National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for reporting interstitial therapy

  1. Displacement Correction Scheme for MR-Guided Interstitial Laser Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Displacement Correction Scheme for MR-Guided Interstitial Laser Therapy S. Suprijanto1 , M.W. Vogel[1,3]. In the absence of motion, MR thermometry based on phase imaging is quite accurate[12 , F.M. Vos1 , H.A. Vrooman2,3 , and A.M. Vossepoel1 1 Pattern Recognition Group, Department

  2. Image-guided therapy system for interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy in a multimodality operating suite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egger, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution, an image-guided therapy system supporting gynecologic radiation therapy is introduced. The overall workflow of the presented system starts with the arrival of the patient and ends with follow-up examinations by imaging and a superimposed visualization of the modeled device from a PACS system. Thereby, the system covers all treatments stages (pre-, intra- and postoperative) and has been designed and constructed by a computer scientist with feedback from an interdisciplinary team of physicians and engineers. This integrated medical system enables dispatch of diagnostic images directly after acquisition to a processing workstation that has an on-board 3D Computer Aided Design model of a medical device. Thus, allowing precise identification of catheter location in the 3D imaging model which later provides rapid feedback to the clinician regarding device location. Moreover, the system enables the ability to perform patient-specific pre-implant evaluation by assessing the placement of intersti...

  3. Fractionalization of Interstitials in Curved Colloidal Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William T. M. Irvine; Mark J. Bowick; Paul M. Chaikin

    2013-10-11

    Understanding the out-of equilibrium behaviour of point defects in crystals, yields insights into the nature and fragility of the ordered state, as well as being of great practical importance. In some rare cases defects are spontaneously healed - a one-dimensional crystal formed by a line of identical charged particles, for example, can accommodate an interstitial (extra particle) by a re-adjusting all particle positions to even out the spacing. In sharp contrast, particles organized into a perfect hexagonal crystal in the plane cannot accommodate an interstitial by a simple re-adjustment of the particle spacing - the interstitial remains instead trapped between lattice sites and diffuses by hopping, leaving the crystal permanently defected. Here we report on the behavior of interstitials in colloidal crystals on curved surfaces. Using optical tweezers operated independently of three dimensional imaging, we insert a colloidal interstitial in a lattice of similar particles on flat and curved (positively and negatively) oil-glycerol interfaces and image the ensuing dynamics. We find that, unlike in flat space, the curved crystals self-heal through a collective rearrangement that re-distributes the increased density associated with the interstitial. The self-healing process can be interpreted in terms of an out of equilibrium interaction of topological defects with each other and with the underlying curvature. Our observations suggest the existence of "particle fractionalization" on curved surface crystals.

  4. Periodontium destruction associated with oncology therapy. Five case reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, W.E.

    1987-08-01

    Radiation treatment to the head and neck and cytotoxic chemotherapy can produce deleterious side effects to the periodontium that are generally transient in nature, reversible, and do not result in permanently visible defects. However, combinations of the malignant disease itself, the direct and indirect effects of medical therapy and associated oral infections, along with local trauma can lead to periodontal tissue destruction with resulting permanent architectural defects. Five case reports illustrate destructive alterations of the periodontium that were associated with oncology therapy. Proposed guidelines for periodontal treatment of compromised individuals undergoing oncology therapies are suggested.

  5. Ulcerative colitis and steroid-responsive, diffuse interstitial lung disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balestra, D.J.; Balestra, S.T.; Wasson, J.H.

    1988-07-01

    The authors describe a patient with ulcerative colitis and extracolonic manifestations in whom diffuse interstitial pulmonary disease developed that was responsive to glucocorticoid therapy one year after total proctocolectomy. The patient presented in December 1983 with a subacute course marked by cough and progressive exertional dyspnea, abnormal chest examination results, and a chest roentgenogram that revealed diffuse interstitital and alveolar infiltrates. A transbronchial biopsy specimen revealed a polymorphic interstitial infiltrate, mild interstitial fibrosis without apparent intraluminal fibrosis, and no vasculitis, granulomas, or significant eosinophilic infiltration. Within one week of the initiation of daily high-dose steroid therapy, the patient's symptoms dramatically improved; chest roentgenogram and forced vital capacity (60%) improved at a slower rate. All three measures deteriorated when alternate-day prednisone therapy was started but once again improved until the patient was totally asymptomatic, chest roentgenograms were normal, and forced vital capacity was 80% of the predicted value 2 1/2 years later.

  6. DFT STUDY REVISES INTERSTITIAL CONFIGURATIONS IN HCP Zr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samolyuk, German D; Golubov, Stanislav I; Osetskiy, Yury N; Stoller, Roger E

    2012-06-01

    Analysis of experimental result on microstructure evolution in irradiated Zr and alloys has demonstrated that available knowledge on self-interstitial defects in Zr is in contradiction. We therefore have initiated an extensive theoretical and modeling program to clarify this issue. In this report we present first ab initio calculations results of single SIA configurations in Zr. We demonstrate importance of simulations cell size, applied exchange-correlation functional and simulated c/a ratio. The results obtained demonstrate clearly that the most stable configurations are in basal plane and provide some evidences for enhanced interstitial transport along basal planes. The results obtained will be used in generation a new interatomic potential for Zr to be used in large-scale atomistic modeling of mechanisms relevant for radiation-induced microstructure evolution.

  7. Bolus electron conformal therapy for the treatment of recurrent inflammatory breast cancer: a case report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Michelle M.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Kanke, James E.; Zhang, Sean; Perkins, George H.

    2012-07-01

    The treatment of locoregionally recurrent breast cancer in patients who have previously undergone radiation therapy is challenging. Special techniques are often required that both eradicate the disease and minimize the risks of retreatment. We report the case of a patient with an early-stage left breast cancer who developed inflammatory-type recurrence requiring re-irradiation of the chest wall using bolus electron conformal therapy with image-guided treatment delivery. The patient was a 51-year-old woman who had undergone lumpectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and adjuvant whole-breast radiation therapy for a stage I left breast cancer in June 1998. In March 2009, she presented at our institution with biopsy-proven recurrent inflammatory carcinoma and was aggressively treated with multi-agent chemotherapy followed by mastectomy that left a positive surgical margin. Given the patient's prior irradiation and irregular chest wall anatomy, bolus electron conformal therapy was used to treat her chest wall and draining lymphatics while sparing the underlying soft tissue. The patient still had no evidence of disease 21 months after treatment. Our results indicate that bolus electron conformal therapy is an accessible, effective radiation treatment approach for recurrent breast cancer in patients with irregular chest wall anatomy as a result of surgery. This approach may complement standard techniques used to reduce locoregional recurrence in the postmastectomy setting.

  8. Di-interstitial defect in silicon revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Londos, C. A.; Antonaras, G.; Chroneos, A.; Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BP

    2013-11-21

    Infrared spectroscopy was used to study the defect spectrum of Cz-Si samples following fast neutron irradiation. We mainly focus on the band at 533 cm{sup ?1}, which disappears from the spectra at ?170 °C, exhibiting similar thermal stability with the Si-P6 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum previously correlated with the di-interstitial defect. The suggested structural model of this defect comprises of two self-interstitial atoms located symmetrically around a lattice site Si atom. The band anneals out following a first-order kinetics with an activation energy of 0.88 ± 0.3 eV. This value does not deviate considerably from previously quoted experimental and theoretical values for the di-interstitial defect. The present results indicate that the 533 cm{sup ?1} IR band originates from the same structure as that of the Si-P6 EPR spectrum.

  9. Friedel-Like Oscillations from Interstitial Iron in Superconducting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Interstitial Iron in Superconducting Fe1+yTe0.62Se0.38 Using polarized and unpolarized neutron scattering we show that interstitial Fe in superconducting Fe1+yTe1-xSex...

  10. Identification of Early Interstitial Lung Disease in Smokers from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identification of Early Interstitial Lung Disease in Smokers from the COPDGene Study George R interstitial lung disease (ILD) on chest computed tomographic (CT) scans. Materials and Methods: The CT scans: Early interstitial lung disease; CT scan; smoker. ªAUR, 2010 I diopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF

  11. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in room-temperature ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Alice E [ORNL; Berlijn, Tom [ORNL; Hahn, Steven E [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL; Williams, Travis J [ORNL; Poudel, Lekhanath N [ORNL; Calder, Stuart A [ORNL; Fishman, Randy Scott [ORNL; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL; Aczel, Adam A [ORNL; Cao, Huibo [ORNL; Lumsden, Mark D [ORNL; Christianson, Andrew D [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We report elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb. Measurements were performed on a large, TC = 434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of delta=0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (H K 2n), and ii) a broad, non-dispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H K 2n+1). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave theory calculations, and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. The results show that the influence of the int

  12. Segregation of Mn2+ Dopants as Interstitials in SrTiO3 Grain Boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Hao; Kotula, Paul G.; Sato, Yukio; Chi, Miaofang; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-10-03

    Mn doped SrTiO3 shows promising magnetic and electrical properties, but the doping mechanism remains unclear. In this research Mn4+ is found to substitute Ti in bulk SrTiO3, but Mn2+ segregates inside grain boundaries at both Sr and interstitial sites. Mn interstitial doping has never been reported, but is found possible with the formation of Sr vacancies. This finding is significantly different from the amphoteric doping of Mn2+ substituting Sr and Mn4+ substituting Ti sites, therefore leads to different understanding on the defect mediated electrical and magnetic properties of transition metal doped perovskites.

  13. Unfaulting mechanism of trapped self-interstitial atom clusters in bcc Fe: A kinetic study based on the potential energy landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Bilge

    We report on the complete unfaulting mechanism of a trapped self-interstitial atom cluster in the form of a nonparallel configuration (NPC), investigated using the autonomous basin climbing (ABC) method. A detailed set of ...

  14. Interstitial diffusion of ion-implanted boron in crystalline silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. I. Velichko; A. P. Kavaliova

    2012-07-03

    Modeling of the long-range migration of boron interstitials during low temperature annealing of ion-implanted silicon crystals has been carried out.

  15. Bistability of Cation Interstitials in II-VI Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, S. H.; Dalpian, G. M.

    2005-11-01

    The stability of cation interstitials in II-VI semiconductors is studied using ab initio methods. We find that interstitials in the neutral charge state are more stable in the tetrahedral interstitial site near the cation, whereas in the (2+) charge state, they are more stable near the anion. The diffusion energy barrier changes when the defect charge state changes. Therefore, if electrons/holes are taken from the defect level by light, changing its charge state, the interstitial atom will be able to diffuse almost spontaneously due to a reduced diffusion barrier.

  16. Self-Reported Cognitive Outcomes in Patients With Brain Metastases Before and After Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Ansa Maer; Scherwath, Angela; Ernst, Gundula; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Bremer, Michael; Steinmann, Diana

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Patients with brain metastases may experience treatment-related cognitive deficits. In this study, we prospectively assessed the self-reported cognitive abilities of patients with brain metastases from any solid primary cancer before and after irradiation of the brain. Methods and Materials: The treatment group (TG) consisted of adult patients (n=50) with brain metastases who received whole or partial irradiation of the brain without having received prior radiation therapy (RT). The control group (CG) consisted of breast cancer patients (n=27) without cranial involvement who were treated with adjuvant RT. Patients were recruited between May 2008 and December 2010. Self-reported cognitive abilities were acquired before RT and 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after irradiation. The information regarding the neurocognitive status was collected by use of the German questionnaires for self-perceived deficits in attention (FEDA) and subjectively experienced everyday memory performance (FEAG). Results: The baseline data showed a high proportion of self-perceived neurocognitive deficits in both groups. A comparison between the TG and the CG regarding the course of self-reported outcomes after RT showed significant between-group differences for the FEDA scales 2 and 3: fatigue and retardation of daily living activities (P=.002) and decrease in motivation (P=.032) with an increase of attention deficits in the TG, but not in the CG. There was a trend towards significance in FEDA scale 1: distractibility and retardation of mental processes (P=.059) between the TG and the CG. The FEAG assessment presented no significant differences. An additional subgroup analysis within the TG was carried out. FEDA scale 3 showed significant differences in the time-related progress between patients with whole-brain RT and those receiving hypofractionated stereotactic RT (P=.025), with less decrease in motivation in the latter group. Conclusion: Self-reported attention declined in patients with brain metastases after RT to the brain, whereas it remained relatively stable in breast cancer patients.

  17. Interstitial Fe in MgO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mølholt, T. E., E-mail: tem4@hi.is; Gislason, H. P.; Ólafsson, S. [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107 Reykjavík (Iceland); Mantovan, R. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via Olivetti 2, 20846 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Svane, A.; Weyer, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Masenda, H.; Naidoo, D. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, WITS 2050 (South Africa); Bharuth-Ram, K. [Durban University of Technology, Durban 4001 (South Africa); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via Olivetti 2, 20846 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Johnston, K. [PH Department, ISOLDE/CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Langouche, G. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralings fysika, University of Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Sielemann, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin für Materialien und Energie, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-01-14

    Isolated {sup 57}Fe atoms were studied in MgO single-crystals by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy following implantation of {sup 57}Mn decaying to {sup 57}Fe. Four Mössbauer spectral components were found corresponding to different Fe lattice positions and/or charge states. Two components represent Fe atoms substituting Mg as Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}, respectively; a third component is due to Fe in a strongly implantation-induced disturbed region. The fourth component, which is the focus of this paper, can be assigned to Fe at an interstitial site. Comparison of its measured isomer shift with ab initio calculations suggests that the interstitial Fe is located on, or close to, the face of the rock-salt MgO structure. To harmonize such an assignment with the measured near-zero quadrupole interaction a local motion process (cage motion) of the Fe has to be stipulated. The relation of such a local motion as a starting point for long range diffusion is discussed.

