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1

PERIODIC GLOW DISCHARGE REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GLOW DISCHARGE REPORT GLOW DISCHARGE REPORT TIME: Jan 11 2014 11:29:09:000PM Power Supply ON/OFF Status OFF Power Supply Fault Status FAULT Power Supply Standby Status ON Power Supply Interlock Status NOT OK HV Power Resistors Status NORMAL Power Supply Voltage 52.00 Power Supply Current -71.00 Electrode 1 Voltage -15.00 Electrode 1 Current -79.00 Electrode 2 Voltage -14.00 Electrode 2 Current -70.00 ROSS 1 Status OPEN ROSS 2 Status OPEN ROSS 1 Common Line OPEN ROSS 2 Common Line OPEN IGBT1 Enable DISABLE IGBT2 Enable DISABLE

2

PERIODIC CRYO REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CRYO REPORT CRYO REPORT TIME: Jan 11 2014 11:29:09:000PM LN2 tank pressure, psi 63.00 LN2 main tank level,inch 48.05 LN2 resv tank level,inch 179.00 Cryostat pressure, psi 0.01 LN2 sump level, inch 0.00 LN2 pump speed, rpm 0.27 LN2 pump pressure, psi 0.00 Scanner OK DIBORANE SYSTEM CRYBOR CONC1 OK CRYBOR CONC2 OK CRYBOR INST1 OK CRYBOR INST2 OK RESISTANCE COIL TEMPERATURES, deg C EF1U, deg C 34.66 EF1L 21.94 EF2U 26.93 EF2L 21.70 EF3U 41.54 EF3L 36.42 EFCU 18.28 EFCL 8.16

3

Climatological Time Series with Periodic Correlation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many climatological time series display a periodic correlation structure. This paper examines three issues encountered when analyzing such time series: detection of periodic correlation, modeling periodic correlation, and trend estimation under ...

Robert Lund; Harry Hurd; Peter Bloomfield; Richard Smith

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Property:TimePeriod | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TimePeriod TimePeriod Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "TimePeriod" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 0 0.4 kV remote control (Smart Grid Project) + Not available + 2 220 kV SSSC device for power flow control (Smart Grid Project) + Jul 2009 Jul 2014 + A A complete and normalized 61850 substation (Smart Grid Project) + Oct 2009 Dec 2015 + ADELE Project AACAES (Smart Grid Project) + Dec 2009 Dec 2013 + AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) + 2011-2014 + AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) (Belgium) + 2011-2014 +

5

Four Time Periods - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... we will be seeing a downward trend in differentials as time moves on. We expect the recent upturn in the light-heavy differentials to be ...

6

Periodic solution of single population models on time scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using the calculus on time scales, we study and establish criterion for the existence of periodic solutions of some scalar dynamical equations on time scales. The existence of periodic solutions for some concrete well-known single population models ... Keywords: Coincidence degree theory, Logistic equations, Periodic solutions, Time scales

Jimin Zhang; Meng Fan; Huaiping Zhu

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Version No: 2013.01 Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: http://www.eia.gov/survey/form/eia_14/instructions.pdf Mailing Address: Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/noticeoog.jsp Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Zip Code - Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov - - - - Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey Email address: U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 PADD 4 Type of Report (Check One ): (Thousands of dollars) (Thousands of barrels) PADD 2 PADD 3 PAD DISTRICT (a) Revision to Report:

8

Particle energization through time-periodic helical magnetic fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We solve for the motion of charged particles in a helical time-periodic ABC (Arnold-Beltrami-Childress) magnetic field. The magnetic field lines of a stationary ABC field with $A=B=C=1$ are chaotic, and we show that the motion of a charged particle in such a field is also chaotic at late time with positive Lyapunov exponent. We further show that in time-periodic (frequency $\\omega$) ABC fields the kinetic energy of a charged particle can increase indefinitely with time. At late times the mean kinetic energy grows as a power law in time with exponent $\\xi$ that approaches unity. For an initial distribution of particles, whose kinetic energy is uniformly distributed within some interval, the PDF of kinetic energy is, at late time, close to a Gaussian but with steeper tails.

Dhrubaditya Mitra; Axel Brandenburg; Brahmananda Dasgupta; Eyvind Niklasson; Abhay Ram

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

13. Type of Report and Period Covered  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rail Corridor preservation and planning for the purpose of reducing or restricting incompatible development is an area of growing importance. This report provides an overview regarding encroachment and the elements that contribute to potentially incompatible development along rail corridors. The report reviews the legal tools that currently exist within Texas for corridor preservation and provides recommendations for new legislation, including draft legislation. The report then reviews the state of practice of corridor planning and preservation with mitigation against encroachment both in Texas and in selected other states around the country. The report pays special attention to incidents in which rail corridors are envisioned to host both freight and passenger services and the implications on land use. Finally, the report provides a review of costs associated to deal with encroachment, whether by planning, preservation, collaboration, or mitigation.

Lisa Loftus-otway; C. Michael Walton; Lynn Blais

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Transmission thresholds in time-periodically driven nonlinear disordered systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study energy propagation in locally time-periodically driven disordered nonlinear chains. For frequencies inside the band of linear Anderson modes, three different regimes are observed with increasing driver amplitude: 1) Below threshold, localized quasiperiodic oscillations and no spreading; 2) Three different regimes in time close to threshold, with almost regular oscillations initially, weak chaos and slow spreading for intermediate times, and finally strong diffusion; 3) Immediate spreading for strong driving. The thresholds are due to simple bifurcations, obtained analytically for a single oscillator, and numerically as turning-points of the nonlinear response manifold for a full chain. Generically, the threshold is nonzero also for infinite chains.

Magnus Johansson; Georgios Kopidakis; Stefano Lepri; Serge Aubry

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

11

Time-Varying z-Transform for the Analysis of Discrete-Time Linear Time Periodic Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article deals with a new representation of linear discrete-time periodic systems. This representation, based on the time-varying z-transform, turns out to be highly efficient in the field of automatic control, when an appropriate choice of ... Keywords: Nyquist criterion, final value theorem, initial value theorem, linear discrete-time periodic systems, time-varying z-transform, time-varying frequency response, time-varying systems

A. Garcia Iturricha; J. Sabatier; A. Oustaloup

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: June 30, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of each project together with progress photographs and the project manager's estimate of the cost to complete the project. Because the reports contain projected costs and also account for budget risks #12;Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: June 30, 2012 Project Number Project Index

Holsinger, Kent

13

EV Project NIssan Leaf Vehicle Summary Report-Reporting period...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

events 80% 16% 4% 2011 ECOtality 1182011 11:44:44 AM INLMIS-11-21904 Page 1 of 11 EV Project Nissan Leaf Vehicle Summary Report Region: Phoenix, AZ Metropolitan Area Number...

14

Reporting Period Start Date: January 1, 2006 Reporting Period End Date: December 31, 2006 Principal Authors:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. The US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a cooperative agreement in 1992 with the South

Nicholas Rigas; Richard A. Wenglarz; Robert Leitner; William H. Day; Doe Award De-fc-nt

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Reporting Period Start Date: 8/21/2006 Reporting Period End Date: 3/30/2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an accounting of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe upon privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. 3 ABSTRACTT Never before has the reduction of oil and gas exploration and production impacts been as important as it is today for operators, regulators, non-governmental organizations and individual landowners. Collectively, these stakeholders are keenly interested in the potential benefits from implementing effective environmental impact reducing technologies and practices. This research

Amy M. Childers

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Changepoint Detection in Periodic and Autocorrelated Time Series  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Undocumented changepoints (inhomogeneities) are ubiquitous features of climatic time series. Level shifts in time series caused by changepoints confound many inference problems and are very important data features. Tests for undocumented ...

Robert Lund; Xiaolan L. Wang; Qi Qi Lu; Jaxk Reeves; Colin Gallagher; Yang Feng

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research activities of the Division are centered primarily in three areas: experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The largest of these efforts, experimental nuclear physics, is dominated by the heavy ion research program. A major responsibility under this program is the operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. During the period of this report, the facility has begun routine operation for the experimental program. The experimental atomic physics program has two components: the accelerator-based studies of basic collisional phenomena and the studies in support of the controlled fusion program. Also associated with the fusion-related studies are a plasma diagnostics program and the operation of an atomic physics data center. The theoretical physics program, both nuclear and atomic, is covered. This program has benefited this year from the success of the VAX-AP computer system and from the increase in manpower provided by the ORNL/University of Tennessee Distinguished Scientist Program. Smaller programs in applications and high-energy physics are summarized. During the period of this report, we continued to explore possible future extensions of the Holifield Facility. We retain a strong interest in a relativistic heavy-ion collider in the 10 x 10 GeV/nuclear energy range. The ideas for such a facility, described in last year's report, have been modified to utilize the HHIRF 25 MV tandem accelerator as the first stage. Finally, the report concludes with some general information on publications, Division activities, and personnel changes.

Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Ultrafast time dynamics studies of periodic lattices with free electron laser radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been proposed that radiation from free electron laser (FEL) at Hamburg (FLASH) can be used for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiments based on the near-infrared (NIR) pump/FEL probe scheme. Here, investigation probing the ultrafast structural dynamics of periodic nano-crystalline organic matter (silver behenate) with such a scheme is reported. Excitation with a femtosecond NIR laser leads to an ultrafast lattice modification which time evolution has been studied through the scattering of vacuum ultraviolet FEL pulses. The found effect last for 6 ps and underpins the possibility for studying nanoperiodic dynamics down to the FEL source time resolution. Furthermore, the possibility of extending the use of silver behenate (AgBh) as a wavelength and temporal calibration tool for experiments with soft x-ray/FEL sources is suggested.

Quevedo, W.; Busse, G.; Hallmann, J.; More, R.; Petri, M.; Rajkovic, I. [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Krasniqi, F.; Rudenko, A. [Max Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Tschentscher, T. [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22671 Hamburg (Germany); Stojanovic, N.; Duesterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Tolkiehn, M. [HASYLAB at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Techert, S. [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Max Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Faster and parameter-free discord search in quasi-periodic time series  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time series discord has proven to be a useful concept for time-series anomaly identification. To search for discords, various algorithms have been developed. Most of these algorithms rely on pre-building an index (such as a trie) for subsequences. Users ... Keywords: anomaly detection, minimax search, periodic time series, time series data mining, time series discord

Wei Luo; Marcus Gallagher

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Geothermal R and D Project report for period April 1, 1976 to...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

30, 1976 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal R and D Project report for period April 1, 1976 to June 30, 1976 Details Activities (1)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

An adaptive multitime multigrid algorithm for time-periodic flow simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multiscale behaviour and multidisciplinary nature of rotorcraft aerodynamics has delayed the introduction of CFD techniques for rotorcraft aerodynamics. The numerical dissipation of standard CFD algorithms may destroy tip vortices before blade-vortex ... Keywords: 02.60.Cb, 02.70.Dh, 03.40.Gc, Multigrid, Space-time discontinuous Galerkin method, Time domain, Time-periodic

H. van der Ven

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Solid state division progress report, period ending February 29, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is reported concerning theoretical solid state physics; surface and near-surface properties of solids; defects in solids; transport properties of solids; neutron scattering; crystal growth and characterization; and isotope research materials.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Growth mechanism of photoreduced silver nanostructures on periodically proton exchanged lithium niobate: Time and concentration dependence  

SciTech Connect

Photodeposition of metallic nanostructures onto ferroelectric surfaces, which have been chemically patterned using a proton exchange process, has recently been demonstrated. By varying the molar concentration of the AgNO{sub 3} solution and the illumination time, one can determine the initial nucleation sites, control the rate of nucleation and the height of silver nanostructures formed, and study the mechanisms by which these processes occurs. The nanoparticles are found to deposit preferentially in the boundary between ferroelectric and proton exchanged regions, in an area proton exchanged via lateral diffusion under the masking layer used for chemical patterning, consistent with our previous results. Using a short illumination time (3 min), we are able to determine that the initial nucleation of the silver nanostructure, having a width of 0.17 {+-} 0.02 {mu}m and a height of 1.61 {+-} 0.98 nm, occurs near the edge of the reactive ion etched area within this lateral diffusion region. Over longer illumination times (15 min), we find that the silver deposition has spread to a width of 1.29 {+-} 0.06 {mu}m, extending across the entire lateral diffusion region. We report that at a high molar concentration of AgNO{sub 3} (10{sup -2} M), the amount of silver deposition for 5 min UV illumination is greater (2.88 {+-} 0.58 nm) compared to that at low (10{sup -4} M) concentrations (0.78 {+-} 0.35 nm), however, this is not the case for longer time periods. With increasing illumination time (15 min), experiments at 10{sup -4} M had greater overall deposition, 6.90 {+-} 1.52 nm, compared to 4.50 {+-} 0.76 nm at 10{sup -2} M. For longer exposure times (30 min) at 10{sup -2} M, the nanostructure height is 4.72 {+-} 0.59 nm, suggesting a saturation in the nanostructure height. The results are discussed in terms of the electric double layer that forms at the crystal surface. There is an order of magnitude difference between the Debye lengths for 10{sup -2} and 10{sup -4} M solutions, i.e., 3.04 vs. 30.40 nm, which suggests the Debye length plays a role in the availability of Ag{sup +} ions at the surface.

Craig Carville, N.; Denning, Denise; Rodriguez, Brian J. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland) [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Manzo, Michele; Gallo, Katia [Department of Applied Physics, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullbacken 21, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)] [Department of Applied Physics, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullbacken 21, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

24

Generation of multiscale magnetic field by parity-invariant time-periodic flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study generation of magnetic fields involving large spatial scales by time- and space-periodic small-scale parity-invariant flows. The anisotropic magnetic eddy diffusivity tensor is calculated by the standard procedure involving expansion of magnetic modes and their growth rates in power series in the scale ratio. Our simulations, conducted for flows with random harmonic composition and exponentially decaying energy spectra, demonstrate that enlargement of the spatial scale of magnetic field is beneficial for generation by time-periodic flows. However, they turn out, in general, to be less efficient dynamos, than steady flows.

V. A. Zheligovsky; O. M. Podvigina

2002-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

25

Physics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in detail in the following areas: Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, the UNISOR program, neutron physics, theoretical physics, the Nuclear Data Project, atomic and plasma physics, and high energy physics. Publications are listed. Separate abstracts were prepared for 34 papers. (WHK)

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Quarterly Construction Status Report Period Ending: March 31, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's estimate of the cost to complete the project. Because the reports contain projected costs and also account Project Parameters Final Budget: $620,000.00 Estimated Cost to Complete: $573,335.63 Project and Program Architectural and Engineering Services Project and Program Management University of Connecticut Health Center

Holsinger, Kent

27

Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses topics in the following areas: Holifield heavy ion research; Experimental Nuclear physics; The Uniser program; Experimental Atomic Physics; Theoretical Physics; Laser and electro-optics lab; High Energy Physics; compilations and evaluations; and accelerator design and development. (FI)

Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Physics division progress report for period ending September 30 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses research being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in physics. The areas covered are: Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility; low/medium energy nuclear physics; high energy experimental physics; the Unisor program; experimental atomic physics; laser and electro-optics lab; theoretical physics; compilations and evaluations; and radioactive ion beam development. (LSP)

Livingston, A.B. [ed.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Locking-time and Information Capacity in CML with Statistical Periodicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we address the statistical periodicity phenomenon on a coupled map lattice. The study was done based on the asymptotic binary patterns. The pattern multiplicity gives us the lattice information capacity, while the entropy rate allows us to calculate the locking-time. Our results suggest that the lattice has low locking-time and high capacity information when the coupling is weak. This is the condition for the system to reproduce a kind of behavior observed in neural networks.

Romeu Miqueias Szmoski; Rodrigo Frehse Pereira; Fabiano Alan Serafim Ferrari; Sandro Ely de Souza Pinto

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

30

Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1985  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1985 fiscal year. The research activities were centered on experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The experimental nuclear physics program is dominated by heavy ion research. A major part of this effort is the responsibility for operating the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility. A major new activity described is the preparation for participation in an ultrarelativistic heavy ion experiment to be performed at CERN in 1986. The experimental atomic physics program has two components: the accelerator-based studies of basic collisional phenomena and the studies in support of the controlled fusion program. Also associated with the fusion-related studies are a plasma diagnostics program and the operation of an atomic physics data center. Theory efforts associated with the UNISOR program are described, as well as smaller programs in applications and high-energy physics. (LEW)

Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the research and development activities of the Physics Division for the 1988 fiscal year, beginning October 1, 1987, and ending September 30, 1988. The activities of this Division are concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. Operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility as a national user facility continues to represent the single largest activity within the Division. This year saw the completion of the acceleration tube upgrade of the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator and the achievement of record terminal potentials, operation for an experiment with 25 million volts on terminal, and successful tests with beam at 25.5 MV. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to be dominated by research utilizing heavy ions. These activities, while continuing to center largely on the Holifield Facility, have seen significant growth in the use of facilities that provide intermediate energies and especially ultrarelativistic beams. The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been intimately associated with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. In addition to the Holifield Facility, the Division operates two smaller facilities, the EN Tandem and the ECR Ion Source Facility, as ''User Resources.'' The efforts in theoretical physics, covering both nuclear and atomic physics, are presented. In addition to research with multicharged heavy ions from the ECR source, the effort on atomic physics in support of the controlled fusion program includes a plasma diagnostics development program. The concentration of this program on optical and laser technology is marked by the change in designation to the Laser and Electro-Optics Lab. A small, continuing effort in elementary particle physics, carried out in collaboration with the University of Tennessee, is reported.

Livingston, A.B. (ed.)

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Tunneling of Massive Dirac Fermions in Graphene through Time-periodic Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy spectrum of graphene sheet with a single barrier structure having a time periodic oscillating height and subjected to magnetic field is analyzed. The corresponding transmission is studied as function of the obtained energy and the potential parameters. Quantum interference within the oscillating barrier has an important effect on quasiparticles tunneling. In particular the time-periodic electromagnetic field generates additional sidebands at energies \\epsilon + l\\hbar \\omega (l=0,\\pm 1, \\cdots) in the transmission probability originating from the photon absorption or emission within the oscillating barrier. Due to numerical difficulties in truncating the resulting coupled channel equations we limited ourselves to low quantum channels, i.e. l=0,\\pm 1.

Ahmed Jellal; Miloud Mekkaoui; El Bouazzaoui Choubabi; Hocine Bahlouli

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

33

Practical reporting times for environmental samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preanalytical holding times for environmental samples are specified because chemical and physical characteristics may change between sampling and chemical analysis. For example, the Federal Register prescribes a preanalytical holding time of 14 days for volatile organic compounds in soil stored at 4{degrees}C. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) uses a more technical definition that the preanalytical holding time is the day when the analyte concentration for an environmental sample falls below the lower 99% confidence interval on the analyte concentration at day zero. This study reviews various holding time definitions and suggest a new preanalytical holding time approach using acceptable error rates for measuring an environmental analyte. This practical reporting time (PRT) approach has been applied to nineteen volatile organic compounds and four explosives in three environmental soil samples. A PRT nomograph of error rates has been developed to estimate the consequences of missing a preanalytical holding time. This nomograph can be applied to a large class of analytes with concentrations that decay linearly or exponentially with time regardless of sample matrices and storage conditions.

Bayne, C.K.; Schmoyer, D.D.; Jenkins, R.A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Real-Time Grid Reliability Management PIER Final Project Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Grid Reliability Management PIER Final Project Report Real-Time Grid Reliability Management PIER Final Project Report Title Real-Time Grid Reliability Management PIER Final Project Report Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2008 Authors Eto, Joseph H., Manu Parashar, Bernard C. Lesieutre, and Nancy J. Lewis Pagination 62 Date Published 12/2008 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords consortium for electric reliability technology solutions (certs), energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract The increased need to manage California's electricity grid in real time is a result of the ongoing transition from a system operated by vertically integrated utilities serving native loads to one operated by an independent system operator supporting competitive energy markets. During this transition period, the traditional approach to reliability management - construction of new transmission lines - has not been pursued due to unresolved issues related to the financing and recovery of transmission project costs. In the absence of investments in new transmission infrastructure, the best strategy for managing reliability is to equip system operators with better real-time information about actual operating margins so that they can better understand and manage the risk of operating closer to the edge. A companion strategy is to address known deficiencies in offline modeling tools that are needed to ground the use of improved real-time tools.

35

Geothermal R and D Project report for period April 1, 1976 to June 30, 1976  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

report for period April 1, 1976 to June 30, 1976 report for period April 1, 1976 to June 30, 1976 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal R and D Project report for period April 1, 1976 to June 30, 1976 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Progress during April to July 1976 in research on geothermal energy is reported. The experiments are performed in the Raft River Valley, Idaho, a hydrothermal resource site with water temperatures below 150/sup 0/C. During this period, a third well, RRGE-3 was drilled and well production was tested, testing of a direct contact heat exchanger continued, design and cost estimating continued on a 40 MW (th) organic-binary heat exchange facility, agricultural studies of irrigation with geothermal water progressed, and down-hole data was obtained from

36

MATHEMATICS DIVISION ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1962  

SciTech Connect

Research on numerical analysis, biological and medical statistics, and programming is reported. Programming and analysis work involved chemistry, health physics, analytical chemistry and chemical technology, neutron physics, physics, reactors, reactor chemistry, metallurgy, and computer operation and programming. Agricultural research and the training courses offered are also reported. A list of lectures, papers, and publications for the report period is included. (D.C.W.)

1963-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

37

Leakage-Aware Reallocation for Periodic Real-Time Tasks on Multicore Processors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is an increasingly important issue to reduce the energy consumption of computing systems. In this paper, we consider partition based energy-aware scheduling of periodic real-time tasks on multicore processors. The scheduling exploits dynamic voltage scaling (DVS) and core sleep scheduling to reduce both dynamic and leakage energy consumption. If the overhead of core state switching is non-negligible, however, the performance of this scheduling strategy in terms of energy efficiency might degrade. To achieve further energy saving, we extend the static task scheduling with run-time task reallocation. The basic idea is to aggregate idle time among cores so that as many cores as possible could be put into sleep in a way that the overall energy consumption is reduced. Simulation results show that the proposed approach results in up to 20% energy saving over traditional leakage-aware DVS.

Huang, Hongtao; Wang, Jijie; Lei, Siyu; Wu, Guowei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Microsoft Word - Management Analysis Report 2008-2010 chairmanship Period.doc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management Analysis Report for the two-year (2008-2010) chairmanship Period. Introduction and objectives: On May 16th, 2010, the two-year period for which we were elected to conduct the Latin American Section of the American Oil Chemists’ S

39

Development of periodic response factors for use with the radiant time series method  

SciTech Connect

Harris and McQuiston (1988) developed conduction transfer function (CTF) coefficients corresponding to 41 representative wall assemblies and 42 representative roof assemblies for use with the transfer function method (TFM). They also developed a grouping procedure that allows design engineers to determine the correct representative wall or roof assembly that most closely matches a specific wall or roof assembly. The CTF coefficients and the grouping procedure have been summarized in the ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals (1989, 1993, 1997) and the ASHRAE Cooling and Heating Load Calculation Manual, second edition. More recently, a new, simplified design cooling load calculation procedure, the radiant time series method (RTSM), has been developed. The RTSM uses periodic response factors to model transient conductive heat transfer. While not a true manual load calculation procedure, it is quite feasible to implement the RTSM in a spreadsheet. To be useful in such an environment, it would be desirable to have a pre-calculated set of periodic response factors. Accordingly, a set of periodic response factors has been calculated and is presented in this paper.

Spitler, J.D.; Fisher, D.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Final report on Project ESEPP (LEAP+) for the period January 1, 1996 - August 1, 1998  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report for the Project to Enhance Student Science and Engineering Preparation at the Pre-College Level (Project ESEPP) for the period from January 1, 1996 through August 1, 1998. This report summarizes the accomplishments of the program and its ability to meet the objectives described in the original proposal (1990).

Henley, Vernard Jr.

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Period: Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite) Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. Zip Code: - If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 - - Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey - - U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov Contact Name: Version No.: 2013.01 Date of this Report: Mo Day State: Year Phone No.: DOMESTIC CRUDE OIL FIRST PURCHASE REPORT Company Name: A completed form must be filed by the 30th calendar day following the end of the report

42

Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

In this report, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations organized into sections following the five major operating units in the division: Mathematical Sciences, Intelligent Systems, Nuclear Data and Measurement Analysis, Nuclear Analysis and Shielding, and the Engineering Physics Information Centers. Each section begins with an introduction highlighting honors, awards, and significant research accomplishments in that unit during the reporting period.

Ward, R.C.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

TIME DELAYS IN QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS OBSERVED DURING THE X2.2 SOLAR FLARE ON 2011 FEBRUARY 15  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report observations of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) during the X2.2 flare of 2011 February 15, observed simultaneously in several wavebands. We focus on fluctuations on timescale 1-30 s and find different time lags between different wavebands. During the impulsive phase, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager channels in the range 25-100 keV lead all the other channels. They are followed by the Nobeyama RadioPolarimeters at 9 and 17 GHz and the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) channels of the Euv SpectroPhotometer (ESP) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The zirconium and aluminum filter channels of the Large Yield Radiometer on board the Project for On-Board Autonomy satellite and the soft X-ray (SXR) channel of ESP follow. The largest lags occur in observations from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, where the channel at 1-8 A leads the 0.5-4 A channel by several seconds. The time lags between the first and last channels is up to Almost-Equal-To 9 s. We identified at least two distinct time intervals during the flare impulsive phase, during which the QPPs were associated with two different sources in the Nobeyama RadioHeliograph at 17 GHz. The radio as well as the hard X-ray channels showed different lags during these two intervals. To our knowledge, this is the first time that time lags are reported between EUV and SXR fluctuations on these timescales. We discuss possible emission mechanisms and interpretations, including flare electron trapping.

Dolla, L.; Marque, C.; Seaton, D. B.; Dominique, M.; Berghmans, D.; Cabanas, C.; De Groof, A.; Verdini, A.; West, M. J.; Zhukov, A. N. [Solar-Terrestrial Center of Excellence, Royal Observatory of Belgium, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centrum voor Plasma-Astrofysica, Department of Mathematics, KULeuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Schmutz, W. [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center, Davos Dorf (Switzerland); Zender, J., E-mail: dolla@sidc.be [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

44

Two-Phase Reaction Turbine. Technical progress report for the period July-December 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the initial part of this period the concentrated effort was placed on getting comprehensive analysis and design of the turbine prototype. This was in order to be able to initiate its fabrication as needed for its building, assembling and timely testing. In the second part of this period the effort was placed on design and other considerations needed to acquire the test rig within the limited budget based on subsequent grant from the DOE.

NONE

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Nuclear Science Division: Annual report for the period October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, at CERN, oxygen-16 beams were accelerated to 3.2 TeV using the LBL-GSI heavy ion injector into the CERN SPS. First results obtained during the beam test period are presented in this report. Bevalac research has probed new regions of the nuclear matter equation of state. Studies of collisions between the most massive nuclei have revealed rich new phenomena such as collective flow, where the pressures generated force the emerging particles away from the beam direction. Experiments on dileptons e/sup +/e/sup -/ pairs) utilizing the newly completed Dilepton Spectrometer (DLS) are being carried out to glean new insights into the hot, high-density stage of the collision. Major new results on the nuclear structure of exotic, very neutron-rich light nuclei are being obtained by exploiting the projectile fragmentation process to produce secondary radioactive beams. The Laboratory has proposed the Bevalac Upgrade Project to replace the Bevalac's weak-focusing synchrotron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams. The significant enhancement of the heavy ion capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron as a result of the recent development of the ECR source has led to a renaissance of the cyclotron as indicated by the increased demand for beam time. A variety of other scientific activities were also carried out during this period. The Isotopes Project published the first edition of a new radioactivity reference book for applied users-The Table of Radioactive Isotopes and division members organized several major scientific meetings.

Mahoney, J. (ed.)

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1995, through March 31, 1997. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program in support of Department of Energy science and technology missions. The report includes brief summaries of research activities in condensed matter theory, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. An addendum includes listings of division publications and professional activities.

Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. [eds.] [eds.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Neutron Physics Division progress report for period ending October 31, 1975  

SciTech Connect

Included are 127 abstracts and summaries of papers and reports published or presented at scientific meetings during the reporting period, which extends from August 31, 1974 to October 31, 1975. The primary areas of study are the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor program, the gas cooled fast breeder reactor program, the controlled thermonuclear reactor program, the high-energy accelerator shielding program, and the defense nuclear agency program. (BJG)

Maienschein, F.C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Chemical Technology Division progress report for the period April 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986  

SciTech Connect

This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period April 1, 1985, through December 31, 1986. The following major areas are covered in the discussion: nuclear and chemical waste management, environmental control technology, basic science and technology, biotechnology research, transuranium-element processing, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, radioactive materials production, computer/engineering applications, fission energy, environmental cleanup projects, and various other work activities. As an appendix, the Administrative Summary presents a comprehensive compilation of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this report period. An organization chart, a staffing level and financial summary, and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included to provide additional information. 78 figs., 40 tabs.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1990  

SciTech Connect

This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1989, to September 30, 1990. During this period, division research programs were significantly enhanced by the restart of the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and by new initiatives in processing and characterization of materials.

Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. (eds.)

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Ferrocyanide Safety Program. Quarterly report for the period ending March 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various high-level radioactive waste from defense operations has accumulated at the Hanford Site in underground storage tanks since the mid-1940s. During the 1950s, additional tank storage space was required to support the defense mission. To obtain this additional storage volume within a short time period, and to minimize the need for constructing additional storage tanks, Hanford Site scientists developed a process to scavenge {sup 137}Cs from tank waste liquids. In implementing this process, approximately 140 metric tons of ferrocyanide were added to waste that was later routed to some Hanford Site single-shell tanks. The reactive nature of ferrocyanide in the presence of an oxidizer has been known for decades, but the conditions under which the compound can undergo endothermic and exothermic reactions have not been thoroughly studied. Because the scavenging process precipitated ferrocyanide from solutions containing nitrate and nitrite, an intimate mixture of ferrocyanides and nitrates and/or nitrites is likely to exist in some regions of the ferrocyanide tanks. This quarterly report provides a status of the activities underway at the Hanford Site on the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue, as requested by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in their Recommendation 90-7. A revised Ferrocyanide Safety Program Plan addressing the total Ferrocyanide Safety Program, including the six parts of DNFSB Recommendation 90-7, was recently prepared and released in March 1994. Activities in the revised program plan are underway or have been completed, and the status of each is described in Section 4.0 of this report.

Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this report is to provide an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period September 1, 1989 through March 31, 1991. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL's research on the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the division. As in previous reports, our research is described through abstracts of journal articles, technical reports, and presentations. Summary lists of publications and presentations, staff additions and departures, scientific and professional activities of division staff, and technical conferences organized and sponsored by the division are included as appendices. The report is organized following the division of our research among four sections and information centers. These research areas are: Mathematical Sciences; Nuclear Data Measurement and Evaluations; Intelligent Systems; Nuclear Analysis and Shielding; and Engineering Physics Information Center.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Analytical Chemistry Division. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The functions of the Analytical Chemistry Division fall into three general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development and utilization; (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections each of which may carry out any type of work falling into the thre categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections which are: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectrometry; analytical technical support; bio/organic analysis section; and nuclear and radiochemical analysis. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Chapter 7 covers supplementary activities. Chapter 8 is on presentation of research results (publications, articles reviewed or referred for periodicals). Approximately 56 articles, 31 proceedings publications and 33 reports have been published, and 119 oral presentations given during this reporting period.

Lyon, W. S. [ed.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Appendix A: Mailing Address: Appendix B:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Period: Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Appendix A: Mailing Address: Appendix B: Zip Code - Secure File Transfer option available at: - - - - Email form to: OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 Email address: Oil & Gas Survey U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 1. Total Acquisitions (Enter the total volume of foreign crude oil acquired during the report month for importation into the United States. This is the sum of column (l), Part III, excluding resubmission.) 2. Offshore Inventories (Enter the total volume of foreign oil owned by the firm, for eventual importation into the United States which is held in storage outside the United States and/or is enroute to the United States as of the

54

Choosing beacon periods to improve response times for wireless HTTP clients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The IEEE 802.11 wireless LAN standard power-saving mode (PSM) allows the network interface card (NIC) to periodically sleep between receiving data. In this paper, we show that 802.11 PSM performs poorly due to the fact that an access point is unable ... Keywords: beacon periods, wireless access

Suman Nath; Zachary Anderson; Srinivasan Seshan

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Influence of Choice of Time Period on Global Surface Temperature Trend Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annual global surface temperature and global land surface temperature trends are calculated for all possible periods of the historical record between 1850 and 2009. Two-dimensional parameter diagrams show the critical influence of the choice of ...

Brant Liebmann; Randall M. Dole; Charles Jones; Ileana Bladé; Dave Allured

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1984  

SciTech Connect

During the reporting period, relatively minor changes have occurred in the research areas of interest to the Division. Nearly all the research of the Division can be classified broadly as mission-oriented basic research. Topics covered include: theoretical solid state physics; surface and near-surface properties of solids; defects in solids; transport properties of solids; neutron scattering; and preparation and characterization of research materials. (GHT)

Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Short-rotation woody-crops program. Quarterly progress report for period ending May 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress of twenty projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program is summarized for the period March 1 through May 31, 1981. Individual quarterly reports included from each of the projects discuss accomplishments within specific project objectives and identify recent papers and publications resulting from the research. The major project activities are species screening and genetic selection, stand establishment and cultural treatment, and harvest, collection, transportation, and storage.

Cushman, J.H.; Ranney, J.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Short-rotation woody-crops program. Quarterly progress report for period ending August 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress of twenty-one projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program is summarized for the period June 1 through August 31, 1981. Individual quarterly reports included from each of the projects discuss accomplishments within specific project objectives and identify recent papers and publications resulting from the research. The major program activities are species screening and genetic selection, stand establishment and cultural treatment, and harvest, collection, transportation, and storage.

Cushman, J.H.; Ranney, J.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

TFE Verification Program: Semiannual report for the period ending April 30, 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. 55 figs., 30 tabs.

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a record of the research activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division for the period January 1, 1993, through December 31, 1994. This report is the final archival record of the EPM Division. On October 1, 1994, ORELA was transferred to Physics Division and on January 1, 1995, the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division and the Computer Applications Division reorganized to form the Computer Science and Mathematics Division and the Computational Physics and Engineering Division. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL`s research in the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division.

Sincovec, R.F.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 2001 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 2001 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2002

L.C. BROWN

2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

62

DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 15,2000 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30,2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 15,2000 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30,2001

L.C. BROWN

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Gang FTP scheduling of periodic and parallel rigid real-time tasks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the scheduling of periodic and parallel rigid tasks. We provide (and prove correct) an exact schedulability test for Fixed Task Priority (FTP) Gang scheduler sub-classes: Parallelism Monotonic, Idling, Limited Gang, and Limited Slack Reclaiming. Additionally, we study the predictability of our schedulers: we show that Gang FJP schedulers are not predictable and we identify several sub-classes which are actually predictable. Moreover, we extend the definition of rigid, moldable and malleable jobs to recurrent tasks.

Goossens, Joël

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Dynamic Scheduling of Skippable Periodic Tasks with Energy Efficiency in Weakly Hard Real-Time System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy consumption is a critical design issue in real-time systems, especially in battery- operated systems. Maintaining high performance, while extending the battery life between charges is an interesting challenge for system designers. Dynamic Voltage Scaling (DVS) allows a processor to dynamically change speed and voltage at run time, thereby saving energy by spreading run cycles into idle time. Knowing when to use full power and when not, requires the cooperation of the operating system scheduler. Usually, higher processor voltage and frequency leads to higher system throughput while energy reduction can be obtained using lower voltage and frequency. Instead of lowering processor voltage and frequency as much as possible, energy efficient real-time scheduling adjusts voltage and frequency according to some optimization criteria, such as low energy consumption or high throughput, while it meets the timing constraints of the real-time tasks. As the quantity and functional complexity of battery powered porta...

Baskaran, Santhi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: Analytical Research, Development and Implementation; Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization; and Technical Support. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1989. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 69 articles, 41 proceedings, and 31 reports were published, and 151 oral presentations were given during this reporting period. Some 308,981 determinations were performed.

Not Available

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Analytical Chemistry Dvision of Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development, and utilization; and (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections, each of which may carry out any type of work falling in the three categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections (analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials, bio/organic analysis, and general and environmental analysis) during the period January 1, 1982 to December 31, 1982. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 61 articles, 32 proceedings publications and 37 reports have been published, and 107 oral presentations were given during this reporting period.

Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is divided into: Analytical spectroscopy (optical spectroscopy, organic mass spectrometry, inorganic mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry), inorganic and radiochemistry (transuranium and activation analysis, low-level radiochemical analysis, inorganic analysis, radioactive materials analysis, special projects), organic chemistry (organic spectroscopy, separations and synthesis, special projects, organic analysis, ORNL/UT research program), operations (quality assurance/quality control, environmental protection, safety, analytical improvement, training, radiation control), education programs, supplementary activities, and presentation of research results. Tables are included for articles reviewed or refereed for periodicals, analytical service work, division manpower and financial summary, and organization chart; a glossary is also included.

Shults, W.D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

PROGRESS REPORT NO. 50 FOR THE PERIOD JUNE 1, 1957 THROUGH AUGUST 31, 1957  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in fission elements chemistry, organic and inorganic nuclear chemistry, cosmic ray research, high-energy accelerator experimentation and physics, bubble chamber experimentation, and theoretical physics. Considerable attention was given to the ionization of mineral acids and hydrogen haloraetallates in inorganic solvents and to anion exchnnge behavior in metal complexes. Studies of various chemical reaction mechanisms were continued. The self-energy of a Dirac particle coupled through its charge with the electromagnetic field was investigated without perturbation theory. (For preceding period see AECU-3580.) (D.E.B.)

1957-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1 through December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and {open_quotes}Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities{close_quotes} (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 265), as amended. Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. The location of each facility is shown. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Performing project management, preparing groundwater monitoring plans, well network design and installation, specifying groundwater data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, data management, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between October and December 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Delimiting “Thunderstorm Watch” Periods by Real-Time Lightning Location for a Power Utility Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During times of thunderstorm activity, the power utility serving metropolitan New York enters a potentially costly “thunderstorm watch” mode of operation which is designed to prevent a major power outage caused by lightning. To evaluate the ...

Vincent P. Idone; Richard E. Orville

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

MAP3S Precipitation Chemistry Network: fifth periodic summary report (1981)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This, the fifth in a series of summary reports, contains complete field and chemical data from the MAP3 Precipitation Chemistry Network for the year 1981. The 1981 data were added to the previous data base, and an update of the previous five year statistical summary completed. Included are basic statistics, time trend analyses, and monthly averages.

