    1997-04-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1995 and 1996 fiscal years, beginning October 1, 1994, and ending September 30, 1996. The activities of the Division continue to be concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. In addition, there are smaller programs in plasma diagnostics and data compilation and evaluation. During the period of this report, there has been considerable success in bringing the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) into routine operation. The budgets of the nuclear physics portion of the Division have increased each year in nearly all areas, and several new members have been added to the Division research and development staff. On August 30, 1996, the HRIBF successfully accelerated its first radioactive ion beams, {sup 69}As and {sup 70}As. Prior to this, the heart of the facility, the RIB injector system, was completed, including installation of a remote handling system for the target/ion source assembly. Target and ion source development is likely to be the technical key to success of the HRIBF. We have expanded our efforts in those development areas. Of special note is the development of highly permeable composite targets which have now been shown to allow release of difficult-to-produce radioactive ions such as {sup 17,18}F. A summary of the HRIBF work is provided in Chapter 1, along with supporting activities of the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research.

  4. Efficient Solvers for Nonlinear Time-Periodic Eddy Current F. Bachinger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoeberl, Joachim

    Efficient Solvers for Nonlinear Time-Periodic Eddy Current Problems F. Bachinger U. Langer J. Sch-periodic eddy current problems, ranging from the description of the nonlinearity to an efficient solution setup, the magnetic field and the thereby generated eddy currents hardly penetrate into conducting

  5. QUANTUM ENERGY EXPECTATION IN PERIODIC TIME-DEPENDENT HAMILTONIANS VIA GREEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1. Introduction Consider a general periodically driven quantum hamiltonian system H(t) = H0 + V (t the system then Um F is this state at time m. Typically, the unper- turbed hamiltonian H0 is assumed to have accelerator in which a particle can acquire unbounded energy from collisions with a heavy periodically moving

  6. Local energy decay and Strichartz estimates for the wave equation with time-periodic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petkov, Vesselin

    Local energy decay and Strichartz estimates for the wave equation with time-periodic perturbations(z) = (U(T, 0) - z)-1 , (x) C 0 (Rn ), where U(t, s) is the propagator related to the wave equation) and T > 0 is the period. Assuming that R(z) has no poles z with |z| 1, we establish a local energy decay

  7. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports for the period October 1, 1992 to March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s eighth Semiannual Report to Congress to be submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General (IG) that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on IG audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1992, to March 31, 1993, the Department took final action on six contract and financial assistance audit reports. At the end of the period only four reports awaited final action. With regard to operational, financial, and preaward audits, final action was taken on 15 reports, resulting in 95 audit reports needing final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first outlines significant audit accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on IG audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of these reports.

  8. Identifying parameters of nonlinear structural dynamic systems using linear time-periodic approximations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Matthew S.

    Identifying parameters of nonlinear structural dynamic systems using linear time- periodic nonlinearity. 1. Introduction Most dynamical systems behave nonlinearly in the most general scenario. This can point bifurcation [1], in rotor dynamic systems with bearing contact nonlinearities [2], in biomechanics

  9. Solid state division progress report, period ending February 29, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Research is reported concerning theoretical solid state physics; surface and near-surface properties of solids; defects in solids; transport properties of solids; neutron scattering; crystal growth and characterization; and isotope research materials.

  10. IS-ENES2 -Contract Number: 312979 reporting period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the IS-ENES2 project X IS-ENES2 MILESTONE (M -N°: 7.4) First review report on the ENES Earth System ModelReviewReportESMResources.docx or .pdf Release date: 30/03/2015 The reviews of IS-ENES2 services on Earth System Models, model components ...........................................12 #12;3 Executive Summary The reviews of IS-ENES2 services on Earth System Models, model

  11. Physics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    Progress is reported in detail in the following areas: Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, the UNISOR program, neutron physics, theoretical physics, the Nuclear Data Project, atomic and plasma physics, and high energy physics. Publications are listed. Separate abstracts were prepared for 34 papers. (WHK)

  12. Physics division progress report for period ending September 30 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B. [ed.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in physics. The areas covered are: Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; low/medium energy nuclear physics; high energy experimental physics; the Unisor program; experimental atomic physics; laser and electro-optics lab; theoretical physics; compilations and evaluations; and radioactive ion beam development. (LSP)

  13. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B.

    1990-03-01

    This report discusses topics in the following areas: Holifield heavy ion research; Experimental Nuclear physics; The Uniser program; Experimental Atomic Physics; Theoretical Physics; Laser and electro-optics lab; High Energy Physics; compilations and evaluations; and accelerator design and development. (FI)

  14. Real-time Scheduling of periodic tasks in a monoprocessor system with rechargeable energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Real-time Scheduling of periodic tasks in a monoprocessor system with rechargeable energy storage-time computing system that is powered through a renewable energy storage device. In this context, two constraints for the properties of the energy source, capacity of the energy storage as well as energy consumption of the tasks

  15. Quantum Energy Expectation in Periodic Time-Dependent hamiltonians via Green Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cesar R. de Oliveira; Mariza S. Simsen

    2009-07-31

    Let $U_F$ be the Floquet operator of a time periodic hamiltonian $H(t)$. For each positive and discrete observable $A$ (which we call a {\\em probe energy}), we derive a formula for the Laplace time average of its expectation value up to time $T$ in terms of its eigenvalues and Green functions at the circle of radius $e^{1/T}$. Some simple applications are provided which support its usefulness.

  16. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1986-04-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1985 fiscal year. The research activities were centered on experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The experimental nuclear physics program is dominated by heavy ion research. A major part of this effort is the responsibility for operating the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. A major new activity described is the preparation for participation in an ultrarelativistic heavy ion experiment to be performed at CERN in 1986. The experimental atomic physics program has two components: the accelerator-based studies of basic collisional phenomena and the studies in support of the controlled fusion program. Also associated with the fusion-related studies are a plasma diagnostics program and the operation of an atomic physics data center. Theory efforts associated with the UNISOR program are described, as well as smaller programs in applications and high-energy physics. (LEW)

  17. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B.

    1989-03-01

    This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1988 fiscal year, beginning October 1, 1987, and ending September 30, 1988. The activities of this Division are concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. Operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility continues to represent the single largest activity within the Division. This year saw the completion of the acceleration tube upgrade of the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator and the achievement of record terminal potentials, operation for an experiment with 25 million volts on terminal, and successful tests with beam at 25.5 MV. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to be dominated by research utilizing heavy ions. These activities, while continuing to center largely on the Holifield Facility, have seen significant growth in the use of facilities that provide intermediate energies and especially ultrarelativistic beams. The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been intimately associated with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. In addition to the Holifield Facility, the Division operates two smaller facilities, the EN Tandem and the ECR Ion Source Facility, as ''User Resources.'' The efforts in theoretical physics, covering both nuclear and atomic physics, are presented. In addition to research with multicharged heavy ions from the ECR source, the effort on atomic physics in support of the controlled fusion program includes a plasma diagnostics development program. The concentration of this program on optical and laser technology is marked by the change in designation to the Laser and Electro-Optics Lab. A small, continuing effort in elementary particle physics, carried out in collaboration with the University of Tennessee, is reported.

  18. Modeling laser-induced periodic surface structures: Finite-difference time-domain feedback simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skolski, J. Z. P., E-mail: j.z.p.skolski@utwente.nl; Vincenc Obona, J. [Materials innovation institute M2i, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Chair of Applied Laser Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Römer, G. R. B. E.; Huis in 't Veld, A. J. [Faculty of Engineering Technology, Chair of Applied Laser Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-03-14

    A model predicting the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSSs) is presented. That is, the finite-difference time domain method is used to study the interaction of electromagnetic fields with rough surfaces. In this approach, the rough surface is modified by “ablation after each laser pulse,” according to the absorbed energy profile, in order to account for inter-pulse feedback mechanisms. LIPSSs with a periodicity significantly smaller than the laser wavelength are found to “grow” either parallel or orthogonal to the laser polarization. The change in orientation and periodicity follow from the model. LIPSSs with a periodicity larger than the wavelength of the laser radiation and complex superimposed LIPSS patterns are also predicted by the model.

  19. Practical reporting times for environmental samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayne, C.K.; Schmoyer, D.D.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1993-02-01

    Preanalytical holding times for environmental samples are specified because chemical and physical characteristics may change between sampling and chemical analysis. For example, the Federal Register prescribes a preanalytical holding time of 14 days for volatile organic compounds in soil stored at 4{degrees}C. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) uses a more technical definition that the preanalytical holding time is the day when the analyte concentration for an environmental sample falls below the lower 99% confidence interval on the analyte concentration at day zero. This study reviews various holding time definitions and suggest a new preanalytical holding time approach using acceptable error rates for measuring an environmental analyte. This practical reporting time (PRT) approach has been applied to nineteen volatile organic compounds and four explosives in three environmental soil samples. A PRT nomograph of error rates has been developed to estimate the consequences of missing a preanalytical holding time. This nomograph can be applied to a large class of analytes with concentrations that decay linearly or exponentially with time regardless of sample matrices and storage conditions.

  20. Modeling the Coastal Ocean over a Time Period of Several April 8, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frénod, Emmanuel

    , lost objects or oil spill over long periods of time in near coastal ocean areas. Such methods would. The final target of this program is to develop methods to forecast the drift of things like con- tainers be of interest for services in charge of maritime safety, environmental studies or pollution impact assessment

  1. Periodicity detection and localization using spike timing from the AER EAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Shih-Chii

    Periodicity detection and localization using spike timing from the AER EAR Theodore Yu1 , Andrew Event Representation (AER) where each spike carries the identity of the sender. There are a handful of silicon cochleae with an Address Event type representation [4][5][6][7]. The AER EAR chip that we use

  2. Risk neutral valuation of options in multi-period discrete-time markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk neutral valuation of options in multi- period discrete-time markets In this lecture we study is the discounted expectation of its payoff under a martingale measure and use it to price call and put options Let F be an algebra of subsets of the finite sample space . Definition. A real-valued function (or

  3. A Numerical Method for Computing Time-Periodic Solutions in Dissipative Wave Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Jianke

    . Then this equation is computed in the combined spatiotemporal domain as a boundary value problem by Newton:420­455 C 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company. #12;A Numerical Method for Computing Time gain or loss), these coherent structures generally exist as continuous families, parameterized

  4. Classification of Floquet Statistical Distribution for Time-Periodic Open Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong E. Liu

    2015-04-07

    How to understand the order of Floquet stationary states in the presence of external bath coupling and their statistical mechanics is challenging; the answers are important for preparations and control of those Floquet states. Here, we propose a scheme to classify the statistical distribution of Floquet states for time-periodic systems which couple to an external heat bath. If an effective Hamiltonian and a system-bath coupling operator, which are all time-independent, can be simultaneously obtained via a time-periodic unitary transformation, the statistical mechanics of the Floquet states is equivalent to the equilibrium statistical mechanics of the effective Hamiltonian. In the large driving frequency cases, we also show that the conditions of this theorem can be weakened to: the time-period part in the system Hamiltonian commutes with the system-bath coupling operator. A Floquet-Markov approach is applied to numerically compute the Floquet state occupation distribution of a bosonic chain, and the results agree with the theoretical predictions.

  5. Report on the Implementation of Periodic Natural Phenomena Hazards Assessment Reviews at Department of Energy Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report provides the results of a review conducted by the Office of Nuclear Safety (AU-30) of the implementation of periodic Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) assessment reviews by sites reporting to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and the Offices of Environmental Management, Nuclear Energy, and Science.

  6. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, R.C.

    1993-05-01

    In this report, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations organized into sections following the five major operating units in the division: Mathematical Sciences, Intelligent Systems, Nuclear Data and Measurement Analysis, Nuclear Analysis and Shielding, and the Engineering Physics Information Centers. Each section begins with an introduction highlighting honors, awards, and significant research accomplishments in that unit during the reporting period.

  7. Time Extraction from Real-time Generated Football Reports Markus Borg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time Extraction from Real-time Generated Football Reports Markus Borg D02, Lund Institute information from football match reports generated through minute- by-minute reporting. By using regular ex is presented. 1 Introduction Football reports written in real-time is an increas- ingly popular way to report

  8. Time-resolved measurement of single pulse femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kafka, K R P; Li, H; Yi, A; Cheng, J; Chowdhury, E A

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved diffraction microscopy technique has been used to observe the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) from the interaction of a single femtosecond laser pulse (pump) with a nano-scale groove mechanically formed on a single-crystal Cu substrate. The interaction dynamics (0-1200 ps) was captured by diffracting a time-delayed, frequency-doubled pulse from nascent LIPSS formation induced by the pump with an infinity-conjugate microscopy setup. The LIPSS ripples are observed to form sequentially outward from the groove edge, with the first one forming after 50 ps. A 1-D analytical model of electron heating and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation induced by the interaction of incoming laser pulse with the groove edge qualitatively explains the time-evloution of LIPSS formation.

  9. Time-Periodic Solutions of Driven-Damped Trimer Granular Crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Charalampidis, E. G.; Li, F.; Chong, C.; Yang, J.; Kevrekidis, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    We consider time-periodic structures of granular crystals consisting of alternate chrome steel (S) and tungsten carbide (W) spherical particles where each unit cell follows the pattern of a 2?:?1 trimer: S-W-S. The configuration at the left boundary is driven by a harmonic in-time actuation with given amplitude and frequency while the right one is a fixed wall. Similar to the case of a dimer chain, the combination of dissipation, driving of the boundary, and intrinsic nonlinearity leads to complex dynamics. For fixed driving frequencies in each of the spectral gaps, we find that the nonlinear surface modes and the statesmore »dictated by the linear drive collide in a saddle-node bifurcation as the driving amplitude is increased, beyond which the dynamics of the system becomes chaotic. While the bifurcation structure is similar for solutions within the first and second gap, those in the first gap appear to be less robust. We also conduct a continuation in driving frequency, where it is apparent that the nonlinearity of the system results in a complex bifurcation diagram, involving an intricate set of loops of branches, especially within the spectral gap. The theoretical findings are qualitatively corroborated by the experimental full-field visualization of the time-periodic structures.« less

  10. Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W.

    1997-12-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1995, through March 31, 1997. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program in support of Department of Energy science and technology missions. The report includes brief summaries of research activities in condensed matter theory, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. An addendum includes listings of division publications and professional activities.

  11. Chemical Technology Division progress report for the period April 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period April 1, 1985, through December 31, 1986. The following major areas are covered in the discussion: nuclear and chemical waste management, environmental control technology, basic science and technology, biotechnology research, transuranium-element processing, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, radioactive materials production, computer/engineering applications, fission energy, environmental cleanup projects, and various other work activities. As an appendix, the Administrative Summary presents a comprehensive compilation of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this report period. An organization chart, a staffing level and financial summary, and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included to provide additional information. 78 figs., 40 tabs.

  12. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W.

    1991-03-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1989, to September 30, 1990. During this period, division research programs were significantly enhanced by the restart of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and by new initiatives in processing and characterization of materials.

  13. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to provide an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period September 1, 1989 through March 31, 1991. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL's research on the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the division. As in previous reports, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations. Summary lists of publications and presentations, staff additions and departures, scientific and professional activities of division staff, and technical conferences organized and sponsored by the division are included as appendices. The report is organized following the division of our research among four sections and information centers. These research areas are: Mathematical Sciences; Nuclear Data Measurement and Evaluations; Intelligent Systems; Nuclear Analysis and Shielding; and Engineering Physics Information Center.

  14. Ferrocyanide Safety Program. Quarterly report for the period ending March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1994-04-01

    Various high-level radioactive waste from defense operations has accumulated at the Hanford Site in underground storage tanks since the mid-1940s. During the 1950s, additional tank storage space was required to support the defense mission. To obtain this additional storage volume within a short time period, and to minimize the need for constructing additional storage tanks, Hanford Site scientists developed a process to scavenge {sup 137}Cs from tank waste liquids. In implementing this process, approximately 140 metric tons of ferrocyanide were added to waste that was later routed to some Hanford Site single-shell tanks. The reactive nature of ferrocyanide in the presence of an oxidizer has been known for decades, but the conditions under which the compound can undergo endothermic and exothermic reactions have not been thoroughly studied. Because the scavenging process precipitated ferrocyanide from solutions containing nitrate and nitrite, an intimate mixture of ferrocyanides and nitrates and/or nitrites is likely to exist in some regions of the ferrocyanide tanks. This quarterly report provides a status of the activities underway at the Hanford Site on the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue, as requested by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in their Recommendation 90-7. A revised Ferrocyanide Safety Program Plan addressing the total Ferrocyanide Safety Program, including the six parts of DNFSB Recommendation 90-7, was recently prepared and released in March 1994. Activities in the revised program plan are underway or have been completed, and the status of each is described in Section 4.0 of this report.

  15. Analytical Chemistry Division. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1982-04-01

    The functions of the Analytical Chemistry Division fall into three general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development and utilization; (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections each of which may carry out any type of work falling into the thre categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections which are: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectrometry; analytical technical support; bio/organic analysis section; and nuclear and radiochemical analysis. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Chapter 7 covers supplementary activities. Chapter 8 is on presentation of research results (publications, articles reviewed or referred for periodicals). Approximately 56 articles, 31 proceedings publications and 33 reports have been published, and 119 oral presentations given during this reporting period.

  16. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period April 1, 1993 through June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungers, D.K.

    1993-10-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between May 24 and August 20, 1993, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from samples collected during the April through June quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  17. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period January 1--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This quarterly report contains data received between January and March 1995, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the January through March quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported. Nineteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater monitoring projects are conducted at the Hanford Site. These projects include treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for both solid and liquid waste. The groundwater monitoring programs described in this report comply with the interim-status federal (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulation [CFR] Part 265) and state (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-303-400) regulations. The RCRA projects are monitored under one of three programs: background monitoring, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment.

  18. Internal Space-time Symmetries of Particles derivable from Periodic Systems in Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. S. Kim

    2010-09-26

    While modern optics is largely a physics of harmonic oscillators and two-by-two matrices, it is possible to learn about some hidden properties of the two-by-two matrix from optical systems. Since two-by-two matrices can be divided into three conjugate classes depending on their traces, optical systems force us to establish continuity from one class to another. It is noted that those three classes are equivalent to three different branches of Wigner's little groups dictating the internal space-time symmetries massive, massless, and imaginary-mass particles. It is shown that the periodic systems in optics can also be described by have the same class-based matrix algebra. The optical system allow us to make continuous, but not analytic, transitions from massiv to massless, and massless to imaginary-mass cases.

  19. DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 15,2000 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30,2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. BROWN

    2002-02-01

    OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 15,2000 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30,2001

  20. Zonal flow sawteeth and the time period between edge-localized transport bursts in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleva, Robert G.; Guzdar, Parvez N.

    2007-01-15

    The time period between particle and energy transport bursts in simulations of tokamak edge turbulence is determined by the magnitude of the diamagnetic drift parameter {alpha}{sub d}{identical_to}{omega}{sub *}/{gamma}{sub 0}, where the diamagnetic drift frequency {omega}{sub *}={rho}{sub s}c{sub s}/L{sub 0}L{sub n} and the characteristic ballooning mode growth rate {gamma}{sub 0}=c{sub s}/(RL{sub n}/2){sup 1/2}. Here, R is the major radius of the torus, L{sub n} is the density gradient scale length, {rho}{sub s} is the ion gyroradius, and c{sub s} is the ion acoustic speed. The scale length L{sub 0} is given by L{sub 0}=2{pi}qR {nu}{sub ei}{rho}{sub s}/2{omega}{sub e}R){sup 1/2}(2R/L{sub n}){sup 1/4}, where q is the safety factor, {nu}{sub ei} is the electron-ion collision frequency, and {omega}{sub e} is the electron cyclotron frequency. When the diamagnetic drift frequency becomes larger than the ballooning mode growth rate ({alpha}{sub d}>1), then the transport in the tokamak edge is characterized by regularly recurring bursts of particles and energy with a single well-defined frequency. As {alpha}{sub d} increases above unity, the time period between the bursts becomes much longer. The temporal dependence of the energy in the zonal flow generated nonlinearly has the appearance of sawteeth.

  1. MAP3S precipitation chemistry network. Third periodic summary report, July 1978-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The MAP3S Precipitation Chemistry Network consists of eight collection sites in the northeastern United States. Precipitation event samples are collected by cooperating site operators, using specially developed sampling equipment. In this, the third periodic summary report, are listed field and concentration data for the period July 1, 1978 to December 31, 1979. Over three years' samples have been collected at most of the sites, which went into operation between September 1976 and October 1978. Samples are chemically analyzed at a central laboratory for 13 pollutant species. Weekly samples in addition to event samples were collected over a 1 1/2 year period at three sites. Analysis of one year's results indicates that there is little difference between the concentrations collected by the two methods in terms of seasonal precipitation-weighted means for all species except dissolved SO/sub 2/. Event samples tend to average about 25% higher in SO/sub 2/ than weekly samples.

  2. A Time-Periodic Bifurcation Theorem and its Application to Navier-Stokes Flow Past an Obstacle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni P. Galdi

    2015-08-04

    We show an abstract time-periodic bifurcation theorem in Banach spaces. The key point as well as the novelty of the method is to split the original evolution equation into two different coupled equations, one for the time-average of the sought solution and the other for the "purely periodic" component. This approach may be particularly useful in studying physical phenomena occurring in unbounded spatial regions. Actually, we furnish a significant application of the theorem, by providing sufficient conditions for time-periodic bifurcation from a steady-state flow of a Navier-Stokes liquid past a three-dimensional obstacle.

  3. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sincovec, R.F.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides a record of the research activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division for the period January 1, 1993, through December 31, 1994. This report is the final archival record of the EPM Division. On October 1, 1994, ORELA was transferred to Physics Division and on January 1, 1995, the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division and the Computer Applications Division reorganized to form the Computer Science and Mathematics Division and the Computational Physics and Engineering Division. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL`s research in the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division.

  4. 24 m meteorological tower data report period: January through December, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, D.; Bowen, J.; Egami, R.; Coulombe, W.; Crow, D.; Cristani, B.; Schmidt, S.

    1997-12-01

    This report was prepared by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). It summarizes meteorological data collected at the 24 meter tower at the Nevada Test Site Hazardous Material Spill Center (HAZMAT) located at Frenchman Flat near Mercury, Nevada, approximately 75 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The tower was originally installed in July, 1993 to characterize baseline conditions for an EPA sponsored experimental research program at the HAZMAT. This report presents results of the monitoring for January--December, 1996, providing: a status of the measurement systems during the report period and a summary of the meteorological conditions at the HAZMAT during the report period. The scope of the report is limited to summary data analyses and does not include extensive meteorological analysis. The tower was instrumented at 8 levels. Wind speed, wind direction, and temperature were measured at all 8 levels. Relative humidity was measured at 3 levels. Solar and net radiation were measured at 2 meters above the ground. Barometric pressure was measured at the base of the tower and soil temperature was measured near the base of the tower.

  5. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1985-03-01

    During the reporting period, relatively minor changes have occurred in the research areas of interest to the Division. Nearly all the research of the Division can be classified broadly as mission-oriented basic research. Topics covered include: theoretical solid state physics; surface and near-surface properties of solids; defects in solids; transport properties of solids; neutron scattering; and preparation and characterization of research materials. (GHT)

  6. Analysis of electromagnetic scattering by nearly periodic structures: an LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, William Arthur; Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Wilton, Donald R. (University of Houston, Houston, TX); Basilio, Lorena I.; Peters, David William; Capolino, F. (University of Houston, Houston, TX)

    2006-10-01

    In this LDRD we examine techniques to analyze the electromagnetic scattering from structures that are nearly periodic. Nearly periodic could mean that one of the structure's unit cells is different from all the others--a defect. It could also mean that the structure is truncated, or butted up against another periodic structure to form a seam. Straightforward electromagnetic analysis of these nearly periodic structures requires us to grid the entire structure, which would overwhelm today's computers and the computers in the foreseeable future. In this report we will examine various approximations that allow us to continue to exploit some aspects of the structure's periodicity and thereby reduce the number of unknowns required for analysis. We will use the Green's Function Interpolation with a Fast Fourier Transform (GIFFT) to examine isolated defects both in the form of a source dipole over a meta-material slab and as a rotated dipole in a finite array of dipoles. We will look at the numerically exact solution of a one-dimensional seam. In order to solve a two-dimensional seam, we formulate an efficient way to calculate the Green's function of a 1d array of point sources. We next formulate ways of calculating the far-field due to a seam and due to array truncation based on both array theory and high-frequency asymptotic methods. We compare the high-frequency and GIFFT results. Finally, we use GIFFT to solve a simple, two-dimensional seam problem.

  7. Long time simulation of a beam in a periodic focusing channel via a two-scale PIC-method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frénod, Emmanuel

    Long time simulation of a beam in a periodic focusing channel via a two-scale PIC-method E. Fr. Keywords: Vlasov-Poisson system, kinetic equations, homogenization, two-scale convergence, two- scale PIC

  8. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1983-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Dvision of Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development, and utilization; and (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections, each of which may carry out any type of work falling in the three categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections (analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials, bio/organic analysis, and general and environmental analysis) during the period January 1, 1982 to December 31, 1982. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 61 articles, 32 proceedings publications and 37 reports have been published, and 107 oral presentations were given during this reporting period.

  9. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: Analytical Research, Development and Implementation; Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization; and Technical Support. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1989. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 69 articles, 41 proceedings, and 31 reports were published, and 151 oral presentations were given during this reporting period. Some 308,981 determinations were performed.

  10. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungers, D.K.

    1994-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between November 20 and February 25, 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  11. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1 through December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and {open_quotes}Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities{close_quotes} (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 265), as amended. Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. The location of each facility is shown. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Performing project management, preparing groundwater monitoring plans, well network design and installation, specifying groundwater data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, data management, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between October and December 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  12. HTGR Generic Technology Program. Semiannual report for the period ending September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Generic Technology Program at General Atomic during the second half of FY-80. It covers a period when the design direction of the National HTGR Program is in the process of an overall review. The HTGR Generic Technology Program activities have continued so as to provide the basic technology required for all HTGR applications. The activities include the need to develop an LEU fuel and the need to qualify materials and components for the higher temperatures of the gas turbines and process heat plants.

  13. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shults, W.D.

    1993-04-01

    This report is divided into: Analytical spectroscopy (optical spectroscopy, organic mass spectrometry, inorganic mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry), inorganic and radiochemistry (transuranium and activation analysis, low-level radiochemical analysis, inorganic analysis, radioactive materials analysis, special projects), organic chemistry (organic spectroscopy, separations and synthesis, special projects, organic analysis, ORNL/UT research program), operations (quality assurance/quality control, environmental protection, safety, analytical improvement, training, radiation control), education programs, supplementary activities, and presentation of research results. Tables are included for articles reviewed or refereed for periodicals, analytical service work, division manpower and financial summary, and organization chart; a glossary is also included.

  14. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This report provides an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period June 30, 1985 through September 30, 1987. Work in Mathematical Sciences continues to include applied mathematics research, statistics research, and computer science. Nuclear-data measurements and evaluations continue for fusion reactors, fission reactors, and other nuclear systems. Also discussed are long-standing studies of fission-reactor shields through experiments and related analysis, of accelerator shielding, and of fusion-reactor neutronics. Work in Machine Intelligence continues to feature the development of an autonomous robot. The last descriptive part of this report reflects the work in our Engineering Physics Information Center, which again concentrates primarily upon radiation-shielding methods and related data.

  15. Real Time PMU-Based Stability Monitoring Final Project Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Real Time PMU-Based Stability Monitoring Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;#12;Real Time PMU for the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC) research project titled "Real Time PMU-based Stability

  16. LOW ALLOY STEELS FOR THICK WALL PRESSURE VESSELS Yearly Report for Period Oct. 1, 1976 to Sept. 30, 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    FOR THICK WALL PRESSURE VESSELS R. M, Horn, E. R. Parker,FOR THICK WALL PRESSURE VESSELS Yearly Report f o r PeriodManufacture Pressure Vessel Fabrication Under ASME Code

  17. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD`s accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  18. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD's accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  19. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, D.F.; Bradley, R.A.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

    1994-07-01

    This report provides an overview of activities and accomplishsments of the division from October 1992 through December 1993; the division is organized to provide technical support, mainly in the area of high-temperature materials, for technologies being developed by DOE. Activities span the range from basic research to industrial interactions (cooperative research and technology transfer). Sections 1-5 describe the different functional groups (engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials). Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines. Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative R and D programs and technology transfer functions. Finally, Sect. 8 briefly describes the division`s involvement in educational activities. Several organizational changes were effected during this period.

  20. Progress report for the first twenty-one months of the contract period

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    During the period of July 1, 1978, through March 31, 1980 in-depth research of the legal and institutional obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric power in all of the nineteen northeastern states was performed. Research into economic issues associated with the development of small scale hydroelectric power was undertaken by the project economist. Special research activities have been undertaken with respect to the federal dam safety programs, the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System requirements of the Federal Clean Water Act and the implications of those requirements to small scale hydroelectric power, riparian law on lake and reservoir fluctuation in the State of Maine, and the implications of Title II and IV of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 to the development of small scale hydroelectric power. The results of these studies are reported. (LCL)

  1. High Efficiency Thin Film CdTe and a-Si Based Solar Cells Annual Technical Report for the Period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    High Efficiency Thin Film CdTe and a-Si Based Solar Cells Annual Technical Report for the Period This report covers the second year of this subcontract for research on high efficiency CdTe-based thin-film solar cells and on high efficiency a-Si-based thin-film solar cells. The effort on CdTe- based materials

  2. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) Analytical Research, Development, and Implementation. The division maintains a program to conceptualize, investigate, develop, assess, improve, and implement advanced technology for chemical and physicochemical measurements. Emphasis is on problems and needs identified with ORNL and Department of Energy (DOE) programs; however, attention is also given to advancing the analytical sciences themselves. (2) Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization. The division carries out a wide variety of chemical work that typically involves analytical research and/or development plus the utilization of analytical capabilities to expedite programmatic interests. (3) Technical Support. The division performs chemical and physicochemical analyses of virtually all types. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each of which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1988. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8.

  3. Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W.

    1994-08-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. This research effort was enhanced by new capabilities in atomic-scale materials characterization, new emphasis on the synthesis and processing of materials, and increased partnering with industry and universities. The theoretical effort included a broad range of analytical studies, as well as a new emphasis on numerical simulation stimulated by advances in high-performance computing and by strong interest in related division experimental programs. Superconductivity research continued to advance on a broad front from fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity to the development of new materials and processing techniques. The Neutron Scattering Program was characterized by a strong scientific user program and growing diversity represented by new initiatives in complex fluids and residual stress. The national emphasis on materials synthesis and processing was mirrored in division research programs in thin-film processing, surface modification, and crystal growth. Research on advanced processing techniques such as laser ablation, ion implantation, and plasma processing was complemented by strong programs in the characterization of materials and surfaces including ultrahigh resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic-resolution chemical analysis, synchrotron x-ray research, and scanning tunneling microscopy.

  4. Behavioral Self-Regulation and Relations to Academic Achievement across a Four Year Time Period 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerda, Carissa Analise

    2015-07-31

    grades 1 to 4 predicts growth in academic achievement across that same time span. Longitudinal growth curve modeling (LGCM) was used to obtain growth trajectories for BSR, reading, and math across grades 1 to 4. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used...

  5. Frequency decoding of periodically timed action potentials through distinct activity patterns in a random neural network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichenbach, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Frequency discrimination is a fundamental task of the auditory system. The mammalian inner ear, or cochlea, provides a place code in which different frequencies are detected at different spatial locations. However, a temporal code based on spike timing is also available: action potentials evoked in an auditory-nerve fiber by a low-frequency tone occur at a preferred phase of the stimulus-they exhibit phase locking-and thus provide temporal information about the tone's frequency. In an accompanying psychoacoustic study, and in agreement with previous experiments, we show that humans employ this temporal information for discrimination of low frequencies. How might such temporal information be read out in the brain? Here we demonstrate that recurrent random neural networks in which connections between neurons introduce characteristic time delays, and in which neurons require temporally coinciding inputs for spike initiation, can perform sharp frequency discrimination when stimulated with phase-locked inputs. Alt...

  6. To receive periodic updates of new RePORT features, tools, or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    -funded activities and it is the primary source of news and information on the Research Portfolio and Online by clicking here: NIH REPORT-PUBLIC-L. The Source for news and information on NIH reports and the RePORT website http://report.nih.gov The ReSource Newsletter provides information on recent reports of NIH

  7. Progress Report 16 for the period April-September 1980, and the proceedings of the 16th Project Integration Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period April to September 1980, is reported in detail. Progress on project analysis and integration; technology development in silicon material, large-area silicon sheet and encapsulation; production process and equipment development; engineering, and operations is described. A report on, and copies of visual presentations made at, the Project Integration Meeting held September 24 and 25, 1980 are included.

  8. The October 1985 Long Outburst of U Geminorum: Revealing the Viscous Time Scale in Long Orbital Period Dwarf Novae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John K. Cannizzo; Neil Gehrels; Janet A. Mattei

    2002-07-11

    We examine the AAVSO light curve of U Geminorum from 1908 to 2002, with particular focus on the October 1985 outburst. This outburst was longer than any other seen in U Gem by about a factor of 2, and appears to be unique among all dwarf nova outbursts seen in systems with orbital periods longer than 3 hr in that one can measure the decay time scale during the initial slow decay. This rate is ~26+-6 d/mag. Using estimates of the rate of accretion during outburst taken from Froning et al., one can show that ~1e24 g of gas was accreted onto the white dwarf during the outburst. When coupled with the viscous time inferred from the (short orbital period) SU UMa stars, the U Gem viscous time scale lends support to the standard model in which the decays in dwarf novae can either be viscous or thermal, with the ratio between them being roughly h/r where h is the vertical pressure scale height in the disk.

  9. Lynx: Authenticated Anonymous Real-Time Reporting of Electric Vehicle Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahrstedt, Klara

    computation overhead during real-time reporting, and our imple- mentation on Raspberry Pi 2 shows that report

  10. Results of Groundwater Monitoring for the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins Reporting Period: July-December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2007-04-10

    This is one of a series of reports on Resource Conservation and Recovery Act monitoring at the 183 H basins. It fulfills a requirement of WAC 173-303-645(11)(g) to report twice each year on the effectiveness of the corrective action program. This report covers the period from July through December 2006. The current objective of corrective action monitoring is simply to track trends. Although there is short-term variability in contaminant concentrations, trends over the past 10 years are downward. The current RCRA permit and monitoring plan remain adequate for the objective of tracking trends.

  11. Deflagration-to-detonation transition project: quarterly report for the period September through November 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lieberman, M. L.

    1980-07-01

    The activities of the Sandia Laboratories project on deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) pertain primarily to the development of small, safe, low-voltage, hot-wire detonators. Its major goals are: the formulation of a modeling capability for DDT of the explosive 2-(5-cyanotetrazolato)pentaamminecobalt(III) perchlorate (CP); the development of improved DDT materials; the establishment of a data base for corrosion, compatibility, and reliability of CP-loaded detonators; and the design and development of advanced DDT components. Progress in this research is reported. The planned development of the MC3423 detonator has been completed and the final design review meeting has been held. Additional work must be performed to establish satisfactory output function. Ignition sensitivity data have also been obtained. Ignition and shock testing experiments for development of the MC3533 detonator have been planned. An initial version of the component will utilize available MC3423 headers, while the final design will incorporate a new header that has been designed and ordered. Detonator performance studies have been planned to optimize CP density-length factors. Feasibility studies on the MC3196A detonator have continued in an effort to obtain a reliable 50-200 ..mu..s function time.