  18. Original article Lentivirus-induced interstitial lung disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Lentivirus-induced interstitial lung disease: pulmonary pathology in sheep a chronic disease in sheep affecting, among other organs, the lungs. Interstitial pneumonitis is similar the pathological features of lungs of sheep naturally infected with visna-maedi virus with the results obtained

  19. Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Quentin E., E-mail: quentin-adams@uiowa.edu; Xu, Jinghzu; Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Li, Xing; Rockey, William R.; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Enger, Shirin A. [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, 1650 Cedar Ave, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)] [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, 1650 Cedar Ave, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a novel needle, catheter, and radiation source system for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) of the prostate. I-RSBT is a promising technique for reducing urethra, rectum, and bladder dose relative to conventional interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Methods: A wire-mounted 62 GBq{sup 153}Gd source is proposed with an encapsulated diameter of 0.59 mm, active diameter of 0.44 mm, and active length of 10 mm. A concept model I-RSBT needle/catheter pair was constructed using concentric 50 and 75 ?m thick nickel-titanium alloy (nitinol) tubes. The needle is 16-gauge (1.651 mm) in outer diameter and the catheter contains a 535 ?m thick platinum shield. I-RSBT and conventional HDR-BT treatment plans for a prostate cancer patient were generated based on Monte Carlo dose calculations. In order to minimize urethral dose, urethral dose gradient volumes within 0–5 mm of the urethra surface were allowed to receive doses less than the prescribed dose of 100%. Results: The platinum shield reduced the dose rate on the shielded side of the source at 1 cm off-axis to 6.4% of the dose rate on the unshielded side. For the case considered, for the same minimum dose to the hottest 98% of the clinical target volume (D{sub 98%}), I-RSBT reduced urethral D{sub 0.1cc} below that of conventional HDR-BT by 29%, 33%, 38%, and 44% for urethral dose gradient volumes within 0, 1, 3, and 5 mm of the urethra surface, respectively. Percentages are expressed relative to the prescription dose of 100%. For the case considered, for the same urethral dose gradient volumes, rectum D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 7%, 6%, 6%, and 6%, respectively, and bladder D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 4%, 5%, 5%, and 6%, respectively. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with I-RSBT was 154 min with ten 62 GBq {sup 153}Gd sources. Conclusions: For the case considered, the proposed{sup 153}Gd-based I-RSBT system has the potential to lower the urethral dose relative to HDR-BT by 29%–44% if the clinician allows a urethral dose gradient volume of 0–5 mm around the urethra to receive a dose below the prescription. A multisource approach is necessary in order to deliver the proposed {sup 153}Gd-based I-RSBT technique in reasonable treatment times.

  20. Complexes of self-interstitials with oxygen atoms in Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khirunenko, L. I.; Pomozov, Yu. V.; Sosnin, M. G.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Riemann, H.

    2014-02-21

    Interactions of germanium self-interstitials with interstitial oxygen atoms in Ge subjected to irradiation at ?80 K and subsequently to annealing have been studied. To distinguish the processes involving vacancies and self-interstitials the doping with tin was used. It was shown that absorption lines with maximum at 602, 674, 713 and 803 cm{sup ?1} are self-interstitials-related. Two lines at 602 and 674, which develop upon annealing in the temperature range 180–240 K, belong to IO complexes, while the bands at 713 and 803 cm{sup ?1}, which emerge after annealing at T>220 K, are associated with I{sub 2}O. It is argued that the annealing of IO occurs by two mechanisms: by dissociation and by diffusion.

  1. Effects of interstitial flow on tumor cell migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polacheck, William J. (William Joseph)

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial flow is the convective transport of fluid through tissue extracellular matrix. This creeping fluid flow has been shown to affect the morphology and migration of cells such as fibroblasts, cancer cells, endothelial ...

  2. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy for Cervical and Endometrial Cancer: A Prospective Report on Toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandecasteele, Katrien, E-mail: Katrien.Vandecasteele@uzgent.be [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Tummers, Philippe; Makar, Amin [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Eijkeren, Marc van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Delrue, Louke [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Denys, Hannelore [Department of Medical Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Lambert, Bieke [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Beerens, Anne-Sophie [Department of Pathology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Pathology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Van den Broecke, Rudy [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Lambein, Kathleen [Department of Pathology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Pathology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Fonteyne, Valerie; De Meerleer, Gert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To report on toxicity after postoperative intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) for cervical (CC) and endometrial cancer (EC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-four CC and 41 EC patients were treated with postoperative IMAT. If indicated, para-aortic lymph node irradiation (preventive or when affected, PALN) and/or concomitant cisplatin (40 mg/m Superscript-Two , weekly) was administered. The prescribed dose for IMAT was 45 Gy (CC, 25 fractions) and 46 Gy (EC, 23 fractions), followed by a brachytherapeutic boost if possible. Radiation-related toxicity was assessed prospectively. The effect of concomitant cisplatin and PALN irradiation was evaluated. Results: Regarding acute toxicity (n = 65), Grade 3 and 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was observed in zero and 63% of patients (79% CC, 54% EC), respectively. Grade 3 and 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was observed in 1% and 18% of patients, respectively. Grade 2 (21%) and 3 (12%) hematologic toxicity (n = 41) occurred only in CC patients. Seventeen percent of CC patients and 2% of EC patients experienced Grade 2 fatigue and skin toxicity, respectively. Adding cisplatin led to an increase in Grade >2 nausea (57% vs. 9%; p = 0.01), Grade 2 nocturia (24% vs. 4%; p = 0.03), Grade {>=}2 hematologic toxicity (38% vs. nil, p = 0.003), Grade {>=}2 leukopenia (33% vs. nil, p = 0.009), and a strong trend toward more fatigue (14% vs. 2%; p = 0.05). Para-aortic lymph node irradiation led to an increase of Grade 2 nocturia (31% vs. 4%, p = 0.008) and a strong trend toward more Grade >2 nausea (44% vs. 18%; p = 0.052). Regarding late toxicity (n = 45), no Grade 3 or 4 late toxicity occurred. Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity, genitourinary toxicity, and fatigue occurred in 4%, 9%, and 1% of patients. Neither concomitant cisplatin nor PALN irradiation increased late toxicity rates. Conclusions: Postoperative IMAT for EC or CC is associated with low acute and late toxicity. Concomitant chemotherapy and PALN irradiation influences acute but not late toxicity.

  3. Integration of microvascular, interstitial, and lymphatic function to determine the effect of their interaction on interstitial fluid volume 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongaonkar, Ranjeet Manohar

    2009-05-15

    Although the physics of interstitial fluid balance is relatively well understood, clinical options for the treatment of edema, the accumulation of fluid in the interstitium, are limited. Two related reasons for this failure ...

  4. Determination of Interstitial Water Chemistry and Porosity in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    of a petroleum hydrocarbon plume in the U.K. Upper Chalk aquifer as part of a natural attenuation assessment to the composition of the host material (1). Data on interstitial water chemistry are important for correlating hydraulic and gas- pressure squeezing (12-15), centrifugation (1, 3), porous suction samplers (2, 7

  5. Microdefects and self-interstitial diffusion in crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowlton, W.B.

    1998-05-01

    In this thesis, a study is presented of D-defects and self-interstitial diffusion in silicon using Li ion (Li{sup +}) drifting in an electric field and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Obstruction of Li{sup +} drifting has been found in wafers from certain but not all FZ p-type Si. Incomplete Li{sup +} drifting always occurs in the central region of the wafers. This work established that interstitial oxygen is not responsible for hindering Li{sup +} drifting. TEM was performed on a samples from the partially Li{sup +} drifted area and compared to regions without D-defects. Precipitates were found only in the region containing D-defects that had partially Li{sup +} drifted. This result indicates D-defects are responsible for the precipitation that halts the Li{sup +} drift process. Nitrogen (N) doping has been shown to eliminate D-defects as measured by conventional techniques. Li{sup +} drifting and D-defects provide a useful means to study Si self-interstitial diffusion. The process modeling program SUPREM-IV was used to simulate the results of Si self-interstitial diffusion obtained from Li{sup +} drifting experiments. Anomalous results from the Si self-interstitial diffusion experiments forced a re-examination of the possibility of thermal dissociation of D-defects. Thermal annealing experiments that were performed support this possibility. A review of the current literature illustrates the need for more research on the effects of thermal processing on FZ Si to understand the dissolution kinetics of D-defects.

  6. Ureteral stent insertion for gynecologic interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy. Int J Radiat OncolBrachytherapy Ureteral stent insertion forhigh-dose-rate brachytherapy D. Jeffrey Demanes*, Robyn

  7. Outcomes of High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinn-Bingham, Melva; Puthawala, Ajmel A.; Syed, A.M. Nisar; Sharma, Anil; DiSaia, Philip; Berman, Michael; Tewari, Krishnansu S.; Randall-Whitis, Leslie; Mahmood, Usama; Ramsinghani, Nilam; Kuo, Jeffrey; Chen, Wen-Pin; McLaren, Christine E.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and toxicity of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between March 1996 and May 2009, 116 patients with cervical cancer were treated. Of these, 106 (91%) patients had advanced disease (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIB-IVA). Ten patients had stage IB, 48 had stage II, 51 had stage III, and 7 had stage IVA disease. All patients were treated with a combination of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to the pelvis (5040 cGy) and 2 applications of HDR-ISBT to a dose of 3600 cGy to the implanted volume. Sixty-one percent of patients also received interstitial hyperthermia, and 94 (81%) patients received chemotherapy. Results: Clinical LRC was achieved in 99 (85.3%) patients. Three-year DFS rates were 59%, 67%, 71%, and 57% for patients with stage IB, II, III, and IVA disease, respectively. The 5-year DFS and overall survival rates for the entire group were 60% and 44%, respectively. Acute and late toxicities were within acceptable limits. Conclusions: Locally advanced cervical cancer patients for whom intracavitary BT is unsuitable can achieve excellent LRC and OS with a combination of EBRT and HDR-ISBT.

  8. Extramedullary progression of multiple myeloma despite concomitant medullary response to multiple combination therapies and autologous transplant: a case report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anup Kasi Loknarth; Dakhil, Christopher; Satyan, Megha Teeka; Haideri, Nisreen

    2014-09-08

    Introduction Extramedullary myeloma that occurs during the clinical course of multiple myeloma is rare but is an independent poor prognostic factor with mortality of 73% and median survival of 12 months despite aggressive therapies including novel...

  9. 1 Art Therapy ART THERAPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    1 Art Therapy ART THERAPY Art Therapy Graduate Program trains exceptionally skilled therapists whose professional practice is grounded in a broad understanding of the most current clinical art unique art therapist identity. GRADUATE Master's programs · Master of Arts in the field of art therapy

  10. Automated segmentation of lungs with severe interstitial lung disease in CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automated segmentation of lungs with severe interstitial lung disease in CT Jiahui Wang Department: Accurate segmentation of lungs with severe interstitial lung disease ILD in thoracic computed tomography CT developed in this study a texture analysis-based method for accurate segmentation of lungs with severe ILD

  11. The Role of Silicon Interstitials in the Formation of Boron-Oxygen Defects in Crystalline Silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Role of Silicon Interstitials in the Formation of Boron-Oxygen Defects in Crystalline Silicon@ise.fhg.de Keywords: crystalline silicon, Czochralski, boron-oxygen defect, silicon interstitial Abstract. Oxygen-rich crystalline silicon materials doped with boron are plagued by the presence of a well-known carrier

  12. Hydrogen and chloride ions effects on the automobile interstitial-free steel corrosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    1 Hydrogen and chloride ions effects on the automobile interstitial-free steel corrosion L.Q. Guo 1 Abstract The effects of hydrogen and chloride ions on the corrosion behavior of interstitial-free steel and the corrosion potentials drop sharply. Under a given hydrogen charging current density, the drops of the pitting

  13. Classification of interstitial lung disease patterns with topological texture features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Markus B; Leinsinger, Gerda; Ray, Lawrence A; Wismüller, Axel; 10.1117/12.844318

    2010-01-01

    Topological texture features were compared in their ability to classify morphological patterns known as 'honeycombing' that are considered indicative for the presence of fibrotic interstitial lung diseases in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images. For 14 patients with known occurrence of honey-combing, a stack of 70 axial, lung kernel reconstructed images were acquired from HRCT chest exams. A set of 241 regions of interest of both healthy and pathological (89) lung tissue were identified by an experienced radiologist. Texture features were extracted using six properties calculated from gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM), Minkowski Dimensions (MDs), and three Minkowski Functionals (MFs, e.g. MF.euler). A k-nearest-neighbor (k-NN) classifier and a Multilayer Radial Basis Functions Network (RBFN) were optimized in a 10-fold cross-validation for each texture vector, and the classification accuracy was calculated on independent test sets as a quantitative measure of automated tissue characteriza...

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy as Primary Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Report on Acute Toxicity After Dose Escalation With Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Intraprostatic Lesion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fonteyne, Valerie Villeirs, Geert; Speleers, Bruno; Neve, Wilfried de; Wagter, Carlos de; Lumen, Nicolas; Meerleer, Gert de

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To report on the acute toxicity of a third escalation level using intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer (PCa) and the acute toxicity resulting from delivery of a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to an intraprostatic lesion (IPL) detected on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with or without spectroscopy. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and March 2007, we treated 230 patients with intensity-modulated radiotherapy to a third escalation level as primary therapy for prostate cancer. If an IPL (defined by MRI or MRI plus spectroscopy) was present, a SIB was delivered to the IPL. To report on acute toxicity, patients were seen weekly during treatment and 1 and 3 months after treatment. Toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity scale, supplemented by an in-house-developed scoring system. Results: The median dose to the planning target volume was 78 Gy. An IPL was found in 118 patients. The median dose to the MRI-detected IPL and MRI plus spectroscopy-detected IPL was 81 Gy and 82 Gy, respectively. No Grade 3 or 4 acute gastrointestinal toxicity developed. Grade 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was present in 26 patients (11%). Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was present in 15 patients (7%), and 95 patients developed Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity (41%). No statistically significant increase was found in Grade 2-3 acute gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity after a SIB to an IPL. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that treatment-induced acute toxicity remains low when intensity-modulated radiotherapy to 80 Gy as primary therapy for prostate cancer is used. In addition, a SIB to an IPL did not increase the severity or incidence of acute toxicity.

  15. Needle-free interstitial fluid acquisition using a Lorentz-force actuated jet injector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Jean H

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial fluid (ISF) provides information on a patient's health as it contains regulatory molecules that are correlated with disease-related processes. However, current ISF acquisition techniques can be slow, resulting ...

  16. A theoretical analysis of interstitial hydrogen : pressure-composition-temperature, chemical potential, enthalpy and entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orondo, Peter Omondi

    2012-01-01

    We provide a first principles analysis of the physics and thermodynamics of interstitial hydrogen in metal. By utilizing recent advances in Density Functional Theory (DFT) to get state energies of the metal-hydrogen system, ...

  17. Interstitial flow influences direction of tumor cell migration through competing mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charest, Joseph L.

    Interstitial flow is the convective transport of fluid through tissue extracellular matrix. This creeping fluid flow has been shown to affect the morphology and migration of cells such as fibroblasts, cancer cells, endothelial ...

  18. Urban temporal storage : re-thinking the public domain using interstitial space in NYC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uchida, Mio

    2010-01-01

    This thesis aims to rethink the notion of public space and civic duty in the city. By using interstitial, underused spaces, without disputing present urban and legal status, the thesis wants to accomodate services for the ...