Dana, M.T.; Rothert, J.E.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

TFE Verification Program: Semiannual report for the period ending September 30, 1987  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. The TFE Verification Program builds directly on the technology and data base developed in the 1960s and early 1970s in an AEC/NASA program, and in the SP-100 program conducted in 1983, 1984 and 1985. In the SP-100 program, the attractive features of thermionic power conversion technology were recognized, but concern was expressed over the lack of fast reactor irradiation data. The TFE Verification Program addresses this concern.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

TFE Verification Program: Semiannual report for the period ending October 31, 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. The TFE Verification Program builds directly on the technology and data base developed in the 1960s and early 1970s in an AEC/NASA program, and in the SP-100 program conducted in 1983, 1984 and 1985. In the SP-100 program, the attractive features of thermionic power conversion technology were recognized, but concern was expressed over the lack of fast reactor irradiation data. 65 figs., 36 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an archival record of the activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division during the period June 30, 1985 through September 30, 1987. Work in Mathematical Sciences continues to include applied mathematics research, statistics research, and computer science. Nuclear-data measurements and evaluations continue for fusion reactors, fission reactors, and other nuclear systems. Also discussed are long-standing studies of fission-reactor shields through experiments and related analysis, of accelerator shielding, and of fusion-reactor neutronics. Work in Machine Intelligence continues to feature the development of an autonomous robot. The last descriptive part of this report reflects the work in our Engineering Physics Information Center, which again concentrates primarily upon radiation-shielding methods and related data.

Not Available

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

QUARTERLY STATUS REPORT ON ULTRA HIGH TEMPERATURE REACTOR EXPERIMENT (UHTREX) FOR PERIOD ENDING DECEMBER 20, 1962  

SciTech Connect

Pressure tests of the reactor vessel showed that stresses were within allowable limits for the design pressure of 550 psig. Tests of the fuel loading mechanism are also reported in which 300,000 cycles were completed. Results of an investigation of core corrosion damage led to the conclusion that for prolonged operation of a graphite reactor in the ultrahigh-temperature range, the average CO/sub 2/ level must be limited to approximately 1 ppm. Developmental work on the coolant system is reported, and results of an analyeis of the reactor and cooling system using an IBM 7090 program are discussed. Tests of the gas cleanup system are reported in which CuO was successfully used. Calculations concerning shielding showed that an extra 2 in. thickness of Pb should be added to the inside face between the water panels and the concrete to reduce the temperature gradient and the associated tensile etress below 1000 psi in the concrete walls. It is noted that the reactor facility was about 14% complete at the end of the reporting period. (J.R.D.)

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

MHD air heater development technology. Report for the period October 1978-December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the period covered by this report, work was done on all three tasks and is summarized as follows: Under Task 1 (design studies) the influence of heater system layout, duct dimensions, and heater sequencing on flow distribution was studied further. One result was that localizing the bulk of the pressure drop in the heaters tends to minimize heater-to-heater flow differences. The task of integrating the temperature and pressure solvers was pursued further. An analysis of current flow back up the air duct from the combustor was done. Results showed that the voltage gradient and power loss back up the air duct depend on the ratio of electrical conductivities of air and duct wall insulation. Under Task 2 (design support tests) Heat 201 was completed and much of the construction on the valve test rig was completed. Heat 201 was run with a Corhart X-317 (fusion cast magnesia-35% alumina, hereafter referred to as Corhart X-317 as this trade name designates not only composition, but microstructure, impurity level and manufacturer's process) matrix in the rig. Matrix Test 7 (Heat 201) ran for over four hundred hours but was terminated early because of a restriction in the bed. This was caused by failure of the insulating lining in the hot gas duct between the burner and the matrix. This liner of magnesia-chrome bricks (RFG) had been used in earlier tests. Reactions with seed/slag occurred and the resulting high viscosity slag partially plugged the bed. Under Task 3 (preliminary design of 5 MW heater) a topical report describing the design of the 5 MW test heater system was prepared. At the end of this reporting period it was being reviewed.

None

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD's accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD`s accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of activities and accomplishsments of the division from October 1992 through December 1993; the division is organized to provide technical support, mainly in the area of high-temperature materials, for technologies being developed by DOE. Activities span the range from basic research to industrial interactions (cooperative research and technology transfer). Sections 1-5 describe the different functional groups (engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials). Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines. Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative R and D programs and technology transfer functions. Finally, Sect. 8 briefly describes the division`s involvement in educational activities. Several organizational changes were effected during this period.

Craig, D.F.; Bradley, R.A.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Progress report for the first twenty-one months of the contract period  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the period of July 1, 1978, through March 31, 1980 in-depth research of the legal and institutional obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric power in all of the nineteen northeastern states was performed. Research into economic issues associated with the development of small scale hydroelectric power was undertaken by the project economist. Special research activities have been undertaken with respect to the federal dam safety programs, the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System requirements of the Federal Clean Water Act and the implications of those requirements to small scale hydroelectric power, riparian law on lake and reservoir fluctuation in the State of Maine, and the implications of Title II and IV of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 to the development of small scale hydroelectric power. The results of these studies are reported. (LCL)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

METALLURGY DIVISION ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING SEPTEMBER 1, 1959  

SciTech Connect

7 = 9 9 9 9 7 7 7 = 9 9 9 95 : > @ 9 ; 5 8 @ = K : . ighpurity Nb deformed by impact or slow compression at - 196 deg C. An apparent phase transformation was detected in high- purity Ga deformed at 4.2 deg K. The specific heat of the group IV-A metals and alloys of Zr-In and Zr-Sn were measured from 1.2 to 4.5 deg K. In the Zr-rich portion of the Zr-Ga phase diagram, the alpha / beta phase boundaries of Zr are depressed by additions of Ga and the beta phase decomposes by a eutectoid reaction. The Cd pressures of alpha - and beta - Zr alloys containing 1 to 11% Cd were measured between 1090 and 1325 deg K. Crystal structures of several unreported transition-metal fluorides, rare-earth hydrides and nitrides were determined. Progress in the study of phase transitions in beta -quenched Zr-Nb alloys aged below the eutectoid temperature is reported. A high-temperature investigation of the order-disorder phase transition of a Cu31 at.% Au alloy has revealed an intermediate periodic antiphase condition. A previously described x- raydiffraction technique for the measurement of the thickness and strain of thin oxide films was applied to a series of five Cu/sub 2/O films grown on Cu single crystals. A new x-raydiffraction method for measuring film thickness, based on the integrated intensities of the Bragg maxima, is shown to agree very well with the thickness as determined from the line-shape analysis. A determination was made of the influence which electrostatic interactions with neighboring ions have on the energy n yields pi transition in the nitrate ion. Some information on the behavior of solute species in dilute solutions of Bi in BiCl/sub 3/ was obtained from absorption spectra. Studies of the gaseous oxidation of Nb and Zr in the 0RnL. Graphite Reactor indicated that neutron fluxes of approximately 10/sup 12/ nv had no effect on the oxidation processes for these two metals. A variety of new techniques was applied to the study of the oxidation of Ta. Efforts to Brow macroscopic single crystals of ceramic-type materials were initiated. HRP Metallurgy. An intensive study of the effects of fabrication variables on the anisotropy of mechanical properties and the preferred orientation in Zircaloy-2 is reported. The transformation sequence study of the Zr-Nb-X alloys is reported. A detailed macro- and micro-examination was completed on samples and debris removed from the core vessel of the Homogeneous Reactor. The fabrication of Zircaloy-2 vessels is discussed. Type 312 stainless steel was found to be satisfactory barrier material in making tube-to-header welds in Inconel-tane 347 stainless steel composites. Reactor Metallurgy. Examinations were made of low-alloy and stainless steels following their exposure to impurities outgassed by graphite. A three-phase out-ofpile corrosion test program is continuing in order to evaluate the behavior of Inconel and INOR-8 in contact with fluoride salt mixtures in terms of such variables as time, temperature, and flow rate. Inconel and INOR-8 specimens carburized in the Na- graphite system show an appreciable decrease in their room-temperatare ductility. The nickelbase Coast Metals Nos. 52 and 63, the 82 Au-Ni, and pure copper brazing alloys show no attack when subjected tc fuel 130 for 100 hr at 1300 deg F. It was found that LiF-BeF/sub 2/- UF/sup 4/ (62-37-1 M%, fuel 130) would precipitate part of its U as decrease in their room-temperature ductility. The nickelUO/sub 2/ when in contact with graphite at 1300 deg F. Graphite grades GT- 123, 186, CCN, R-0013, AGOT, and TSF were exposed in 100-hr static permeation tests to molten fluoride salts at 1300 deg F under a 150-psig pressure. Hotpressed UO/sub 2/ pellets show no corrosion after being subjected to pure lead, pure bismuth, the 55 Bi-45 Pb eutectic alloy, and the Pb-0.69 1.i alloy eutectic in separate tosts at 650 and 750 deg F. The reactions of type 304 stainless steel with CO and CO/sub 2/ were studied at high temperatures. Studies were made to determine the feasibility of fabricating a triplex heat exchanger tube made up of two con

1959-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

82

Long-time solvability of the Navier-Stokes-Boussinesq equations with almost periodic initial large data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate large time existence of solutions of the Navier-Stokes-Boussinesq equations with spatially almost periodic large data when the density stratification is sufficiently large. In 1996, Kimura and Herring \\cite{KH} examined numerical simulations to show a stabilizing effect due to the stratification. They observed scattered two-dimensional pancake-shaped vortex patches lying almost in the horizontal plane. Our result is a mathematical justification of the presence of such two-dimensional pancakes. To show the existence of solutions for large times, we use $\\ell^1$-norm of amplitudes. Existence for large times is then proven using techniques of fast singular oscillating limits and bootstrapping argument from a global-in-time unique solution of the system of limit equations.

Ibrahim, Slim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

TFE Verification Program semiannual report for the period ending March 31, 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the semiannual progress report is to summarize the technical results obtained during the latest reporting period. The information presented herein will include evaluated test data, design evaluations, the results of analyses and the significance of results. The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. The TFE Verification Program builds directly on the technology and data base developed in the 1960s and early 1970s in an AEC/NASA program, and in the SP-100 program conducted in 1983, 1984 and 1985. In the SP-100 program, the attractive features of thermionic power conversion technology were recognized but concern was expressed over the lack of fast reactor irradiation data. The TFE Verification Program addresses this concern. 6 refs., 67 figs., 37 tabs.

Not Available

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River during Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Migration, 2002-2006 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10 C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoir's epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the water's surface and during periods of low river discharge often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The thickness (depth) of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004. Although temperature, and hence density, differences during flow augmentation periods between the Clearwater and Snake rivers were approximately equal (7-12 C) for all four years, the discharge ratio varied which resulted in significant differences in entrainment of cooler Clearwater River water into the Lower Granite Reservoir epilimnion. However, as a direct result of system management, Lower Granite Dam tailrace temperatures were maintained near 20 C during all years. Primary differences in the other three lower Snake River reservoirs were therefore a result of meteorological conditions and dam operations, which produced variations in wind setup and surface heating. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are capable of matching diurnal and long-term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the three-dimensional non-hydrostatic model Flow3D. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake river discharge. Simulation results were linked with the particle tracking model FINS to develop reservoir-integrated metrics that varied due to these alternative operation schemes. Findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir, which may also impact the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

Cook, C.; Dibrani, B.; Richmond, M.; Bleich, M.; Titzler, P..; Fu, T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1988  

SciTech Connect

The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) Analytical Research, Development, and Implementation. The division maintains a program to conceptualize, investigate, develop, assess, improve, and implement advanced technology for chemical and physicochemical measurements. Emphasis is on problems and needs identified with ORNL and Department of Energy (DOE) programs; however, attention is also given to advancing the analytical sciences themselves. (2) Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization. The division carries out a wide variety of chemical work that typically involves analytical research and/or development plus the utilization of analytical capabilities to expedite programmatic interests. (3) Technical Support. The division performs chemical and physicochemical analyses of virtually all types. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each of which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1988. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Solid State Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. This research effort was enhanced by new capabilities in atomic-scale materials characterization, new emphasis on the synthesis and processing of materials, and increased partnering with industry and universities. The theoretical effort included a broad range of analytical studies, as well as a new emphasis on numerical simulation stimulated by advances in high-performance computing and by strong interest in related division experimental programs. Superconductivity research continued to advance on a broad front from fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity to the development of new materials and processing techniques. The Neutron Scattering Program was characterized by a strong scientific user program and growing diversity represented by new initiatives in complex fluids and residual stress. The national emphasis on materials synthesis and processing was mirrored in division research programs in thin-film processing, surface modification, and crystal growth. Research on advanced processing techniques such as laser ablation, ion implantation, and plasma processing was complemented by strong programs in the characterization of materials and surfaces including ultrahigh resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic-resolution chemical analysis, synchrotron x-ray research, and scanning tunneling microscopy.

Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. [eds.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1988  

SciTech Connect

The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) Analytical Research, Development, and Implementation. The division maintains a program to conceptualize, investigate, develop, assess, improve, and implement advanced technology for chemical and physicochemical measurements. Emphasis is on problems and needs identified with ORNL and Department of Energy (DOE) programs; however, attention is also given to advancing the analytical sciences themselves. (2) Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization. The division carries out a wide variety of chemical work that typically involves analytical research and/or development plus the utilization of analytical capabilities to expedite programmatic interests. (3) Technical Support. The division performs chemical and physicochemical analyses of virtually all types. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each of which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1988. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT COVERING RESEARCHES DURING THE PERIOD JUNE 1, 1956 TO MAY 31, 1957. Report No. 45  

SciTech Connect

>Results of solvent extraction studies on Au, Ga, Nb, and Ta are given. Data on the dependence of B/sub A/, epsilon /sub A/ and S/sub A/ on A and on nucleon shells in beta decay are summarized. Rates of hydrolysis of benzyl and benzhydryl halides and methyl iodide in H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O are tabulated. Values for the solvolysis of triphenplmethyl fluoride, the decarboxylation rates of beta -keto acids, and the decomposition of single chlorosulfites are included. Experiments were conducted to examine the velocity spectrum of cosmic ray mu mesons at sea level, the incidence of air showers and their direction of arrival at sites in Bolivia and India, short period fluctuations in cosmic-ray intensity, the mu -meson component of large air showers, polarization of cosmic-ray mu mesons, and other related measurements. Photographic emulsion research continued on the dynamics of K/sup +/ scattering and on a search for the Pais-Piccioni effects. The linear accelerator work centered about a study of gamma -ray induced neutron spectra of Bi, Pb, Au, and Ta. The Rockefeller Van de Graaff Generator work was concerned with the measurement of g-factors of low-lying excited states of Sm, Nd, and Gd. Nuclear energy level studies using the ONR Van de Graaff Generator were concentrated largely on the nuclei between mass numbers 40 and 70. Efforts were directed award a determination of level order and, where possible, of spins and parities of states. A number of angular distribution studies for deuterium stripping reactions were carried out. Research with the M.I.T. cyclotron involved a continuation of the angular distribution studies of elastically scattered 7.5-Mev protons, the measurement or polarization of such elastically scattered protons; 30-Mev alpha particle scattering, alpha ment of apparatus for time-of-flight neutron energy measurements. (For preceding period see AECU-3377.) (M.H.R.)

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

HIGH TEMPERATURE CORROSION STUDY INTERIM REPORT FOR THE PERIOD NOVEMBER 1958 THROUGH MAY 1959  

SciTech Connect

Samples of grade A Monel snd grade A nickel were subjected statically in a single reactor to an undiluted atmosphere of gaseous fluorine at pressures up to one atmosphere absolute and temperatures up to 1500 deg F. The grade A Monel was conservatively estimated to have consumed at least 40 times as much fluorine as grade A nickel during the entire period of the investigation. Samples of fused alpha Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, alpha -Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/- MgO spinel, and alpha -Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-NiO--nickel cermet were exposed to undiluted fluorine at one atinosphere absolute pressure at temperatures of 1340 and 1500 deg F. Results indicated that the alpha -Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is as good as the Ni in the region of 1300 deg F. Grade A nickel samples coated with nickel fluoride filins of 37,000 and 74,000 A, respectively, were exposed to an absolute pressure of gaseous UF/sub 6/ of 12 cm of Hg at temperatures of 1000 and 1800 deg F. (W.L.H.)

Hale, C.F.; Barber, E.J.; Bernhardt, H.A.; Rapp, K.E.

1959-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

90

REAL TIME GRID RELIABILITY MANAGEMENT 2005 PIER FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REAL TIME GRID RELIABILITY REAL TIME GRID RELIABILITY MANAGEMENT 2005 Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Prepared By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory PIER FINAL PROJECT REPORT LBNL-62368 ii Legal Notice This report was prepared as a result of work sponsored by the California Energy Commission (Energy Commission). It does not necessarily represent the views of the Energy Commission, its employees, or the State of California. The Energy Commission, the State of California, its employees, contractors, and subcontractors make no warrant, express or implied, and assume no legal liability for the information in this report; nor does any party represent that the use of this information will not infringe upon privately owned rights. This report has not been

91

Puerto Rico time-of-day rates demonstration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Puerto Rico Time of Day (TOD) electric rate demonstration project consists of three distinct studies: (A) Low usage customers (less than or equal to425 kWh per 30 consecutive days) are compared for a 12 hours peak period rate, against a control group of similar usage. (B) High usage customers (>425 kWh per 30 consecutive days) are assigned a single 12 hours peak period experimental rate. (C) High usage customers, assigned to a number of different experimental rates and compared against a control group (also used for B). For this group, peak period lengths are fixed at a specific six hour period and rates are allowed to vary. For comparative purposes a control group is included. As part of this experiment an entry and exit survey have been designed. The purpose of the surveys is to find out the changes in electric consumption stock and life style of the participants from the start to the end of the project. As participants were assigned to rates or control groups on a random basis, the emphasis of the entry survey analysis is to determine if there are any significant statistical differences among the selected participants.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Performance oriented packaging report for fuse, blasting, time, M700. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This POP report is for the Fuse, Blasting, Time, M700 which is packaged 4000 feet/ Mil-B-2427 wood box. This report describes the results of testing conducted on a similar packaging which is used as an analogy for this item....Performance oriented packaging, POP, Fuse, Blasting, Time, M700, Mil-B-2427 Wood box.

Sniezek, F.M.

1992-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

93

Performance oriented packaging report for ignitor, time blasting fuse, weatherproof: M60. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This POP report is for the Time Blasting Fuse, Weatherproof: M60 which is packaged 300/ Mil-B-2427 wood box. This report describes the results of testing conducted.... Performance oriented packaging, POP, Time blasting fuse, Weatherproof: M60 Mil-B-2427 wood box.

Sniezek, F.

1992-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

94

HOMOGENEOUS REACTOR PROJECT QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING JULY 31, 1956  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Homogeneous Reactor Test. Experiments and tests conducted preparatory to operation with unenriched UO//sub 2/SO/sub 4/ are reviewed. Remote maintenance practlces and operation at reduced pressures and temperatures were analyzed. A simplified freeze jackct design for remote operation wlil be used in the HRT system. A differential-temperature flowmeter was designed for use on feed and purge pumps. The preliminary design of the replacement pressure vessel is shown. Fuel and blanket feed and purge pump test using UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions were continued. Performance and corrosion results are given. HRT controls and instrumentation status is reviewed. Flowsheets for the fuel and blanket chemical processing systems are shown. The construction and engineering test status of the fuel processing plant are presented. Reactor Design and Analysis. Prellminary design parameters indicate the feasibility of a 500 Mw homogeneous research reactor using UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The fuel costs for homogeneous reactors whose fuel is processed on a batch rather than a continuous basis were analyzed. Tables of data were prepared indicating the effecta of fuel isotopic concentration, the use of Li//sub 2/SO/sub 4/ additives, fission product removal, reactor operating periods, and Fu recovery on per krv power cost. The effects of Xe/sup 135/ on reactor conditions following shutdown were determined for the case of a U/sup 235/O/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, D/sub 2/O, spheri cal reactor operating at 280 deg C, assuming no fission product removal. Engineering Development. Developmental studies of ThO/sub 2/ blanket slurries were continued. Experience with ThO/sub 2/ deposits in circulation loops is tabulated; and shear diagrams, friction factors, and heat transfer characteristics are plotted. Slurry blanket system operational tests indicate satisfactory operation up to 300 deg C. Corrosion and Matertals. Studies of the corrosive effects of UO/sub 2/SO/ sub 4/ on Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Al//sub 2/O/sub were continued. The appearance of liquid phases as a function of temperature in UO//sub 2/SO/sub 4/-- Li/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, UO/sub 2/SO /sub 4/-BeSO/sub 4/, and BeSO/sub 4/-- UO/sub 3/ systems is plotted. Additional observations of pump corrosion and performance in reactor blanket loops contalning a range of ThO/sub 2/ concentrations are reported. Further attempts were made to establish the effects of slurry particle size on corrosive attack rates. Results of metallographic examinations of in- pile corrosion specimens of Zr and Ti alloys and stainless steel are tabulated and discussed. The effects of high temperatures and welding on crystalline phase changes in Zr alloys were investigated. The crystailine phase changes in H pickup in Ti, Zr, Al-Ti-V alloy, and Zircaloy upon exposure in the recombiner loop were determined. The effects of aging and temperature on Zircaloy impact strength are plotted. Chemical Engineering Revelopment. Chemical and engineering studies associated wlth HRT fuel processing are reported. In the study of Pu-producer blanket chemistry, adsorption of Pu on metals, Pu behavior in UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions at 250 deg C, and dissolutlon of corrosion product oxides were considered. Slurries of ThO/sub 2/-U0//sub 3/-MoO/sub 3/-H/ sub 2/O were prepared and irradiated. Radiation effects and gas recombination rates for this type slurry are repcrted. Methods of particle size control in Th and U oxide preparation, and the effects of additives on oxide sedimentation rates in slurries were investigated. Supporting Chemical Research. Studies of slurry particle preparation and suspension are reported. The methods used in separating Pa/sup 231/ from Mallinckrodt waste are reviewed. (D.E.B.)

None

1956-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Progress Report 16 for the period April-September 1980, and the proceedings of the 16th Project Integration Meeting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress made by the Low-Cost Solar Array Project during the period April to September 1980, is reported in detail. Progress on project analysis and integration; technology development in silicon material, large-area silicon sheet and encapsulation; production process and equipment development; engineering, and operations is described. A report on, and copies of visual presentations made at, the Project Integration Meeting held September 24 and 25, 1980 are included.

McDonald, R.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Milestone and cost management financial reports for period ending September 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a monthly summary for September 1995 for work performed by IIT Research Institute under DOE contract number DE-AC05-93OR22160. Financial data and milestones for September 1995 are included in the report.

NONE

1995-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

97

Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Separate abstracts were prepared for most sections of this report. The one remaining section is theoretical chemistry. (DLC)

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY DIVISION ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING MAY 31, 1963  

SciTech Connect

Progress in chemical technology is reported under 24 topics. Separate abstracts were prepared for each topic. (M.C.G.)

1963-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

99

SERF photovoltaic systems. Technical report on system performance for the period, August 1, 1994--July 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of performance data on the two identical, 6 kW{sub ac}, grid-connected photovoltaic systems located on the roof of the Solar Energy Research Facility building at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. The data cover the monitoring period August 1, 1994, to July 31, 1995, and the performance parameters analyzed include direct current and alternating current power, aperture-area efficiency, energy, capacity factor, and performance index. These parameters are compared to plane-of-array irradiance, ambient temperature, and back-of-module temperature as a function of time, either daily or monthly. We also obtained power ratings of the systems for data corresponding to different test conditions. This study has shown, in addition to expected seasonal trends, that system monitoring is a valuable tool in assessing performance and detecting faulty equipment. Furthermore, methods applied for this analysis may be used to evaluate and compare systems using cells of different technologies. The systems were both found to be operating at approximately 7% below their estimated rating, which was based on Photovoltaics for Utility-Scale Applications test conditions. This may be attributed to the design inverter efficiency being estimated at 95% compared to measured values of approximately 88%, as well as the fact that aperture-area efficiency that was overestimated at 12.8% compared to a measured value of 11.0%. The continuous monitoring also revealed faulty peak-power point tracking equipment.

Dyk, E.E. van; Strand, T.R.; Hansen, R.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program with emphasis on theoretical solid state physics, superconductivity, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. The High Flux Isotope Reactor was returned to full operation.

Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. (eds.)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Semi-annual report for the unconventional gas recovery program, period ending September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in research on methane recovery from coalbeds, eastern gas shales, western gas sands, and geopressured aquifers. In the methane from coalbeds project, data on information evaluation and management, resource and site assessment and characterization, model development, instrumentation, basic research, and production technology development are reported. In the methane from eastern gas shales project, data on resource characterization and inventory, extraction technology, and technology testing and verification are presented. In the western gas sands project, data on resource assessments, field tests and demonstrations and project management are reported. In the methane from geopressured aquifers project, data on resource assessment, supporting research, field tests and demonstrations, and technology transfer are reported.

Manilla, R.D. (ed.)

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Semi-annual report for the unconventional gas recovery program, period ending March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Four subprograms are reported on: methane recovery from coalbeds, Eastern gas shales, Western gas sands, and methane from geopressured aquifers. (DLC)

Manilla, R.D.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Health Physics Division Annual Progress Report for Period Ending June 30, 1963  

SciTech Connect

Progress in health physics is reported under 20 topics. Separate abstracts were prepared for 19 topics. Education, training, and consultation are also discussed (M.C.G.)

Morgan, K. Z.; Snyder, W. S.; Struxness, E. G.

1963-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

104

Gas Turbine HTGR program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending December 31, 1977  

SciTech Connect

The report covers the demonstration plant design studies, core and fission product studies, shielding studies, heat exchanger design, and maintenance studies, including inservice inspection (ISI).

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The progress is reported in the following sections: analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, technical support, bio-organic analysis, nuclear and radiochemical analysis, and quality assurance. (DLC)

Shults, W.D.; Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

MOLTEN-SALT REACTOR PROGRAM SEMIANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING JULY 31, 1963  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in two separate abstracts: MSRE design, engineering analysis, and component development; and material studies. (N.W.R.)

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Summary of Time Period-Based and Other Approximation Methods for Determining the Capacity Value of Wind and Solar in the United States: September 2010 - February 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper updates previous work that describes time period-based and other approximation methods for estimating the capacity value of wind power and extends it to include solar power. The paper summarizes various methods presented in utility integrated resource plans, regional transmission organization methodologies, regional stakeholder initiatives, regulatory proceedings, and academic and industry studies. Time period-based approximation methods typically measure the contribution of a wind or solar plant at the time of system peak - sometimes over a period of months or the average of multiple years.

Rogers, J.; Porter, K.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

SOLID STATE DIVISION ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING MAY 31, 1963  

SciTech Connect

Progress in solid state physics is reported in the following areas: theory, crystals, metals and nonmetals, radiation effects, and other subjects. Separate abstracts were prepared for the fifteen sections of the report. A list of 70 papers and publications is included. (D.C.W.)

1963-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

109

Fusion reactor materials. Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

Rowcliffe, A.F.; Burn, G.L.; Knee`, S.S.; Dowker, C.L. [comps.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Time-dependent hydrogen and helium pressure profiles in a long, cryogenically cooled tube, pumped at periodic intervals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many particle accelerators and colliders throughout the world make use of superconducting magnets to focus highly relativistic beams. These magnets are cooled to [approximately]4.2[degree]K For practical reasons, the beam pipes, encircled by the magnets, also operate at these cryogenic temperatures. This paper presents a theoretical model for determining pressure profiles, in space and time, stemming from either hydrogen or helium gas leak into the cold-bore tube with appendage pumps located at periodic intervals. It is shown that a wave-like pressure gradient propagates from the leak source at a rate which is dependent on the leak magnitude, gas species, speed and location of appendage pumps, and the geometry and effective roughness of the cold-bore tube. Steady-state, linear pressure gradients eventually equilibrate between the appendage pumps in a magnitude commensurate with both the adsorption isotherm of the species and mass flow in the beam pipe. Results are given for a variety of conditions relevant to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider being constructed at Brookhaven, and a general procedure, with expressions, is provided for the making of similar calculations in other installations.

Hobson, J.P. (National Vacuum Technologies, Inc., Ontario (Canada)); Welch, K.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Time-of-use electricity price effects. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1975 the Federal Energy Administration, now the Department of Energy (DOE), initiated 16 rate demonstration projects. This report summarizes a standardized analysis of data from the residential portion of 11 of those projects: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Los Angeles, North Carolina (Blue Ridge Electric Membership Corporation), North Carolina (Carolina Power and Light Company), Ohio, Oklahoma, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. A brief description of the DOE rate demonstration program is provided along with a statement of RTI's objectives in the analysis of TOU rate effects. The report also describes methods and estimation models used for the studies. Details of experimental design and analysis results are given for individual projects analyzed by RTI. Finally, some general observations about the impacts of TOU rates that have been suggested by these analyses are offered. A review of the analytical findings suggests that experimental TOU rates generally reduced peak-period consumption on both average and system peak days. The reductions tended to be larger on system peak days than on average days. Since off-peak consumption was usually about the same for both TOU and control customers, total daily usage by TOU customers was generally reduced. The studies also indicate that high-usage customers responded to TOU rates more sensitively than low-usage customers, suggesting that an effective implementation of a TOU rate schedule may initially be limited to high-usage customers.

Miedema, A.K.; Lee, K.K.; White, S.B.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This is the eighteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: {sm_bullet} Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance. {sm_bullet} Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies. {sm_bullet} Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. This report has been compiled and edited under the guidance of A.F. Rowcliffe by Gabrielle Burn, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Their efforts, and the efforts of the many persons who made technical contributions, are gratefully acknowledged.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for Period Ending December 31, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the twenty-fifth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately.

Rowcliff, A.F.; Burn, G.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

METALLURGY DIVISION SEMIANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING OCTOBER 10, 1956  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in corrosion studies of stainless steels, Nb, Zr, Al- Fe-Mo, Mo, Ni alloys, and Al- Ni by various materials including Na, Na-K, Li, Rb, and fused salts, Corrosion studies in pump loops of various materials by fused salts and liquid metals are reported, Fuel elements and shielding materials for ART and APPR are beirg developed. General studies in welding and brazing, nondestructive testing, fabrication, and inspection are described. Developments in high-temperature metals and ceramics, metallographic techniques, ceramic materials, and Zr alloys are reported, (T.R.H.)

1960-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

An Extended and More Sensitive Search for Periodicities in Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer/all-sky Monitor X-ray Light Curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a systematic search in ~14 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer All-Sky Monitor (ASM) data for evidence of periodicities. Two variations of the commonly used Fourier analysis search method have ...

Levine, Alan M.

116

Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report: For period ending December 31, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is divided into analytical spectroscopy; radioactive materials analysis; inorganic chemistry; organic chemistry; ORNL environmental programs; quality assurance, safety, and training; supplementary activities; and presentation of research results.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Chemical Technology Division annual progress report for period ending March 31, 1977  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts were prepared for several of the sections reporting work on the fuel cycle, radioactive waste management, coal conversion, isotope separation, fusion energy, separation processes, reactor safety, biomedical studies, and chemical engineering.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Solid State Division Progress Report for period ending March 31, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is divided into: theoretical solid-state physics, surface and near-surface properties of solids, defects in solids, transport properties of solids, neutron scattering, and synthesis and properties of novel materials. (DLC)

Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

SOLID STATE DIVISION ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING AUGUST 31, 1961  

SciTech Connect

Progress in solid state physics is reported on the following topics: theory, metals and alloys, nonmetals, reactor materials, and special projects. Twenty-one separate abstracts were prepared. (M.C.G.)

1961-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

120

ORNL nuclear waste programs annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect

Research progress is reported in 20 activities under the headings: spent fuels, defense waste management, commercial waste management, remedial action, and conventional reactors. Separate entries were prepared for each activity.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Isotopic power materials development. Quarterly progress report for period ending June 30, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress is reported on: (1) high-temperature alloys for space isotopic heat sources; (2) physical and mechanical metallurgy of heat-source containment materials; (3) isotope brayton system materials support; and (4) space nuclear flight systems hardware. (TFD)

Schaffhauser, A.C.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

HEALTH PHYSICS DIVISION ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT, FOR PERIOD ENDING JULY 31, 1961  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in 26 papers on radioactive waste disposal, ecologicah research, radiation physics and dosimetry, internal dosimetry, and health physics technology. Twenty-five separate abstracts were prepared. One paper was previously abstracted for NSA. (M.C.G.)

none,

1961-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress report is divided into: engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, program activities, and collaborative research facilities. Very little hard data is presented. The appendices include listings of seminars, publications, and conference papers. (DLC)

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

PHYSICS DIVISION ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING JANUARY 31, 1963  

SciTech Connect

Abstracts of 38 papers published or prepared for publication are presented. Individual abstracts are prepared for 32 of 35 papers reporting preliminary results of work in progress. (C.E.S.)

1963-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the division, whose purpose is to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by US DOE. Activities range from basic research to industrial research and technology transfer. The division (and the report) is divided into the following: Engineering materials, high-temperature materials, materials science, ceramics, nuclear fuel materials, program activities, collaborative research facilities and technology transfer, and educational programs.

Craig, D.F.; Weir, J.R. Jr.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the ninth in series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development of Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fusion Reactor Materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the twelfth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Heat-Pipe Development for Advanced Energy Transport Concepts Final Report Covering the Period January 1999 through September 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work in the Heat-pipe Technology Development for the Advanced Energy Transport Concepts program for the period January 1999 through September 2001. A gas-loaded molybdenum-sodium heat pipe was built to demonstrate the active pressure-control principle applied to a refractory metal heat pipe. Other work during the period included the development of processing procedures for and fabrication and testing of three types of sodium heat pipes using Haynes 230, MA 754, and MA 956 wall materials to assess the compatibility of these materials with sodium. Also during this period, tests were executed to measure the response of a sodium heat pipe to the penetration of water.

R.S.Reid; J.F.Sena; A.L.Martinez

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

METALLURGY DIVISION ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING OCTOBER 10, 1957  

SciTech Connect

High-Temperatare Metallurgy. A series of Inconel loops were operated to study the variation with time of depth of corrosion, effect of flow rate on corrosion, and effect of temperature drop on corrosion using fused salts. The corrosive effects of fused salts on Hastelloy B and Ni--Mo alloys are discussed. A series of Inconel--Na and Inconel-NaK forced circulation loops was operated to study the mass transfer in the systems. The mass transfer between Na and forced circulation loop of stainless steel, Incoloy, and Hastelloys B and W is discussed. Thermal convection loop corrosion resistance studies of Ni--Mo alloy, Inconel castings, and Nb in various systems are presented. Nondestructive testing methods and equipment are discussed. Methods and equipmeat used in the inspection of materials for reactor service are presented. A distillation apparatus is described for the purification of Na. To determine the effect of concentration on the diffusion coefficients, study on the rate of diffusion of NI in liquid Pb was initiated. A study is reported to determine why the protective oxide layer of Nl, Ta, and Zr becomes disrupted. A brief survey was made of the microtopography of sulfide films formed on Nb, Ta, and Zr. A research program was undertaken to determine the effect of reactor radiation on the gaseous oxidation of metals. Measurements of the density and absorption spectra of fused salts are presented. HRP Metallurgy. Microstructures of aged quench-and-reheat specimens of Zr--Nb alloys are presented. The effect of H/sub 2/ on the embrittlement of Ti is given. Tensile and impact specimens ot Zircaloy-2 were irradiated in corrosion loops to determine if any harmful mechanical property changes occurred through neutron irradiation or as a result of environment. Applied Metallurgy. Substitution of type 347 stainless steel for type 304 in APPR fuel elements because of heat-treatmeat specifications is discussed. An investigation was initiated to develop a dispersion of Eu/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in an iron-bass material, clad with stainless steel as a replacement for boron-bearing absorber sections. The fabrication and composition of various reactor fuel materials are described. Treatment of various fuel materials by carburization is presented. Results of experimente on the intergranular diffusion of Zr by Mg are presented. Metallographic examinations of HRP reactor components are presented. Progress and statas of development of pollshing techniques for metallographic specimans employing vibratory polishing machines are presented. The microstructures of Inconel was investigated. Preparation and identification of some rare earth silicides are discussed. The diffusion of Ca in TiO/sub 2/ was stadisd. A preliminary investigation was made of ths ThO/sub 2/--SiO/sub 2/ system. The electric are calcination of ThO/sub 2/ is desrribed. Fundumental Metallurgy. The allotropic modifications in metallic Cs ars described. Preferred orientation in extruded Al rod is described. Low-temperature measurements of the specific heats of Zr and Zr--In alloys are presented. Phase studies of the Cd--Zr alloys ars presented. Structures and phase transformations in Perovskits-type compounds are presented. (See also ORNL-2217.) (W.L.H.)

1957-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

133

Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1993, which extended from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who were in ESD and the end of FY 1993 is located in the final section of the report.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Quarterly report on the Ferrocyanide Safety Program for the period ending June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This is the thirteenth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated With Hanford site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (Borsheim et al. 1993), and this report follows the same format presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1.2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 3.0 and 4.0.

Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Quarterly report on the ferrocyanide safety program for the period ending March 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the twentieth quarterly report on the progress of activities addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. Progress in the Ferrocyanide Safety Program is reviewed, including work addressing the six parts of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 (FR 1990). All work activities are described in the revised program plan (DOE 1994b), and this report follows the same fomzat presented there. A summary of the key events occurring this quarter is presented in Section 1. 2. More detailed discussions of progress are located in Sections 2. 0 through 4. 0.

Meacham, J.E.

1996-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

136

Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1980. [Lead abstract  

SciTech Connect

Research conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division for the Fiscal Year 1980 included studies carried out in the following Division programs and sections: (1) Advanced Fossil Energy Program, (2) Nuclear Program, (3) Environmental Impact Program, (4) Ecosystem Studies Program, (5) Low-Level Waste Research and Development Program, (6) National Low-Level Waste Program, (7) Aquatic Ecology Section, (8) Environmental Resources Section, (9) Earth Sciences Section, and (10) Terrestrial Ecology Section. In addition, Educational Activities and the dedication of the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park are reported. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report.

Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

MATERIALS TESTING REACTOR PROJECT. QUARTERLY REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING MARCH 1, 1950  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in finaiizing basic design data for the Materials Testing Reactor. The major emphasis at ANL was on issurance of design reports on practically all phases of the MTR project outside the reactor face and low the first fioor level. Operation of the mock-up reacr at ORNL at 10 watts resulted in no major design changes. Topics discussed include the reactor building, wing, and reactor service building; canal and canal facilities; water systems; air exhaust systems; electrical power systems; effluent control; and shielding requirements. 11 drawings. (C.H.)

Huffman, J.R.