  12. Semi-annual report for the unconventional gas recovery program, period ending March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manilla, R.D.

    1980-06-01

    Four subprograms are reported on: methane recovery from coalbeds, Eastern gas shales, Western gas sands, and methane from geopressured aquifers. (DLC)

  13. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shults, W.D.; Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1980-05-01

    The progress is reported in the following sections: analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, technical support, bio-organic analysis, nuclear and radiochemical analysis, and quality assurance. (DLC)

  14. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report for the period July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klobe, L.E. (ed.)

    1990-12-01

    The format of this Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report is a major departure from previous reports. This report has been published in two volumes instead of one, and the description of individual activities have been shortened considerably to make it easier document to scan and to read. Volume 1 of this report presents brief descriptions of a few highly significant programmatic and technological efforts representative of Instrumentation and Controls Division activities over the past two years. This volume contains information concerning the publications, presentations, and other professional activities and achievements of I C Division staff members.

  15. Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. [eds.

    1992-09-01

    During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, superconductivity, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. The High Flux Isotope Reactor was returned to full operation.

  16. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for period ending December 31, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burn, G.

    2000-03-01

    This is the twenty-seventh in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components.

  17. High Efficiency Thin Film CdTe and a-Si Based Solar Cells Final Technical Report for the Period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    High Efficiency Thin Film CdTe and a-Si Based Solar Cells Final Technical Report for the PeriodTe-based thin-film solar cells and on high efficiency a-Si-based thin-film solar cells. Phases I and II have-SiGe bottom cells. · Studied the sputter deposition of ITO films for the top electrode on a-Si cells and found

  18. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This is the eighteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: {sm_bullet} Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance. {sm_bullet} Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies. {sm_bullet} Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. This report has been compiled and edited under the guidance of A.F. Rowcliffe by Gabrielle Burn, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Their efforts, and the efforts of the many persons who made technical contributions, are gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for Period Ending December 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowcliff, A.F.; Burn, G.

    1999-04-01

    This is the twenty-fifth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately.

  20. Field verification program for small wind turbines. Quarterly report for the period October - December 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, A. Craig; Davis, Dean A.

    2000-01-26

    Windward Engineering has a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy to install two Whisper 900 wind turbines, one at the NREL National Wind Technology Center and one at a test site near Spanish Fork Utah. The authors monitor the turbine in Spanish Fork for approximately three years and report energy production availability, and general operating experience. In addition, they created a computer model to predict the furling behavior of the Whisper 900. They compare the predictions with measurements from the Utah test site. This is the first quarterly report on this project. The report is organized into 6 tasks and the progress is discussed for each task. The tasks are: (1) Install two turbines and repair as needed; (2) Phase 1 testing and analysis; (3) Phase 2 testing and analysis; (4) Phase 3 testing and analysis; (5) Turbine removal and inspection; and (6) Reporting and administration.

  1. ORNL nuclear waste programs annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    Research progress is reported in 20 activities under the headings: spent fuels, defense waste management, commercial waste management, remedial action, and conventional reactors. Separate entries were prepared for each activity.

  2. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report: For period ending December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This report is divided into analytical spectroscopy; radioactive materials analysis; inorganic chemistry; organic chemistry; ORNL environmental programs; quality assurance, safety, and training; supplementary activities; and presentation of research results.

  3. Solid State Division Progress Report for period ending March 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1986-08-01

    This report is divided into: theoretical solid-state physics, surface and near-surface properties of solids, defects in solids, transport properties of solids, neutron scattering, and synthesis and properties of novel materials. (DLC)

  4. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This progress report is divided into: engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, program activities, and collaborative research facilities. Very little hard data is presented. The appendices include listings of seminars, publications, and conference papers. (DLC)

  5. Summary of Time Period-Based and Other Approximation Methods for Determining the Capacity Value of Wind and Solar in the United States: September 2010 - February 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, J.; Porter, K.

    2012-03-01

    This paper updates previous work that describes time period-based and other approximation methods for estimating the capacity value of wind power and extends it to include solar power. The paper summarizes various methods presented in utility integrated resource plans, regional transmission organization methodologies, regional stakeholder initiatives, regulatory proceedings, and academic and industry studies. Time period-based approximation methods typically measure the contribution of a wind or solar plant at the time of system peak - sometimes over a period of months or the average of multiple years.

  6. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  7. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  8. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, D.F.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the division, whose purpose is to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by US DOE. Activities range from basic research to industrial research and technology transfer. The division (and the report) is divided into the following: Engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials, program activities, collaborative research facilities and technology transfer, and educational programs.

  9. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1994, which extended from October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to covey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who wee in ESD at the end of FY 1994 is located in the final section of the report.

  10. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1993, which extended from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who were in ESD and the end of FY 1993 is located in the final section of the report.

  11. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1995-07-01

    This is the seventeenth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six pans of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (DOE 1994b), and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented.

  12. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1994-07-01

    This is the thirteenth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated With Hanford site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (Borsheim et al. 1993), and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1.2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 3.0 and 4.0.

  13. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cash, R.J.; Meacham, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    This is the nineteenth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (DOE 1994b), and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1.2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 2.0 through 4.0. 58 refs.

  14. Quarterly report on the ferrocyanide safety program for the period ending March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.

    1996-05-08

    This is the twentieth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (DOE 1994b), and this report follows the same fomzat presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1. 2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 2. 0 through 4. 0.

  15. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1994-10-01

    This is the fourteenth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan, and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1.2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 3.0 and 4.0.

  16. Quarterly report on the ferrocyanide safety program for the period ending December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1995-01-01

    This is the fifteenth quarterly report on the progress of active addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (DOE 1994b), and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1.2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 2.0 through 4.0. 60 refs.

  17. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1995-10-01

    This is the eighteenth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (DOE 1994b), and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1.2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 2.0 through 4.0.

  18. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashdown, B.G.

    1980-10-01

    This report is organized along topical lines in parallel to a Program Plan of the same title so that activities and accomplishments may be followed readily relative to that Program Plan. Thus, the work of a given laboratory may appear throughout the report. Chapters 1, 2, 8, and 9 review activities on analysis and evaluation, test methods development, status of irradiation experiments, and corrosion testing and hydrogen permeation studies, respectively. These activities relate to each of the alloy development paths. Chapters 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 present the ongoing work on each alloy development path. The Table of Contents is annotated for the convenience of the reader.

  19. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This is the fourteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Depart of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. Separate abstracts were prepared for each individual section.

  20. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1980. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1981-03-01

    Research conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division for the Fiscal Year 1980 included studies carried out in the following Division programs and sections: (1) Advanced Fossil Energy Program, (2) Nuclear Program, (3) Environmental Impact Program, (4) Ecosystem Studies Program, (5) Low-Level Waste Research and Development Program, (6) National Low-Level Waste Program, (7) Aquatic Ecology Section, (8) Environmental Resources Section, (9) Earth Sciences Section, and (10) Terrestrial Ecology Section. In addition, Educational Activities and the dedication of the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park are reported. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report.

  1. Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNaturalOctober 2015 Alcohol. TheData -1 IdleReportReport

  2. Riparian Buffer Project : Annual Report for the Period April 1, 2001 to March 31, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasco County Soil and Water Conservation District

    2002-01-01

    This project implements riparian buffer systems in the Mid-Columbia, addressing limiting factors identified in the Fifteen mile Subbasin Summary, June 30, 2000. The project is providing the technical planning support needed to implement at least 36 riparian buffer system contracts on approximately 872 acres covering an estimated 40 miles of anadromous fish streams over a three year period. In the first year of implementation, 26 buffer contracts were established on 25-26 miles of stream. This nearly doubled the annual goal. Buffer widths averaged 83 ft. on each side of the stream. Implementation included prescribed plantings, fencing, and related practices. Actual implementation costs, lease payments, and maintenance costs are borne by existing USDA programs: Conservation Reserve and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Programs. The lease period of each contract may vary between 10 to 15 years. During this year the average was 14.5 years. The total value of contracts established this year is $1,491,235 compared with $64,756 in BPA contract costs to provide the technical support needed to get the contracts implemented. This project provides technical staffing to conduct assessments and develop plans to help keep pace with the growing backlog of potential riparian buffer projects. Word of mouth from satisfied customers has brought in many new sign-ups during the year. More than half of the contracts this year have been done in the Hood and Fifteen mile sub-basins with additional contracts in adjacent sub-basins.

  3. A decade of DIII-D research. Final report for the period of work, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    During the ten-year DIII-D tokamak operating period of 1989 through 1998, major scientific advances and discoveries were made and facility upgrades and improvements were implemented. Each year, annual reports as well as journal and international conference proceedings document the year-by-year advances (summarized in Section 7). This final contract report, provides a summary of these historical accomplishments. Section 2 encapsulates the 1998 status of DIII-D Fusion Science research. Section 3 summarizes the DIII-D facility operations. Section 4 describes the major upgrades to the DIII-D facility during this period. During the ten-year period, DIII-D has grown from predominantly a General Atomics program to a national center for fusion science with participants from over 50 collaborating institutions and 300 users who spend more than one week annually at DIII-D to carry out experiments or data analysis. In varying degrees, these collaborators participate in formulating the research program directions. The major collaborating institution programs are described in Section 6.

  4. PERIODICAL CICADA REPORTS FROM SOUTHERN INDIANA Timothy J. Gibb, Insect Diagnostician, Department of Entomology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    . Adultsliveforaboutamonthduring which time the females can lay between 400 and 600 eggs. In urban areas, heavy infestations can make sidewalks and roads slick with dead insect carcasses. In orchards, nurs- eries and landscapes

  5. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1984-05-01

    Progress and activities are reported in: analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials analysis, bio/organic analysis, general and environmental analysis, and quality assurance and safety. Supplementary activities are also discussed, and a bibliography of publications is also included. (DLC)

  6. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaitkus, M.R.; Wein, G.R. [eds.; Johnson, G.

    1993-11-01

    This progress report gives an overview of research programs at the Savannah River Site. Topics include; environmental operations support, wood stork foraging and breeding, defense waste processing, environmental stresses, alterations in the environment due to pollutants, wetland ecology, biodiversity, pond drawdown studies, and environmental toxicology.

  7. MAP3S precipitation chemistry network: sixth periodic summary report (1982)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothert, J.E.; Dana, M.T.

    1983-07-01

    This report contains complete field and chemical data from the MAP3S Precipitation Chemistry Network for the year 1982. Included is an update on network status and a summary of the USGS blind sample analysis program and laboratory sample exchanges during 1982. The statistical summary is deferred to a forthcoming publication.

  8. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    Progress is reported in the following fields: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, elecrochemistry, catalysis, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemistry of hazardous chemicals, and thermal energy storage.

  9. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1987-10-01

    This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

  10. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    This report has been indexed by 11 separate chapters. The subjects covered are: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, materials chemistry, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, catalysis, electron spectroscopy, nuclear waste chemistry, heuristic modeling, and special topics. (PLG)

  11. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

  12. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period October 1, 1991--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berven, B.A.

    1993-09-01

    This is a progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology, Biological and Radiation Physics, Chemical Physics, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis, Risk Analysis, Center for Risk Management, Associate Laboratories for Excellence in Radiation Technology (ALERT), and Contributions to National and Lead Laboratory Programs and Assignments--Environmental Restoration.

  13. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    This annual report summarizes activities in the Aquatic Ecology, Earth Sciences, Environmental Analyses, and Terrestrial Ecology sections, as well as in the Fossil Energy, Biomass, Low-Level Waste Research and Management, and Global Carbon Cycle Programs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each section. (ACR)

  14. Analytical Chemistry Division. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1981-05-01

    This report is divided into: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectrometry; technical support; bio/organic analysis; nuclear and radiochemical analysis; quality assurance, safety, and tabulation of analyses; supplementary activities; and presentation of research results. Separate abstracts were prepared for the technical support, bio/organic analysis, and nuclear and radiochemical analysis. (DLC)

  15. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

    1985-04-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following sections: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectroscopy; radioactive materials analysis; bio/organic analysis; and general and environmental analysis; quality assurance, safety, and tabulation analyses. In addition a list of publications and oral presentations and supplemental activities are included.

  16. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheffield, J.; Berry, L.A.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1990-02-01

    This report discusses the following topics on fusion research: toroidal confinement activities; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; fusion theory and computation; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; advanced systems program; fusion materials research; neutron transport; and management services, quality assurance, and safety.

  17. Quarterly report on the ferrocyanide safety program for the period ending June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dukelow, G.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-31

    This quarterly report provides a status of activities underway on the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue at the Hanford Site, including actions in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). In March 1991, a DNFSB implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the six parts of Recommendation 90-7 was prepared and sent to the DNFSB. A ferrocyanide safety program plan addressing the total Ferrocyanide Safety Program, including the six parts of DNFSB Recommendation 90-7, was released in October 1994 (DOE 1994b). Activities in the program plan are underway or are completed, and the status of each is described in Sections 2.0 and 3. 0 of this report.

  18. Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending, March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cash, R.J.; Meacham, J.E.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1995-04-01

    This quarterly report provides a status of the activities underway on the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue at the Hanford Site, including actions in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). In March 1991, a DNFSB implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the six parts of Recommendation 90-7 was prepared and sent to the DNFSB. A Ferrocyanide Safety Program Plan addressing the total Ferrocyanide Safety Program, including the six parts of DNFSB Recommendation 90-7, was released in October 1994 (DOE 1994b). Activities in the program plan are underway or have been completed, and the status of each is described in Sections 2.0 and 3.0 of this report.

  19. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    This eighth annual report of the Division covers work done during FY 1981 (October 1, 1980, through September 30, 1981). As with these documents in the past, the format follows approximately the organizational structure of the Energy Division. Chapters 2 through 6 summarize the activities of the sections of the Division: Environmental Impact Section, headed by H.E. Zittel; Regional and Urban Studies Section, R.M. Davis; Economic Analysis Section, R.B. Shelton; Data and Analysis Section, A.S. Loebl; and Efficiency and Renewables Research Section, J.W. Michel. In addition, work on a variety of projects which cut across section lines is reported in Chapter 7, Integrated Programs. These activities are under the supervision of T.J. Wilbanks, Associate Director for the Division. Separate abstracts are included for individual projects.

  20. Chemistry Division: Annual progress report for period ending March 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This report is divided into the following sections: coal chemistry; aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures; geochemistry of crustal processes to high temperatures and pressures; chemistry of advanced inorganic materials; structure and dynamics of advanced polymeric materials; chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds; separations chemistry; reactions and catalysis in molten salts; surface science related to heterogeneous catalysis; electron spectroscopy; chemistry related to nuclear waste disposal; computational modeling of security document printing; and special topics. (DLC)

  1. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending July 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Research is reported on: chemistry of coal liquefaction, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures, geosciences, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of TRU elements and compounds, separations chemistry, electrochemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, inorganic chemistry of hydrogen cycles, molten salt systems, and enhanced oil recovery. Separate abstracts were prepared for the sections dealing with coal liquefaction, TRU elements and compounds, separations, nuclear wastes, and enhanced oil recovery. (DLC)

  2. Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1988-11-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

  3. Quarterly report on ferrocyanide safety program for the period ending December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1994-02-01

    This is the eleventh quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing safety issues associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks that contain ferrocyanide compounds. In the presence of oxidizing materials, such as nitrates or nitrites, ferrocyanide can be made to explode in the laboratory by heating to high temperatures [above 285{degree}C (545{degree}F)]. In the mid 1950s, approximately 140 metric tons of ferrocyanide were added to waste now stored in underground high-level radioactive waste tanks. An implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990) was issued in March 1991 describing the activities that were planned and underway to address each of the six parts of Recommendation 90-7. A revision to the original plan (Borsheim et al. 1992) was transmitted to the US Department of Energy by Westinghouse Hanford Company in December 1992, and subsequently to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board in 1993. The implementation plan was updated and revised this quarter and re-released as the ferrocyanide safety program plan (Borsheim et al, 1993a). The program plan still addresses the six parts of Recommendation 90-7; however, it also includes all work in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program. This quarterly report is reported against the new program plan.

  4. Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division progress report for the period January 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poutsma, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This report provides brief summaries of progress in the Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division (CASD) during 1993 and 1994. The first four chapters, which cover the research mission, are organized to mirror the major organizational units of the division and indicate the scope of the research portfolio. These divisions are the Analytical Spectroscopy Section, Nuclear and Radiochemistry Section, Organic Chemistry Section, and Physical and Materials Chemistry Section. The fifth and sixth chapters summarize the support activities within CASD that are critical for research progress. Finally, the appendices indicate the productivity and recognition of the staff in terms of various forms of external publications, professional activities, and awards.

  5. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This report describes work done by staff of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during FY 1986. The work of the Division is quite diversified, but it can be divided into four research themes: (1) technology for improving the productivity of energy use; (2) technology for electric power systems; (3) analysis and assessment of energy and environmental issues, policies, and technologies; and (4) data systems research and development (R and D). The research is supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), numerous other federal agencies, and some private organizations. 190 refs., 60 figs., 23 tabs.

  6. Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaye, S.V.

    1992-03-01

    This is a brief progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology including Measurement Applications and Development, Pollutant Assessments, Measurement Systems Research, Dosimetry Applications Research, Metabolism and Dosimetry Research and Nuclear Medicine. Biological and Radiation Physics including Atomic, Molecular, and High Voltage Physics, Physics of Solids and Macromolecules, Liquid and Submicron Physics, Analytic Dosimetry and Surface Physics and Health Effects. Chemical Physics including Molecular Physics, Photophysics and Advanced Monitoring Development. Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis including Human Genome and Toxicology, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication, Environmental Regulations and Remediation and Information Management Technology. Risk Analysis including Hazardous Waste.

  7. Solid-State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1983-09-01

    Progress and activities are reported on: theoretical solid-state physics (surfaces; electronic, vibrational, and magnetic properties; particle-solid interactions; laser annealing), surface and near-surface properties of solids (surface, plasma-material interactions, ion implantation and ion-beam mixing, pulsed-laser and thermal processing), defects in solids (radiation effects, fracture, impurities and defects, semiconductor physics and photovoltaic conversion), transport properties of solids (fast-ion conductors, superconductivity, mass and charge transport in materials), neutron scattering (small-angle scattering, lattice dynamics, magnetic properties, structure and instrumentation), and preparation and characterization of research materials (growth and preparative methods, nuclear waste forms, special materials). (DLC)

  8. Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Appendix A: Mailing Address: Appendix B:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNaturalOctober 2015 Alcohol. TheData -1 IdleReport

  9. Particle Physics at the University of Pittsburgh Summary Report for Proposal Period FY'09-11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreau, Joe; Dytman, Steven; Mueller, James; Naples, Donna; Paolone, Vittorio; Savinov, Vladimir

    2012-10-01

    Presented is the final summary report for grant DOE-FG02-91ER40646. The HEP group at the University consists of three tasks: B,D and L. Task B supports Pitt's CDF group at the energy frontier which includes Joe Boudreau and Paul Shepard. Work of the group includes Hao Song's thesis on the measurement of the B_c lifetime using exclusive J/psi+pion decays, and an update of the previous B_c semi-leptonic analyses under the supervision of Paul Shepard. Task D supports Pitt's neutrino group at the intensity frontier which includes PIs Dytman, Naples and Paolone. The group also includes postdoctoral research associate Danko, and thesis students Isvan (MINOS), Eberly (Minerva ), Ren (Minerva )and Hansen (T2K). This report summarizes their progress on ongoing experiments which are designed to make significant contributions to a detailed understanding of the neutrino mixing matrix. Task L supports Pitt's ATLAS group at the energy frontier and includes investigators Vladimir Savinov, James Mueller and Joe Boudreau. This group contributed both to hardware (calorimeter electronics, Savinov) and to software (Simulation, Detector Description, and Visualization: Boudreau and Mueller; MC generators: Savinov) and a summary of their progress is presented.

  10. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program.

  11. MAP3S precipitation chemistry network: seventh periodic summary report, 1983. [MAP3S Network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothert, J.E.; Dana, M.T.

    1984-11-01

    This summary report, the seventh in the series, contains complete field and chemical data from the MAP3S Precipitation Chemistry Network for the year 1983. Sections cover QA/QC of the MAP3S/PCN; network history, network site information and a MAP3S/PCN bibliography; and a brief statistical look at the laboratory operations for 1983. There is also a brief statistical summary for 1982 to 1983. Included under the Quality Control section are the QA audits for site performance, laboratory comparisons, field blank and pH test results, and sample shipping and analysis results. Included is a listing of cooperating organizations and personnel for the MAP3S/PCN. 10 references, 10 figures, 32 tables.

  12. Fossil Energy Program Annual Progress Report for the Period April 1, 2000 through March 31, 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkins, RR

    2001-06-14

    This report covers progress made at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of fossil energy technologies. Projects on the ORNL Fossil Energy Program are supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program, the DOE National Petroleum Technology Office, and the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The ORNL Fossil Energy Program research and development activities cover the areas of coal, clean coal technology, gas, petroleum, and support to the SPR. An important part of the Fossil Energy Program is technical management of all activities on the DOE Fossil Energy Advanced Research (AR) Materials Program. The AR Materials Program involves research at other DOE and government laboratories, at universities, and at industrial organizations.

  13. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Counce, D.M.; Wolff, P.P.

    1993-04-01

    Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related Issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1992. Energy Division`s total expenditures in FY 1992 were $42.8 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, the US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 116.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, technology transfer, analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries, and civilian transportation analysis. Energy conservation technologies focus on electric power systems, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems conduct research for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. Much of Energy Division`s research is valuable to other organizations as well as to sponsors. This information is disseminated by the staff`s involvement in professional and trade organizations and workshops; joint research with universities and private-sector firms; collaboration with state and local governments; presentation of work at conferences; and publication of research results in journals, reports, and conference proceedings.

  14. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M&C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

  15. Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

  16. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selden, R.H.

    1991-06-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division are described in this annual progress report for FY 1990. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of how societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy efficient technologies; and (4) developing improved transportation planning and policy. Disciplines of the 129 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, chemical heat pumps, refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building enveloped (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), retrofits for existing buildings, and electric power systems. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. 48 refs., 34 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, J.N.

    1992-04-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division's total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  18. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1988: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described in this annual progress report for Fiscal Year (FY) 1988. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of the way society makes choices in energy use and energy-using technologies, (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental implications of changes in energy technology, and (3) improving and developing new energy-efficient technologies. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on four major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) transportation and decision systems research, (3) technology research and development for improving the efficiency of energy and end-use technologies, and (4) electric power systems. The Division's total expenditures in FY 1988 were $44.3 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 139 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics.

  19. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, J.N.

    1992-04-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division`s total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division`s programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  20. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    This report covers work done during FY 1983 by the staff of the Energy Division and its subcontractors and by colleagues in other Oak Ridge National Laboratory divisions working on Energy Division projects. The work can be divided into four areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) models and data systems, (3) research to improve the efficiency of energy use and to improve electric power transmission and distribution, and (4) research utilization. Support came principally from the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the US Department of Defense, but also from a number of other agencies and organizations. Analysis and assessment included work on (a) environmental issues, including those deriving from the preparation of environmental impact statements; (b) energy and resource analysis; and (c) emergency preparedness. The models and data systems area involved research on evaluating and developing energy, environment, and engineering simulation models and on devising large data management systems, evaluating user data requirements, and compiling data bases. Research on improving the efficiency of energy use was focused primarily on the buildings and electricity sectors. A major effort on heat pump technology, which includes both heat-activated and electrically driven systems, continues. An important aspect of all the work was research utilization. Since the Energy Division is doing applied research, results are, by definition, intended to solve problems or answer questions of DOE and other sponsors. However, there are other users, and research utilization activities include technology transfer, commercialization efforts, outreach to state and regional organizations, and, of course, information dissemination.

  1. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, P.P.

    1994-07-01

    One of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY1993. Energy Division is committed to (1) understanding the mechanisms by which societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society`s understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy-efficient technologies; (4) improving transportation policy and planning; (5) enhancing basic knowledge in the social sciences as related to energy and associated issues. Energy Division`s expenditures in FY1993 totaled $42 million. The work was supported by the US DOE, DOD, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 126.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and computer sciences and data systems. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy use and delivery technologies, and (3) transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on emergency preparedness, transportation analysis, and analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries. Energy use and delivery technologies focus on electric power systems, building equipment, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Transportation systems research is conducted both to improve the quality of civilian transportation and for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  2. Grande Ronde Subbasin Gauging Station Operations, 2007-2008 Reporting Period.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menton, R. Coby [Grande Ronde Model Watershed

    2008-11-10

    The Grande Ronde Basin (GRB) in Northeast Oregon is a moderately dry climate receiving between 10 and 20 inches of precipitation per year with surrounding mountains accumulating up to 100 inches. Irrigated agriculture is a major part of the economy with water being diverted or pumped from surface and ground sources from April through October. Several ESA listed species exist in the basin including Chinook, steelhead, and bulltrout. Agriculture and ESA (Endangered Species Act) listed aquatic species combined with a dry climate demonstrate the need for a network of stream gauges. The GRB covers over 5,000 square miles and includes several thousand miles of perennial flowing streams. This project is in place to operate 12 existing stream gauges in combination with USGS (4 gauges) and OWRD (one gauge) who, independent of this project, operate five additional gauges (Grande Ronde at Troy, Imnaha R. at Imnaha, Minam R. at Minam, Lookingglass Creek, and Upper Catherine Cr.) to characterizes flow in both the Grande Ronde and Imnaha subbasins. These gauges are intended to assist in irrigation water management, fisheries management, long term flow and trend analysis, TMDL and SB1010 water quality management plan effectiveness, subbasin plan implementation, and provide essential information regarding cumulative effects response to conservation in the GRB. Headwater characteristics, land management influence, and basin outlet data are all selectively collected in this network of 17 flow gauges. Prior to the 2007 water year there were three separate stream gauging programs with similar objectives, protocol, and funding sources in the GRB. Each of these programs for the past ten years has operated under separate administration consuming more time and administrative money than is necessary to accomplish stated objectives. By combining all programs into one project costs have been reduced, each funding source has one contract instead of three, and the same amount of work has been done accomplishing the same objectives. This objective has been continued and realized in the 2008 water year.

  3. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-01-01

    The following sentences highlight some of the technical activities carried out during 1991. They illustrate the diversity of programs and technical work performed within the Analytical Chemistry Division. Our neutron activation analysis laboratory at HFIR was placed into operation during 1991. We have combined inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) with a preparation procedure developed at the Argonne National Laboratory to measure ultra-trace levels of U, Pu, Np, and Am in body fluids, primarily urine. Much progress has been made over the last year in the interfacing of an rf-powered glow discharge source to a double-focusing mass spectrometer. Preliminary experiments using electrospray ionization combined with ion trap mass spectrometry show much promise for the analysis of metals in solution. A secondary ion microprobe has been constructed that permits determination of the distribution of organic compounds less than a monolayer thick on samples as large as 1 cm diameter. Fourier transform mass spectrometry has been demonstrated to be a highly effective tool for the detailed characterization of biopolymers, especially normal and modified oligonucleotides. Much has been accomplished in understanding the fundamentals of quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Work with ITMS instrumentation has led to the development of rapid methods for the detection of trace organics in environmental and physiological samples. A new type of time-of-flight mass spectrometer was designed for use with our positron ionization experiments. Fundamental research on chromatography at high concentrations and on gas-solid adsorption has continued. The preparation of a monograph on the chemistry of environmental tobacco smoke was completed this year.

  4. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report for the period July 1, 1986 to June 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klobe, L.E. (ed.)

    1988-12-01

    The Instrumentation and Controls (IandC) Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performs basic and applied instrumentation and controls research, development and design engineering, specialized instrument design and fabrication, and maintenance services for instruments, electronics, and computers. The IandC Division is one of the largest RandD organizations of its type among government laboratories, and it exists as the result of an organizational strategy to integrate ORNL's instrumentation and controls-related disciplines into one dedicated functional organization to increase the Laboratory's expertise and capabilities in these rapidly expanding, innovative areas of technology. The Division participates in the programs and projects of ORNL by applying its expertise and capabilities in concert with other divisions to perform basic research and mission-oriented technology development. Many of the Division's RandD tasks that are a part of a larger ORNL program are of sufficient scope that the IandC effort constitutes a separate program element with direct funding and management responsibility within the Division. The activities of IandC include performance of an RandD task in IandC facilities, the participation of from one of many IandC engineers and scientists in a multidisciplinary team working in a specific research area or development project, design and fabrication of a special instrument or instrumentation system, or a few hours of maintenance service. In its support and maintenance work, the role of the IandC Division is to provide a level of expertise appropriate to complete a job successfully at minimum overall cost and time schedule---a role which involves IandC in almost all ORNL activities.

  5. Nuclear Science Division annual report for the period October 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, J.

    1989-10-01

    Highlights of the low energy research program included the identification of new super-deformed bands in gadolinium and palladium isotopes using the HERA array. Other work at the 88-Inch Cyclotron involved studies of the fragmentation of light nuclei; the spectroscopy of nuclear far from stability and interesting new experiments on the properties of the heaviest elements. Two other programs deserve special mention, the new program in Nuclear Astrophysics and the spectroscopic studies being carried out at OASIS. This isotope separator is now in full operation at the SuperHILAC after many yeas of development. At the Bevalac, important new results were obtained on the properties of hot dense nuclear matter produced in central collisions of heavy ions. First measurements were made using the di-lepton spectrometer which provide the most direct access to the conditions at the earliest stage of the reaction. New results on pion interferometry have been obtained using the Janus spectrometer and surprises continue to be found in careful analysis of data from the Plastic Ball detector, most recently the identification of a new component of hydrodynamic flow. Also at the Bevalac the intermediate energy program continued to grow, studying the evolution of the reaction mechanism from incomplete fusion to the fireball regime, as did the spectroscopic studies using secondary radioactive beams. The third major component of the experimental program is the study of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions using the CERN SPS. This year saw the completing of analysis of the first round of experiments with important results being obtained on general particle production, the space-time evolution of the system and strangeness production.

  6. PERIODIC TORVAC REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jul 18 2015 05:41:56:000AM Cryostat Moisture, ppm 4.00 Vaporizer Moisture, ppm 24.00 Air Pressure, psi 123.25 Water Pressure, psi 29.70 Water Flow, galmin 0.30 ECDC On Normal...

  7. Hurricane FRANCES Preliminary water Levels report *For the purpose of timely release, data contained within this report have undergone "limited"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurricane FRANCES Preliminary water Levels report *For the purpose of timely release, data for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services NOAA NOS CO-OPS Hurricane FRANCIS Preliminary Report #12 the hurricane season (June through November), CO-OPS personnel can trigger gauges for real-time monitoring

  8. Statistics of particle time-temperature histories : progress report for June 2013.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewson, John C.; Gin, Craig; Lignell, David O. [Brigham Young University Provo, UT; Sun, Guangyuan [Brigham Young University Provo, UT

    2013-10-01

    Progress toward predictions of the statistics of particle time-temperature histories is presented. These predictions are to be made using Lagrangian particle models within the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model. In the present reporting period we have further characterized the performance, behavior and capabilities of the particle dispersion models that were added to the ODT model in the first period. We have also extended the capabilities in two manners. First we provide alternate implementations of the particle transport process within ODT; within this context the original implementation is referred to as the type-I and the new implementations are referred to as the type-C and type-IC interactions. Second we have developed and implemented models for two-way coupling between the particle and fluid phase. This allows us to predict the reduced rate of turbulent mixing associated with particle dissipation of energy and similar phenomena. Work in characterizing these capabilities has taken place in homogeneous decaying turbulence, in free shear layers, in jets and in channel flow with walls, and selected results are presented.

  9. Appendix E Instrumentation time lines This appendix contains timelines of instrument and equipment installation periods and where appropriate, system maintenance information is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , an ID of the instrument installed is given above the line designating the period of installation 6. Profile tower CO2/H2O logger 7. Power system control logger 537 #12;Time Line Date 5/12/20015/12 . . Cell T volt divider . 0 .. . ... Main ... low er upper . . . Sw itched . S 762 ...... 83 . 470

  10. A systematic procedure for reservoir characterization: Annual report for the period October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lake, L.W.; Kocurek, G.A.; Miller, M.A.

    1987-12-01

    This report deals with a variety of topics all centered around the main goal of making numerical reservoir simulation results conform more closely with geologic descriptions. The first part of the report discusses results on conditional simulations of miscible displacements in randomly heterogeneous permeable media. The focus here is on local or macroscopic dispersion, the dispersion experienced at a fixed point in the medium. Macroscopic dispersivity has many of the same dependencies on reservoir properties as does megascopic dispersivity, but it seems to be less time dependent and is always smaller. We have not discovered a mathematical model to describe its behavior. A major portion of the report deals with statistical descriptions. We investigate the bias and precision of standard measures of heterogeneity, the Lorenz and Dykstra-Parsons coefficient. After this, the work explores the benefits of using a distribution type characterization parameter in exploring heterogeneity. The final major protion of the report describes our mapping efforts on the Page sandstone outcrop in northern Arizona. The mapping is to be used in generating both deterministic descriptions and in calibrating the stochastic descriptions discussed above. 128 refs., 95 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 7, 2012-Former New York Times reporter...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more than 30 years and also worked at Esquire and Time. He was twice awarded the George Polk Award for National Reporting and for Foreign Affairs Reporting. Now a consulting...

  12. Expert Meeting Report: Retrofit Implementation - A Neighborhood at a Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffiths, D.

    2012-04-01

    This report provides information about a Building America expert meeting hosted by research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings on October 25, 2011, in New York City. The meeting discussed several community residential retrofit projects underway across the United States, and included representatives from utilities, energy program implementation firms, affordable housing agencies, and the financing industry.

  13. Expert Meeting Report: Retrofit Implementation - A Neighborhood at a Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffiths, Dianne

    2012-04-01

    This report provides information about a Building America expert meeting hosted by research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) on October 25, 2011, in New York City. The meeting discussed several community residential retrofit projects underway across the United States, and included representatives from utilities, energy program implementation firms, affordable housing agencies, and the financing industry.

  14. Execution Characteristics of JustInTime Compilers Technical Report TR99071701

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    Execution Characteristics of Just­In­Time Compilers Technical Report ­ TR­990717­01 R@cse.psu.edu Abstract Just­In­Time (JIT) compilers interact with the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) at run time and compile appropriate bytecode sequences into native machine code. Loading and compilation time penalties are incurred

  15. Real Time PMU-Based Stability Monitoring Final Project Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;#12;Real Time PMU, Western Area Power Administration Clifton Black, Southern Company David Schooley, Exelon the increasing amount of PMU data for operation, planning, protection, and control. This research proposes new

  16. 03.108 Time Sheets. All employees authorized via an HRM-8 must have their time reported to the Payroll Office electronically through the Time Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    03.108 Time Sheets. All employees authorized via an HRM-8 must have their time reported System.) They should be filled out with all the departmental information from the HRM-8, hours worked through the Payroll Office on a HRM-6, HRM-7, or HRM-8 form. These payments will be subject to fringe

  17. TiP: Analyzing Periodic Time Series Patterns Thomas Bernecker, Hans-Peter Kriegel, Peer Kroger, and Matthias Renz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kriegel, Hans-Peter

    , evolution of stock charts, research on medical behavior of organisms, or analysis and detec- tion of motion of environmental data. 1 Introduction In a large range of application domains, e.g. environmental analysis series. Overall, TiP serves as a framework to effectively and efficiently manage dual- domain time series

  18. National synchrotron light source annual report 1987: For the period of October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White-DePace, S.; Gmur, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.