  19. A STUDY OF PRECIPITATION IN INTERSTITIAL ALLOYS. I. PRECIPITATION SEQUENCE IN Ta-C ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahmen, U.

    2010-01-01

    Acta Meta11urgica A STUDY OF PRECIPITATION IN INTERSTITIALALLOYS. I. PRECIPITATION SEQUENCE IN Ta-C ALLOYS U. Dahmen,ENG-48 y A Study of Precipitation in Interstitial Alloys. I.

  20. Measurements of the oxidation state and concentration of plutonium in interstitial waters of the Irish Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, D.M.; Lovett, M.B.

    1980-01-01

    The question of plutonium movement in interstitial waters resulting from diffusion along concentration gradients or from advective flow is addressed. The results of measurements of both the concentration and the oxidation state of plutonium in interstitial water collected from sediments near the Windscale discharge, in the solid phases of these sediments and in seawater and suspended solids collected at the coring locations are discussed. (ACR)

  1. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbons, John P., E-mail: john.gibbons@marybird.com [Department of Physics, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States); Antolak, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Klein, Eric E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Lam, Kwok L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Roback, Donald M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Centers of North Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Centers of North Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 (United States); Reid, Mark [Department of Medical Physics, Fletcher-Allen Health Care, Burlington, Vermont 05401 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Fletcher-Allen Health Care, Burlington, Vermont 05401 (United States); Khan, Faiz M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, D{sub 0}{sup ?}, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where D{sub 0}{sup ?} = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent D{sub 0}{sup ?} ? 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of d{sub m}, with D{sub 0}{sup ?} = 1 cGy/MU, although both systems are acceptable within the current protocol. For photon beams, the formalism includes the use of blocked fields, physical or dynamic wedges, and (static) multileaf collimation. No formalism is provided for intensity modulated radiation therapy calculations, although some general considerations and a review of current calculation techniques are included. For electron beams, the formalism provides for calculations at the standard and extended SSDs using either an effective SSD or an air-gap correction factor. Example tables and problems are included to illustrate the basic concepts within the presented formalism.

  2. Is Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy an Attractive Option for Unresectable Liver Metastases? A Preliminary Report From a Phase 2 Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scorsetti, Marta; Arcangeli, Stefano; Tozzi, Angelo; Comito, Tiziana; Alongi, Filippo; Navarria, Pierina; Mancosu, Pietro; Reggiori, Giacomo; Fogliata, Antonella; Torzilli, Guido; Tomatis, Stefano; Cozzi, Luca

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of high-dose stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of unresectable liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Patients with 1 to 3 liver metastases, with maximum individual tumor diameters less than 6 cm and a Karnofsky Performance Status of at least 70, were enrolled and treated by SBRT on a phase 2 clinical trial. Dose prescription was 75 Gy on 3 consecutive days. SBRT was delivered using the volumetric modulated arc therapy by RapidArc (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) technique. The primary end-point was in-field local control. Secondary end-points were toxicity and survival. Results: Between February 2010 and September 2011, a total of 61 patients with 76 lesions were treated. Among the patients, 21 (34.3%) had stable extrahepatic disease at study entry. The most frequent primary sites were colorectal (45.9%) and breast (18%). Of the patients, 78.7% had 1 lesion, 18.0% had 2 lesions, and 3.3% had 3 lesions. After a median of 12 months (range, 2-26 months), the in-field local response rate was 94%. The median overall survival rate was 19 months, and actuarial survival at 12 months was 83.5%. None of the patients experienced grade 3 or higher acute toxicity. No radiation-induced liver disease was detected. One patient experienced G3 late toxicity at 6 months, resulting from chest wall pain. Conclusions: SBRT for unresectable liver metastases can be considered an effective, safe, and noninvasive therapeutic option, with excellent rates of local control and a low treatment-related toxicity.

  3. Machine therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Kelly E. (Kelly Elizabeth), 1970-

    2007-01-01

    Machine Therapy is a new practice combining art, design, psychoanalysis, and engineering work in ways that access and reveal the vital, though often unnoticed, relevance of people's interactions and relationships with ...

  4. Muddy Water? Variation in Reporting Receipt of Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy by Population-Based Tumor Registries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Gary V.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Williams, Melanie; Jiang, Jing; Niu, Jiangong; MacKinnon, Jill; Anderson, Patricia; Wohler, Brad; Sinclair, Amber H.; Boscoe, Francis P.; Schymura, Maria J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in the setting of breast cancer, the accuracy of registry radiation therapy (RT) coding compared with the gold standard of Medicare claims. Methods and Materials: Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare data, we identified 73,077 patients aged ?66 years diagnosed with breast cancer in the period 2001-2007. Underascertainment (1 - sensitivity), sensitivity, specificity, ?, and ?{sup 2} were calculated for RT receipt determined by registry data versus claims. Multivariate logistic regression characterized patient, treatment, and geographic factors associated with underascertainment of RT. Findings in the SEER–Medicare registries were compared with three non-SEER registries (Florida, New York, and Texas). Results: In the SEER–Medicare registries, 41.6% (n=30,386) of patients received RT according to registry coding, versus 49.3% (n=36,047) according to Medicare claims (P<.001). Underascertainment of RT was more likely if patients resided in a newer SEER registry (odds ratio [OR] 1.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.60-1.80; P<.001), rural county (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21-1.48; P<.001), or if RT was delayed (OR 1.006/day, 95% CI 1.006-1.007; P<.001). Underascertainment of RT receipt in SEER registries was 18.7% (95% CI 18.6-18.8%), compared with 44.3% (95% CI 44.0-44.5%) in non-SEER registries. Conclusions: Population-based tumor registries are highly variable in ascertainment of RT receipt and should be augmented with other data sources when evaluating quality of breast cancer care. Future work should identify opportunities for the radiation oncology community to partner with registries to improve accuracy of treatment data.

  5. Surface-induced charge at the Ge (001) surface and its interaction with self-interstitials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamiyama, Eiji; Sueoka, Koji [Department of Communication Engineering, Okayama Prefectural University, 111 Kuboki, Soja-shi, Okayama-ken 719-1197 (Japan); Vanhellemont, Jan [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2014-02-21

    The Ge (001) surface with dimer structure, is negatively charged while into the bulk, positive charges are observed even deeper than the fifteenth layer from the surface. This is different from the Si case. This charge distribution can lead to the repulsion of positively charged self-interstitials by the positively charged near surface layer in an implantation or irradiation process. Self-interstitial reflection by Ge surfaces had been proposed to explain the results of diffusion experiments during irradiation whereby positively charged self-interstitials are generated by collisions of highly energetic particles with Ge atoms. We investigated different Ge (001) surface comparing an as-cleaved surface with dangling bonds to a surface with dimer structure, and to a surface terminated by hydrogen atoms. The effect of these different surface terminations on the surface-induced charges in the near surface bulk were calculated by ab initio techniques.

  6. Quality assurance for image-guided radiation therapy utilizing CT-based technologies: A report of the AAPM TG-179

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Balter, Peter A.; Dong Lei; Langen, Katja M.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Miften, Moyed; Moseley, Douglas J.; Pouliot, Jean; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Yoo, Sua

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Commercial CT-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) systems allow widespread management of geometric variations in patient setup and internal organ motion. This document provides consensus recommendations for quality assurance protocols that ensure patient safety and patient treatment fidelity for such systems. Methods: The AAPM TG-179 reviews clinical implementation and quality assurance aspects for commercially available CT-based IGRT, each with their unique capabilities and underlying physics. The systems described are kilovolt and megavolt cone-beam CT, fan-beam MVCT, and CT-on-rails. A summary of the literature describing current clinical usage is also provided. Results: This report proposes a generic quality assurance program for CT-based IGRT systems in an effort to provide a vendor-independent program for clinical users. Published data from long-term, repeated quality control tests form the basis of the proposed test frequencies and tolerances.Conclusion: A program for quality control of CT-based image-guidance systems has been produced, with focus on geometry, image quality, image dose, system operation, and safety. Agreement and clarification with respect to reports from the AAPM TG-101, TG-104, TG-142, and TG-148 has been addressed.

  7. SU-D-16A-07: Photobleaching Predicts Necrosis in Interstitial PDT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, M; Finlay, J; Liu, B; Zhu, T [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetry for PDT has proven to be a challenge thus far, and for prediction of PDT outcome, a singlet oxygen model based on fundamental photophysical parameters has been developed. Previously, the photobleaching effect of photosensitizers was taken into account in the singlet oxygen explicit dosimetry model; here we report of direct measurements of photobleaching in the same model to assess the conditions under which implicit dosimetry using photobleaching can serve as an intermediate surrogate for PDT damage. Methods: Fluorescence spectra were measured interstitially in sensitized mouse tumors prior to after irradiation via a cylindrical diffuser. Photobleaching was determined by the relative decrease in fluorescence amplitude from the initial pre-treatment measurement. Spectra were analyzed by singular value decomposition to determine the photosensitizer concentration. Different photosensitizers were used to see the effect of photobleaching on PDT outcome and the impact of fluence on photobleaching. The drugs used were BPD (at two drug-light intervals), HPPH, and Photofrin. PDT outcome was determined by tumor necrosis radii measured upon sectioning and staining of treated tumors. Results: Post-PDT photosentizer concentrations were compared to initial pre-PDT photosensitizer concentrations, and the decrease was greater with a higher fluence measured during treatment. Furthermore, photobleaching and necrosis radius were found to be positively correlated. The relationship between photobleaching and necrosis radius is sensitizer-dependent, however the differences among sensitizers can be understood in terms of their respective photophysical parameters. Conclusions: Photobleaching is predictive of PDT outcome, but a comprehensive singlet oxygen model, has the potential to further improve the prediction of PDT outcome and the understanding of implicit dosimetry.

  8. Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    term, i.e. the contribution to the total energy from the valence electron density. Consequently we needRelation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr Janne Wallenius a,b,*, Pa¨r Olsson b , Christina Lagerstedt a a Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, KTH

  9. Precipitation of interstitial iron in multicrystalline silicon AnYao Liu1, a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Precipitation of interstitial iron in multicrystalline silicon AnYao Liu1, a and Daniel Macdonald1, multicrystalline silicon, precipitation, supersaturation, spatial distribution Abstract The internal gettering of iron in silicon via iron precipitation at low processing temperatures is known to improve solar cell

  10. SU-E-T-574: Fessiblity of Using the Calypso System for HDR Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J S; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is always a challenge to reconstruct the interstitial catheter for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy on patient CT or MR images. This work aims to investigate the feasibility of using the Calypso system (Varian Medical, CA) for HDR catheter reconstruction utilizing its accuracy on tracking the electromagnetic transponder location. Methods: Experiment was done with a phantom that has a HDR interstitial catheter embedded inside. CT scan with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm was taken for this phantom with two Calypso beacon transponders in the catheter. The two transponders were connected with a wire. The Calypso system was used to record the beacon transponders’ location in real time when they were gently pulled out with the wire. The initial locations of the beacon transponders were used for registration with the CT image and the detected transponder locations were used for the catheter path reconstruction. The reconstructed catheter path was validated on the CT image. Results: The HDR interstitial catheter was successfully reconstructed based on the transponders’ coordinates recorded by the Calypso system in real time when the transponders were pulled in the catheter. After registration with the CT image, the shape and location of the reconstructed catheter are evaluated against the CT image and the result shows an accuracy of 2 mm anywhere in the Calypso detectable region which is within a 10 cm X 10 cm X 10 cm cubic box for the current system. Conclusion: It is feasible to use the Calypso system for HDR interstitial catheter reconstruction. The obstacle for its clinical usage is the size of the beacon transponder whose diameter is bigger than most of the interstitial catheters used in clinic. Developing smaller transponders and supporting software and hardware for this application is necessary before it can be adopted for clinical use.

  11. Migration Mechanisms of Oxygen Interstitial Clusters in UO2 (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport) |(Patent)Inter-Nucleon InteractionsElectronArticle) |

  12. Migration mechanisms of oxygen interstitial cluste (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport) |(Patent)Inter-Nucleon InteractionsElectronArticle) |SciTech

  13. IEEE JOURNAL OF PHOTOVOLTAICS, VOL. 4, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 2014 1185 Imaging As-Grown Interstitial Iron Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEEE JOURNAL OF PHOTOVOLTAICS, VOL. 4, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 2014 1185 Imaging As-Grown Interstitial of one or more of the figures in this paper are available online at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org. Digital

  14. Chemical composition of interstitial waters from the Japan Sea, ODP Leg 128

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturz, A. ); Von Breymann, M.; Dunbar, R. )

    1990-06-01

    During ODP Leg 128, interstitial waters were recovered from Oki Ridge (Site 798) and Kita-Yamato Trough (Site 799) sediment, Sea of Japan. Interstitial water chemical composition reflects diagenetic processes. Evidence indicating organic matter degradation processes includes sulfate depletion, high ammonium concentrations, and shallow maxima of dissolved phosphate. Rapid alkalinity increases in the uppermost sections of the sediments are accompanied by decreases in dissolved calcium, reflecting inorganic calcite precipitation. Authigenic dolomitization results in changes in slopes of the Mg/Ca molar ratios with depth. The opal-A/opal-CT transition is documented by the concentration depth profiles of dissolved silica and lithium. Dolomitization precedes the opal-A/opal-CT transition at both sites. Kita-Yamato Trough sediments show an abrupt change in the compositional character of the pore fluids below 435 mbsf, which coincides with the occurrence of low porosity and high bulk density layers composed of dolomite and opal-CT. These layers impede to some extent diffusional communication with the overlying interstitial waters. The interstitial waters in sediments below 435 mbsf have chloride concentrations of 504-515 mM, significantly lower than that of modern day Japan Sea water (540 mM). The presence of low chloride waters within Miocene age sediments may indicate: (1) diagenetic reactions that involve the release of exchangeable and structural bound water from clay minerals and/or opal-A, (2) Miocene connate brackish lake water, (3) phase separation of hydrothermal fluids associated with rifting, (4) potential effects of clay membrane filtration in a high pressure zone.

  15. Most Viewed Documents for Biology and Medicine: December 2014...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Most Viewed Documents for Biology and Medicine: December 2014 Dose and volume specification for reporting interstitial therapy NONE (1997) 38 Modification to the Monte Carlo...