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress report covers the research and development activities of the Metals and Ceramics Division from January 1, 1983, through June 30, 1984. The format of the report follows the organizational structure of the division. Short summaries of technical work in progress in the various experimental groups are presented in six parts. Chapter 1 deals with the research and development activities of the Engineering Materials Section, Chapter 2 with the Processing Science and Technology Section, Chapter 3 with the Materials Science Section, Chapter 4 with Project Activities, Chapter 5 with Specialized Research Facilities and Equipment, and Chapter 6 with Miscellaneous Activities.

Brogden, I. (ed.)

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Depart of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. Separate abstracts were prepared for each individual section.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

This report is organized along topical lines in parallel to a Program Plan of the same title so that activities and accomplishments may be followed readily relative to that Program Plan. Thus, the work of a given laboratory may appear throughout the report. Chapters 1, 2, 8, and 9 review activities on analysis and evaluation, test methods development, status of irradiation experiments, and corrosion testing and hydrogen permeation studies, respectively. These activities relate to each of the alloy development paths. Chapters 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 present the ongoing work on each alloy development path. The Table of Contents is annotated for the convenience of the reader.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period October 1, 1991--March 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology, Biological and Radiation Physics, Chemical Physics, Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis, Risk Analysis, Center for Risk Management, Associate Laboratories for Excellence in Radiation Technology (ALERT), and Contributions to National and Lead Laboratory Programs and Assignments--Environmental Restoration.

Berven, B.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented for the following sections: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectroscopy; radioactive materials analysis; bio/organic analysis; and general and environmental analysis; quality assurance, safety, and tabulation analyses. In addition a list of publications and oral presentations and supplemental activities are included.

Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the following fields: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, elecrochemistry, catalysis, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemistry of hazardous chemicals, and thermal energy storage.

Not Available

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Semiannual Report to Congress for the period ending March 31, 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OCTOBER 1, 2011 - MARCH 31, 2012 OCTOBER 1, 2011 - MARCH 31, 2012 1 SEMIANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS Table of Contents Message from the Inspector General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Key Accomplishments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Other Significant Audits, Inspections, and Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Investigative Outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Positive Outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Highlights Based on Office of Inspector General Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

145

Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report mainly discusses topics on the physical effects of radiation on thermonuclear reactor materials. The areas discussed are: irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; mechanistic studies, theory and modeling; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics. (FI)

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Page 1 of 6 Reporting Period: January 2013 through June 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Michigan Number of Projects to Report: 16 Estimated Impact on Tuition and Fee Rates: 0% Project Description buildings on Central Campus, and also uses the steam produced to generate electricity. This co- generation will address life safety needs in Martha Cook while preserving the architectural quality of the historic

Michigan, University of

147

Analytical Chemistry Division. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

This report is divided into: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectrometry; technical support; bio/organic analysis; nuclear and radiochemical analysis; quality assurance, safety, and tabulation of analyses; supplementary activities; and presentation of research results. Separate abstracts were prepared for the technical support, bio/organic analysis, and nuclear and radiochemical analysis. (DLC)

Lyon, W.S. (ed.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Central receiver solar thermal power system, phase 1. Progress report for period ending December 31, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program objective is the preliminary design of a 10 MWe pilot solar power plant supported by major subsystem experiments. Progress is reported on the following task elements: 10 MWe pilot plant; collector subsystem design and analysis; receiver subsystem requirements; receiver subsystem design; thermal storage subsystem; electrical power generation subsystem; and pilot plant architectural engineering and support. (WDM)

None

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This progress report gives an overview of research programs at the Savannah River Site. Topics include; environmental operations support, wood stork foraging and breeding, defense waste processing, environmental stresses, alterations in the environment due to pollutants, wetland ecology, biodiversity, pond drawdown studies, and environmental toxicology.

Vaitkus, M.R.; Wein, G.R. [eds.; Johnson, G.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report summarizes activities in the Aquatic Ecology, Earth Sciences, Environmental Analyses, and Terrestrial Ecology sections, as well as in the Fossil Energy, Biomass, Low-Level Waste Research and Management, and Global Carbon Cycle Programs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each section. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported concerning preparation of a materials handbook for fusion, creep-fatigue of first-wall structural materials, test results on miniature compact tension fracture toughness specimens, austenitic stainless steels, Fe-Ni-Cr alloys, iron-base alloys with long-range crystal structure, ferritic steels, irradiation experiments, corrosion testing, and hydrogen permeation studies. (FS)

Ashdown, B.G. (comp.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has been indexed by 11 separate chapters. The subjects covered are: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, materials chemistry, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, catalysis, electron spectroscopy, nuclear waste chemistry, heuristic modeling, and special topics. (PLG)

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics on fusion research: toroidal confinement activities; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; fusion theory and computation; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; advanced systems program; fusion materials research; neutron transport; and management services, quality assurance, and safety.

Sheffield, J.; Berry, L.A.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

QUARTERLY STATUS REPORT ON LAMPRE PROGRAM FOR PERIOD ENDING NOVEMBER 20, 1963  

SciTech Connect

The development and operation of the Los Alamos Molten Plutonium Reactor Experiments are described. The development and compatibility of iron-- plutonium and cerium-cobalt-- plutonium alloy fuels are evaluated. The fabrication and testing of the liquid sodiam loop are summarized. The phase studies of plutoniam alloys containing neodymium, scandium, yttrium, praseodymium, and cerium-- cobalt mixtures are reported. (N.W.R.)

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Isotopic power materials development. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress is reported on: (1) high-temperature alloys for space isotopic heat sources; (2) physical and mechanical metallurgy of heat source containment materials; (3) /sup 144/Cm fuel development; (4) terrestrial radioisotope applications; (5) selenide isotope generator system support; (6) isotope Brayton system materials support; and (7) space nuclear flight systems hardware. (TFD)

Schaffhauser, A.C.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986  

SciTech Connect

This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

GAS-COOLED REACTOR PROGRAM SEMIANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING MARCH 31, 1963  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on the development of gas-cooled reactors. The report contains eleven sections which are abstracted separately in NSA. These sections are contained in two parts: investigations in support of the Experimental Gas-Cooled Reactor and advanced reactor design and development. The four sections abstracted under Part I are: performance analyses, component development and testing, materials development, and irradiation testing of components and materials. The remaining sections are under Part II and they are: development of fueled-graphite bodies, investigations of fueled-graphite systems, clad fuel development, investigations of moderator materials, studies of advanced systems, experimental investigations of heat transfer and fluid flow, and facilities and equipment. (N.W.R.)

1963-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

159

Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This eighth annual report of the Division covers work done during FY 1981 (October 1, 1980, through September 30, 1981). As with these documents in the past, the format follows approximately the organizational structure of the Energy Division. Chapters 2 through 6 summarize the activities of the sections of the Division: Environmental Impact Section, headed by H.E. Zittel; Regional and Urban Studies Section, R.M. Davis; Economic Analysis Section, R.B. Shelton; Data and Analysis Section, A.S. Loebl; and Efficiency and Renewables Research Section, J.W. Michel. In addition, work on a variety of projects which cut across section lines is reported in Chapter 7, Integrated Programs. These activities are under the supervision of T.J. Wilbanks, Associate Director for the Division. Separate abstracts are included for individual projects.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

SMUDPV2: Quarterly performance report 2 for the period July through September 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the nominal 1 MW/sub AC/ photovoltaic power plant located adjacent to the Rancho Seco generating station in California is reported for the months of July, August, and September 1986. The performance data presented were measured, stored, and reduced by the onsite plant control and data acquisition computer. Data pertaining to operating and maintenance activities were obtained from the operator's log. (LEW)

Collier, D.E.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY DIVISION ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1962  

SciTech Connect

The report is divided into 4 major parts with several sections in each part. Separate abstracts were prepared for all sections in Parts I and II except 8 and 9 (containing information on mass spectrometry and microscopy). A summary of service analyses is given in Part III, and information concerning the ORNL master analytical manual is presented in Part IV; abstracts were not prepared for these. (J.R.D.)

1963-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY DIVISION ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING NOVEMBER 15, 1963  

SciTech Connect

Research and development progress is reported on analytical instrumentation, chemical analysis of advanced reactor fuels, analytical studies of molten-salt systems, special research problems, reactor projects, effects of radiation on analytical methods, x-ray and spectrochemical analyses, spectroscopy, optical and electron microscopy, nuclear and radiochemical analyses, inorganic preparations, organic preparations, and analytical development. Service analyses are also described. Separate abstracts were prepared for each topic. (M.C.G.)

1964-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

Duke Energy Smart Grid Host Site Progress Report for the Period Ending November 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a progress update for the Duke Energy Smart Grid Demonstration Host Site Project, which is a part of the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) multi-year Smart Grid Demonstration Initiative. The Duke Energy Demonstration Project is focused on the integration of higher levels of distributed energy resources, such as energy storage, photovoltaic generation, demand response, and plug-in electric vehicles. In addition, Duke Energy is developing a communications ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Sacramento Municipal Utility District Smart Grid Host Site Progress Report: For the Period Ending May 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a progress update on the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Smart Grid Demonstration Project. This project is part of the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) seven-year Smart Grid Demonstration Initiative. The project is focused on integrating large-scale distributed energy resources (DER)—including demand response, storage, distributed generation, and distributed renewable generation—into a “virtual power plant” to advance ...

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending June 30, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report is divided into eight sections: (1) nuclear data measurements and evaluation; (2) systems analysis and shielding; (3) applied physics and fusion reactor analysis; (4) mathematical modeling and intelligent control; (5) reliability and human factors research; (6) applied risk and decision analysis; (7) information analysis and data management; and (8) mathematical sciences. Each section then consists of abstracts of presented or published papers. (WRF)

Not Available

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Physics Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1978. [ORNL  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on the Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, nuclear physics with neutrons, theoretical physics, the Nuclear Data Project, accelerator-based atomic physics, magnetic fusion energy-applied physics research, electron spectroscopy, and high-energy physics, as well as lists of publications, papers presented at meetings, and other general information. Sixty-two items containing significant information were abstracted and indexed individually. (RWR)

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1985  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for the four major sections of the division: analytical spectroscopy, radioactive materials laboratories, inorganic chemistry, and organic chemistry. A brief discussion of the division's role in the Laboratory's Environmental Restoration and Facilities Upgrade is given. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited.

Shultz, W.D.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending July 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Research is reported on: chemistry of coal liquefaction, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures, geosciences, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of TRU elements and compounds, separations chemistry, electrochemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, inorganic chemistry of hydrogen cycles, molten salt systems, and enhanced oil recovery. Separate abstracts were prepared for the sections dealing with coal liquefaction, TRU elements and compounds, separations, nuclear wastes, and enhanced oil recovery. (DLC)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 CFR 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. Long-term laboratory contracts were approved on October 22, 1991. DataChem Laboratories of Salt Lake City, Utah, performs the hazardous chemicals analyses for the Hanford Site. Analyses for coliform bacteria are performed by Columbia/Biomedical Laboratories and for dioxin by TMS Analytical Services, Inc. International Technology Analytical Services Richland, Washington performs the radiochemical analyses. This quarterly report contains data that were received prior to March 8, 1993. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Critical analysis of European load management practices. Final report for period January--July 1976  

SciTech Connect

Load management has been practiced in Europe for approximately a quarter century. A critical evaluation of the initial objectives and economic justifications for load management given in Europe may help energy policymakers in the U.S. assess the relevance of load management to meeting their current energy goals. Load management was adopted in Europe primarily to promote a growth in energy sales at a rate greater than the increase in capacity requirements. Utilities were able to improve daily load factors during the winter peak period; however, they may not have been successful in maintaining or improving their financial strength through load management. Increased capital and operating expenditures in the generation and distribution systems became necessary as the power system evolved in response to changing load characteristics. Rates charged to customers did not always produce adequate revenues from managed loads to cover the capital and operating costs to supply those loads. Comprehensive studies of the long-term costs and benefits might have prevented some of the load management problems experienced in Europe. Load management was not introduced in Europe to reduce utility production costs, conserve energy or scarce fuels, improve the environment, or influence summer loads. Accordingly, the European experience with load management may not be relevant to energy policymakers in the U.S. who desire to achieve these objectives.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Contamination limits for real and personal property. Progress report for the period January--June 1973  

SciTech Connect

S>During the initial 6 month period of this project, attention was focused on several individual problem areas, primarily through literature searches ond interpretations of the data found. The first was a review of information on the effects of internal radiation doses to the lung with emphasis on the key question of the possible difference in response between a uniformly distributed dose and the same energy delivered to smaller -masses of tissue from radioactive particles. The second involved a study of the soil properties of importance to the transfer to man of radioactive particles and the factors involved in wind erosion with resulting air concentrations. The third was an attempt to better define the many questions arising from mechanisms of transfer involving localized concentrations of plutonium, either from direct disturbance of the soil or from transport of the contamination to other areas. Finally, calculations were made on the air concentrations expected from wind pickup of particles from one contaminated area for comporison with measurements in this area and to further refine the calculational model. (125 references) (auth)

Healy, J.W.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Health and Safety Research Division progress report for the period April 1, 1990--September 30, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a brief progress report from the Health and Safety Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information is presented in the following sections: Assessment Technology including Measurement Applications and Development, Pollutant Assessments, Measurement Systems Research, Dosimetry Applications Research, Metabolism and Dosimetry Research and Nuclear Medicine. Biological and Radiation Physics including Atomic, Molecular, and High Voltage Physics, Physics of Solids and Macromolecules, Liquid and Submicron Physics, Analytic Dosimetry and Surface Physics and Health Effects. Chemical Physics including Molecular Physics, Photophysics and Advanced Monitoring Development. Biomedical and Environmental Information Analysis including Human Genome and Toxicology, Chemical Hazard Evaluation and Communication, Environmental Regulations and Remediation and Information Management Technology. Risk Analysis including Hazardous Waste.

Kaye, S.V.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

GAS-COOLED REACTOR PROGRAM QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1961  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on investigations in support of the Experimental Gas-Cooled Reactor, the Pebble-Bed Reactor Experiment, Advanced reactor design and development, test facilities, components, and materials. Topics covered include EGCR physics, EGCR performance analyses, structural investigations, EGCR component and materials development and testing, EGCR experimental facilities, PBRE physics and design studies, fueled-graphite investigations, clad fuel development, design studies of advanced power plants, experimental investigations of heat transfer and fluid flow, development of equipment anmd test facilities. and fabrication studies. (M.C.G.)

1962-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division progress report for the period January 1, 1993--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report provides brief summaries of progress in the Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division (CASD) during 1993 and 1994. The first four chapters, which cover the research mission, are organized to mirror the major organizational units of the division and indicate the scope of the research portfolio. These divisions are the Analytical Spectroscopy Section, Nuclear and Radiochemistry Section, Organic Chemistry Section, and Physical and Materials Chemistry Section. The fifth and sixth chapters summarize the support activities within CASD that are critical for research progress. Finally, the appendices indicate the productivity and recognition of the staff in terms of various forms of external publications, professional activities, and awards.

Poutsma, M.L.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Solid-State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress and activities are reported on: theoretical solid-state physics (surfaces; electronic, vibrational, and magnetic properties; particle-solid interactions; laser annealing), surface and near-surface properties of solids (surface, plasma-material interactions, ion implantation and ion-beam mixing, pulsed-laser and thermal processing), defects in solids (radiation effects, fracture, impurities and defects, semiconductor physics and photovoltaic conversion), transport properties of solids (fast-ion conductors, superconductivity, mass and charge transport in materials), neutron scattering (small-angle scattering, lattice dynamics, magnetic properties, structure and instrumentation), and preparation and characterization of research materials (growth and preparative methods, nuclear waste forms, special materials). (DLC)

Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

HTGR base program quarterly progress report for the period ending August 31, 1973  

SciTech Connect

The High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) work reported includes studies of basic fission-product distribution mechanisms, recycle fuel studies (including designing and testing of recycle test elements) and exploration of head-end reprocessing methods (as part of a national recycle plan and of a recycle fuel plan), and physics and fuel management studies. Materials studies include irradiation and analysis of fuel particles in capsules to evaluate fuel systems, and basic studies of control materials and of carbon and graphite. Experimental procedures and results are discussed and, where appropriate, the data are presented. (auth)

1973-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

178

HTGR fuel recycle development program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending August 31, 1978  

SciTech Connect

The work reported includes the development of unit processes and equipment for reprocessing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) fuel, the design and development of an integrated pilot line to demonstrate the head end of HTGR reprocessing using unirradiated fuel materials, and design work in support of Hot Engineering Tests (HET). Work is also described on tradeoff studies concerning the required design of facilities and equipment for the large-scale recycle of HTGR fuels in order to guide the development activities for HTGR fuel recycle.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A decade of DIII-D research. Final report for the period of work, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect

During the ten-year DIII-D tokamak operating period of 1989 through 1998, major scientific advances and discoveries were made and facility upgrades and improvements were implemented. Each year, annual reports as well as journal and international conference proceedings document the year-by-year advances (summarized in Section 7). This final contract report, provides a summary of these historical accomplishments. Section 2 encapsulates the 1998 status of DIII-D Fusion Science research. Section 3 summarizes the DIII-D facility operations. Section 4 describes the major upgrades to the DIII-D facility during this period. During the ten-year period, DIII-D has grown from predominantly a General Atomics program to a national center for fusion science with participants from over 50 collaborating institutions and 300 users who spend more than one week annually at DIII-D to carry out experiments or data analysis. In varying degrees, these collaborators participate in formulating the research program directions. The major collaborating institution programs are described in Section 6.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Central receiver solar thermal power system, phase 1. Quarterly progress report (final) for period ending June 30, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this report period, the major program activities were aimed toward the fabrication of the three major research experiments and continued evaluation of the Pilot Plant performance and operating modes. The detail designs were completed early in this period. Effort was continued in the evaluation of Pilot Plant start transients. Both warm and hot starts from thermal storage were evaluated as was a cold start from the Receiver. In the Collector Subsystem Experiment the heliostat structures and drive mechanisms were completed and delivered. The detail design of the 5 MW Receiver Experiment was completed at Foster Wheeler. In the Thermal Storage Subsystem the detail design of the experiment was completed early in the period. A final selection of the heat transport media was made with Hitec selected as the molten salt and Caloria HT-43 selected as the hydrocarbon oil. During this period Bechtel continued its efforts in the optimization of the Electrical Power Generation Subsystem. Work was also continued on the completion of data that will be used in the Electrical Power Generation Subsystem analytical model being prepared by Martin as a part of the overall Pilot Plant Simulation Model. (WDM)

None

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

METALLURGY DIVISION ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING MAY 31, 1961  

SciTech Connect

>Fundamental Alloying. Studies of crystal structures, reactions at metal surfaces, spectroscopy of molten salts, mechanical deformation, and alloy theory are reported. Long-Range Applied Metallurgy. A thermal comparator is described and the characteristic temperature of U0/sub 2/ determined. Sintering studies were carried out on ThO/sub 2/. The diffusion of fission products in fuel and of Al/sup 26/ and Mn/sup 54/ in Al and the reaction of Be with UC were studied. Transformation and oxidation data were obtained for a number of Zr alloys. Reactor Metallurgy. A large number of ceramic technology projects are described. Some corrosion data are given for metals exposed to impure He and molten fluorides. Studies were made of the fission-gas-retention Properties of ceramic fuel bodies. A large number of materials compatibility studies are described. The mechanical properties of some reactor materials were studied. Fabrication work was conducted to develop materials for application in low-, medium-, and high-temperature reactors or systems. A large number of new metallographic and nondestructive testing techniques are reported. Studies were carried out on the oxidation, carburization, and stability of alloys. Equipment for postirradiation examination is described. Preparation of some alloys and dispersion fuels by powder metallurgy methods was studied. The development of welding and brazing techniques for reactor materials is described. (D.L.C.)

1961-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

182

Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Expert Meeting Report: Retrofit Implementation - A Neighborhood at a Time  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Retrofit Implementation - Retrofit Implementation - A Neighborhood at a Time Dianne Griffiths Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) April 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, subcontractors, or affiliated partners makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply

185

Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption Report to Congress  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Pub. L. No. 109-58; EPAct 2005) amended the Uniform Time Act of 1966 (Pub. L. No. 89-387) to increase the portion of the year that is subject to Daylight Saving Time. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) EPAct 2005 extended the duration of Daylight Saving Time in the spring by changing its start date from the first Sunday in April to the second Sunday in March, and in the fall by changing its end date from the last Sunday in October to the first Sunday in November. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) EPAct 2005 also called for the Department of Energy to evaluate the impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on energy consumption in the United States and to submit a report to Congress. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) This report presents the results of impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on the national energy consumption in the United States. The key findings are: (1) The total electricity savings of Extended Daylight Saving Time were about 1.3 Tera Watt-hour (TWh). This corresponds to 0.5 percent per each day of Extended Daylight Saving Time, or 0.03 percent of electricity consumption over the year. In reference, the total 2007 electricity consumption in the United States was 3,900 TWh. (2) In terms of national primary energy consumption, the electricity savings translate to a reduction of 17 Trillion Btu (TBtu) over the spring and fall Extended Daylight Saving Time periods, or roughly 0.02 percent of total U.S. energy consumption during 2007 of 101,000 TBtu. (3) During Extended Daylight Saving Time, electricity savings generally occurred over a three- to five-hour period in the evening with small increases in usage during the early-morning hours. On a daily percentage basis, electricity savings were slightly greater during the March (spring) extension of Extended Daylight Saving Time than the November (fall) extension. On a regional basis, some southern portions of the United States exhibited slightly smaller impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on energy savings compared to the northern regions, a result possibly due to a small, offsetting increase in household air conditioning usage. (4) Changes in national traffic volume and motor gasoline consumption for passenger vehicles in 2007 were determined to be statistically insignificant and therefore, could not be attributed to Extended Daylight Saving Time.

Belzer, D. B.; Hadley, S. W.; Chin, S-M.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

QUARTERLY STATUS REPORT ON LAMPRE PROGRAM FOR PERIOD ENDING NOVEMBER 20, 1960  

SciTech Connect

A decision was made to begin fabrication for the initial core loading of LAMPRE-1 with capsules from the tantalum on hand. Fuel for the first loading will be the cast Fe--Pu alloy from LCX III capsules and will contain carbon and stabilizer. Certification and melt-freeze tests are continuing on LAMPRE type capsules. The filling of the reactor sodium system is described. The cover gas system operated satisfactorily during the sodium shakedown phase. Four of the 15 core thermocouples have operated improperly since the sodium system was filled. The capsule charges were operated to remove dummy capsules and insert tantalum capsules containing test coupons. The 2000-kw Sodium Test Facility, including test steam generator, was operated continuously from Aug. 20 to Nov. 20, except for l59 hr of shutdown required for maintenance of auxiliary steam system equipment. Mercury-water flow systems were set up and are being operated to study both lift and jet pumping. A second fuel pumping experiment using Co --Ce - -Pu fuel was set up and tried without success. The effects of various additives on the properties of Fe-Pu fuels are being studied. The fabrication of LAMPRE-1 capsules by impact-extruding a rod-slug into a starting cup followed by six ironing stages is described. Materials that were corrosion tested as fabricated capsules include arcmelted and electron-beann-melted high-purity tantalum and Ta-- 0.1 wt.% W alloy. Corrosion tests are in progress on experimental deep-drawn capsules made from Ta --0.1 wt. % W--0.2 wt. % Y. An x-ray fluorescence spectrographic method was developed for determining hafnium in Ta--Hf and Ta--W- Hf alloys. Work is in progress on the development of a solvent extraction method for the recovery of plutonium residues from various pyrometallurgical processes. (For preceding period see LAMS-2462.) (W.L.H.)

1960-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PROGRAM TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE PERIOD SEPTEMBER 9 TO OCTOBER 20, 1955  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the design, development, and construction of PWR power plant systems and components and PWR core and auxiliaries is summarized. The blanket assembly design is described and illustrated. Results of MTR evaluation of fuel element failure instrumentation are reported. Development of fabrication and testing tochaiques for clad fuel elements, fuel rods, plates, and assemblies is described. Investigations of fuel and cladding alloys include crystal structure and thermal stability determinations on U--Mo alloys, studies on the nature of the hydride phase formed during corrosion of gamma -phase alloys in high- temperature water, and specific heat, resistivity, and phase diagram studies of U- -Mo and U--Nb alloys. The equilibrium and kinetics in the system UO/sub 2/--O/ sub 2/ are being studied to gain information on the structure and stability of UO/ sub 2/ under various conditions. Results of irradiation tests on UO/sub 2/ samples and of thermal cycling tests of Zircaloy-2 clad UO/sub 2/ rods are reported. Corrosion test resuIts are summarized for unclad and Zircaloy-2 clad U- - Mo and U--Nb samples. The radiation induced volume change of prototype fuel reds has been investigated. Studies of the fabrication cladding, tensile properties, and corrosion of U-- Si systems are described. Corrosion tests are continuing on Zircaloy-2 clad U-- Zr fuel elements and on various experimental Al alloys for cladding applications. Work was continued on the preparation, corrosion and sinterability of pure UO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 2/ containing additives. Operation and chemical analysis of in-pile loop experiments are described. Results are reported from studies of the erosion of UO/sub 2/ in high-velocity coolant, decontamination of water by ion exchange resins, sorption of radioisotopes on stainless steel, and decontamination of corrosion loops. Work in reactor physics has included PWR control calculations using a 2-dimensional UNIVAC code, calculation of fission product activity in the primary coolant, and criticaiity studies on the Flexibie Critical Experiment and on a lattice of UO/ sub 2/ fuel reds in the TRX. Current PWR plant parameters are recapitulated. (D.E.B.)

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

MARITIME REACTOR PROGRAM ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1961  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on general support of the NS Savannah, operation of the pressurized-water in-pile loop, and advanced core development. A shield survey, iodine adsorption studies, a bioassay development program, preparation of replacement control rod drives, irradiation testing of pressure-vessel steel, a thermal insulation investigation, and an analysis of primary system components for gamm-emitting elements were carried out in the NS Savannah program. Water- chemistry studies in the pressurized-water in-pile: loop were made to determine the specific activities and the chemical compositions of filterable and nonfilterable impurities in the loop water. Fuel development and irradiation tests and core I lifetime studies were carried out in the NS Savannah advanced core development. (M.C.G.)

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

MAP3S precipitation chemistry network: seventh periodic summary report, 1983. [MAP3S Network  

SciTech Connect

This summary report, the seventh in the series, contains complete field and chemical data from the MAP3S Precipitation Chemistry Network for the year 1983. Sections cover QA/QC of the MAP3S/PCN; network history, network site information and a MAP3S/PCN bibliography; and a brief statistical look at the laboratory operations for 1983. There is also a brief statistical summary for 1982 to 1983. Included under the Quality Control section are the QA audits for site performance, laboratory comparisons, field blank and pH test results, and sample shipping and analysis results. Included is a listing of cooperating organizations and personnel for the MAP3S/PCN. 10 references, 10 figures, 32 tables.

Rothert, J.E.; Dana, M.T.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

SUMMARY TECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1955 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1955  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on the following investigations: pilot-plant evaluation of U ore concentrates; low-acid extraction of U; scrub-column operation, corrosion of reactor materials in sparge tanks containing UNH; effect of UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ content on UF/sub 4/ reduction; thermal densification of UF/ sub 4/,; operation of the moving bed reactor; reduction of UF/sub 4/ with Mg; development of a mold insulator; preparation of Th (C/sub 2/O/sub 4/)/sub 2/ and ThCI/sub 4/; production of Th metal; ore resistant t transform ation of U; effect of H/sub 2/ content of slug canning behavior; centrifugal casting of slugs; determination of Zr and Mo in U alloys; and analysis of U and Th ores for rare earths. (W.L.H.)

Simmons, J.W. ed.

1955-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

191

Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related Issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1992. Energy Division`s total expenditures in FY 1992 were $42.8 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, the US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 116.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, technology transfer, analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries, and civilian transportation analysis. Energy conservation technologies focus on electric power systems, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems conduct research for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. Much of Energy Division`s research is valuable to other organizations as well as to sponsors. This information is disseminated by the staff`s involvement in professional and trade organizations and workshops; joint research with universities and private-sector firms; collaboration with state and local governments; presentation of work at conferences; and publication of research results in journals, reports, and conference proceedings.

Counce, D.M.; Wolff, P.P. [eds.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Stochastic modeling and global warming trend extraction for ocean acoustic travel times. Interim technical report  

SciTech Connect

A possible indication of the existence of global climate warming is a negative trend for the travel time of an acoustic pulse along a fixed long path, or paths, in the ocean over a period of many years. The goal of this report is the development of methods specifically for determining the presence of a long term trend for climate change from a temporal sequence of measurements of acoustic propagation times. Robust statistical methods for determining whether a significant trend is present in a given set of time series data have been developed and, for illustration, applied to some specific traveltime time series generated by the MASIG and GFDL ocean models. In this report we consider line + noise and ARIMA statistical models. We show that if the time series are long enough, somewhat over 20 years, then series such as those simulated by the MASIG and GFDL models can be classified reliably as line + noise when this is the case. However, it is shown that the results are considerably different for the two ocean models under consideration and that these models can not currently be relied upon by themselves to predict global warming. Experimental data is most certainly needed, not only to measure global warming itself, but to help improve the ocean model themselves.

Bottone, S.; Gray, H.L.; Woodward, W.A.

1995-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

193

Stimulated Emission of Energetic particles (SEEP). Final report for period ending 30 September 1987  

SciTech Connect

An active satellite-ground coordinated space-plasma experiment was conducted in which electrons were precipitated from the radiation belts into the ionosphere by the controlled injection of VLF signals from ground-based transmitters. In this experiment Stimulated Emission of Energetic Particles (SEEP), four operational VLF transmitters were operated in special controlled formats at times of overpasses of the low-altitude polar- orbiting satellite S81-1. The results confirm the hypothesis that electrons can be precipitated from the radiation belts by ground-based VLF transmitters, and they provide information relating to the effects of such precipitation on the ionosphere. In addition, the precipitation of electrons by VLF waves associated with lightning was measured for the first time from a satellite. Many other important findings were made with the SEEP data. These include the following: 1) An assessment was made of the relative contributions of hiss, lightning, and VLF transmitter waves to electron precipitation from the slot region, 2) discovery of the frequent occurrence of multiple peaks in the energy spectra of electrons trapped at low altitudes, 3) observation of electron pulsations near the trapping boundary, and 4) discovery of bremsstrahlung x-ray images of small isolated patches of energetic electron precipitation at high latitude.

Imhof, W.L.; Voss, H.D.; Mobilia, J.; Datlowe, D.W.; Gaines, E.E.

1987-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

CSDP: The seismology of continental thermal regimes: Final report for period April 1, 1986-April 1, 1987  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the study of both wave propagation in complex structures and source mechanism of geothermal seismic events. The following work was accomplished in the past one-year period: (1) interpretation of long-period events observed at Mt. St. Helens and at the Fenton Hill hot-dry-rock experimental site in terms of seismic radiation from a fluid-filled crack; (2) interpretation of teleseismic data collected in and near the Valles caldera in terms of a model with irregular topography, caldera fill, and magma chamber; (3) interpretation of VSP (Vertical Seismic Profiling) data from the Oroville fault zone by ray tracing and polarization calculation for P, SV, and SH waves in heterogeneous and anisotropic media containing aligned fluid-filled and/or dry cracks; and (4) development of a new powerful method for calculating seismic motions in media with irregular topography and interfaces by the superposition of Gaussian Beams.

Aki, K.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

HOMOGENEOUS REACTOR PROJECT QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING JULY 31, 1955  

SciTech Connect

8 5 6 2 0 5 8 5 5 ? 5 : tion of the HRT is summarized. The design of some reactor components is described, including fuel system line coolers, the thermal shield, instrument cubicles, the reactor cell air monitor, and sampling facilities. The important design specifications for the HRT fissionproduct adsorption system are outlined. The effects of fluid circulation on HRT stability, the results of the rupture of the fuel inlet nozzle on the pressure vessel, core tank temperature, and heat generation and temperature distribution in the control room area shield were examined. Operation of the HRT mockup loop is summarized. High generalized corrosion rates and U precipitation were observed when 50 ppm oxygen was used. Results from tests of HRT pumps, heat exchanger, sampler mockup, and reflex condenser and recombiner are presented. Design of the instrumentation in the control room area and fabrication of differential pressure and liquid level transmitters are reported. Thorium Breeder Reactor. Stability criteria, the effect of slurry settling on reactivity, and neutron losses due to coating the core tank with platinum bave been analyzed for the TBR. An economic study of partial fuel costs for one-region Pu-U reactors was completed. The design concept of a 300- electrical-Mw thorium breeder power station utilizing low-pressure gas recombination was completed, and construction and operating costs were estimated. Design problems which must be solved before the design can be considered practical are discussed. Medification of TBR design from low- to high-pressure recombination was started. Corrosion. Operation of dynamic-corroslon test loops with uranyl sulfate solutions and thorium oxide slurries proceeded in a routine manner, and results are presented tabularly. Sedimentation characteristics of thorium dioxide slurries were determined at 100 to 300 deg C. Development, fabrication, and operation of in-side loops for radiation corrosion studies are described. Data from in-side loop and bomb experiments to study the corrosion of Zircaloy-2 and stainless steel under irradiation are reported. Results are presented from laboratory corrosion studies of stressed and unstressed specimens of stainless steel, titanium alloy and Zlrcaloy-2, and unstressed specimens of aluminum oxide in simulated HRT solutions. The effects of sulfate additions, calcination temperature, and particle size on the corrosive effects of thorium oxide slurries were studied. Engneering Development. The status of the heat exchanger development program is summarized. Thorium oxide slurry circulation studies and the development of blanket-system components such as dump tanks and pressurizer are continuing. The power removal capabilities of boiling homogeneous reactors are being studied. The results of stress-corrosion tests on austenitic stainless steels and dynamiccorrosion tests of stainless steel welds are reported. The mechanical properties of irradiated Zircaloy-2, stainless steel, and carbon steel specimens are being studied. Chemical Engineering Development. Studies to determine the effect of irradiation on the properties of thorium oxide slurries and to demonstrate slurry radiation stability were continued. Silver was shown to be a good internal catalyst for the recombination of radiolytic gases in thorium oxide slurries. Progress was made in the characterization of thorium oxide preducts and slurries by x-ray, nitrogen adsorption surface area, thermogravimetric, and gaseous adsorption techniques, sedimentation particle size analyses, and bulk density measurements. The HRT fuel processing plant is described. The precipitation of needymium sulfate from

McDuffle, H.F.; Kelly, D.C. comps.

1955-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M&C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Metals and Ceramics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a brief overview of the activities and accomplishments of the Metals and Ceramics (M C) Division during fiscal year (FY) 1991. The division is organized to provide technical support, primarily in the area of high-temperature materials, for the various technologies being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Activities span the range from basic research (through applied research and engineering development) to industrial interactions (through cooperative research and a strong technology transfer program). The division is organized in functional groups that encompass nearly all of the disciplines needed to develop and to apply materials in high-temperature applications. Sections I through 5 describe the different functional groups; Sect. 6 provides an alternative view of the division in terms of the major programs, most of which cross group lines; and Sect. 7 summarizes external interactions including cooperative research and development programs, educational activities, and technology transfer functions. Appendices describe the organizational structure, note personnel changes, present honors and awards received by division members, and contain listings of publications completed and presentations made at technical meetings.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1988: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described in this annual progress report for Fiscal Year (FY) 1988. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of the way society makes choices in energy use and energy-using technologies, (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental implications of changes in energy technology, and (3) improving and developing new energy-efficient technologies. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on four major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) transportation and decision systems research, (3) technology research and development for improving the efficiency of energy and end-use technologies, and (4) electric power systems. The Division's total expenditures in FY 1988 were $44.3 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 139 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics.

Not Available

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division's total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

Stone, J.N. (ed.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division`s total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division`s programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

Stone, J.N. [ed.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Microstructural effects in abrasive wear: Final report for period September 15, 1981--March 14, 1986  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes research performed on abrasion of metallic alloys. The work was designed to improve our understanding of the factors affecting abrasion rates in two-phase alloys containing large, hard second-phase particles (SPPs) such as carbides, since this class of alloys generally has very high abrasion resistance owing to the presence of such carbides. The project was divided into sections dealing with material removal in the carbide and matrix phases. The materials studied included Stellite and high Cr-Mo white cast irons and a set of specially prepared model alloys containing one of six types of artificial SPPs dispersed in a sintered matrix of pure Cu. Scratch tests were employed to simulate abrasion mechanisms, and specially designed scratch test systems were fabricated to permit scratch testing in-situ in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and to permit scratches to be made at fixed depths of cut rather than fixed loads. Three types of abrasion tests were employed; a dry-sand rubber wheel abrasion test; a low-speed ''gouging'' abrasion test employing a special low-speed Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ grinding wheel; and a pin-on-disc abrasion test using abrasive paper. Abrasive type and size was varied in the rubber wheel and the pin-on-disc tests. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Kosel, T.H.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

202

MHD air heater development technology. Report for the period July, 1978-September, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The statement of work divides the effort into three tasks: Task 1 (design studies): The objectives of this task are to: (1) evaluate full-scale, direct- and indirect-fired regenerative air heater systems from use in MHD power plants; (2) support testing of refractory materials, hot gas valves, and design concepts; (3) support design of a 5 MW test heater. Task 2 (design support tests): The objectives of this task are to: (1) support design of a 5 MW test heater; (2) identify and evaluate life of promising refractory materials for use in MHD heaters; (3) determine operating conditions and bed geometry (hole size, web thickness which permit operation without clogging of heater passages due to accumulations of seed/slag or slag alone, (4) test valves for use in hot gas streams which are laden with seed/slag or slag alone. Task 3 (vertical slice test bed): The ojbective of this task is to provide a preliminary design of a test heater which is a vertical slice of a full-sclae heater. It will be sized for a thermal input of approx. 5 MW. Testing with hot gas streams containing seed/slag or slag alone will be accommodated in order to simulate both direct-and indirect-diring. Progress is reported in detail on these tasks.

Not Available

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division are described in this annual progress report for FY 1990. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of how societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy efficient technologies; and (4) developing improved transportation planning and policy. Disciplines of the 129 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, chemical heat pumps, refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building enveloped (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), retrofits for existing buildings, and electric power systems. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. 48 refs., 34 figs., 7 tabs.