    1987-10-01

    This report contains the reports and operational information of the National Synchrotron Light source facility for 1987. The reports are grouped mainly under VUV research and x-ray research. (LSP)

  19. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.; Foster, I. T.; Middleton, D. E.; Ananthakrishnan, R.; Siebenlist, F.; Shoshani, A.; Sim, A.; Bell, G.; Drach, R.; Ahrens, J.; Jones, P.; Brown, D.; Chastang, J.; Cinquini, L.; Fox, P.; Harper, D.; Hook, N.; Nienhouse, E.; Strand, G.; West, P.; Wilcox, H.; Wilhelmi, N.; Zednik, S.; Hankin, S.; Schweitzer, R.; Bernholdt, D.; Chen, M.; Miller, R.; Shipman, G.; Wang, F.; Bharathi, S.; Chervenak, A.; Schuler, R.; Su, M.

    2010-04-21

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities).

  20. Final Report for Grant DE-FG02-91ER40690 for the period 12/1/2010 to 4/30/2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durkin, Stan; Hill, Chris; Kass, Richard; Braaten, Eric; Mathur, Samir; Raby, Stuart; Shigemitsu, Junko; Gan, K. K.; Kagan, Harris; Hughes, Richard E.; Winer, Brian L.; Honscheid, Klaus

    2014-07-22

    This is the #12;final report for The Ohio State University high energy physics grant DE-FG02- 91ER40690. The activities of the various Tasks are briefy summarized over the previous grant period. The support from the Department of Energy is greatly appreciated.

  1. Upper ocean model of dissolved atmospheric gases. Final report for the period 1 August 1991--31 May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schudlich, R.; Emerson, S.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes results from three years of funding for a modelling study of processes controlling the distribution of metabolic chemical tracers in surface waters. We determined concentrations of the gases O{sub 2}, Ar, N{sub 2}, and the stable isotope ratio ({sup 18}O/{sup 16}O) of molecular oxygen in surface waters at Station ALOHA in conjunction with the Global Ocean Flux Study (GOFS) Hawaiian Ocean Time-series project during the years 1989- 90 and 1992-93. Under this contract we have incorporated chemical tracers into an existing ocean mixed-layer model to simulate the physical processes controlling the distribution and seasonal cycle of dissolved gases in the upper ocean. The broad background of concurrent chemical, physical, and biological measurements at Station ALOHA provides enough redundancy of ``ground truth`` to assess the model`s accuracy. Biological oxygen production estimated from modelled chemical tracers agrees with estimates based on measurement of carbon fluxes into the deep ocean and nitrate fluxes into the upper ocean during 1989-90 and 1992-93, verifying for the first time the utility of chemical tracers for determining biological fluxes in the ocean. Our results suggest that in the euphotic zone (the upper 100 m of the ocean), the net biological O{sub 2} production is 1.0-2. 0 moles m{sup -2}yr{sup - 1}. Inert gas (Ar, N{sub 2}) supersaturation levels show that air and bubble injection are important modes of air-sea gas transfer in the Station ALOHA region.

  2. High-energy channeling and its applications. Progress report for period May 1, 1981-December 1, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, W.M.; Sun, C.R.

    1981-12-01

    Progress is reported in these areas; proton channeling through bent crystals at GeV energies; gamma radiation from 10 GeV positrons channeled in silicon monocrystal; and other publications during the year reported. (GHT)

  3. Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, reporting period March--August 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, reporting period October--December 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Activities of DOE's Oil Implementation Task Force for the period March--August 1991 are reviewed. Contracts for fields projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery are discussed, with a list of related publications given. Enhanced recovery processes covered include chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, and microbial recovery.

  4. GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-196 Comparative Evaluation of Real-Time PCR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-196 554 Comparative Evaluation of Real-Time PCR (Taq Health and Seeds Inspectorate between October 2003 and February 2004. These were surface- decontaminated

  5. Real-Time Deep-Ocean Tsunami Measuring, Monitoring, and Reporting System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Real-Time Deep-Ocean Tsunami Measuring, Monitoring, and Reporting System: The NOAA DART II Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) Hugh B. Milburn Oceanographic Engineer 1. Introduction This paper describes the system components that make up the second-generation Deep-Ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis

  6. Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Reporting period July--September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This report contains information on accomplishments completed during July through September 1997 on contracts for field projects and supporting research on Enhanced Oil Recovery.

  7. Assessment of tunnel ground conditions for a two-year stand-by period, January 1994. UTAP report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-01-28

    This report summarizes observations, assessment of ground conditions, and recommendations pertaining to the Collider main ring tunnel at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC).

  8. Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report for the period July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1990. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klobe, L.E. [ed.

    1990-12-01

    The format of this Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report is a major departure from previous reports. This report has been published in two volumes instead of one, and the description of individual activities have been shortened considerably to make it easier document to scan and to read. Volume 1 of this report presents brief descriptions of a few highly significant programmatic and technological efforts representative of Instrumentation and Controls Division activities over the past two years. This volume contains information concerning the publications, presentations, and other professional activities and achievements of I&C Division staff members.

  9. SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N.; Foster, I. T.; Middleton, D. E.

    2009-10-15

    This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities). During this semi-annual reporting period, the ESG-CET team continued its efforts to complete software components needed for the ESG Gateway and Data Node. These components include: Data Versioning, Data Replication, DataMover-Lite (DML) and Bulk Data Mover (BDM), Metrics, Product Services, and Security, all joining together to form ESG-CET's first beta release. The launch of the beta release is scheduled for late October with the installation of ESG Gateways at NCAR and LLNL/PCMDI. Using the developed ESG Data Publisher, the ESG II CMIP3 (IPCC AR4) data holdings - approximately 35 TB - will be among the first datasets to be published into the new ESG enterprise system. In addition, the NCAR's ESG II data holdings will also be published into the new system - approximately 200 TB. This period also saw the testing of the ESG Data Node at various collaboration sites, including: the British Atmospheric Data Center (BADC), the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology, the University of Tokyo Center for Climate System Research, and the Australian National University. This period, a total of 14 national and international sites installed an ESG Data Node for testing. During this period, we also continued to provide production-level services to the community, providing researchers worldwide with access to CMIP3 (IPCC AR4), CCES, and CCSM, Parallel Climate Model (PCM), Parallel Ocean Program (POP), and Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP), and NARCCAP data.

  10. Technical Report 2009-003 A Testing Theory for Real-Time Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report 2009-003 A Testing Theory for Real-Time Systems Stefan D. Bruda and Chun Dai|cdai}@cs.ubishops.ca 30 October 2009 Abstract We develop a testing theory for real-time systems. We keep the usual notion or failure of infinite runs, using a formalism similar to the acceptance in B¨uchi automata. We present two

  11. Stanford's nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones Stanford Report, December 18, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Stanford's nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones Stanford Report, December 18, 2007 Stanford's nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones BY DAN STOBER Stanford researchers have found a way to use silicon nanowires to reinvent the rechargeable lithium-ion batteries

  12. Quarterly report on Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 for the period ending June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.; Forbes, C.J.; Meacham, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    This is the ninth quarterly report on the progress of activities that address safety issues associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks containing ferrocyanide compounds. Milestones completed this quarter include (1) a report on the credibility of hot spots and a recommendation on infrared scans; (2) a document discussing the strength and limitations of proposed moisture monitoring technologies; (3) limited calibration of the neutron probe in simulant-filled drums; (4) a report interpreting data from auger surface samples of ferrocyanide tank 241-BY-104; (5) a document on the effect of possible catalyst, initiator, and diluents on ferrocyanide reactivity; (6) a report on small scale sensitivity tests of ferrocyanide flowsheet simulants; and (7) preparation and shipment of T Plant simulants for calorimetric and dryout tests.

  13. Chemical Technology Division progress report for the period April 1, 1981-March 31, 1983. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for eight sections of the report: nuclear waste management; fossil energy; basic science and technology; biotechnology and environmental programs; transuranium-element processing; Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs; Three Mile Island support studies; and miscellaneous programs.

  14. HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS FOR SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT ALSO INCLUDES THE QUARTERLY TECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD 01/01/1997 - 03/31/1997.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DIMITRI GIDASPOW

    1997-08-15

    The objective of this study is to develop a predictive experimentally verified computational fluid dynamic (CFD) three phase model. It predicts the gas, liquid and solid hold-ups (volume fractions) and flow patterns in the industrially important bubble-coalesced (churn-turbulent) regime. The input into the model can be either particulate viscosities as measured with a Brookfield viscometer or effective restitution coefficient for particles. A combination of x-ray and {gamma}-ray densitometers was used to measure solid and liquid volume fractions. There is a fair agreement between the theory and the experiment. A CCD camera was used to measure instantaneous particle velocities. There is a good agreement between the computed time average velocities and the measurements. There is an excellent agreement between the viscosity of 800 {micro}m glass beads obtained from measurement of granular temperature (random kinetic energy of particles) and the measurement using a Brookfield viscometer. A relation between particle Reynolds stresses and granular temperature was found for developed flow. Such measurement and computations gave a restitution coefficient for a methanol catalyst to be about 0.9. A transient, two-dimensional hydrodynamic model for production of methanol from syn-gas in an Air Products/DOE LaPorte slurry bubble column reactor was developed. The model predicts downflow of catalyst at the walls and oscillatory particle and gas flow at the center, with a frequency of about 0.7 Hertz. The computed temperature variation in the rector with heat exchangers was only about 5 K, indicating good thermal management. The computed slurry height, the gas holdup and the rate of methanol production agree with LaPorte's reported data. Unlike the previous models in the literature, this model computes the gas and the particle holdups and the particle rheology. The only adjustable parameter in the model is the effective particle restitution coefficient.

  15. Analysis of acid precipitation samples collected by state agencies sampling period: January-December 1992. Annual project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, L.S.

    1995-03-01

    The report presents analytical data from the 30 acid precipitation collection sites in the State-Operated Network. Samples are collected weekly in plastic bag bucket liners and shipped in 500 mL polyethylene bottles to Global Geochemistry Corporation, the central laboratory for the network. The report contains maps showing the location of each site, plots of analytical data, tables of all field and analytical data, plots comparing field and laboratory pH and conductivity, and information on data quality. Samples are analyzed for pH, strong acid, conductivity, fluoride, chloride, nitrite, phosphate, bromide, nitrate, sulfate, ammonium, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium.

  16. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology. (KRM)

  17. Advanced research and technology development fossil energy materials program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, R.A.

    1981-12-01

    This is the fourth combined quarterly progress report for those projects that are part of the Advanced Research and Technology Development Fossil Energy Materials Program. The objective is to conduct a program of research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. Work performed on the program generally falls into the Applied Research and Exploratory Development categories as defined in the DOE Technology Base Review, although basic research and engineering development are also conducted. A substantial portion of the work on the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program is performed by participating cntractor organizations. All subcontractor work is monitored by Program staff members at ORNL and Argonne National Laboratory. This report is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure defined in the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program Plan for FY 1981 in which projects are organized according to fossil energy technologies. We hope this series of AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program quarterly progress reports will aid in the dissemination of information developed on the program.

  18. Quarterly report on Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 for the period ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.; Forbes, C.J.

    1993-03-01

    This is the seventh quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing safety issues associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks that contain ferrocyanide compounds. In the presence of oxidizing materials, such as nitrates or nitrites, ferrocyanide can be made to explode in the laboratory by heating it to high temperatures [above 285{degrees}C (545{degrees}F)]. In the mid 1950s approximately 140 metric tons of ferrocyanide were added to 24 underground high-level radioactive waste tanks. An implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990) was issued in March 1991 describing the activities that were planned and underway to address each of the six parts of Recommendation 90-7. A revision to the original plan was transmitted to US Department of Energy by Westinghouse Hanford Company in December 1992. Milestones completed this quarter are described in this report. Contents of this report include: Introduction; Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Implementation Plan Task Activities (Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation for enhanced temperature measurement, Recommendation for continuous temperature monitoring, Recommendation for cover gas monitoring, Recommendation for ferrocyanide waste characterization, Recommendation for chemical reaction studies, and Recommendation for emergency response planning); Schedules; and References. All actions recommended by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board for emergency planning by Hanford Site emergency preparedness organizations have been completed.

  19. Assessment of the 60 km rapid update cycle (RUC) with near real-time aircraft reports. Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.E.; Richard, C.; Kim, S.; Bailey, D.

    1998-07-15

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing the Center-TRA-CON Advisory System (CTAS), a set of Air Traffic Management (ATM) Decision Support Tools (DST) for en route (Center) and terminal (TRACON) airspace designed to enable controllers to increase capacity and flight efficiency. A crucial component of the CTAS, or any ATM DST, is the computation of the time-of-flight of aircraft along flight path segments. Earlier NASA studies show that accurate knowledge of the wind through which the aircraft are flying is required to estimate time-of-flight accurately. There are current envisioned to be two sources of wind data for CTAS: The Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) for the Center airspace, a numerical model developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Forecast System Laboratory (FSL) and run operationally by the National Weather Service (NWS) National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP); and The Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS) Terminal Winds (TW) for the TRACON airspace, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory under funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This study has three goals: (1) determine the errors in the baseline 60 km resolution RUC forecast wind fields relative to the needs of en route DSTs such as CTAS, (2) determine the benefit of using the TW algorithm to refine the RUC forecast wind fields with near real-time Meteorological Data Collection and Reporting System (MDCRS) reports, and (3) identify factors that influence wind errors in order to improve accuracy and estimate errors in real time.

  20. Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. Quarterly technical progress report for period ending March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The present study shows that activation of a high surface area Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst in CO in a (CSTR), continuously stirred tank reactor using tetralin as solvent results in an activated that is three times of material that is activated in H{sub 2} or directly in the syngas.

  1. NIST Report to the FBI: Plex-ID Electrospray Time-of-Flight Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 NIST Report to the FBI: Plex-ID Electrospray Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer for Mitochondrial. John Butler (NIST) Dr. Thomas Callaghan (FBI) Eric Pokorak (FBI) Points of view in this document of Investigation (FBI). Certain commercial equipment, instruments, and materials are identified in order to specify

  2. Technical Report CS96466, CSE Dept., UCSD, January 1996 Determining Asynchronous Acyclic Pipeline Execution Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrante, Jeanne

    Technical Report CS96­466, CSE Dept., UCSD, January 1996 Determining Asynchronous Acyclic Pipeline of California, San Diego La Jolla, California 92093­0114 fvdonalds,ferranteg@cs.ucsd.edu Abstract Pipeline in the body of a loop, are executed in parallel. A measure of the execution time of a pipeline is needed

  3. Oklahoma DOE EPSCoR Trainees. Final Report for the Period September 30, 1991 to March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, R.C.

    2000-11-01

    This report presents the results of the State of Oklahoma DOE EPSCOR Traineeship program. The program was carried out at the three major research universities in the state: the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University, and the University of Tulsa. Each of the three universities selected a central thrust area for the DOE EPSCOR traineeships that was in keeping with research strengths of the institution. These thrust areas are related closely enough to be mutually supportive, but are sufficiently distinct to minimize duplication of effort among the institutions. The University of Tulsa emphasized its programs in petroleum exploration, development and processing. The University of Oklahoma is emphasized research related to the supply and applications of natural gas and environmental concerns. Oklahoma State University focused on advanced materials and manufacturing, particularly as they relate to the oil and gas industries.

  4. Quarterly report on Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 for the period ending March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.; Forbes, C.J.; Meacham, J.E.

    1993-06-01

    This is the eighth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing safety issues associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks that contain ferrocyanide compounds. In the presence of oxidizing materials, such as nitrates or nitrites, ferrocyanide can be made to explode in the laboratory by heating it to high temperatures [above 285{degree}C (545{degree}F)]. In the mid 1950s, approximately 140 metric tons of ferrocyanide were added to 24 underground high-level radioactive waste tanks. An implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990) was issued in March 1991 describing the activities that were planned and underway to address each of the six parts of Recommendation 90-7. A revision to the original plan was transmitted to the US Department of Energy by Westinghouse Hanford Company in December 1992.

  5. Quarterly report on Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 for the period ending March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1992-05-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing safety issues associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks that contain ferrocyanide compounds. In the presence of oxidizing materials, such as nitrates or nitrites, ferrocyanide can be made to explode in the laboratory by heating it to high temperatures (above 285{degrees}C (545{degree}F)). In the mid 1950s approximately 140 metric tons of ferrocyanide were added to 24 underground high-level radioactive waste tanks. An implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990) was issued in March 1991 describing the activities planned and underway to address each of the six parts of the recommendation.

  6. Quarterly report on Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 for the period ending March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1992-05-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing safety issues associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks that contain ferrocyanide compounds. In the presence of oxidizing materials, such as nitrates or nitrites, ferrocyanide can be made to explode in the laboratory by heating it to high temperatures [above 285{degrees}C (545{degree}F)]. In the mid 1950s approximately 140 metric tons of ferrocyanide were added to 24 underground high-level radioactive waste tanks. An implementation plan (Cash 1991) responding to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990) was issued in March 1991 describing the activities planned and underway to address each of the six parts of the recommendation.

  7. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 112: AREA 23 HAZARDOUS WASTE TRENCHES, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA; FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 2003 - SEPTEMBER 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2004-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 112, Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit located in Area 23 of the NTS. This annual Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report provides the results of inspections and monitoring for CAU 112. This report includes a summary and analysis of the site inspections, repair and maintenance, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 112 for the current monitoring period, October 2003 through September 2004. Inspections of the CAU 112 RCRA unit were performed quarterly to identify any significant physical changes to the site that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit. The overall condition of the covers and facility was good, and no significant findings were observed. The annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted on August 23, 2004, and the results indicated that no cover subsidence4 has occurred at any of the markers. The elevations of the markers have been consistent for the past 11 years. The total precipitation for the current reporting period, october 2003 to September 2004, was 14.0 centimeters (cm) (5.5 inches [in]) (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory, Special Operations and Research Division, 2004). This is slightly below the average rainfall of 14.7 cm (5.79 in) over the same period from 1972 to 2004. Post-closure monitoring verifies that the CAU 112 trench covers are performing properly and that no water is infiltrating into or out of the waste trenches. Sail moisture measurements are obtained in the soil directly beneath the trenches and compared to baseline conditions for the first year of post-closure monitoring, which began in october 1993. neutron logging was performed twice during this monitoring period along 30 neutron access tubes to obtain soil moisture data and detect any changes that may indicate moisture movement beneath each trench. Soil moisture results obtained to date indicate that the compliance criterion of less than 5% Residual Volumetric Moisture Content was met. Soil conditions remain dry and stable beneath the trenches, and the cover is functioning as designed within the compliance limits.

  8. Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress Report for the Period of July 1, 1994 to December 31, 1997: Publications, Presentations, Activities, and Awards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, D.W.

    1998-04-01

    This report contains a record of publishing and other activities in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) Division for the period of July 1, 1994, to December31, 1997. It is a companion volume to Working Together on New Horizons: Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress Report for the Period of July 1, 1994, to December 31, 1997 (OR.NLA4-6530). Working Together on New Horizons contains illustrated summaries of some of the projects under way in I&C Division. Both books can be obtained by contacting C. R. Brittain (brittain@ornl. gov), P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6005. l&C Division Mission and Vision I&C Division develops and maintains techniques, instruments, and systems that lead to a better understanding of nature and harnessing of natural phenomena for the benefit of humankind. We have dedicated ourselves to accelerating the advancement of science and the transfer of those advancements into products and processes that benefit U.S. industry and enhance the security of our citizens.

  9. Annual Report to the Bonneville Power Administration, Reporting Period: April 2008 - February 2009 [re: "Survival and Growth in the Columbia River Plume and north California Current"].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries; Cooperative Institute for Marine Resources Studies, Oregon State University; OGI School of Science & Engineering, Oregon Health Sciences University.

    2009-07-17

    We have made substantial progress toward our objectives outlined in our BPA supported proposal entitled 'Columbia River Basin Juvenile Salmonids: Survival and Growth in the Columbia River Plume and northern California Current' which we report on herein. During 2008, we were able to successfully conduct 3 mesoscale cruises. We also were able to conduct 7 biweekly predator cruises, along with substantial shore-based visual observations of seabirds. Detailed results of the mesoscale cruises are available in the Cruise Reports and summarized in the next section. We have taken a proactive approach to getting the results of our research to fisheries managers and the general public. We have begun to make annual predictions based on ocean conditions of the relative survival of juvenile coho and Chinook salmon well before they return as adults. This is based on both biological and physical indicators that we measure during our surveys or collect from outside data sources. Examples of our predictions for 2009 and 2010 are available on the following web site: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/research/divisions/fed/oeip/a-ecinhome.cfm.

  10. Water Research Consortium U.S. Department of Energy Grant Award Number DE-FG02-05ER64132 Final Technical Report For Period Beginning: 15 September 2005 And Ending: 31 December 2009 Report Date: 16 March 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven R. Billingsley

    2010-03-18

    This report summarizes the activities of the INRA Water Research Consortium (IWRC) for the period beginning September 15, 2005 and ending December 16, 2010. This report compares accomplishments to project objectives, documents the activities associated with this project, and lists products developed during the course of the project. The Water Resources Research Needs Assessment team received funding from the Inland Northwest Research Alliance Water Resources Steering Committee to facilitate a structured needs assessment process that could provide a basis for future targeted research efforts to improve regional water resources management in the Inland Northwest region. The original INRA proposal specifically mentions the need to conduct a detailed assessment of the information and research needs of policy makers and water user groups during a period of increasing competition for scarce water supplies. A particular focus of this assessment would be to understand what types of research might facilitate water resource management during periods of drought. The specific goals of the Needs Assessment project were to: (1) Quickly ascertain the perceptions of diverse stakeholders in this region; (2) Condense this complex information into a format that can be shared with the INRA scientific panel, and (3) Develop of a realistic set of research needs & priorities that can shape future INRA-funded research activities.

  11. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 333: U-3auS DISPOSAL SITE, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA FOR THE PERIOD JULY 2005-JUNE 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-08-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 333, U-3auS Disposal Site, is a closed construction landfill located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The closure of this site was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) dated June 27, 2001. Post-closure requirements are described in a letter from NNSA/NV to NDEP dated October 9, 2001, and were approved by the NDEP in a letter dated November 5, 2001. This report covers the period July 2005 through June 2006 and consists of copies of the inspection checklist and field notes, repair records (if any), photographs, and recommendations and conclusions.

  12. 44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, January 912, 2006 Reno, Nevada Application of the Time Spectral Method to Periodic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jameson, Antony

    of the body. Practical examples of this type include helicopter rotor blades in forward flight, rotor and efficient computation of periodic unsteady flows. The algorithm has been validated with both 2D and 3D test

  13. Automatic control of electric thermal storage (heat) under real-time pricing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daryanian, B.; Tabors, R.D.; Bohn, R.E. [Tabors Caramanis and Associates, Inc. (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Real-time pricing (RTP) can be used by electric utilities as a control signal for responsive demand-side management (DSM) programs. Electric thermal storage (ETS) systems in buildings provide the inherent flexibility needed to take advantage of variations in prices. Under RTP, optimal performance for ETS operations is achieved under market conditions where reductions in customers` costs coincide with the lowering of the cost of service for electric utilities. The RTP signal conveys the time-varying actual marginal cost of the electric service to customers. The RTP rate is a combination of various cost components, including marginal generation fuel and maintenance costs, marginal costs of transmission and distribution losses, and marginal quality of supply and transmission costs. This report describes the results of an experiment in automatic control of heat storage systems under RTP during the winter seasons of 1989--90 and 1990--91.

  14. HONORS THESIS PLANNER Writing an Honors thesis is a significant undertaking. Ideally, a student will devote time over a twelve-to eighteen-month period to propose, research, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Tony R.

    HONORS THESIS PLANNER Writing an Honors thesis is a significant undertaking. Ideally, a student will devote time over a twelve-to eighteen-month period to propose, research, and write the thesis. You may use this form to create your own thesis plan. Honors Program Deadlines December graduation April

  15. Matrix tablets are drug delivery devices that release a water-soluble drug over an extended period of time. Such matrix tablets are formulated from mixtures of drug, polymer, and excipient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinow, Peter

    Summary Matrix tablets are drug delivery devices that release a water-soluble drug over an extended period of time. Such matrix tablets are formulated from mixtures of drug, polymer, and excipient powders variation in the drug release profile of the tablet. While fabrication of experimental tablets

  16. Effects of variations in holding time, curing temperature, and treatment period on selected physical properties of concrete made with type III cement and steam cured at atmospheric pressure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burleson, Kenneth Stewart

    1958-01-01

    of concrete are as foliose: Send (at a SSD condition) - - - - - 1266. 3 pounds Oearse (aC a SSD aen4ition) - - - - 166&. 1 pounds Oe?ent - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 607. 5 pounds or 6. &6 sachs gator - - - - - - - ? - - - - - - - 297. 0 pounds or 35. 66... and 185 F to obtain the waxima nodulus of rupture for a treataant period of 16 hours is indicated in Figures 29 through 32. *C ~ 1 day nodulus of rupture of concrete stean cured as show, expressed as a per cent of the 28 day nodulus of rupture...

  17. Applications of ICP magnetic sector multicollector mass spectrometry to basic energy research. Final report for period December 1st, 1993 - May 31st, 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halliday, A.N.

    2002-05-01

    The primary aims of this research were threefold: to develop and utilize the new technique of multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and apply it to problems in the earth, ocean, and environmental sciences; to develop new chronometers and improve existing chronometers to allow the accurate determination of the ages of geological features and processes; and to study natural fluid-mediated mass transfer processes and source of components in the crust and the oceans. This technique has now become the preferred method for the determination of the isotopic compositions of a variety of elements in the periodic table. The prototype instrument was used to explore a vast array of isotopic systems and demonstrate applicability to problems as different as the origin of the solar system and smelting methods in the Bronze Age. Highlights of the program are briefly summarized under the following topics: tungsten isotopes and the early solar system; trace siderophile and chalcophile element geochemistry; hafnium isotopes and the early development of the continents; evolution of lead isotopic compositions of the oceans; the isotopic composition and residence time of Hf in seawater; the isotopic compositions of Sr, Hf, Pb, and Nd in dust; U-Th disequilibrium dating of carbonates and soils; in situ U-Th disequilibrium dating of opal.

  18. Abstract--The ability to record from the same neuron for extended periods of time is essential to understanding how the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bizzi, Emilio

    of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 USA (e and Cognitive Science and McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In this paper, we report the implantation of a conducting polymer microwire electrode in a rodent brain

  19. Phase 3 of a Brushless Doubly-Fed Machine System Development Program : Final Technical Report for Period January 1, 1992-June 30, 1993.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, Gerald C.; Spee, Rene; Wallace, Alan K.

    1993-12-31

    Since the inception of the BDFM development program in 1989, the value of BDFM technology has become apparent. The BDFM provides for adjustable speed, synchronous operation while keeping costs associated with the required power conversion equipment lower than in competing technologies. This provides for an advantage in initial as well as maintenance expenses over conventional drive system. Thus, the BDFM enables energy efficient, adjustable speed process control for applications where established drive technology has not been able to deliver satisfactory returns on investment. At the same time, the BDFM challenges conventional drive technologies in established markets by providing for improved performance at lower cost. BDFM converter rating is kept at a minimum, which significantly improves power quality at the utility interface over competing power conversion equipment. In summary, BDFM technology can be expected to provide significant benefits to utilities as well as their customers. This report discusses technical research and development activities related to Phase 3 of the Brushless Doubly-Fed Machine System Development Program, including work made possible by supplemental funds for laboratory improvement and prototype construction. Market research for the BDFM was provided by the College of Business at Oregon State University; market study results will be discussed in a separate report.

  20. Magnetomechanically induced long period fiber gratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Causado-Buelvas, Jesus D.; Gomez-Cardona, Nelson D.; Torres, Pedro

    2008-04-15

    In this work, we report a simple, flexible method to create long period fiber gratings mechanically by controlling the repulsion/attraction force between two magnets that pressing a plate with a periodic array of small glass cylinders to a short length of optical fiber. Via the photoelastic effect, the pressure points induce the required periodic refractive index modulation to create the LPFG. We found that the induced device exhibits spectral characteristics similar to those of other types of LPFG. As the optical properties of LPFGs are directly related to the nature of the applied perturbations, we show, to our knowledge for the frrst time, how is the evolution of birefringence effects in mechanically induced LPFGs.

  1. GPS Tracking and Time-Geography: Applications for Activity Modeling and Microsimulation, Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goulias, Kostas; Janelle, Donald G.

    2006-01-01

    GPS Tracking and Time-Geography Applications for Activityevents/meetings/time-geography/ Center for SpatiallyGPS Tracking and Time Geography ii FHWA Peer Exchange and

  2. Development of a focussing-crystal spectrograph for x-rays from laser-fusion targets. Final report for the period ending September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaakobi, B.; Burek, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    The report is arranged in five major sections, Section II describes the measurements of mica and lithium fluoride crystal properties before and after the cylindrical bending required for a Von-Hamos spectrograph. It also describes the property of mosaic focussing and the measurements of the spatial as well as spectral resolutions of bent crystals. Section III describes the imaging calculations which relate the instrument focussing capability to source misalignment. These calculations demonstrate the necessity to maintain fabrication and alignment precision which is about equal to the radiation source size, if the full potential of the instrument is to be realized. Section IV shows x-ray spectra obtained on the OMEGA 24 laser facility at LLE. The targets used were plastic shells, coated with copper either on the outside or the inside surface, germania shells, and krytpon-filled glass shells. The data indicate deeper heat penetration on the target surface, than predicted by a flux-limited heat transport model. In Section V, we list new spectral lines involving multiple electron excitation, which are observed here for the first time and whose wavelengths are calculated using Hartrer-Fock methods.

  3. Hurricane Rita Preliminary Water Levels Report *For the purpose of timely release, data contained within this report have undergone a "limited" NOS Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurricane Rita Preliminary Water Levels Report *For the purpose of timely release, data contained water levels during the landfall of Hurricane RITA from Vaca Key, FL to Port Isabel, TX. Station of Storm Tide Anomoly is discounted. Hurricane RITA made landfall on 24 September 2005 at 2:38 CDT (7

  4. j\\TOMKI Report All ( 1983) DIREdr TEST OF THE TIME-INOCPENDENCE OF f1JNIlA.MENTAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlyakhter, Ilya

    .}.!TS USING THE OKLO NATURAL REACTOR* A. I. Shlyakhter Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchinaj\\TOMKI Report All ( 1983) DIREdr TEST OF THE TIME- INOCPENDENCE OF f1JNIlA.MENTAL NUCLEAR CONSTP the important natural cons tants of cosIOOlogy and atomic theory are connected by simple Imthematical rela

  5. PETROLEUM INDUSTRY INFORMATION REPORTING ACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    over that time period. The April 2006 staff report, California Crude Oil Production and Prices, depended upon monthly PIIRA reports. This report made use of refinery production levels, crude oil data, dealer tank wagon prices, terminal stocks, and refinery inventory levels were used in the Spring 2006

  6. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, Final Report For the Performance Period May 1, 2008 through April 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampson, Melvin R.

    2009-07-30

    The Yakima-Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a joint project of the Yakama Nation (lead entity) and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and is sponsored in large part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with oversight and guidance from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). It is among the largest and most complex fisheries management projects in the Columbia Basin in terms of data collection and management, physical facilities, habitat enhancement and management, and experimental design and research on fisheries resources. Using principles of adaptive management, the YKFP is attempting to evaluate all stocks historically present in the Yakima subbasin and apply a combination of habitat restoration and hatchery supplementation or reintroduction, to restore the Yakima Subbasin ecosystem with sustainable and harvestable populations of salmon, steelhead and other at-risk species. The original impetus for the YKFP resulted from the landmark fishing disputes of the 1970s, the ensuing legal decisions in United States versus Washington and United States versus Oregon, and the region's realization that lost natural production needed to be mitigated in upriver areas where these losses primarily occurred. The YKFP was first identified in the NPCC's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) and supported in the U.S. v Oregon 1988 Columbia River Fish Management Plan (CRFMP). A draft Master Plan was presented to the NPCC in 1987 and the Preliminary Design Report was presented in 1990. In both circumstances, the NPCC instructed the Yakama Nation, WDFW and BPA to carry out planning functions that addressed uncertainties in regard to the adequacy of hatchery supplementation for meeting production objectives and limiting adverse ecological and genetic impacts. At the same time, the NPCC underscored the importance of using adaptive management principles to manage the direction of the Project. The 1994 FWP reiterated the importance of proceeding with the YKFP because of the added production and learning potential the project would provide. The YKFP is unique in having been designed to rigorously test the efficacy of hatchery supplementation. Given the current dire situation of many salmon and steelhead stocks, and the heavy reliance on artificial propagation as a recovery tool, YKFP monitoring results will have great region-wide significance. Supplementation is envisioned as a means to enhance and sustain the abundance of wild and naturally-spawning populations at levels exceeding the cumulative mortality burden imposed on those populations by habitat degradation and by natural cycles in environmental conditions. A supplementation hatchery is properly operated as an adjunct to the natural production system in a watershed. By fully integrating the hatchery with a naturally-producing population, high survival rates for the component of the population in the hatchery can raise the average abundance of the total population (hatchery component + naturally-producing component) to a level that compensates for the high mortalities imposed by human development activities and fully seeds the natural environment. The objectives of the YKFP are to: use Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) and other modeling tools to facilitate planning for project activities, enhance existing stocks, re-introduce extirpated stocks, protect and restore habitat in the Yakima Subbasin, and operate using a scientifically rigorous process that will foster application of the knowledge gained about hatchery supplementation and habitat restoration throughout the Columbia River Basin. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until results are published in the peer-reviewed literature. The following is a brief summary of current YKFP activities by species.

  7. Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Warren, Glen A.

    2012-09-28

    Executive Summary Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration, of which PNNL is a part, to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory methods. This document is a progress report for FY2012 PNNL analysis and algorithm development. Progress made by PNNL in FY2012 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS analysis and algorithms applied to used fuel assemblies. PNNL further refined the semi-empirical model developed in FY2011 based on singular value decomposition (SVD) to numerically account for the effects of self-shielding. The average uncertainty in the Pu mass across the NGSI-64 fuel assemblies was shown to be less than 3% using only six calibration assemblies with a 2% uncertainty in the isotopic masses. When calibrated against the six NGSI-64 fuel assemblies, the algorithm was able to determine the total Pu mass within <2% uncertainty for the 27 diversion cases also developed under NGSI. Two purely empirical algorithms were developed that do not require the use of Pu isotopic fission chambers. The semi-empirical and purely empirical algorithms were successfully tested using MCNPX simulations as well applied to experimental data measured by RPI using their LSDS. The algorithms were able to describe the 235U masses of the RPI measurements with an average uncertainty of 2.3%. Analyses were conducted that provided valuable insight with regard to design requirements (e.g. Pb stack size, neutron source location) of an LSDS for the purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Sensitivity studies were conducted that provide insight as to how the LSDS instrument can be improved by making it more sensitive to the center of the fuel assemblies. In FY2013, PNNL will continue efforts to develop and refine design requirements of an LSDS for the ultimate purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Future efforts will be directed toward more extensive experimental benchmarking of currently implemented time-spectra analysis algorithms.

  8. Short residence time hydropyrolysis of coal. Technical progress report, 1 July-31 September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saville, D. A.; Russel, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    In this quarterly report we update the status of the program to gather kinetic data for the pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis of coal and the combined theoretical and experimental effort to understand the role of plasticity in these processes.