  16. Cinnamaldehyde impairs high glucose-induced hypertrophy in renal interstitial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, Louis Kuoping [Department of Cosmeceutics, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Chang, W.-T.; Shih, Y.-W. [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, Tainan 717, Taiwan (China); Huang, J.-S., E-mail: jaushyang12@hotmail.co [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, Tainan 717, Taiwan (China)

    2010-04-15

    Cinnamaldehyde is a major and a bioactive compound isolated from the leaves of Cinnamomum osmophloeum kaneh. To explore whether cinnamaldehyde was linked to altered high glucose (HG)-mediated renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in diabetic nephropathy (DN), the molecular mechanisms of cinnamaldehyde responsible for inhibition of HG-induced hypertrophy in renal interstitial fibroblasts were examined. We found that cinnamaldehyde caused inhibition of HG-induced cellular mitogenesis rather than cell death by either necrosis or apoptosis. There were no changes in caspase 3 activity, cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein expression, and mitochondrial cytochrome c release in HG or cinnamaldehyde treatments in these cells. HG-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (but not the Janus kinase 2/signal transducers and activators of transcription) activation was markedly blocked by cinnamaldehyde. The ability of cinnamaldehyde to inhibit HG-induced hypertrophy was verified by the observation that it significantly decreased cell size, cellular hypertrophy index, and protein levels of collagen IV, fibronectin, and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA). The results obtained in this study suggest that cinnamaldehyde treatment of renal interstitial fibroblasts that have been stimulated by HG reduces their ability to proliferate and hypertrophy through mechanisms that may be dependent on inactivation of the ERK/JNK/p38 MAPK pathway.

  17. Correlation between the electronic structures and diffusion paths of interstitial defects in semiconductors: The case in CdTe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Jie; Yang, Jihui; Da Silva, J. L.F.; Wei, Su-Huai

    2014-10-30

    Using first-principles calculations, we study the diffusions of interstitial defects Cd, Cu, Te, and Cl in CdTe. We find that the diffusion behavior is strongly correlated with the electronic structure of the interstitial diffuser. For Cd and Cu, because the defect state is the non-degenerated slike state under Td symmetry, the diffusions are almost along the [111] directions between the tetrahedral sites, although the diffusion of Cu shows some deviation due to the s - d coupling. The diffusions of the neutral and charged Cd and Cu follow similar paths. However, for Te and Cl atoms, because the defect statemore »is the degenerated p-like state under Td symmetry, large distortions occur. Therefore, the diffusion paths are very different from those of Cd and Cu interstitials, and depend strongly on the charge states of the interstitial atoms. For Te, we find that the distortion is mostly stabilized by the crystal-field splitting, but for Cl, the exchange splitting plays a more important role.« less

  18. Correlation between the electronic structures and diffusion paths of interstitial defects in semiconductors: The case in CdTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Jie; Yang, Jihui; Da Silva, J. L.F.; Wei, Su-Huai

    2014-10-30

    Using first-principles calculations, we study the diffusions of interstitial defects Cd, Cu, Te, and Cl in CdTe. We find that the diffusion behavior is strongly correlated with the electronic structure of the interstitial diffuser. For Cd and Cu, because the defect state is the non-degenerated slike state under Td symmetry, the diffusions are almost along the [111] directions between the tetrahedral sites, although the diffusion of Cu shows some deviation due to the s - d coupling. The diffusions of the neutral and charged Cd and Cu follow similar paths. However, for Te and Cl atoms, because the defect state is the degenerated p-like state under Td symmetry, large distortions occur. Therefore, the diffusion paths are very different from those of Cd and Cu interstitials, and depend strongly on the charge states of the interstitial atoms. For Te, we find that the distortion is mostly stabilized by the crystal-field splitting, but for Cl, the exchange splitting plays a more important role.

  19. Correlation between the electronic structures and diffusion paths of interstitial defects in semiconductors: The case in CdTe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Jie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yang, Jihui [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Da Silva, J. L.F. [Univ. of Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil). Sao Carlos Institute of Chemistry; Wei, Su-Huai [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we study the diffusions of interstitial defects Cd, Cu, Te, and Cl in CdTe. We find that the diffusion behavior is strongly correlated with the electronic structure of the interstitial diffuser. For Cd and Cu, because the defect state is the non-degenerated slike state under Td symmetry, the diffusions are almost along the [111] directions between the tetrahedral sites, although the diffusion of Cu shows some deviation due to the s - d coupling. The diffusions of the neutral and charged Cd and Cu follow similar paths. However, for Te and Cl atoms, because the defect state is the degenerated p-like state under Td symmetry, large distortions occur. Therefore, the diffusion paths are very different from those of Cd and Cu interstitials, and depend strongly on the charge states of the interstitial atoms. For Te, we find that the distortion is mostly stabilized by the crystal-field splitting, but for Cl, the exchange splitting plays a more important role.

  20. Pressure effect on stabilities of self-Interstitials in HCP structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Qing; Ji, Wei; Lian, Jie; Chen, Xiao-jia; Huang, Hanchen; Gao, Fei; De, Suvranu

    2014-07-18

    The self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) mediate the evolution of micro-structures which is crucial in understanding the instabilities of hexagonal close packed (HCP) structures. Taken zirconium as a prototype, we investigate the pressure effect on the stabilities of SIAs using first-principles calculations based on density-functional theory. We found that the pressure greatly affects the stability of the SIAs. The SIAs in basal planes are more stable to changes in pressure. The most stable SIA configuration changes from basal octahedral (BO) to octahedral (O) at pressure of 21 GPa. The lowest formation enthalpy configuration switches from BO to S (split-dumbbell) at P = 30 GPa. Our results reveal that it is important to take the pressure effect into account when predicting the micro-structural evolution of HCP structures.

  1. Quality Assurance of Multifractionated Pelvic Interstitial Brachytherapy for Postoperative Recurrences of Cervical Cancers: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shukla, Pragya; Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Paul, Siji Nojin; Phurailatpam, Reena; SV, Jamema; Shrivastava, Shyam K.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate three-dimensional needle displacements during multifractionated interstitial brachytherapy (BT) for cervical cancers. Methods and Materials: Patients scheduled to undergo pelvic interstitial BT for postoperative and or postradiation vault recurrences were included from November 2009 to December 2010. All procedures were performed under spinal anesthesia. Postprocedure BT planning CT scans were obtained with patients in supine position with arms on the chest (interslice thickness of 3 mm). Thereafter, verification CT was repeated at every alternate fraction. Needle displacements were measured in reference to a relocatable bony point. The mean cranial, caudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral displacements were recorded. Statistical significance of mean interfraction displacements was evaluated with Wilcoxon Test. Results: Twenty patients were included. Seventeen received boost BT (20 Gy/5 fractions/3 days) after external radiation, three received radical BT alone (36 Gy/9 fractions/5-8 days). An average of three scans (range, 2-3) were available per patient, and 357 needle displacements were analyzed. For the entire study cohort, the average of mean needle displacement was 2.5 mm (range, 0-7.4), 17.4 mm (range, 0-27.9), 1.7 mm (range, 0-6.7), 2.1 mm (range, 0-9.5), 1.7 mm (range, 0-9.3), and 0.6 mm (range, 0-7.8) in cranial, caudal, anterior, posterior, right, and left directions, respectively. The mean displacement in the caudal direction was higher between Days 1 and 2 than that between Days 2 and 3 (13.4 mm vs. 3.8 mm; p = 0.01). The average caudal displacements were no different between reirradiation and boost cohort (15.2 vs. 17.8 mm). Conclusions: Clinically significant caudal displacements occur during multifractionated pelvic brachytherapy. Optimal margins need to be incorporated while preplanning brachytherapy to account for interfraction displacements.

  2. Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAboutNuclear Nonproliferation ReportReports Reports

  3. High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Gleason Score 8-10 and PSA Level {<=}15 ng/ mL Treated With Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, L. Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Murray, Brian C.; Reed, Joshua L. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Veterans Affairs Hospital, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: With widespread prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, there has been an increase in men diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer defined by a Gleason score (GS) {>=}8 coupled with a relatively low PSA level. The optimal management of these patients has not been defined. Cause-specific survival (CSS), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated in brachytherapy patients with a GS {>=}8 and a PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL with or without androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to October 2005, 174 patients with GS {>=}8 and a PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL underwent permanent interstitial brachytherapy. Of the patients, 159 (91%) received supplemental external beam radiation, and 113 (64.9%) received ADT. The median follow-up was 6.6 years. The median postimplant Day 0 minimum percentage of the dose covering 90% of the target volume was 121.1% of prescription dose. Biochemical control was defined as a PSA level {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on survival. Results: Ten-year outcomes for patients without and with ADT were 95.2% and 92.5%, respectively, for CSS (p = 0.562); 86.5% and 92.6%, respectively, for bPFS (p = 0.204); and 75.2% and 66.0%, respectively, for OS (p = 0.179). The median post-treatment PSA level for biochemically controlled patients was <0.02 ng/mL. Multivariate analysis failed to identify any predictors for CSS, whereas bPFS and OS were most closely related to patient age. Conclusions: Patients with GS {>=}8 and PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL have excellent bPFS and CSS after brachytherapy with supplemental external beam radiotherapy. The use of ADT did not significantly impact bPFS, CSS, or OS.

  4. Structure of self-interstitial atom clusters in iron and copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Akiyuki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda-shi, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Ghoniem, Nasr M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    The dislocation core structure of self-interstitial atom (SIA) clusters in bcc iron and fcc copper is determined using the hybrid ab initio continuum method of Banerjee et al. [Philos. Mag. 87, 4131 (2007)]. To reduce reliance on empirical potentials and to facilitate predictions of the effects of local chemistry and stress on the structure of defects, we present here a hybrid extension of the Peierls-Nabarro continuum model, with lattice resistance to slip determined separately from ab initio calculations. A method is developed to reconstruct atomic arrangements and geometry of SIA clusters from the hybrid model. The results are shown to compare well with molecular-dynamics simulations. In iron, the core structure does not show dependence on the size of the self-interstitial cluster, and is nearly identical to that of a straight edge dislocation. However, the core structure of SIA clusters in Cu is shown to depend strongly on the cluster size. Small SIA clusters are found to have nondissociated compact dislocation cores, with a strong merging of Shockley partial dislocations and a relatively narrow stacking fault (SF) region. The compact nature of the SIA core in copper is attributed to the strong dependence of the self-energy on the cluster size. As the number of atoms in the SIA cluster increases, Shockley partial dislocations separate and the SF region widens, rendering the SIA core structure to that of an edge dislocation. The separation distance between the two partials widens as the cluster size increases, and tends to the value of a straight edge dislocation for cluster sizes above 400 atoms. The local stress is found to have a significant effect on the atomic arrangements within SIA clusters in copper and the width of the stacking faults. An applied external shear can delocalize the core of an SIA cluster in copper, with positive shear defined to be on the (111) plane along the [112] direction. For an SIA cluster containing 1600 atoms, a positive 1 GPa shear stress delocalizes the cluster and expands the SF to 30b, while a negative shear stress of 2 GPa contracts the core to less than 5b, where b is the Burgers vector magnitude.

  5. Modeling Local Control After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Report From the Elekta Collaborative Lung Research Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohri, Nitin; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Grills, Inga S.; Belderbos, Jose; Hope, Andrew; Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L.; Guckenberger, Matthias; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Xiao, Ying

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment option for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using data collected by the Elekta Lung Research Group, we generated a tumor control probability (TCP) model that predicts 2-year local control after SBRT as a function of biologically effective dose (BED) and tumor size. Methods and Materials: We formulated our TCP model as follows: TCP = e{sup [BED10-c Asterisk-Operator L-TCD50]/k} Division-Sign (1 + e{sup [BED10-c Asterisk-Operator L-TCD50]/k}), where BED10 is the biologically effective SBRT dose, c is a constant, L is the maximal tumor diameter, and TCD50 and k are parameters that define the shape of the TCP curve. Least-squares optimization with a bootstrap resampling approach was used to identify the values of c, TCD50, and k that provided the best fit with observed actuarial 2-year local control rates. Results: Data from 504 NSCLC tumors treated with a variety of SBRT schedules were available. The mean follow-up time was 18.4 months, and 26 local recurrences were observed. The optimal values for c, TCD50, and k were 10 Gy/cm, 0 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively. Thus, size-adjusted BED (sBED) may be defined as BED minus 10 times the tumor diameter (in centimeters). Our TCP model indicates that sBED values of 44 Gy, 69 Gy, and 93 Gy provide 80%, 90%, and 95% chances of tumor control at 2 years, respectively. When patients were grouped by sBED, the model accurately characterized the relationship between sBED and actuarial 2-year local control (r=0.847, P=.008). Conclusion: We have developed a TCP model that predicts 2-year local control rate after hypofractionated SBRT for early-stage NSCLC as a function of biologically effective dose and tumor diameter. Further testing of this model with additional datasets is warranted.

  6. The effect of strain and path change on the mechanical properties and microstructural evolution of ultrafine grained interstitial free steel during equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutter, Steven George

    2007-04-25

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effect of strain and path change on the microstructural evolution of ultrafine grained interstitial free (IF) steel during equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE); to determine the mechanical...

  7. GROUP THERAPY Syracuse University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    your individual needs. In a group, up to eight students meet with one or two group therapists. MostGROUP THERAPY Syracuse University Counseling Center 200 Walnut Place Phone: 315-443-4715 Fax: 315-443-4276 counselingcenter.syr.edu WHAT STUDENTS SAY ABOUT GROUP THERAPY I was really anxious about joining a group

  8. Mixed ligand chelate therapy for plutonium and toxic metals from energy power production. Final report, April 15, 1977-October 14, 1980. [Mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, J.

    1980-10-14

    The results of experiments are summarized on the ability of combinations of chelating agents to modify the genotoxicity or tissue distributions. The mutagenicities of Cr and of chelating agents were determined. The metals described in the report are Pu(IV), Cd(II), Cr(III), and Cr(VI). Accurate measurements were made of the ability of CaNa/sub 2/EDTA, CaNa/sub 3/DTPA, and DMPS to reduce mortality in mice given doses (i.p.) of CdCl/sub 2/ well above the 100% lethal level. The efficacy in terms of the mmoles/kg needed to reduce the mortality was: DTPA > EDTA > DMPS. The combination of DTPA + DMPS proved most promising though little evidence for mixed complex formation was noted. Potentiometric titration studies the case of Pu(IV) a few combinations proved effective, but only when given shortly after Pu administration and then only in the liver but not the skeleton. It is recommended that metabolically stable chelating agents be used in combinations, especially for those combinations which may form very stable mixed ligand chelates.

  9. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine 38:427434 (2006) Preliminary Results of Interstitial Motexafin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yodh, Arjun G.