Selden, R.H. (ed.)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

MARITIME GAS-COOLED REACTOR PROGRAM QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE PERIOD ENDING MARCH 31, 1959  

SciTech Connect

Turbomachinery considerations indicated that it would be desirable to reduce the cycle pressure from 1,000 to 800 psia. The problem of determining the temperature distribution and the resulting thermal stress pattern within the graphite was considered. Preliminary designs for a heterogeneous fuel element and a semihomogeneous fuel element were developed. Utilization of the Hanford in- pile gas loop for fuel element testing is discussed. Two-group PDQ calculations were run to estimate control rod worth for the preliminary design core under cold, clean conditions. Curves of rod worth versus position were developed for the hot, clean and the cold, clean preliminary design core. A detailed lifetime calculation was made for the preliminary design heterogeneous core. Fuel cycle costs were estimated on the basis of the effect of B in the fuel elements. The schedule and facilities for the critical experiments are discussed in some detail. The speed of the main turbine shaft was tentatively set at about 12,200 rpm. The design and fabrication of a test stand to evaluate shaft seals and seal systems were completed and trial runs were made. The effects of minor heat transfer due to heat leakage, fluid flow, and thermodynamic phenomena on MGCR full-load cycle performance were studied. Operating characteristics of the heat exchanger test facility are described. A critical review was conducted on the desirability of using concentric ducts and valves. Block diagrams outlining reactor power level, outlet temperature, and plant inventory control are presented. Equations which permit the dynamic analysis of a closed-cycle gas-turbine plant were programed for a digital computer. Descriptions were prepared for fluid-mechanical systems. Several methods of purifying He in both storage bank and main loop were investigated. Investigations into the maximum operating temperatures of the various electrical equipment indicate that temperatures up to 140 deg F can be tolerated. Preliminary design work was carried out on an emergency cooldown system which uses a stored inert coolant. Work on the irradiation stability of fuel materials indicated that conversion from the monocarbide to the dicarbide can take place at 2,350 deg F in graphite bodies containing UC. Densities as high as 96.6% theoretical were obtalned in alumina pellets sintered in H. Xenon released from irradiated UO/sub 2/ granules was measured. Progress was made in the development of high-temperature x-ray-diffraction techniques. Tests were conducted to investigate the effects of coolant and impurities in the coolant on plant materials and the effects of gettering on inhibiting reactions. Economic studies were continued with the objective of determining the optimum size and power ranges for both nuclear and conventionally powered ships. (For preceding period see GA-744.) (W.D.M.)

1960-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work done during FY 1983 by the staff of the Energy Division and its subcontractors and by colleagues in other Oak Ridge National Laboratory divisions working on Energy Division projects. The work can be divided into four areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) models and data systems, (3) research to improve the efficiency of energy use and to improve electric power transmission and distribution, and (4) research utilization. Support came principally from the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the US Department of Defense, but also from a number of other agencies and organizations. Analysis and assessment included work on (a) environmental issues, including those deriving from the preparation of environmental impact statements; (b) energy and resource analysis; and (c) emergency preparedness. The models and data systems area involved research on evaluating and developing energy, environment, and engineering simulation models and on devising large data management systems, evaluating user data requirements, and compiling data bases. Research on improving the efficiency of energy use was focused primarily on the buildings and electricity sectors. A major effort on heat pump technology, which includes both heat-activated and electrically driven systems, continues. An important aspect of all the work was research utilization. Since the Energy Division is doing applied research, results are, by definition, intended to solve problems or answer questions of DOE and other sponsors. However, there are other users, and research utilization activities include technology transfer, commercialization efforts, outreach to state and regional organizations, and, of course, information dissemination.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

One of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY1993. Energy Division is committed to (1) understanding the mechanisms by which societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society`s understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy-efficient technologies; (4) improving transportation policy and planning; (5) enhancing basic knowledge in the social sciences as related to energy and associated issues. Energy Division`s expenditures in FY1993 totaled $42 million. The work was supported by the US DOE, DOD, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 126.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and computer sciences and data systems. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy use and delivery technologies, and (3) transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on emergency preparedness, transportation analysis, and analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries. Energy use and delivery technologies focus on electric power systems, building equipment, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Transportation systems research is conducted both to improve the quality of civilian transportation and for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

Wolff, P.P. [ed.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Oxidative derivatization and solubilization of coal. Final report. Period: October 1, 1986 - April 30, 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated the solubilization of coal by oxidative means to produce motor fuels. Nitric acid was used in the first of two approaches taken to cleave aliphatic linkages in coal and reduce the size of its macrostructure. Mild conditions, with temperatures up to a maximum of 75 C, and nitric acid concentrations below 20% by weight, characterize this process. The solid product, obtained in high yields, is soluble in polar organic solvents. Lower alcohols, methanol in particular, are of interest as carrier solvents in diesel fuel applications. Coals investigated were New York State peat, Wyodak subbituminous coal, North Dakota lignite, and Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal. The lower tank coals were easily converted and appear well suited to the process, while the bituminous Illinois No. 6 and Pitt Seam coals were unreactive. We concentrated our efforts on Wyodak coal and North Dakota lignite. Reaction conditions with regards to temperature, acid concentration, and time were optimized to obtain high product selectivity at maximum conversion. A continuous process scheme was developed for single pass coal conversions of about 50% to methanol-soluble product.

Schulz, J.G.; Porowski, E.N.; Straub, A.M.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

DEVELOPMENT OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING FUEL MATERIALS. Progress Report for Period January 1 through March 31, 1962  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this reporting period, particular effort was of aced on powder blending and pellet sintering studies prior to irradiation sample fabrication, and, subsequently, the production and characterization of the pellets slated for irradiation. Also, PuO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 2/-PuO/sub 2/ characterization studies were continued, and new techniques are being developed. Specifically, dynamic moisture pickup determinations on PuO/sub 2/ were made in moist air, N, and CO/ sub 2/ atmospheres using a recording thermogravimetric balance; the Sharples Micromerograph was committed to Pu, and powder particle size distributions were measured and compared with previous determinations made with air-permeability equipment; and the suitability and reliability of analytical chemistry assaying procedures such as x-ray-fluorescence and gamma spectrometry are being evaluated. Prototype work on UO/sub 2/ for the direct precipitation of PuO/sub 2/ and PuO/ sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ feed materials for swaging, vibratory compaction, and dispersion fabrication was also continued. In addition, investigation of PuO/sub 2/ spherical particle formation by mechanical buildup and by plasma torch fusion was extended. Associated reactor physics studies were concentrated on the further comparison of Pu and U/sup 235/ in near-thermal converter reactors. In preparation for the fabrication of irradiation test specimens to be prepared by the mechanical blending of individuaI PuO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 2/ powders, bIending studies were initiated to develop methods required for the attainment of desired homogeneity. Sintering studies were carried out on PuOs/sub 2/ to study the effects of compaction pressure, firing temperature, firing time, and firing atmosphere. It was determined that 1400 to 1500 deg C is the best firing temperature to obtain maximum pellet density, and that sintering in air yields higher densities than sintering in a N/sub 2/--H/sub 2/ atmosphere. Further, it was noted that the degree of Pu/sub 2/O/sub 3/ formation while sintering in an N/ sub 2/--H/sub 2/ atm osphere is inversely proportional to compaction pressure, indicating that the degree of formation is determined by the exposed surface area. Two additional Iots of UO/sub 2/-5 wt% PuO/sub 2/ powder were precipitated during this period. Powder characterization data for these and two previously produced lots were obtained. Also, powder characteristics were remeasured following hammermilling in order to allow assessment of the effects of this treatment. In preparation for work with PuO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 2/--PuO/sub 2/, prototype studies are being carried out with UO/sub 2/ to assess the possibility of producing directly high density granular feed for swaging, vibratory compaction, and dispersion fuel fabrication. Effort was continued on the fabrication of spherical PuO/sub 2/ particles by mechanical buildup and by plasma torch fusion. Reactor physics studies were continued to allow assessment of Pu relative to U/ sup 235/ in near-thermal reactor sys tems. Under cost assumptions used previously, it was shown that optimum fuel cycle costs from Pu-natural U fueled systems are well below those attainable with slightly enriched U iueled systems even if it is assumed that radiation damage is not limiting and that an ideal burnable poison (or solution poison) exists to limit the reactivity. (auth)

None

1962-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

QUARTERLY REPORT OF THE SOLUTION CORROSION GROUP FOR THE PERIOD ENDING APRIL 30, 1958  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

6 9 2 4 8 < E 5 0 2 5 H 5 of a solution containing 0.04 M UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 0.025 M D/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 0.03 M CuSO/sub 4/ and 750 ppm of nickel as nickel sulfate at 300 deg C in D/sub 2/0 but both nickel and copper were lost from solution when the nickel concentration was increased to 1700 ppm. The chemical stability of a solution containing 0.036 M UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 0.022 M D/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 0.009 M CuSO/sub 0.013 M NiSO/sub 4/ and 0.0016 M MnSO/sub 4/ in D/sub 2/0 was also demonstrated at 300 deg C. The corrosion of stainless steel in 0.04 M UO/sub 2/S/sub 4/O/sub 4/ containing 0.025 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and 0.0 1 M CuSO/sub 4/ was found to be relatively severe above the critical velocity at 250 and 300 deg C. The critical velocities observed were 10 to 20 and 30 to 40 fps, respectively at 250 and 300 deg C. Loop runs in which oxygen was removed from solution have shown that as uranium precipitated excess acid, ferrous and nickelous ions formed. On addition of oxygen to such a solution, uranium dissolved and ferrous ions were oxidized to ferric ions which precipitated from solution. A sixth test of the bellows and stainless steel-Zircaloy-2 traasition joint mockup was completed satisfactorily. The total exposure of the mockup was 9153 hr, including 8600 hr on fuel solution 312 thermal cycles between 300 and 1OO deg C and 518 mechanicai deflections. Tests to determine if type 304 stainless steel York mesh would corrode appreciably in uranyl sulfate solutions containing iodine and a hydrogen and oxygen atmosphere at 1OO deg C produced negative results. No significant corrosion of the steel was observed. A solution of 0.04 M U0/sub 2/S0/sub 4/ containing 0.04 M BeSO/sub 4/ and O.0O5 M CuSO/sub 4/ proved to be unstable during a 200-hr run at 280 deg C. Both uranium and beryllium were lost from solution. The addition of 100 ppm ruthenium as rthenium nitroso sulfate to a 0.02 M UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solution containing 0.025M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and 0.01 M CuSO/sub 4/ at 250 deg C provided substantial inhibition of corrosion of stainless steel. However, the inhibition appeared to be due to the substantial quantities of chromium(VI) that formed in the presence of ruthenium. A solution of 0.17 M U0/sub 2/S0/sub 4/ containing 0.20 M Li/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 0.10 M H/sub 2/ S0/sub 4/, and 0.02 M CuSO/sub 4/ was stabl e at 280 to 295 deg C and was only slightly more corrosive to stainless steel at 250 deg C than 0.17 M U0/sub 2/S0/ sub 4/ without additives. Tests of inhibitors of corrosion of stainiess steel in 0.05 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at 250 deg C showed 0.002 M potassium dichromate to be very effective. 0.04 M MgSO/sub 4/ and 0.05 M Li/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ also gave substantial inhibition though not so much as expected. 0.02 M U0/sub 2/S0/sub 4/ had little effect. Stress-corrosion cracking characteristics of a number of alloys were investigated under conditions in which steam-heated pipe bends of the materials were cooled by a spray of chloride-containing potable water. MST Gr 3 titanium and Croloy 16-1 stainless steel did not crack during 5000-hr of exposure. Inconel and Nionel were resistant to cracking during test periods of 1000 and 2000 hr, respectively. Incoloy T cracked in 1000 hr. Cold-formed type 347 stainless steel pipe bends did not crack provided the surface was shot-blasted or cathodically protected with aluminum. Normally, coldformed bends of the alloy crack during 1000 hr. Annealing; of type 347 stainless steel pipes did not completely eliminnte susceptibility to cracking but did reduce the frequency of cracks. No cracking of the alloy was experienced during a 1000-hr run in which the cooling water was added slowly enough to allow flash vaporization. Stress specimens of several alloys were tested in distilled water at 300 deg C containing oxygen and 100 ppm of chloride. Generally, at pH 10.5 the high nickel alloys such as Nionel and Incoloy were more resistant to cracking than the austenitic stainiess steels. However,

Griess, J.C.; Savage, H.C.; English, J.L.; Greeley, R.S.; Buxton, S.R.; Hess, D.N.; Neumann, P.D.; Bolt, S.E.; Ulrich, W.C.

1958-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

Nuclear Science Division annual report for the period October 1, 1987--September 30, 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights of the low energy research program included the identification of new super-deformed bands in gadolinium and palladium isotopes using the HERA array. Other work at the 88-Inch Cyclotron involved studies of the fragmentation of light nuclei; the spectroscopy of nuclear far from stability and interesting new experiments on the properties of the heaviest elements. Two other programs deserve special mention, the new program in Nuclear Astrophysics and the spectroscopic studies being carried out at OASIS. This isotope separator is now in full operation at the SuperHILAC after many yeas of development. At the Bevalac, important new results were obtained on the properties of hot dense nuclear matter produced in central collisions of heavy ions. First measurements were made using the di-lepton spectrometer which provide the most direct access to the conditions at the earliest stage of the reaction. New results on pion interferometry have been obtained using the Janus spectrometer and surprises continue to be found in careful analysis of data from the Plastic Ball detector, most recently the identification of a new component of hydrodynamic flow. Also at the Bevalac the intermediate energy program continued to grow, studying the evolution of the reaction mechanism from incomplete fusion to the fireball regime, as did the spectroscopic studies using secondary radioactive beams. The third major component of the experimental program is the study of ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions using the CERN SPS. This year saw the completing of analysis of the first round of experiments with important results being obtained on general particle production, the space-time evolution of the system and strangeness production.

Mahoney, J. (ed.)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Instrumentation and Controls Division progress report for the period July 1, 1986 to June 30, 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Instrumentation and Controls (IandC) Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performs basic and applied instrumentation and controls research, development and design engineering, specialized instrument design and fabrication, and maintenance services for instruments, electronics, and computers. The IandC Division is one of the largest RandD organizations of its type among government laboratories, and it exists as the result of an organizational strategy to integrate ORNL's instrumentation and controls-related disciplines into one dedicated functional organization to increase the Laboratory's expertise and capabilities in these rapidly expanding, innovative areas of technology. The Division participates in the programs and projects of ORNL by applying its expertise and capabilities in concert with other divisions to perform basic research and mission-oriented technology development. Many of the Division's RandD tasks that are a part of a larger ORNL program are of sufficient scope that the IandC effort constitutes a separate program element with direct funding and management responsibility within the Division. The activities of IandC include performance of an RandD task in IandC facilities, the participation of from one of many IandC engineers and scientists in a multidisciplinary team working in a specific research area or development project, design and fabrication of a special instrument or instrumentation system, or a few hours of maintenance service. In its support and maintenance work, the role of the IandC Division is to provide a level of expertise appropriate to complete a job successfully at minimum overall cost and time schedule---a role which involves IandC in almost all ORNL activities.

Klobe, L.E. (ed.)

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Grande Ronde Subbasin Gauging Station Operations, 2007-2008 Reporting Period.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grande Ronde Basin (GRB) in Northeast Oregon is a moderately dry climate receiving between 10 and 20 inches of precipitation per year with surrounding mountains accumulating up to 100 inches. Irrigated agriculture is a major part of the economy with water being diverted or pumped from surface and ground sources from April through October. Several ESA listed species exist in the basin including Chinook, steelhead, and bulltrout. Agriculture and ESA (Endangered Species Act) listed aquatic species combined with a dry climate demonstrate the need for a network of stream gauges. The GRB covers over 5,000 square miles and includes several thousand miles of perennial flowing streams. This project is in place to operate 12 existing stream gauges in combination with USGS (4 gauges) and OWRD (one gauge) who, independent of this project, operate five additional gauges (Grande Ronde at Troy, Imnaha R. at Imnaha, Minam R. at Minam, Lookingglass Creek, and Upper Catherine Cr.) to characterizes flow in both the Grande Ronde and Imnaha subbasins. These gauges are intended to assist in irrigation water management, fisheries management, long term flow and trend analysis, TMDL and SB1010 water quality management plan effectiveness, subbasin plan implementation, and provide essential information regarding cumulative effects response to conservation in the GRB. Headwater characteristics, land management influence, and basin outlet data are all selectively collected in this network of 17 flow gauges. Prior to the 2007 water year there were three separate stream gauging programs with similar objectives, protocol, and funding sources in the GRB. Each of these programs for the past ten years has operated under separate administration consuming more time and administrative money than is necessary to accomplish stated objectives. By combining all programs into one project costs have been reduced, each funding source has one contract instead of three, and the same amount of work has been done accomplishing the same objectives. This objective has been continued and realized in the 2008 water year.

Menton, R. Coby [Grande Ronde Model Watershed

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

HOMOGENEOUS REACTOR PROJECT QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING APRIL 30, 1954  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Homogeneous Reactor Experiment. Final data were obtained on the effectiveness of Cu/sup ++/ as an internal recombiner catalyst for radiolytic gas. Homogeneous Reactor Test. Criticality calculations have been completed for three blanket configurations using D/sub 2/O. ThO/sub 2/ slurry, and unenriched UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions. Investigations on the temperature coefficient of reactivity and kinetic studies with respect to core pressure rise were also undertaken. Startup and shutdown procedures will involve the addition and removal of fuel concentrate. Revised flow sheet and design data sheets are presented, including the reactor vessel assembly, fuel pressurizer, recombiner- condenser, outer dump tank condenser, and fuel solution evaporator. The physical properties of HRT fuel and blanket solution at 2000 psia are given. Present evidence indicates that the Xe poison level can be maintained below 1% by continuous stripping with only 2% of the decomposition gases which would be produced if no Cu/sup ++/ catalyst were present for recombination. Revised inlet and outlet valve designs for the HRT pulsafeeder system have resulted in improved performance. General Homogeneous Reactor Studies. Principal activities in engineering development consist of the design of several representative heat exchanger layouts and recombiner loops. An extensive body of data on the corrosion of stainless steel by UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions has been accumulated. The corrosive effects of boiling HNO/sub 3/ on stainless steel, and the UO/sub 2/ SO/sub 4/ corrosion of Zircaloy were also investigated. Stress relief annealing at 1000 deg F improved the dynamic corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel welds corroded by UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The dynamic corrosion of Zircaloy-2 and Ti by UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ showed no marked effect on the impact behavior of these materials. The yield of N/sub 2/ from irradiated Th(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/ is considerably less than previous values reported for UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ solutions. A revised phase diagram of the UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O system is presented. The preparation and corrosive properties of ThO/sub 2/ slurries were investigated, together with the abrasion characteristics on stainless steel and Ti. Considerations associated with chemical processing of fuel and blanket solutions, such as the solubility of rare-earth sulfates, are discussed. (T.R.H.)

McDuffie, H.F. comp.

1954-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

214

Fuzzy multi-objective production/distribution planning decisions with multi-product and multi-time period in a supply chain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work develops a fuzzy multi-objective linear programming (FMOLP) model with piecewise linear membership function to solve integrated multi-product and multi-time period production/distribution planning decisions (PDPD) problems with fuzzy objectives. ... Keywords: Fuzzy multi-objective linear programming, Fuzzy sets, Production/distribution planning decisions, Supply chain management

Tien-Fu Liang

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

PERIODIC HEAT REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vessel Temp Walls, deg C 59.00 Vessel Setpoint Walls 60.00 Power, kW 25.00 Breaker OK Scanner OK Highest Temp Last Fault 138.00 TripHigh tc Date MO:DAY 8.00: 2.00...

216

U.S. Department of Energy Integrated Manufacturing & Processing Predoctoral Fellowships. 2000-2001 Annual Progress Report. Reporting period - July 1, 2000 - June 30, 2001  

SciTech Connect

Administration and management of predoctoral fellowship program for the reporting period. The objective of the program was threefold: to create a pool of PhD's trained in the integrated approach to manufacturing and processing, to promote academic interest in the field, and to attract talented professionals to this challenging area of engineering. It was anticipated that the program would result in the creation of new manufacturing methods that would contribute to improved energy efficiency, to better utilization of scarce resources, and to less degradation of the environment. Emphasis in the competition was on integrated systems of manufacturing and the integration of product design with manufacturing processes.

Willis, J.

2001-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

(Development of automated welding process for field fabrication of thick walled pressure vessels). Technical progress report for period ending June 30, 1979  

SciTech Connect

The following activities for this period are reported: five welding processes (GTAW, GMAW, SAW, ESW, and EBW) are reviewed, torch design modifications were completed, improved joint designs were machined, and all wires for the project were ordered. (FS)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A systematic procedure for reservoir characterization: Annual report for the period October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986  

SciTech Connect

This report deals with a variety of topics all centered around the main goal of making numerical reservoir simulation results conform more closely with geologic descriptions. The first part of the report discusses results on conditional simulations of miscible displacements in randomly heterogeneous permeable media. The focus here is on local or macroscopic dispersion, the dispersion experienced at a fixed point in the medium. Macroscopic dispersivity has many of the same dependencies on reservoir properties as does megascopic dispersivity, but it seems to be less time dependent and is always smaller. We have not discovered a mathematical model to describe its behavior. A major portion of the report deals with statistical descriptions. We investigate the bias and precision of standard measures of heterogeneity, the Lorenz and Dykstra-Parsons coefficient. After this, the work explores the benefits of using a distribution type characterization parameter in exploring heterogeneity. The final major protion of the report describes our mapping efforts on the Page sandstone outcrop in northern Arizona. The mapping is to be used in generating both deterministic descriptions and in calibrating the stochastic descriptions discussed above. 128 refs., 95 figs., 10 tabs.

Lake, L.W.; Kocurek, G.A.; Miller, M.A.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Expert Meeting Report: Retrofit Implementation - A Neighborhood at a Time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information about a Building America expert meeting hosted by research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings on October 25, 2011, in New York City. The meeting discussed several community residential retrofit projects underway across the United States, and included representatives from utilities, energy program implementation firms, affordable housing agencies, and the financing industry.

Griffiths, D.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Statistics of particle time-temperature histories : progress report for June 2013.  

SciTech Connect

Progress toward predictions of the statistics of particle time-temperature histories is presented. These predictions are to be made using Lagrangian particle models within the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model. In the present reporting period we have further characterized the performance, behavior and capabilities of the particle dispersion models that were added to the ODT model in the first period. We have also extended the capabilities in two manners. First we provide alternate implementations of the particle transport process within ODT; within this context the original implementation is referred to as the type-I and the new implementations are referred to as the type-C and type-IC interactions. Second we have developed and implemented models for two-way coupling between the particle and fluid phase. This allows us to predict the reduced rate of turbulent mixing associated with particle dissipation of energy and similar phenomena. Work in characterizing these capabilities has taken place in homogeneous decaying turbulence, in free shear layers, in jets and in channel flow with walls, and selected results are presented.

Hewson, John C.; Gin, Craig; Lignell, David O. [Brigham Young University Provo, UT] [Brigham Young University Provo, UT; Sun, Guangyuan [Brigham Young University Provo, UT] [Brigham Young University Provo, UT

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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221

Columbia Computer Science Technical Report (2005) Time-Varying Textures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the reflectance and texture of surfaces is a static phe- nomenon. Yet, there is an abundance of materials in nature whose appearance varies dramatically with time, such as cracking paint, growing grass, or ripening such as stress fracture, accu- mulation of particles, and state changes such as oxidation. We then synthesize

222

Columbia Computer Science Technical Report (2005) TimeVarying Textures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the reflectance and texture of surfaces is a static phe­ nomenon. Yet, there is an abundance of materials in nature whose appearance varies dramatically with time, such as cracking paint, growing grass, or ripening such as stress fracture, accu­ mulation of particles, and state changes such as oxidation. We then synthesize

223

Federal Assistance Program Quarterly Project Progress Report. Geothermal Energy Program: Information Dissemination, Public Outreach, and Technical Analysis Activities. Reporting Period: January 1 - March 31, 2001 [Final report  

SciTech Connect

The final report of the accomplishments of the geothermal energy program: information dissemination, public outreach and technical analysis activities by the project team consisting of the Geo-Heat Center, Geothermal Resources Council, Geothermal Education Office, Geothermal Energy Association and the Washington State University Energy Program.

Lund, John W.

2002-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

Active period Sleep period Active period Sleep period Fig. 1. Sleep-awake cycles of SMAC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cycle Active period Sleep period Active period Sleep period SYNC usage DATA usage time Fig. 1 Yang and Wendi Heinzelman Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester duty cycles. Since a smaller duty cycle leads to a longer network lifetime but lower throughput

Heinzelman, Wendi

225

The Behavior of Matter Under Nonequilibrium Conditions: Fundamental Aspects and Applications: Progress Report for Period April 15,1990 - April 14, 1991  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Our report contains a brief summary of what has been achieved over the period of the contract. We have studied the behavior of matter under nonequilibrium conditions on three levels: (1) on the microscopic level in the frame of classical mechanics or of quantum theory; (2) on the stochastic level, which includes fluctuations; and (3) on the phenomenological, macroscopic level described by nonlinear equations. We first report on the level (1), then report on the levels (2) and (3).

Prigogine, I.

1990-12-00T23:59:59.000Z

226

Low-temperature thermal energy storage quarterly progress report for period July--September 1976. [Phase-change materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The document is the second in a series of quarterly progress reports covering activities funded at ORNL by the ERDA Division of Energy Storage Systems to develop low-temperature thermal energy storage (TES) technology. These systems will be based on either sensible or latent heat storage at temperatures up to approximately 250/sup 0/C. At ORNL, research efforts were continued to (a) develop a time-dependent analytical model that will describe a TES system charged with a phase-change material, (b) measure thermophysical properties and melt-freeze cyclic behavior of interesting PCM's and (c) determine crystal lattice structures of hydrated salts and their nucleators. A report on TES subsystems for application to solar energy sources was completed and is being reviewed. In the area of program management, subcontracts were signed with Clemson University, Dow Chemical Company, Suntek Research Associates, and The Franklin Institute. Detailed reviews were completed for ten unsolicited proposals related to TES. Industries, research institutions, universities, and other national laboratory participation in the TES program, for which ORNL has management responsibilities, are listed.

Hoffman, H. W.; Kedi, R. J.

1977-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, reporting period September--November 1990: Contracts for field projects and supporting research on Enhanced Oil Recovery, reporting period January--March 1990  

SciTech Connect

This report presents contracts and brief research program descriptions in support of enhanced petroleum recovery. (CBS).

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Utah State Prison Space Heating with Geothermal Heat Third Semi-Annual Report for the Period January 1981 - July 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Facing certain cost overruns and lacking information about the long term productivity of the Crystal Hot Springs geothermal resource, costs of construction for the geothermal retrofit, and the method of disposal of geothermal waste water, the Energy Office embarked on a strategy that would enable the project participants to develop accurate cost information on the State Prison Space Heating Program through the completion of Task 5-Construction. The strategy called for: (1) Completion of the resource assessment to determine whether test well USP/TH-1 could be used as a production well. If well USP/TH-1 was found to have sufficient production capacity, money would not have to be expended on drilling another production well. (2) Evaluation of disposal alternatives and estimation of the cost of each alternative. There was no contingency in the original budget to provide for a reinjection disposal system. Cooperative agreement DE EC07-ET27027 indicated that if a disposal system requiring reinjection was selected for funding that task would be negotiated with DOE and the budget amended accordingly. (3) Completion of the preliminary engineering and design work. Included in this task was a thorough net present value cash flow analysis and an assessment of the technical feasibility of a system retrofit given the production characteristics of well USP/TH-1 . In addition, completion of the preliminary design would provide cost estimates for the construction and commissioning of the minimum security geothermal space heating system. With this information accurate costs for each task would be available, allowing the Energy Office to develop strategies to optimize the use of money in the existing budget to ensure completion of the program. Reported herein is a summary of the work towards the completion of these three objectives conducted during the period of January 1981 through June 1981.

None

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

National synchrotron light source annual report 1987: For the period of October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the reports and operational information of the National Synchrotron Light source facility for 1987. The reports are grouped mainly under VUV research and x-ray research. (LSP)

White-DePace, S.; Gmur, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1978. Environmental Sciences Division publication No. 1280  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separate abstracts were prepared for the ten sections of the report. The report also includes lists of publications, theses, professional activities, and organization charts. (HLW)

Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.; Struxness, E.G.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Assessment of pulverized-coal-fired combustion performance: Final report for the period September 1980--September 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this program was to evaluate an engineering analysis procedure which could be used to assess the impact on thermal performance of converting gas and oil fired equipment to coal. The program consisted of four major tasks: (1) Engineering Analysis. The objective was to evaluate currently available models which could be used to predict combustor performance and to define a procedure which could be used to assess the impact of a coal firing in a boiler or furnace; (2) Reactor Studies. The purpose was to evaluate, under controlled conditions, the radiative properties of fly ash clouds; (3) Pilot Scale Experiments. This involved a combustion trial with gas and coals which were burned at 0.7 /times/ 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr in a pilot-scale combustor. The purpose was to verify and supplement the results of the small-scale reactor studies on the radiant properties of coal flames at larger scale; (4) Reporting. Engineering analysis procedures were used to identify those fuels related properties which had a major impact on the thermal performance of furnaces. The major result of the study is that thermal performance of coal-fired furnaces is dominated by the formation of fly ash deposits on the heat transfer surfaces. The key parameters which influence thermal performance are: thickness, thermal conductivity, and surface emissivity or absorptivity. 105 refs., 170 figs., 29 tabs.

Richter, W.F.; Clark, W.; Pohl, J.H.; Payne, R.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana: Annual report for the period 1 November 1984 to 31 December 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes environmental monitoring activities carried out by Louisiana State University (LSU) under US Department of Energy Contract FC07-85NV10425 for the period 1 November 1984 through 31 December 1986. Other aspects of the LSU technical support program completed under prior contracts were covered in final form in reports preceding this one. During the contract period, the Louisiana Geological Survey, aided by subcontractors, monitored microseismic activity, land-surface subsidence, and surface and ground-water quality at three designed geopressured-geothermal test well sites in Louisiana and Texas. Don Stevenson supervised microseismic monitoring activities, and Drukell Trahan coordinated water quality and land-surface subsidence studies. This is a progress report in the sense that it discusses program components, provides raw data, and presents preliminary interpretations. The environmental monitoring program continues and will be the subject of subsequent annual reports.

Groat, C.G.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period October 1, 2009 through March 31, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities).

Williams, D N; Foster, I T; Middleton, D E; Ananthakrishnan, R; Siebenlist, F; Shoshani, A; Sim, A; Bell, G; Drach, R; Ahrens, J; Jones, P; Brown, D; Chastang, J; Cinquini, L; Fox, P; Harper, D; Hook, N; Nienhouse, E; Strand, G; West, P; Wilcox, H; Wilhelmi, N; Zednik, S; Hankin, S; Schweitzer, R; Bernholdt, D; Chen, M; Miller, R; Shipman, G; Wang, F; Bharathi, S; Chervenak, A; Schuler, R; Su, M

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

234

PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PROGRAM TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE PERIOD MAY 5, 1955 TO JUNE 16, 1955  

SciTech Connect

The current PWR plant and core parameters are listed. Resign requirements are briefly summarized for a radiation monitoring system, a fuel handling water system, a coolant purification system, an electrical power distribution system, and component shielding. Results of studies on thermal bowing and stressing of UO/sub 2/ are reported. A graph is presented of reactor power vs. reactor flow for various hot channel conditions. Development of U-- Mo and U-Nb alloys has been stopped because of the recent selection of UO/sub 2/ fuel material for the PWR core and blanket. The fabrication characteristics of UO/sub 2/ powders are being studied. Seamless Zircaloy-2 tubing has been tested to determine elastic limits, bursting pressures, and corrosion resistance. Fabrication techniques and tests for corrosion and defects in Zircaloy-clad U-Mo and UO/sub 2/ fuel rods are described. The preparation of UO/sub 2/ by various methods is being studied to determine which method produces a material most suitable for PWR fuel elements. The stability of UO/sub 2/ compacts in high temperature water and steam is being determined. Surface area and density measurements have been performed on samples of UO/sub 2/ powder prepared by various methods. Revelopment work on U-- Mo and U--Nb alloys has included studies of the effect on corrosion behavior of additions to the test water, additions to the alloys, homogenization of the alloys, annealing times, cladding, and fabrication techniques. Data are presented on relaxation in spring materials after exposure to a corrosive environment. Results are reported from loop and autoclave tests on fission product and crud deposition. Results of irradiation and corrosion testing of clad and unclad U--Mo and U-Nh alloys are described. The UO/sub 2/ irradiation program has included studies of dimensional changes, release of fission gases, and activity in the water surrounding the samples. A review of the methods of calculating reactor physics parameters has been completed, and the established procedures have been applied to determination of PWR reference design parameters. Critical experiments and primary loop shielding analyses are described. (D.E.B.)

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

Busy period, time of the first loss of a customer and the number of customers in $ M^{\\varkappa}|G^{\\delta}|1|B$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A two-sided exit problem is solved for a difference of a compound Poisson process and a compound renewal process. More precisely, the Laplace transforms of the joint distribution of the first exit time, the value of the overshoot and the value of a linear component at this instant are found. Further, we study the process reflected in its supremum. We determine the main two-boundary characteristics of the process reflected in its supremum. These results are then applied for studying the $ M^{\\varkappa}|G^{\\delta}|1|B$ system. We derive the distribution of a busy period and the numbers of customers in the system in transient and stationary regimes. The advantage is that these results are in a closed form, in terms of resolvent sequences of the process.

Kadankova, Tetyana; Veraverbeke, Noel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Technical progress report for the magnetohydrodynamics coal-fired flow facility for the period April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on the status of a multitask contract to develop the technology for the steam bottoming portion of a MHD Steam Combined Cycle Power Plant. The report describes the facility maintenance and environmental work completed, status of completing technical reports and certain key administrative actions occurring during the quarter. In view of current year budget reductions and program reductions to closeout the MHD program, downsizing of the UTSI work force took place. No further testing occurred or was scheduled during the quarter, but the DOE CFFF facility was maintained in a standby status.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Reporting period July--September 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on accomplishments completed during July through September 1997 on contracts for field projects and supporting research on Enhanced Oil Recovery.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Baca Geothermal Demonstration project legal and regulatory challenges. First semi-annual report for period through June 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Legal and Regulatory Constraints Reports identify and describe the major legal and institutional constraints associated with the Baca Geothermal Demonstration Project. The impacts of these constraints on the Project in terms of cost, schedule, and technical design are also analyzed. The purpose of these reports is to provide a guide for future geothermal development.

Province, S.G.; Walter, K.M.; Miller, J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Improving RUC-1 Wind Estimates by Incorporating Near-Real-Time Aircraft Reports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A verification study of wind accuracy is presented for wind nowcasts generated by augmenting Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) wind forecasts with near-real-time aircraft reports using the Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS) gridded winds algorithm. ...

Rodney E. Cole; Steve M. Green; Matt R. Jardin

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

NY/NJ distributed wind power field verification project. Quarterly report for the period November - December 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the Significant Accomplishments for this quarter. The accomplishments are: (1) began preparations for host site installations; and (2) data acquisition system installation at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Boulder, CO.

Putnam, Robert Jr.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Quarterly report on Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 90-7 for the period ending June 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the ninth quarterly report on the progress of activities that address safety issues associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks containing ferrocyanide compounds. Milestones completed this quarter include (1) a report on the credibility of hot spots and a recommendation on infrared scans; (2) a document discussing the strength and limitations of proposed moisture monitoring technologies; (3) limited calibration of the neutron probe in simulant-filled drums; (4) a report interpreting data from auger surface samples of ferrocyanide tank 241-BY-104; (5) a document on the effect of possible catalyst, initiator, and diluents on ferrocyanide reactivity; (6) a report on small scale sensitivity tests of ferrocyanide flowsheet simulants; and (7) preparation and shipment of T Plant simulants for calorimetric and dryout tests.

Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.; Forbes, C.J.; Meacham, J.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Chemical Technology Division progress report for the period April 1, 1981-March 31, 1983. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts were prepared for eight sections of the report: nuclear waste management; fossil energy; basic science and technology; biotechnology and environmental programs; transuranium-element processing; Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs; Three Mile Island support studies; and miscellaneous programs.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Theoretical reversed field pinch studies: Technical progress report for the period September 1, 1986-August 31, 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report gives information on research dealing with plasma stability in a reverse-field pinch device. Analytic and numerical calculations on various stability phenomena have been performed. (JDH)

Prager, S.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

EXPERIMENTAL BERYLLIUM OXIDE REACTOR PROGRAM. Quarterly Progress Report for the Period, January 1 through March 31, 1962  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in the development of the Experimental Beryllium Oxide Reactor (EBOR) is reported. The objective of the EBOR program is to develop a gas-cooled, beryllium oxide-moderated reactor which can be used in conjunction with a closed-cycle gas turbine or a steam cycle for a small land-based or a maritime power plant. Progress is reported on reactor development, reactor physics, and materials development. (N.W.R.)

1962-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

245

Technical progress report for the magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility for the period April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on progress on a multitask contract to develop the necessary technology for the steam bottoming plant of the MHD Steam Combined Cycle power plant. A Proof-Of-Concept (POC) test was conducted during the quarter and the results are reported. This POC test was terminated after 88 hours of operation due to the failure of the coal pulverizer main shaft. Preparations for the test and post-test activities are summarized. Modifications made to the dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP) are described and measurements of its performance are reported. The baghouse performance is summarized, together with actions being taken to improve bag cleaning using reverse air. Data on the wet ESP performance is included at two operating conditions, including verification that it met State of Tennessee permit conditions for opacity with all the flow through it. The results of experiments to determine the effect of potassium seed on NO{sub x} emissions and secondary combustion are reported. The status of efforts to quantify the detailed mass balance for all POC testing is summarized. The work to develop a predictive ash deposition model is discussed and results compared with deposition actually encountered during the test. Plans to measure the kinetics of potassium and sulfur on flames like the secondary combustor, are included. Advanced diagnostic work by both UTSI and MSU is reported. Efforts to develop the technology for a high temperature air heater using ceramic tubes are summarized.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending December 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ORNL Fossil Energy Materials Program Office compiles and issues this combined quarterly progress report from camera-ready copies submitted by each of the participating subcontractor organizations. This report of activities on the program is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure defined in the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program Plan for FY 1982-1986 in which projects are organized according to fossil energy technologies. This report is divided into parts and chapters with each part describing projects related to a particular fossil energy technology. Chapters within a part provide details of the various projects associated with that technology. We hope this series of AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program quarterly progress reports will aid in the dissemination of information developed on the program. Plans for the program will be issued annually. A draft of the program plan for FY 1982 to 1986 has been prepared and is in the review process. The implementation of these plans will be reflected by these quarterly progress reports, and this dissemination of information will bw augmented by topical or final reports as appropriate.