  9. Final Technical Report for the Period September 2002 through September 2005; H2-MHR Pre-Conceptual Design Report: SI-Based Plant; H2-MHR Pre-Conceptual Design Report: HTE-Based Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Richards; A. Shenoy; L. Brown; R. Buckingham; E. Harvego; K. Peddicord; M. Reza; J. Coupey

    2006-04-19

    For electricity and hydrogen production, an advanced reactor technology receiving considerable international interest is a modular, passively-safe version of the high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor, known in the U.S. as the Modular Helium Reactor (MHR), which operates at a power level of 600 MW(t). For electricity production, the MHR operates with an outlet helium temperature of 850 C to drive a direct, Brayton-cycle power-conversion system with a thermal-to-electrical conversion efficiency of 48 percent. This concept is referred to as the Gas Turbine MHR (GT-MHR). For hydrogen production, both electricity and process heat from the MHR are used to produce hydrogen. This concept is referred to as the H2-MHR. This report provides pre-conceptual design descriptions of full-scale, nth-of-a-kind H2 MHR plants based on thermochemical water splitting using the Sulfur-Iodine process and High-Temperature Electrolysis.

  10. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #17 Pedro Quintana;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #16 Covering the time period from

  11. Technical Report CS96481, CSE Dept., UCSD, April 1996 Determining Asynchronous Pipeline Execution Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrante, Jeanne

    Technical Report CS96­481, CSE Dept., UCSD, April 1996 Determining Asynchronous Pipeline Execution pipelining is a form of parallelism in which processors execute different loop tasks (loop statements) as opposed to different loop iterations. An asynchronous pipeline schedule for a loop is an assignment

  12. Annual Expense Report, President David Naylor, University of Toronto For the period May 1, 2009 to April 30, 2010 page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    $ 402.28 The University of Toronto is committed to good governance and transparency. Annual expense reporting advances transparency. Fiscal responsibility, sound administration, and conscientious internal Round table $40.47 December 3, 2009 Lunch meeting with members of the community $176.66 December 11

  13. Storm Water Analytical Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Individual Permit Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial...

  14. Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Nelson, V. Lance

    1990-01-01

    This project monitored the daily passage of smolts during the 1988 spring outmigration at two migrant traps; one each on the Snake and Clearwater rivers. Due to the low runoff year, chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was very low. Steelhead trout catch was higher than normal, probably due to trap modifications and because the trap was moved to the east side of the river. Chinook salmon and steelhead trout catch at the Clearwater River trap was similar to 1987. Total cumulative recovery of PIT tagged fish at the three dams, with PIT tag detection systems was: 55% for chinook salmon, 73% for hatchery steelhead trout, and 75% for wild steelhead trout. Travel time through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir, was affected by discharge. Statistical analysis showed that as discharge increased from 40 kcfs to 80 kcfs, chinook salmon travel time decreased three fold, and steelhead trout travel time decreased two fold. There was a statistical difference between estimates of travel time through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT tagged and freeze branded steelhead trout, but not for chinook salmon. These differences may be related to the estimation techniques used for PIT tagged and freeze branded groups, rather than real differences in travel time. 10 figs, 15 tabs.

  15. Effect of time and temperature on transformation-toughened zirconias. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schioler, L.J.

    1987-06-01

    The effects of exposure to elevated temperatures (900 to 1300 C) for times ranging from 50 to 500 hours on toughened oxide ceramics intended for use in heat engines were examined. The materials were magnesia-stabilized transformation-toughened zirconia, yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal, and zirconia-toughened alumina, as well as untoughened zirconias for comparison. The materials were heat treated, and physical and mechanical properties were then measured at room temperature. High-temperature mechanical tests performed were stress rupture and stepped temperature stress rupture. The results of the tests indicate that the mechanical properties of magnesia-stabilized transformation-toughened zirconia degrade substantially after relatively short times at the moderate temperatures expected in low-heat-rejection diesel engines. The yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal and the untoughened partially stabilized zirconia materials appear to be more stable against the effects of time and temperature.

  16. Management of the Network Time Protocol (NTP) with SNMP 1 Technical Report No. 9809

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, David L.

    consists of a number of primary reference sources, synchronized by wire or radio to national standards. Sethi Hongxiang Gao Department of Computer & Information Sciences University of Delaware Newark, DE, and operated as primary time servers. Additional hosts or gateways run NTP with one or more of the primary

  17. CAIA Technical Report 060707A July 2006 page 1 of 9 Minimally Intrusive Round Trip Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zander, Sebastian

    for a range of highly interactive real-time applications. Active probing techniques are possible but problematic. The extra packet traffic imposed by active probes along a network path can modify the behaviour is running. One common approach involves actively probing the path. Extra packets are injected

  18. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer DNA analyzer. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.H.W.; Martin, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer DNA analyzer which can be broadly used for biomedical research. Tasks include: pulsed ion extraction to improve resolution; two-component matrices to enhance ionization; and solid phase DNA purification.

  19. Report on Fission Time Projection Chamber M3FT-12IN0210052

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James K. Jewell

    2012-08-01

    The Time Projection Chamber is a collaborative effort to implement an innovative approach and deliver unprecedented fission measurements to DOE programs. This 4?-detector system will provide unrivaled 3-D data about the fission process. Shown here is a half populated TPC (2?) at the LLNL TPC laboratory as it undergoes testing before being shipped to LANSCE for beam experiments.

  20. Real-Time Traffic Information for Emergency Evacuation Operations: Phase A Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Zhang, Li [Mississippi State University (MSU); Mahmoud, Anas M. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Wen, Yi [Mississippi State University (MSU)

    2010-05-01

    There are many instances in which it is possible to plan ahead for an emergency evacuation (e.g., an explosion at a chemical processing facility). For those cases, if an accident (or an attack) were to happen, then the best evacuation plan for the prevailing network and weather conditions would be deployed. In other cases (e.g., the derailment of a train transporting hazardous materials), there may not be any previously developed plan to be implemented and decisions must be made ad-hoc on how to proceed with an emergency evacuation. In both situations, the availability of real-time traffic information plays a critical role in the management of the evacuation operations. To improve public safety during a vehicular emergency evacuation it is necessary to detect losses of road capacity (due to incidents, for example) as early as possible. Once these bottlenecks are identified, re-routing strategies must be determined in real-time and deployed in the field to help dissipate the congestion and increase the efficiency of the evacuation. Due to cost constraints, only large urban areas have traffic sensor deployments that permit access to some sort of real-time traffic information; any evacuation taking place in any other areas of the country would have to proceed without real-time traffic information. The latter was the focus of this SERRI/DHS (Southeast Region Research Initiative/Department of Homeland Security) sponsored project. That is, the main objective on the project was to improve the operations during a vehicular emergency evacuation anywhere by using newly developed real-time traffic-information-gathering technologies to assess traffic conditions and therefore to potentially detect incidents on the main evacuation routes. Phase A of the project consisted in the development and testing of a prototype system composed of sensors that are engineered in such a way that they can be rapidly deployed in the field where and when they are needed. Each one of these sensors is also equipped with their own power supply and a GPS (Global Positioning System) device to auto-determine its spatial location on the transportation network under surveillance. The system is capable of assessing traffic parameters by identifying and re-identifying vehicles in the traffic stream as those vehicles pass over the sensors. The system of sensors transmits, through wireless communication, real-time traffic information (travel time and other parameters) to a command and control center via an NTCIP (National Transportation Communication for ITS Protocol) -compatible interface. As an alternative, an existing NTCIP-compatible system accepts the real-time traffic information mentioned and broadcasts the traffic information to emergency managers, the media and the public via the existing channels. A series of tests, both in a controlled environment and on the field, were conducted to study the feasibility of rapidly deploying the system of traffic sensors and to assess its ability to provide real-time traffic information during an emergency evacuation. The results of these tests indicated that the prototype sensors are reliable and accurate for the type of application that is the focus of this project.

  1. Low cost, compact high efficiency, traction motor for electric vehicles/hybrid electric vehicles. Final report for the period September 1998 - December 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Jerry; Kessinger, Roy

    2000-04-28

    This final report details technical accomplishments for Phase I of the ''Low Cost, Compact High Efficiency, Traction Motor for Electric Vehicles/Hybrid Electric Vehicles'' program. The research showed that the segmented-electromagnetic array (SEMA) technology combined with an Integrated Motion Module (IMM) concept is highly suited for electric vehicles. IMMs are essentially mechatronic systems that combine the motor, sensing, power electronics, and control functions for a single axis of motion into a light-weight modular unit. The functional integration of these components makes possible significant reductions in motor/alternator size, weight, and cost, while increasing power density and electromechanical conversion efficiency.

  2. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 7, Appendix B (contd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wwlls completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W10-14; 299-W15-15; 299-W15-16; 299-W15-17; 299-W15-18. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  3. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 5, Appendix B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W6-2; 299-W7-1; 299-W7-2; 299-W7-3; 299-W7-4. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  4. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period, January 1-March 31, 1988: Volume 6, Appendix B (contd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W7-5; 299-W7-6; 299-W8-1; 299-W9-1; 299-W10-13. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  5. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 8, Appendix B (contd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W18-21; 299-W18-22; 299-W18-23; 299-W18-24. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  6. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 2, Appendix A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix A cover the following wells: 299-E27-8; 299-E27-9; 299-E27-10; 299-E28-26; 299-E28-27. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  7. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 4, Appendix A (contd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix A cover the following wells: 299-E33-30; 299-E34-2; 299-E34-3; 299-E34-4; 299-E34-5; 299-E34-6. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  8. Demonstration of oxygen-enriched air staging at Owens-Brockway glass containers. Final technical report for the period April 1, 1995--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rue, D.; Abbasi, H.

    1997-10-01

    The overall objective of this program was to demonstrate the use of a previously developed combustion modification technology to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from sideport regenerative container glass melters. Specific objectives were to: acquire baseline operating data on the host sideport furnace, evaluate secondary oxidant injection strategies based on earlier endport furnace results and through modeling of a single port pair, retrofit and test one port pair (the test furnace has six port pairs) with a flexible OEAS system, and select the optimal system configuration, use the results from tests with one port pair to design, retrofit, and test OEAS on the entire furnace (six port pairs), and analyze test results, prepare report, and finalize the business plan to commercialize OEAS for sideport furnaces.

  9. In-Situ Real Time Monitoring and Control of Mold Making and Filling Processes: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed Abdelrahman; Kenneth Currie

    2010-12-22

    This project presents a model for addressing several objectives envisioned by the metal casting industries through the integration of research and educational components. It provides an innovative approach to introduce technologies for real time characterization of sand molds, lost foam patterns and monitoring of the mold filling process. The technology developed will enable better control over the casting process. It is expected to reduce scrap and variance in the casting quality. A strong educational component is integrated into the research plan to utilize increased awareness of the industry professional, the potential benefits of the developed technology, and the potential benefits of cross cutting technologies.

  10. Operation redwing: Report to the scientific director. Timing and firing (sanitized version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-29

    Task Unit 5 (YU-5) was organized to accomplish the following tasks during Operation Redwing (May - June 1956): (1) To supply timing signals and voice count-down to meet the principal requirements of the experimental programs; (2) To supply the arming and firing pulses to the devices tested; (3) To furnish personnel as members of the arming and firing parties; (4) To provide and maintain the Task Group 7.1 (TG 7.1) short-range commercial radio communications at Bikini and Eniwetok atolls; and (5) To perform such scientific measurements and photography as provided for under existing contractual agreements.

  11. Periodic Measurement of Advertising Effectiveness Using Multiple-Test-Period Geo Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    of ad effectiveness measurements across time. Additionally, the experimental units should rotate betweenPeriodic Measurement of Advertising Effectiveness Using Multiple-Test-Period Geo Experiments Jon experiments to the measurement of advertising effectiveness. One reason this method of measurement

  12. Real-time discriminatory sensors for water contamination events :LDRD 52595 final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III; Carrejo-Simpkins, Kimberly; Wheeler, David Roger; Adkins, Douglas Ray; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Irwin, Adriane Nadine; Lewis, Patrick Raymond; Goodin, Andrew M.; Shelmidine, Gregory J.; Dirk, Shawn M.; Chambers, William Clayton; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Showalter, Steven Kedrick

    2005-10-01

    The gas-phase {mu}ChemLab{trademark} developed by Sandia can detect volatile organics and semi-volatiles organics via gas phase sampling . The goal of this three year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to adapt the components and concepts used by the {mu}ChemLab{trademark} system towards the analysis of water-borne chemicals of current concern. In essence, interfacing the gas-phase {mu}ChemLab{trademark} with water to bring the significant prior investment of Sandia and the advantages of microfabrication and portable analysis to a whole new world of important analytes. These include both chemical weapons agents and their hydrolysis products and disinfection by-products such as Trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). THMs and HAAs are currently regulated by EPA due to health issues, yet water utilities do not have rapid on-site methods of detection that would allow them to adjust their processes quickly; protecting consumers, meeting water quality standards, and obeying regulations more easily and with greater confidence. This report documents the results, unique hardware and devices, and methods designed during the project toward the goal stated above. It also presents and discusses the portable field system to measure THMs developed in the course of this project.

  13. Application of time-domain reflectometry to subsidence monitoring. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, R.A.; Dowding, C.H.; Mehnert, B.B.; O'Connor, K.; Van Roosendaal, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The report describes how reflected voltage pulses from coaxial antenna cable grouted in rock masses can be employed to quantify the type and magnitude of rock mass deformation (movements) during abandoned mine subsidence events. The cable signal generated can differentiate between both extension and shear deformation. It performs the same task as a combined full profile extensometer (to measure local extension) and inclinometer (to measure local shearing). Rock mass movements locally deform the grouted cable, which changes cable capacitance and thereby the reflected wave form of an induced voltage pulse. By monitoring changes in these reflected signatures, it is possible to monitor rock mass deformation. The project encompassed two sequential phases of work. First, laboratory determinations were made to quantify signal changes with shear and tensile cable deformation, and to select cable diameter and grout mix. Secondly, field installation and monitoring procedures were tested at two active planned subsidence mining operations and over one abandoned mine with an active subsidence event. The paper also develops the electromagnetic wave theory necessary to quantitatively relate changes in cable geometry to changes in reflected voltage signatures. The results of these analyses are employed to extract new information from previously collected field data and to analyze cable signature results from cables installed over the two planned subsidence mining operations and one abandoned mine.

  14. Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scully, Richard J.; Buettner, Edwin W.

    1986-02-01

    Hatcheries released 9.3 million chinook salmon and 6.3 million steelhead smolts and presmolts upriver from Lower Granite Reservoir for migration in spring, 1984. Peak passage of yearling chinook salmon occurred the third week in April at both Whitebird and Snake River traps. Passage of steelhead was still increasing when high water stopped trapping in mid-May. Average migration rate between release sites and Snake River (the head of Lower Granite Reservoir) was 13.2 miles/day and from that point on through the reservoir to the dam, 1.9 miles/day. Salmon River discharge, when considered along with other environmental factors, had the greatest effect on migration rate of smolts branded both at hatcheries and at the Whitebird trap and migrating to the head of Lower Granite Reservoir. Migration rate for steelhead released from Dworshak Hatchery and recaptured at the Clearwater trap was 34 miles/day. Survival rates to the Snake River trap of branded chinook salmon smolts released at Hells Canyon Dam, Rapid River, South Fork Salmon and Decker Flat were 52%, 65%, 68% and 35%, respectively. Classical descaling, where at least 40% of the scales are missing from at least two of five areas on the side of a smolt, ranged from 0 to 5.3% at hatcheries for chinook salmon and was less than 1% for steelhead. Scattered descaling, where at least 10% of scales are missing from at least one side of a fish, was always more extensive than was classical descaling, ranging from 2.5 times greater for Clearwater hatchery steelhead to 6.8 times greater for Clearwater wild steelhead. Mean total length of chinook salmon yearlings was the same at all the traps, i.e., 128 mm (117 mm fork length) +- 1 mm.

  15. SPACE-R Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System: Design and Technology Demonstration Program. Semiannual technical progress report for period ending March 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This Semiannual Technical Progress Report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments for the Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System (TI-SNPS) Design and Technology Demonstration Program of the Prime Contractor, Space Power Incorporated (SPI), its subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories during the first half of the Government Fiscal Year (GFY) 1993. SPI`s subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories include: Babcock & Wilcox for the reactor core and externals; Space Systems/Loral for the spacecraft integration; Thermocore for the radiator heat pipes and the heat exchanger; INERTEK of CIS for the TFE, core elements and nuclear tests; Argonne National Laboratories for nuclear safety, physics and control verification; and Oak Ridge National laboratories for materials testing. Parametric trade studies are near completion. However, technical input from INERTEK has yet to be provided to determine some of the baseline design configurations. The INERTEK subcontract is expected to be initiated soon. The Point Design task has been initiated. The thermionic fuel element (TFE) is undergoing several design iterations. The reactor core vessel analysis and design has also been started.

  16. Cavity Light-Emitting Diode for Durable, High-Brightness and High-Efficiency Lighting Applications: First Budget Period Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yijian Shi

    2009-09-30

    A COLED device consists of a top electrode (anode) and a bottom electrode (cathode) separated by a thin dielectric layer. In this metal/dielectric stack, numerous small wells, or cavities, are etched through the top electrode and the dielectric layer. These cavities are subsequently filled with LEP molecules. When a voltage is applied between the top and bottom electrodes, holes (from the top electrode) and electrons (from the bottom electrode) are injected into the polymer. Light emission is generated upon recombination of holes and electrons within the polymer along the perimeters of cavities. Figure 1 compares the structures of the COLED and the traditional OLED. The existing COLED fabrication process flow is illustrated in Figure 2. A COLED can potentially be 5 times more efficient and can operate at as much as 100 times higher current density with much longer lifetime than an OLED. To fully realize these potential advantages, the COLED technology must overcome the following technical barriers, which were the technical focused points for Years 1 and 2 (Phase I) of this project: (1) Construct optimum thickness dielectric layer: In the traditional OLED structure, the optimal thickness of the LEP film is approximately 80-100 nm. In a COLED device, the effective LEP thickness roughly equals the thickness of the dielectric layer. Therefore, the optimal dielectric thickness for a COLED should also be roughly equal to 80-100 nm. Generally speaking, it is technically challenging to produce a defect-free dielectric layer at this thickness with high uniformity, especially over a large area. (2) Develop low-work-function cathode: A desired cathode should have a low work function that matches the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of the LEP molecules. This is usually achieved by using a low-work-function metal such as calcium, barium, lithium, or magnesium as the cathode. However, these metals are very vulnerable to oxygen and water. Since the cathode of the COLED will be exposed to air and processing chemicals during the COLED fabrication process, these low-work-function metals cannot be used directly in the COLED structure. Thus, new materials with low work function and better chemical stability are needed for the COLED cathode. (3) Increase active device area: Since photons are only generated from perimeters of the cavities, the actual active area in a COLED device is smaller than the device surface area. The cavity diameter and cavity spacing of the COLED devices previously produced at SRI by conventional photolithography processing are typically in the range of 3 to 7 {mu}m with an estimated active area of 2-3%. To achieve the same brightness of a traditional OLED at the same applied voltage, the active device area of a COLED should be at least 20% (1/5) of the device surface area, provided the COLED has 5 times higher EQE. This requires reducing the cavity diameter and cavity spacing to the sub-micrometer region, which can be achieved by electron-beam lithography or nanoimprint lithography. (4) Improve metal/polymer interfaces: The polymer/metal interfaces are critical issues to improve and optimize since they directly affect the effectiveness and balance of hole and electron injection, and consequently the device performance. Conventional approaches for improving a metal/polymer interface include deposition of a special interfacial material on the selected electrode surface or applying a proper surface treatment prior to deposition of the LEP. Since these approaches are generally nonselective to the cathode and anode, they cannot be directly adopted for COLED devices. Generally, the interface integration in current OLED technology still needs a better chemical approach. Hence, advanced methodology developed for the COLED technology as promoted in this project may be also suitable for other OLED devices.

  17. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 1. Prompt-gamma-ray measurements. Part 3. The measurement of transit time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, W.C.

    1985-04-01

    This report describes the procedures followed in measuring the transit time of the atomic explosions evaluated in Operation Greenhouse. It includes a description of the equipment used, the installations made, and the results obtained. Transmit time measurements were obtainded for the Easy, George and Item Shots; and on the whole, the transit-time recording equipment performed well.

  18. Testing the performance of real-time incinerator emission monitors. Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghorishi, S.B.; Whitworth, W.E.; Goldman, C.G.; Waterland, L.R.

    1997-03-01

    Ten prototypes of continuous emission monitors (CEMs) for measuring trace metal or trace organic species concentrations were tested. Of the 10 CEMs tested, four measured incinerator flue gas concentrations of several specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs), one measured total particulate-bound polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations, two measured flue gas concentrations of several (up to 14) trace metals, and three measured mercury concentrations. While the testing consisted of obtaining quantitative measurement data on the four measures of CEM performance checked in a relative accuracy test audit (RATA) as described in 40 CFR 60 Appendix F -- relative accuracy (RA), calibration drift (CD), zero drift (ZD), and response time - the primary project objective focused on the RA measurement. Four series of tests were performed, each simultaneously testing up to three monitors measuring the same or similar analyte type. Each test series consisted of performing triplicate Reference Method (RM) measurements at each of three target flue gas monitored analyte concentrations while the tested CEMs were in operation.

  19. Synthesis of oxygenate products for high volume fuels applications. Quarterly status report No. 3 for the period April through June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-09-26

    A rudimentary process variables study of the reaction of acetylene with methanol indicates high activity for the formation of ethanol, n- propanol, and i-butanol with a pure low temperature activated MgO catalyst. Initial results indicate that higher conversions and space- time yields may be obtainable by operation at higher temperatures and reactant feed rates, respectively. Also, ethanol formation was consistently observed to rise with decreasing reaction temperature between 454{degrees}C and 370{degrees}C. A 10% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MgO catalyst exhibited high activity for methanol-dimethyl ether interconversion but was not very active for the condensation of these reactants to either the product alcohols or their methyl ethers. Neither catalyst exhibited significant activity for the condensation to dimethyl ether/water with acetylene to form such products. This lack of activity in the ether systems is attributed to insufficient hydrolysis of dimethyl ether to methanol, and it is expected that feeds containing additional water or methanol (which produces water via condensation) will exhibit higher activity. The aluminum- containing catalyst exhibited diminished condensation activity possibly as a result of deactivation of Mg sites by Al sites. The overall objective of this project is to develop catalyst and process technology for evaluation as potential routes for the production of high volume fuel oxygenates.

  20. Synthesis of oxygenate products for high volume fuels applications. Quarterly status report No. 4 for the period July through September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-12-29

    A rudimentary process variables study of the reaction of acetylene with methanol indicates high activity for the formation of ethanol, n- propanol, and i-butanol with a pure low temperature activated MgO catalyst. Initial results indicate that higher conversions and space- time yields may be obtainable by operation at higher temperatures and reactant feed rates, respectively. Also, ethanol formation was consistently observed to rise with decreasing reaction temperature between 454{degrees}C and 370{degrees}C. A 10% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MgO catalyst exhibited high activity for methanol-dimethyl ether interconversion but was not very active for the condensation of these reactants to either the product alcohols or their methyl ethers. Neither catalyst exhibited significant activity for the condensation of dimethyl ether/water with acetylene to form such products. This lack of activity in the ether systems us attributed to insufficient hydrolysis of dimethyl ether to methanol, and it is expected that feeds containing additional water or methanol (which produces water via condensation) will exhibit higher activity. The aluminum- containing catalyst exhibited diminished condensation activity possibly as the result of deactivation of Mg sites by Al sites. The overall objective of this project is to develop catalyst and process technology for evaluation as potential routes for the production of high volume fuel oxygenates.

  1. Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY11 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Casella, Andrew M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Warren, Glen A.

    2011-09-30

    Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration, of which PNNL is a part, to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today's confirmatory assay methods. This document is a progress report for FY2011 PNNL analysis and algorithm development. Progress made by PNNL in FY2011 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS analysis and algorithms applied to used fuel. PNNL developed an empirical model based on calibration of the LSDS to responses generated from well-characterized used fuel. The empirical model, which accounts for self-shielding effects using empirical basis vectors calculated from the singular value decomposition (SVD) of a matrix containing the true self-shielding functions of the used fuel assembly models. The potential for the direct and independent assay of the sum of the masses of 239Pu and 241Pu to within approximately 3% over a wide used fuel parameter space was demonstrated. Also, in FY2011, PNNL continued to develop an analytical model. Such efforts included the addition of six more non-fissile absorbers in the analytical shielding function and the non-uniformity of the neutron flux across the LSDS assay chamber. A hybrid analytical-empirical approach was developed to determine the mass of total Pu (sum of the masses of 239Pu, 240Pu, and 241Pu), which is an important quantity in safeguards. Results using this hybrid method were of approximately the same accuracy as the pure empirical approach. In addition, total Pu with much better accuracy with the hybrid approach than the pure analytical approach. In FY2012, PNNL will continue efforts to optimize its empirical model and minimize its reliance on calibration data. In addition, PNNL will continue to develop an analytical model, considering effects such as neutron-scattering in the fuel and cladding, as well as neutrons streaming through gaps between fuel pins in the fuel assembly.

  2. Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1983-1984 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scully, Richard J.; Buettner, Edwin W.

    1985-12-01

    Hatcheries released 9.3 million chinook salmon and 6.3 million steelhead smolts and presmolts upriver from Lower Granite Reservoir for migration In spring, 1984. We operated smolt monitoring traps at Whitebird from March 14 to May 12, Snake River from March 22 to May 15 and Clearwater from March 29 to May 13. Peak passage of yearling chinook salmon occurred the third week In April at both Whitebird and Snake River traps. Passage of steelhead was still increasing when high water stopped trapping in mid-May. Median migration rates for branded chinook salmon between release sites and Whitebird were 3, 17 and 15 miles/day for Rapid River, South Fork Salmon and Decker Flat smolts, respectively, an average of 11.6 miles/day. Average migration rate for these three groups between Whitebird and Snake River trap was 28 miles/day. Average migration rate between release sites and Snake River (the head of Lower Granite Reservoir) was 13.2 miles/day and from that point on through the reservoir to the dam, 1.9 miles/day. Salmon River discharge, when considered along with other environmental factors, had the greatest effect on migration rate of smolts branded both at hatcheries and at the Whitebird trap and migrating to the head of Lower Granite Reservoir. Migration rate for steelhead released from Dworshak Hatchery and recaptured at the Clearwater trap was 34 miles/day. Survival rates to the Snake River trap of branded chinook salmon smolts released at Hells Canyon Dam, Rapid River, South Fork Salmon and Decker Flat were 52%, 65%, 68% and 35%, respectively. Classical descaling, where at least 40% of the scales are missing from at least two of five areas on the side of a smolt, ranged from 0 to 5.3% at hatcheries for chinook salmon and was less than 1% for steelhead. Descaling rate often Increased about 1% at release sites. Classical descaling at Whitebird, Clearwater and Snake River traps averaged 4.5, 2.5 and 1.5% for chinook salmon, 2.1, 0.4 and 1.4% for wild steelhead and 8.7, 4.1 and 5.5% for hatchery steelhead, respectively. Scattered descaling, where at least 10% of scales are missing from at least one side of a fish, was always more extensive than was classical descaling, ranging from 2.5 times greater for Clearwater hatchery steelhead to 6.8 times greater for Clearwater wild steelhead. Mean total length of chinook salmon yearlings was the same at all the traps, i.e., 128 mm (117 mm fork length) + 1 mm. The largest chinook salmon smolts came from Dworshak National Fish Hatchery on the Clearwater River. Hatchery steelhead were smallest (2 = 203 mm) at the Clearwater trap and largest (2 = 239 mm) at the Whitebird trap. Wild steelhead were also smallest at Clearwater trap ({bar x} = 178 mm) and largest at Whitebird trap ({bar x} = 193 mm). Purse seining to evaluate rates of descaling before and after smolts passed Lower Granite Dam was largely ineffective since we were unable to catch sufficient numbers of smolts in the tailrace, and winds in the forebay area altered descaling rates in sampled smolts.

  3. Closeout Report - Search for Time Reversal Symmetry Violation with TREK at J-PARC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohl, Michael

    2015-04-15

    This DOE Early Career Award has enabled Dr. Michael Kohl to take on and expand his leadership roles in several projects such as TREK@J-PARC, OLYMPUS@DESY, MUSE@PSI, and in the experimental program in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. Dr. Kohl has successfully accomplished several items: (i) Preliminary results from SANE (E08-003) at Jefferson Lab: Former HU graduate student Anusha Liyanage has pursued her PhD research on SANE. Her analysis of the elastic ep scattering data has resulted in the extraction of the proton electric-to-magnetic form factor ratio from double spin asymmetries at the highest momentum transfer to date. The results are almost final and a publication is in preparation. (ii) Approval of TREK/E36 for running, preparation of simulation and analysis: the TREK experiment has been stage-II approved in fall 2013, has been mounted on the hall floor from November 2014 to April 2015, has been commissioned in April-June 2015 and is scheduled to run in fall 2015. The group has contributed significantly with simulations and magnetic field map calculations, has investigated the sensitivity of TREK to new light neutral particles, and contributed substantially to the mounting and commissioning of the experiment. (iii) Running of OLYMPUS and analysis: Under Dr. Kohl's leadership as spokesman, the OLYMPUS experiment has completed data taking beginning of 2013; calibrations and analysis have been well underway, with results to be expected in the course of 2015. (iv) Operation of GEM detectors at OLYMPUS and MUSE: The GEM telescopes built for OLYMPUS luminosity monitoring with forward-angle ep elastic scattering have been operated successfully, have meanwhile been relocated to PSI, and have been re-commissioned as beam particle trackers for the PSI secondary beams for MUSE. (v) Trained and prepared postdocs and graduate students for their future careers. Two postdocs from Dr. Kohl's group (Dr. Juergen Diefenbach and Dr. Peter Monaghan) have found permanent academic positions. Two former graduate students of the group have graduated and received their PhD degrees in nuclear physics (Dr. Anusha Liyanage and Dr. Ozgur Ates). In particular, this award has enabled Dr. Kohl to pursue the TREK project (Time Reversal Experiment with Kaons) at J-PARC, which he has been leading and advancing as International Spokesperson. Originally proposed as a search for time reversal symmetry violation [6], the project has evolved into a precision test of lepton flavor universality in the Standard Model along with sensitive searches for physics beyond the Standard Model through a possible discovery of new particles such as a sterile neutrino or a neutral gauge boson from the hidden sector in the mass region up to 300 MeV/c2 [7]. Experiment TREK/E36, first proposed in 2010, has been mounted between November 2014 and April 2015, and commissioning with beam has been started in April 2015, with production running anticipated in early summer and late fall 2015. It uses the apparatus from the previous KEK/E-246 experiment with partial upgrades to measure the ratio of decay widths of leptonic two-body decays of the charged kaon to µ? and e?, respectively, which is highly sensitive to the ratio of electromagnetic charged lepton couplings and possible new physics processes that could differentiate between ? and e, hence breaking lepton flavor universality of the Standard Model. Through the searches for neutral massive particles, TREK/E36 can severely constrain any new physics scenarios designed to explain the proton radius puzzle [12, 13].

  4. Final Technical Report of project: "Contactless Real-Time Monitoring of Paper Mechanical Behavior During Papermaking"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emmanuel Lafond; Paul Ridgway; Ted Jackson; Rick Russo; Ken Telschow; Vance Deason; Yves Berthelot; David Griggs; Xinya Zhang; Gary Baum

    2005-08-30

    The early precursors of laser ultrasonics on paper were Prof. Y. Berthelot from the Georgia Institute of Technology/Mechanical Engineering department, and Prof. P. Brodeur from the Institute of Paper Science and Technology, both located in Atlanta, Georgia. The first Ph.D. thesis that shed quite some light on the topic, but also left some questions unanswered, was completed by Mont A. Johnson in 1996. Mont Johnson was Prof. Berthelot's student at Georgia Tech. In 1997 P. Brodeur proposed a project involving himself, Y. Berthelot, Dr. Ken Telschow and Mr. Vance Deason from INL, Honeywell-Measurex and Dr. Rick Russo from LBNL. The first time the proposal was not accepted and P. Brodeur decided to re-propose it without the involvement from LBNL. Rick Russo proposed a separate project on the same topic on his side. Both proposals were finally accepted and work started in the fall of 1997 on the two projects. Early on, the biggest challenge was to find an optical detection method which could detect laser-induced displacements of the web surface that are of the order of .1 micron in the ultrasonic range. This was to be done while the web was having an out-of-plane amplitude of motion in the mm range due to web flutter; while moving at 10 m/s to 30 m/s in the plane of the web, on the paper machine. Both teams grappled with the same problems and tried similar methods in some cases, but came up with two similar but different solutions one year later. The IPST, GT, INL team found that an interferometer made by Lasson Technologies Inc. using the photo-induced electro-motive force in Gallium Arsenide was able to detect ultrasonic waves up to 12-15 m/s. It also developed in house an interferometer using the Two-Wave Mixing effect in photorefractive crystals that showed good promises for on-line applications, and experimented with a scanning mirror to reduce motion-induced texture noise from the web and improve signal to noise ratio. On its side, LBNL had the idea to combine a commercial Mach-Zehnder interferometer to a spinning mirror synchronized to the web speed, in order to make almost stationary measurements. The method was demonstrated at up to 10 m/s. Both teams developed their own version of a web simulator that was driving a web of paper at 10 m/s or higher. The Department of Energy and members of the Agenda 2020 started to make a push for merging the two projects. This made sense because their topics were really identical but this was not well received by Prof. Brodeur. Finally IPST decided to reassign the direction of the IPST-INL-GT project in the spring of 1999 to Prof. Chuck Habeger so that the two teams could work together. Also at this time, Honeywell-Measurex dropped as a member of the team. It was replaced by ABB Industrial Systems whose engineers had extensive previous experience of working with ultrasonic sensors on paperboard. INL also finished its work on the project as its competencies were partly redundant with LBNL. From the summer of 1999, the IPST-GT and LBNL teams were working together and helped each other often by collaborating and visiting either laboratory when was necessary. Around the beginning of 2000, began an effort at IPST to create an off-line laser-ultrasonics instrument that could perform automated measurements of paper and paperboard's bending stiffness. It was widely known that the mechanical bending tests of paper used for years by the paper industry were very inaccurate and exhibited poor reproducibility; therefore the team needed a new instrument of reference to validate its future on-line results. In 1999-2000, the focus of the on-line instrument was on a pre-industrial demonstration on a pilot coater while reducing the damage to the web caused by the generation laser, below the threshold where it could be visible by the naked eye. During the spring of 2000 Paul Ridgway traveled to IPST and brought with him a redesigned system still using the same Mach-Zehnder interferometer as before, but this time employing an electric motor-driven spinning mirror instead of the previously belt-driven m

  5. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER FINAL RECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1, 1999 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2002 REV. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH, RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-12-01

    OAK-B135 Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy [1-1,1-2]. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties [1-3,1-4]. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.''