    2006-01-01

    Lutetium-Mediated PDT for Prostate Cancer K.L. Du, MD, PhD,1 R. Mick, MS,2 T.M. Busch, PhD,1 T.C. Zhu, Ph, using motexafin lutetium-mediated PDT for recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma. Dosimetry of light fluence Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: photodynamic therapy; prostate cancer; adenocarcinoma; motexafin lutetium

  10. Reports

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnPandAlba Craft

  11. Reports

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnPandAlba Craftaehsed herewith

  12. A Comparison of Three Music Therapy Introduction Dialogues on Acceptance of Music Therapy Services by Cancer Patients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barck, Leanne Kathleen

    2014-12-31

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of 3 different music therapy introduction dialogues with cancer patients. Relationships between patient-reported anxiety levels, sex, and age and the acceptance rate of music...

  13. Comparison of precipitate behaviors in ultra-low carbon, titanium-stabilized interstitial free steel sheets under different annealing processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, J.; Wang, X.

    1999-12-01

    Ultra-low carbon, titanium-stabilized interstitial free (ULC Ti-IF) steel sheets are widely used in the automobile industry because of excellent deep drawability. The annealing process is critical to their final property, and there are two different annealing processes used in industrial production of interstitial free (IF) steel sheets, namely batch annealing and continuous annealing. In this study, precipitation behaviors of titanium IF steels, that is, TiN, TiS, Ti{sub 4}(CS){sub 2}, and TiC, the size and dispersion of TiN, TiS, and Ti{sub 4}(CS){sub 2} remained almost unchanged after either annealing process. Conversely, the average size of a TiC particle increased substantially after both annealing processes, while TiC after continuous annealing was larger than that after batch annealing due to the higher heating temperature of continuous annealing. Two new particles, FeTiP and (Ti, Mn)S, were also observed in the batch annealing process but not in continuous annealing. The structure of FeTiP and (Ti, Mn)S were studied, and furthermore the evolution of FeTiP precipitation was found to be closely related to recrystallization in batch annealing. Finally, the interrelation among processing parameters, precipitation behaviors, and final property was studied.

  14. PHYSICAL THERAPY Degree Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Doctor of PHYSICAL THERAPY Degree Program In 1952, the University of Connecticut became the first Neag School of Education University of Connecticut 2095 Hillside Road, U-1110 Storrs, Connecticut 06269 #12;What We Look For: All applicants must meet the University of Connecticut Graduate School admission

  15. Structure, Stoichiometry and Stability in Magnetoplumbite and {beta}-Alumina Structured Type Ceramics. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cormack, A. N.

    2004-03-01

    Work has been completed on the atomistic simulation of hexa-aluminate ceramics with the magnetoplumbite and beta-alumina type structures. In this report, three aspects of the work are highlighted. One is the simulation of surface structures. The second concerns details of the interstitially mechanisms observed in molecular dynamics simulations. The novel result here is the observation that the lattice ion always leaves its Beevers-Ross site before the aBR interstitial begins to move towards the lattice site. It is also found that, as expected, the interstitial mechanism is the most common mechanism in the heavily disordered nonstoichiometric structure, as well as in the stoichiometric material. Finally, the disposition of trivalent europium in the phosphor material BAM has been elucidated.

  16. RAPID ASSESSMENT OF AS-GROWN INTERSTITIAL IRON CONCENTRATION AND IMPACT ON P-TYPE SILICON BLOCKS VIA SPECTRAL PHOTOLUMINESCENCE IMAGING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Canberra, Australia 3 Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Freiburg, Germany 4 BT Imaging Pty Ltd South Wales, Sydney, Australia 2 Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University to the further understanding of the crystallization and following cell processing. Interstitial iron has been

  17. Simulation of xenon, uranium vacancy and interstitial diffusion and grain boundary segregation in UO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersson, Anders D.; Tonks, Michael R.; Casillas, Luis; Nerikar, Pankaj; Vyas, Shyam; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2014-10-31

    In light water reactor fuel, gaseous fission products segregate to grain boundaries, resulting in the nucleation and growth of large intergranular fission gas bubbles. Based on the mechanisms established from density functional theory (DFT) and empirical potential calculations 1, continuum models for diffusion of xenon (Xe), uranium (U) vacancies and U interstitials in UO2 have been derived for both intrinsic conditions and under irradiation. Segregation of Xe to grain boundaries is described by combining the bulk diffusion model with a model for the interaction between Xe atoms and three different grain boundaries in UO2 ( ?5 tilt, ?5 twist and a high angle random boundary),as derived from atomistic calculations. All models are implemented in the MARMOT phase field code, which is used to calculate effective Xe and U diffusivities as well as redistribution for a few simple microstructures.

  18. In-Situ Characterization of Cloud Condensation Nuclei, Interstitial, and background Particles using Single Particle Mass Spectrometer, SPLAT II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; Earle, Michael; Easter, Richard C.; Korolev, Alexei; Leaitch, W. R.; Liu, Peter; Macdonald, A. M.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Strapp, Walter

    2010-10-01

    Aerosol indirect effect remains the most uncertain aspect of climate change modeling because proper test requires knowledge of individual particles sizes and compositions with high spatial and temporal resolution. We present the first deployment of a single particle mass spectrometer (SPLAT II) that is operated in a dual data acquisition mode to measure all the required individual particle properties with sufficient temporal resolution to definitively resolve the aerosol-cloud interaction in this exemplary case. We measured particle number concentrations, asphericity, and individual particle size, composition, and density with better than 60 seconds resolution. SPLAT II measured particle number concentrations between 70 particles cm-3and 300 particles cm-3, an average particle density of 1.4 g cm-3. Found that most particles are composed of oxygenated organics, many of which are mixed with sulfates. Biomass burn particles some with sulfates were prevalent, particularly at higher altitudes, and processed sea-salt was observed over the ocean. Analysis of cloud residuals shows that with time cloud droplets acquire sulfate by the reaction of peroxide with SO2. Based on the particle mass spectra and densities we find that the compositions of cloud condensation nuclei are similar to those of background aerosol but, contain on average ~7% more sulfate, and do not include dust and metallic particles. A comparison between the size distributions of background, activated, and interstitial particles shows that while nearly none of the activated particles is smaller than 115 nm, more than 80% of interstitial particles are smaller than 115 nm. We conclude that for this cloud the most important difference between CCN and background aerosol is particle size although having more sulfate also helps.

  19. SU-E-T-507: Interfractional Variation of Fiducial Marker Position During HDR Brachytherapy with Cervical Interstitial Needle Template

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, S; Kim, R; Benhabib, S; Araujo, J; Burnett, L; Duan, J; Popple, R; Wu, X; Cardan, R; Brezovich, I [UniversityAlabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: HDR brachytherapy using interstitial needle template for cervical cancer is commonly delivered in 4-5 fractions. Routine verification of needle positions before each fraction is often based on radiographic imaging of implanted fiducial markers. The current study evaluated interfractional displacement of implanted fiducial markers using CT images. Methods: 9 sequential patients with cervical interstitial needle implants were evaluated. The superior and inferior borders of the target volumes were defined by fiducial markers in planning CT. The implant position was verified with kV orthogonal images before each fraction. A second CT was acquired prior 3rd fraction (one or 2 days post planning CT). Distances from inferior and superior fiducial markers to pubic symphysis plane (perpendicular to vaginal obtulator)were measured. Distance from needle tip of a reference needle (next to the inferior marker) to the pubic symphysis plane was also determined. The difference in fiducial marker distance or needle tip distance between planning CT and CT prior 3rd fraction were measured to assess markers migration and needle displacement. Results: The mean inferior marker displacement was 4.5 mm and ranged 0.9 to 11.3 mm. The mean superior marker displacement was 2.7 mm and ranged 0 to 10.4 mm. There was a good association between inferior and superior marker displacement (r=0.95). Mean averaged inferior and superior marker displacement was 3.3 mm and ranged from 0.1 to 10.9 mm, with a standard deviation of 3.2 mm. The mean needle displacement was 5.6 mm and ranged 0.2 to 15.6 mm. Needle displacements were reduced (p<0.05) after adjusting according to needle-to-fiducials distance. Conclusion: There were small fiducial marker displacements between HDR fractions. Our study suggests a target margin of 9.7 mm to cover interfractional marker displacements (in 95% cases) for pretreatment verification based on radiographic imaging.

  20. Proton beam therapy facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  1. Neutron capture therapies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C. (Cambridge, MA); Shefer, Ruth E. (Newton, MA); Klinkowstein, Robert E. (Winchester, MA)

    1999-01-01

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.).sup.7 Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  2. Density functional theory study on the interstitial chemical shifts of main-group-element centered hexazirconium halide clusters; synthetic control of speciation in [(Zr6ZCl12)] (Z = B, C)-based mixed ligand complexes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Jingyi

    2005-08-29

    The correlation between NMR chemical shifts of interstitial atoms and electronic structures of boron- and carbon-centered hexazirconium halide clusters was investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculation. The ...

  3. VISTAnet: Radiation therapy treatment planning through rapid dose calculation and interactive 3D volume visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State, Andrei

    deliver a high radiation dose to the planning target volume and a low dose to surrounding normal tissueVISTAnet: Radiation therapy treatment planning through rapid dose calculation and interactive 3D capable of real-time radiation therapy dose calculation and display. We report on the methods used

  4. Therapist and Adolescent Behavior in Online Therapy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cepeda, Lisa Marie

    2009-05-15

    and repeated opportunities (anticipate future communications) to exchange information and build relationships. To examine the extent to which the process of online therapy resembles face-to-face therapy, online therapy transcripts were examined through a...

  5. Anticoagulation Drug Therapy: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harter, Katherine; Levine, Michael; Henderson, Sean O.

    2015-01-01

    et al. Anticoagulation Drug Therapy: A Review 15. NishijimaRandomized antiplatelet drugs. In: Goodman & Gilman’s The2008;24:2757-65. Cardiovasc Drugs. 2006;6:265-85. 34. Nordt

  6. In vivo photodynamic therapy using upconversion nanoparticles as remote-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    destruction. Moreover, invasive interstitial PDT which involves percutaneous implantation of light emitting diode (LED) probes arranged in a cylinder tip to fit into a balloon catheter to illuminate tumors

  7. Quantum states and specific heat of low-density He gas adsorbed within the carbon nanotube interstitial channels: Band structure effects and potential dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Siber; H. Buljan

    2002-09-13

    We calculate the energy-band structure of a He atom trapped within the interstitial channel between close-packed nanotubes within a bundle and its influence on the specific heat of the adsorbed gas. A robust prediction of our calculations is that the contribution of the low-density adsorbed gas to the specific heat of the nanotube material shows pronounced nonmonotonic variations with temperature. These variations are shown to be closely related to the band gaps in the adsorbate density of states.

  8. Electrical signature analysis to quantify human and animal performance on fitness and therapy equipment such as a treadmill

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cox, Daryl F.; Hochanadel, Charles D.; Haynes, Howard D.

    2010-05-18

    The invention is a human and animal performance data acquisition, analysis, and diagnostic system for fitness and therapy devices having an interface box removably disposed on incoming power wiring to a fitness and therapy device, at least one current transducer removably disposed on said interface box for sensing current signals to said fitness and therapy device, and a means for analyzing, displaying, and reporting said current signals to determine human and animal performance on said device using measurable parameters.

  9. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-08-04

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in neutron irradiated nuclear materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1:0a? to 3:3a? have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomicmore »level using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a? by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. This value agrees well with the experimental estimate. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.« less

  10. Chemoradiotherapeutic wrinkled mesoporous silica nanoparticles for use in cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munaweera, Imalka; Balkus, Kenneth J. Jr., E-mail: Balkus@utdallas.edu, E-mail: Anthony.DiPasqua@unthsc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 West Campbell Rd., Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Koneru, Bhuvaneswari; Shi, Yi; Di Pasqua, Anthony J., E-mail: Balkus@utdallas.edu, E-mail: Anthony.DiPasqua@unthsc.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of North Texas System College of Pharmacy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, Texas 76107 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Over the last decade, the development and application of nanotechnology in cancer detection, diagnosis, and therapy have been widely reported. Engineering of vehicles for the simultaneous delivery of chemo- and radiotherapeutics increases the effectiveness of the therapy and reduces the dosage of each individual drug required to produce an observable therapeutic response. We here developed a novel chemoradiotherapeutic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine lipid coated/uncoated platinum drug loaded, holmium-containing, wrinkled mesoporous silica nanoparticle. The materials were characterized with TEM, FTIR, {sup 1}H NMR, energy dispersive x-ray, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and zeta potential measurements. In vitro platinum drug release from both lipid coated and uncoated chemoradiotherapeutic wrinkled mesoporous silica are reported. Various kinetic models were used to analyze the release kinetics. The radioactivity of the chemoradiotherapeutic nanocarriers was measured after neutron-activation.

  11. Cancer Therapy with Particle Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    Cancer Therapy with Particle Beams #12;· The potential to use high energy particle beams to treat many types of cancer has been known even before their creation. · The availability of these treatments to be used in medicine, specifically for the treatment of certain cancers. His paper was published when

  12. Tailoring couple therapy techniques to client needs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsueh, Annie C.

    2010-01-14

    Research illuminating which therapist techniques are used in care-as-usual couple therapy, and under what circumstances, can contribute to a fuller understanding of how therapy works. The overall goal of the present study was to better understand...

  13. Radiation Therapy Program Technical Standards Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMillan, Andrew

    Radiation Therapy Program Technical Standards Procedure Original Approval Date: October 27, 2014 of the Radiation Therapy Program. 1 #12;Radiation Therapy Program Technical Standards Procedure accurately observe, as well as competently and independently complete complex technical procedures in a reasonable amount

  14. STANFORD REDWOOD CITY INFUSION THERAPY CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puglisi, Joseph

    STANFORD REDWOOD CITY INFUSION THERAPY CENTER Stanford Redwood City Infusion Therapy Center 450 that the new Stanford Redwood City Infusion Therapy Center opened on January 6, 2014. This new state previously received infusion treatments in the Infusion Treatment Area (ITA) at the Stanford Cancer Center

  15. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October--December 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from October 1 to December 31, 1988. For this reporting period, there were no abnormal occurrences at nuclear power plants licensed to operate. There was one abnormal occurrence under other NRC-issued licenses involving a medical therapy misadministration. Three other abnormal occurrences were reported by Agreement States. The State of New York reported an event involving multiple medical therapy misadministrations. The State of Maryland reported two events, both occurring at the same hospital. One involved a single medical therapy misadministration and the second involved multiple medical therapy misadministrations. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences. 3 refs.