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Semi-Annual Progress Report for the Period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes work carried out by the ESG-CET during the period April 1, 2009 through September 30, 2009. It includes discussion of highlights, overall progress, period goals, collaborations, papers, and presentations. To learn more about our project, and to find previous reports, please visit the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) website. This report will be forwarded to the DOE SciDAC program management, the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) program management, national and international collaborators and stakeholders (e.g., the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5), the Climate Science Computational End Station (CCES), the SciDAC II: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP), and other wide-ranging climate model evaluation activities). During this semi-annual reporting period, the ESG-CET team continued its efforts to complete software components needed for the ESG Gateway and Data Node. These components include: Data Versioning, Data Replication, DataMover-Lite (DML) and Bulk Data Mover (BDM), Metrics, Product Services, and Security, all joining together to form ESG-CET's first beta release. The launch of the beta release is scheduled for late October with the installation of ESG Gateways at NCAR and LLNL/PCMDI. Using the developed ESG Data Publisher, the ESG II CMIP3 (IPCC AR4) data holdings - approximately 35 TB - will be among the first datasets to be published into the new ESG enterprise system. In addition, the NCAR's ESG II data holdings will also be published into the new system - approximately 200 TB. This period also saw the testing of the ESG Data Node at various collaboration sites, including: the British Atmospheric Data Center (BADC), the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology, the University of Tokyo Center for Climate System Research, and the Australian National University. This period, a total of 14 national and international sites installed an ESG Data Node for testing. During this period, we also continued to provide production-level services to the community, providing researchers worldwide with access to CMIP3 (IPCC AR4), CCES, and CCSM, Parallel Climate Model (PCM), Parallel Ocean Program (POP), and Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP), and NARCCAP data.

Williams, D N; Foster, I T; Middleton, D E

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Central receiver solar thermal power system, phase 1. Quarterly progress report for period ending June 30, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major program activities were aimed toward the fabrication of the three major research experiments and continued evaluation of the pilot plant performance and operating modes. The detail designs were completed early in this period. Effort was continued in the evaluation of pilot plant start transients. Both warm and hot starts from thermal storage were evaluated as was a cold start from the receiver. In the collector subsystem experiment the heliostat structures and drive mechanisms were completed and delivered. The sensor and associated electronics for the first heliostat were completed as were installation and checkout of the PDP-11 computer and control console for the entire collector experiment. By the end of May the first twenty-five mirror heliostat had been erected and was operational. The detail design of the 5 MW receiver experiment was completed at Foster Wheeler. In the thermal storage subsystem the detail design of the experiment was completed early in the period. A final selection of the heat transport media was made with Hitec selected as the molten salt and Caloria HT-43 selected as the hydrocarbon oil. (WDM)

None

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. Quarterly progress report (final) for period ending March 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this period (January 1976 through March 1976), the primary program effort was expended toward the completion of the detail design of the three major research experiments. Also, the Preliminary Pilot Plant Economic Cost Study was completed. In the Collector Subsystem, the designs for both the twenty-five mirror and the nine-mirror heliostats were completed and released. In the Receiver Subsystem, Foster Wheeler continued with the detail design of the 5 MW research experiment receiver. A preliminary draft of the detailed test plan for the receiver subsystem research experiment was prepared and is now undergoing a final review. The detailed design of the Thermal Storage Subsystem continued at Georgia Institute of Technology. Several incremental detail design reviews were held as the design progressed. During this period, Bechtel completed the preliminary environmental analysis for the Pilot Plant. The optimization studies of the electrical power generation subsystem were initiated. A major effort was the preparation of the preliminary cost analysis for the 10 MWe Central Receiver Solar Thermal Pilot Plant. This task required the development of a cost accounting structure and a definition of all of the costs associated with the design, construction, checkout, and two-year test of the Pilot Plant. (WDM)

None

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090. [Lead abstract  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology. (KRM)

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS FOR SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT ALSO INCLUDES THE QUARTERLY TECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD 01/01/1997 - 03/31/1997.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop a predictive experimentally verified computational fluid dynamic (CFD) three phase model. It predicts the gas, liquid and solid hold-ups (volume fractions) and flow patterns in the industrially important bubble-coalesced (churn-turbulent) regime. The input into the model can be either particulate viscosities as measured with a Brookfield viscometer or effective restitution coefficient for particles. A combination of x-ray and {gamma}-ray densitometers was used to measure solid and liquid volume fractions. There is a fair agreement between the theory and the experiment. A CCD camera was used to measure instantaneous particle velocities. There is a good agreement between the computed time average velocities and the measurements. There is an excellent agreement between the viscosity of 800 {micro}m glass beads obtained from measurement of granular temperature (random kinetic energy of particles) and the measurement using a Brookfield viscometer. A relation between particle Reynolds stresses and granular temperature was found for developed flow. Such measurement and computations gave a restitution coefficient for a methanol catalyst to be about 0.9. A transient, two-dimensional hydrodynamic model for production of methanol from syn-gas in an Air Products/DOE LaPorte slurry bubble column reactor was developed. The model predicts downflow of catalyst at the walls and oscillatory particle and gas flow at the center, with a frequency of about 0.7 Hertz. The computed temperature variation in the rector with heat exchangers was only about 5 K, indicating good thermal management. The computed slurry height, the gas holdup and the rate of methanol production agree with LaPorte's reported data. Unlike the previous models in the literature, this model computes the gas and the particle holdups and the particle rheology. The only adjustable parameter in the model is the effective particle restitution coefficient.

DIMITRI GIDASPOW

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. Annual progress report (final) for period ending September 30, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program activities since the beginning of the program in July of 1975 through September of 1976 are summarized. The primary efforts during the first portion of this period were the preparation of the Pilot Plant Preliminary Design Baseline, and the Conceptual Design of the three subsystem research experiments. The Preliminary Design Baseline for the Pilot Plant was developed from the commercial plant conceptual design that had been defined prior to the start of this program. It definitized each of the basic Pilot Plant Subsystems and provided the basis for development of the conceptual designs of the research experiments. For each of the solar peculiar subsystems, the Collector Subsystem, the Receiver Subsystem and the Thermal Storage Subsystem, a subsystem research experiment was planned. The Conceptual Design of each of these experiments was prepared and reviewed with ERDA and Sandia in order to obtain authorization for the design, build and test of these experiments. In the Collector Subsystem experiment the design was completed, the four experimental heliostats have been fabricated and erected. Initial calorimeter and radiometer data have been obtained and have demonstrated good correlation with the projected performance. The 5 megawatt thermal experiment receiver has been fabricated by Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation and is now completing erection at the Radiant Heat Test Facility at Sandia in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This testing is scheduled for the period from December 1976 through February 1977. The Thermal Storage Research Experiment fabrication and erection is nearing completion by Georgia Institute of Technology. Checkout of this experiment is scheduled for the first of December 1976 with the test program to be complete by the end of January 1977.

None

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Report on equipment availability for the ten-year period, 1967--1976. A report of the Equipment Availability Task Force of the Prime Movers Committee  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data are tabulated on the availability and outage rates for all types of electric power generating plants operating in the U.S. during the period from 1967 through 1976. The power plant types include fossil-fueled, nuclear, hydro, and pumped storage. The outages include those scheduled for maintenance and normal operation and unplanned or forced outages. (LCL)

Haueter, R.L.; Haddad, E.E.; Brickell, M.C.; Poeppelmeier, V.E.; Prestele, J.A.; Roettger, R.W.; Thompson, W.H.; Weiser, J.L.; Whooley, J.P.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Advanced Researech and Technology Development fossil energy materials program: Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1988  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the ARandTD Fossil Energy Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. The ORNL Fossil Energy Materials Program Office compiles and issues this combined semiannual progress report from camera-ready copies submitted by each of the participating subcontractor organizations. This report of activities on the program is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure in which projects are organized according to materials research thrust areas. These areas are (1) Structural Ceramics, (2) Alloy Development and Mechanical Properties, (3) Corrosion and Erosion of Alloys, and (4) Assessments and Technology Transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Connecting women in mathematical sciences to industry. Final report for period August 1, 2000 - December 30, 2000  

SciTech Connect

The Institute for Mathematics and its Applications (IMA) was awarded a grant by the Department of Energy that provided partial support for the IMA Career Workshop: Connecting Women in Mathematical Sciences to Industry. The workshop took place on September 8 to 10, 2000 at the IMA was co-sponsored by the Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM), and also received additional funding from Coastcom. This report highlights the activities and the accomplishments of the program.

Miller, Willard; Santosa, Fadil

2002-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

Advanced research and technology development fossil energy materials program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending September 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the fourth combined quarterly progress report for those projects that are part of the Advanced Research and Technology Development Fossil Energy Materials Program. The objective is to conduct a program of research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. Work performed on the program generally falls into the Applied Research and Exploratory Development categories as defined in the DOE Technology Base Review, although basic research and engineering development are also conducted. A substantial portion of the work on the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program is performed by participating cntractor organizations. All subcontractor work is monitored by Program staff members at ORNL and Argonne National Laboratory. This report is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure defined in the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program Plan for FY 1981 in which projects are organized according to fossil energy technologies. We hope this series of AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program quarterly progress reports will aid in the dissemination of information developed on the program.

Bradley, R.A. (comp.) [comp.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. Quarterly technical progress report for period ending March 31, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present study shows that activation of a high surface area Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst in CO in a (CSTR), continuously stirred tank reactor using tetralin as solvent results in an activated that is three times of material that is activated in H{sub 2} or directly in the syngas.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal twelth quarterly report for the period 1 July 1995--30 September 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to produce liquid fuels from coal by direct liquefaction at a cost that is competitive with conventional fuels. Specifically, this continuous bench-scale program contains provisions to examine new ideas in areas such as: low temperature pretreatments, more effective catalysts, on-line hydrotreating, new coal feedstocks, other hydrogen sources, more concentrated coal feeds and other highly responsive process improvements while assessing the design and economics of the bench- scale results. This quarterly report covers work on Laboratory Scale Studies, Continuous Bench-Scale Operations, Technical Assessment and Project Management.

Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.; Pradhan, V.R.; Stalzer, R.H.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Commercialization of the Conversion of Bagasse to Ethanol. Summary quarterly report for the period January-September 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These studies were intended to further refine sugar yield parameters which effect sugar yield such as feedstock particle size, debris, acid soak time, temperature, dewatering, and pretreatment conditions (such as temperature, reaction time, percentage solids concentration, acid concentration), liquid-solids separation, and detoxification parameters (such as time temperature and mixing of detoxification ingredients). Validate and refine parameters, which affect ethanol yield such as detoxification conditions mentioned above, and to fermenter conditions such as temperature, pH adjustment, aeration, nutrients, and charging sequence. Materials of construction will be evaluated also. Evaluate stillage to determine clarification process and suitability for recycle; evaluate lignocellulosic cake for thermal energy recovery to produce heat and electricity for the process; and Support Studies at UF - Toxin Amelioration and Fermentation; TVA work will provide pre-hydroylsates for the evaluation of BCI proprietary methods of toxin amelioration. Pre-hydrolysates from batch studies will allow the determination of the range of allowable hydrolyze conditions that can be used to produce a fermentable sugar stream. This information is essential to guide selection of process parameters for refinement and validation in the continuous pretreatment reactor, and for overall process design. Additional work will be conducted at UFRFI to develop improved strains that are resistant to inhibitors. The authors are quite optimistic about the long-term prospects for this advancement having recently developed strains with a 25%--50% increase in ethanol production. The biocatalyst platform selected originally, genetically engineered Escherichia coli B, has proven to be quite robust and adaptable.

NONE

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Demonstration of constructed wetlands for treatment of municipal wastewaters, monitoring report for the period, March 1988--October 1989  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the constructed wetland technology, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) implemented a municipal wastewater demonstration project in western Kentucky. Using combined city, State, and TVA appropriated funds, three constructed wetland systems were built at Benton, Hardin, and Pembroke, Kentucky. Demonstration objectives include evaluating relative advantages and disadvantages of these types of systems; determining permit compliance ability; developing, evaluating, and improving basic design and operation criteria; evaluating cost effectiveness; and transferring technology to users and regulators. A demonstration monitoring project was implemented with a partnership of funds from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, other EPA funds through the National Small Flows Clearinghouse (NSFC), and TVA appropriations. TVA is managing the project in cooperation with an interagency team consisting of EPA, Kentucky Division of Water and NSFC. This report, which supersedes the first monitoring report (Choate, et. al., 1989) of these demonstration projects, describes each constructed wetland system, its status, and summarizes monitoring data and plans for each system. 5 refs., 30 figs., 26 tabs.

Choate, K.D.; Watson, J.T.; Steiner, G.R.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Integrated fuel cell energy systems for modern buildings. Final technical report for contract period October 1997 to September 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and results of a cooperative agreement. The scope focused on natural gas fuel processing subsystems for fuel cell systems that could be used in modern buildings. The focus of this project was the development of a natural gas (NG) fueled, fuel processing subsystem (FPS) for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems in modern buildings applications. This cooperative development program was coordinated with several parallel programs that were related to integrated fuel processor developments for fuel cell systems. The most significant were the development of an integrated fuel-flexible, fuel processing subsystem (DE-FC02-97EE0482) and internal HbT programs to develop autothermal reforming (ATR) technologies and to develop a commercially viable stationary subsystem.

Woods, Richard

2001-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

262

Development, characterization and evaluation of materials for open cycle MHD. Quarterly report for the period ending June 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program are directed toward the development and characterization of high temperature ceramics for open-cycle, coal-fired MHD power generators. The current activities are directed to electrode and insulator materials, and include (1) determination of the effects of alkali seed on the behavior of ceramics in a dc electric field; (2) development and testing of improved high temperature ceramic electrodes and insulators with controlled composition, microstructure, and properties; and (3) characterization and evaluation of materials utilized in channels being tested for MHD power generator development. Research is reported on (1) evaluation of metal electrodes from 250 hour MHD test, (2) characterization and properties of USSR MgO insulating wall material, (3) thermal diffusivity/thermal conductivity of electrode and insulator materials, (4) coprecipitation of ceramic powders, (5) properties of yttria chromites, and (6) rare earth hafnates. (WHK)

Bates, J.L.; Marchant, D.D.; Daniel, J.L.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Operation of beam line facilities for real-time x-ray studies at Sector 7 of the advanced photon source. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report documents the research accomplishments achieved in the first phase of operations of a new Advanced Photon Source beam line (7-ID MHATT-CAT) dedicated to real-time x-ray studies. The period covered by this report covers the establishment of a world-class facility for time-dependent x-ray studies of materials. During this period many new and innovative research programs were initiated at Sector 7 with support of this grant, most notably using a combination of ultrafast lasers and pulsed synchrotron radiation. This work initiated a new frontier of materials research: namely, the study of the dynamics of materials under extreme conditions of high intensity impulsive laser irradiation.

Clarke, Roy

2003-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

40-MW(E) PROTOTYPE HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. Summary Report for the Period January 1, 1959-December 31, 1959 and Quarterly Progress Report for the Period October 1, 1959-December 31, 1959  

SciTech Connect

The HTGR prototype plant (Peach Bottom Power Reactor) is being designed to produce steam at l450 psi and 1000 deg F and to have a net capacity of 40 Mw(e). The fuel temperatures and gas pressures will be approximately the same as those required for larger plants. The reactor data and operating conditions for the graphite-clad core are given. The reactor and primary coolant systems are described. The prospects for development of the graphite-clad fuel element in time for use in the first loading of the reactor were improved by important advances in methods of fabrication and testing of both fuel compacts and graphite sleeves. The hot-pressing process for making fuel compacts was used successfully to make full-size compacts with a uniform distribution of ThC/sub 2/- UC/sub 2/ particles. Three irradiation capsules were fabricated and inserted in a test reactor to determine fuel compact and sleeve performance under HTGR conditions of irradiation and temperature. Two of these ran satisfactorily for the scheduled time of operation. A scope design study of the in-pile loop that will be used to evaluate the full-diameter graphite-clad element was completed. Experiments to determine the extent of fuel migration within the element were undertaken. Preliminary results indicated that the central fuel-element temperatures must not exceed 2300-C for routine operation. An important start was made in developing an understanding of how to treat the neutron thermalization process in high-temperature graphite reactors. Analytical techniques for calculating the thermal neutron spectra in poisoned graphite media were developed and programmed for the IBM 704 computer. The experimental technique of measuring neutron spectra by using a pulsed linear electron accelerator was demonstrated by measurements made with boron-loaded graphite. A mockup of a small portion of the reactor core was constructed and operated to determine the local heat-transfer coefficients and pressure drop in the tricusp- shaped coolant passage. Initial results indicated that the variation of the heat-transfer coefficient around the circumference of the element is less than expected. Studies were started of the transient temperatures and stresses developed in the pressure vessel as a result of load changes or a scram. A detailed study of several types of steam generator for use in the nuclear steam supply system was completed. A design incorporating a steam drum was selected for further study. Preliminary flow diagrams were completed for the helium- purification and fission-product trapping systems. Adsorption isobars for selected fission products in activated carbon were measured and will be used in the detailed design of the trapping system. Detailed planning of the experimental reactor physics program was initiated. Progress was made in the identification of the principal safeguards problems for this type of reactor, and a preliminary safety analysis of the plant was completed. (auth)

1960-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Development of cost-effective surfactant flooding technology. First annual report for the period, September 30, 1992--September 29, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research consists of the parallel development of a new chemical flooding simulator and the application of existing UTCHEM simulation code to model surfactant flooding. The new code is based upon a completely new numerical method that combines for the first time higher order finite difference methods, flux limiters, and implicit algorithms. Early results indicate that this approach has significant advantages in some problems and will likely enable simulation of much larger and more realistic chemical floods once it is fully developed. Additional improvements have also been made to the UTCHEM code and it has been applied for the first time to the study of stochastic reservoirs with and without horizontal wells to evaluate methods to reduce the cost and risk of surfactant flooding. During the first year of this contract, significant progress has been made on both of these tasks. The authors have found that there are indeed significant differences between the performance predictions based upon the traditional layered reservoir description and the more realistic and flexible descriptions using geostatistics. These preliminary studies of surfactant flooding using horizontal wells shows that although they have significant potential to greatly reduce project life and thus improve the economics of the process, their use requires accurate reservoir descriptions and simulations to be effective. Much more needs to be done to fully understand and optimize their use and develop reliable design criteria.

Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford Facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989 - Volume 1 - Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, completion/inspection reports, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled, completed, or logged during this period. Volume 2 can be found on microfiche in the back pocket of Volume 1. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality.

Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

SDR PROJECT QUARTERLY TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT NO. 6 FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1, 1958 THROUGH OCTOBER 31, 1958  

SciTech Connect

A family of 200-Mw(e) SDR's was designed which could be operable ln 1965. They give total energy costs in the range 10 to 12 mills/kwh. The most promising of these reactors has the following characteristics: single-region design, moderate steam conditlons, natural uranium fuel, Zircaloy cladding, and stainless steel fuel tubes. A study of the applicability of SDR's to a broad range of power outputs (10 to 500 Mw(e)) was made. Although it appears reasonable to design a natural-uranium SDR with a power output down to 10 Mw(e), present studies indicate significant and wide economic interest at 40 Mw(e) and higher. Difficulties were encountered in interpreting the results of natural uranlum--D/ sub 2/0 lattice experiments in the Process Development Pile, and studies were initiated to determine the sources of difficulty and corrective measures. A code, called PALINDROME, which solves the Boltzmarm transport equation in the P/ sub 3/ approximation, was written. Work during the quarter on the Chugach 10- Mw(e) reactor was mainly concerned with completing the layout design of the more important reactor components and systems. A listing of the current design data is given, and a cross section of the reactor is shown. Two major changes were made during the quarter: (1) the substitution of steel ball-filled organiccooled neutron shield disks for the original concretefilled, water-cooled designs and (2) the reduction in size of the shutdown gas cooling systems. The preliminary safety analysis is briefly outlined. The development of maintenance techniques is discussed. Approximately 280 additional hours of operation of the SDR mockup facility were logged during the quarter. Modifications were made of the barrier test apparatus, and three successful experiments were performed on 6061 Al alloy. A liquid sodium leak detector was constructed, and also a rig for testlng fuel -- coolant tube closures. Sodium --liquid water and sodium--water vapor reactions were studied. (For preceding period see NDA-84-12.1 (L.T.W.)

1958-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Energy integrated dairy farm: Phase 1 report for the period 1 May 1982 to 30 June 1982  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of the project is to evaluate the use of integrated farm energy systems for dairy farms in the southeastern United States (Phase I); select and design alternative energy systems which are economically feasible for use on the Mathis farm (Phase I); install the selected systems (Phase II); and operate and monitor performance of the systems (Phase III). This report covers Phase I. Results of the Phase I work indicate that the most technically and economically appropriate alternative energy systems for the farm are: (1) anaerobic digestion of dairy cattle manure to produce a methane-rich biogas and to use the manure as a source of cattle bedding material and as a fertilizer; (2) use of the biogas to fuel a spark ignition engine coupled to an induction generator, producing a major portion of the electricity needed on the farm and all of the thermal energy required in the dairy operation; and (3) implementation of energy conservation measures, including waste heat recovery from the bulk milk refrigeration system, water conservation, irrigation scheduling, and minimum tillage.

Combes, R.S.; Lamade, R.M.; Ross, C.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Annual summary report of the Decontamination and Decommissioning Surveillance and Maintenance Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for period ending September 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 1976 to provide collective management of all surplus sites under ORNL`s control on the Oak Ridge Reservation. Presently, over 50 facilities, grouped into projects, are currently managed by the Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, the successor program to the SFMP. Support includes (1) surveillance and maintenance planning; (2) routine surveillance and maintenance; and (3) special maintenance projects. This report documents routine surveillance and maintenance, special projects, and special maintenance performed on these facilities for the period of October 1993 through September 1994.

Anderson, L.A. [comp.; Burwinkle, T.W.; Ford, M.K.; Gaddis, H.R.; Holder, L. Jr.; Mandry, G.J.; Nelson, T.R.; Patton, B.D.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables, Summary Report: A Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality for the Period September 2007 - August 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 79th Legislature, through Senate Bill 20, House Bill 2481 and House Bill 2129, amended Senate Bill 5 to enhance its effectiveness by adding 5,880 MW of generating capacity from renewable energy technologies by 2015 and 500 MW from non-wind renewables. This legislation also requires the Public Utilities Commission of Texas (PUCT) to establish a target of 10,000 megawatts of installed renewable capacity by 2025, and requires the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to develop methodology for computing emissions reductions from renewable energy initiatives and the associated credits. In this Legislation the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL or Laboratory) is to assist the TCEQ in quantifying emissions reductions credits from energy efficiency and renewable energy programs, through a contract with the Texas Environmental Research Consortium (TERC) to develop and annually calculate creditable emissions reductions from wind and other renewable energy resources for the State Implementation Plan (SIP). The Energy Systems Laboratory, in fulfillment of its responsibilities under this Legislation, submits its third annual report, “Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables,” to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The report is organized in several deliverables: • A Summary Report, which details the key areas of work; • Supporting Documentation; and • Supporting data files, including weather data, and wind production data, which have been assembled as part of the third year’s effort. This executive summary provides summaries of the key areas of accomplishment this year, including: • Continuation of stakeholder’s meetings; • Analysis of power generation from wind farms using improved method and 2006 data; • Analysis of emissions reduction from wind farms; • Updates on degradation analysis; • Analysis of other renewables, including: PV, solar thermal, hydroelectric, geothermal and landfill gas; • Review of electricity generation by renewable sources and transmission planning study reported by ERCOT; • Review of combined heat and power projects in Texas; and • Preliminary reporting of NOx emissions savings in the 2007 Integrated Savings report to the TCEQ.

Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Subbarao, K.; Culp, C.; Liu, Z.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations From Wind and Other Renewables Summary Report Draft, a Report to the TCEQ for the Period Sept. 2005 - August 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This executive summary provides summaries of the key areas of accomplishment this year, including: • development of stakeholder’s meetings; • reporting of NOx emissions reductions from renewable energy generation in the 2005 report to the TCEQ; • results of preliminary literature search of previous methods; • proposed weather normalization procedure for a single wind turbine; • proposed weather normalization procedure for a wind farm containing multiple wind turbines; • testing of the models; • weather data collection efforts, and • proposed modifications to the Laboratory’s Quality Assurance Project Plan.

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Subbarao, K.; Verdict, M.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Turner, W. D.

2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

272

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988: Volume 1, Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of 12 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988. During this quarter, field activities at the 300 Area process trenches, the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, the 1324-N/NA Surface Impoundment and Percolation Ponds, the 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities, and the 216-A-36B Crib consisted of ground-water sampling and analyses, and water-level monitoring. The 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds section includes well development data, sediment analysis, and water-level measurements. Ground-water sampling was begun at this site, and results will be included in next quarter's report. Twelve new wells were installed during the quarter, two at the 216-A-29 Ditch, size at the 216-A-10 Crib, and four at the 216-B-3 Pond. Preliminary characterization data for these new wells are included in this report. Driller's logs and other drilling and site characterization data will be provided in the next quarterly report. At the 2101-M Pond, construction was completed on four wells, and initial ground-water samples were taken. The drilling logs, geophysical logging data, and as-built diagrams are included in this report in Volume 2. 19 refs., 24 figs., 39 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Review of resistance temperature detector time response characteristics. Safety evaluation report  

SciTech Connect

A Resistance Temperature Detector (RTD) is used extensively for monitoring water temperatures in nuclear reactor plants. The RTD element does not respond instantaneously to changes in water temperature, but rather there is a time delay before the element senses the temperature change, and in nuclear reactors this delay must be factored into the computation of safety setpoints. For this reason it is necessary to have an accurate description of the RTD time response. This report is a review of the current state of the art of describing and measuring this time response.

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON PAD FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE NEVADA, FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 2004 - DECEMBER 2004  

SciTech Connect

This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), requires post-closure inspections. CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, is located inside the fence at the Building 6-605 compound. This report covers the annual period January 2004 through December 2004.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress Report for the Period of July 1, 1994 to December 31, 1997: Publications, Presentations, Activities, and Awards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains a record of publishing and other activities in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) Division for the period of July 1, 1994, to December31, 1997. It is a companion volume to Working Together on New Horizons: Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress Report for the Period of July 1, 1994, to December 31, 1997 (OR.NLA4-6530). Working Together on New Horizons contains illustrated summaries of some of the projects under way in I&C Division. Both books can be obtained by contacting C. R. Brittain (brittain@ornl. gov), P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6005. l&C Division Mission and Vision I&C Division develops and maintains techniques, instruments, and systems that lead to a better understanding of nature and harnessing of natural phenomena for the benefit of humankind. We have dedicated ourselves to accelerating the advancement of science and the transfer of those advancements into products and processes that benefit U.S. industry and enhance the security of our citizens.

McDonald, D.W.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Specific features in building hardware-software complexes operating in real-time: An example of test rig used in periodic tests of reducers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Test rig for periodic tests of reducers is involved as an example to discuss specific features in building automatic test systems (ATS); the test rig is designed at ZAO NPP MIKS Engineering. A certain approach to ATS design based on adaptation of universal ...

A. A. Urakov; M. A. Rylov; D. S. Shutov; P. G. Dorofeev

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Annual Report to the Bonneville Power Administration, Reporting Period: April 2008 - February 2009 [re: "Survival and Growth in the Columbia River Plume and north California Current"].  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have made substantial progress toward our objectives outlined in our BPA supported proposal entitled 'Columbia River Basin Juvenile Salmonids: Survival and Growth in the Columbia River Plume and northern California Current' which we report on herein. During 2008, we were able to successfully conduct 3 mesoscale cruises. We also were able to conduct 7 biweekly predator cruises, along with substantial shore-based visual observations of seabirds. Detailed results of the mesoscale cruises are available in the Cruise Reports and summarized in the next section. We have taken a proactive approach to getting the results of our research to fisheries managers and the general public. We have begun to make annual predictions based on ocean conditions of the relative survival of juvenile coho and Chinook salmon well before they return as adults. This is based on both biological and physical indicators that we measure during our surveys or collect from outside data sources. Examples of our predictions for 2009 and 2010 are available on the following web site: http://www.nwfsc.noaa.gov/research/divisions/fed/oeip/a-ecinhome.cfm.

Northwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries; Cooperative Institute for Marine Resources Studies, Oregon State University; OGI School of Science & Engineering, Oregon Health Sciences University.

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

278

California ISO Real-Time Voltage Security Assessment (VSA) Summary Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-Time Real-Time Voltage Security Assessment (VSA) Summary Report Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Prepared By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions APPENDIX B October 2008 CEC-500-2008-049-APB Prepared By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Joe Eto, Manu Parashar, Bernard Lesieutre, and Nancy Jo Lewis Berkeley, CA Administered by University of California, California Institute for Energy and Environment under 500-99-013, BOA-138. Jim Cole, Larry Miller Oakland, California 94612 Commission Contract No. 500-02-004 Commission Work Authorization No: MR-036 Prepared For: Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) California Energy Commission

279

This Letter is a Non-Technical Annual Report of Activities on Project 2007-275-00, Impact of American Shad for the Period February 1, 2008 through January 31, 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This letter is a non-technical annual report of activities on Project 2007-275-00, Impact of American Shad for the period February 1, 2008 through January 31, 2009. A non-technical report is appropriate at this time since data collection is ongoing and results are preliminary. This report is intended to highlight accomplishments during this performance period. Progress on administrative work elements in the statement of work has been captured in the periodic status reports provided through Pisces. During this performance period the USGS accomplished the following tasks: (1) Co-chaired a symposium on American shad in the Columbia Basin at the annual meeting of the Western Division, American Fisheries Society. The USGS gave four presentations from work done during this project. Abstracts of the presentations were attached to the 2007 progress report. (2) Continued parameterization of a bioenergetics model for juvenile American shad. We performed a literature review to determine the applicability of the existing adult salmon bioenergetics parameters to juvenile fall Chinook salmon in support of our modeling investigation of diet overlap between juvenile American shad and fall Chinook salmon. We formulated testable hypotheses to investigate using bioenergetics models and conceptually developed model simulations. Held an in-house workshop to obtain feedback on the physiological parameters we selected for the American shad bioenergetics model and to solicit feedback on our modeling approach to address research questions. (3) Received a Section 10 ESA sampling permit based on the application submitted in the 2007 contract period. With the ESA permit in hand, we obtained scientific collection permits from the states of Washington and Oregon that allowed us to use a variety of fisheries sampling techniques to capture juvenile and adult American shad. (4) Conducted field sampling to meet project objectives. Gillnetting efforts to capture adult American shad near Astoria were discontinued in accordance with our ESA permit after encountering a higher-than-expected number of salmonids. Only 30 PIT-tagged adult pre-spawn American shad were released. Another 53 adults were processed for diet and population characterization. Collection objectives for adult pre-spawn fish were met for areas downstream from Bonneville, John Day, and McNary dams. In October we captured 30 post-spawn adult shad from the McNary Dam forebay for diet analysis. Collection objectives for juvenile American shad were met for all four areas. (5) Began laboratory work to enumerate and accomplish dry-weight analysis of prey items from juvenile and adult shad stomachs. (6) Continued to exchange information and develop relations with others interested in American shad research. As an example, at the request of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Northeast Fishery Center, Lamar, PA, we provided tissue samples from adult Columbia River American shad for use in genetic comparisons with Hudson River fish. Key findings during this contract period: (1) Determined that prevalence of Ichthyophonus infection among adult American shad was the highest level detected in any population of fish throughout the Pacific region. A manuscript describing results is in preparation. (2) Thiaminase specific activity assessed from Columbia River juvenile and adult American shad is higher than that of forage fish of salmonines in the Great Lakes. The consumption of forage fish high in thiaminase can lead to thiamine deficiency in the predator if the diet of the predators contains little other prey. (3) Adult American shad are feeding during their freshwater migration. Plans for next year: (1) Completing laboratory analysis of the gut contents of juvenile and adult American shad collected. (2) Completing bioenergetics model parameterization and testing hypotheses. (3) Describing the age composition of the adult American shad run during the 2008 spawning migration via aging of scales and otoliths. (4) Providing a draft final report describing project tasks and findings.

Parsley, Michael J.

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

Water Research Consortium U.S. Department of Energy Grant Award Number DE-FG02-05ER64132 Final Technical Report For Period Beginning: 15 September 2005 And Ending: 31 December 2009 Report Date: 16 March 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities of the INRA Water Research Consortium (IWRC) for the period beginning September 15, 2005 and ending December 16, 2010. This report compares accomplishments to project objectives, documents the activities associated with this project, and lists products developed during the course of the project. The Water Resources Research Needs Assessment team received funding from the Inland Northwest Research Alliance Water Resources Steering Committee to facilitate a structured needs assessment process that could provide a basis for future targeted research efforts to improve regional water resources management in the Inland Northwest region. The original INRA proposal specifically mentions the need to conduct a detailed assessment of the information and research needs of policy makers and water user groups during a period of increasing competition for scarce water supplies. A particular focus of this assessment would be to understand what types of research might facilitate water resource management during periods of drought. The specific goals of the Needs Assessment project were to: (1) Quickly ascertain the perceptions of diverse stakeholders in this region; (2) Condense this complex information into a format that can be shared with the INRA scientific panel, and (3) Develop of a realistic set of research needs & priorities that can shape future INRA-funded research activities.

Steven R. Billingsley

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

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281

The modelling reported here updates and revises pilot work-in-progress reported in Cronin and Garnsey 2007, Is there Evidence in Favour of Clock Time on GMT,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and piloting an exploratory methodology. 1 Summary The impact of clock time on electricity usage is examined using British evidence. New findings are reported from a 2008-9 inquiry based on a nonlinear regression methodology (SVR) for estimating the potential effect on electricity demand in Britain of advancing the clock by an hour between November and March. Electricity demand data were supplied by National Grid for 2001-8. Analysis of the data showed that had the clocks not been put back to GMT in winter, electricity savings of 885 GWhs of electricity could have been achieved. GB average daily demand for electricity could have been lower, with a reduction in peak demand for electricity of up to 4.3 % during periods of high demand. The electricity wasted on GMT could have supplied 200,000 households and around 447,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions could have been avoided. The market price of electricity was found to be higher by 0.8 % as a result of higher peaks in demand (November study). The effect on the price actually paid by end-users is not direct or immediate because of forward contracts between utilities companies and suppliers. But

Yu-foong Chong; Elizabeth Garnsey; Simon Hill; Frederic Desobry

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Shallow-crustal magma zones in and south of Long Valley, California: Final report for the period 1 Sept 1986 to 30 April 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes our investigations of seismic data from the Long Valley caldera region based mainly on data obtained from the USGS-Doe seismic network. During the period several thousands of earthquakes were recorded and located, including the extensive aftershock sequence of the July 1986 Chalfant Valley. This contract has provided partial operating support for this network, including the establishment of the first permanently-recording wideband digital station in the Mammoth Lakes region. Results presented here unclude five manuscripts involving various aspects of the research. These manuscripts cover: (1) a general description of unusual seismic phase near Mammoth Lakes and their possible use in the delineation of shallow-crustal anomalous bodies, (2) a paper which pinpoints the location of a shallow-crustal anomaly about 6 km deep and 2 to 3 km in lateral near the south end of Hilton Creek fault, (3) the documentation of a strong lateral structural change in the vicinity of Inyo Craters, and (4) papers contributing to knowledge of the tectonics of the Mammoth Lakes area.

Peppin, W.A.

1988-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

283

Phase 3 of a Brushless Doubly-Fed Machine System Development Program : Final Technical Report for Period January 1, 1992-June 30, 1993.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the inception of the BDFM development program in 1989, the value of BDFM technology has become apparent. The BDFM provides for adjustable speed, synchronous operation while keeping costs associated with the required power conversion equipment lower than in competing technologies. This provides for an advantage in initial as well as maintenance expenses over conventional drive system. Thus, the BDFM enables energy efficient, adjustable speed process control for applications where established drive technology has not been able to deliver satisfactory returns on investment. At the same time, the BDFM challenges conventional drive technologies in established markets by providing for improved performance at lower cost. BDFM converter rating is kept at a minimum, which significantly improves power quality at the utility interface over competing power conversion equipment. In summary, BDFM technology can be expected to provide significant benefits to utilities as well as their customers. This report discusses technical research and development activities related to Phase 3 of the Brushless Doubly-Fed Machine System Development Program, including work made possible by supplemental funds for laboratory improvement and prototype construction. Market research for the BDFM was provided by the College of Business at Oregon State University; market study results will be discussed in a separate report.

Alexander, Gerald C.; Spee, Rene; Wallace, Alan K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

The Behavior of Matter under Nonequilibrium Conditions: Fundamental Aspects and Applications: Progress Report for Period August 15, 1989 - April 14, 1990  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

As in the previous period, our work has been concerned with the study of the properties of nonequilibrium systems and especially with the mechanism of self-organization. As is well-known, the study of self-organization began with the investigation of hydrodynamical or chemical instabilities studied from the point of view of macroscopic physics. The main outcome is that nonequilibrium generates spatial correlations of macroscopic physics. The main outcome is that nonequilibrium generated spatial correlations of macroscopic range whose characteristics length is an intrinsic property and whose amplitude is determined by nonequilibrium constraints. A survey of the macroscopic approach to nonequilibrium states is given in the paper. "Nonequilibrium States and Long Range Correlations in Chemical Dynamics", by G. Nicolis at al. However, over the last few years important progress has been made in the simulation of nonequilibrium situations using mainly molecular dynamics. It appears now that processes corresponding to self-organization as well as the appearance of long-range correlations can be obtained in this way starting from a program involving Newtonian dynamics (generally the laws of interaction correspond to hard spheres or hard disks). Examples of such types of studies leading to Benard instabilities, to chemical clocks, or to spatial structure formation are given in this report. As a result, we may now view self-organization as a direct expression of tan appropriate microscopic dynamics. This is the reason why we have devoted much work to the study of large Poincare systems (LPS) involving continuous sets of resonances. These systems have been shown to lead, according to the constraints, either to equilibrium situations or to nonequilibrium states involving long range correlations. We discuss LPS in the frame of classical mechanics.

Prigogine, I.

1989-10-00T23:59:59.000Z

285

Study of flow and loss processes at the ends of a linear theta pinch. Progress report for the period June 1, 1976--May 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental and analytical studies initiating and supporting research on flow and energy losses at the ends of a linear theta pinch have been carried out. A 25 cm linear pinch coil has been driven by a 515,000 A discharge with 10 ..mu..sec half-cycle time supplied by a 100 ..mu..F, 18 kV energy storage system. With reliable preionization generated up to 400 mT He, current sheath behavior has been identified with magnetic loop probes and double loop probes. Spectroscopic determination of preionization has been made. A ruby laser Thomson scattering diagnostic has been designed and is being procured. A study of transient plasma behavior in a 10 cm theta pinch has been carried out with a Twyman-Green interferometer using a 7 mW He--Ne CW laser. Pressure, electric field, and velocity probe diagnostics have received preliminary testing. Design work has been completed for the doubling of pinch length and energy storage system. Studies of particle loss scaling and reactor scaling of linear theta pinch devices have been reported. Detailed calculations of plasma properties at the end of the pinch coil following expansion from the central coil have been carried out. A O--D, time dependent computer code that includes conduction, convection, and magnetic field diffusion has been developed. Predicted plasma behavior is in good agreement with experimental data.