  6. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; Artificial Imprinting of Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon (Oncorhynchus Nerka) with Synthetic Chemicals: Measurement of Thyroxine Content as an Indicator of the Sensitive Period for Imprinting to Olfactory Cues; 1992 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholz, Allan T.; White, Ronald J.; Tilson, Mary Beth [Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    In 1991, we initiated studies to determine the critical period for thyroxine-induced olfactory imprinting in kokanee salmon. In our preliminary investigation we found that thyroxine [T{sub 4}] levels of Lake Whatcom stock, 1990 year class, kokanee were relatively high in eggs and alevins as compared to post-swimup fry, and peaked at hatch and swimup. Here we report on follow-up studies conducted in 1992 designed to determine if our initial results could be replicated. Additionally, in 1992, we initiated experiments to determine if kokanee could be imprinted to synthetic chemicals--morpholine and phenethyl alcohol--at different life stages. In 1991, whole body thyroxine content [T{sub 4}] was measured in 460 Lake Whatcom stock kokanee and 480 Lake Pend Orielle (Cabinet Gorge) stock kokanee to indicate the critical period for imprinting. Lots of 20 kokanee eggs, alevins and fry from both stocks, reared at the Spokane Tribal hatchery, were collected at weekly intervals from November 1991 to August 1992 and assayed for T{sub 4} content by radioimmunoassay. T{sub 4} levels were monitored in Lake Whatcom stock, 1991 year class fish, from eyed egg (33 days post-fertilization) to fry (248 days post-fertilization) stages. T{sub 4} concentration ({+-} SEM) in eggs was 6.7 {+-} 1.3 rig/g body weight. T{sub 4} peaked on the day of hatch at 13.1 {+-} 2.5 ng/g body weight, then declined to 10.3 {+-} 1.1 ng/g body weight in recently post-hatch alevins. T{sub 4} peaked again at 22.1 {+-} 5.2 ng/g body weight during swimup, then steadily decreased to about 1.0 ng/g body weight in 176-248 day old fry. T{sub 4} levels were monitored in Lake Pend Orielle stock, 1991 year class, fish from the day of fertilization (day 0) to 225 days post-fertilization. T{sub 4} content of eggs was 9.5 {+-} 1.7 ng/g body weight and peaked on the day of hatch (day 53 post-fertilization) at 24.2 {+-} 4.5 ng/g body weight. After declining to 13.0 {+-} 2.9 ng/g body weight on day 81 post-fertilization, T{sub 4} peaked a second time during swimup (88-95 days post-fertilization) at 24.3 {+-} 3.8 ng/g body weight. After swimup, T{sub 4} concentration steadily declined to about 0.6 ng/g body weight in 225 day old post-fertilization fry. Thus, results of our 1992 investigations were consistent with our preliminary 1991 study. In all cases: (1) T{sub 4} concentration was relatively high in eggs and alevins as compared to older fry; and (2) T{sub 4} peaks occurred at hatch and swimup. Blood serum T{sub 4} concentration was measured in 9 month to 21 month-old Lake Whatcom stock, 1990 year class, kokanee from July 1991 to August 1992. T{sub 4} concentrations were low in summer, peaked slightly in October, were low in early winter, then peaked several times between January and May 1992. Thus, the 1990 year class Lake Whatcom kokanee evidenced high T{sub 4} activity from egg to swimup stages in their first year and in the winter and spring of their second year of life. The fish appeared to undergo smolt transformation between 16-18 months old. In 1992, Lake Whatcom (1991 cohort) kokanee were exposed to synthetic chemicals--1,072,000 to morpholine and 1,117,000 to phenethyl alcohol--at different life history stages: (1) eye to hatch; (2) hatch; (3) hatch to swimup; (4) swimup; and (5) post-swimup fry (in February, March, April and May-June). Additionally, Lake Whatcom (1990 cohort) kokanee were exposed to synthetic chemicals--36,000 to morpholine and 51,600 to phenethyl alcohol--at age 16-18 months. Most of these fish were marked and released in Lake Roosevelt in July and August 1992 as part of a field test. A portion of the fish from each group was retained at the Spokane Tribal hatchery until August-October 1993, when behavioral tests will be conducted to determine if the fish imprinted to their exposure odor.

  7. Investigation of a rotary valving system with variable valve timing for internal combustion engines: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, P.C.; Hansen, C.N.

    1994-11-18

    The objective of the program was to provide a functional demonstration of the Hansen Rotary Valving System with Variable Valve timing (HRVS/VVT), capable of throttleless inlet charge control, as an alternative to conventional poppet-valves for use in spark ignited internal combustion engines. The goal of this new technology is to secure benefits in fuel economy, broadened torque band, vibration reduction, and overhaul accessibility. Additionally, use of the variable valve timing capability to vary the effective compression ratio is expected to improve multi-fuel tolerance and efficiency. Efforts directed at the design of HRVS components proved to be far more extensive than had been anticipated, ultimately requiring that proof-trial design/development work be performed. Although both time and funds were exhausted before optical or ion-probe types of in-cylinder investigation could be undertaken, a great deal of laboratory data was acquired during the course of the design/development work. This laboratory data is the basis for the information presented in this Final Report.

  8. Periodic Reward-Based Scheduling and Its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydin, Hakan

    catastrophic. Examples of real-time systems can be found in control systems of nuclear power plants, air36 Periodic Reward-Based Scheduling and Its Application to Power-Aware Real-Time Systems Hakan ........................... 36-9 Modeling Real-Time Workload and Energy on a Variable Speed CPU · Correlating Real-Time Power

  9. I. K. Konstantopoulos, P. J. Antsaklis, "Robust Stability of Linear Continuous and Discrete-Time Systems under Parametric Uncertainty," Technical Report of the ISIS (Interdisciplinary Studies of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    -Time Systems under Parametric Uncertainty," Technical Report of the ISIS (Interdisciplinary Studies of Intelligent Systems) Group, No. ISIS-94-006, Univ of Notre Dame, March 1994. #12;I. K. Konstantopoulos, P. J," Technical Report of the ISIS (Interdisciplinary Studies of Intelligent Systems) Group, No. ISIS-94-006, Univ

  10. Solar water heating technical support. Technical report for November 1997--April 1998 and final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huggins, J.

    1998-10-01

    This progress report covers the time period November 1, 1997 through April 30, 1998, and also summarizes the project as the final report. The topics of the report include certification of solar collectors for water heating systems, modeling and testing of solar collectors and gas water heater backup systems, ratings of collectors for specific climates, and solar pool heating systems.

  11. Groundwater Periodic Monitoring Reports | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping STD-1128-2013 April< BackGovernmentthe Watersheds at

  12. Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural GasNatural GasEIARegional energyEIA-782A

  13. Illinois Clean Coal Institute 2005 annual report. Final technical report for the period September 1st, 2004, through August 31, 2005 on projects funded by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2005-11-08

    This final technical report contains the abstracts and executive summaries of projects funded through the Illinois Clean Coal Institute solicitation entitled 'Request for proposals No. 04-1(ICCI/RFP04-1)'. Support of these projects is by the Office of Coal Development and Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity. The projects fall into the following categories: advanced coal mining technologies; coal preparation and coal production business practice; management of coal combustion byproducts; commercialization and technology transfer. Final project extensions are also recorded.

  14. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; Measurement of Thyroxin Concentration as an Indicator of the Critical Period for Imprinting in the Kokanee Salmon (Orcorhynchus Nerka) Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Hatcheries; 1991 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholz, Allan T.; White, Ronald J.; Koehler, Valerie A. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

    1992-05-01

    Previous investigations have determined that thyroid hormone surges activate olfactory imprinting in anadromous salmonid smolts. The mechanism of action appears to require binding of thyroid hormones to receptors in brain cell nuclei, which stimulates neuron differentiation and wires a pattern of neuron circuitry that allows for the permanent storage of the imprinted olfactory memory. In this study, thyroxine concentrations [T{sub 4}] were measured in 487 Lake Whatcom stock and 70 Lake Roosevelt stock Kokanee salmon to indicate the critical period for imprinting. Eggs, alevins and fry, reared at the Spokane Indian Kokanee Hatchery, were collected from January through August 1991. Sampled fish were flash frozen on dry ice and stored at {minus}80{degrees}C until T{sub 4} was extracted and concentrations determined by radioimmunassay. Mean concentration {+-} SEM of 10--20 individual fish (assayed in duplicate) were determined for each time period. T{sub 4} concentration peaked on the day of hatch at 16.8 ng/g body weight and again at swim-up at 16.0 {+-} 4.7 ng/g body weight. T{sub 4} concentration was 12.5 to 12.9 ng/g body weight in eggs, 7.1 to 15.2 ng/g body weight in. alevins, 4.5 to 11.4 ng/g body weight in 42 to 105 day old fry and 0.1 to 2.9 ng/g body weight in 112 to 185 day old fry. T{sub 4} concentrations were highest in eggs at 13.3 {+-} 2.8 ng/g body weight, then steadily decreased to 0.1 {+-} 0.1 ng/g body weight in older fry. Fry were released in Lake Roosevelt tributaries in July and August 1991, at about 170--180 days post hatching, in order to imprint them to those sites. The results of this study indicate that the time of release was not appropriate for imprinting. If T{sub 4} levels are an accurate guide for imprinting in kokanee, our results suggest that the critical period for imprinting in kokanee is at hatching or swim-up stages.

  15. Genealogy of periodic trajectories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Adguiar, M.A.M.; Maldta, C.P.; de Passos, E.J.V.

    1986-05-20

    The periodic solutions of non-integrable classical Hamiltonian systems with two degrees of freedom are numerically investigated. Curves of periodic families are given in plots of energy vs. period. Results are presented for this Hamiltonian: H = 1/2(p/sub x//sup 2/ + p/sub y//sup 2/) + 1/2 x/sup 2/ + 3/2 y/sup 2/ - x/sup 2/y + 1/12 x/sup 4/. Properties of the families of curves are pointed out. (LEW)

  16. Inference and Visualization of Periodic Sequences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Ying

    2011-10-21

    are evenly spaced in time. The period is estimated by a "leave-out-one-cycle" version of cross-validation (CV) and complements the periodogram, a widely used tool for period estimation. The CV method is computationally simple and implicitly penalizes...

  17. Fourier series and periodicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donal F. Connon

    2014-12-07

    A large number of the classical texts dealing with Fourier series more or less state that the hypothesis of periodicity is required for pointwise convergence. In this paper, we highlight the fact that this condition is not necessary.

  18. Holding Period Complete

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has published a Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), and the 30-day waiting period has ended. DOE is preparing a Record of Decision to announce and explain its chosen project alternative...

  19. NATIONAL EVALUATION OF THE WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM DURING THE ARRA PERIOD: PROGRAM YEARS 2009-2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward; Rose, Erin M; Schmoyer, Richard L; Eisenberg, Joel Fred; Ternes, Mark P; Schweitzer, Martin; Hendrick, Timothy P

    2012-08-01

    This report describes the third major evaluation of the Program, encompassing program years 2009 to 2011. In this report, this period of time is referred to as the ARRA Period. This is a special period of time for the Program because the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 has allocated $5 billion of funding for the Program. In normal program years, WAP s annual appropriation is in the range of $200-250 million, supporting the weatherization of approximately 100,000 homes. With the addition of ARRA funding during these program years, the expectation is that weatherization activity will exceed 300,000 homes per year. In addition to saving energy and reducing low-income energy bills, expanded WAP funding is expected to stimulate the economy by providing new jobs in the weatherization field and allowing low-income households to spend more money on goods and services by spending less on energy.

  20. Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAboutNuclear Nonproliferation ReportReports Reports

  1. Natural Gas Storage Report, Weekly EIA-AGA Comparison

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This report is intended to aid data users by examining differences between the Energy Information Administration and American Gas Association weekly surveys and comparing the results of the two surveys for the brief period of time in which they overlapped.

  2. SANDIA CONTRACTORS REPORT FATIGUE OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SANDIA CONTRACTORS REPORT FATIGUE OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS AND SUBSTRUCTURES FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES Abstract ThisreportpresentsthemajorfindingsoftheMontanaStateUniversityCompositeMaterialsFatigue Program Fatigue Database. Additions of greatest interest to the database in this time period include environmental

  3. Guidance on the Required Period for Grantees to Obligate Funds...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on the Required Period for Grantees to Obligate Funds and the Procedures for Reporting of Obligated Funds for the Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program...

  4. QM/MM description of periodic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doll, K

    2015-01-01

    A QM/MM implementation for periodic systems is reported. This is done for the case of molecules and for systems with two and three-dimensional periodicity, which is suitable to model electrolytes in contact with electrodes. Tests on different water-containing systems, ranging from the water dimer up to liquid water indicate the correctness of the scheme. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations are performed, as a possible direction to study realistic systems.

  5. FINAL REPORT ESTABLISHMENT AND MAINTENANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    #12;FINAL REPORT ESTABLISHMENT AND MAINTENANCE OF A MANNED LUNAR BASE IN THE TIME PERIOD 1970. Phase One: Presupply ......... . 1 2. Phase Two: Manned Lunar Landings . 6 3. Phase Three: Logistic Base Class Vehicles ...... . Competing Rendezvous Modes. Concepts: Manned Lunar Landings Logistic Base

  6. DURING THIS REPORTING PERIOD, WE ISSUED 39 REPORTS; IDENTIFIED

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    downloaded numerous images of child pornography onto his Department-issued computer. A search warrant at his residence resulted in the discovery of a larger child pornography...

  7. MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITIES AGREEMENT REPORT Report Period: January 1-

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700,Grand Junction Office This

  8. DURING THIS REPORTING PERIOD, WE ISSUED 39 REPORTS; IDENTIFIED

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratory | version of the1996of EnergyIdahoS . D EREPORTS;

  9. Technical and economic assessments of electrochemical energy storage systems: Volume 6, Zinc-Bromide battery plant description, cost estimate credible accident and efficiency assessment: Part 1, Energy Research Corporation battery design: Final report for the period September 1978-May 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J.; Binas, G.; Del Monaco, J.L.; Pandya, D.A.; Sharp, T.E.

    1985-06-05

    This document describes the ERC zinc-bromide battery module as the basic unit in the development of a battery load-leveling facility that will accumulate the output of base-load generation during periods of low demand and provide power for periods of high demands. (DLC)

  10. Reports

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnPandAlba Craft

  11. Reports

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnPandAlba Craftaehsed herewith

  12. https://www.employment.ucdavis.edu/userfiles/jsp/shared/reports/Report.jsp?time=1399397237289[5/6/2014 10:28:29 AM] Position Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    by a comprehensive programmatic environmental impact report. Develop land use plans for the diverse and extensive in the development process. The CPCR team, in addition to the campus planning function, is responsible space. This configuration leads to strong integration of sustainable strategies that merge long range

  13. A test for second order stationarity of a time series based on the Discrete Fourier Transform -Technical report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subba Rao, Suhasini

    A test for second order stationarity of a time series based on the Discrete Fourier Transform stationary. Exploiting this important property, we construct a Portmanteau type test statistic for testing stationarity of the time series. It is shown that under the null of stationarity, the test statistic has

  14. Short contact time direct coal liquefaction using a novel batch reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, September 15, 1995--January 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.; Huang, He

    1996-01-26

    The objective of this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (SCTBR) f or coal liquefaction at short contact times (0.01 to 10 minutes or longer). Additional objectives are to study the kinetics of direct coal liquefaction particularly at short reaction times, and to investigate the role of the organic oxygen components of coal and their reaction pathways during liquefaction. Many of those objectives have already been achieved and others are still in progress. This quarterly report covers further progress toward those objectives.

  15. Time Entry Form Overtime Eligible Staff & Temporaries Harvard Medical School Harvard School of Dental Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorf, Martin E.

    Time Entry Form ­ Overtime Eligible Staff & Temporaries Harvard Medical School Harvard School of Dental Medicine Action: Reported Time Prior Period Adjustment Name: Week Ending: Employee ID: Job Title: Dept: Job Rcd #: Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Time Type Tub Org Fund Activity Sub-Act Root Rate Comments

  16. Iterative prediction of chaotic time series using a recurrent neural network. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodruzzaman, M.; Essawy, M.A.

    1996-03-31

    Chaotic systems are known for their unpredictability due to their sensitive dependence on initial conditions. When only time series measurements from such systems are available, neural network based models are preferred due to their simplicity, availability, and robustness. However, the type of neural network used should be capable of modeling the highly non-linear behavior and the multi- attractor nature of such systems. In this paper we use a special type of recurrent neural network called the ``Dynamic System Imitator (DSI)``, that has been proven to be capable of modeling very complex dynamic behaviors. The DSI is a fully recurrent neural network that is specially designed to model a wide variety of dynamic systems. The prediction method presented in this paper is based upon predicting one step ahead in the time series, and using that predicted value to iteratively predict the following steps. This method was applied to chaotic time series generated from the logistic, Henon, and the cubic equations, in addition to experimental pressure drop time series measured from a Fluidized Bed Reactor (FBR), which is known to exhibit chaotic behavior. The time behavior and state space attractor of the actual and network synthetic chaotic time series were analyzed and compared. The correlation dimension and the Kolmogorov entropy for both the original and network synthetic data were computed. They were found to resemble each other, confirming the success of the DSI based chaotic system modeling.

  17. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 5. Neutron measurements. Part 3. High-energy spectrum (time-of-flight method)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, W.C.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the experiments performed to measure the energy spectrum of neutrons released in certain atomic-weapons tests in Operation Greenhouse. The measurements were made of two types: (1) the time-of-flight measurements designed to establish the fission neutron spectrum down to about 3 MeV energy, and (2) the so-called Tenex (Temperature-Neutron Experiment) measurements designed to obtain the velocity distribution of neutrons produced by the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions.

  18. Interim Report on Consumer Acceptance, Retention, and response to Time-based rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S. Department of Energy |June 2015 Interim Report on Impacts

  19. Final Report: Improved Site Characterization And Storage Prediction Through Stochastic Inversion Of Time-Lapse Geophysical And Geochemical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, A; Mcnab, W; Hao, Y; White, D; Johnson, J

    2011-04-14

    During the last months of this project, our project activities have concentrated on four areas: (1) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir bulk/shear moduli and density; the need for this inversion was not anticipated in the original scope of work, (2) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir porosity and permeability, (3) complete the software needed to perform geochemical inversions and (4) use the software to perform stochastic inversion of aqueous chemistry data to deduce mineral volume fractions. This report builds on work described in progress reports previously submitted (Ramirez et al., 2009, 2010, 2011 - reports fulfilled the requirements of deliverables D1-D4) and fulfills deliverable D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product. The main challenge with our stochastic inversion approach is its large computational expense, even for single reservoir patterns. We dedicated a significant level of effort to improve computational efficiency but inversions involving multiple patterns were still intractable by project's end. As a result, we were unable to fulfill Deliverable D6: Field-based multi-pattern simulations work product.

  20. Ball Packings with Periodic Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Connelly; Jeffrey D. Shen; Alexander D. Smith

    2013-01-04

    We call a periodic ball packing in d-dimensional Euclidean space periodically (strictly) jammed with respect to a period lattice if there are no nontrivial motions of the balls that preserve the period (that maintain some period with smaller or equal volume). In particular, we call a packing consistently periodically (strictly) jammed if it is periodically (strictly) jammed on every one of its periods. After extending a well-known bar framework and stress condition to strict jamming, we prove that a packing with period Lambda is consistently strictly jammed if and only if it is strictly jammed with respect to Lambda and consistently periodically jammed. We next extend a result about rigid unit mode spectra in crystallography to characterize periodic jamming on sublattices. After that, we prove that there are finitely many strictly jammed packings of m unit balls and other similar results. An interesting example shows that the size of the first sublattice on which a packing is first periodically unjammed is not bounded. Finally, we find an example of a consistently periodically jammed packing of low density \\delta = \\frac{4 \\pi}{6 \\sqrt{3} + 11} + \\epsilon ~ 0.59, where \\epsilon is an arbitrarily small positive number. Throughout the paper, the statements for the closely related notions of periodic infinitesimal rigidity and affine infinitesimal rigidity for tensegrity frameworks are also given.

  1. Emergent hyperuniformity in periodically-driven emulsions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joost H. Weijs; Raphaël Jeanneret; Rémi Dreyfus; Denis Bartolo

    2015-04-28

    We report the emergence of large-scale hyperuniformity in microfluidic emulsions. Upon periodic driving confined emulsions undergo a first-order transition from a reversible to an irreversible dynamics. We evidence that this dynamical transition is accompanied by structural changes at all scales yielding macroscopic yet finite hyperuniform structures. Numerical simulations are performed to single out the very ingredients responsible for the suppression of density fluctuations. We show that as opposed to equilibrium systems the long-range nature of the hydrodynamic interactions are not required for the formation of hyperuniform patterns, thereby suggesting a robust relation between reversibility and hyperuniformity which should hold in a broad class of periodically driven materials.

  2. Quantum transport calculations using periodic boundaryconditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2004-06-15

    An efficient new method is presented to calculate the quantum transports using periodic boundary conditions. This method allows the use of conventional ground state ab initio programs without big changes. The computational effort is only a few times of a normal groundstate calculations, thus is makes accurate quantum transport calculations for large systems possible.

  3. I. K. Konstantopoulos, P. J. Antsaklis, "Design of Output Feedback Controllers for Robust Stability and Optimal Performance of Discrete-Time Systems," Technical Report of the ISIS (Interdisciplinary Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    and Optimal Performance of Discrete-Time Systems," Technical Report of the ISIS (Interdisciplinary Studies of Intelligent Systems) Group, No. ISIS-94-009, Univ of Notre Dame, September 1994. #12;I. K. Konstantopoulos, P of Discrete-Time Systems," Technical Report of the ISIS (Interdisciplinary Studies of Intelligent Systems

  4. 10/21/2006 08:45 PMThe Maneater -New York Times reporter speaks about science Page 1 of 2http://www.themaneater.com/article.php?id=25068

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Rainer

    10/21/2006 08:45 PMThe Maneater - New York Times reporter speaks about science Page 1 of 2http://www.themaneater.com/article.php?id=25068 Darren Milosevich/The Maneater MU professor H.R. Chandrasekhar and New York Times reporter Claudia' on Saturday in the Life Sciences Center. Search Go News Outlook Forum Arts Sports Comics Classifieds New York

  5. Appendix 7 - Historic Preservation Reporting Form

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Number 1910 - 5155 U.S. Department of Energy HISTORIC PRESERVATION REPORT Historic Preservation Reporting Period: Grant Number: ...

  6. Nuclear Science Division, 1995--1996 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poskanzer, A.M. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) for the two-year period, January 1, 1995 to January 1, 1997. This was a time of major accomplishments for all research programs in the Division-many of which are highlighted in the reports of this document.

  7. Kepler and the long-period variables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartig, Erich; Lebzelter, Thomas [University of Vienna, Department of Astrophysics, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Cash, Jennifer [Department of Biological and Physical Sciences, South Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7024, Orangeburg, SC 29117 (United States); Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Mighell, Kenneth J. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Walter, Donald K., E-mail: erich.hartig@univie.ac.at, E-mail: thomas.lebzelter@univie.ac.at, E-mail: jcash@physics.scsu.edu, E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu, E-mail: mighell@noao.edu, E-mail: dkw@physics.scsu.edu [Department of Biological and Physical Sciences, South Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7296, Orangeburg, SC 29117 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    High-precision Kepler photometry is used to explore the details of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) light curves. Since AGB variability has a typical timescale on the order of a year, we discuss at length the removal of long-term trends and quarterly changes in Kepler data. Photometry for a small sample of nine semi-regular (SR) AGB stars is examined using a 30 minute cadence over a period of 45 months. While undergoing long-period variations of many magnitudes, the light curves are shown to be smooth at the millimagnitude level over much shorter time intervals. No flares or other rapid events were detected on a sub-day timescale. The shortest AGB period detected is on the order of 100 days. All the SR variables in our sample are shown to have multiple modes. This is always the first overtone, typically combined with the fundamental. A second common characteristic of SR variables is shown to be the simultaneous excitation of multiple closely separated periods for the same overtone mode. Approximately half the sample had a much longer variation in the light curve, likely a long secondary period (LSP). The light curves were all well represented by a combination of sinusoids. However, the properties of the sinusoids are time variable, with irregular variations present at low levels. No non-radial pulsations were detected. It is argued that the LSP variation seen in many SR variables is intrinsic to the star and linked to multiple mode pulsation.

  8. The periodicity of the eta Carinae events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Damineli; M. F. Corcoran; D. J. Hillier; O. Stahl; R. S. Levenhagen; N. V. Leister; J. H. Groh; M. Teodoro; J. F. Albacete Colombo; F. Gonzalez; J. Arias; H. Levato; M. Grosso; N. Morrell; R. Gamen; G. Wallerstein; V. Niemela

    2007-11-27

    Extensive spectral observations of eta Carinae over the last cycle, and particularly around the 2003.5 low excitation event, have been obtained. The variability of both narrow and broad lines, when combined with data taken from two earlier cycles, reveal a common and well defined period. We have combined the cycle lengths derived from the many lines in the optical spectrum with those from broad-band X-rays, optical and near-infrared observations, and obtained a period length of 2022.7+-1.3 d. Spectroscopic data collected during the last 60 years yield an average period of 2020+-4 d, consistent with the present day period. The period cannot have changed by more than $\\Delta$P/P=0.0007 since 1948. This confirms the previous claims of a true, stable periodicity, and gives strong support to the binary scenario. We have used the disappearance of the narrow component of HeI 6678 to define the epoch of the Cycle 11 minimum, T_0=JD 2,452,819.8. The next event is predicted to occur on 2009 January 11 (+-2 days). The dates for the start of the minimum in other spectral features and broad-bands is very close to this date, and have well determined time delays from the HeI epoch.

  9. Development of methods to objectively identify time spent using active and motorised modes of travel to work: how do self-reported measures compare?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panter, Jenna; Costa, Silvia; Dalton, Alice; Jones, Andy; Ogilvie, David

    2014-09-19

    to objectively identify time spent using active and motorised modes of travel to work: how do self-reported measures compare? Jenna Panter 1,2 , Silvia Costa 1,2 , Alice Dalton 2,3 , Andy Jones 2,3 and David Ogilvie 1,2 1 MRC Epidemiology Unit, School... , and surveillance. University of Chicago Law Review 2008, 75:47-74. 14. van Hees VT, Golubic R, Ekelund U, Brage S: Impact of study design on development and evaluation of an activity-type classifier. Journal of Applied Physiology 2013, 114:1042-1051. 15...

  10. Stable a-Si:H Based Multijunction Solar Cells with Guidance from Real Time Optics: Annual Report, Phase I: 17 July 1998-16 October 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wronski, C.R.; Collins, R.W.; Jiao, L.; Ferlauto, A.; Rovira, P.I.; Koval, R.J.; Lu, Z.; Niu, X.

    2000-08-29

    This summary describes tasks of novel improved intrinsic materials for multijunction solar cells, insights into improved stability in materials and solar cells, optimization of solar cell performance with improved intrinsic layers, and optimization of multijunction solar cells. The report characterizes a protocrystalline a-Si:H film growth regime where thin samples retain their amorphous state when their growth time or thickness is limited to small values, even when films are deposited with high hydrogen dilution that results in microcrystalline thick films. The Staebler-Wronski degradation kinetics of films and devices are systematically studied as a function of hydrogen dilution.

  11. Periodicals collection management using a decision support system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compton, M.L.; Moser, E.C.

    1993-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram national laboratory established in 1949. The Library currently uses DOBIS for its automated system, including the Periodicals Control function for periodical check-in. DOBIS performs processing and control functions adequately, but could not meet our reporting needs. Therefore the Library`s Periodicals Decision Team decided that they needed another ``system`` for collection management. A Periodicals Decision Support System was created using information downloaded from DOBIS and uploaded into dBASE IV. The Periodical Decision Support System functions as an information-processing system that has aided us in making collection management decisions for periodicals. It certainly allows us to do interactive ad-hoc analysis; although there are no modeling tools currently incorporated in the system. We hope that these modeling tools will come later. We have been gathering information and developing needed reports to achieve this goal.

  12. Stable a-Si:H-Based Multijunction Solar Cells with Guidance from Real-Time Optics: Final Report, 17 July 1998--16 November 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wronski, C. R.; Collins, R. W.; Pearce, J. M.; Koval, R. J.; Ferlauto, A. S.; Ferreira, G. M.; Chen C.

    2002-08-01

    This report describes the new insights obtained into the growth of hydrogenated silicon (Si:H) films via real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry (RTSE) measurements. Evolutionary phase diagrams were expanded to include the effects of different deposition conditions, including rf power, pressure, and temperature. Detailed studies of degradation kinetics in thin films and corresponding solar cells have been carried out. Both p-i-n and n-i-p solar cells that incorporate Si:H i-layers deposited with and without H2-dilution have been studied. For the first time, direct and reliable correlations have been obtained between the light-induced changes in thin-film materials and the degradation of the corresponding solar cells.

  13. National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, Eva

    1999-05-01

    National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report for period October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998

  14. Solar/hydrogen systems for the 1985 to 2000 time frame. Volume I. Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Escher, W. J.D.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-01

    The findings of a study of opportunities for commercialization of systems capable of producing hydrogen from solar energy are presented in two volumes. A compendium of monographs by specialists in the fields of solar energy conversion technologies, hydrogen production technologies and related technology descriptions from the general literature comprise Volume II. This data base was used to support an evaluation and selection process that identified four candidate solar/hydrogen systems best suited to commercialization within the next two decades. Volume I first reviews the background of the work and the methods used. Then an evaluation of the hydrogen product costs that might be achieved by the four selected candidate systems (photovoltaic/water electrolysis, thermal-heat engine/water electrolysis, wind energy/water electrolysis, small hydrogen/water electrolysis) is compared with the pricing structure and practices of the commodity gas market. Subsequently, product cost and market price match is noted to exist in the small user sector of the hydrogen marketplace. Barriers to and historical time lags in, commercialization of new technologies are then reviewed. Finally, recommendations for development and demonstration programs designed to accelerate the commercialization of the candidate systems are presented.

  15. Homogenization of linear spatially periodic electronic Michel Lenczner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homogenization of linear spatially periodic electronic circuits Michel Lenczner January 20, 2006 Abstract: In this paper we establish a simplified model of general spatially periodic linear electronic is reported. 1 Introduction It is well known that when the size of an analog electronic network increases too

  16. Classical Propagation of Light in Spatio-Temporal Periodic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrov, B S; Findikoglu, A T; Bishop, A R; Kostadinov, I Z

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the propagation of electromagnetic waves in media where the dielectric constants undergo rapid temporal periodic modulation. Both spatially homogeneous and periodic media are studied. Fast periodic temporal modulation of the dielectric constant of a homogeneous medium leads to existence of photonic band-gap like phenomena. In the presence of both spatial and tem- poral periodicity the electromagnetic spectrum is described in a four-dimensional cube, defining an effective Brillouin zone. In the case of incommensurability between space and time periodicities, completely dispersed point spectra exist.

  17. Time period Annual mean [DOC] 95% CI (mg l-1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    can we measure the impacts on peatland? Streamwater can be sampled upstream and downstream downstream of forest felling were mostly higher than the sampling points upstream. The mean concentrations the results show? There has been a slight increase in [DOC] downstream of forest felling, tracks, turbine

  18. Time-periodic solutions of the Benjamin-Ono equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambrose, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    application to Benjamin Ono equation. Chinese Physics, 14(solutions of Hamiltonian equations. In Dynamics and Pro-quelques generalisations de l’equation de Korteweg-deVries.

  19. Application of reservoir characterization and advanced technology to improve recovery and economics in a lower quality shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. End of budget period report, August 3, 1994--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, A.R.; Hinterlong, G.; Watts, G.; Justice, J.; Brown, K.; Hickman, T.S.

    1997-12-01

    The Oxy West Welch project is designed to demonstrate how the use of advanced technology can improve the economics of miscible CO{sub 2} injection projects in a lower quality shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. The research and design phase primarily involves advanced reservoir characterization and accelerating the production response. The demonstration phase will implement the reservoir management plan based on an optimum miscible CO{sub 2} flood as designed in the initial phase. During Budget Period 1, work was completed on the CO{sub 2} stimulation treatments and the hydraulic fracture design. Analysis of the CO{sub 2} stimulation treatment provided a methodology for predicting results. The hydraulic fracture treatment proved up both the fracture design approach a and the use of passive seismic for mapping the fracture wing orientation. Although the 3-D seismic interpretation is still being integrated into the geologic model and interpretation of borehole seismic is still underway, the simulator has been enhanced to the point of giving good waterflood history matches. The simulator-forecasted results for an optimal designed miscible CO{sub 2} flood in the demonstration area gave sufficient economics to justify continuation of the project into Budget Period 2.

  20. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transportation Security, Transportation Modes, Entrepreneurship, Geographic Information System, STEM System College Station, Texas 77843-3135 13. Type of Report and Period Covered Final Report 14: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, Virginia 22161 19. Security

  1. Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier Series 23.2 Introduction In this Section we show how, then the Fourier series expansion takes the form: f(t) = a0 2 + n=1 (an cos nt + bn sin nt) Our main purpose here Fourier coefficients of a function of period 2 calculate Fourier coefficients of a function of general

  2. Shortest recurrence periods of novae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Mariko [Department of Astronomy, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8521 (Japan); Saio, Hideyuki [Astronomical Institute, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Hachisu, Izumi [Department of Earth Science and Astronomy, College of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Nomoto, Ken'ichi, E-mail: mariko@educ.cc.keio.ac.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-10-01

    Stimulated by the recent discovery of the 1 yr recurrence period nova M31N 2008-12a, we examined the shortest recurrence periods of hydrogen shell flashes on mass-accreting white dwarfs (WDs). We discuss the mechanism that yields a finite minimum recurrence period for a given WD mass. Calculating the unstable flashes for various WD masses and mass accretion rates, we identified a shortest recurrence period of about two months for a non-rotating 1.38 M {sub ?} WD with a mass accretion rate of 3.6 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}. A 1 yr recurrence period is realized for very massive (? 1.3 M {sub ?}) WDs with very high accretion rates (? 1.5 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}). We revised our stability limit of hydrogen shell burning, which will be useful for binary evolution calculations toward Type Ia supernovae.

  3. Increased Levels of Harvest and Habitat Law Enforcement and Public Awareness for Anadromous Salmonids and Resident Fish in the Columbia River Basin -- Demonstration Period, 1992--1994, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NeSmith, Frank; Long, Mack; Matthews, Dayne

    1995-06-01

    This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, as part of BPA`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Illegal harvest and violation of habitat protection regulations are factors affecting the survival of many native species of anadromous and resident fish in the Columbia Basin.

  4. 3D-PSTD for modelling second harmonic generation in periodically poled lithium niobate ridge-type waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devaux, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    We report an application of the tri-dimensional pseudo-spectral time domain algorithm, that solves with accuracy the nonlinear Maxwell's equations, to predict second harmonic generation in lithium niobate ridge-type waveguides with high index contrast. Characteristics of the nonlinear process such as conversion efficiency as well as impact of the multimode character of the waveguide are investigated as a function of the waveguide geometry in uniformly and periodically poled medium.

  5. Dwarf Nova-like Outburst of Short Period Intermediate Polar HT Camelopardalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryoko Ishioka; Taichi Kato; Makoto Uemura; Gary W. Billings; Koichi Morikawa; Ken'ichi Torii; Kenji Tanabe; Arto Oksanen; Harri Hyvonen; Hitoshi Itoh

    2002-06-12

    We report the first time-series observations of the short outburst of the proposed intermediate polar HT Cam (=RX J0757.0+6306). On 2001 December 29, we detected the object was undergoing a bright outburst at the magnitude of $m_{vis}=12.2$. Following this detection, we started international joint observations through VSNET. The light curve showed a gradual decline for the first 0.5 d. Following this short plateau phase, the rate of decline dramatically increased to more than 4 mag d$^{-1}$. Within 1.5 d from the outburst detection, the object almost declined to the quiescent level. During the rapidly declining phase, long-term modulations with a period of 86 min and strong pulses with a period of 8.6 min were observed. We concluded that 86 min and 8.6 min are the orbital period and the spin period of HT Cam, respectively. By the detection of the spin period, we confirmed the IP classification of HT Cam. However, its outburst behavior rather resembles that of dwarf novae. The discrepancy between the declining rates of the total flux and the pulse flux strongly suggests that the disk instabilities were taking place during the outburst.