  16. PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY MEASUREMENTS IN A REPRESENTATIVE GAS-COOLED PRISMATIC REACTOR CORE MODEL: FLOW IN THE COOLANT CHANNELS AND INTERSTITIAL BYPASS GAPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas E. Conder; Richard Skifton; Ralph Budwig

    2012-11-01

    Core bypass flow is one of the key issues with the prismatic Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, and it refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial, non-cooling passages between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. To determine the bypass flow, a double scale representative model was manufactured and installed in the Matched Index-of-Refraction flow facility; after which, stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the flow field within. PIV images were analyzed to produce vector maps, and flow rates were calculated by numerically integrating over the velocity field. It was found that the bypass flow varied between 6.9-15.8% for channel Reynolds numbers of 1,746 and 4,618. The results were compared to computational fluid dynamic (CFD) pre-test simulations. When compared to these pretest calculations, the CFD analysis appeared to under predict the flow through the gap.

  17. A Prospective Longitudinal Clinical Trial Evaluating Quality of Life After Breast-Conserving Surgery and High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garsa, Adam A.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; DeWees, Todd A.; Deshields, Teresa L.; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Cyr, Amy E.; Naughton, Michael; Aft, Rebecca; Gillanders, William E.; Eberlein, Timothy; Matesa, Melissa A.; Ochoa, Laura L.; Zoberi, Imran

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively examine quality of life (QOL) of patients with early stage breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and December 2008, 151 patients with early stage breast cancer were enrolled in a phase 2 prospective clinical trial. Eligible patients included those with Tis-T2 tumors measuring ?3 cm excised with negative surgical margins and with no nodal involvement. Patients received 3.4 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy. QOL was measured using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, version 3.0, and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires. The QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23 questionnaires were evaluated during pretreatment and then at 6 to 8 weeks, 3 to 4 months, 6 to 8 months, and 1 and 2 years after treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 55 months. Breast symptom scores remained stable in the months after treatment, and they significantly improved 6 to 8 months after treatment. Scores for emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective showed significant improvement 2 years after treatment. Symptomatic fat necrosis was associated with several changes in QOL, including increased pain, breast symptoms, systemic treatment side effects, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as decreased role functioning, emotional functioning, and social functioning. Conclusions: HDR multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy was well tolerated, with no significant detrimental effect on measured QOL scales/items through 2 years of follow-up. Compared to pretreatment scores, there was improvement in breast symptoms, emotional functioning, social functioning, and future perspective 2 years after treatment.

  18. Progress Reports Reporting Obligations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    Progress Reports - 1 - Reporting Obligations When submitting applications and accepting awards, Syracuse University agrees to adhere to a sponsor's reporting requirements. Principal Investigators/Project Directors (PIs/PDs) agree to fulfill these reporting requirements and other sponsor conditions when

  19. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (San Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Longmeadow, MA); Olsen, Howard B. (Irvine, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

    2010-09-21

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  20. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-06-25

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  1. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-12-03

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  2. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Redlands, CA); Olsen, Howard B. (Colton, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

    2008-07-08

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  3. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  4. Dynamics of vascular normalization during anti-angiogenic therapy : implications for combination therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Ricky T. (Ricky Tsee-Wai)

    2005-01-01

    Solid tumors require blood vessels for growth, and the goal of anti-angiogenic therapy is to destroy the tumor vasculature. Recent findings suggest that anti-angiogenic therapy enhances radiation and chemotherapy responses. ...

  5. Continuing Physical Therapy Education School of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Continuing Physical Therapy Education School of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine Presents: Conference Fund & College of Medicine Visiting Lecture Fund Visiting Lecture Fund #12;CONFERENCE OVERVIEW of Physical Therapy in the College of Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan. Alumni from across

  6. BERAC Subcommittee Report on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Clinical

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H.4OfficeArizonaScience

  7. Validation of mathematical models for the prediction of organs-at-risk dosimetric metrics in high-dose-rate gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damato, Antonio L.; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Cormack, Robert A. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)] [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Given the complicated nature of an interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy treatment plan, the use of a quantitative tool to evaluate the quality of the achieved metrics compared to clinical practice would be advantageous. For this purpose, predictive mathematical models to predict the D{sub 2cc} of rectum and bladder in interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy are discussed and validated.Methods: Previous plans were used to establish the relationship between D2cc and the overlapping volume of the organ at risk with the targeted area (C0) or a 1-cm expansion of the target area (C1). Three mathematical models were evaluated: D{sub 2cc}=?*C{sub 1}+? (LIN); D{sub 2cc}=?– exp(–?*C{sub 0}) (EXP); and a mixed approach (MIX), where both C{sub 0} and C{sub 1} were inputs of the model. The parameters of the models were optimized on a training set of patient data, and the predictive error of each model (predicted D{sub 2cc}? real D{sub 2cc}) was calculated on a validation set of patient data. The data of 20 patients were used to perform a K-fold cross validation analysis, with K = 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 20.Results: MIX was associated with the smallest mean prediction error <6.4% for an 18-patient training set; LIN had an error <8.5%; EXP had an error <8.3%. Best case scenario analysis shows that an error ?5% can be achieved for a ten-patient training set with MIX, an error ?7.4% for LIN, and an error ?6.9% for EXP. The error decreases with the increase in training set size, with the most marked decrease observed for MIX.Conclusions: The MIX model can predict the D{sub 2cc} of the organs at risk with an error lower than 5% with a training set of ten patients or greater. The model can be used in the development of quality assurance tools to identify treatment plans with suboptimal sparing of the organs at risk. It can also be used to improve preplanning and in the development of real-time intraoperative planning tools.

  8. A Survey of Hadron Therapy Accelerator Technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA, T.; FLANZ, J.

    2007-06-25

    Hadron therapy has entered a new age [1]. The number of facilities grows steadily, and 'consumer' interest is high. Some groups are working on new accelerator technology, while others optimize existing designs by reducing capital and operating costs, and improving performance. This paper surveys the current requirements and directions in accelerator technology for hadron therapy.

  9. Prototype demonstration of radiation therapy planning code system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, R.C.; Adams, K.J.; Estes, G.P.; Hughes, L.S. III; Waters, L.S.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiation therapy planning is the process by which a radiation oncologist plans a treatment protocol for a patient preparing to undergo radiation therapy. The objective is to develop a protocol that delivers sufficient radiation dose to the entire tumor volume, while minimizing dose to healthy tissue. Radiation therapy planning, as currently practiced in the field, suffers from inaccuracies made in modeling patient anatomy and radiation transport. This project investigated the ability to automatically model patient-specific, three-dimensional (3-D) geometries in advanced Los Alamos radiation transport codes (such as MCNP), and to efficiently generate accurate radiation dose profiles in these geometries via sophisticated physics modeling. Modem scientific visualization techniques were utilized. The long-term goal is that such a system could be used by a non-expert in a distributed computing environment to help plan the treatment protocol for any candidate radiation source. The improved accuracy offered by such a system promises increased efficacy and reduced costs for this important aspect of health care.

  10. Workshop on neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    Potentially optimal conditions for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) may soon be in hand due to the anticipated development of band-pass filtered beams relatively free of fast neutron contaminations, and of broadly applicable biomolecules for boron transport such as porphyrins and monoclonal antibodies. Consequently, a number of groups in the US are now devoting their efforts to exploring NCT for clinical application. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring these groups together to exchange views on significant problems of mutual interest, and to assure a unified and effective approach to the solutions. Several areas of preclinical investigation were deemed to be necessary before it would be possible to initiate clinical studies. As neither the monomer nor the dimer of sulfhydryl boron hydride is unequivocally preferable at this time, studies on both compounds should be continued until one is proven superior.

  11. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

    1994-08-16

    A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

  12. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, Daniel N. (Sound Beach, NY); Dilmanian, F. Avraham (Yaphank, NY); Spanne, Per O. (Shoreham, NY)

    1994-01-01

    A method of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation, in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue.

  13. Selenium fractionation and cycling in the intertidal zone of the Carquinez Strait. Annual Report. October 1, 1995 through December 31, 1996.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zawislanski, P.T.

    2010-01-01

    l Interstitial Water Extraction and Sample HomogenizationExtraction A. 1 Interstitial Water Extraction and SampleA.2 Distilled Water Extraction A.3 Phosphate Extraction A.4

  14. Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui Yunfeng; Galvin, James M.; Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Parker, William; Breen, Stephen; Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing; Papiez, Lech S.; Li, X. Allen; Bednarz, Greg; Chen Wenzhou; Xiao Ying

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA for RTOG clinical trials is feasible and effective. The magnitude of registration discrepancy between institution and reviewer was presented, and the major issues were investigated to further improve this remote evaluation process.

  15. Decision Regret in Men Undergoing Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steer, Anna N.; Aherne, Noel J.; Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques; Shakespeare, Thomas P.; Rural Clinical School Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. Methods and Materials: We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. Results: There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Conclusion: Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery.

  16. Improving Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Using Nuclear Nanotechnology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jordan Andrew

    2013-05-03

    The objectives of this thesis are to produce radioactive antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles to improve the efficacy of targeted radionuclide therapy for the treatment of cancer, and to demonstrate that this product can be produced at Texas A...

  17. Radiation Therapy Program Technical Standards Self-Assessment and Details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMillan, Andrew

    Radiation Therapy Program Technical Standards Self-Assessment and Details Original Approval Date Therapy Program (referred to as the "Program") Technical Standards Policy and Procedure, available of the Radiation Therapy Program. #12;Radiation Therapy Program Technical Standards Self-Assessment and Details 3

  18. Research Report Report 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Report 2012 #12;#12;Research Report 2012 #12;#12;Table of contents Numerical weather, aerosols and air quality page 36 Snow page 40 Oceanography page 44 Observation engineering page 48 Research for aeronautics page 54 Annexes page 57 #12;4 . Research Report 2012 The mission statement of Météo

  19. Technical Design of Hadron Therapy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Lorna Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

  20. Technical design of hadron therapy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Loma Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

  1. CRD Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ucilia

    2007-01-01

    Research Division Report Deconstructing Microbes Metagenomicon page 2 (Scientific Report SciDAC continued from page 1www.ctwatch.org/quarterly. Report Nano Letters continued

  2. Java Therapy: Web-Based Robotic Rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinkensmeyer, David J.

    Java Therapy: Web-Based Robotic Rehabilitation David J. Reinkensmeyer, Clifton T. Pang, Jeff A performance, allowing users and their caregivers to assess rehabilitation progress via the Web. 1 are developing robotic devices, termed "rehabilitators", that physically interact with people to stimulate

  3. Porphyrins for boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko (Center Moriches, NY); Gabel, Detlef (Bremen, DE)

    1990-01-01

    Novel compounds for treatment of brain tumors in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy are disclosed. A method for preparing the compounds as well as pharmaceutical compositions containing said compounds are also disclosed. The compounds are water soluble, non-toxic and non-labile boronated porphyrins which show significant uptake and retention in tumors.

  4. Durchbruch bei der Therapie der Hepatitis C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    Durchbruch bei der Therapie der Hepatitis C: Segen für die Patienten ­ Albtraum für die Behandler -Virushepatitis Oktober 2012 #12;H. Wedemeyer -Virushepatitis Oktober 2012 Hepatitisviren Hepatitis A Feinstone 1973 RNA Hepatitis B Blumberg 1965 DNA Hepatitis C Houghton 1988 RNA Hepatitis D Rizzetto 1977 RNA

  5. Cell Death Pathways in Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mroz, Pawel

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging cancer therapy that uses the combination of non-toxic dyes or photosensitizers (PS) and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species and destroy tumors. The PS can be ...

  6. Radiobiology of normal rat lung in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiger, Jingli Liu

    2006-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary cancer radiation therapy that utilizes biochemical tumor cell targeting and provides a mixed field of high and low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation with differing ...

  7. Development of an interleukin 2 receptor targeted gene therapy vehicle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wattanakaroon, Wanida

    2006-08-16

    The effectiveness of most chemotherapeutic regimens is limited by the toxicity of the therapy to normal healthy cells. Therapies to selectively modulate abnormal T cells bearing the interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) have been ...

  8. In-situ measurement of electrodermal activity during occupational therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, Elliott B. (Elliot Bruce)

    2010-01-01

    Physiological arousal is an important part of occupational therapy for children with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) but therapists do not have a way to objectively measure how therapy affects arousal. We hypothesized ...

  9. IIIPRISMA System Operator's Manual PRISMA Therapy Options ............................................................................. 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    IIIPRISMA System Operator's Manual ... PRISMA Therapy Options .................................................................................................... PRISMA System ............................... xvi Operator's Manual ......................................................... #12;PRISMA System Operator's Manual ia Controller CCA

  10. Optimal Lipid Modification: the Rationale for Combination Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backes, James M.; Gibson, Cheryl A.; Howard, Patricia A.

    2005-01-25

    , combination therapy has been shown to be advantageous in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) resulting in better glycemic control and fewer complications (Bell and Ovalle 2004; Strowig et al 2004). For patients with dyslipidemia, hesitancy to use combination therapy..., combination therapy has been shown to be advantageous in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) resulting in better glycemic control and fewer complications (Bell and Ovalle 2004; Strowig et al 2004). For patients with dyslipidemia, hesitancy to use combination therapy...

  11. Physical Therapy Career Options Human Biology Health & Society (HBHS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    65 Physical Therapy Career Options Human Biology Health & Society (HBHS) Nutritional Sciences ­ CHE-CALS) ________________________________________________________________________________________ Many NS-CHE, NS-CALS and HBHS majors consider physical therapy as a career option because, performance and rehabilitation. The pathway to a career in physical therapy for Cornell undergraduates

  12. Radiation therapy of pediatric brain tumors : comparison of long-term health effects and costs between proton therapy and IMRT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vu, An T. (An Thien)

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important component of pediatric brain tumor treatment. However, radiation-induced damage can lead to adverse long-term health effects. Proton therapy has the ability to reduce the dose delivered ...