York, T.M.; Klevans, E.H.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

High voltage, fast turn-on and turn-off switch: Final report for period September 2, 1998 - March 17, 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The aspect to be investigated during this contract was an electron-beam triggered diamond switch to be used in high power modulators. Today's high power modulators require higher voltage switches than those developed to date. Specifically, the proposed 1 TeV linear collider, the NLC/ILC at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), consists of two linacs with 6600 X-Band klystrons powered by 3300 high power modulators. These modulators require switches capable of handling 80 kV, switching 8 kA with pulse durations ranging from 2 ps (linac) to 6 {micro}s (pre-linac) with switching times <50 ns at pulse repetition frequencies up to 180 Hz. In addition the large number of switches and other components dictate a pulse to pulse jitter of <10 ns and a mean time between failures of at least 50,000 hours. The present approach is to use hydrogen filled thyratrons. While these switches meet the voltage and conduction current requirements they lack the required reliability (pulse to pulse jitter) and lifetime. Research to improve these aspects is in progress. A solid state switch inherently offers the required reliability and lifetime. However, Si-based switches developed to date are limited to about 5 kV and several must be stacked in series to deliver the required voltage. This further increases the already large parts count and compromises reliability and lifetime. A monolithic, solid state switch capable of meeting all the requirements for X-Band modulators would be ideal. DOE selected this proposal for a Phase 1 SBIR award and this final report describes the progress made during the contract.

Jochen Schein; Xiaoxi Xu; Niansheng Qi; Steven Gensler; Rahul Prasad; Mahadevan Krishnan

1999-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

287

Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration, of which PNNL is a part, to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory methods. This document is a progress report for FY2012 PNNL analysis and algorithm development. Progress made by PNNL in FY2012 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS analysis and algorithms applied to used fuel assemblies. PNNL further refined the semi-empirical model developed in FY2011 based on singular value decomposition (SVD) to numerically account for the effects of self-shielding. The average uncertainty in the Pu mass across the NGSI-64 fuel assemblies was shown to be less than 3% using only six calibration assemblies with a 2% uncertainty in the isotopic masses. When calibrated against the six NGSI-64 fuel assemblies, the algorithm was able to determine the total Pu mass within <2% uncertainty for the 27 diversion cases also developed under NGSI. Two purely empirical algorithms were developed that do not require the use of Pu isotopic fission chambers. The semi-empirical and purely empirical algorithms were successfully tested using MCNPX simulations as well applied to experimental data measured by RPI using their LSDS. The algorithms were able to describe the 235U masses of the RPI measurements with an average uncertainty of 2.3%. Analyses were conducted that provided valuable insight with regard to design requirements (e.g. Pb stack size, neutron source location) of an LSDS for the purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Sensitivity studies were conducted that provide insight as to how the LSDS instrument can be improved by making it more sensitive to the center of the fuel assemblies. In FY2013, PNNL will continue efforts to develop and refine design requirements of an LSDS for the ultimate purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Future efforts will be directed toward more extensive experimental benchmarking of currently implemented time-spectra analysis algorithms.

Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Warren, Glen A.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

288

Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Summary Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration, of which PNNL is a part, to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory methods. This document is a progress report for FY2012 PNNL analysis and algorithm development. Progress made by PNNL in FY2012 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS analysis and algorithms applied to used fuel assemblies. PNNL further refined the semi-empirical model developed in FY2011 based on singular value decomposition (SVD) to numerically account for the effects of self-shielding. The average uncertainty in the Pu mass across the NGSI-64 fuel assemblies was shown to be less than 3% using only six calibration assemblies with a 2% uncertainty in the isotopic masses. When calibrated against the six NGSI-64 fuel assemblies, the algorithm was able to determine the total Pu mass within Pu isotopic fission chambers. The semi-empirical and purely empirical algorithms were successfully tested using MCNPX simulations as well applied to experimental data measured by RPI using their LSDS. The algorithms were able to describe the 235U masses of the RPI measurements with an average uncertainty of 2.3%. Analyses were conducted that provided valuable insight with regard to design requirements (e.g. Pb stack size, neutron source location) of an LSDS for the purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Sensitivity studies were conducted that provide insight as to how the LSDS instrument can be improved by making it more sensitive to the center of the fuel assemblies. In FY2013, PNNL will continue efforts to develop and refine design requirements of an LSDS for the ultimate purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Future efforts will be directed toward more extensive experimental benchmarking of currently implemented time-spectra analysis algorithms.

Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Warren, Glen A.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

289

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, Final Report For the Performance Period May 1, 2008 through April 30, 2009.  

SciTech Connect

The Yakima-Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a joint project of the Yakama Nation (lead entity) and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and is sponsored in large part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with oversight and guidance from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). It is among the largest and most complex fisheries management projects in the Columbia Basin in terms of data collection and management, physical facilities, habitat enhancement and management, and experimental design and research on fisheries resources. Using principles of adaptive management, the YKFP is attempting to evaluate all stocks historically present in the Yakima subbasin and apply a combination of habitat restoration and hatchery supplementation or reintroduction, to restore the Yakima Subbasin ecosystem with sustainable and harvestable populations of salmon, steelhead and other at-risk species. The original impetus for the YKFP resulted from the landmark fishing disputes of the 1970s, the ensuing legal decisions in United States versus Washington and United States versus Oregon, and the region's realization that lost natural production needed to be mitigated in upriver areas where these losses primarily occurred. The YKFP was first identified in the NPCC's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) and supported in the U.S. v Oregon 1988 Columbia River Fish Management Plan (CRFMP). A draft Master Plan was presented to the NPCC in 1987 and the Preliminary Design Report was presented in 1990. In both circumstances, the NPCC instructed the Yakama Nation, WDFW and BPA to carry out planning functions that addressed uncertainties in regard to the adequacy of hatchery supplementation for meeting production objectives and limiting adverse ecological and genetic impacts. At the same time, the NPCC underscored the importance of using adaptive management principles to manage the direction of the Project. The 1994 FWP reiterated the importance of proceeding with the YKFP because of the added production and learning potential the project would provide. The YKFP is unique in having been designed to rigorously test the efficacy of hatchery supplementation. Given the current dire situation of many salmon and steelhead stocks, and the heavy reliance on artificial propagation as a recovery tool, YKFP monitoring results will have great region-wide significance. Supplementation is envisioned as a means to enhance and sustain the abundance of wild and naturally-spawning populations at levels exceeding the cumulative mortality burden imposed on those populations by habitat degradation and by natural cycles in environmental conditions. A supplementation hatchery is properly operated as an adjunct to the natural production system in a watershed. By fully integrating the hatchery with a naturally-producing population, high survival rates for the component of the population in the hatchery can raise the average abundance of the total population (hatchery component + naturally-producing component) to a level that compensates for the high mortalities imposed by human development activities and fully seeds the natural environment. The objectives of the YKFP are to: use Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) and other modeling tools to facilitate planning for project activities, enhance existing stocks, re-introduce extirpated stocks, protect and restore habitat in the Yakima Subbasin, and operate using a scientifically rigorous process that will foster application of the knowledge gained about hatchery supplementation and habitat restoration throughout the Columbia River Basin. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until results are published in the peer-reviewed literature. The following is a brief summary of current YKFP activities by species.

Sampson, Melvin R. [The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand versus Time of Day 11182013 3:15:15 PM INLMIS-11-24311 Page 2 of 17 Residential Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Report period: July 2013 through September 2013...

291

Quarterly Status Report on the Space Electric Power R and D Program for the Period Ending July 31, 1968 Part II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported with respect to ZrH{sub x}-moderated thermionic reactors, thermionic fuel studies, EBR-II and OWR isothermal irradiator tests and tri-layer assembly development.

none,

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

292

Development and verification of simplified prediction models for enhanced-oil-recovery application. Monthly technical progress report for the period May 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following tasks and sub-tasks have been defined and all reporting which follows will be identifiable according to these categories until January 1982: (1) Reservoir Data Collection - all processes; (2) Steamflood Predictive Performance Model Development which includes literature analysis, algorithm development, computer coding of algorithm, process data base utilizing algorithm; validate algorithm; numerical simulation analysis; and final report; (3) Carbon Dioxide Predictive Performance Model Development which includes literature analysis, algorithm development, computer coding of algorithm, process data base utilizing algorithm, validate algorithm, numerical simulation analysis, and final report; and (4) Polymer Flooding Predictive Performance Model Development which includes literature analysis. The current status of the literature analysis, algorithm development, computer coding of algorithm, and numerical simulation analysis of steamflood predictive performance model, and the literature analysis and numerical simulation analysis of carbon dioxide predictive performance model are reported.

McElhiney, J.E.

1981-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

293

j\\TOMKI Report All ( 1983) DIREdr TEST OF THE TIME-INOCPENDENCE OF f1JNIlA.MENTAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.}.!TS USING THE OKLO NATURAL REACTOR* A. I. Shlyakhter Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchinaj\\TOMKI Report All ( 1983) DIREdr TEST OF THE TIME- INOCPENDENCE OF f1JNIlA.MENTAL NUCLEAR CONSTP the important natural cons tants of cosIOOlogy and atomic theory are connected by simple Imthematical rela

Shlyakhter, Ilya

294

Final Technical Report for the Period September 2002 through September 2005; H2-MHR Pre-Conceptual Design Report: SI-Based Plant; H2-MHR Pre-Conceptual Design Report: HTE-Based Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For electricity and hydrogen production, an advanced reactor technology receiving considerable international interest is a modular, passively-safe version of the high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor, known in the U.S. as the Modular Helium Reactor (MHR), which operates at a power level of 600 MW(t). For electricity production, the MHR operates with an outlet helium temperature of 850 C to drive a direct, Brayton-cycle power-conversion system with a thermal-to-electrical conversion efficiency of 48 percent. This concept is referred to as the Gas Turbine MHR (GT-MHR). For hydrogen production, both electricity and process heat from the MHR are used to produce hydrogen. This concept is referred to as the H2-MHR. This report provides pre-conceptual design descriptions of full-scale, nth-of-a-kind H2 MHR plants based on thermochemical water splitting using the Sulfur-Iodine process and High-Temperature Electrolysis.

M. Richards; A. Shenoy; L. Brown; R. Buckingham; E. Harvego; K. Peddicord; M. Reza; J. Coupey

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

295

Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis, 1991-1992 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regression techniques were used to determine the effects of several biotic and abiotic variables on the migration rates of juvenile spring chinook salmon and steelhead in the Columbia and Snake rivers. Comparisons of the effects of river flow and smoltification, assessed using gill Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase activity, were of primary interest. Day of the year, water temperature, change in flow, condition factor, and fork length were also considered as independent variables. Groups of fish were sampled to assess smoltification 2-3 times per week during the spring outmigrations during 1989-1992. These groups were assumed to be representative of other fish which were PIT-tagged and released as a part of the Smolt Monitoring Program in the Columbia Basin. River flow, gill ATPase activity, condition factor, water temperature, and change in flow were significant variables in regressions predicting the time for juvenile spring chinook salmon to travel between specific points (travel time), whereas river flow was the only significant contributor to models describing travel times of steelhead. Predicted travel times of wild steelhead were shorter than those of hatchery steelhead. River flow was the only variable common to all regression equations. Based on the characteristic, changes in river flow would be the most logical means to decrease travel times of both juvenile spring chinook salmon and steelhead in the Columbia and Snake rivers.

Maule, Alec G.; Beeman, John W.; Schrock, Robin M. (Seattle National Fishery Research Center, Columbia River Field Station, Cook, WA)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1987 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project monitored the daily passage of smolts during the 1988 spring outmigration at two migrant traps; one each on the Snake and Clearwater rivers. Due to the low runoff year, chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was very low. Steelhead trout catch was higher than normal, probably due to trap modifications and because the trap was moved to the east side of the river. Chinook salmon and steelhead trout catch at the Clearwater River trap was similar to 1987. Total cumulative recovery of PIT tagged fish at the three dams, with PIT tag detection systems was: 55% for chinook salmon, 73% for hatchery steelhead trout, and 75% for wild steelhead trout. Travel time through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir, was affected by discharge. Statistical analysis showed that as discharge increased from 40 kcfs to 80 kcfs, chinook salmon travel time decreased three fold, and steelhead trout travel time decreased two fold. There was a statistical difference between estimates of travel time through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT tagged and freeze branded steelhead trout, but not for chinook salmon. These differences may be related to the estimation techniques used for PIT tagged and freeze branded groups, rather than real differences in travel time. 10 figs, 15 tabs.

Buettner, Edwin W.; Nelson, V. Lance

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

EFFECT OF NEUTRON IRRADIATION ON MATERIALS SUBJECTED TO MULTI-AXIAL STRESS DISTRIBUTIONS. Quarterly Report for the Period Ending June 30, 1962  

SciTech Connect

Activities in a program to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on A-302B steel are reported. Plans are discussed concerning performance tests on tensile, notched tensile, tube, and Charpy specimens. An irradiation capsule design was finalized. A theoretical analysis of the critical conditions arising in a tube subjected to both internal pressure and axial load is included. (J.R.D.)

Trozera, T A

1962-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Behavior of Matter under Nonequilibrium Conditions: Fundamental Aspects and Applications in Energy-oriented Problems: Progress Report for Period September 1984--November 1987  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This report briefly discusses progress on the following topics: state selection dynamics; polymerization under nonequilibrium conditions; inhomogeneous fluctuations in hydrodynamics and in completely mixed reactors; homoclinic bifurcations and mixed-mode oscillations; intrinsic randomness and spontaneous symmetry breaking in explosive systems; and microscopic means of irreversibility.

Prigogine, I.

1987-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

299

Report on Fission Time Projection Chamber M3FT-12IN0210052  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Time Projection Chamber is a collaborative effort to implement an innovative approach and deliver unprecedented fission measurements to DOE programs. This 4?-detector system will provide unrivaled 3-D data about the fission process. Shown here is a half populated TPC (2?) at the LLNL TPC laboratory as it undergoes testing before being shipped to LANSCE for beam experiments.

James K. Jewell

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis, 1993-1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The assessment of smolt condition for travel time analysis (ASCTTA) project provided information on the level of smoltification in Columbia River hatchery and wild salmonid stocks to the Fish Passage Center (FPC), for the primary purpose of in-river management of flows.

Schrock, Robin M; Beeman, John W; VanderKooi, Scott P [US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Experimental evaluation of an instrumented synthesis method for the real-time estimation of reactivity. Progress report, 1 July 1992--31 December 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report concerns the first and second quarters supported under this grant. The period covered is 1 July 1992--31 December 1992. Progress is reported for tasks involving: Theoretical characterization of flux shapes; experimental determination of flux shapes; experimental evaluation of instrumented synthesis method; and controller design.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

Instrumentation and Controls Division Progress Report for the Period July 1, 1994, to December 31, 1997: Working Together on New Horizons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ORNL I&C Division was created to support DOE-funded research. We have since broadened our mission to include other sponsors as the need for our services has grown. This report summarizes some of the work we have been conducting on behalf of DOE, other federal agencies, and the private sector during the past three and a half years. Because we take on nearly 750 individual projects every year, much of our work cannot be reported in detail. We hope that these summaries are of interest and demonstrate that our work, rooted in DOE scientific and technological programs, can also benefit the nation, its industry, and its citizens in direct and tangible ways.

McDonald, D.W.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Real-Time Traffic Information for Emergency Evacuation Operations: Phase A Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many instances in which it is possible to plan ahead for an emergency evacuation (e.g., an explosion at a chemical processing facility). For those cases, if an accident (or an attack) were to happen, then the best evacuation plan for the prevailing network and weather conditions would be deployed. In other cases (e.g., the derailment of a train transporting hazardous materials), there may not be any previously developed plan to be implemented and decisions must be made ad-hoc on how to proceed with an emergency evacuation. In both situations, the availability of real-time traffic information plays a critical role in the management of the evacuation operations. To improve public safety during a vehicular emergency evacuation it is necessary to detect losses of road capacity (due to incidents, for example) as early as possible. Once these bottlenecks are identified, re-routing strategies must be determined in real-time and deployed in the field to help dissipate the congestion and increase the efficiency of the evacuation. Due to cost constraints, only large urban areas have traffic sensor deployments that permit access to some sort of real-time traffic information; any evacuation taking place in any other areas of the country would have to proceed without real-time traffic information. The latter was the focus of this SERRI/DHS (Southeast Region Research Initiative/Department of Homeland Security) sponsored project. That is, the main objective on the project was to improve the operations during a vehicular emergency evacuation anywhere by using newly developed real-time traffic-information-gathering technologies to assess traffic conditions and therefore to potentially detect incidents on the main evacuation routes. Phase A of the project consisted in the development and testing of a prototype system composed of sensors that are engineered in such a way that they can be rapidly deployed in the field where and when they are needed. Each one of these sensors is also equipped with their own power supply and a GPS (Global Positioning System) device to auto-determine its spatial location on the transportation network under surveillance. The system is capable of assessing traffic parameters by identifying and re-identifying vehicles in the traffic stream as those vehicles pass over the sensors. The system of sensors transmits, through wireless communication, real-time traffic information (travel time and other parameters) to a command and control center via an NTCIP (National Transportation Communication for ITS Protocol) -compatible interface. As an alternative, an existing NTCIP-compatible system accepts the real-time traffic information mentioned and broadcasts the traffic information to emergency managers, the media and the public via the existing channels. A series of tests, both in a controlled environment and on the field, were conducted to study the feasibility of rapidly deploying the system of traffic sensors and to assess its ability to provide real-time traffic information during an emergency evacuation. The results of these tests indicated that the prototype sensors are reliable and accurate for the type of application that is the focus of this project.

Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Zhang, Li [Mississippi State University (MSU); Mahmoud, Anas M. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Wen, Yi [Mississippi State University (MSU)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis, 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a part of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program, the Fish Passage Center collects information on the migrational characteristics of juvenile salmon and steelhead (Oncorhynchus sp.) in the Columbia River basin. This information is collected through the Smolt Monitoring Program, and is used as a tool in the management and evaluation of the Water Budget. The Water Budget is a volume of water used to enhance environmental conditions (flows) to aid in the seaward migration of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Implicit in the Water Budget concept is that by augmenting flows, travel time of juvenile salmonids will be decreased, thereby increasing survival via reductions in delayed migration and exposure to predators. This study was initiated to (1) provide physiological information about the juvenile salmonids used for these travel time estimates, (2) to analyze the physiological data, and (3) to determine if an ``index`` of smolt condition could be developed to aid in management of the Water Budget.

Beeman, John W.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Faler, Joyce C. (Seattle National Fishery Research Center, Columbia River Field Station, Cook, WA)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Time-Limited Aging Analysis Report for the Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The option to operate a nuclear power plant beyond its initial license term of 40 years is an important factor in financial decisions and long-term planning for utility asset management and capital improvement. Southern Company has submitted an application for the renewal of its operating licenses for the E. I. Hatch Nuclear Power Plant. As part of the application preparation process, Southern Company has reviewed its design and licensing basis for Plant Hatch for time-limited, aging-related assumptions....

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

306

Area 6 Decontamination Pond Corrective Action Unit 92 Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report for the Period January 2000-December 2000  

SciTech Connect

The Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Corrective Action Unit 92, was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP, 1995]) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (NDEP, 1996) on May 11, 1999. Historically the Decontamination Pond was used for the disposal of partially treated liquid effluent discharged from the Decontamination Facility (Building 6-05) and the Industrial Laundry (Building 6-07) (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1996). The Decontamination Pond was constructed and became operational in 1979. Releases of RCRA-regulated hazardous waste or hazardous waste constituents have not been discharged to the Decontamination Pond since 1988 (DOE/NV, 1996). The pipe connecting the Decontamination Pond and Decontamination Facility and Industrial Laundry were cut and sealed at the Decontamination Pad Oil/Water Separator in 1992. The Decontamination Pond was closed in place by installing a RCRA cover. Fencing was installed around the periphery to prevent accidental damage to the cover. Post-closure monitoring at the site consists of quarterly inspections of the RCRA cover and fencing, and a subsidence survey. Additional inspections are conducted if: Precipitation occurs in excess of 1.28 centimeters (cm) (0.50 inches [in]) in a 24-hour period, or An earthquake occurs with a magnitude exceeding 4.5 on the Richter scale within 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) of the closure.

J. L. Traynor

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 5, Appendix B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W6-2; 299-W7-1; 299-W7-2; 299-W7-3; 299-W7-4. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

none,

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 8, Appendix B (contd)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W18-21; 299-W18-22; 299-W18-23; 299-W18-24. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 7, Appendix B (contd)  

SciTech Connect

This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wwlls completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W10-14; 299-W15-15; 299-W15-16; 299-W15-17; 299-W15-18. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 2, Appendix A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix A cover the following wells: 299-E27-8; 299-E27-9; 299-E27-10; 299-E28-26; 299-E28-27. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period, January 1-March 31, 1988: Volume 6, Appendix B (contd)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W7-5; 299-W7-6; 299-W8-1; 299-W9-1; 299-W10-13. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Diagnosis and correction of soil nutrient limitations in intensively managed Southern pine forests. Quarterly report for the period January-March 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of project status and activities performed during the quarter: (1) Initial error runs were finished and coding was adjusted to account for errors. A documentation manual and users manual have been written and gone through the first editing. The model was presented to the forest industry during a review meeting and adjustments were made to the model based on their input. The model has been sent to interested parties in Canada and Australia to test it and report back on any errors or modifications they feel would be necessary. (2) Based on the laboratory studies, one paper was written and submitted to the Soil and Water Science for internal review. It is currently under internal review. This paper describes a method for measuring resorption isotherms. A second paper that uses this method to investigate desorption isotherms for different soils is in progress. (3) All soil samples have been dried and sieved. All tissue samples have been ground and the ashing of the tissue samples has just begun. (4) A literature search continued focusing on root to shoot relationships of fast growing pine in order to assist the development of the nutrient demand section of the model. This is about 40% done.

Comerford, N.B.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Operation redwing: Report to the scientific director. Timing and firing (sanitized version)  

SciTech Connect

Task Unit 5 (YU-5) was organized to accomplish the following tasks during Operation Redwing (May - June 1956): (1) To supply timing signals and voice count-down to meet the principal requirements of the experimental programs; (2) To supply the arming and firing pulses to the devices tested; (3) To furnish personnel as members of the arming and firing parties; (4) To provide and maintain the Task Group 7.1 (TG 7.1) short-range commercial radio communications at Bikini and Eniwetok atolls; and (5) To perform such scientific measurements and photography as provided for under existing contractual agreements.

NONE

1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

314

Timing and duration of subsidence due to longwall mining. Report of investigations/1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsidence data gathered by the U.S. Bureau of Mines over a series of longwall panels in the Pittsburgh Coalbed were studied to obtain insight as to the role of time in the subsidence process. IT was found that subsidence began essentially with undermining and was completed within one year. The progress of the subsidence was dependent upon location above the panel. All sites behaved similarly in the central portion of the subsidence trough. However, the subsidence of points over the adjacent to the ribs of the longwall panels was site specific.

Jeran, P.W.; Trevits, M.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

In-Situ Real Time Monitoring and Control of Mold Making and Filling Processes: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This project presents a model for addressing several objectives envisioned by the metal casting industries through the integration of research and educational components. It provides an innovative approach to introduce technologies for real time characterization of sand molds, lost foam patterns and monitoring of the mold filling process. The technology developed will enable better control over the casting process. It is expected to reduce scrap and variance in the casting quality. A strong educational component is integrated into the research plan to utilize increased awareness of the industry professional, the potential benefits of the developed technology, and the potential benefits of cross cutting technologies.

Mohamed Abdelrahman; Kenneth Currie

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

316

Final Report Reporting Period Start Date: August 8, 1999 Reporting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

constrains the possible types of constitutive equations that can rigorously describe multiphase fluid properties in porous media. As a consequence of this theoretical...

317

Assessment of Smolt Condition for Travel Time Analysis, 1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Water Budget is a volume of water used to enhance environmental conditions (flows) in the Columbia and Snake rivers for juvenile salmonids during their seaward migration. To manage the Water Budget, the Fish Passage Center estimates travel times of juvenile salmonids in index reaches of the main-stem rivers, using information on river flows and the migrational characteristics of the juvenile salmonids. This study was initiated to provide physiological information on the juvenile salmonids used for these travel time estimates. The physiological ability to respond to stressors was evaluated by measuring concentrations of plasma cortisol, glucose, and chlorides before and after a 30-s handling-stress challenge test. The development of smoltification was assessed by measuring gill Na{sup +}--K{sup +} ATPase activity and plasma thyroxine concentrations. Prevalence of bacterial kidney disease in spring chinook salmon was generally higher than in 1988, ranging from 81--100{percent} using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Fish from Snake River hatcheries had more severe infections than those from mid-Columbia hatcheries. 42 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

Beeman, John W.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Faler, Joyce C. (Seattle National Fishery Research Center, Columbia River Field Station, Cook, WA)

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Demonstration of oxygen-enriched air staging at Owens-Brockway glass containers. Final technical report for the period April 1, 1995--February 28, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program was to demonstrate the use of a previously developed combustion modification technology to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from sideport regenerative container glass melters. Specific objectives were to: acquire baseline operating data on the host sideport furnace, evaluate secondary oxidant injection strategies based on earlier endport furnace results and through modeling of a single port pair, retrofit and test one port pair (the test furnace has six port pairs) with a flexible OEAS system, and select the optimal system configuration, use the results from tests with one port pair to design, retrofit, and test OEAS on the entire furnace (six port pairs), and analyze test results, prepare report, and finalize the business plan to commercialize OEAS for sideport furnaces.

Rue, D.; Abbasi, H.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Northern Power Systems WindPACT Drive Train Alternative Design Study Report; Period of Performance: April 12, 2001 to January 31, 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) project seeks to advance wind turbine technology by exploring innovative concepts in drivetrain design. A team led by Northern Power Systems (Northern) of Waitsfield, Vermont, was chosen to perform this work. Conducted under subcontract YCX-1-30209-02, project objectives are to identify, design, and test a megawatt (MW)-scale drivetrain with the lowest overall life cycle cost. The project entails three phases: preliminary study of alternative drivetrain designs (Phase I), detailed design development (Phase II), and proof of concept fabrication and test (Phase III). This report summarizes the results of the preliminary design study (Phase I).

Bywaters, G.; John, V.; Lynch, J.; Mattila, P.; Norton, G.; Stowell, J.; Salata, M.; Labath, O.; Chertok, A.; Hablanian, D.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

High resolution, low cost solar cell contact development. Quarterly technical progress and schedule report for the period ending December 31, 1980. CDRL 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The scope of the contract covers the development and evaluation of forming solar cell collector grid contacts by the MIDFILM process. This is a proprietary process developed by the Ferro Corporation which is a subcontractor for the program. The MIDFILM process attains line resolution characteristics of photoresist methods with processing related to screen printing. The surface to be processed is first coated with a thin layer of photoresist material. Upon exposure to ultraviolet light through a suitable mask, the resist in the non-pattern area cross-links and becomes hard. The unexposed pattern areas remain tacky. The conductor material is applied in the form of a dry mixture of metal and frit particles which adher to the tacky pattern area. The assemblage is then fired to ash the photo-polymer and sinter the fritted conductor powder. Progress is reported. (WHK)

Garcia, A.

1981-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Includes all charging units that were in use by the end of the reporting period Includes all charging units that were in use by the end of the reporting period ² A charging event is defined as the period when a vehicle is connected to a charging unit, during which period some power is transferred ³ Considers the connection status of all charging units every minute Based on 15 minute rolling average power output from all charging units Charging Availability: Range of Percent of Charging Units with a Vehicle Connected versus Time of Day³

322

Authorizing supplemental appropriations to the Energy Research and Development Administration for fiscal year 1976 and the transition period. Report by the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy, to accompany S. 3108 and H. R. 12388  

SciTech Connect

Reports from the House and Senate members of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy are given for H.R. 12388 and S. 3108, which authorize supplemental appropriations of $34 million to ERDA for fiscal year 1976, $23 million for the period of budget authority transition, and $26.5 million and $17.5 million in budget outlays for the respective periods. The supplemental appropriations are needed for research, development, and testing of nuclear weapons; verification of the nuclear explosive agreement with the Soviet Union; and capital equipment, specifically a computer for the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Since this funding was requested too late for the ERDA appropriations of FY 1976, it was submitted as a supplemental request to avoid serious manpower reductions and a decline in nuclear weapons capability, and to enable the U.S. to proceed with treaty negotiations with the U.S.S.R. (DCK)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Risk-averse periodic preventive maintenance optimization.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We consider a class of periodic preventive maintenance (PM) optimization problems, for a single piece of equipment that deteriorates with time or use, and can… (more)

Singh, Inderjeet,1978-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hatcheries released 9.3 million chinook salmon and 6.3 million steelhead smolts and presmolts upriver from Lower Granite Reservoir for migration in spring, 1984. Peak passage of yearling chinook salmon occurred the third week in April at both Whitebird and Snake River traps. Passage of steelhead was still increasing when high water stopped trapping in mid-May. Average migration rate between release sites and Snake River (the head of Lower Granite Reservoir) was 13.2 miles/day and from that point on through the reservoir to the dam, 1.9 miles/day. Salmon River discharge, when considered along with other environmental factors, had the greatest effect on migration rate of smolts branded both at hatcheries and at the Whitebird trap and migrating to the head of Lower Granite Reservoir. Migration rate for steelhead released from Dworshak Hatchery and recaptured at the Clearwater trap was 34 miles/day. Survival rates to the Snake River trap of branded chinook salmon smolts released at Hells Canyon Dam, Rapid River, South Fork Salmon and Decker Flat were 52%, 65%, 68% and 35%, respectively. Classical descaling, where at least 40% of the scales are missing from at least two of five areas on the side of a smolt, ranged from 0 to 5.3% at hatcheries for chinook salmon and was less than 1% for steelhead. Scattered descaling, where at least 10% of scales are missing from at least one side of a fish, was always more extensive than was classical descaling, ranging from 2.5 times greater for Clearwater hatchery steelhead to 6.8 times greater for Clearwater wild steelhead. Mean total length of chinook salmon yearlings was the same at all the traps, i.e., 128 mm (117 mm fork length) +- 1 mm.

Scully, Richard J.; Buettner, Edwin W.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Real-time discriminatory sensors for water contamination events :LDRD 52595 final report.  

SciTech Connect

The gas-phase {mu}ChemLab{trademark} developed by Sandia can detect volatile organics and semi-volatiles organics via gas phase sampling . The goal of this three year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to adapt the components and concepts used by the {mu}ChemLab{trademark} system towards the analysis of water-borne chemicals of current concern. In essence, interfacing the gas-phase {mu}ChemLab{trademark} with water to bring the significant prior investment of Sandia and the advantages of microfabrication and portable analysis to a whole new world of important analytes. These include both chemical weapons agents and their hydrolysis products and disinfection by-products such as Trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). THMs and HAAs are currently regulated by EPA due to health issues, yet water utilities do not have rapid on-site methods of detection that would allow them to adjust their processes quickly; protecting consumers, meeting water quality standards, and obeying regulations more easily and with greater confidence. This report documents the results, unique hardware and devices, and methods designed during the project toward the goal stated above. It also presents and discusses the portable field system to measure THMs developed in the course of this project.

Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III (; ); Carrejo-Simpkins, Kimberly; Wheeler, David Roger; Adkins, Douglas Ray; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Irwin, Adriane Nadine; Lewis, Patrick Raymond; Goodin, Andrew M.; Shelmidine, Gregory J.; Dirk, Shawn M.; Chambers, William Clayton; Mowry, Curtis Dale (1722 Micro-Total-Analytical Systems); Showalter, Steven Kedrick

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Experimental observation of a complex periodic window  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of a special periodic window in the two-dimensional parameter space of an experimental Chua's circuit is reported. One of the main reasons that makes such a window special is that the observation of one implies that other similar periodic windows must exist for other parameter values. However, such a window has never been experimentally observed, since its size in parameter space decreases exponentially with the period of the periodic attractor. This property imposes clear limitations for its experimental detection.

D. M. Maranhão; M. S. Baptista; J. C. Sartorelli; I. L. Caldas

2007-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

327

SYNTHESIS OF REFRACTORY MIXED OXIDE WITH PEROVSKITE STRUCTURE. Bi-monthly Report No. 2 for the Period July 24, 1960 to September 24, 1960  

SciTech Connect

Experimental work on the preparation and measurement of BaThO/sub 3/ shows that the compound exists and is the most stable compound in the Ba-Th-O system. It is cubic at ordinary temperature, with the perovskite structure, and has a crystal density of 4.59 g/cc. The compound may be prepared from a coprecipitated mixture of the barium and thorium oxalates at 750 deg C, and the reaction is driven to completion below 1000 deg C in the presence of an excess of barium. BaThO/sub 3/ appears to hydrolyze readily in the presence of moisture and/or CO/sub 2/. It does not, therefore, appear to have the chemical stability required in a protective coating, and it is inadvisable to measure other coating parameters at this time. It may, however, serve as a superior thermionic emitter. (auth)

Harada, Y.; Bradstreet, S.W.

1961-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Kinetics of catalyzed steam gasification of low-rank coals to produce hydrogen. Final report for the period ending March 31, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The principal goal of coal char-steam gasification research at the University of North Dakota Energy Research Center (UNDERC) is to establish the feasibility of low-rank coal gasification for hydrogen production. The program has focused on determining reaction conditions for maximum product gas hydrogen content and on evaluating process kinetics with and without catalyst addition. The high inherent reactivity of lignites and subbituminous coals, compared to coals of higher rank, make them the probable choice for use in steam gasification. An extensive matrix of char-steam gasification tests was performed in a laboratory-scale thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures of 700/sup 0/, 750/sup 0/, and 800/sup 0/C. Four low-rank coals and one bituminous coal were included in the TGA test matrix. Catalysts screened in the study included K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, trona, nahcolite, sunflower hull ash, and lignite ash. Results showed uncatalyzed North Dakota and Texas lignites to be slightly more reactive than a Wyoming subbituminous coal, and 8 to 10 times more reactive than an Illinois bituminous coal. Several catalysts that substantially improved low-rank coal steam gasification rates included pure and mineral (trona and nahcolite) alkali carbonates. The reactivity observed when using trona and nahcolite to catalyze the steam gasification was the highest, at nearly 3.5 times that without catalysts. The use of these inexpensive, naturally-occurring alkalis as gasification catalysts may result in elimination of the need for catalyst recovery in the hydrogen-from-coal process, thereby simplifying operation and improving process economics. The study included evaluations of temperature and catalyst loading effects, coal and catalyst screening, and determinations of the apparent activation energies of the steam gasification reaction. 11 refs., 23 figs., 9 tabs.

Galegher, S.J.; Timpe, R.C.; Willson, W.G.; Farnum, S.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

all charging units that were in use by the end of the reporting period all charging units that were in use by the end of the reporting period ² A charging event is defined as the period when a vehicle is connected to a charging unit, during which period some power is transferred ³ Considers the connection status of all charging units every minute Based on 15 minute rolling average power output from all charging units Note: throughout this report, weekdays are defined as the period from Monday 6:00 AM until Saturday 6:00 AM. The weekend is defined as the period from Saturday 6:00 AM until Monday 6:00 AM. Charging Availability: Range of Percent of Charging Units with a Vehicle Connected versus Time of Day³ Charging Unit Usage Residential Level 2 Private Nonresidential Level 2 Publicly Available Level 2 Publicly Available DC Fast

330

ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS - ASH BEHAVIOR IN POWER SYSTEMS. INCLUDES THE SEMIANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 01, 1998 - JUNE 30, 1998.  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this initiative is to develop fundamental knowledge of ash behavior in power systems for the purpose of increasing power production efficiency, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The specific objectives of this initiative focus primarily on ash behavior related to advanced power systems and include the following: Determine the current status of the fundamental ash interactions and deposition formation mechanisms as already reported through previous or ongoing projects at the EERC or in the literature; Determine sintering mechanisms for temperatures and particle compositions that are less well known and remain for the most part undetermined; Identify the relationship between the temperature of critical viscosity (T{sub cv}) as measured in a viscometer and the crystallization occurring in the melt; Perform a literature search on the use of heated-stage microscopy (HSM) for examining in situ ash-sintering phenomena and then validate the use of HSM in the determination of viscosity in spherical ash particles; Ascertain the formation and stability of specific mineral or amorphous phases in deposits typical of advanced power systems; and Evaluate corrosion for alloys being used in supercritical combustion systems.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

SPACE-R Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System: Design and Technology Demonstration Program. Semiannual technical progress report for period ending March 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Semiannual Technical Progress Report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments for the Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System (TI-SNPS) Design and Technology Demonstration Program of the Prime Contractor, Space Power Incorporated (SPI), its subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories during the first half of the Government Fiscal Year (GFY) 1993. SPI`s subcontractors and supporting National Laboratories include: Babcock & Wilcox for the reactor core and externals; Space Systems/Loral for the spacecraft integration; Thermocore for the radiator heat pipes and the heat exchanger; INERTEK of CIS for the TFE, core elements and nuclear tests; Argonne National Laboratories for nuclear safety, physics and control verification; and Oak Ridge National laboratories for materials testing. Parametric trade studies are near completion. However, technical input from INERTEK has yet to be provided to determine some of the baseline design configurations. The INERTEK subcontract is expected to be initiated soon. The Point Design task has been initiated. The thermionic fuel element (TFE) is undergoing several design iterations. The reactor core vessel analysis and design has also been started.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

THE MOVEMENT OF RADIOSTRONTIUM THROUGH NATURAL POROUS MEDIA. Progress Report No. 2 Covering Period July 1, 1955 to June 30, 1956  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of discharging radioactive wastes into underground formations is dependent on the predictability of the movement of certain hazardous radioisotopic components. This progress report examines several theories concerned with the equilibria and kinetics of ion-exchange as they apply to estimating the rate of underground movement of radiostrontium. Laboratory studies were conducted with the objective of testing the applicability of these theories to estimating the displacement and dispersion of radiostrontium fronts in natural media. The porous media studied with both hntch and column systems included several connate-water bearing sands, an agricultural soil, and a standard halloysite clay. The parameters investigated were the exchange capacity, various expressions of equilibria, the influence of calcium, sodium, and hydrogen ions on the rate of strontium movement, the hydraulic rate of liquid application, and the rate coefficients controlling the ion-exchange reactions. The results indicate that a proper application of existing ion-exchange theory will greatly reduce the uncertainties in estimating the rate of radiocontaminant travel through natural media and may ultimately provide criteria for the design of subsurface disposal systems. (auth)

Orcutt, R.G.; Kaufman, W.J.; Klein, G.