  6. Discovery of four periodic methanol masers and updated light curve for a further one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szymczak, M; Bartkiewicz, A

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of 6.7 GHz methanol maser periodic flares in four massive star forming regions and the updated light curve for the known periodic source G22.357+0.066. The observations were carried out with the Torun 32 m radio telescope between June 2009 and April 2014. Flux density variations with period of 120 to 245 d were detected for some or all spectral features. A variability pattern with a fast rise and relatively slow fall on time-scale of 30-60 d dominated. A reverse pattern was observed for some features of G22.357+0.066, while sinusoidal-like variations were detected in G25.411+0.105. A weak burst lasting ~520 d with the velocity drift of 0.24 km/s/yr occurred in G22.357+0.066. For three sources for which high resolution maps are available, we found that the features with periodic behaviour are separated by more than 500 au from those without any periodicity. This suggests that the maser flares are not triggered by large-scale homogeneous variations in either the background seed photon fl...

  7. Competitive Multi-period Pricing with Fixed Inventories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perakis, Georgia

    This paper studies the problem of multi-period pricing for perishable products in a competitive (oligopolistic) market. We study non cooperative Nash equilibrium policies for sellers. At the beginning of the time horizon, ...

  8. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Technical progress report for the period of April--June, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitts, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this study of the West Kiehl is to (1) quantify the incremental oil produced from the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project by classical engineering and numerical simulation techniques, (2) quantify the effect of chemical slug volume on incremental oil in the two swept areas of the field, (3) determine the economics of the application of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology, (4) forecast the results of injecting an alkaline--surfactant-polymer solution to mature waterfloods and polymer floods, and (5) provide the basis for independent operators to book additional oil reserves by using the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology. This report will document the numerical simulation waterflood, polymer flood, alkaline-surfactant flood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood predictions from the West Kiehl and Prairie Creek South fields.

  9. Self-reported Impacts of LED Lighting Technology Compared to Fuel-based Lighting on Night Market Business Prosperity in Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Time period Pre 07/2008 Lighting Technology (Nightly Cost,2 Self-reported Impacts of LED Lighting Technology Comparedto Fuel-based Lighting on Night Market Business Prosperity

  10. Final Technical Report Advanced Anchoring Technology DOE Award Number DE-EE0003632 Project Period 09/10 -Ã?Â?Ã?Â?Ã?Â?Ã?Â? 09/12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meggitt, Dallas J.

    2012-11-09

    It is generally conceded that the costs associated with current practices for the mooring, anchoring, or foundation systems of Marine HydroKinetic (MHK) and Deepwater Floating Wind systems are a disproportionate portion of the total cost of an installed system. Reducing the cost of the mooring and anchoring components for MHK systems can contribute substantially to reducing the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). Micropile anchors can reduce the LCOE both directly, because the anchors, associated mooring hardware and installation costs are less than conventional anchor and mooring systems, but also because micropile anchors require less extensive geotechnical surveys for confident design and proper implementation of an anchor or foundation system. This report presents the results of the development of critical elements of grouted marine micropile anchor (MMA) technology for application to MHK energy conversion systems and other ocean engineering applications that require fixing equipment to the seafloor. Specifically, this project identified grout formulations and developed designs for grout dispensing systems suitable for use in a seawater environment as a critical development need for successful implementation of practical MMA systems. The project conducted a thorough review of available information on the use of cement-based grouts in seawater. Based on this review and data available from commercial sources, the project selected a range of grout formulations for testing as part of a micropile system. The project also reviewed instrumentation for measuring grout density, pressure and flow rate, and integrated an instrumentation system suitable for use with micropile installation. The grout formulations and instrumentation system were tested successfully and demonstrated the suitability of MMA technology for implementation into anchor systems for MHK and other marine renewable energy systems. In addition, this project developed conceptual designs for micropile anchor systems and the associated drilling and grouting systems to demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of micropile anchors. This report presents several conceptual system designs for different applications. This project has concluded that grouted marine micropile anchor technology is practical and very attractive technically and financially for marine renewable energy applications. This technology is considered to be at a Technology Readiness Level 5.

  11. National Weatherization Assistance Program Characterization Describing the Recovery Act Period

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward; Rose, Erin M.; Hawkins, Beth A.

    2015-10-01

    This report characterizes the U.S. Department of Energy s Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) during the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) period. This research was one component of the Recovery Act evaluation of WAP. The report presents the results of surveys administered to Grantees (i.e., state weatherization offices) and Subgrantees (i.e., local weatherization agencies). The report also documents the ramp up and ramp down of weatherization production and direct employment during the Recovery Act period and other challenges faced by the Grantees and Subgrantees during this period. Program operations during the Recovery Act (Program Year 2010) are compared to operations during the year previous to the Recovery Act (Program Year 2008).

  12. Analytic aspects of periodic instantons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charbonneau, Benoit, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    The main result is a computation of the Nahm transform of a SU(2)-instanton over R x T³, called spatially-periodic instanton. It is a singular monopole over T³, a solution to the Bogomolny equation, whose rank is computed ...

  13. Stratified Steady Periodic Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel Walsh

    2009-02-11

    This paper considers two-dimensional stratified water waves propagating under the force of gravity over an impermeable flat bed and with a free surface. We prove the existence of a global continuum of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. These waves, moreover, can exhibit large density variation, speed and amplitude.

  14. Introduction to RLE Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Jonathan

    This report No. 128 in a series of Progress Reports issued by the Research Laboratory of Electronics, contains the annual statement of research objectives and summary of research for each group. The report covers the period ...

  15. Alternative (Potentially Green) Separations Media: Aqueous Biphasic and Related Systems � Extending the Frontier Final Report For Period September 1, 2002 � January 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robin D. Rogers

    2007-06-25

    Through the current DoE-BES funding, we have extended our fundamental understanding of the critical phase separation of aqueous polymer solutions at the molecular level, and have developed a similar understanding of their application as novel solvent systems. Our principal aims included mode of delivery of the aqueous biphasic system (ABS) solvent system and the application of this system to problems of reactive extraction. In the former case we have developed novel solid phase analogues, in the form of cross-linked polyethylene glycol hydrogels, and in the latter case we have examined the role that ABS might play in reaction engineering, with a view to greener, simpler, and safer processes. We have also developed a new salt/salt ABS and have extended our understanding of this system as well. The major outcomes are as follows: (1) Through the use of variable temperature phase diagrams, coupled with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements of the phases, a better understanding of the thermodynamics of phase formation was obtained. Evidence to the existence and role of an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) or lower critical solution temperature (LCST) (or both) in these systems was gained. With variable temperature solute partitioning, thermodynamic parameters were calculated, and inter-system comparisons were made. Through the use of Abraham's linear solvation energy regression (LSER) the solvent-solute properties of liquid/liquid ABS were examined. We have shown that ABS are indeed very tunable and LSERs have been used as a tool to compare these systems to traditional organic/water and other liquid/liquid systems. (2) We have successfully shown the development of novel reaction media for chemical synthesis and reaction; Aqueous Biphasic Reactive Extraction (ABRE). As a proof of concept, we have shown the synthesis of adipic acid from cyclohexene in an ABS, which represents an important development in the exploitation of this technology. Previous oxidations of this type have relied on the use of phase transfer catalysts, which are expensive to produce and difficult to recover. In this reaction the polyethylene glycol (PEG) phase seems to function simultaneously as the phase transfer catalyst, the reaction solvent, and to provide the reaction driving force. (3) PEG hydrogels may be used as probes for their macroscopic analogues by which the molecular events underlying the phase behavior of polymer-salt systems can be investigated. The properties of covalently cross-linked PEG hydrogels have been studied. It was demonstrated that these hydrogels could be thought of as analogous to polymer/salt ABS without phase separation. The salts examined cause collapse of the hydrogel, and there is a physical limit to the degree of collapse that can be achieved. In addition, salts bringing about significant collapse are only prevented from reaching this limit by the limits of their own solubility. This lead to our discovery that PEG will phase separate with KSCN at high enough concentration of polymer and salt. We have also successfully shown the development of an IL-PEG hydrogel as well as a Si-modified PEG hydrogel. We have also demonstrated for the first time that this cross-linked PEG matrix has been used to gel non-aqueous solvents. (4) The use of hydrophilic ionic liquids (ILs) in separation schemes has been accomplished via a 'salting out' technique using inorganic, kosmotropic salts that is applicable to many classes of these materials. We have begun to obtain a deeper knowledge about the role that each component plays in the process, including that of the ionic liquid cation and anion, the kosmotropic salt cation and anions, as well as the distribution of water in the system. This is allowing us to design separation systems with desired properties. In addition, temperature studies on these aqueous biphasic systems are revealing thermodynamic data for the first time, so that we can quantitate the importance of entropic and enthalpic contributions to the biphase-forming process.

  16. Advanced downhole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-07-16

    An advanced downhole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  17. Down hole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hills, Richard G. (Las Cruces, NM); Striker, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  18. Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program, Annual Report, Class of 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMakin, Andrea H.

    2013-09-23

    This 32-pp annual report/brochure describes the accomplishments of the Class of 2012 of the Nonproliferation Graduate Fellowship Program (the last class of this program), which PNNL administers for the National Nuclear Security Administration. The time period covers Sept 2011 through June 2013.

  19. Page 1 of 8 Reviewing Current Term Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    the Report Search (available Feb 09) function. When the current term reporting period closes, those reports will only be accessible from the Report Search function and the new term reports will be displayed. When the current term reporting period closes, reports are only accessible from the Report Search

  20. GEOS RR Lyr Survey: Blazhko Period Measurement of Three RRab Stars - CX Lyrae, NU Aurigae and VY Corona Borealis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Ponthiere, Pierre; Fumagalli, F; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Krajci, Tom; Llapasset, J-M; Menzies, Kenneth; Nobile, Marco; Sabo, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of collaborative observations of three RR Lyrae stars (CX Lyr, NU Aur and VY CrB) which have a strong Blazhko effect. This work has been initiated and performed in the framework of the GEOS RR Lyr Survey (Groupe Europ\\'een d'Observations Stellaires). From the measured light curves, we have determined the times and the magnitudes at maximum. The times of maxima have been compared to ephemerides to obtain the (O-C) values and from a period analysis of these (O-C) values, the Blazhko period is derived. The Blazhko periods of NU Aur (114.8 days) and VY CrB (32.3 days) are reported here for the first time and a more accurate period for CX Lyr (68.3 days) has been obtained. The three stars are subject to strong Blazhko effect, but this effect has different characteristics for each of them. When we compare the variations of magnitude at maximum and variations of (O-C) values with respect to the Blazhko phase, these variations are either in phase, in opposition, or even in quadrature.

  1. A search for periodicities from a ULX in the LINER galaxy NGC 4736

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avdan, H; Akyuz, A; Balman, S

    2014-01-01

    We report our findings on a new quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) and a long period from the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) X-2 in nearby galaxy NGC 4736 based on the Chandra and XMM-Newton archival data. To examine the timing properties, power density spectra of the source have been obtained using Fast Fourier Transform. Also the spectral parameters of the source have been calculated by obtaining and fitting the energy spectra. Power density spectrum of this source reveals a QPO peak at $0.73_{-0.14}^{+0.16}$ mHz with an fractional rms variability of 16% using the Chandra data (in the year 2000-lower state of the source). The XMM-Newton data analysis indicates a peak at $0.53_{-0.35}^{+0.09}$ mHz with a fractional rms variation of 5% (in the year 2006-higher state of the source). These recovered QPOs overlap within errors and may be the same oscillation. In addition, we detect a long periodicity or a QPO in the Chandra data of about $(5.2\\pm2.0)\\times10^{-5}$ Hz ($\\sim$ 5.4 hrs) over 3 $\\sigma$ confidence l...

  2. RECOVERY ACT: DYNAMIC ENERGY CONSUMPTION MANAGEMENT OF ROUTING TELECOM AND DATA CENTERS THROUGH REAL-TIME OPTIMAL CONTROL (RTOC): Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ron Moon

    2011-06-30

    This final scientific report documents the Industrial Technology Program (ITP) Stage 2 Concept Development effort on Data Center Energy Reduction and Management Through Real-Time Optimal Control (RTOC). Society is becoming increasingly dependent on information technology systems, driving exponential growth in demand for data center processing and an insatiable appetite for energy. David Raths noted, 'A 50,000-square-foot data center uses approximately 4 megawatts of power, or the equivalent of 57 barrels of oil a day1.' The problem has become so severe that in some cases, users are giving up raw performance for a better balance between performance and energy efficiency. Historically, power systems for data centers were crudely sized to meet maximum demand. Since many servers operate at 60%-90% of maximum power while only utilizing an average of 5% to 15% of their capability, there are huge inefficiencies in the consumption and delivery of power in these data centers. The goal of the 'Recovery Act: Decreasing Data Center Energy Use through Network and Infrastructure Control' is to develop a state of the art approach for autonomously and intelligently reducing and managing data center power through real-time optimal control. Advances in microelectronics and software are enabling the opportunity to realize significant data center power savings through the implementation of autonomous power management control algorithms. The first step to realizing these savings was addressed in this study through the successful creation of a flexible and scalable mathematical model (equation) for data center behavior and the formulation of an acceptable low technical risk market introduction strategy leveraging commercial hardware and software familiar to the data center market. Follow-on Stage 3 Concept Development efforts include predictive modeling and simulation of algorithm performance, prototype demonstrations with representative data center equipment to verify requisite performance and continued commercial partnering agreement formation to ensure uninterrupted development, and deployment of the real-time optimal control algorithm. As a software implementable technique for reducing power consumption, the RTOC has two very desirable traits supporting rapid prototyping and ultimately widespread dissemination. First, very little capital is required for implementation. No major infrastructure modifications are required and there is no need to purchase expensive capital equipment. Second, the RTOC can be rolled out incrementally. Therefore, the effectiveness can be proven without a large scale initial roll out. Through the use of the Impact Projections Model provided by the DOE, monetary savings in excess of $100M in 2020 and billions by 2040 are predicted. In terms of energy savings, the model predicts a primary energy displacement of 260 trillion BTUs (33 trillion kWh), or a 50% reduction in server power consumption. The model also predicts a corresponding reduction of pollutants such as SO2 and NOx in excess of 100,000 metric tonnes assuming the RTOC is fully deployed. While additional development and prototyping is required to validate these predictions, the relative low cost and ease of implementation compared to large capital projects makes it an ideal candidate for further investigation.

  3. An Autonomous Adaptive Scheduling Agent for Period Searching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric S. Saunders; Tim Naylor; Alasdair Allan

    2008-01-24

    We describe the design and implementation of an autonomous adaptive software agent that addresses the practical problem of observing undersampled, periodic, time-varying phenomena using a network of HTN-compliant robotic telescopes. The algorithm governing the behaviour of the agent uses an optimal geometric sampling technique to cover the period range of interest, but additionally implements proactive behaviour that maximises the optimality of the dataset in the face of an uncertain and changing operating environment.

  4. Long period fiber gratings induced by mechanical resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahal, Shir; Duadi, Hamootal; Fridman, Moti

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple, and robust method for writing long period fiber gratings with low polarization dependent losses. Our method is based on utilizing mechanical vibrations of the tapered fiber while pooling it. Our method enables real-time tunability of the periodicity, efficiency and length of the grating. We also demonstrate complex grating by writing multiple gratings simultaneously. Finally, we utilized the formation of the gratings in different fiber diameters to investigate the Young's modulus of the fiber.

  5. Single-periodic-film optical bandpass filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niraula, Manoj; Magnusson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Resonant periodic surfaces and films enable new functionalities with wide applicability in practical optical systems. Their material sparsity, ease of fabrication, and minimal interface count provide environmental and thermal stability and robustness in applications. Here we report an experimental bandpass filter fashioned in a single patterned layer on a substrate. Its performance corresponds to bandpass filters requiring perhaps 30 traditional thin-film layers as shown by an example. We demonstrate an ultra-narrow, high-efficiency bandpass filter with extremely wide, flat, and low sidebands. This class of devices is designed with rigorous solutions of the Maxwell equations while engaging the physical principles of resonant waveguide gratings. The proposed technology is integration-friendly and opens doors for further development in various disciplines and spectral regions where thin-film solutions are traditionally applied.

  6. Evolution of the periodicities in 2S 0114+650

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravi Sood; Sean Farrell; Paul O'Neill; Ravi Manchanda; N. M. Ashok

    2006-03-01

    We have analysed nine years of data from the All Sky Monitor on the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer for 2S 0114+650 to study the evolution of its spin, binary and super-orbital periods. The spin history of the neutron star in this system exhibits torque reversals lasting ~1 yr. The newly discovered super-orbital period has remained stable over the 9-yr span, making 2S 0114+650 the fourth known system to exhibit stable super-orbital modulation. We compare its super-orbital period evolution with those of the other three such systems.

  7. PERIODIC REVIEW REPORT TO THE MIDDLE STATES COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennehy, John

    ................................................................................... 17 Chapter 4 Finance and Enrollment Trends and Projections. "Mina Rees Library: Self-Study and Strategic Plan," draft 6/30/04; rev. 11/17/04. http://library

  8. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    Research and development activities are summarized in the following areas: Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, the UNISOR program, accelerator-based atomic physics, theoretical physics, nuclear science applications, atomic physics and plasma diagnostics for fusion program, high-energy physics, the nuclear data project, and the relativistic heavy-ion collider study. Publications and papers presented are listed. (WHK)

  9. Annual site environmental report, period: January 1994 to June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The environmental management program at the US Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), addresses all areas of environmental concern, including surface water and groundwater quality, air quality, and solid and hazardous waste disposal. The program focuses primarily on the treatment and disposal of industrial, contaminated, and sanitary wastewaters; the disposal of solid and hazardous wastes; minimizing air pollutant emissions; the monitoring of surface water, groundwater, and air quality on the METC site and in the surrounding area; the decommissioning, decontamination, and disposal of on-site research facilities no longer in use; and the identification, characterization, and cleanup of off-site property where METC sponsored research and development activities. The environmental management program is conducted to meet the requirements of all applicable Federal, state, and local laws and regulations.

  10. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1991-03-01

    The activities of this Division continue to be concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility and its operation as a national user facility continued as the single largest activity within the Division. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to emphasize heavy ion studies, with much of the activity centered at the Holifield Facility. The work with heavy ions at ultrarelativistic energies continues at the CERN SPS. Studies at the Brookhaven AGS, particularly in preparation of future experiments at RHIC, have seen an increased emphasis. A major consortium has been formed to propose the design and construction of a dimuon detector as the basis for one the principal experiments for RHIC. Also included are results from the increasing effort in particle physics, including participation in the L* proposal for the SSC. The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been associated intimately with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. A major area of experimental research for the Division is atomic physics. This activity comprises two groups: one on accelerator-based atomic physics, centered primarily at the EN-tandem and the Holifield Facility, but extending this year to an experiment at ultrarelativistic energies at the CERN SPS; and one on atomic physics in support of fusion energy, based primarily at the ECR ion source facility. Included in this section is also a description of a new effort in multicharged ion-surface interactions, and details of a planned upgrade of the ECR source.

  11. Engineering Physics Division progress report period ending May 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    Progress is described in the following areas: nuclear cross sections and related quantities; methods for generating and validating multigroup cross-section libraries; methods for reactor and shield analysis; methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis; integral experiments and nuclear analyses (integral experiments supporting fusion reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting fusion reactor designs, high-energy particle transport calculations, integral experiments supporting gas-cooled fast breeder reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting gas-cooled reactor designs, nuclear analyses supporting utilization of light-water reactors, and integral experiment analyses supporting surveillance dosimetry improvement program); energy economics modeling and analysis; safety and reliability assessments for nuclear power reactors; and information analysis and distribution. Publications and papers presented are listed. (WHK)

  12. Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

    1988-03-01

    The activities of this Division are concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. A major activity within the Division is operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. Highlights for this year, which include a record number of beam hours provided for research, are summarized. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to be dominated by research utilizing heavy ions. These activities, while continuing to center largely on the Holifield Facility, have seen growth in the use of facilities that provide intermediate energies (GANIL) and ultrarelativistic beams (CERN). The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been intimately associated with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. The experimental nuclear structure research of this consortium is included. In addition to the Holifield Facility, the Division also operates two smaller facilities, the EN Tandem and the ECR Ion Source Facility, as /open quotes/User Resources/close quotes/. The tandem continues a long history of supporting research in accelerator-based atomic physics. During this past year, new beam lines have been added to the ECR ion source to create user opportunities for atomic physics experiments with this unique device. These two facilities and the experimental programs in atomic physics are discussed. The efforts in theoretical physics, covering both nuclear and atomic physics, are presented. Also included is the theory effort in support of the UNISOR structure program. In addition to research with multicharged heavy ions from the ECR source, the effort on atomic physics in support of the controlled fusion program includes a plasma diagnostics development program and operation of an atomic physics data center. The nuclear physics program also operates a compilation and evaluation effort; this work is also described.

  13. Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: December 31, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Greenhouse Upgrade Heating System 901367c Whetten Quad Pedestrian Safety Improvements Phase I 901629 Heating System 901698 Homer Babbidge Library - Replace Floor Coverings 901715 Arjona & Monteith - Renovations foot (gsf) two story steel framed building with exterior masonry walls. The floor surface

  14. Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: September 30, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Campus Student Center 901278 Floriculture Greenhouse Upgrade Heating System 901367c Young Building - Heating/AC/Electrical Repairs 901580 Whetten Quad Pedestrian Safety Improvements Phase I 901629 Repair One - Replace Floor Coverings 901715 Arjona & Monteith - Renovations 901719 Gant Building Renovation - Immediate

  15. The Western Water Assessment Annual RISA Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    ;Western Water Assessment 2007 Annual Report 2 Table of Contents I. Areas of FocusThe Western Water Assessment Annual RISA Report Reporting Period: January 2007-December 2007 #12-30 #12;Western Water Assessment 2007 Annual Report 3

  16. Frozen light in periodic metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Figotin; I. Vitebskiy

    2006-09-16

    Wave propagation in spatially periodic media, such as photonic crystals, can be qualitatively different from any uniform substance. The differences are particularly pronounced when the electromagnetic wavelength is comparable to the primitive translation of the periodic structure. In such a case, the periodic medium cannot be assigned any meaningful refractive index. Still, such features as negative refraction and/or opposite phase and group velocities for certain directions of light propagation can be found in almost any photonic crystal. The only reservation is that unlike hypothetical uniform left-handed media, photonic crystals are essentially anisotropic at frequency range of interest. Consider now a plane wave incident on a semi-infinite photonic crystal. One can assume, for instance, that in the case of positive refraction, the normal components of the group and the phase velocities of the transmitted Bloch wave have the same sign, while in the case of negative refraction, those components have opposite signs. What happens if the normal component of the transmitted wave group velocity vanishes? Let us call it a "zero-refraction" case. At first sight, zero normal component of the transmitted wave group velocity implies total reflection of the incident wave. But we demonstrate that total reflection is not the only possibility. Instead, the transmitted wave can appear in the form of an abnormal grazing mode with huge amplitude and nearly tangential group velocity. This spectacular phenomenon is extremely sensitive to the frequency and direction of propagation of the incident plane wave. These features can be very attractive in numerous applications, such as higher harmonic generation and wave mixing, light amplification and lasing, highly efficient superprizms, etc.

  17. Real-Time Demand Side Energy Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor, A.; Brodkorb, M.

    2006-01-01

    • Provides periodic energy consumption reports Demand-Side Energy Management • Compares actual energy cost against defined dynamic targets • Alerts responsible personnel when corrective action is needed • Provides a list of recommended actions... stream_source_info ESL-IE-06-05-24.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 17485 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name ESL-IE-06-05-24.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Real-Time Demand Side Energy...

  18. Summary Report on FY12 Small-Scale Test Activities High Temperature Electrolysis Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James O'Brien

    2012-09-01

    This report provides a description of the apparatus and the single cell testing results performed at Idaho National Laboratory during January–August 2012. It is an addendum to the Small-Scale Test Report issued in January 2012. The primary program objectives during this time period were associated with design, assembly, and operation of two large experiments: a pressurized test, and a 4 kW test. Consequently, the activities described in this report represent a much smaller effort.

  19. Dynamical system theory of periodically collapsing bubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yukalov, V I; Sornette, D

    2015-01-01

    We propose a reduced form set of two coupled continuous time equations linking the price of a representative asset and the price of a bond, the later quantifying the cost of borrowing. The feedbacks between asset prices and bonds are mediated by the dependence of their "fundamental values" on past asset prices and bond themselves. The obtained nonlinear self-referencing price dynamics can induce, in a completely objective deterministic way, the appearance of periodically exploding bubbles ending in crashes. Technically, the periodically explosive bubbles arise due to the proximity of two types of bifurcations as a function of the two key control parameters $b$ and $g$, which represent, respectively, the sensitivity of the fundamental asset price on past asset and bond prices and of the fundamental bond price on past asset prices. One is a Hopf bifurcation, when a stable focus transforms into an unstable focus and a limit cycle appears. The other is a rather unusual bifurcation, when a stable node and a saddle...

  20. Quasi-periodic oscillations of perturbed tori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthasarathy, Varadarajan; Kluzniak, Wlodek

    2015-01-01

    We performed axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of perturbed tori orbiting a black hole. The tori in equilibrium were constructed with a constant distribution of angular momentum in a pseudo-Newtonian potential (Klu{\\'z}niak-Lee). Epicyclic motions were triggered by adding sub-sonic velocity fields: radial, vertical and diagonal to the tori in equilibrium. As the perturbed tori evolved in time, we measured $L_{2}$ norm of density and obtained the power spectrum of $L_{2}$ norm which manifested eigenfrequencies of tori modes. We observe a pair of modes which occur in an approximate 3:2 ratio. Results from our simulations are relevant in the context of high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HF QPOs) observed in stellar-mass black hole binaries.

  1. QuickSim Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Athalye, Rahul A.; Gowri, Krishnan; Glazer, Jason; Schultz, Robert W.

    2010-10-31

    In software tools such as COMcheck, use of the EnergyPlus simulation engine for performance-based code compliance raises a concern about simulation runtime which impacts the dynamic feedback of compliance results to the user. EnergyPlus annual simulations for proposed and code base line building models, and the mechanical equipment sizing runs together increase the annual simulation runtime beyond unacceptable duration, for example, to 5 minutes for a typical small commercial building. This report presents a study undertaken to compare the results of a shortened simulation time period, using 4 weeks of weather data to do a simulation of a full 52 weeks of data. Three representative building types and three climate zones were used for determining the validity of using shortened simulation run period. Further sensitivity analysis and run time comparisons were made to evaluate the robustness and run time savings of using this approach. The results of this analysis show that the shortened simulation run period provides compliance index calculations within 1% of that predicted using annual simulation results, and typically saves about 75% of simulation runtime.

  2. X-ray and EUV Observations of Simultaneous Short and Long Period Oscillations in Hot Coronal Arcade Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Pankaj; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    We report decaying quasi-periodic intensity oscillations in the X-ray (6-12 keV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) channels (131, 94, 1600, 304 \\AA) observed by the Fermi GBM (Gamma-ray Burst Monitor) and SDO/AIA, respectively, during a C-class flare. The estimated period of oscillation and decay time in the X-ray channel (6-12 keV) was about 202 s and 154 s, respectively. A similar oscillation period was detected at the footpoint of the arcade loops in the AIA 1600 and 304 \\AA channels. Simultaneously, AIA hot channels (94 and 131 \\AA) reveal propagating EUV disturbances bouncing back and forth between the footpoints of the arcade loops. The period of the oscillation and decay time were about 409 s and 1121 s, respectively. The characteristic phase speed of the wave is about 560 km/s for about 115 Mm loop length, which is roughly consistent with the sound speed at the temperature about 10-16 MK (480-608 km/s). These EUV oscillations are consistent with the SOHO/SUMER Doppler-shift oscillations interpreted as the...

  3. Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing time tracking and efficiency measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; Richard G. Kron; William N. Boroski

    2002-10-16

    Accurate and consistent time tracking is essential for evaluating the efficiency of survey observing operations and identifying areas that need improvement. Off the shelf time tracking software, which requires users to enter activities by hand, proved tedious to use and insufficiently exible. In this paper, we present an alternate time tracking system developed specifically for Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing. This system uses an existing logging system, murmur, to log the beginning and ending times of tracked circumstances, including activities, weather, and problems which effect observing. Operations software automatically generates most entries for routine observing activities; in a night of routine observing, time tracking requires little or no attention from the observing staff. A graphical user interface allows observers to make entries marking time lost to weather and equipment, and to correct inaccurate entries made by the observing software. The last is necessary when the change in activity is not marked by a change in the state of the software or instruments, or when the time is used for engineering or other observing not part of routine survey data collection. A second utility generates reports of time usage from these logs. These reports include totals for the time spent for each observing task, time lost to weather and problems, efficiency statistics for comparison with the survey baseline, and a detailed listing of what activities and problems were present in any covered time period.

  4. Planar resonant periodic orbits in Kuiper belt dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Voyatzis; Thomas Kotoulas

    2005-02-28

    In the framework of the planar restricted three body problem we study a considerable number of resonances associated to the Kuiper Belt dynamics and located between 30 and 48 a.u. Our study is based on the computation of resonant periodic orbits and their stability. Stable periodic orbits are surrounded by regular librations in phase space and in such domains the capture of trans-Neptunian object is possible. All the periodic orbits found are symmetric and there is evidence for the existence of asymmetric ones only in few cases. In the present work first, second and third order resonances are under consideration. In the planar circular case we found that most of the periodic orbits are stable. The families of periodic orbits are temporarily interrupted by collisions but they continue up to relatively large values of the Jacobi constant and highly eccentric regular motion exists for all cases. In the elliptic problem and for a particular eccentricity value of the primary bodies the periodic orbits are isolated. The corresponding families, where they belong to, bifurcate from specific periodic orbits of the circular problem and seem to continue up to the rectilinear problem. Both stable and unstable orbits are obtained for each case. In the elliptic problem the unstable orbits found are associated with narrow chaotic domains in phase space. The evolution of the orbits, which are located in such chaotic domains, seems to be practically regular and bounded for long time intervals.

  5. Periodic Photometric Variability in the Becklin-Neugebauer Object

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynne A. Hillenbrand; John M. Carpenter; M. F. Skrutskie

    2000-10-24

    The Becklin-Neugebauer (BN) object in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) is a well-studied optically invisible, infrared-bright young stellar object, thought to be an intermediate-mass protostar. We report here that BN exhibited nearly-sinusoidal periodic variability at the near-infrared H- and Ks-bands during a one month observing campaign in 2000 March/April. The period was 8.28 days and the peak-to-peak amplitude ~0.2 mag. Plausible mechanisms for producing the observed variability characteristics are explored.

  6. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Office P.O. Box 5080 Austin, TX 78763-5080 13. Type of Report and Period Covered Technical Report with potentially significant cost implications. This research project is designed to address issues associated, floodplain, Weir equations, culvert, flow, test channel, return channel, Pitot tube 18. Distribution

  7. Periodic relativity: basic framework of the theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vikram H. Zaveri

    2014-11-25

    An alternative gravity theory is proposed which does not rely on Riemannian geometry and geodesic trajectories. The theory named periodic relativity (PR) does not use the weak field approximation and allows every two body system to deviate differently from the flat Minkowski metric. PR differs from general relativity (GR) in predictions of the proper time intervals of distant objects. PR proposes a definite connection between the proper time interval of an object and gravitational frequency shift of its constituent particles as the object travels through the gravitational field. PR is based on the dynamic weak equivalence principle which equates the gravitational mass with the relativistic mass. PR provides very accurate solutions for the Pioneer anomaly and the rotation curves of galaxies outside the framework of general relativity. PR satisfies Einstein's field equations with respect to the three major GR tests within the solar system and with respect to the derivation of Friedmann equation in cosmology. This article defines the underlying framework of the theory.

  8. Passive Tracer Dispersion with Random or Periodic Source \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passive Tracer Dispersion with Random or Periodic Source \\Lambda Jinqiao Duan Clemson University sources on the pattern formation and long­time behavior of concentration pro­ files of passive tracers Introduction The dispersion of passive tracers (or passive scalars) occur in various geo­ physical

  9. Passive Tracer Dispersion with Random or Periodic Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passive Tracer Dispersion with Random or Periodic Source Jinqiao Duan Clemson University sources on the pattern formation and long-time behavior of concentration pro- #12;les of passive tracers #12;1 Introduction The dispersion of passive tracers (or passive scalars) occur in various geo

  10. The Chinese Calendar of The Later Han Period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aslaksen, Helmer

    The Chinese Calendar of The Later Han Period Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme would like to learn some basic knowledge in the Chinese calendar, which is an important part of the Chinese culture and Chinese history. However, by the time we decided to take this project, the deadline

  11. Numerical Modeling of Periodic Composite Media for Electromagnetic Shielding Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koledintseva, Marina Y.

    on a conventional mixing theory, have served as the fundamentals for these techniques. In these formulationsNumerical Modeling of Periodic Composite Media for Electromagnetic Shielding Application Dagang Wu-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The results are compared with conventional mixing theories and 3D Fourier

  12. Oscillations with uniquely long periods in a microfluidic bubble generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Oscillations with uniquely long periods in a microfluidic bubble generator PIOTR GARSTECKI1 generator that shows stable oscillatory patterns (both in space and time) of unanticipated complexity to a single outlet channel. In this geometry, the pinch-off process that generates bubbles is regulated17

  13. Long-period pulses Motivation Developed program Results Long-period disturbances in records of Swiss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Long-period pulses Motivation Developed program Results Long-period disturbances in records 2014 #12;Long-period pulses Motivation Developed program Results Index 1 Long-period pulses in records 2 Motivation for the study 3 Developed program 4 Results #12;Long-period pulses Motivation Developed

  14. Reactor physics project final report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Driscoll, Michael J.

    1970-01-01

    This is the final report in an experimental and theoretical program to develop and apply single- and few-element methods for the determination of reactor lattice parameters. The period covered by the report is January 1, ...

  15. Evaluation of the National Weatherization Assistance Program during Program Years 2009-2011 (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Period)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward; Rose, Erin M.; Schmoyer, Richard L.; Eisenberg, Joel Fred; Ternes, Mark P.; Schweitzer, Martin; Hendrick, Timothy P.

    2011-12-29

    This report presents the plan that was developed to evaluate the Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program during the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act period.

  16. Clean energy from municipal solid waste. ERIP technical progress report No. 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klosky, M.

    1995-07-14

    Just prior to this award and reporting period but as part of this program, EnerTech initiated preliminary pilot scale slurry carbonization experiments with Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) and preliminary pilot scale combustion experiments with the carbonized RDF slurry fuel. For this award and the time period April 1995--July 1995, several modifications to the pilot plant facilities were completed to improve operational reliability, system performance, and characteristics of the carbonized slurry fuel, based upon the previous plant experiments.

  17. A Periodic Solution to Impulsive Logistic Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gyong-Chol Kim; Hyong-Chol O; Sang-Mun Kim; Chol Kim

    2014-03-28

    In this paper is provided a new representation of periodic solution to the impulsive Logistic equation considered in [7].

  18. HEP Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chunhui

    2013-05-21

    In this report, we summarize the research activity funded by the DOE award DE-FG02-12ER41827 (DE-SC0007892) during the funding period (May 1, 2012- March 31, 2013).