  13. The use of photodynamic therapy to treat hidradenitis suppurativa a review and critical analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheinfeld, Noah

    2015-01-01

    T. Photodynamic therapy: off-label and alternative use inreal-life practice of off-label photodynamic therapy using

  14. original article The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Molecular Therapy vol. 20 no. 4, 829839 apr. 2012 829

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Sang

    original article© The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Molecular Therapy vol. 20 no. 4, 829 that the intranasal delivery of HMGB1 siRNA offers an efficient means of gene knockdown-mediated therapy is released by necrotic cells into the extracellular milieu and is also actively secreted by macrophages

  15. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hathout, Lara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l'Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hijal, Tarek [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Théberge, Valérie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, L'Hôtel-Dieu de Québec, Quebec (Canada); Centre des maladies du sein Deschênes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l'Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Vulpe, Horia [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hogue, Jean-Charles [Centre des maladies du sein Deschênes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, Hôpital St-Sacrement, Quebec (Canada); Lambert, Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bahig, Houda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l'Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); and others

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Conventional radiation therapy (RT) administered in 25 fractions after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is the standard treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Although accelerated hypofractionated regimens in 16 fractions have been shown to be equivalent to conventional RT for invasive breast cancer, few studies have reported results of using hypofractionated RT in DCIS. Methods and Materials: In this multicenter collaborative effort, we retrospectively reviewed the records of all women with DCIS at 3 institutions treated with BCS followed by hypofractionated whole-breast RT (WBRT) delivered in 16 fractions. Results: Between 2003 and 2010, 440 patients with DCIS underwent BCS followed by hypofractionated WBRT in 16 fractions for a total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy per fraction). Boost RT to the surgical bed was given to 125 patients (28%) at a median dose of 10 Gy in 4 fractions (2.5 Gy per fraction). After a median follow-up time of 4.4 years, 14 patients had an ipsilateral local relapse, resulting in a local recurrence-free survival of 97% at 5 years. Positive surgical margins, high nuclear grade, age less than 50 years, and a premenopausal status were all statistically associated with an increased occurrence of local recurrence. Tumor hormone receptor status, use of adjuvant hormonal therapy, and administration of additional boost RT did not have an impact on local control in our cohort. On multivariate analysis, positive margins, premenopausal status, and nuclear grade 3 tumors had a statistically significant worse local control rate. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions provides excellent local control for patients with DCIS undergoing BCS.

  16. Quarterly Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Business Expand Doing Business Skip navigation links Financial Information Annual Reports Prior Fiscal Years Quarterly Reports Prior Fiscal Years Financial Overview FY 2014...

  17. Report to congress on abnormal occurrences: January--March 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to congress. This report covers the period from January 1 through March 31, 1992. The abnormal occurrences involving medical therapy misadministrations at NRC-licensed facilities are discussed in this report. There were no abnormal occurrences at a nuclear power plant, and none were reported by NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences.

  18. Acceleration Of Wound Healing Ny Photodynamic Therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hasan, Tayyaba (Arlington, MA); Hamblin, Michael R. (Revere, MA); Trauner, Kenneth (Sacramento, CA)

    2000-08-22

    Disclosed is a method for accelerating wound healing in a mammal. The method includes identifying an unhealed wound site or partially-healed wound site in a mammal; administering a photosensitizer to the mammal; waiting for a time period wherein the photosensitizer reaches an effective tissue concentration at the wound site; and photoactivating the photosensitizer at the wound site. The dose of photodynamic therapy is selected to stimulate the production of one or more growth factor by cells at the wound site, without causing tissue destruction.

  19. Gantry for medical particle therapy facility

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trbojevic, Dejan (Wading River, NY)

    2012-05-08

    A particle therapy gantry for delivering a particle beam to a patient includes a beam tube having a curvature defining a particle beam path and a plurality of fixed field magnets sequentially arranged along the beam tube for guiding the particle beam along the particle path. In a method for delivering a particle beam to a patient through a gantry, a particle beam is guided by a plurality of fixed field magnets sequentially arranged along a beam tube of the gantry and the beam is alternately focused and defocused with alternately arranged focusing and defocusing fixed field magnets.

  20. Gantry for medical particle therapy facility

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trbojevic, Dejan

    2013-04-23

    A particle therapy gantry for delivering a particle beam to a patient includes a beam tube having a curvature defining a particle beam path and a plurality of superconducting, variable field magnets sequentially arranged along the beam tube for guiding the particle beam along the particle path. In a method for delivering a particle beam to a patient through a gantry, a particle beam is guided by a plurality of variable field magnets sequentially arranged along a beam tube of the gantry and the beam is alternately focused and defocused with alternately arranged focusing and defocusing variable field magnets.

  1. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence of an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health and safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period October through December 1991. Five abnormal occurrences at NRC-licensed facilities are discussed in this report. None of these occurrences involved a nuclear power plant. Four involved medical therapy misadministrations and one involved a medical diagnostic misadministration. The NRC's Agreement States reported three abnormal occurrences. Two involved exposures of non-radiation workers and one involved a medical therapy misadministration. The report also contains information that updates some previously reported abnormal occurrences.

  2. Metalloporphyrins and their uses as radiosensitizers for radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    2004-07-06

    The present invention covers radiosensitizers containing as an active ingredient halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages having the structure ##STR1## which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies including, but not limited to, boron neutron--capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. The present invention also covers methods for using these radiosensitizers in tumor imaging and cancer treatment.

  3. Radioisotopes for Medical Diagnostics and Cancer Therapy at BNL...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Radioisotopes for Medical Diagnostics and Cancer Therapy at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear...

  4. 2001 annual report 2001 annual report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual reportelectrical & computer engineering 2001 annual report the university of new mexico department of 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual

  5. Occupational therapy is a healthcare profession that provides services to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    Occupational therapy is a healthcare profession that provides services to individuals of all ages of occupational therapy services, and contributor to the profession. The occupational therapist practitioner and healthcare, participates in clinical research, and advocates appropriately for clients and the profession

  6. Combined Ethanol Injection Therapy and Radiofrequency Ablation Therapy in Percutaneous Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Larger than 4 cm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vallone, Paolo; Catalano, Orlando [National Cancer Institute, Department of Radiology (Italy)], E-mail: orlandcat@tin.it; Izzo, Francesco [National Cancer Institute, Department of Surgical Oncology 'D' (Italy); Siani, Alfredo [National Cancer Institute, Department of Radiology (Italy)

    2006-08-15

    Background. Optimal treatment of large-sized hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still debated, because percutaneous ablation therapies alone do not always achieve complete necrosis. Objective. To report our experience in the treatment of patients with HCC larger than 4 cm in diameter by combined percutaneous ethanol injection and radiofrequency thermal ablation. Methods. In a 5-year period there were 40 consecutive patients meeting the inclusion criteria (24 men and 16 women; age range 41-72 years, mean 58 years). These subjects had a single HCC larger than 4 cm. Twelve subjects also had one or two additional nodules smaller than 4 cm (mean 1.2 nodules per patient). Patients were submitted to one to three sessions consisting of ethanol injection at two opposite tumor poles (mean 12 ml) and then of radiofrequency application through one or two electrodes placed at the tumor center (mean treatment duration 30 min). Results. Complete necrosis was obtained in all cases with one to three sessions (mean 1.3 sessions per patient). All patients experienced pain and fever but one only subject had a major complication requiring treatment (abscess development and fistulization). Overall follow-up was 7-69 months. Two patients showed local recurrence and 9 developed new etherotopic HCC nodules. Seven subjects died during follow-up while 33 were free from recurrence 8-69 months after treatment. Conclusion. A combination of ethanol injection and radiofrequency ablation is effective in the treatment of large HCC.

  7. Intraoperative radiation therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yap, O.W. Stephanie . E-mail: stbeast@stanford.edu; Kapp, Daniel S.; Teng, Nelson N.H.; Husain, Amreen

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and complications in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients with ovarian carcinoma who underwent secondary cytoreduction and intraoperative radiation therapy at our institution between 1994 and 2002 was conducted. After optimal cytoreductive surgery, IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays (200 kVp) using individually sized and beveled cone applications. Outcomes measures were local control of disease, progression-free interval, overall survival, and treatment-related complications. Results: Of these 24 patients, 22 were available for follow-up analysis. Additional treatment at the time of and after IORT included whole abdominopelvic radiation, 9; pelvic or locoregional radiation, 5; chemotherapy, 6; and no adjuvant treatment, 2. IORT doses ranged from 9-14 Gy (median, 12 Gy). The anatomic sites treated were pelvis (sidewalls, vaginal cuff, presacral area, anterior pubis), para-aortic and paracaval lymph node beds, inguinal region, or porta hepatitis. At a median follow-up of 24 months, 5 patients remain free of disease, whereas 17 patients have recurred, of whom 4 are alive with disease and 13 died from disease. Five patients recurred within the radiation fields for a locoregional relapse rate of 32% and 12 patients recurred at distant sites with a median time to recurrence of 13.7 months. Five-year overall survival was 22% with a median survival of 26 months from time of IORT. Nine patients (41%) experienced Grade 3 toxicities from their treatments. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with locally recurrent ovarian cancer, combined IORT and tumor reductive surgery is reasonably tolerated and may contribute to achieving local control and disease palliation.

  8. War, Trauma, and Technologies of the Self : : The Making of Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Marisa Renee

    Therapy Require Technological Enhancement? Virtual Iraq’s Therapeutic Milieu ..Therapy Require Technological Enhancement? Virtual Iraq’s Therapeutic Milieumilieu they saw their work as part of: which was shaped more by experience in entertainment media than in therapy.

  9. Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Hall, William H.; Li, Judy; Beckett, Laurel; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Purdy, James A.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and treatment-related predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred thirty patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively screened using a standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from completion of radiation therapy was 56 months (range, 6-135 months). One-hundred fifty-five patients (47%) were treated by definitive radiation therapy, and 175 (53%) were treated postoperatively. Radiation doses ranged from 50 to 74 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used in 62% of cases, and 133 patients (40%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Forty patients (12%) reported neuropathic symptoms, with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), motor weakness, and/or muscle atrophy (25%). When patients with <5 years of follow-up were excluded, the rate of positive symptoms increased to 22%. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with brachial plexus symptoms: prior neck dissection (p = 0.01), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed that both neck dissection (p < 0.001) and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001) were independently predictive of symptoms. Conclusion: The incidence of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer may be underreported. In view of the dose-response relationship identified, limiting radiation dose to the brachial plexus should be considered when possible.

  10. General Information for Physical Therapy School: Prerequisites for admission to physical therapy school exhibit extreme variation between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    General Information for Physical Therapy School: Prerequisites for admission to physical therapy Chemistry I and II (CHEM 121/121L, CHEM 122/122L) - General Physics I and II (PHYS 151/151L, PHYS 152, 152L, it is not possible to recommend a uniform curriculum that prepares the student for application to all physical

  11. Impact of cognitive-behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder on the neural bases of emotional reactivity to and regulation of social

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    examined whether Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) would modify self-reported) increased brain responses in right superior frontal gyrus (SFG), inferior pa- rietal lobule (IPL), and middle occipital gyrus (MOG) when reacting to social praise, and (b) increases in right SFG and IPL

  12. INSPECTION REPORT

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    more than 100,000 to their respective Offices of Inspector General. Our report on Conference Management at Selected Department Sites (DOEIG-0913, June 2014) revealed that the...

  13. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Use of Deep Saline Formations for Combined Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Needs and Carbon Sequestration at a Regional- Scale: Phase I Report. June, 2008 Disclaimer This...

  14. Cold atmospheric plasma in cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alex; Volotskova, Olga; Ann Stepp, Mary; Srinivasan, Priya; Sandler, Anthony; Trink, Barry

    2013-05-15

    Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas has led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. This paper outlines recent progress in understanding of cold plasma physics as well as application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) in cancer therapy. Varieties of novel plasma diagnostic techniques were developed recently in a quest to understand physics of CAP. It was established that the streamer head charge is about 10{sup 8} electrons, the electrical field in the head vicinity is about 10{sup 7} V/m, and the electron density of the streamer column is about 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3}. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies of CAP action on cancer were performed. It was shown that the cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in-vitro without damaging normal cells and significantly reduces tumor size in-vivo. Studies indicate that the mechanism of action of cold plasma on cancer cells is related to generation of reactive oxygen species with possible induction of the apoptosis pathway. It is also shown that the cancer cells are more susceptible to the effects of CAP because a greater percentage of cells are in the S phase of the cell cycle.

  15. SHORT REPORT Micropatterning of human embryonic stem cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    SHORT REPORT Micropatterning of human embryonic stem cells dissects the mesoderm and endoderm in revised form 10 November 2008; accepted 13 November 2008 Abstract Human pluripotent cells such as human embryonic stem cells (hESC) are a great potential source of cells for cell-based therapies; however

  16. [CANCER RESEARCH 62, 56185621, October 1, 2002] Meeting Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimchi, Adi

    [CANCER RESEARCH 62, 5618­5621, October 1, 2002] Meeting Report Progress in Differentiation of Cancer Research, Chester Beatty Laboratories, London, United Kingdom [A. Z.]; Department of Molecular and pro- grammed cell death as cancer cell-selective therapies. As in the past, the organizers

  17. Stimulation of dendritic cells enhances immune response after photodynamic therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mroz, Pawel

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the primary tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell necrosis ...

  18. A novel nanodelivery system for combination tumor therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eavarone, David A. (David Alan)

    2004-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapy offers many benefits over traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy including fewer toxic side effects and the reduced development of drug resistance. Anti-angiogenics alone have not proven effective in ...

  19. Radiation Therapy for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishan, Amar U.; Modjtahedi, Bobeck S.; Morse, Lawrence S.; Lee, Percy

    2013-03-01

    In the enormity of the public health burden imposed by age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), much effort has been directed toward identifying effective and efficient treatments. Currently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections have demonstrated considerably efficacy in treating neovascular ARMD, but patients require frequent treatment to fully benefit. Here, we review the rationale and evidence for radiation therapy of ARMD. The results of early photon external beam radiation therapy are included to provide a framework for the sequential discussion of evidence for the usage of stereotactic radiation therapy, proton therapy, and brachytherapy. The evidence suggests that these 3 modern modalities can provide a dose-dependent benefit in the treatment of ARMD. Most importantly, preliminary data suggest that all 3 can be used in conjunction with anti-VEGF therapeutics, thereby reducing the frequency of anti-VEGF injections required to maintain visual acuity.

  20. Predicting Couple Therapy Dropouts in Veteran Administration Medical Centers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsueh, Annie

    2012-10-19

    The present study examined predictors of couple therapy dropout in the VA medical centers using six different dropout criteria. The most accurate dropout definitions included using a statistical modeling procedure to determine whether the client...

  1. Köebner phenomenon induced by cupping therapy in a psoriasis patient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Rui-xing; Hui, Yun; Li, Cheng-rang

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of KP in psoriasis and other diseases isto cupping therapy in a psoriasis patient. To our knowledge,R K. The biology of psoriasis. An experimental study of the

  2. Grounded-Encounter Therapy: A Sociodiagnostic and Sociotherapeutic Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swan, L. Alex

    1985-01-01

    patterns of their relationships. The milieu of the so­ cial context is the particular setting that has been created by the coming together of human systems and the -94- Grounded-Encounter Therapy experiences or ways in which the human systems have tried... therein. It grounds the therapy in social diagnosis and explanations of the social situation through encounter between and among the individuals, and between the individuals and the social milieu of the human systems. A process and content is established...