1956-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

In-Situ Real Time Measurements of Molten Glass Properties, Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Energy Research Company (ERCo) of Staten Island, NY has developed a sensor capable of measuring in situ and in real time, both the elemental composition and the temperature of molten glass. A prototype sensor has been designed, constructed and tested in ERCo's laboratory. The sensor was used to collect atomic emission spectra from molten fiberglass via Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). From these spectra, we were able to readily identify all elements of interest (B, Si, Ca, Fe, Mg, Na, Sr, Al). The high signal-to-background signals achieved suggest that data from the sensor can be used to determine elemental concentrations, either through calibration curves or using ERCo's calibrationless method. ERCo's technology fits in well with DOE's Glass Industry Technology Roadmap which emphasizes the need for accurate process and feedstock sensors. Listed first under technological barriers to increased production efficiency is the 'Inability to accurately measure and control the production process'. A large-scale glass melting furnace, developed by SenCer Inc. of Penn Yan, NY was installed in ERCo's laboratory to ensure that a large enough quantity of glass could be melted and held at temperature in the presence of the water-cooled laser sensor without solidifying the glass.

Robert De Saro; Joe Craparo

2007-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

334

Variability in natural gas fuel composition and its effects on the performance of catalytic combustion systems. Final report for period September 18, 1998 - September 17, 2000  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is composed primarily of methane with small amounts of higher hydrocarbons and diluents, which vary by region and over time. Compositions of natural gas from domestic and worldwide sources were surveyed with respect to content of higher hydrocarbons and diluents. The survey showed slight compositional variability between most of the gases, with a small fraction of them containing significantly larger contents of higher hydrocarbons than the mean. As gas-fired turbines will be used for power generation all over the world, they will need to tolerate operation with fuels with a wide variety of compositions, particularly with respect to the concentration of higher hydrocarbons and diluents. Subscale catalytic combustion modules typical of those used in gas turbine power generation with ultra low emissions of pollutants were tested in a subscale test system with natural gas alone and with added known levels of hydrocarbon compounds and diluents. The range of compositions tested contained the range observed in the survey. Test results were used to calculate the effect of composition on catalyst performance. The compositional variability is of little consequence to the catalyst for most of the gases in the survey, including nearly all of the gases delivered in the U.S. To accommodate the remaining gases, the catalyst inlet temperature must be lowered to maintain combustor durability. These results support commercial acceptance of catalytic combustion systems for use in natural gas fired turbines in distributed power generation with ultra low NO{sub x} emissions.

Ginter, David; Simchick, Chuck; Schlatter, Jim

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Low cost hydrogen/novel membranes technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas, Phase 1. Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending June 30, 1987  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this quarter, work continued on the development of high-flux palladium-silver membranes for the separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide. Palladium-silver/poly(etherimide) composite membranes were prepared by a vacuum sputtering technique. The influence of different poly(etherimide) support membranes on the performance of palladium-silver membranes was investigated. All membranes tested showed a hydrogen/carbon dioxide selectivity lower than that of the uncoated poly(etherimide)/poly(dimethylsiloxane) membranes. This is probably due to damage of the skin layer of the asymmetric poly(etherimide) support membranes during the palladium-silver electron bombardment. Polysulfone/poly(dimethylsiloxane) / poly(ether-ester-amide) composite membranes were also prepared. Membrane samples consistently showed a carbon dioxide/hydrogen selectivity of 9 to 10 and a normalized carbon dioxide flux of 2 to 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} cm{sup 3} (STP)/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}sec{center_dot}cmHg. These are extremely good values, superior to any commercially available membranes for this separation. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Enhanced oil recovery utilizing high-angle wells in the Frontier Formation, Badger Basin Field, Park County, Wyoming. Final report for the period October 1992--October 1993  

SciTech Connect

Badger Basin Field, discovered in 1931, produces at stripper rates from low-permeability fractured sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation. Only 15% of the estimated 25 million barrels of oil originally in-place will be produced from the twenty-two attempted vertical completions. This project will increase recoverable reserves through a better understanding of the reservoir and factors which control production. Characterization of the reservoir has been accomplished through an integrated engineering, geological and geophysical approach. Production data, drilling and completion techniques, and relative location of wells on the anticline were reviewed and related to productivity. Literature was reviewed for interpretations on preferred flow directions on anticlinal structures. A structure map of the producing Frontier reservoir was constructed. Porosity development and its relationship to fracture networks was examined petrographically. Fractures in core were described and oriented using paleomagnetic techniques. Azimuths of fractures in outcrop were compared to fracture azimuths measured in the core. A 17 square-mile 3D seismic survey was designed, acquired and processed. Interpretation is being performed on a Sun workstation using Landmark Graphics software. Time-structure and amplitude-distribution maps will be constructed on three Frontier horizons. A location for a high-angle well will be chosen. The slant/horizontal test will be drilled and completed to increase recovery of reserves. Transfer of successful technologies will be accomplished by technical publications and presentations, and access to project materials, data, and field facilities.

Walker, J.P.; Fortmann, R.G.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 2003-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fish health work continued in this report period as described in the project statement of work. The statements of work for this time period list the work element (Maintain Fish Health - Monitor Fish Health) and description of deliverables.

Onjukka, Sam T.; O'Connor, Glenda M.; Gibbs, Derek (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Salem, OR)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Final Technical Report of project: "Contactless Real-Time Monitoring of Paper Mechanical Behavior During Papermaking"  

SciTech Connect

The early precursors of laser ultrasonics on paper were Prof. Y. Berthelot from the Georgia Institute of Technology/Mechanical Engineering department, and Prof. P. Brodeur from the Institute of Paper Science and Technology, both located in Atlanta, Georgia. The first Ph.D. thesis that shed quite some light on the topic, but also left some questions unanswered, was completed by Mont A. Johnson in 1996. Mont Johnson was Prof. Berthelot's student at Georgia Tech. In 1997 P. Brodeur proposed a project involving himself, Y. Berthelot, Dr. Ken Telschow and Mr. Vance Deason from INL, Honeywell-Measurex and Dr. Rick Russo from LBNL. The first time the proposal was not accepted and P. Brodeur decided to re-propose it without the involvement from LBNL. Rick Russo proposed a separate project on the same topic on his side. Both proposals were finally accepted and work started in the fall of 1997 on the two projects. Early on, the biggest challenge was to find an optical detection method which could detect laser-induced displacements of the web surface that are of the order of .1 micron in the ultrasonic range. This was to be done while the web was having an out-of-plane amplitude of motion in the mm range due to web flutter; while moving at 10 m/s to 30 m/s in the plane of the web, on the paper machine. Both teams grappled with the same problems and tried similar methods in some cases, but came up with two similar but different solutions one year later. The IPST, GT, INL team found that an interferometer made by Lasson Technologies Inc. using the photo-induced electro-motive force in Gallium Arsenide was able to detect ultrasonic waves up to 12-15 m/s. It also developed in house an interferometer using the Two-Wave Mixing effect in photorefractive crystals that showed good promises for on-line applications, and experimented with a scanning mirror to reduce motion-induced texture noise from the web and improve signal to noise ratio. On its side, LBNL had the idea to combine a commercial Mach-Zehnder interferometer to a spinning mirror synchronized to the web speed, in order to make almost stationary measurements. The method was demonstrated at up to 10 m/s. Both teams developed their own version of a web simulator that was driving a web of paper at 10 m/s or higher. The Department of Energy and members of the Agenda 2020 started to make a push for merging the two projects. This made sense because their topics were really identical but this was not well received by Prof. Brodeur. Finally IPST decided to reassign the direction of the IPST-INL-GT project in the spring of 1999 to Prof. Chuck Habeger so that the two teams could work together. Also at this time, Honeywell-Measurex dropped as a member of the team. It was replaced by ABB Industrial Systems whose engineers had extensive previous experience of working with ultrasonic sensors on paperboard. INL also finished its work on the project as its competencies were partly redundant with LBNL. From the summer of 1999, the IPST-GT and LBNL teams were working together and helped each other often by collaborating and visiting either laboratory when was necessary. Around the beginning of 2000, began an effort at IPST to create an off-line laser-ultrasonics instrument that could perform automated measurements of paper and paperboard's bending stiffness. It was widely known that the mechanical bending tests of paper used for years by the paper industry were very inaccurate and exhibited poor reproducibility; therefore the team needed a new instrument of reference to validate its future on-line results. In 1999-2000, the focus of the on-line instrument was on a pre-industrial demonstration on a pilot coater while reducing the damage to the web caused by the generation laser, below the threshold where it could be visible by the naked eye. During the spring of 2000 Paul Ridgway traveled to IPST and brought with him a redesigned system still using the same Mach-Zehnder interferometer as before, but this time employing an electric motor-driven spinning mirror instead of the previously belt-driven m

Emmanuel Lafond; Paul Ridgway; Ted Jackson; Rick Russo; Ken Telschow; Vance Deason; Yves Berthelot; David Griggs; Xinya Zhang; Gary Baum

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER FINAL RECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1, 1999 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2002 REV. 1  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy [1-1,1-2]. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties [1-3,1-4]. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.''

BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH, RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER FINAL RECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1, 1999 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2002 REV. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy [1-1,1-2]. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties [1-3,1-4]. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.''

BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH, RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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341

Variable-response model of electricity demand by time of day: Results of a Wisconsin pricing experiment: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observationally alike households may differ in demand parameters and thus in economic quantities that are functions of those parameters. We have proposed a methodology for dealing with this variation. Estimation of both translog and CES versions of the model with data from the Wisconsin Electricity Pricing Experiment revealed considerable variation among households in time-of-day electricity consumption demand parameters for both summer and winter seasons and for several different definitions of the peak period. Observed household characteristics explained only a small share of total household differences, but permanent household differences dominated month-to-month variation in either expenditure shares or log consumption ratios in most cases. Permanent differences among households are important relative to total variation, including transitory month-to-month variation. We calculated various economic variables from the demand parameters, including the partial elasticity of substitution, compensated and uncompensated elasticities, and a measure of electricity expenditure under peak load pricing required to maintain the utility level under flat rate pricing relative to the flat rate expenditure. Because these are nonlinear functions of the household demand parameters, the mean parameter value over households with different demand parameters may be substantially different from the value of the function at mean values, under the representative household paradigm. For time-of-day electricity demand, variation among households is significant but small relative to mean parameter values. Therefore, controlling for the effect of household variation makes little difference in these mean calculations, but it does imply substantial variation among households in the welfare implications (and elasticities of response) of the introduction of time-of-day pricing. 25 refs., 12 tabs.

Lillard, L.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Microsoft Word - PARS II Process Document - Close Period 2013...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARS II APM DepSec Monthly Report & Close Period, V-2013-04-29 Page 1 PARS II Process Document APM DEPSEC MONTHLY REPORT & CLOSE PERIOD PURPOSE The purpose of this document is to...

343

Metallurgy Department Progress Report for the Period  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electricity generating companies. The projects within this area are related to design, manufacture, testing Research, Technology and Materials De- velopment, Fuel Elements. Furthermore, a survey is given-descriptors: FUEL ELEMENTS, METALLURGY, NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING, RESEARCH PROGRAMS, RISOE NATIONAL LABORATORY. UDC

344

Investigation of a rotary valving system with variable valve timing for internal combustion engines: Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the program was to provide a functional demonstration of the Hansen Rotary Valving System with Variable Valve timing (HRVS/VVT), capable of throttleless inlet charge control, as an alternative to conventional poppet-valves for use in spark ignited internal combustion engines. The goal of this new technology is to secure benefits in fuel economy, broadened torque band, vibration reduction, and overhaul accessibility. Additionally, use of the variable valve timing capability to vary the effective compression ratio is expected to improve multi-fuel tolerance and efficiency. Efforts directed at the design of HRVS components proved to be far more extensive than had been anticipated, ultimately requiring that proof-trial design/development work be performed. Although both time and funds were exhausted before optical or ion-probe types of in-cylinder investigation could be undertaken, a great deal of laboratory data was acquired during the course of the design/development work. This laboratory data is the basis for the information presented in this Final Report.

Cross, P.C.; Hansen, C.N.

1994-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

345

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; Artificial Imprinting of Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon (Oncorhynchus Nerka) with Synthetic Chemicals: Measurement of Thyroxine Content as an Indicator of the Sensitive Period for Imprinting to Olfactory Cues; 1992 Supplement Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1991, we initiated studies to determine the critical period for thyroxine-induced olfactory imprinting in kokanee salmon. In our preliminary investigation we found that thyroxine [T{sub 4}] levels of Lake Whatcom stock, 1990 year class, kokanee were relatively high in eggs and alevins as compared to post-swimup fry, and peaked at hatch and swimup. Here we report on follow-up studies conducted in 1992 designed to determine if our initial results could be replicated. Additionally, in 1992, we initiated experiments to determine if kokanee could be imprinted to synthetic chemicals--morpholine and phenethyl alcohol--at different life stages. In 1991, whole body thyroxine content [T{sub 4}] was measured in 460 Lake Whatcom stock kokanee and 480 Lake Pend Orielle (Cabinet Gorge) stock kokanee to indicate the critical period for imprinting. Lots of 20 kokanee eggs, alevins and fry from both stocks, reared at the Spokane Tribal hatchery, were collected at weekly intervals from November 1991 to August 1992 and assayed for T{sub 4} content by radioimmunoassay. T{sub 4} levels were monitored in Lake Whatcom stock, 1991 year class fish, from eyed egg (33 days post-fertilization) to fry (248 days post-fertilization) stages. T{sub 4} concentration ({+-} SEM) in eggs was 6.7 {+-} 1.3 rig/g body weight. T{sub 4} peaked on the day of hatch at 13.1 {+-} 2.5 ng/g body weight, then declined to 10.3 {+-} 1.1 ng/g body weight in recently post-hatch alevins. T{sub 4} peaked again at 22.1 {+-} 5.2 ng/g body weight during swimup, then steadily decreased to about 1.0 ng/g body weight in 176-248 day old fry. T{sub 4} levels were monitored in Lake Pend Orielle stock, 1991 year class, fish from the day of fertilization (day 0) to 225 days post-fertilization. T{sub 4} content of eggs was 9.5 {+-} 1.7 ng/g body weight and peaked on the day of hatch (day 53 post-fertilization) at 24.2 {+-} 4.5 ng/g body weight. After declining to 13.0 {+-} 2.9 ng/g body weight on day 81 post-fertilization, T{sub 4} peaked a second time during swimup (88-95 days post-fertilization) at 24.3 {+-} 3.8 ng/g body weight. After swimup, T{sub 4} concentration steadily declined to about 0.6 ng/g body weight in 225 day old post-fertilization fry. Thus, results of our 1992 investigations were consistent with our preliminary 1991 study. In all cases: (1) T{sub 4} concentration was relatively high in eggs and alevins as compared to older fry; and (2) T{sub 4} peaks occurred at hatch and swimup. Blood serum T{sub 4} concentration was measured in 9 month to 21 month-old Lake Whatcom stock, 1990 year class, kokanee from July 1991 to August 1992. T{sub 4} concentrations were low in summer, peaked slightly in October, were low in early winter, then peaked several times between January and May 1992. Thus, the 1990 year class Lake Whatcom kokanee evidenced high T{sub 4} activity from egg to swimup stages in their first year and in the winter and spring of their second year of life. The fish appeared to undergo smolt transformation between 16-18 months old. In 1992, Lake Whatcom (1991 cohort) kokanee were exposed to synthetic chemicals--1,072,000 to morpholine and 1,117,000 to phenethyl alcohol--at different life history stages: (1) eye to hatch; (2) hatch; (3) hatch to swimup; (4) swimup; and (5) post-swimup fry (in February, March, April and May-June). Additionally, Lake Whatcom (1990 cohort) kokanee were exposed to synthetic chemicals--36,000 to morpholine and 51,600 to phenethyl alcohol--at age 16-18 months. Most of these fish were marked and released in Lake Roosevelt in July and August 1992 as part of a field test. A portion of the fish from each group was retained at the Spokane Tribal hatchery until August-October 1993, when behavioral tests will be conducted to determine if the fish imprinted to their exposure odor.

Scholz, Allan T.; White, Ronald J.; Tilson, Mary Beth (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Budget Period 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Budget Period 1 Budget Period 1 Budget Period 2 Budget Period 3 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% PMC123.1 - Budget Justification for SF 424A Budget 0 Additional Explanations/Comments (as necessary) *IMPORTANT: In the space provided below (or as an attachment) provide a complete explanation and the full calculations used to derive the total indirect costs. If the total indirect costs are a cumulative amount of more than one calculation or rate application, the explanation and calculations should identify all rates used, along with the base they were applied to (and how the base was derived), and a total for each (along with grand total). The rates and how they are applied should not be averaged to get one indirect cost percentage. NOTE: The indirect rate should be applied to both the Federal Share and Recipient Cost Share.

347

Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 110: Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, For the Period July 2007-June 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report (PCIMR) provides the results of inspections and monitoring for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 110, Area 3 WMD [Waste Management Division] U-3ax/bl Crater. This PCIMR includes an analysis and summary of the site inspections, repairs and maintenance, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 110 for the period July 2007 through June 2008. Site inspections of the cover were performed quarterly to identify any significant changes to the site requiring action. The overall condition of the cover, perimeter fence, and use restriction (UR) warning signs was good. However, settling was observed that exceeded the action level as specified in Section VII.B.7 of the Hazardous Waste Permit Number NEV HW021 (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 2005). This permit states that cracks or settling greater than 15 centimeters (6 inches) deep that extend 1.0 meter (m) (3 feet [ft]) or more on the cover will be evaluated and repaired within 60 days of detection. Two areas of settling and cracks were observed on the south and east edges of the cover during the September 2007 inspection that exceeded the action level and required repair. The areas were repaired in October 2007. Additional settling and cracks were observed along the east side of the cover during the December 2007 inspection that exceeded the action level, and the area was repaired in January 2008. Significant animal burrows were also observed during the March 2008 inspection, and small mammal trapping and relocation was performed in April 2008. The semiannual subsidence surveys were performed in September 2007 and March 2008. No significant subsidence was observed in the survey data. Monument 5 shows the greatest amount of subsidence (-0.02 m [-0.08 ft] compared to the baseline survey of 2000). This amount is negligible and near the resolution of the survey instruments; it does not indicate that subsidence is occurring overall on the cover. Soil moisture results obtained to date indicate that the CAU 110 cover is performing well. Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) data show regular changes in the shallow subsurface with significant rain events; however, major changes in volumetric moisture content (VMC) appear to be limited to 1.8 m (6 ft) below ground surface or shallower, depending on the location on the cover. At 2.4 m (8 ft) below the cover surface, TDR data show soil moisture content remained between 9 and 15 percent VMC, depending on the TDR location. The west portion of the cover tends to reflect a lower moisture content and less variability in annual fluctuations in moisture content at this depth. Results of soil moisture monitoring of the cover indicate that VMC at the compliance level (at 2.4 m [8 ft] below the cover surface) is approaching a steady state. If the moisture content at this level remains consistent with recent years, then a recommendation may be made for establishing compliance levels for future monitoring.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Investigations into the Early Life History of Naturally Produced Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the Grande Ronde River Subbasin, Annual Report 2008 : Project Period 1 February 2008 to 31 January 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to document and describe the status and life history strategies of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Grande Ronde River Subbasin. We determined migration timing, abundance, and life-stage survival rates for juvenile spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and summer steelhead O. mykiss in four streams during migratory year 2008 from 1 July 2007 through 30 June 2008. As observed in previous years of this study, spring Chinook salmon and steelhead exhibited fall and spring movements out of natal rearing areas, but did not begin their smolt migration through the Snake and lower Columbia River hydrosystem until spring. In this report we provide estimates of migrant abundance and migration timing for each study stream, and their survival and timing to Lower Granite Dam. We also document aquatic habitat conditions using water temperature and stream flow in four study streams in the subbasin.

Yanke, Jeffrey A.; Alfonse, Brian M.; Bratcher, Kyle W. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Report for CAU 91: Area 3 U-3fi Waste Unit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 1999-October 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Unit, located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 1999 to October 2000 period. Inspections of the U-3fi Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the concrete pad, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. The objective of the neutron-logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 128-meter (m) (420-feet [ft]) ER3-3 monitoring well and detect changes that maybe indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval extending between 73 to 82 m (240 to 270 ft) or to detect changes that maybe indicative of subsidence within the disposal unit itself. Physical inspections of the closure were completed in March and September 2000 and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. The directional survey which is required to be completed every five years was run in the ER3-3 casing to determine if subsidence was occurring in the U-3fi emplacement borehole. Small changes were noted which are attributed to initial settling of the sand pack stemming. No evidence of subsidence within the emplacement borehole was observed. The subsidence survey for the October 1999 to October 2000 monitoring period indicated an increase in elevation of 0.244 centimeters (cm) (0.008 ft) compared to the previous year, July 1999. All changes in subsidence survey data taken to date are so small as to be at the survey instrument resolution level and it is not clear if they represent subsidence or measurement error. There is no clear evidence for any subsidence of the monument. Soil moisture monitoring results indicate dry stable conditions for all quarterly monitoring periods. The Residual Raw Neutron Counts remain below the compliance Action Level of 200 counts within the regulated interval of 73 to 82 m (240 to 270 ft) for the period from October 1999 through October 2000.

D. F. Emer

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; Measurement of Thyroxin Concentration as an Indicator of the Critical Period for Imprinting in the Kokanee Salmon (Orcorhynchus Nerka) Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Hatcheries; 1991 Supplement Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous investigations have determined that thyroid hormone surges activate olfactory imprinting in anadromous salmonid smolts. The mechanism of action appears to require binding of thyroid hormones to receptors in brain cell nuclei, which stimulates neuron differentiation and wires a pattern of neuron circuitry that allows for the permanent storage of the imprinted olfactory memory. In this study, thyroxine concentrations [T{sub 4}] were measured in 487 Lake Whatcom stock and 70 Lake Roosevelt stock Kokanee salmon to indicate the critical period for imprinting. Eggs, alevins and fry, reared at the Spokane Indian Kokanee Hatchery, were collected from January through August 1991. Sampled fish were flash frozen on dry ice and stored at {minus}80{degrees}C until T{sub 4} was extracted and concentrations determined by radioimmunassay. Mean concentration {+-} SEM of 10--20 individual fish (assayed in duplicate) were determined for each time period. T{sub 4} concentration peaked on the day of hatch at 16.8 ng/g body weight and again at swim-up at 16.0 {+-} 4.7 ng/g body weight. T{sub 4} concentration was 12.5 to 12.9 ng/g body weight in eggs, 7.1 to 15.2 ng/g body weight in. alevins, 4.5 to 11.4 ng/g body weight in 42 to 105 day old fry and 0.1 to 2.9 ng/g body weight in 112 to 185 day old fry. T{sub 4} concentrations were highest in eggs at 13.3 {+-} 2.8 ng/g body weight, then steadily decreased to 0.1 {+-} 0.1 ng/g body weight in older fry. Fry were released in Lake Roosevelt tributaries in July and August 1991, at about 170--180 days post hatching, in order to imprint them to those sites. The results of this study indicate that the time of release was not appropriate for imprinting. If T{sub 4} levels are an accurate guide for imprinting in kokanee, our results suggest that the critical period for imprinting in kokanee is at hatching or swim-up stages.

Scholz, Allan T.; White, Ronald J.; Koehler, Valerie A. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Periodic load balancing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiprocessor load balancing aims to improve performance by moving jobs from highly loaded processors to more lightly loaded processors. Some schemes allow only migration of new jobs upon arrival, while other schemes allow migration of ... Keywords: heavy traffic diffusion approximations, load balancing, periodic load balancing, reflected Brownian motion, resource sharing, transient behavior

Gísli Hjálmtýsson; Ward Whitt

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Periodic windows distribution resulting from homoclinic bifurcations in the two-parameter space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Periodic solution parameters, in chaotic dynamical systems, form periodic windows with characteristic distribution in two-parameter spaces. Recently, general properties of this organization have been reported, but a theoretical explanation for that remains unknown. Here, for the first time we associate the distribution of these periodic windows with scaling laws based in fundamental dynamic properties. For the R\\"ossler system, we present a new scenery of periodic windows composed by multiple spirals, continuously connected, converging to different points along of a homoclinic bifurcation set. We show that the bi-dimensional distribution of these periodic windows unexpectedly follows scales given by the one-parameter homoclinic theory. Our result is a strong evidence that, close to homoclinic bifurcations, periodic windows are aligned in the two-parameter space.

Rene Orlando Medrano-T.; Iberê Luis Caldas

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

353

Effective Rate Period  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fiscal Year 2014 Fiscal Year 2014 Effective Rate Period As of Beginning of the FY 10/01/2013 - 09/30/2014 Mid-Year Changes (if applicable) 10/01/2013 - 09/30/2014 Power Rates Annual Revenue Requirement Rate Schedule Power Revenue Requirement $73,441,557 CV-F13 Base Resource Revenue Requirement $69,585,875 First Preference Revenue Requirement $3,855,682

354

Report Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notes Notes 1 "Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi)" is based on AC electricity consumed during charging events which began during the reporting period and distance driven during all trips in the reporting period. 2 "Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)" is based on net DC electricity discharged from or charged to the plug-in battery pack and distance driven during all trips in the reporting period. DC Wh/mi may not be comparable to AC Wh/mi if AC electricity charged prior to the reporting period was discharged during driving within the reporting period, or if AC electricity charged during the reporting period was not discharged during driving within the reporting period. 3 Trips when the plug-in battery pack charge was depleted to propel the vehicle throughout

355

On occult period maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the "occult" period maps into ball quotients which exist for the moduli spaces of cubic surfaces, cubic threefolds, non-hyperelliptic curves of genus three and four. These were constructed in the work of Allcock/Carlson/Toledo, Looijenga/Swierstra, and Kondo. We interpret these maps as morphisms into moduli spaces of polarized abelian varieties of Picard type, and show that these morphisms, whose initial construction is transcendental, are defined over the natural field of definition of the spaces involved. This paper is extracted from section 15 of our paper arXiv:0912.3758, and differs from it only in some points of exposition.

Kudla, Stephen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network Requirements Reviews Reports Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Reports ESnet publishes reports from science network Program Requirements Reviews on a regular basis. View the most recent of these below. Sort by: Date | Author | Type 2012 Eli Dart, Brian Tierney, Editors, "Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements Workshop, November 2012 - Final Report"", November 29, 2012, LBNL LBNL-6395E

357

Progress Report Schedule  

COMPANY PROPRIETARY INFORMATION 1 PROGRESS REPORT (Before First Commercial Sale) Progress Report Schedule Due date For period

358

NONPARAMETRIC BAYESIAN ESTIMATION OF PERIODIC LIGHT CURVES  

SciTech Connect

Many astronomical phenomena exhibit patterns that have periodic behavior. An important step when analyzing data from such processes is the problem of identifying the period: estimating the period of a periodic function based on noisy observations made at irregularly spaced time points. This problem is still a difficult challenge despite extensive study in different disciplines. This paper makes several contributions toward solving this problem. First, we present a nonparametric Bayesian model for period finding, based on Gaussian Processes (GPs), that does not make assumptions on the shape of the periodic function. As our experiments demonstrate, the new model leads to significantly better results in period estimation especially when the light curve does not exhibit sinusoidal shape. Second, we develop a new algorithm for parameter optimization for GP which is useful when the likelihood function is very sensitive to the parameters with numerous local minima, as in the case of period estimation. The algorithm combines gradient optimization with grid search and incorporates several mechanisms to overcome the high computational complexity of GP. Third, we develop a novel approach for using domain knowledge, in the form of a probabilistic generative model, and incorporate it into the period estimation algorithm. Experimental results validate our approach showing significant improvement over existing methods.

Wang Yuyang; Khardon, Roni [Department of Computer Science, Tufts University, Medford, MA (United States); Protopapas, Pavlos [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

NATIONAL EVALUATION OF THE WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM DURING THE ARRA PERIOD: PROGRAM YEARS 2009-2011  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the third major evaluation of the Program, encompassing program years 2009 to 2011. In this report, this period of time is referred to as the ARRA Period. This is a special period of time for the Program because the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 has allocated $5 billion of funding for the Program. In normal program years, WAP s annual appropriation is in the range of $200-250 million, supporting the weatherization of approximately 100,000 homes. With the addition of ARRA funding during these program years, the expectation is that weatherization activity will exceed 300,000 homes per year. In addition to saving energy and reducing low-income energy bills, expanded WAP funding is expected to stimulate the economy by providing new jobs in the weatherization field and allowing low-income households to spend more money on goods and services by spending less on energy.

Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL; Rose, Erin M [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL; Ternes, Mark P [ORNL; Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL; Hendrick, Timothy P [ORNL

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Neither Pinnacle Technologies, Inc. nor any person acting on behalf of Pinnacle: * Makes any warranty or representation, express or implied, with respect to the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of the information contained in this report, or that the use of any apparatus, method or process disclosed in this report may not infringe privately owned rights; or * Assumes any liability with respect to the use of, or for damages resulting from the use of, any information, apparatus, method or process disclosed in this report Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions DE-FC26-02NT41663 Final Report for National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, WV Project No.: USDE-0511 Report Date: December 2005 By:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A test for second order stationarity of a time series based on the Discrete Fourier Transform -Technical report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A test for second order stationarity of a time series based on the Discrete Fourier Transform stationary. Exploiting this important property, we construct a Portmanteau type test statistic for testing stationarity of the time series. It is shown that under the null of stationarity, the test statistic has

Subba Rao, Suhasini

362

Gauge Interaction as Periodicity Modulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper is devoted to a geometrical interpretation of gauge invariance in terms of the formalism of field theory in compact space-time dimensions [arXiv:0903.3680]. In this formalism, the kinematic information of an interacting elementary particle is encoded on the relativistic geometrodynamics of the boundary of the theory through local transformations of the underlying space-time coordinates. Therefore, gauge interaction is described as invariance of the theory under local deformations of the boundary, the resulting local variations of field solution are interpreted as internal transformations, and the internal symmetries of the gauge theory turn out to be related to corresponding local space-time symmetries. In the case of local infinitesimal isometric transformations, Maxwell's kinematics and gauge invariance are inferred directly from the variational principle. Furthermore we explicitly impose periodic conditions at the boundary of the theory as semi-classical quantization condition in order to investigate the quantum behavior of gauge interaction. In the abelian case the result is a remarkable formal correspondence with scalar QED.

Donatello Dolce

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

363

Solar Wind Oscillations With a 1.3 Year Period  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The IMP-8 and Voyager 2 spacecraft have ecently detected a very strong modulation in the solar wind d w speed with an approximately 1.3 year period. Combine ith evidence from long-term auroral and magnetometer o studies, this suggests that fundamental changes in the Sun ccur on a roughly 1.3 year time scale. Introduction The Sun emits a continuous stream of ionized particles s d called the solar wind. This wind is not constant, but varie ue to changes on the Sun. Strong periodicities in the solar ) [ wind linked with the solar rotation period (roughly 25 days Neugebauer and Snyder, 1966] and the solar cycle , 1 [Neugebauer, 1975; Bridge, 1977; Lazarus and McNutt 990] have been observed. Periodicities ranging from 51 to r s 256 days have been reported both in solar wind and in othe olar observations (see Villanueva [1994] and references a therein). Solar cycle variations of sunspot numbers and uroral activity are well established [see review by Silverman, 1992]. The IMP...

John Richardson Karolen; John D. Richardson; Karolen I. Paularena; John W. Belcher; Alan J. Lazarus

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Researchers For Researchers What You Need to Know and Do The Tech Transfer Process Business Development Services Berkeley Lab LaunchPad Funding - Innovation Grants Forms and Policies Conflict of Interest Outside Employment Export Control Record of Invention Software Disclosure and Abstract See Also FAQs for Researchers Entrepreneurial Resources Webcast: Transferring Technology to the Marketplace Pre-Publication Review Report Invention/Software The next step is for Lab researchers to report the invention or software to the Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Management Department. The invention report is not a patent application and in and of itself secures no intellectual property rights. It is used by the Lab to make a decision as to whether to proceed with a patent application.

365

Solar water heating technical support. Technical report for November 1997--April 1998 and final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report covers the time period November 1, 1997 through April 30, 1998, and also summarizes the project as the final report. The topics of the report include certification of solar collectors for water heating systems, modeling and testing of solar collectors and gas water heater backup systems, ratings of collectors for specific climates, and solar pool heating systems.

Huggins, J.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Final Report: Improved Site Characterization And Storage Prediction Through Stochastic Inversion Of Time-Lapse Geophysical And Geochemical Data  

SciTech Connect

During the last months of this project, our project activities have concentrated on four areas: (1) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir bulk/shear moduli and density; the need for this inversion was not anticipated in the original scope of work, (2) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir porosity and permeability, (3) complete the software needed to perform geochemical inversions and (4) use the software to perform stochastic inversion of aqueous chemistry data to deduce mineral volume fractions. This report builds on work described in progress reports previously submitted (Ramirez et al., 2009, 2010, 2011 - reports fulfilled the requirements of deliverables D1-D4) and fulfills deliverable D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product. The main challenge with our stochastic inversion approach is its large computational expense, even for single reservoir patterns. We dedicated a significant level of effort to improve computational efficiency but inversions involving multiple patterns were still intractable by project's end. As a result, we were unable to fulfill Deliverable D6: Field-based multi-pattern simulations work product.

Ramirez, A; Mcnab, W; Hao, Y; White, D; Johnson, J

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

367

Periodicity estimation of Dynamic Textures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic Textures (DTs) are image sequences of natural events like fire, smoke, water etc., that possesses regular motion patterns. Periodicity is a widely used tool to analyse regular structures of periodic one dimensional signals as well as two dimensional ... Keywords: co-occurrence matrix, dynamic textures, image sequences, image texture analysis, motion patterns, natural events, periodicity estimation, temporal textures

Khalid Zaman Bijon; Ahmed Hasan; Ashfaqur Rahman; Manzur Murshed

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

THE ORBITAL PERIOD OF SCORPIUS X-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The orbital period of Sco X-1 was first identified by Gottlieb et al. While this has been confirmed on multiple occasions, this work, based on nearly a century of photographic data, has remained the reference in defining the system ephemeris ever since. It was, however, called into question when Vanderlinde et al. claimed to find the one-year alias of the historical period in RXTE/All-Sky Monitor data and suggested that this was the true period rather than that of Gottlieb et al. We examine data from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) spanning 2001-2009. We confirm that the period of Gottlieb et al. is in fact the correct one, at least in the optical, with the one-year alias strongly rejected by these data. We also provide a modern time of minimum light based on the ASAS data.

Hynes, Robert I.; Britt, Christopher T., E-mail: rih@phys.lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

369

Transit Timing Variation Analysis of Ogle-Tr-132b with Seven New Transits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the results of the first transit timing variation analysis of the very hot Jupiter OGLE-TR-132b, using 10 transits collected over a seven-year period. Our analysis combines three previously published transit light ...

Adams, Elisabeth Rose

370

REPORT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPORT REPORT of the INFRASTRUCTURE TASK FORCE of the DOE NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE January 16, 2003 2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY On October 1, 2002 the DOE Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee was asked to provide specific, focused updates to its Nuclear Science and Technology Infrastructure Roadmap and review the specific issues at the DOE key nuclear energy research and development (R&D) laboratories. This activity was assigned to a five-member Infrastructure Task Force (ITF). After receiving extensive written materials from DOE, the Idaho Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W), on November 6-8, 2002 the ITF visited the Idaho site and received briefings and tours of the INEEL and ANL-W facilities. INEEL and

371

Research Directed at Developing a Classical Theory to Describe Isotope Separation of Polyatomic Molecules Illuminated by Intense Infrared Radiation. Final Report for period May 7, 1979 to September 30, 1979; Extension December 31, 1997  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This final report describes research on the theory of isotope separation produced by the illumination of polyatomic molecules by intense infrared laser radiation. This process is investigated by treating the molecule, sulfur hexafluoride, as a system of seven classical particles that obey the Newtonian equations of motion. A minicomputer is used to integrate these differential equations. The particles are acted on by interatomic forces, and by the time-dependent electric field of the laser. We have a very satisfactory expression for the interaction of the laser and the molecule which is compatible with infrared absorption and spectroscopic data. The interatomic potential is capable of improvement, and progress on this problem is still being made. We have made several computer runs of the dynamical behavior of the molecule using a reasonably good model for the interatomic force law. For the laser parameters chosen, we find that typically the molecule passes quickly through the resonance region into the quasi-continuum and even well into the real continuum before dissociation actually occurs. When viewed on a display terminal, the motions are exceedingly complex. As an aid to the visualization of the process, we have made a number of 16 mm movies depicting a three-dimensional representation of the motion of the seven particles. These show even more clearly the enormous complexity of the motions, and make clear the desirability of finding ways of characterizing the motion in simple ways without giving all of the numerical detail. One of the ways to do this is to introduce statistical parameters such as a temperature associated with the distribution of kinetic energies of the single particle. We have made such an analysis of our data runs, and have found favorable indications that such methods will prove useful in keeping track of the dynamical histories.

Lamb, W. E. Jr.

1981-12-00T23:59:59.000Z

372

Upstream Migration of Pacific Lampreys in the John Day River : Behavior, Timing, and Habitat Use : Annual Report 2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historic accounts and recent observations of Pacific lampreys (Lampetra tridentata) at mainstem Columbia River dams indicate the number of Pacific lampreys migrating upriver has decreased dramatically over the last 60 years. Consequently, state, federal, and tribal governments have recently expressed concern for this species. Little is known about the biological and ecological characteristics of habitats suitable for upstream migrating Pacific lampreys. If rehabilitation efforts are to be done effectively and efficiently, we must gain knowledge of factors limiting survival and reproduction of Pacific lampreys. From data gathered in the first year of this project, we can for the first time, describe the timing, extent, and patterns of movements for Pacific lampreys. We have tested methods and gained information that will allow us to refine our objectives and approach in future work. Knowledge of behavior, timing, and the resulting quantification of habitat use will provide a means to assess the suitability of overwintering and spawning habitats and allow the establishment of goals for recovery projects. Further research is necessary, including multiple years of data collection, tracking of movement patterns through the spawning season, and more rigorously examining habitat use.