  19. Periods Associated to Algebraic Cycles Spencer Bloch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloch, Spencer

    K0(X) = CHp (X)Q Spencer Bloch () Periods Associated to Algebraic Cycles March 3, 2014 Albert) CHp(X, n) := H-n(Zp(X, ·)). Spencer Bloch () Periods Associated to Algebraic Cycles March 3, 2014 ) - Zp (X) CHp(X, n) := H-n(Zp(X, ·)). Spencer Bloch () Periods Associated to Algebraic Cycles March 3

  20. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 11. Timing and firing and fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grier, H.E.

    1985-09-01

    An automatic remote-control system armed and fired the bomb and sent out a sequence of time signals to experimental equipment on the atoll. A central station at Parry Island sent signals via submarine cables to a timer station on a shot island. The timer station controlled signals to the zero station and to experiments on the island, and through auxiliary stations, it also controlled signal distribution on adjacent islands. Light-sensitive triggering units for apparatus and for accurate standard zero-time reference were provided in the form of Blue Boxes, or fiducial markers.

  1. Detection of superimposed periodic signals using wavelets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Otazu; M. Ribo; M. Peracaula; J. M. Paredes; J. Nunez

    2002-02-05

    In this paper we present a wavelet based algorithm that is able to detect superimposed periodic signals in data with low signal-noise ratio. In this context, the results given by classical period determination methods highly depend on the intrinsic characteristics of each periodic signal, like amplitude or profile. It is then difficult to detect the different periods present in the data set. The results given by the wavelet based method for period determination we present here are independent of the characteristics of the signals.

  2. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 1. Prompt-gamma-ray measurements. Part 2. Prompt-gamma-ray intensity as a function of time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, W.C.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the procedure followed and the results obtained in measuring, as a function of time, the prompt gamma radiation emitted within 1,000 seconds after the explosion of the atomic weapons studies in Operation Greenhouse. The design of the experiment and a description of the equipment are given. The fast coaxial scintillation detectors for the Greenhouse test were used without collimators at a distance of several mean free paths from the source. Numerous factors complicated the interpretation of the data obtained, thus reducing the accuracy that may be ascribed to the results. The probable peak gamma-ray intensity, the time of occurrence of the peak, and the prompt-gamma decay curves as a function of time were obtained for each shot. A composite decay curve fitting all the shots was obtained, and from this, a scaling factor was deduced which related the shot energy to the gamma-ray intensity.

  3. Measurement of Time-Averaged Particle-Wall Collision Properties Using Particle Tracking Velocimetry, CRADA PC93-006, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaffer, F.; Massah, H.; Sinclair, J.; Shahnam, M.

    1995-04-30

    This paper describes an experimental facility to measure time-averaged properties of particle-wall collisions. A particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) system measures particle rebound angles and velocities and impact angles and velocities for specific particles. From these measured properties, values of normal and tangential coefficient of restitution are derived. The PTV system rapidly measures thousands of particle-wall collisions enabling determination of time-averaged properties. In this initial work we use 191 {micro}m glass particles colliding with a glass plate at a fixed angle of 17.5{degree} and a velocity of 17.07 m/s. Observations are also made of aspherical particles colliding with gross sliding. In the future, this experimental system will be used with particles and wall materials of industrial significance.

  4. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 8. 2B. Interferometer gauge pressure-time measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, J.E.; Seacord, D.F.; Newman, R.W.

    1985-04-01

    This project was charged with the responsibility of conducting tests on static aircraft panels mounted on the ground at various ranges from the blast. Pressure-versus-time data were obtained using interferometer gauges. The gauge proved to be reliable and easy to operate. Its high-frequency response enabled it to record data to the pressure rise at the front of the blast wave which had not been noted previously. These results show, from measurements taken by pressure instruments mounted flush with the ground, that the rise times at the front of the blast waves were on gamma-radiation intensity by the smple expedient of stacking a few layers of lead breic around the gauge mounts.

  5. Seismic isolation of two dimensional periodic foundations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Y.; Mo, Y. L.; Laskar, A.; Cheng, Z.; Shi, Z.; Menq, F.; Tang, Y.

    2014-07-28

    Phononic crystal is now used to control acoustic waves. When the crystal goes to a larger scale, it is called periodic structure. The band gaps of the periodic structure can be reduced to range from 0.5?Hz to 50?Hz. Therefore, the periodic structure has potential applications in seismic wave reflection. In civil engineering, the periodic structure can be served as the foundation of upper structure. This type of foundation consisting of periodic structure is called periodic foundation. When the frequency of seismic waves falls into the band gaps of the periodic foundation, the seismic wave can be blocked. Field experiments of a scaled two dimensional (2D) periodic foundation with an upper structure were conducted to verify the band gap effects. Test results showed the 2D periodic foundation can effectively reduce the response of the upper structure for excitations with frequencies within the frequency band gaps. When the experimental and the finite element analysis results are compared, they agree well with each other, indicating that 2D periodic foundation is a feasible way of reducing seismic vibrations.

  6. Progress Report, December 2010: Improved Site Characterization And Storage Prediction Through Stochastic Inversion Of Time-Lapse Geophysical And Geochemical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, A; Mcnab, W; Carle, S; Hao, Y; White, D; Johnson, J

    2010-12-17

    Over the last project six months, our project activities have concentrated on three areas: (1) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir permeability, (2) development of the geochemical inversion strategy and implementation of associated software, and (3) completing the software implementation of TProGS and the geostatistical analysis that provides the information needed when using the software to produce realizations of the Midale reservoir. The report partially the following deliverables: D2: Model development: MCMC tool (synthetic fluid chemistry data); deliverable completed. D4: Model development/verification: MCMC tool (TProGS, field seismic/chemistry data) work product; deliverable requirements partially fulfilled. D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product; deliverable requirements partially fulfilled. When completed, our completed stochastic inversion tool will explicitly integrate reactive transport modeling, facies-based geostatistical methods, and a novel stochastic inversion technique to optimize agreement between observed and predicted storage performance. Such optimization will be accomplished through stepwise refinement of: (1) the reservoir model - principally its permeability magnitude and heterogeneity - and (2) geochemical parameters - primarily key mineral volume fractions and kinetic data. We anticipate that these refinements will facilitate significantly improved history matching and forward modeling of CO{sub 2} storage. Our tool uses the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methodology. Deliverable D1, previously submitted as a report titled ''Development of a Stochastic Inversion Tool To Optimize Agreement Between The Observed And Predicted Seismic Response To CO{sub 2} Injection/Migration in the Weyburn-Midale Project'' (Ramirez et al., 2009), described the stochastic inversion approach that will identify reservoir models that optimize agreement between the observed and predicted seismic response. The software that implements this approach has been completed, tested, and used to process seismic data from pattern 16. A previously submitted report titled ''Model verification: synthetic single pattern simulations using seismic reflection data'', Ramirez et al. 2010, partially fulfilled deliverable D3 by summarizing verification activities that evaluate the performance of the seismic software and its ability to recover reservoir model permeabilities using synthetic seismic reflection data. A future progress report will similarly describe summarizing verification activities of the geochemical inversion software, thereby completing deliverable D3. This document includes a chapter that shows and discusses permeability models produced by seismic inversion that used seismic data from pattern 16 in Phase 1A. It partially fulfills deliverable D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product. The D5 work product is supposed to summarize the results of applying NUFT/MCMC to refine the reservoir model and geochemical parameters by optimizing observation/prediction agreement for the seismic/geochemical response to CO{sub 2} injection/migration within a single pattern of Phase 1A/1B. A future progress report will show inversion results for the same pattern using geochemical data, thereby completing deliverable D5. This document also contains a chapter that fulfills deliverable D2: Model development: MCMC tool (synthetic fluid chemistry data). The chapter will summarize model development activities required to facilitate application of NUFT/MCMC to optimize agreement between the observed and predicted geochemical response to CO{sub 2} injection/migration. Lastly, this document also contains a chapter that partially fulfills deliverable D4: Model development/verification: MCMC tool (TProGS, field seismic/chemistry data) work product. This work product is supposed to summarize model development activities required for (1) application of TProGS to Weyburn, (2) use of TProGS within the MCMC tool, and (3) application of the MCMC tool to address field seismic and g

  7. Solid state NMR spectrometer. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, C.M.

    1997-11-01

    The new Varian Unity INOVA 400 is being utilized on a daily basis. The instrument is available 24 hours a day seven days a week for scheduled experiments. In addition, a limited amount of time is available on a walk-in basis for researchers on the project. The instrument has operated with no down time since the end of the Varian installation process. Minor problems have been corrected by the facility staff (spent fused, malfunctioning boards and components and interrupted data transfers). Most of the initial problems were covered under the warrantee period. Since the end of this period there have been no major operational problems. This report discusses two research projects using the new spectrometer: dynamics of dihydrogen and alkane complexes of iridium and catalytic dehydrogenation by iridium hydride complexes.

  8. Experiments to Understand HPC Time to Development (Final report for Department of Energy contract DE-FG02-04ER25633) Report DOE/ER/25633-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basili, Victor, R.; ,; Zelkowitz, Marvin, V.

    2007-11-14

    In order to understand how high performance computing (HPC) programs are developed, a series of experiments, using students in graduate level HPC classes and various research centers, were conducted at various locations in the US. In this report, we discuss this research, give some of the early results of those experiments, and describe a web-based Experiment Manager we are developing that allows us to run studies more easily and consistently at universities and laboratories, allowing us to generate results that more accurately reflect the process of building HPC programs.

  9. Solvent refined coal (SRC) process: trace elements research and development report no. 53, interim report no. 34. Volume III. Pilot plant development work part 6: the fate of trace elements in the SRC process for the period, August 1, 1977 - February 28, 1979. [36 elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filby, R.H.; Khalil, S.R.; Grimm, C.A.; Ekabaram, V.; Hunt, M.L.

    1980-12-01

    This work reports the results of neutron activation analysis determination of the fate of trace elements in the SRC II process. Six coals were studied for their behavior in material balance runs carried out at the Fort Lewis Pilot Plant. The distribution of trace elements among products and input streams was determined by thermal neutron activation analysis using thermal neutron flux of 8 x 10/sup 12/ neutrons cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ followed by Ge(Li) gamma ray spectroscopy. National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Materials (SRM) were used to evaluate the analytical precision and accuracy of the methods used. For each material balance study the trace element input stream was taken as ground coal and the output streams were vacuum bottoms, SRC II product oil, and process water. In addition to these major components, oils, sludges and waters from liquid-liquid separators, effluent waters, biosludges, and by-product sulfur were also analyzed. Concerning the distribution of trace elements in the SRC II process, it was found that the vacuum bottoms was the major sink for all trace element studied, with the exception of Hg. Much lower trace element concentrations (except for Hg) were found in the SRC II product oil relative to the vacuum bottoms or the feed coal, irrespective of coal type. The results indicate excellent balances for the elements studied, except for Hg. Except for Hg, Se, and C1, the SRC II product and process waters contributed less than 1% of the elemental balances for light oil fractions and process waters indicates that Hg, and to a lesser degree As, Se, and Sb, exhibited volatile behavior in the SRC II process but that the degree of volatility is strongly dependent on conditions or coal type.

  10. Do triatomic molecules echo atomic periodicity?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hefferlin, R. Barrow, J.

    2015-03-30

    Demonstrations of periodicity among triatomic-molecular spectroscopic constants underscore the role of the periodic law as a foundation of chemistry. The objective of this work is to prepare for another test using vibration frequencies ?{sub 1} of free, ground-state, main-group triatomic molecules. Using data from four data bases and from computation, we have collected ?{sub 1} data for molecules formed from second period atoms.

  11. M.I.T. LMFBR Blanket Physics Project : final summary report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Driscoll, Michael J.

    1983-01-01

    This is a final summary report on an experimental and analytical program for the investigation of LMFBR blanket characteristics carried out at M.I. T. in the period 1969-1983. During this span of time, work was carried out ...

  12. Progress Reports Reporting Obligations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    Progress Reports - 1 - Reporting Obligations When submitting applications and accepting awards, Syracuse University agrees to adhere to a sponsor's reporting requirements. Principal Investigators/Project Directors (PIs/PDs) agree to fulfill these reporting requirements and other sponsor conditions when

  13. Pricing Conspicuous Consumption Products in Recession Periods ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-09-26

    cally used in chemical engineering, e.g., to avoid irreversible reactions in ... Our basic problem is based on an economic setting with a recession period followed.

  14. Time Limitation on Direct Subsidized Loan Eligibility for First-Time Borrowers on or after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Time Limitation on Direct Subsidized Loan Eligibility for First-Time Borrowers on or after July 1, 2013 Maximum eligibility period to receive Direct Subsidized Loans There is a limit on the maximum period of time (measured in academic years) that you can receive Direct Subsidized Loans. In general, you

  15. Seismicity in the Vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the Period October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Ken

    2007-11-26

    This report describes earthquake activity within approximately 65 km of Yucca Mountain site during the October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2006 time period (FY05-06). The FY05-06 earthquake activity will be compared with the historical and more recent period of seismic activity in the Yucca Mountain region. The relationship between the distribution of seismicity and active faults, historical patterns of activity, and rates of earthquakes (number of events and their magnitudes) are important components in the assessment of the seismic hazard for the Yucca Mountain site. Since October 1992 the University of Nevada has compiled a catalog of earthquakes in the Yucca Mountain area. Seismicity reports have identified notable earthquake activity, provided interpretations of the seismotectonics of the region, and documented changes in the character of earthquake activity based on nearly 30 years of site-characterization monitoring. Data from stations in the seismic network in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain is collected and managed at the Nevada Seismological Laboratory (NSL) at the University of Nevada Reno (UNR). Earthquake events are systematically identified and cataloged under Implementing Procedures developed in compliance with the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Quality Assurance Program. The earthquake catalog for FY05-06 in the Yucca Mountain region submitted to the Yucca Mountain Technical Data Management System (TDMS) forms the basis of this report.

  16. Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report to Congress Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption, Report to Congress This report presents the detailed results, data, and analytical...

  17. Periodic cellular automata and Bethe ansatz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atsuo Kuniba; Akira Takenouchi

    2006-01-07

    We review and generalize the recent progress in a soliton cellular automaton known as the periodic box-ball system. It has the extended affine Weyl group symmetry and admits the commuting transfer matrix method and the Bethe ansatz at q=0. Explicit formulas are proposed for the dynamical period and the number of states characterized by conserved quantities.

  18. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael C. Weinberg; Lori L. Burgner; Joseph H. Simmons

    2003-05-23

    OAK B135 The formation of metastable crystalline phases in lithium disilicate glass has been a subject of controversy for decades. Here, one aspect of this problem relating to the stability of these non-equilibrium phases when glasses are heated for extended time periods in the nucleation regime is addressed. The results of a systematic experimental investigation on the persistence of metastable phases and the factors that may influence the appearance of such phases, e.g., water content, impurities, glass composition, and glass preparation procedure are presented. Growth rates of lithium disilicate crystals in lithium disilicate glass are measured as a function water concentration in the glass and of temperature in the deeply undercooled regime. The growth rate data obtained in this work are combined with data reported in the literature and used to assess the applicability of standard models of crystal growth for the description of experimental results over a very broad temperature range. The reduced growth rate versus undercooling graph is found to consist of three regimes. For undercoolings less than 140°C, the reduced growth rate curve is suggestive of either 2-D surface nucleation or screw dislocation growth. For undercoolings greater than 400°C, the reduced growth rate plot suggests the operative crystal growth mechanism is 2-D surface nucleation, but detailed calculations cast doubt upon this conclusion. In the intermediate undercooling range, there appears to be some sort of transitional behavior for which none of the standard models appear to be applicable. Further, it is observed that small differences in the viscosity data employed can produce enormous differences in the predicted growth rates at larger undercoolings. Results of the kinetic analyses conducted herein seem to indicate that the nature of the kinetic rate coefficient used in the standard growth models may be incorrect. Nucleation rates of sodium metasilicate crystals in a sodium silicate glass of composition 43Na2O-57SiO2 (mol%) are investigated using the development technique. The results of this study are compared with the nucleation rate results recently obtained for this composition using a novel DTA method. The two techniques are found to agree within experimental error.

  19. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, April 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s ninth Semiannual Report to Congress to be submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, April 1 through September 30, 1993, the Department took final action on four contract and financial assistance audit reports. At the end of the period only three reports awaited final action. With regard to operational, financial, and preaward audits, final action was taken on 41 reports, resulting in 93 audit reports needing final action at the end of the period.

  20. Post Competition Accountability Report: Second Quarter, FY 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Post Competition Accountability Quarterly Report: High Performing Organization Proposal 2012Fiscal Years (FY) 2012–2016: Reporting Period: Second Quarter, FY 2013

  1. Post Competition Accountability Report: Third Quarter, FY 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Post Competition Accountability Quarterly Report: High Performing Organization Proposal 2012Fiscal Years (FY) 2012–2016: Reporting Period: Third Quarter, FY 2013

  2. Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  3. All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. S. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Brummit; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Cain; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Dorsher; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr?czi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; W. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; M. R. Ganija; J. Garcia; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. González; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; T. Hayler; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; H. Jang; P. Jaranowski; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; I. Kamaretsos; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; D. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; M. Kinsey; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Królak

    2011-10-02

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space where signals can be detected by a factor of 10, but has not revealed any gravitational wave signals. The pipeline has been tested for robustness with respect to deviations from the model of an isolated neutron star, such as caused by a low-mass or long-period binary companion.

  4. All-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S4 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Belczynski, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casey, M M; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Chin, D; Chin, E; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coward, D; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Dalrymple, J; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Daz, M; Dickson, J; Di Credico, A; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, a C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Howell, E; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jackrel, D; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lee, B; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, a N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McNabb, J W C; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mudge, D; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ramsunder, M; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Tarallo, M; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ungarelli, C; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C

    2007-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search with the LIGO detectors for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range 50-1000 Hz and with the frequency's time derivative in the range -1.0E-8 Hz/s to zero. Data from the fourth LIGO science run (S4) have been used in this search. Three different semi-coherent methods of transforming and summing strain power from Short Fourier Transforms (SFTs) of the calibrated data have been used. The first, known as "StackSlide", averages normalized power from each SFT. A "weighted Hough" scheme is also developed and used, and which also allows for a multi-interferometer search. The third method, known as "PowerFlux", is a variant of the StackSlide method in which the power is weighted before summing. In both the weighted Hough and PowerFlux methods, the weights are chosen according to the noise and detector antenna-pattern to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. The respective advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed. Observing no evidence of periodic gravitationa...

  5. SYMBOLS FOR TIME = time variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    =forever) Cost spent to build variation point i at time i = index over variation points #12;SYMBOLS FOR TIME to account for net present value of money r = assumed interest rate i = index over variation points Cost Expected cost summed over all relevant time intervals Cost spent to build variation point i at time r

  6. Annual Change Report 2006/2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-11-16

    As part of continuing compliance, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide information on any change in conditions or activities pertaining to the disposal system since the most recent compliance application. This requirement is identified in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Section 194.4(b)(4), which states: "No later than six months after the administrator issues a certification, and at least annually thereafter, the Department shall report to the Administrator, in writing, any changes in conditions or activities pertaining to the disposal system that were not required to be reported by paragraph (b)(3) of this section and that differ from information contained in the most recent compliance application." In meeting the requirement, the DOE provides an annual report each November of all applicable changes under the above requirement. This annual report informs the EPA of changes to information in the most recent compliance recertification (the 2004 Compliance Recertification). Significant planned changes must be reported to the EPA prior to implementation by the DOE. In addition, Title 40 CFR, Section 194.4(b)(3) requires that significant unplanned changes be reported to the EPA within 24 hours or ten days, depending on the severity of the activity or condition. To date, there have been no significant unplanned changes to the certification basis. Planned changes have been submitted on an individual basis. All other changes are reported annually. Changes in activities or conditions are reviewed to determine if 40 CFR Section 194.4(b)(3) reporting is necessary. As indicated above, no significant unplanned changes were identified for the time period covered by this report. The enclosed tables list those items identified for reporting under 40 CFR Section 194.4(b)(4). The majority of the items described in this report are inspections, reports, and modifications to written plans and procedures for WIPP operations.

  7. Variable-Period Undulators For Synchrotron Radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Gopal (Naperville, IL); Lewellen, John (Plainfield, IL); Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Vinokurov, Nikolai (Novosibirsk, RU)

    2005-02-22

    A new and improved undulator design is provided that enables a variable period length for the production of synchrotron radiation from both medium-energy and high-energy storage rings. The variable period length is achieved using a staggered array of pole pieces made up of high permeability material, permanent magnet material, or an electromagnetic structure. The pole pieces are separated by a variable width space. The sum of the variable width space and the pole width would therefore define the period of the undulator. Features and advantages of the invention include broad photon energy tunability, constant power operation and constant brilliance operation.

  8. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Aug 12 -Aug 18, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-001248 THOMPSON ROAD Gas leak Security , Toronto Fire, Toronto Police, and Occupational Health and Safety responded to a report of a natural gas leak in the area of the Life Science BuildingWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Aug 12 - Aug 18, 2013 Incident No. Reported Date Building

  9. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Feb 6 -Feb 12, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gas leak Security and Toronto Fire responded to a report of a natural gas odour in B-wing. TorontoWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Feb 6 - Feb 12, 2012 Incident No. Reported Date Building\\Const. Security, York Fire Prevention and Toronto Fire responded to a fire alarm. The cause of the alarm

  10. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Jul 9 -Jul 15, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Safety responded to a report of a natural gas odour in the building. The building was checked and no natural gas was found. Toronto Fire determined that all was in order. 7/12/2012 07:31 AM HazardousWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Jul 9 - Jul 15, 2012 Incident No. Reported Date Building

  11. Weekly Security Incident Log Period of Apr 29 -May 5, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-000845 YORK LANES RETAIL Gas leak Security, Toronto Fire and Enbridge Gas responded to a report of a natural gas odour in the building. The source of the odour was located in a restaurant kitchen. EnbridgeWeekly Security Incident Log Period of Apr 29 - May 5, 2013 Incident No. Reported Date Building

  12. Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period April Through June 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-11-01

    This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period April through June 2006. Seventeen RCRA sites were sampled during the reporting quarter. Sampled sites include seven monitored under groundwater indicator evaluation (''detection'') programs, eight monitored under groundwater quality assessment programs, and two monitored under final-status programs.

  13. Traveling Waves Solutions for Bistable Differential-Difference Equations with Periodic Diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmer, Christopher E.; Van Vleck, Erik

    2001-10-05

    on the underlying lattice as well as on time. For the case of spatially periodic diffusion we obtain analytic solutions for the traveling wave problem using a piecewise linear nonlinearity. The formula for the wave forms is implicitly defined in the general periodic...

  14. Temporal evolution of long-timescale periodicities in ULX NGC 5408 X-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Tao; Wang, Jun-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Context. NGC 5408 X-1 is one of the few ultraluminous X-ray sources with an extensive monitoring program in X-rays (a temporal baseline of 4.2 yr), making it one of the most suitable candidates to study the long-timescale quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). Aims. Previous timing analysis of the Swift data of NGC 5408 X-1 led to detection of multiple periodicities ranging from 2.6 d to 230 d. In this paper, we focus on the statistical significance and the temporal evolution of these periodicities. Methods. A time-series analysis technique in the time-frequency domain, the weighted wavelet Z-transform (WWZ), was employed to identify the periodicities and trace their variations with time. Results. Three periodic components were detected from the WWZ periodogram, corresponding to periods of 2.65$\\pm$0.01 d, 115.4$\\pm$14.4 d and 189.1$\\pm$15.2 d. All three have statistical significance higher than 99.74%. The 2.65-d periodicity is quite stable in the majority of the light curve. The 115-d periodicity is the most p...

  15. Transverse Ising Chain under Periodic Instantaneous Quenches: Dynamical Many-Body Freezing and Emergence of Solitary Oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sirshendu Bhattacharyya; Arnab Das; Subinay Dasgupta

    2012-08-10

    We study the real-time dynamics of a quantum Ising chain driven periodically by instantaneous quenches of the transverse field (the transverse field varying as rectangular wave symmetric about zero). Two interesting phenomena are reported and analyzed: (1) We observe dynamical many-body freezing or DMF (Phys. Rev. B, vol. 82, 172402, 2010), i.e. strongly non-monotonic freezing of the response (transverse magnetization) with respect to the driving parameters (pulse width and height) resulting from equivocal freezing behavior of all the many-body modes. The freezing occurs due to coherent suppression of dynamics of the many-body modes. For certain combination of the pulse height and period, maximal freezing (freezing peaks) are observed. For those parameter values, a massive collapse of the entire Floquet spectrum occurs. (2) Secondly, we observe emergence of a distinct solitary oscillation with a single frequency, which can be much lower than the driving frequency. This slow oscillation, involving many high-energy modes, dominates the response remarkably in the limit of long observation time. We identify this slow oscillation as the unique survivor of destructive quantum interference between the many-body modes. The oscillation is found to decay algebraically with time to a constant value. All the key features are demonstrated analytically with numerical evaluations for specific results.

  16. Modelling Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2008-09-03

    We briefly review two concepts of time - the usual time associated with "being" and more recent ideas, answering to the description of "becoming". The approximation involved in the former is examined. Finally we argue that it is (unpredictable) fluctuations that underlie time.

  17. Dynamics of Periodically-kicked Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin K. Lin; Lai-Sang Young

    2010-04-21

    We review some recent results surrounding a general mechanism for producing chaotic behavior in periodically-kicked oscillators. The key geometric ideas are illustrated via a simple linear shear model.

  18. Impact of Motor Failures on Payback Periods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheek, K. F.; Pillay, P.; Dudley, K. J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper uses MotorMaster and Vaughen's Complete Price Guide to determine payback periods for different motor failure scenarios. Some scenarios considered are rewinds, reconditions, and replacement of bearings. Prices for these repairs...

  19. University of Oregon Libraries Types of Periodicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockery, Shawn

    University of Oregon Libraries Types of Periodicals Scholarly Sources Popular Sources SCHOLARLY American Quarterly RN Automotive News Library Journal Restaurants & Institutions Chemical Engineering News & biographical information Statistics, including forecasts Some book reviews Commentary on political & social

  20. Distribution of Time-Energy Entanglement over 100 km fiber using superconducting single-photon detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang Zhang; Hiroki Takesue; Sae Woo Nam; Carsten Langrock; Xiuping Xie; M. M. Fejer; Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    2007-12-25

    In this letter, we report an experimental realization of distributing entangled photon pairs over 100 km of dispersion-shifted fiber. In the experiment, we used a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide to generate the time-energy entanglement and superconducting single-photon detectors to detect the photon pairs after 100 km. We also demonstrate that the distributed photon pairs can still be useful for quantum key distribution and other quantum communication tasks.

  1. Quasi-bound states in periodically driven scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Landa

    2015-06-29

    We present an approach for obtaining eigenfunctions of periodically driven time-dependent Hamiltonians. Assuming an approximate scale separation between two spatial regions where different potentials dominate, we derive an explicit expansion for scattering problems with mixed cylindrical and spherical symmetry, by matching wavefunctions of a periodic linear drive in the exterior region to solutions of an arbitrary interior potential expanded in spherical waves. Using this method we study quasi-bound states of a square-well potential in three dimensions subject to an axial driving force. In the nonperturbative regime we show how eigenfunctions develop an asymptotic dressing of different partial waves, accompanied by large periodic oscillations in the angular momentum and a nonmonotonous dependence of the decay rate on the drive strength. We extend these results to the strong driving regime near a resonant intersection of the quasi-energy surfaces of two bound states of different symmetry. Our approach can be applied to general quantum scattering problems of particles subject to periodic fields.

  2. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    and Technology Implementation Office P.O. Box 5080 Austin, TX 78763-5080 13. Type of Report and Period Covered rehabilitation projects with potentially significant cost implications. This research project is designed channel, Pitot tube 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

  3. DURING THIS REPORTING PERIOD, WE ISSUED 45 REPORTS; IDENTIFIED $30.8 MILLION IN FUNDS PUT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratory | version of the1996of EnergyIdahoS . D EREPORTS;

  4. Quantum Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ashmead

    2010-05-05

    Normally we quantize along the space dimensions but treat time classically. But from relativity we expect a high level of symmetry between time and space. What happens if we quantize time using the same rules we use to quantize space? To do this, we generalize the paths in the Feynman path integral to include paths that vary in time as well as in space. We use Morlet wavelet decomposition to ensure convergence and normalization of the path integrals. We derive the Schr\\"odinger equation in four dimensions from the short time limit of the path integral expression. We verify that we recover standard quantum theory in the non-relativistic, semi-classical, and long time limits. Quantum time is an experiment factory: most foundational experiments in quantum mechanics can be modified in a way that makes them tests of quantum time. We look at single and double slits in time, scattering by time-varying electric and magnetic fields, and the Aharonov-Bohm effect in time.

  5. Majorana DUSEL R&D Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, James E.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Mintzer, Esther E.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Gerlach, David C.; Farmer, Orville T.; Liezers, Martin; Lepel, Elwood A.; Miley, Harry S.; Edwards, Danny J.

    2010-09-21

    This report summarizes the work performed at PNNL under the project Majorana Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay DUSEL R&D over the period of FY07-FY09.

  6. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 6. Blast measurements. Part 4. Pressure-time measurements in the Mach region. Sections 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, J.F.; Sokol, G.M.; Anastasion, S.N.; Vader, R.L.; Walthall, E.R.

    1985-09-01

    The objective of the laboratory and field work described in this report was to make accurate measurements of air blast in the Mach region from two explosions of Operation Greenhouse. Measurements were made at constant height along a single radius on Test Dog and along two different radii for test Easy. In addition, diaphragm-type inductance gages were installed at five different heights on approximately the same radii on test Easy. The spring-piston gage successfully did the job it was designed to do. The diaphragm-type inductance-gage measuring system had an accuracy of 2% in pressure and a resolving time of approximately 1 musec. Complete details concerning equipment design, field operation, and recommendations for future use of the systems are presented.

  7. Confinement Time Exceeding One Second for a Toroidal Electron Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marler, J. P.; Stoneking, M. R.

    2008-04-18

    Nearly steady-state electron plasmas are trapped in a toroidal magnetic field for the first time. We report the first results from a new toroidal electron plasma experiment, the Lawrence Non-neutral Torus II, in which electron densities on the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3} are trapped in a 270 deg. toroidal arc (670 G toroidal magnetic field) by application of trapping potentials to segments of a conducting shell. The total charge inferred from measurements of the frequency of the m=1 diocotron mode is observed to decay on a 3 s time scale, a time scale that approaches the predicted limit due to magnetic pumping transport. Three seconds represents {approx_equal}10{sup 5} periods of the lowest frequency plasma mode, indicating that nearly steady-state conditions are achieved.

  8. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  9. Periodic subsystem density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genova, Alessandro; Pavanello, Michele; Ceresoli, Davide

    2014-11-07

    By partitioning the electron density into subsystem contributions, the Frozen Density Embedding (FDE) formulation of subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) has recently emerged as a powerful tool for reducing the computational scaling of Kohn–Sham DFT. To date, however, FDE has been employed to molecular systems only. Periodic systems, such as metals, semiconductors, and other crystalline solids have been outside the applicability of FDE, mostly because of the lack of a periodic FDE implementation. To fill this gap, in this work we aim at extending FDE to treat subsystems of molecular and periodic character. This goal is achieved by a dual approach. On one side, the development of a theoretical framework for periodic subsystem DFT. On the other, the realization of the method into a parallel computer code. We find that periodic FDE is capable of reproducing total electron densities and (to a lesser extent) also interaction energies of molecular systems weakly interacting with metallic surfaces. In the pilot calculations considered, we find that FDE fails in those cases where there is appreciable density overlap between the subsystems. Conversely, we find FDE to be in semiquantitative agreement with Kohn–Sham DFT when the inter-subsystem density overlap is low. We also conclude that to make FDE a suitable method for describing molecular adsorption at surfaces, kinetic energy density functionals that go beyond the GGA level must be employed.

  10. 2013 INTERNSHIP REPORT RICE MBA FULL TIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aazhang, Behnaam

    Michael Fisackerly Midstream Financial Analyst Apple Raymond Dee Marketing Analytics Intern Arcos Medical Operations Analyst Freeport-McMoRan Oil & Gas Taylor Throckmorton Treasury Intern GE - Energy Management Elizabeth Chao GE-XD Power Delivery Intern GE - Oil & Gas Damian Savoy ECLP Summer Associate Jeff Li ECLP

  11. 2015 INTERNSHIP REPORT RICE MBA FULL TIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aazhang, Behnaam

    Marketing Intern Alliance Residential Company Fengyi Zhang Development Analyst Intern Apache Corporation Aaron Fellers Oil and Gas Marketing Intern Atwood Oceanics Shouzhen Luo Finance Intern Baker Hughes Ivy Jonathan Daum Oil and Gas Credit Analyst Andrew Pierpont Oil and Gas Credit Analyst Credit Suisse John

  12. Search for time modulations in the decay rate of 40K and 232Th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bellotti; C. Broggini; G. Di Carlo; M. Laubenstein; R. Menegazzo; M. Pietroni

    2014-05-13

    Time modulations at per mil level have been reported to take place in the decay constant of about 15 nuclei with period of one year (most cases) but also of about one month or one day. In this paper we give the results of the activity measurement of a 40K source and a 232Th one. The two experiments have been done at the Gran Sasso Laboratory during a period of about 500 days, above ground (40K) and underground (232Th) with a target sensitivity of a few parts over 10^5. We also give the results of the activity measurement at the time of the X-class solar flares which took place in May 2013. Briefly, our measurements do not show any evidence of unexpected time dependence in the decay rate of 40K and 232Th.

  13. Kodama time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abreu, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    In a general time-dependent (3+1)-dimensional spherically symmetric spacetime, the so-called Kodama vector is a naturally defined geometric quantity that is timelike outside the evolving horizon and so defines a preferred class of fiducial observers. However the Kodama vector does not by itself define any preferred notion of time. We demonstrate that a preferred time coordinate - which we shall call Kodama time - can be introduced by taking the additional step of applying the Clebsch decomposition theorem to the Kodama vector. We thus construct a geometrically preferred coordinate system for any time-dependent spherically symmetric spacetime, and explore its properties. In particular we use this formalism to construct a general class of conservation laws, generalizing Kodama's energy flux. We study the geometrically preferred fiducial observers, and demonstrate that it is possible to define and calculate a generalized notion of surface gravity that is valid throughout the entire evolving spacetime. Furthermor...

  14. Theoretical and Computational Investigation of Periodically Focused Intense Charged-Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-06-26

    The purpose of this report is to summarize results of theoretical and computational investigations of periodically focused intense charged-particle beams in parameter regimes relevant to the development of advanced high-brightness, high-power accelerators for high-energy physics research. The breakthroughs and highlights in our research in the period from April 1, 2010 to March 30, 2013 were: a) Theory and simulation of adiabatic thermal Child-Langmuir flow; b) Particle-in-cell simulations of adiabatic thermal beams in periodic solenoidal focusing field; c)Dynamics of charged particles in an adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium in a periodic solenoidal focusing field; d) Training of undergraduate researchers and graduate student in accelerator and beam physics. A brief introduction and summary is presented. Detailed descriptions of research results are provided in an appendix of publications at the end of the report.

  15. Sequential conditions for fixed and periodic points 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Burnis Charles

    1970-01-01

    ) (Member) ~A (Month) 1970 (Year) ~04SQQ ABSTRACT Sec, uential Conditions fo. Fixed and Periodic Points (August 1970) Burnis C. Peter, Jr. , B. A. , Texas ASM University; M. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Jack Bryant and L. F. Guseman, Jr.... Let (X, d) be a metric space and f a selfmap of X. It is shown that a number of known theorems on the existence of fixed and periodic points are related through simple properties of the n sequence (f ) of iterates . ACMOVI. EDGEMENTS I wish...