Bayer, Jennifer M.; Seelye, James G.; Robinson, T. Craig

2001-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

373

Super Gabor frames on discrete periodic sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to its potential applications in multiplexing techniques such as time division multiple access and frequency division multiple access, superframe has interested some mathematicians and engineering specialists. In this paper, we investigate super ... Keywords: 42C40, Discrete Zak transform, Discrete periodic sets, Gabor dual, Super Gabor frame, Superframe

Yun-Zhang Li; Qiao-Fang Lian

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Multi-site magnetotelluric measurement system with real-time data analysis. Final technical report No. 210  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A magnetotelluric measurement system has been designed to provide a more cost effective electrical method for geothermal and mineral exploration. The theoretical requirements and sensitivities of the magnetotelluric inversion process were specifically addressed in determining system performance requirements. Significantly reduced instrument noise levels provide improved data quality, and simultaneous measurement at up to six locations provides reduced cost per site. Remotely located, battery powered, instrumentation packages return data to a central controlling site through a 2560 baud wire-line or radio link. Each remote package contains preamplifiers, data conditioning filters, and a 12-bit gain ranging A-D converter for frequencies from 0.001 Hz to 8 Hz. Data frequencies above 8 Hz are processed sequentially by a heterodyne receiver to reduce bandwidth to within the limits of the 2560 baud data link. The central data collection site provides overall control for the entire system. The system operator interacts with the system through a CRT terminal, and he receives hard copy from a matrix graphics printer. Data from the remote packages may be recorded in time sequence on a magnetic tape cartridge system, or an optional Hewlett-Packard 21MX minicomputer can be used to perform real-time frequency analysis. The results of this analysis provide feedback to the operator for improved evaluation of system performance and for selection of future measurement sites.

Becker, J.D.; Bostick, F.X. Jr.; Smith, H.W.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The periodicity of the eta Carinae events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extensive spectral observations of eta Carinae over the last cycle, and particularly around the 2003.5 low excitation event, have been obtained. The variability of both narrow and broad lines, when combined with data taken from two earlier cycles, reveal a common and well defined period. We have combined the cycle lengths derived from the many lines in the optical spectrum with those from broad-band X-rays, optical and near-infrared observations, and obtained a period length of 2022.7+-1.3 d. Spectroscopic data collected during the last 60 years yield an average period of 2020+-4 d, consistent with the present day period. The period cannot have changed by more than $\\Delta$P/P=0.0007 since 1948. This confirms the previous claims of a true, stable periodicity, and gives strong support to the binary scenario. We have used the disappearance of the narrow component of HeI 6678 to define the epoch of the Cycle 11 minimum, T_0=JD 2,452,819.8. The next event is predicted to occur on 2009 January 11 (+-2 days). The dates for the start of the minimum in other spectral features and broad-bands is very close to this date, and have well determined time delays from the HeI epoch.

A. Damineli; M. F. Corcoran; D. J. Hillier; O. Stahl; R. S. Levenhagen; N. V. Leister; J. H. Groh; M. Teodoro; J. F. Albacete Colombo; F. Gonzalez; J. Arias; H. Levato; M. Grosso; N. Morrell; R. Gamen; G. Wallerstein; V. Niemela

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

376

Natural Gas Storage Report, Weekly EIA-AGA Comparison  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report is intended to aid data users by examining differences between the EIA and AGA weekly surveys and comparing the results of the two surveys for the brief period of time in which they overlapped.

Information Center

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Reports  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Reports Reports . . . . , Book -1. Service Open File Information for Project Rulison, Production Testing Phase, . , August 28,1970 : . "; DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. DESCRIPTION O F PU1:T41C I-l!lkI,T;-1 SE1:VICh: 0P:SN F I L E INPOPt4ATION i[ ' 7 S&u-~%uestcrn E a d i o l o g i c a l H e a l t h 1,aboratol-p r? U. S. Depaieraent o f I l e a l t h ,. E d u c a t i o n aud Welfa,re i i I t - - . L-J~ub-l-ic H e a l t h ' ~ c r v i c e : Y T h i s s u r v e i l l a ~ l c e p e r f o r m e d u n d e r r e , a Memorandum o f ~ n d e k s t a n d i n ~ (No. SF 5 1 & L A U. S . . A t o m i c E n e r g y Commission i hk, ! i ilYo.,jh,asic g r o u p s o f i n f o r m a t i o n a r e p l a c e d i n t h e P u b l i c H e a l t h i k e l ~ e r v i k e , \ ~ o u t h w e s t c r n R a t i i o l o g i c a l H

378

Shock Dynamics in Layered Periodic Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solutions of constant-coefficient nonlinear hyperbolic PDEs generically develop shocks, even if the initial data is smooth. Solutions of hyperbolic PDEs with variable coefficients can behave very differently. We investigate formation and stability of shock waves in a one-dimensional periodic layered medium by computational study of time-reversibility and entropy evolution. We find that periodic layered media tend to inhibit shock formation. For small initial conditions and large impedance variation, no shock formation is detected even after times much greater than the time of shock formation in a homogeneous medium. Furthermore, weak shocks are observed to be dynamically unstable in the sense that they do not lead to significant long-term entropy decay. We propose a characteristic condition for admissibility of shocks in heterogeneous media that generalizes the classical Lax entropy condition and accurately predicts the formation or absence of shocks in these media.

David I Ketcheson; Randall J. LeVeque

2011-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

379

Coupling light to periodic nanostructures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes coupling of light to periodic structures. A material is patterned with a regular pattern on a length scale comparable to the wavelength… (more)

Driessen, Eduard Frans Clemens

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Middle-term electrical load forecasting by time series decomposition. Report for EUNITE 2001 Competition, 2001. Available at http://neuron.tuke.sk/competition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We present the results of our work in the frame of World-Wide Competition organized within the EUNITE network. For the middle-term electric load forecasting task with prediction horizon 1-31 days ahead we decided to develop a simple model based on decomposition of analyzed time series. The additive components were estimated using the training data collected by the Eastern Slovakian Electricity Corporation during the period 1997-1998. The model was validated by using of the real data from the first 20 days in December 1998. For final application the model was retrained and the requested forecasts were performed. The temperatures in January 1999, which form the inputs to the model, were estimated by moving average methods applied on historical data sets. 1

Emil Pelikán

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Periodic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

04 04 by C.G. Wohl (LBNL). Adapted from the Commission of Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances, "Atomic Weights of the Elements 1995," Pure and Applied Chemistry 68, 2339 (1996), and G. Audi and A.H. Wapstra, "The 1993 Mass Evaluation," Nucl. Phys. A565, 1 (1993). The atomic number (top left) is the number of protons in the nucleus. The atomic mass (bottom) is weighted by isotopic abundances in the Earth's surface. For a new determination of atomic masses, not weighted by abundances, see G. Audi, A.H. Wapstra, and C. Thibault, Nucl. Phys. A729, 337 (2003). Atomic masses are relative to the mass of the carbon-12 isotope, defined to be exactly 12 unified atomic mass units (u). Errors range from 1 to 9 in the last digit quoted. Relative isotopic abundances often vary considerably, both in natural and commercial samples. A number in parentheses is the mass of the longest-lived

382

Solar/hydrogen systems for the 1985 to 2000 time frame. Volume I. Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The findings of a study of opportunities for commercialization of systems capable of producing hydrogen from solar energy are presented in two volumes. A compendium of monographs by specialists in the fields of solar energy conversion technologies, hydrogen production technologies and related technology descriptions from the general literature comprise Volume II. This data base was used to support an evaluation and selection process that identified four candidate solar/hydrogen systems best suited to commercialization within the next two decades. Volume I first reviews the background of the work and the methods used. Then an evaluation of the hydrogen product costs that might be achieved by the four selected candidate systems (photovoltaic/water electrolysis, thermal-heat engine/water electrolysis, wind energy/water electrolysis, small hydrogen/water electrolysis) is compared with the pricing structure and practices of the commodity gas market. Subsequently, product cost and market price match is noted to exist in the small user sector of the hydrogen marketplace. Barriers to and historical time lags in, commercialization of new technologies are then reviewed. Finally, recommendations for development and demonstration programs designed to accelerate the commercialization of the candidate systems are presented.

Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Escher, W. J.D.; Hanson, J. A.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Embedding a chaotic signature in a periodic train: can periodic signals be chaotic?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how a chaotic system can be locked to emit a periodic waveform belonging to its chaotic attractor. We numerically demonstrate our idea in a system composed of a semiconductor laser driven to chaos by optical feedback from a short external cavity. The clue is the injection of an appropriate periodic signal that modulates the phase and amplitude of the intra-cavity radiation, a chaotic analogy of conventional mode-locking. The result is a time process that manifests a chaotic signature embedded in a long-scale periodic train.

Antonio Mecozzi; Cristian Antonelli

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

384

An experimental evaluation of the instrumented flux synthesis method for the real-time estimation of reactivity. Final report  

SciTech Connect

One method of determining the flux density is flux synthesis which approximates the flux in the core by linear combinations of precomputed shape functions. In traditional flux synthesis, the unknown mixing coefficients are determined using a weighted residual method of solving the diffusion equation. In the instrumented synthesis method, the mixing coefficients are determined using count rates from neutron detectors in the core. In this way the mixing coefficients are linked to conditions in the reactor. Using the synthesized flux, kinetics parameters, notably reactivity, can be calculated in real time. An experimental evaluation has been performed in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor, MITR-II. Detector measurements have been collected using fission chambers placed at the periphery of the core. The reactor was put into a number of various conditions, both static and transient, and data were collected using a digital acquisition system for later combination with shape functions. Transients included increasing power, decreasing power, and a reactor scram. The shape functions were generated using Version 3.0 of the QUARTZ code, a quadratic nodal diffusion theory code in triangular-Z geometry. Supernodal analysis algorithms have been added to the original program, along with subroutines to guarantee diagonal dominance of the leakage matrix in the finite difference or quadratic current approximations in the coarse mesh. The agreement between coarse mesh and fine mesh in all cases is excellent, with finite difference coarse mesh solutions generally slightly better. The synthesis method has been shown to accurately reflect the changes from an initial condition by combining representative flux shapes. It can be concluded that, with proper calibration of the measurement system and inclusion of representative flux shapes, the instrumented synthesis method will properly predict the flux in the core under a number of conditions.

Hughes, J.C.; Henry, A.F.; Lanning, D.D.; Bernard, J.A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Discontinuous bifurcations of periodic solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses different aspects of bifurcations of periodic solutions in discontinuous systems. It is explained how jumps in the fundamental solution matrix lead to jumps of the Floquet multipliers of periodic solutions. A Floquet multiplier of ... Keywords: Bifurcation, Discontinuous, Dry friction, Stick-slip

R. I. Leine; D. H. Van Campen

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Effects of consumers' attitudes and knowledge on the acceptance and utilization of time-of-use rates: Edmond, Oklahoma. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Edmond, Oklahoma, Time-of-use (TOU) Rate Demonstration Project was concerned with the effects of various TOU rate schedules on consumers' electrical usage. Both total usage and temporal patterns of electric consumption were studied in this demonstration. This report summarizes the results of a series of secondary analyses of data based on exit and followup surveys. These analyses were focused principally on the effects of consumers' knowledge of, and attitudes toward, the TOU rate structure to which they were assigned, and the impact of these reactions on their electric usage, relative to that of a comparable group of consumers.

Crano, W.D.; Messe, L.A.; Buldain, R.W.; Johnson, C.D.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

REAL-TIME IN SITU DETECTION OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS BY LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE SYSTEM. Final tropical report (Task 1.3).  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of the field demonstration of a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) method for characterization of brownfields and other contaminated sites. The technology was provided and demonstrated by Dakota Technologies, Inc. (DTI), of Fargo, North Dakota. LIF generates continuous data on the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) within the soil profile. The sensor used to record real-time data is deployed into the soil using a modified truck-mounted Geoprobe percussion soil probing device. The summary of observations described in the following text represents an independent evaluation of the performance, usefulness, and economics of the demonstrated technology for characterization at PAH-contaminated sites.

Daniel J. Stepan; James A. Sorensen; Jaroslav Solc

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

,"Energy","Water","Renewable","Petroleum","Alt. Fuel",,"On-Line Data Collection System",,"Report Period","Due In",,,"Primary","Secondary","Secondary"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy","Water","Renewable","Petroleum","Alt. Fuel",,"On-Line Data Collection System",,"Report Period","Due In",,,"Primary","Secondary","Secondary" Energy","Water","Renewable","Petroleum","Alt. Fuel",,"On-Line Data Collection System",,"Report Period","Due In",,,"Primary","Secondary","Secondary" 2003,,,,,,,"EMS4","Environmental Management System","Fiscal Year (Oct 1 - Sept 30)","November 15",,"Fiscal Year",2009 2004,,,,,,,"FAST","Federal Automotive Statistical Tool","Fiscal Year (Oct 1 - Sept 30)","October 31",,"Department","Department of Energy" 2005,-2.775557562e-17,,,0,0,,"FIMS","Facilities Information Management System","Fiscal Year (Oct 1 - Sept 30)","November 15",,"Program","Office of Legacy Management"

389

Stable a-Si:H-Based Multijunction Solar Cells with Guidance from Real-Time Optics: Final Report, 17 July 1998--16 November 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the new insights obtained into the growth of hydrogenated silicon (Si:H) films via real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry (RTSE) measurements. Evolutionary phase diagrams were expanded to include the effects of different deposition conditions, including rf power, pressure, and temperature. Detailed studies of degradation kinetics in thin films and corresponding solar cells have been carried out. Both p-i-n and n-i-p solar cells that incorporate Si:H i-layers deposited with and without H2-dilution have been studied. For the first time, direct and reliable correlations have been obtained between the light-induced changes in thin-film materials and the degradation of the corresponding solar cells.

Wronski, C. R.; Collins, R. W.; Pearce, J. M.; Koval, R. J.; Ferlauto, A. S.; Ferreira, G. M.; Chen C.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Application of reservoir characterization and advanced technology to improve recovery and economics in a lower quality shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. End of budget period report, August 3, 1994--December 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oxy West Welch project is designed to demonstrate how the use of advanced technology can improve the economics of miscible CO{sub 2} injection projects in a lower quality shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. The research and design phase primarily involves advanced reservoir characterization and accelerating the production response. The demonstration phase will implement the reservoir management plan based on an optimum miscible CO{sub 2} flood as designed in the initial phase. During Budget Period 1, work was completed on the CO{sub 2} stimulation treatments and the hydraulic fracture design. Analysis of the CO{sub 2} stimulation treatment provided a methodology for predicting results. The hydraulic fracture treatment proved up both the fracture design approach a and the use of passive seismic for mapping the fracture wing orientation. Although the 3-D seismic interpretation is still being integrated into the geologic model and interpretation of borehole seismic is still underway, the simulator has been enhanced to the point of giving good waterflood history matches. The simulator-forecasted results for an optimal designed miscible CO{sub 2} flood in the demonstration area gave sufficient economics to justify continuation of the project into Budget Period 2.

Taylor, A.R.; Hinterlong, G.; Watts, G.; Justice, J.; Brown, K.; Hickman, T.S.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas fired fuel cell. Draft and final progress report for the period May 1, 1993--July 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is an account of the work performed from May 1, 1993 to July 30,1993 on the economic feasibility generating electrical power by natural gas-fired fuel cells. The study is comprised of a survey of energy users, the development of numeric models of an energy distribution system and a central plant utilities system that includes a fuel cell. A model of the capital cost of the hardware elements is combined with a series of ownership scenarios and an operations model that provide the necessary input for a model of the cost of ownership of a fuel cell-based power generation system. The primary model development tasks are complete. The remaining study emphasis is to perform an economic analysis of varied ownership scenarios using the model. This report outlines the progress to date.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Just-in-Time Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Logo Department of Energy Seal Left Tab SEARCH Right Tab TOOLS Right Tab Left Tab HOME Right Tab Left Tab ABOUT US Right Tab Left Tab...

393

Increased Levels of Harvest and Habitat Law Enforcement and Public Awareness for Anadromous Salmonids and Resident Fish in the Columbia River Basin -- Demonstration Period, 1992--1994, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, as part of BPA`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Illegal harvest and violation of habitat protection regulations are factors affecting the survival of many native species of anadromous and resident fish in the Columbia Basin.

NeSmith, Frank (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Long, Mack (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Paks, Kalispell, MT); Matthews, Dayne (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Short period eclipsing binary candidates identified using SuperWASP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present light curves and periods of 53 candidates for short period eclipsing binary stars identified by SuperWASP. These include 48 newly identified objects with periods <2x10^4 seconds (~0.23d), as well as the shortest period binary known with main sequence components (GSC2314-0530 = 1SWASP J022050.85+332047.6) and four other previously known W UMa stars (although the previously reported periods for two of these four are shown to be incorrect). The period distribution of main sequence contact binaries shows a sharp cut-off at a lower limit of around 0.22d, but until now, very few systems were known close to this limit. These new candidates will therefore be important for understanding the evolution of low mass stars and to allow investigation of the cause of the period cut-off.

Norton, A J; Evans, T; West, R G; Wheatley, P J; Anderson, D R; Barros, S C C; Butters, O W; Cameron, A Collier; Christian, D J; Enoch, B; Faedi, F; Haswell, C A; Hellier, C; Holmes, S; Horne, K D; Lister, T A; Maxted, P F L; Parley, N; Pollacco, D; Simpson, E K; Skillen, I; Smalley, B; Southworth, J; Street, R A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(mi) 7.2 43.8 Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted) 76% 80% Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration Fleet Summary Report Reporting period: May 2011 through March...

396

The orbital and superhump periods of the deeply eclipsing dwarf nova PU UMa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report unfiltered photometry during superoutbursts of PU UMa in 2009 and 2012. The amplitude was 4.5 magnitudes above mean quiescence and lasted at least 9 to 10 days. Superhumps were present with a peak-to-peak amplitude of up to ~0.3 mag, thereby confirming it to be a member of the SU UMa family of dwarf novae. The mean superhump period during the later part of the 2012 outburst was Psh = 0.08076(40) d. Analysis of the eclipse times of minimum, supplemented with data from other researchers, revealed an orbital period of Porb = 0.077880551(17) d. The superhump period excess was epsilon = 0.037(5). During the 2012 outburst, which was the better observed of the two, the FWHM eclipse duration gradually declined from 9.5 to 5 min. The eclipse depth was up to 1.7 magnitudes.

Shears, Jeremy; Littlefield, Colin; Miller, Ian; Morelle, Etienne; Pickard, Roger; Pietz, Jochen; Sabo, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

398

Microbiology and physiology of anaerobic fermentation of cellulose. Progress report (4/30/91--4/30/92) and outline of work for the period 9/1/92--9/1/93  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors are continuing their efforts to partly dissociate the cellulolytic enzyme complex of C. thermocellum. This complex named cellulosome (also existing as polycellulosome) consists of perhaps as many as 26 different subunits. It is extremely resistant to dissociation and denaturation. Treatments with urea and SDS have little effect unless the latter treatment is at high temperature. Significantly, some of the subunits after SDS dissociation have CMCase (endoglucanase) activity but no activity toward crystalline cellulose. The only reported success of hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose by cellulosomal subunits is by Wu et al. who isolated two protein fractions labeled SL and SS which when combined exhibit a low (about 1% of the original cellulosome) activity toward crystalline cellulose. The long standing goal is still to determine the activities of the individual subunits, to characterize them, to find out how they are associated in the cellulosome, and to establish the minimum number of subunits needed for efficient hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. This report also presents the results of experiments on cellulose hydrolysis in aerobic fungi, as well as other anaerobic bacteria.

Ljungdahl, L.G.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Time Series of Aerosol Column Optical Depth at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Fourth Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uncertainties in current estimates of anthropogenic radiative forcing are dominated by the effects of aerosols, both in relation to the direct absorption and scattering of radiation by aerosols and also with respect to aerosol-related changes in cloud formation, longevity, and microphysics (See Figure 1; Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Assessment Report 4, 2008). Moreover, the Arctic region in particular is especially sensitive to changes in climate with the magnitude of temperature changes (both observed and predicted) being several times larger than global averages (Kaufman et al. 2009). Recent studies confirm that aerosol-cloud interactions in the arctic generate climatologically significant radiative effects equivalent in magnitude to that of green house gases (Lubin and Vogelmann 2006, 2007). The aerosol optical depth is the most immediate representation of the aerosol direct effect and is also important for consideration of aerosol-cloud interactions, and thus this quantity is essential for studies of aerosol radiative forcing.

C Flynn; AS Koontz; JH Mather

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Energy resource alternatives competition. Progress report for the period February 1, 1975--December 31, 1975. [Space heating and cooling, hot water, and electricity for homes, farms, and light industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report describes the objectives and results of the intercollegiate Energy Resource Alternatives competition. The one-year program concluded in August 1975, with a final testing program of forty student-built alternative energy projects at the Sandia Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The goal of the competition was to design and build prototype hardware which could provide space heating and cooling, hot water, and electricity at a level appropriate to the needs of homes, farms, and light industry. The hardware projects were powered by such nonconventional energy sources as solar energy, wind, biologically produced gas, coal, and ocean waves. The competition rules emphasized design innovation, economic feasibility, practicality, and marketability. (auth)

Matzke, D.J.; Osowski, D.M.; Radtke, M.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Technical progress report for the period of April--June, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study of the West Kiehl is to (1) quantify the incremental oil produced from the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project by classical engineering and numerical simulation techniques, (2) quantify the effect of chemical slug volume on incremental oil in the two swept areas of the field, (3) determine the economics of the application of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology, (4) forecast the results of injecting an alkaline--surfactant-polymer solution to mature waterfloods and polymer floods, and (5) provide the basis for independent operators to book additional oil reserves by using the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology. This report will document the numerical simulation waterflood, polymer flood, alkaline-surfactant flood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood predictions from the West Kiehl and Prairie Creek South fields.

Pitts, M.J.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Dogs and Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Question: I travel often and worry how leaving for long periods of time (and boarding my dog) will affect her. I wouldn't think that dogs could understand the concept of...

403

Investigations into the [Early] Life History of Spring Chinook Salmon in the Grande Ronde River Basin : Fish Research Project, Oregon : Annual Report 1994 : Project Period 1 June 1993 to 31 May 1994.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to describe aspects of the life history strategies of spring chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde basin. During the past year we focused on rearing and migration patterns of juveniles and surveys of spawning adults. The specific objectives for the early life history portion of the study were: Objective 1, document the annual in-basin migration patterns for spring chinook salmon juveniles in the upper Grande Ronde River, including the abundance of migrants, migration timing and duration; Objective 2, estimate and compare smolt survival indices to mainstem Columbia and Snake River dams for fall and spring migrating spring chinook salmon; Objective 3 initiate study of the winter habitat utilized by spring chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde River basin. The specific objectives for the spawning ground surveys were: Objective 4, conduct extensive and supplemental spring chinook salmon spawning ground surveys in spawning streams in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha basin, Objective 5; determine how adequately historic index area surveys index spawner abundance by comparing index counts to extensive and supplemental redd counts; Objective 6, determine what changes in index areas and timing of index surveys would improve the accuracy of index surveys; Objective 7, determine the relationship between number of redds observed and fish escapement for the Grande Ronde and Imnaha river basins.

Keefe, MaryLouise

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

THE INDUCTION PERIOD IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a plant is illuminated, its rate of photosynthesis is at first low and gradually increases until it becomes constant. This induction period was first observed by Osterhout and Haas (1918) for UIva and independently confirmed by Warburg (1920) with Chlorella. It has

L. Smith

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Stability of Underwater Periodic Locomotion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most aquatic vertebrates swim by lateral flapping of their bodies and caudal fins. While much effort has been devoted to understanding the flapping kinematics and its influence on the swimming efficiency, little is known about the stability (or lack of) of periodic swimming. It is believed that stability limits maneuverability and body designs/flapping motions that are adapted for stable swimming are not suitable for high maneuverability and vice versa. In this paper, we consider a simplified model of a planar elliptic body undergoing prescribed periodic heaving and pitching in potential flow. We show that periodic locomotion can be achieved due to the resulting hydrodynamic forces, and its value depends on several parameters including the aspect ratio of the body, the amplitudes and phases of the prescribed flapping. We obtain closed-form solutions for the locomotion and efficiency for small flapping amplitudes, and numerical results for finite flapping amplitudes. We then study the stability of the (finite amplitude flapping) periodic locomotion using Floquet theory. We find that stability depends nonlinearly on all parameters. Interesting trends of switching between stable and unstable motions emerge and evolve as we continuously vary the parameter values. This suggests that, for live organisms that control their flapping motion, maneuverability and stability need not be thought of as disjoint properties, rather the organism may manipulate its motion in favor of one or the other depending on the task at hand.

Fangxu Jing; Eva Kanso

2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

406

Final Technical Report Advanced Anchoring Technology DOE Award Number DE-EE0003632 Project Period 09/10 -Ã?Â?Ã?Â?Ã?Â?Ã?Â? 09/12  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is generally conceded that the costs associated with current practices for the mooring, anchoring, or foundation systems of Marine HydroKinetic (MHK) and Deepwater Floating Wind systems are a disproportionate portion of the total cost of an installed system. Reducing the cost of the mooring and anchoring components for MHK systems can contribute substantially to reducing the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE). Micropile anchors can reduce the LCOE both directly, because the anchors, associated mooring hardware and installation costs are less than conventional anchor and mooring systems, but also because micropile anchors require less extensive geotechnical surveys for confident design and proper implementation of an anchor or foundation system. This report presents the results of the development of critical elements of grouted marine micropile anchor (MMA) technology for application to MHK energy conversion systems and other ocean engineering applications that require fixing equipment to the seafloor. Specifically, this project identified grout formulations and developed designs for grout dispensing systems suitable for use in a seawater environment as a critical development need for successful implementation of practical MMA systems. The project conducted a thorough review of available information on the use of cement-based grouts in seawater. Based on this review and data available from commercial sources, the project selected a range of grout formulations for testing as part of a micropile system. The project also reviewed instrumentation for measuring grout density, pressure and flow rate, and integrated an instrumentation system suitable for use with micropile installation. The grout formulations and instrumentation system were tested successfully and demonstrated the suitability of MMA technology for implementation into anchor systems for MHK and other marine renewable energy systems. In addition, this project developed conceptual designs for micropile anchor systems and the associated drilling and grouting systems to demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of micropile anchors. This report presents several conceptual system designs for different applications. This project has concluded that grouted marine micropile anchor technology is practical and very attractive technically and financially for marine renewable energy applications. This technology is considered to be at a Technology Readiness Level 5.

Meggitt, Dallas J.

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

407

Annual Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Radiation Exposure Occupational Radiation Exposure Home Welcome What's New Register Dose History Request Data File Submittal REMS Data Selection HSS Logo Annual Reports User Survey on the Annual Report Please take the time to complete a survey on the Annual Report. Your input is important to us! The 2012 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2011 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2010 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2009 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2008 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2007 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2006 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2005 Annual Report

408

Coordination studies with PNNL's global change assessment model: integrated science modeling and applications to the human dimensions. Final technical report for period October 1996 - March 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) supported by the DOE Program on Health and Environmental Research: Environmental Sciences Program under Grant No. DOE DFGO2-96ER62284. As part of this research proposal, we designed the model that better represent spatial variations and treat the process relevant towards evaluating the biogeochemical cycles important to determining atmospheric composition and resulting climatic effects at the regional scale. The process level understanding of regional impacts into the Integrated Assessment (IA) model will help to improve the understanding of climate change impacts and extend the range of issues, which can be addressed in an IA framework. On the application front, the newly developed model has been applied to a selected set of studies to address policy related questions on climate change, in particular, the role of forestry, and land-use for historical greenhouse gas emissions; projections of future methane emissions; a research study related to energy implications of future stabilization of atmospheric CO{sub 2} content; and radiative forcing and estimation of a number of important greenhouse gases. In the following, the significant findings from the DOE supported study are outlined.

Wuebbles, Donald J.; Jain Atul

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

409

Stochastic Resonance in a Periodically Modulated Dissipative Nuclear Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fission decay of highly excited periodically driven compound nuclei is considered in the framework of Langevin approach. We have used residual-time distribution (RTD) as the tool for studying of dynamic features in a presence of periodic perturbation. The structure of RTD essentially depends on the relation between Kramers decay rate and the frequency of the periodic perturbation. In particular, intensity of the first peak in RTD has a sharp maximum at certain nuclear temperature depending on the frequency of the periodic perturbation. This maximum should be considered as first-hand manifestation of stochastic resonance in nuclear dynamics.

V. P. Berezovoj; Yu. L. Bolotin; O. P. Dzyubak; V. V. Yanovsky; A. V. Zhiglo

2001-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

410

Maslov indices for periodic orbits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that there is a generalization of the Conley-Zehnder index for periodic trajectories of a classical Hamiltonian system $(Q, \\omega, H)$ from the case $Q = T^*R^n$ to arbitrary symplectic manifolds. As it turns out, it is precisely this index which appears as a Maslov phase in the trace formulas by Gutzwiller and Duistermaat-Guillemin. Contribution presented at the XIX ICGTMP Salamanca June 92.

Meinrenken, E

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Alternative (Potentially Green) Separations Media: Aqueous Biphasic and Related Systems âÂ?Â? Extending the Frontier Final Report For Period September 1, 2002 âÂ?Â? January 31, 2007  

SciTech Connect

Through the current DoE-BES funding, we have extended our fundamental understanding of the critical phase separation of aqueous polymer solutions at the molecular level, and have developed a similar understanding of their application as novel solvent systems. Our principal aims included mode of delivery of the aqueous biphasic system (ABS) solvent system and the application of this system to problems of reactive extraction. In the former case we have developed novel solid phase analogues, in the form of cross-linked polyethylene glycol hydrogels, and in the latter case we have examined the role that ABS might play in reaction engineering, with a view to greener, simpler, and safer processes. We have also developed a new salt/salt ABS and have extended our understanding of this system as well. The major outcomes are as follows: (1) Through the use of variable temperature phase diagrams, coupled with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements of the phases, a better understanding of the thermodynamics of phase formation was obtained. Evidence to the existence and role of an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) or lower critical solution temperature (LCST) (or both) in these systems was gained. With variable temperature solute partitioning, thermodynamic parameters were calculated, and inter-system comparisons were made. Through the use of Abraham's linear solvation energy regression (LSER) the solvent-solute properties of liquid/liquid ABS were examined. We have shown that ABS are indeed very tunable and LSERs have been used as a tool to compare these systems to traditional organic/water and other liquid/liquid systems. (2) We have successfully shown the development of novel reaction media for chemical synthesis and reaction; Aqueous Biphasic Reactive Extraction (ABRE). As a proof of concept, we have shown the synthesis of adipic acid from cyclohexene in an ABS, which represents an important development in the exploitation of this technology. Previous oxidations of this type have relied on the use of phase transfer catalysts, which are expensive to produce and difficult to recover. In this reaction the polyethylene glycol (PEG) phase seems to function simultaneously as the phase transfer catalyst, the reaction solvent, and to provide the reaction driving force. (3) PEG hydrogels may be used as probes for their macroscopic analogues by which the molecular events underlying the phase behavior of polymer-salt systems can be investigated. The properties of covalently cross-linked PEG hydrogels have been studied. It was demonstrated that these hydrogels could be thought of as analogous to polymer/salt ABS without phase separation. The salts examined cause collapse of the hydrogel, and there is a physical limit to the degree of collapse that can be achieved. In addition, salts bringing about significant collapse are only prevented from reaching this limit by the limits of their own solubility. This lead to our discovery that PEG will phase separate with KSCN at high enough concentration of polymer and salt. We have also successfully shown the development of an IL-PEG hydrogel as well as a Si-modified PEG hydrogel. We have also demonstrated for the first time that this cross-linked PEG matrix has been used to gel non-aqueous solvents. (4) The use of hydrophilic ionic liquids (ILs) in separation schemes has been accomplished via a 'salting out' technique using inorganic, kosmotropic salts that is applicable to many classes of these materials. We have begun to obtain a deeper knowledge about the role that each component plays in the process, including that of the ionic liquid cation and anion, the kosmotropic salt cation and anions, as well as the distribution of water in the system. This is allowing us to design separation systems with desired properties. In addition, temperature studies on these aqueous biphasic systems are revealing thermodynamic data for the first time, so that we can quantitate the importance of entropic and enthalpic contributions to the biphase-forming process.

Robin D. Rogers

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

412

ECONOMIC REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ECONOMIC REPORT ECONOMIC REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT Economic Report of the President | 3 ECONOMIC REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT To the Congress of the United States: Over the past 6 years of economic expansion, the American economy has proven its strength and resilience. Job creation grew uninterrupted for a record period of time, inflation remains moderate, unemployment is low, and productivity continues to grow. The economy is built upon a strong foundation, with deep and sophisticated capital markets, flexible labor markets, low taxes, and open trade and investment policies. Americans should be confident about the long-term strength of our economy, but our economy is undergoing a period of uncertainty, and there are heightened risks to our near-term economic growth. To insure against

413

XFD progress report.  

SciTech Connect

In May 2002, the Advanced Photon Source (APS) was reorganized into three divisions: the Accelerator Systems Division (ASD), the APS Operations Division (AOD), and the Experimental Facilities Division (XFD). Parts of the former User Program Division (UPD) were incorporated into XFD; other parts were incorporated into AOD. This Progress Report summarizes the main scientific and technical activities of XFD and parts of the former UPD from January 2001 through June 2002. The report is divided into two major sections, (1) SRI-CAT Beamlines, Technical Developments, and Scientific Applications, and (2) User Technical Support, which describe the technical activities and research and development (R&D) accomplishments of the XFD and former UPD personnel in supporting the synchrotron radiation instrumentation (SRI) collaborative access team (CAT) and the general APS user community. Also included in this report is a comprehensive list of publications by XFD and UPD staff members during the time period covered by this report.

Gluskin, E.

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

414

Optimal observation time window for forecasting the next earthquake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report that the accuracy of predicting the occurrence time of the next earthquake is significantly enhanced by observing the latest rate of earthquake occurrences. The observation period that minimizes the temporal uncertainty of the next occurrence is on the order of 10 hours. This result is independent of the threshold magnitude and is consistent across different geographic areas. This time scale is much shorter than the months or years that have previously been considered characteristic of seismic activities.

Omi, Takahiro; Shinomoto, Shigeru [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kanter, Ido [Minerva Center and Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, 52900 (Israel)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

STELLAR PULSATIONS AND PERIOD CHANGES IN THE SX PHOENICIS STAR XX CYGNI  

SciTech Connect

Time-series photometric observations were made for the SX Phoenicis star XX Cyg between 2007 and 2011 at the Xinglong Station of National Astronomical Observatories of China. With the light curves derived from the new observations, we do not detect any secondary maximum in the descending portion of the light curves of XX Cyg, as reported in some previous work. Frequency analysis of the light curves confirms a fundamental frequency f{sub 0} = 7.4148 cycles day{sup -1} and up to 19 harmonics, 11 of which are newly detected. However, no secondary mode of pulsation is detected from the light curves. The O-C diagram, produced from 46 newly determined times of maximum light combined with those derived from the literature, reveals a continuous period increase with the rate of (1/P)(dP/dt) = 1.19(13) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} yr{sup -1}. Theoretical rates of period change due to the stellar evolution were calculated with a modeling code. The result shows that the observed rate of period change is fully consistent with period change caused by evolutionary behavior predicted by standard theoretical models.

Yang, X. H.; Fu, J. N.; Zha, Q., E-mail: jnfu@bnu.edu.cn [Astronomy Department, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Nuclear Science Division, 1995--1996 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) for the two-year period, January 1, 1995 to January 1, 1997. This was a time of major accomplishments for all research programs in the Division-many of which are highlighted in the reports of this document.

Poskanzer, A.M. [ed.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Microsoft Word - PARS II Process Document - Close Period 2013-04-29 _FINAL_  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARS II APM DepSec Monthly Report & Close Period, V-2013-04-29 Page 1 PARS II APM DepSec Monthly Report & Close Period, V-2013-04-29 Page 1 PARS II Process Document APM DEPSEC MONTHLY REPORT & CLOSE PERIOD PURPOSE The purpose of this document is to describe the process of preparing the APM Deputy Secretary Monthly Report and closing the DOE Reporting Period in PARS II. SCOPE This process applies to the Headquarters Office of Acquisition and Project Management (HQ OAPM) and its support contractors as the organization that prepares the monthly reports and closes the monthly reporting period. The process covers data validation and verification; running, distributing and archiving of reports; and

418

Time Trends in Dutch Children's Mental Health.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigated time trends in Dutch children's and adolescent's mental health problems by comparing population samples from different time periods. From 1983 to 2003,… (more)

Tick, N.T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Computing with almost periodic functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper develops a method for discrete computational Fourier analysis of functions defined on quasicrystals and other almost periodic sets. A key point is to build the analysis around the emerging theory of quasicrystals and diffraction in the setting on local hulls and dynamical systems. Numerically computed approximations arising in this way are built out of the Fourier module of the quasicrystal in question, and approximate their target functions uniformly on the entire infinite space. The methods are entirely group theoretical, being based on finite groups and their duals, and they are practical and computable. Examples of functions based on the standard Fibonacci quasicrystal serve to illustrate the method (which is applicable to all quasicrystals modeled on the cut and project formalism).

R. V. Moody; M. Nesterenko; J. Patera

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

420

Annual Progress Report Period May 1, 2009April 30, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2009 Submitted April 30, 2009 Lead University University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Director Deborah Estrin, Ph.D. 3563 Boelter Hall, Box 951596 Los Angeles, CA 90095-1596 Phone (310) 206-247; Fax University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Director Deborah Estrin, Ph.D. 3563 Boelter Hall, Box 951596 Los

Grether, Gregory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting time period" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research and development activities are summarized in the following areas: Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility, nuclear physics, the UNISOR program, accelerator-based atomic physics, theoretical physics, nuclear science applications, atomic physics and plasma diagnostics for fusion program, high-energy physics, the nuclear data project, and the relativistic heavy-ion collider study. Publications and papers presented are listed. (WHK)

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Annual Progress Report Period May 1, 2010April 30, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(PAR, T, RH, PPT) and a newly installed within-canopy eddy co-variance measurement system. All measurement system (Michael Goulden, UCI). We added an additional set of AMR and soil sensor nodes at the La Observing Systems (NAMOS), employs coordinated measurements between stationary sensing nodes and robotic

Soatto, Stefano

423

Physics Division progress report for period ending September 30, 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activities of this Division continue to be concentrated in the areas of experimental nuclear physics, experimental atomic physics, and theoretical nuclear and atomic physics. The Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility and its operation as a national user facility continued as the single largest activity within the Division. The experimental nuclear physics program continues to emphasize heavy ion studies, with much of the activity centered at the Holifield Facility. The work with heavy ions at ultrarelativistic energies continues at the CERN SPS. Studies at the Brookhaven AGS, particularly in preparation of future experiments at RHIC, have seen an increased emphasis. A major consortium has been formed to propose the design and construction of a dimuon detector as the basis for one the principal experiments for RHIC. Also included are results from the increasing effort in particle physics, including participation in the L* proposal for the SSC. The UNISOR program, since its inception, has been associated intimately with the Division and, most particularly, with the Holifield Facility. A major area of experimental research for the Division is atomic physics. This activity comprises two groups: one on accelera