  16. Einstein@Home all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in LIGO S5 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Farr, B F; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner}, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Langley, A; Lantz, B

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents results of an all-sky searches for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range [50, 1190] Hz and with frequency derivative ranges of [-2 \\times 10^-9, 1.1 \\times 10^-10] Hz/s for the fifth LIGO science run (S5). The novelty of the search lies in the use of a non-coherent technique based on the Hough-transform to combine the information from coherent searches on timescales of about one day. Because these searches are very computationally intensive, they have been deployed on the Einstein@Home distributed computing project infrastructure. The search presented here is about a factor 3 more sensitive than the previous Einstein@Home search in early S5 LIGO data. The post-processing has left us with eight surviving candidates. We show that deeper follow-up studies rule each of them out. Hence, since no statistically significant gravitational wave signals have been detected, we report upper limits on the intrinsic gravitational wave amplitude h0. For example, in the 0.5 Hz-wide band at 15...

  17. New insights into the quasi-periodic X-ray burster GS 0836-429

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aranzana, E; Kuulkers, E

    2015-01-01

    GS 0836-429 is a neutron star X-ray transient that displays Type-I X-ray bursts. In 2003 and 2004 it experienced two outbursts in X-rays. We present here an analysis of the system bursting properties during these outbursts. We studied the evolution of the 2003-2004 outbursts in soft X-rays using RXTE (2.5-12 keV; ASM), and in hard X-rays with INTEGRAL (17-80 keV, IBIS/ISGRI). Using data from the JEM-X monitor onboard INTEGRAL we detected 61 Type-I X-ray bursts, and confirm that the source displayed a quasi-periodic burst recurrence time of about 2.3 hours. We improve the characterization of the fuel composition, as well as the description of the typical burst durations and fluences. We estimate the average value of $\\alpha$ to be $49\\pm\\,3$. This value together with the observed burst profiles indicate a regime of a mixed He/H runaway triggered by unstable helium ignition. In addition, we report the detection of four series of double bursts, with burst recurrence times of $\\leq\\,20$ minutes. The measured recu...

  18. PULSATION PERIOD VARIATIONS IN THE RRc LYRAE STAR KIC 5520878

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Zee, A.; Edmondson, William H.; Lindner, John F.; Kia, Behnam; Ditto, William L.; Stevens, Ian R. E-mail: jgl@phys.hawaii.edu E-mail: w.h.edmondson@bham.ac.uk E-mail: wditto@hawaii.edu E-mail: irs@star.sr.bham.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    Learned et al. proposed that a sufficiently advanced extra-terrestrial civilization may tickle Cepheid and RR Lyrae variable stars with a neutrino beam at the right time, thus causing them to trigger early and jogging the otherwise very regular phase of their expansion and contraction. This would turn these stars into beacons to transmit information throughout the galaxy and beyond. The idea is to search for signs of phase modulation (in the regime of short pulse duration) and patterns, which could be indicative of intentional, omnidirectional signaling. We have performed such a search among variable stars using photometric data from the Kepler space telescope. In the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878, we have found two such regimes of long and short pulse durations. The sequence of period lengths, expressed as time series data, is strongly autocorrelated, with correlation coefficients of prime numbers being significantly higher (p = 99.8%). Our analysis of this candidate star shows that the prime number oddity originates from two simultaneous pulsation periods and is likely of natural origin. Simple physical models elucidate the frequency content and asymmetries of the KIC 5520878 light curve. Despite this SETI null result, we encourage testing of other archival and future time-series photometry for signs of modulated stars. This can be done as a by-product to the standard analysis, and can even be partly automated.

  19. Localization length of nearly periodic layered metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Barco, O

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed numerically the localization length of light $\\xi$ for nearly periodic arrangements of homogeneous stacks (formed exclusively by right-handed materials) and mixed stacks (with alternating right and left-handed metamaterials). Layers with index of refraction $n_1$ and thickness $L_1$ alternate with layers of index of refraction $n_2$ and thickness $L_2$. Positional disorder has been considered by shifting randomly the positions of the layer boundaries with respect to periodic values. For homogeneous stacks, we have shown that the localization length is modulated by the corresponding bands and that $\\xi$ is enhanced at the center of each allowed band. In the limit of long-wavelengths $\\lambda$, the parabolic behavior previously found in purely disordered systems is recovered, whereas for $\\lambda \\ll L_1 + L_2$ a saturation is reached. In the case of nearly periodic mixed stacks with the condition $|n_1 L_1|=|n_2 L_2|$, instead of bands there is a periodic arrangement of Lorenztian resonances, ...

  20. Utility Building Analysis Billing Period: NOV -2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ELECTRICITY Consumption MUNICIPAL WATER Consumption 8 CCF STEAM Consumption CHILLED WATER Consumption GAS Building Analysis Billing Period: NOV - 2013 032 JACKSON HALL: 150,393 Square Feet ELECTRICITY Consumption,550 Square Feet ELECTRICITY Consumption 114,185 KWHRS MUNICIPAL WATER Consumption 1,423 CCF STEAM Consumption

  1. Semiannual Report to Congress on Inspector General Audit Reports, October 1, 1993--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    During this period the Department took final action on five contract and financial assistance audit reports. At the end of the period only four reports awaited final action. With regard to operational, financial, and preaward audit, final action was taken on 40 reports, resulting in 84 audit reports needing final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first outlines significant audit accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of these reports.

  2. Quantum time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovannetti, Vittorio

    We give a consistent quantum description of time, based on Page and Wootters’s conditional probabilities mechanism, which overcomes the criticisms that were raised against similar previous proposals. In particular we show ...

  3. Chow Time 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    -1 THE PREDICTION OF BUS ARRIVAL TIME USING AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION SYSTEMS DATA A Dissertation by RAN HEE JEONG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2004 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE PREDICTION OF BUS ARRIVAL TIME USING AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION SYSTEMS DATA A Dissertation by RAN HEE JEONG Submitted to Texas A...

  4. Research Report Report 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Report 2012 #12;#12;Research Report 2012 #12;#12;Table of contents Numerical weather, aerosols and air quality page 36 Snow page 40 Oceanography page 44 Observation engineering page 48 Research for aeronautics page 54 Annexes page 57 #12;4 . Research Report 2012 The mission statement of Météo

  5. Magnetic field gradients in solar wind plasma and geophysics periods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bershadskii

    2006-11-16

    Using recent data obtained by Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) the pumping scale of the magnetic field gradients of the solar wind plasma has been calculated. This pumping scale is found to be equal to 24h $\\pm$ 2h. The ACE spacecraft orbits at the L1 libration point which is a point of Earth-Sun gravitational equilibrium about 1.5 million km from Earth. Since the Earth's magnetosphere extends into the vacuum of space from approximately 80 to 60,000 kilometers on the side toward the Sun the pumping scale cannot be a consequence of the 24h-period of the Earth's rotation. Vise versa, a speculation is suggested that for the very long time of the coexistence of Earth and of the solar wind the weak interaction between the solar wind and Earth could lead to stochastic synchronization between the Earth's rotation and the pumping scale of the solar wind magnetic field gradients. This synchronization could transform an original period of the Earth's rotation to the period close to the pumping scale of the solar wind magnetic field gradients.

  6. Elsevier Journal Specific Embargo Periods 2013 Journal Name Issn Embargo Period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio

    Elsevier Journal Specific Embargo Periods 2013 Journal Name Issn Embargo Period ACADEMIC PEDIATRICS 18762859 12 ACADEMIC RADIOLOGY 10766332 12 ACC CARDIOSOURCE REVIEW JOURNAL 15568571 12 ACCIDENT ANALYSIS 18759637 24 AEROSPACE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 12709638 24 AESTHETIC SURGERY JOURNAL 1090820X 12 AESTHETISCHE

  7. User Experiment Time-Line

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Experiment Time-Line Event Target Call for proposal 2 months before proposals are due PAC Proposals Due 7 weeks before PAC meeting TAC Report for PAC Proposals (includes...

  8. NANOTECHNOLOGY INITIATIVE Annual Report FY 20092010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NC STATE NANOTECHNOLOGY INITIATIVE Annual Report FY 20092010 In This Report: · Raleigh named top AS AN EMERGING LEADER IN THE FIELD OF NANOTECHNOLOGY." Dr. Gregory Parsons, NC State Nanotechnology Initiative was a period of tremendous growth for nanotechnology activitiesThis past year was a period of tremendous growth

  9. Periodically-driven quantum matter: the case of resonant modulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Goldman; J. Dalibard; M. Aidelsburger; N. R. Cooper

    2015-03-06

    Quantum systems can show qualitatively new forms of behavior when they are driven by fast time-periodic modulations. In the limit of large driving frequency, the long-time dynamics of such systems can often be described by a time-independent effective Hamiltonian, which is generally identified through a perturbative treatment. Here, we present a general formalism that describes time-modulated physical systems, in which the driving frequency is large, but resonant with respect to energy spacings inherent to the system at rest. Such a situation is currently exploited in optical-lattice setups, where superlattice (or Wannier-Stark-ladder) potentials are resonantly modulated so as to control the tunneling matrix elements between lattice sites, offering a powerful method to generate artificial fluxes for cold-atom systems. The formalism developed in this work identifies the basic ingredients needed to generate interesting flux patterns and band structures using resonant modulations. Additionally, our approach allows for a simple description of the micro-motion underlying the dynamics; we illustrate its characteristics based on diverse dynamic-lattice configurations. It is shown that the impact of the micro-motion on physical observables strongly depends on the implemented scheme, suggesting that a theoretical description in terms of the effective Hamiltonian alone is generally not sufficient to capture the full time-evolution of the system.

  10. Multi-period Optimal Procurement and Demand Responses in the Presence of Uncertain Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wierman, Adam

    Multi-period Optimal Procurement and Demand Responses in the Presence of Uncertain Supply Libin markets, uncertainty in renewable generation, and real-time dynamic demand response. A load-serving entity day-ahead decision, propose real-time demand response algorithm, and study the effect of volume

  11. Real-Time Task Scheduling under Thermal Constraints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Youngwoo

    2010-10-12

    periodic tasks and non-real-time, but latency-sensitive, aperiodic jobs. We first introduce the Transient Overclocking Server, which safely reduces the response time of aperiodic jobs in the presence of hard real-time periodic tasks and thermal constraints...

  12. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, October 1, 1997--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s eighteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1997, through March 31, 1998, the Department took final action on 20 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 80 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on one contract and financial assistance audit, leaving two reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of those reports.

  13. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, October 1, 1996--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s sixteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1996, through March 31, 1997, the Department took final action on 31 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 74 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on 11 contract and financial assistance audits, leaving no reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of those reports.

  14. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports: April 1--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s seventeenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, April 1 through September 30, 1997, the Department took final action on 29 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 72 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on five contract and financial assistance audits, leaving two reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of those reports.

  15. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General Audit Reports, October 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s twelfth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1994 through March 31, 1995, the Department took final action on 32 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 90 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on four contract and financial assistance audits, leaving four reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of these reports.

  16. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, April 1--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s fifteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, April 1, 1996, through September 30, 1996, the Department took final action on 34 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 87 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on seven contract and financial assistance audits, leaving two reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector Generator audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective action on each of these reports.

  17. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, April 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s thirteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, April 1, 1995, through September 30, 1995, the Department took final action on 33 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 96 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on 2 contract and financial assistance audits, leaving 2 reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of these reports.

  18. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports: October 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy`s fourteenth Semiannual Report to Congress submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-504), agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report complements a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General that provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on Inspector General audit reports. During the period covered by this report, October 1, 1995, through March 31, 1996, the Department took final action on 35 operational, financial, and preaward audit reports. At the end of the period 92 reports awaited final action. Final action was taken on two contract and financial assistance audits, leaving two reports requiring final action at the end of the period. This report has three sections. The first section outlines significant audit resolution and followup accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables that illustrate the status of final action on Inspector General audit reports. The third lists the audit reports that are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action. This section also provides the status of corrective actions on each of these reports.

  19. University Library Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    and a recognition of the need to provide zones within the building for different types of library user behaviourUniversity Library Annual Report 2011-2012 #12;Academic Year 2011-12 brought with it another period of turbulent change ­ most of it positive ­ for the University Library. The major and very tangible difference

  20. The Super Period Matrix With Ramond Punctures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Witten

    2015-01-11

    We generalize the super period matrix of a super Riemann surface to the case that Ramond punctures are present. For a super Riemann surface of genus g with 2r Ramond punctures, we define, modulo certain choices that generalize those in the classical theory (and assuming a certain generic condition is satisfied), a g|r x g|r period matrix that is symmetric in the Z_2-graded sense. As an application, we analyze the genus 2 vacuum amplitude in string theory compactifications to four dimensions that are supersymmetric at tree level. We find an explanation for a result that has been found in orbifold examples in explicit computations by D'Hoker and Phong: with their integration procedure, the genus 2 vacuum amplitude always vanishes "pointwise" after summing over spin structures, and hence is given entirely by a boundary contribution.

  1. Beat Cepheid Period Ratios from OPAL Opacities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Morgan; D. L. Welch

    1997-06-26

    The discovery of a large number of beat Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud in the MACHO survey, provides an opportunity to compare the characteristics of such Cepheids over a range of metallicities. We produced a large grid of linear nonadiabatic pulsation models using the OPAL opacity tables and with compositions corresponding to those of the Milky Way, and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. Using the relationship between the period ratio and the main pulsation period, we are able to define a range of models which correspond to the observed beat Cepheids, and thereby constrain the physical characteristics of the LMC beat Cepheids. We are also able to make some predictions about the nature of the yet-to-be-discovered SMC beat Cepheids.

  2. LANSCE Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Robinson; Audrey Archuleta; Barbara Maes; Dan Strottman; Earl Hoffman; Garth Tietjen; Gene Farnum; Geoff Greene; Joyce Roberts; Ken Johnson; Paul Lewis; Roger Pynn; Stan Schriber; Steve Sterbenz; Steve Wender; Sue Harper

    1999-02-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Activity Report describes scientific and technological progress and achievements in LANSCE Division during the period of 1995 to 1998. This report includes a message from the Division Director, an overview of LANSCE, sponsor overviews, research highlights, advanced projects and facility upgrades achievements, experimental and user program accomplishments, news and events, and a list of publications. The research highlights cover the areas of condensed-matter science and engineering, accelerator science, nuclear science, and radiography. This report also contains a compact disk that includes an overview, the Activity Report itself, LANSCE operations progress reports for 1996 and 1997, experiment reports from LANSCE users, as well as a search capability.

  3. Time Limitation on Direct Subsidized Loan Eligibility for First-Time Borrowers on or after July 1, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    1 of 3 Time Limitation on Direct Subsidized Loan Eligibility for First- Time Borrowers on or after July 1, 2013 Maximum eligibility period to receive Direct Subsidized Loans There is a limit on the maximum period of time (measured in academic years) that you can receive Direct Subsidized Loans

  4. Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding 5 Years Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of Performance Exceeding 5 Years Attached is Policy Flash 2013-41 Contracts Periods of...

  5. Outburst-related period changes of recurrent nova CI aquilae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, R. E.; Honeycutt, R. K., E-mail: honey@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: rewilson@ufl.edu [Astronomy Department, Indiana University, Swain Hall West, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Pre-outburst and post-outburst light curves and post-outburst eclipse timings are analyzed to measure any period (P) change related to nova CI Aql's outburst of early 2000 and a mean post-outburst dP/dt, which then lead to estimates of the accreting component's rate of mass (M) change and its overall outburst-related change of mass over roughly a decade of observations. We apply a recently developed procedure for unified analysis of three timing-related data types (light curves, radial velocities, and eclipse timings), although with only light curves and timings in this case. Fits to the data are reasonably good without need for a disk in the light-curve model, although the disk certainly exists and has an important role in our post-outburst mass flow computations. Initial experiments showed that, although there seems to be an accretion hot spot, it has essentially no effect on derived outburst-related ?P or on post-outburst dP/dt. Use of atomic time (HJED) in place of HJD also has essentially nil effect on ?P and dP/dt. We find ?P consistently negative in various types of solutions, although at best only marginally significant statistically in any one experiment. Pre-outburst HJD {sub 0} and P results are given, as are post-outburst HJD {sub 0}, P, and dP/dt, with light curves and eclipse times as joint input, and also with only eclipse time input. Post-outburst dP/dt is negative at about 2.4?. Explicit formulae for mass transfer rates and epoch-to-epoch mass change are developed and applied. A known offset in the magnitude zero point for 1991-1994 is corrected.

  6. Short-period X-ray oscillations in super-soft novae and persistent SSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ness, J -U; Osborne, J P; Kuulkers, E; Henze, M; Piro, A L; Drake, J J; Dobrotka, A; Schwarz, G; Starrfield, S; Kretschmar, P; Hirsch, M; Wilms, J

    2015-01-01

    Transient short-period <100s oscillations have been found in the X-ray light curves of three novae during their SSS phase and in one persistent SSS. We pursue an observational approach to determine possible driving mechanisms and relations to fundamental system parameters such as the white dwarf mass. We performed a systematic search for short-period oscillations in all available XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray light curves of persistent SSS and novae during their SSS phase. To study time evolution, we divided each light curve into short time segments and computed power spectra. We then constructed dynamic power spectra from which we identified transient periodic signals even when only present for a short time. From all time segments of each system, we computed fractions of time when periodic signals were detected. In addition to the previously known systems with short-period oscillations, RS Oph (35s), KT Eri (35s), V339 Del (54s), and Cal 83 (67s), we found one additional system, LMC 2009a (33s), and also c...

  7. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, April 1 to September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This is the fifth Semiannual Report to Congress by the Secretary of Energy to be submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988, agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report is complementary to a report prepared by the Department`s Office of Inspector General (IG), which provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on IG audit reports. During the period covered by this report, from April 1 to September 30, 1991, the Department took final action on 15 contract and financial assistance audit reports. At the end of the period, there were only five reports pending final action, which represents a decrease of 29 percent from the previous period. This report has three sections. The first outlines significant management accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables which illustrate the status of final action on IG audit reports. The third lists the audit reports which are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action, and provides the status of corrective actions on each report.

  8. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, April 1 to September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This is the fifth Semiannual Report to Congress by the Secretary of Energy to be submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988, agency heads are to report to Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report is complementary to a report prepared by the Department's Office of Inspector General (IG), which provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on IG audit reports. During the period covered by this report, from April 1 to September 30, 1991, the Department took final action on 15 contract and financial assistance audit reports. At the end of the period, there were only five reports pending final action, which represents a decrease of 29 percent from the previous period. This report has three sections. The first outlines significant management accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables which illustrate the status of final action on IG audit reports. The third lists the audit reports which are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action, and provides the status of corrective actions on each report.

  9. Microsoft Word - Alcoa Extended Initial Period ROD - 2010-10...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extended Initial Period... 6 b. Benefits to BPA will equal or exceed costs for the Extended Initial Period of the Block Contract. ......

  10. DOE Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement DOE Extends Public Comment Period for the Draft Uranium Leasing...

  11. Comparison of quantization of charge transport in periodic and open pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gian Michele Graf; Gregorio Ortelli

    2007-09-19

    We compare the charges transported in two systems, a spatially periodic and an open quantum pump, both depending periodically and adiabatically on time. The charge transported in a cycle was computed by Thouless, respectively by Buttiker et al. in the two cases. We show that the results agree in the limit where the two physical situations become the same, i.e., that of a large open pump.

  12. Short-Period RF Undulator for a SASE Nanometer source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2001-12-21

    Analysis is described towards development of a RF undulator with a period < 1 cm, an undulator parameter K of the order of unity, and a gap greater than 2.25 mm. The application for the undulator is for a SASE source to produce 1 nm wavelength radiation using a low energy electron beam in the range 1-2 GeV. Particle orbit calculations in a conventional standing-wave resonator configuration show that the presence of a co-propagating component of RF field can cause deleterious motion for the undulating electrons that can seriously degrade their radiation spectrum. To obviate this problem, resonator designs were devised in which only the counter-propagating field components interact with the particles. Two resonator configurations with the same undulator parameter K = 0.4 have been devised and are described in this report.

  13. Energy Management Report November 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Management Report November 2014 #12; TAMU Energy Management Report it established for reducing its usage of electricity, gasoline, and natural gas: Energy consumption per period from FY02 ­ FY14. The goal in the 2005 Energy Conservation Plan was to achieve an EUI of 275

  14. Time-resolved photometry of cataclysmic variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Papadaki; H. M. J. Boffin; J. Cuypers; V. Stanishev; Z. Kraicheva; V. Genkov

    2003-12-18

    We present time-resolved photometry of two cataclysmic variables whose CCD photometric observations were obtained with the 1m telescope at the South African Astronomical Observatory in October 2002 and August 2003 and with the 1m telescope at Hoher List in Germany. Concerning MCT 2347-3144 we detect for the first time a period of 6.65h. For V1193 Ori the 3.96 h periodicity has for the first time been confirmed through time-resolved photometry.

  15. FINAL REPORT: Transformational electrode drying process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claus Daniel, C.; Wixom, M.

    2013-12-19

    This report includes major findings and outlook from the transformational electrode drying project performance period from January 6, 2012 to August 1, 2012. Electrode drying before cell assembly is an operational bottleneck in battery manufacturing due to long drying times and batch processing. Water taken up during shipment and other manufacturing steps needs to be removed before final battery assembly. Conventional vacuum ovens are limited in drying speed due to a temperature threshold needed to avoid damaging polymer components in the composite electrode. Roll to roll operation and alternative treatments can increase the water desorption and removal rate without overheating and damaging other components in the composite electrode, thus considerably reducing drying time and energy use. The objective of this project was the development of an electrode drying procedure, and the demonstration of processes with no decrease in battery performance. The benchmark for all drying data was an 80°C vacuum furnace treatment with a residence time of 18 – 22 hours. This report demonstrates an alternative roll to roll drying process with a 500-fold improvement in drying time down to 2 minutes and consumption of only 30% of the energy compared to vacuum furnace treatment.

  16. Timing the Parkes Multibeam Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. N. Manchester; A. G. Lyne; F. Camilo; V. M. Kaspi; I. H. Stairs; F. Crawford; D. J. Morris; J. F. Bell; N. D'Amico

    1999-11-17

    Measurement of accurate positions, pulse periods and period derivatives is an essential follow-up to any pulsar survey. The procedures being used to obtain timing parameters for the pulsars discovered in the Parkes multibeam pulsar survey are described. Completed solutions have been obtained so far for about 80 pulsars. They show that the survey is preferentially finding pulsars with higher than average surface dipole magnetic fields. Eight pulsars have been shown to be members of binary systems and some of the more interesting results relating to these are presented.

  17. IUPAC Periodic Table of Isotopes for the Educational Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden N. E.; Holden,N.E.; Coplen,T.B.

    2012-07-15

    John Dalton first proposed the concept of atomic weights of the elements in the first decade of the nineteenth century. These atomic weights of the chemical elements were thought of as constants of nature, similar to the speed of light. Dmitri Mendeleev arranged the atomic weights of the elements in ascending order of value and used the systematic variation of their chemical properties to produce his Periodic Table of the Elements in 1869. Measurement of atomic weight values became an important chemical activity for a century and a half. Theodore Richards received a Noble Prize for his work in this area. In 1913, Fredrick Soddy found a species of radium, which had an atomic weight value of 228, compared to the familiar radium gas value of 226. Soddy coined the term 'isotope' (Greek for 'in the same place') to account for this second atomic weight value in the radium position of the Periodic Table. Both of these isotopes of radium are radioactive. Radioactive isotopes are energetically unstable and will decay (disintegrate) over time. The time it takes for one half of a sample of a given radioactive isotope to decay is the half-life of that isotope. In addition to having different atomic weight values, radium-226 and radium-228 also have different half-life values. Around the same time as Soddy's work, J.J. Thomson (discoverer of the electron) identified two stable (non-radioactive) isotopes of the same element, neon. Over the next 40 years, the majority of the known chemical elements were found to have two or more stable (or long-lived radioactive isotopes that contribute significantly to the determination of the atomic weights of the elements).

  18. Down-hole periodic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

    1982-10-28

    A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

  19. POSSIBLE DISINTEGRATING SHORT-PERIOD SUPER-MERCURY ORBITING KIC 12557548

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, E.

    We report on the discovery of stellar occultations, observed with Kepler, which recur periodically at 15.685 hr intervals, but which vary in depth from a maximum of 1.3% to a minimum that can be less than 0.2%. The star ...

  20. Dynamical behavior of the motions associated with the nonlinear periodic regime in a laboratory plasma subject to delayed feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukuyama, T.; Shirahama, H. [Faculty of Education, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 3, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Watanabe, Y.; Kawai, Y. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasugakoen 6-1, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Taniguchi, K. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University of Education, Fujinomori-cho 1, Fukakusa, Fushimi-ku, Kyoto 612-8522 (Japan)

    2006-07-15

    Time-delayed feedback is applied to the motions associated with the nonlinear periodic regime generated due to current-driven ion acoustic instability; this is a typical instability in a laboratory plasma, and the dynamical behavior is experimentally investigated using delayed feedback. A time-delayed autosynchronization method is applied. When delayed feedback is applied to the nonlinear periodic orbit, the periodic state changes to various motions depending on the control parameters, namely, the arbitrary time delay and the proportionality constant. Lyapunov exponents are calculated in order to examine the dynamical behavior.

  1. Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final reprot, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluations, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

  2. All-sky Search for Periodic Gravitational Waves in the Full S5 LIGO Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Ganija, M R; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamaretsos, I; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, D; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinsey, M; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H M

    2011-01-01

    We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency band 50-800 Hz and with the frequency time derivative in the range of 0 through -6e-9 Hz/s. Such a signal could be produced by a nearby spinning and slightly non-axisymmetric isolated neutron star in our galaxy. After recent improvements in the search program that yielded a 10x increase in computational efficiency, we have searched in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run and have obtained the most sensitive all-sky upper limits on gravitational wave strain to date. Near 150 Hz our upper limit on worst-case linearly polarized strain amplitude $h_0$ is 1e-24, while at the high end of our frequency range we achieve a worst-case upper limit of 3.8e-24 for all polarizations and sky locations. These results constitute a factor of two improvement upon previously published data. A new detection pipeline utilizing a Loosely Coherent algorithm was able to follow up weaker outliers, increasing the volume of space wher...

  3. KIC 4768731: a bright long-period roAp star in the Kepler Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smalley, B; Murphy, S J; Lehmann, H; Kurtz, D W; Holdsworth, D L; Cunha, M S; Balona, L A; Briquet, M; Bruntt, H; de Cat, P; Lampens, P; Thygesen, A O; Uytterhoeven, K

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification of 61.45 d^-1 (711.2 mu Hz) oscillations, with amplitudes of 62.6-mu mag, in KIC 4768731 (HD 225914) using Kepler photometry. This relatively bright (V=9.17) chemically peculiar star with spectral type A5 Vp SrCr(Eu) has previously been found to exhibit rotational modulation with a period of 5.21 d. Fourier analysis reveals a simple dipole pulsator with an amplitude that has remained stable over a 4-yr time span, but with a frequency that is variable. Analysis of high-resolution spectra yields stellar parameters of T_eff = 8100 +/- 200 K, log g = 4.0 +/- 0.2, [Fe/H] = +0.31 +/- 0.24 and v sin i = 14.8 +/- 1.6 km/s. Line profile variations caused by rotation are also evident. Lines of Sr, Cr, Eu, Mg and Si are strongest when the star is brightest, while Y and Ba vary in anti-phase with the other elements. The abundances of rare earth elements are only modestly enhanced compared to other roAp stars of similar T_eff and log g. Radial velocities in the literature suggest a significant...

  4. Electromagnetic Siegert states for periodic dielectric structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friends R. Ndangali; Sergei V. Shabanov

    2011-08-09

    The formalism of Siegert states to describe the resonant scattering in quantum theory is extended to the resonant scattering of electromagnetic waves on periodic dielectric arrays. The excitation of electromagnetic Siegert states by an incident wave packet and their decay is studied. The formalism is applied to develop a theory of coupled electromagnetic resonances arising in the electromagnetic scattering problem for two such arrays separated by a distance 2h (or, generally, when the physical properties of the scattering array depend on a real coupling parameter h). Analytic properties of Siegert states as functions of the coupling parameter h are established by the Regular Perturbation Theorem which is an extension the Kato-Rellich theorem to the present case. By means of this theorem, it is proved that if the scattering structure admits a bound state in the radiation continuum at a certain value of the coupling parameter h, then there always exist regions within the structure in which the near field can be amplified as much as desired by adjusting the value of h. This establishes a rather general mechanism to control and amplify optical nonlinear effects in periodically structured planar structures possessing a nonlinear dielectric susceptibility.

  5. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for January, February, and March 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2007-04-01

    This report describes the results of groundwater monitoring near the K Basins for the period January, February, and March 2007.

  6. CRD Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ucilia

    2007-01-01

    Research Division Report Deconstructing Microbes Metagenomicon page 2 (Scientific Report SciDAC continued from page 1www.ctwatch.org/quarterly. Report Nano Letters continued

  7. A field expansions method for scattering by periodic multilayered media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malcolm, Alison E.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of acoustic and electromagnetic waves with periodic structures plays an important role

  8. Clean energy from municipal solid waste. Technical progress report No. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klosky, M.

    1996-04-08

    This report documents progress made for the time period of January to April, 1996 in developing and testing a slurry carbonization plant at the Energy and Environment Research Center (EERC) in North Dakota. Various combinations of paper and plastics were carbonized` Performance parameters were assessed and the resulting refuse derived fuel pellets were analyzed for chemical composition and caloric values. Difficulties with performance and reliability of the equipment are discussed.

  9. Equilibrium quasi-periodic configurations with resonant frequencies in quasi-periodic media I: perturbative expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xifeng Su; Lei Zhang; Rafael de la Llave

    2015-03-11

    We consider 1-D quasi-periodic Frenkel-Kontorova models (describing, for example, deposition of materials in a quasi-periodic substratum). We study the existence of equilibria whose frequency (i.e. the inverse of the density of deposited material) is resonant with the frequencies of the substratum. We study perturbation theory for small potential. We show that there are perturbative expansions to all orders for the quasi-periodic equilibria with resonant frequencies. Under very general conditions, we show that there are at least two such perturbative expansions for equilibria for small values of the parameter. We also develop a dynamical interpretation of the equilibria in these quasi-periodic media. We show that the dynamical system has very unusual properties. Using these, we obtain results on the Lyapunov exponents of the resonant quasi-periodic solutions. In a companion paper, we develop a rather unusual KAM theory (requiring new considerations) which establishes that the perturbative expansions converge when the perturbing potentials satisfy a one-dimensional constraint.

  10. Semiannual report to Congress on Inspector General audit reports, October 1, 1991--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    This is the Secretary of Energy's sixth Semiannual Report to Congress to be submitted under the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. Pursuant to the Inspector General Act Amendments of 1988 (Public Law 100-54), agency heads are to report on Congress on the status of final action taken on audit report recommendations. This report is complementary to a report prepared by the Department's Office of Inspector General (IG) which provides information on audit reports issued during the period and on the status of management decisions made on IG audit reports. This report has three sections. The first outlines significant management accomplishments achieved by the Department during the reporting period. The second section contains the statistical tables which illustrate the status of final action on IG audit reports. The third lists the audit reports which are one year or more past management decision and have not completed final action, and provides the status of corrective actions on each report.

  11. Determining Optimal Processor Speeds for Periodic Real-Time Tasks with Different Power Characteristics*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydin, Hakan

    for efficient power- aware design and dynamic power monitoring techniques. Solar- and nuclear-powered systems such as the ACPI (Advanced COP figuration and Power Interface) [I11 for power manage- ment of laptop computers,his technique remains sub-optima.1, even for a system with perfect, knowledge of idle intervals. In other words

  12. Studies of non-diffusive heat conduction through spatially periodic and time-harmonic thermal excitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Kimberlee C. (Kimberlee Chiyoko)

    2015-01-01

    Studies of non-diffusive heat conduction provide insight into the fundamentals of heat transport in condensed matter. The mean free paths (MFPs) of phonons that are most important for conducting heat are well represented ...

  13. Extracting unstable periodic orbits from chaotic time series data Paul So,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Stephen

    , D.C. 20010 2 Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 3

  14. Periodic Charging Scheme for Fixed-Priority Real-Time Systems with Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydin, Hakan

    , the deployed systems use solar panels and piezoelectric units, that exploit solar energy and mechani- cal research and development area. In the last decade, power-aware resource management and scheduling of the day and season in the case of solar energy); but its rate of supply is not necessarily uniform

  15. Systems for optimizing the condition of beef carcasses for distribution over extended time periods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Ronald Douglas

    1974-01-01

    of simulated nitrogen gas atmospheres in comparison to normal air atmospheres for beef storage. Eighty beef sides were divided into quarters and subjected to one of eight treatments 48 hr postmortem. Two kinds of surface protection (unprotected vs. PVC film... wrapping), two rinsing treat- ments (200 ppm chlorine vs. no chlorine rinse), two types of atmos- phere (air vs. nitrogen gas) and two storage intervals (14 vs. 21 days) were compared. Analysis of variance revealed that wrapping in PVC film, rinsing...

  16. Automatic and Accurate Determination of the Onset Time of the Quasi-periodic Oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higuchi, Tomoyuki

    Higuchi The Institute of Statistical Mathematics, 4-6-7 Minami-Azabu, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-8569 Japan eld observation is usually carried out by focusing on a wave- like component obtained by applying on a simple modi - cation of the wavelet analysis, always generates a pseudo precursor prior to a true onset

  17. Time series study of urban rainfall suppression during clean-up periods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Jun

    2009-05-15

    The effect on urban rainfall of pollution aerosols is studied both by data analysis and computational simulation. Our study examines data for urban areas undergoing decadal clean-up. We compare the annual precipitation between polluted sites...

  18. Time series study of urban rainfall suppression during clean-up periods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Jun

    2008-10-10

    . Effects of Pollutant Aerosols on Precipitation……………….... 3 3. Our Focus………………………………………………………. 6 II STUDY OF SUPPRESSION OF PRECIPITATION IN AIR POLLUTIONS BY ANALYZING DATA FROM...)......................................................................................... 21 6 Trends of ratio of annual precipitation amount of Culver City (CC) and Pasadena (PA)...................................................................................... 23 7 The relationship between precipitation and TSP...

  19. Computerized management report system for monitoring manpower and cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullington, V.R.; Stephenson, R.L.; Cardwell, R.G.

    1980-04-01

    Although most cost systems offer complete detail and traceability, not all provide timely detail in a concise form useful to senior management. This system was developed for a multifunction research organization funded from many sources. It extracts cost and manpower data from the general cost systems, summarizes it, compares it by program with previous cost periods, and presents it with minimum detail yet with maximum overview. The system monitors the basic manpower distribution of effort at the source, that is, the division time-card input. Cost data are taken from the central computer ahead of the print-out and report-distribution steps; thus, the summary information is available several days ahead of the detailed reports. This procedure has been regularly used for several months, and has proven to be a valuable tool in management action and planning. 9 figures.

  20. 22 March 2012 Employee Information Lost Time No Lost Time Modified Duties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    22 March 2012 Employee Information Lost Time No Lost Time Modified Duties Last Name First Name the injured worker have personal coverage? Yes No Is the injured worker a partner or director in this business OR Did this condition develop over a period of time? Yes No Hours of employment on the day of accident