  3. Review of ion beam therapy: Present and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, Jose R.

    2000-06-01

    First therapy efforts at the Bevalac using neon ions took place in the 70's and 80's. Promising results led to construction of HIMAC in Chiba Japan, and more recently to therapy trials at GSI. Both these facilities are now treating patients with carbon beams. Advances in both accelerator technology and beam delivery have taken place at these two centers. Plans are well along for new facilities in Europe and Japan.

  4. Nanofabricated upconversion nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Li, T. A. K. Raap, R. S. Niedbala, and H. J. Tanke, "Up-converting phosphor reporters for nucleic acid microarrays," Nature Biotech. 19, 273-276 (2001). 4. M. Zuiderwijk, H. J. Tanke, R. S. Niedbala, R. Riehn, W. S. Ryu, N. Khanarian, C. K. Tung, D. Tank, and R. H. Austin, "In vivo and scanning

  5. Prospective Study of Local Control and Late Radiation Toxicity After Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, David W.; Marvelde, Luc te; Chua, Boon H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report the local recurrence rate and late toxicity of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) boost to the tumor bed using the Intrabeam System followed by external-beam whole-breast irradiation (WBI) in women with early-stage breast cancer in a prospective single-institution study. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer ?3 cm were recruited between February 2003 and May 2005. After breast-conserving surgery, a single dose of 5 Gy IORT boost was delivered using 50-kV x-rays to a depth of 10 mm from the applicator surface. This was followed by WBI to a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Patients were reviewed at regular, predefined intervals. Late toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring systems. Results: Fifty-five patients completed both IORT boost and external-beam WBI. Median follow-up was 3.3 years (range, 1.4-4.1 years). There was no reported locoregional recurrence or death. One patient developed distant metastases. Grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis was detected in 29 (53%) and 8 patients (15%), respectively. Conclusions: The use of IORT as a tumor bed boost using kV x-rays in breast-conserving therapy was associated with good local control but a clinically significant rate of grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis.

  6. Recent Master's Theses, Professional Reports & Client Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editor, Berkeley

    2007-01-01

    Recent Master's Theses, Professional Reports &Client Reports Adair, Randi. Pacifica Quarry Redevelopment:

  7. Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pugh, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Andrew K., E-mail: aklee@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ?0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ?2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ?2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ?3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ?2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a larger patient cohort are warranted.

  8. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biros, George

    2014-08-18

    This the final report for the project "Large-Scale Optimization for Bayesian Inference in Complex Systems," for the work in the group of the co-PI George Biros.

  9. Informal Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mm ts LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY Post Office Box 1663 Los Alamos. New Mexico 87545 DISTRDU7irM o r TdiS BGGbT.lENT IS UNLIMITED DISCLAIMER This report was...

  10. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeTar, Carleton

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  11. The Efficacy of Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Graves' Orbitopathy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthiesen, Chance, E-mail: chance-matthiesen@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Thompson, J. Spencer [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Thompson, David [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Farris, Bradley; Wilkes, Byron [Dean A. McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence; Bogardus, Carl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To review our institutional outcomes of patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) for Graves' orbitopathy (GO), assess the role of orbital reirradiation, and identify prognostic factors of complete response (CR). Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of 211 patients who presented with a diagnosis of GO and received RT between January 2000-2010. RT dose was 20 Gy in 10 fractions. Patient median age was 51 years (range, 15-84 years), median follow-up was 11 months (range, 1-88 months). Patient symptoms included any combination of proptosis (90.9%), extraocular muscle dysfunction (78.9%), soft tissue signs (68.4%), and diplopia (58.4%). Corticosteroids were used as first-line therapy in 20.6% of patients. Among those who achieved either CR or partial response (PR), prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: Stabilization of disease without recurrence was clinically achieved overall in 202 patients (96.7%). At the completion of RT, 176 patients (84.2%) reported a symptomatic improvement of pretreatment symptoms. CR of GO symptoms was achieved using multiple treatment modalities, including RT by 93 patients (44.5%), of which 32 patients received RT only. Corticosteroids were discontinued in 97.8% of patients who received them as initial therapy. Surgical intervention following radiotherapy was required for 144 (68.9%) of all patients. Fourteen patients received orbital reirradiation for persistent or recurrent symptoms. Five of these achieved a CR, and the other nine achieved disease stabilization but retained persistent ocular symptoms. Long-term side effects of RT included dry eyes (12%). Of the prognostic factors we investigated, only gender predicted CR, which was less common in men (33.9%) than in women (49.7%) p = 0.0471. Conclusions: Orbital radiation for GO is an established treatment modality for patients. Orbital reirradiation is beneficial for patients who do not respond to initial RT or experience symptom recurrence without an apparent risk of increased morbidity.

  12. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O'Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  13. Biochemical Response to Androgen Deprivation Therapy Before External Beam Radiation Therapy Predicts Long-term Prostate Cancer Survival Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Polkinghorn, William R.; Pei, Xin; Kollmeier, Marisa

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the response to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) defined by a decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) to nadir values is associated with improved survival outcomes after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: One thousand forty-five patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with definitive EBRT in conjunction with neoadjuvant and concurrent ADT. A 6-month course of ADT was used (3 months during the neoadjuvant phase and 2 to 3 months concurrently with EBRT). The median EBRT prescription dose was 81 Gy using a conformal-based technique. The median follow-up time was 8.5 years. Results: The 10-year PSA relapse-free survival outcome among patients with pre-radiation therapy PSA nadirs of ?0.3 ng/mL was 74.3%, compared with 57.7% for patients with higher PSA nadir values (P<.001). The 10-year distant metastases-free survival outcome among patients with pre-radiation therapy PSA nadirs of ?0.3 ng/mL was 86.1%, compared with 78.6% for patients with higher PSA nadir values (P=.004). In a competing-risk analysis, prostate cancer-related deaths were also significantly reduced among patients with pre-radiation therapy PSA nadirs of <0.3 ng/mL compared with higher values (7.8% compared with 13.7%; P=.009). Multivariable analysis demonstrated that the pre-EBRT PSA nadir value was a significant predictor of long-term biochemical tumor control, distant metastases-free survival, and cause-specific survival outcomes. Conclusions: Pre-radiation therapy nadir PSA values of ?0.3 ng/mL after neoadjuvant ADT were associated with improved long-term biochemical tumor control, reduction in distant metastases, and prostate cancer-related death. Patients with higher nadir values may require alternative adjuvant therapies to improve outcomes.

  14. Optimization of triiodothyronine therapy in beagles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carnahan, Victoria

    1976-01-01

    not be of maximum benefit to dogs due to: 1) their higher metabolic rate, 2) the fact 3 that the human hormone may not be homologous to canine T-3, and 3) the probability that a faster T- 3 plasma clearance rate exi sts in dogs than in man. The purpose... ng per 100 milliliters (140 ng/. ) . The 7 normal range in humans for T-3 as suggested by one T-3 radioimmunoassay manufacturer is 60 to 190 ng/ , /8 Reports of measurements of canine thyroid hormone plasma levels started appearing...

  15. Successful High Power Acceleration of the HSC Type Injector for Cancer Therapy in IMP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang Lu

    2015-03-25

    A Hybrid single cavity (HSC) linac, which is formed by combining a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) structure and a drift tube (DT) structure into one interdigital-H (IH) cavity, is fabricated and assembled as a proof of principle (PoP) type injector for cancer therapy synchrotron according to the series researches. The injection method of the HSC linac adopt a direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS), which is considered to be the only method for accelerating an intense current heavy ion beam produced by a laser ion source (LIS). The input beam current of the HSC was designed to be 20 milliampere (mA) C6+ ions. According to numerical simulations, the HSC linac could accelerate a 6-mA C6+ beam which meets requirement of the needed particle number for cancer therapy use (108~9 ions per pulse). The injection system adopted HSC injector with the method of DPIS can make the existing multi-turn injection system and the stripping system unnecessary, and also can make the beam pipe of the existing synchrotron magnets downsize which could reduce the whole cost of synchrotron (estimated millions dollars). Details of the measurements and evaluations of the assembled HSC linac, and the results of the high power test using a LIS with DPIS are reported in this paper.

  16. WE-D-BRD-01: Innovation in Radiation Therapy Delivery: Advanced Digital Linac Features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, L; Wong, J; Li, R

    2014-06-15

    Last few years has witnessed significant advances in linac technology and therapeutic dose delivery method. Digital linacs equipped with high dose rate FFF beams have been clinically implemented in a number of hospitals. Gated VMAT is becoming increasingly popular in treating tumors affected by respiratory motion. This session is devoted to update the audience with these technical advances and to present our experience in clinically implementing the new linacs and dose delivery methods. Topics to be covered include, technical features of new generation of linacs from different vendors, dosimetric characteristics and clinical need for FFF-beam based IMRT and VMAT, respiration-gated VMAT, the concept and implementation of station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT), beam level imaging and onboard image guidance tools. Emphasis will be on providing fundamental understanding of the new treatment delivery and image guidance strategies, control systems, and the associated dosimetric characteristics. Commissioning and acceptance experience on these new treatment delivery technologies will be reported. Clinical experience and challenges encountered during the process of implementation of the new treatment techniques and future applications of the systems will also be highlighted. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of emerging digital linacs and summarize their key geometric and dosimetric features. SPORT as an emerging radiation therapy modality specifically designed to take advantage of digital linacs. Discuss issues related to the acceptance and commissioning of the digital linacs and FFF beams. Describe clinical utility of the new generation of digital linacs and their future applications.

  17. Find Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices » Incentives &Reports Find Reports Most

  18. Report2

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding access toSmall ReactorRaymond Davis, Jr.,Workshop Report on a Future

  19. Report to congress on abnormal occurrences: January--March 1992. Volume 15, No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to congress. This report covers the period from January 1 through March 31, 1992. The abnormal occurrences involving medical therapy misadministrations at NRC-licensed facilities are discussed in this report. There were no abnormal occurrences at a nuclear power plant, and none were reported by NRC`s Agreement States. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences.

  20. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October--December 1991. Volume 14, No. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence of an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health and safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period October through December 1991. Five abnormal occurrences at NRC-licensed facilities are discussed in this report. None of these occurrences involved a nuclear power plant. Four involved medical therapy misadministrations and one involved a medical diagnostic misadministration. The NRC`s Agreement States reported three abnormal occurrences. Two involved exposures of non-radiation workers and one involved a medical therapy misadministration. The report also contains information that updates some previously reported abnormal occurrences.

  1. Occurrence Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-25

    To establish and maintain a system for reporting operations information related to DOE-owned or -operated facilities and processing that information to identify the root causes of Unusual, Off-Normal, and Emergency Occurrences and provide for appropriate corrective action. Cancels DOE 5000.3B.

  2. Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  3. A Dosimetric Comparison of Tomotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in the Treatment of High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasquier, David; Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille; Centre Galilee, Clinique de la Louviere, Lille ; Cavillon, Fabrice; Faculte Libre de Medecine, Lille ; Lacornerie, Thomas; Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille ; Touzeau, Claire; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Lartigau, Eric; Universite Lille Nord de France, Lille

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric results of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with pelvic nodal radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plans were generated for 10 consecutive patients treated for high-risk prostate cancer with prophylactic whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) using VMAT and HT. After WPRT, a sequential boost was delivered to the prostate. Plan quality was assessed according to the criteria of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 83 report: the near-minimal (D98%), near-maximal (D2%), and median (D50%) doses; the homogeneity index (HI); and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Beam-on time, integral dose, and several organs at risk (OAR) dosimetric indexes were also compared. Results: For WPRT, HT was able to provide a higher D98% than VMAT (44.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 43.9 {+-} 0.5 Gy, respectively; P=.032) and a lower D2% than VMAT (47.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 49.1 {+-} 0.7 Gy, respectively; P=.005), leading to a better HI. The DSC was better for WPRT with HT (0.89 {+-} 0.009) than with VMAT (0.80 {+-} 0.02; P=.002). The dosimetric indexes for the prostate boost did not differ significantly. VMAT provided better rectum wall sparing at higher doses (V70, V75, D2%). Conversely, HT provided better bladder wall sparing (V50, V60, V70), except at lower doses (V20). The beam-on times for WPRT and prostate boost were shorter with VMAT than with HT (3.1 {+-} 0.1 vs 7.4 {+-} 0.6 min, respectively; P=.002, and 1.5 {+-} 0.05 vs 3.7 {+-} 0.3 min, respectively; P=.002). The integral dose was slightly lower for VMAT. Conclusion: VMAT and HT provided very similar and highly conformal plans that complied well with OAR dose-volume constraints. Although some dosimetric differences were statistically significant, they remained small. HT provided a more homogeneous dose distribution, whereas VMAT enabled a shorter delivery time.

  4. Development of a Novel Robot for Transperineal Needle Based Interventions: Focal Therapy, Brachytherapy and Prostate Biopsies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Jean-Alexandre; Baumann, Michael; Descotes, Jean-Luc; Bolla, Michel; Giraud, Jean-Yves; Rambeaud, Jean-Jacques; Troccaz, Jocelyne; 10.1016/j.juro.2012.06.003

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We report what is to our knowledge the initial experience with a new 3-dimensional ultrasound robotic system for prostate brachytherapy assistance, focal therapy and prostate biopsies. Its ability to track prostate motion intraoperatively allows it to manage motions and guide needles to predefined targets. Materials and Methods: A robotic system was created for transrectal ultrasound guided needle implantation combined with intraoperative prostate tracking. Experiments were done on 90 targets embedded in a total of 9 mobile, deformable, synthetic prostate phantoms. Experiments involved trying to insert glass beads as close as possible to targets in multimodal anthropomorphic imaging phantoms. Results were measured by segmenting the inserted beads in computerized tomography volumes of the phantoms. Results: The robot reached the chosen targets in phantoms with a median accuracy of 2.73 mm and a median prostate motion of 5.46 mm. Accuracy was better at the apex than at the base (2.28 vs 3.83 mm, p <...

  5. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April--June 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    The Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. For this reporting period, there was one abnormal occurrence at nuclear power plants licensed to operate involving significant deficiencies in management controls at Slurry Nuclear Power Station. There was one abnormal occurrence under other NRC-issued licenses; the event involved a medical therapy misadministration. One other abnormal occurrence, involving industrial radiography overexposures, was reported by an Agreement State (Texas). 40 refs.

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLE Interstitial iron concentrations across multicrystalline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wafers were alkaline etched and received a 30 min double PROGRESS IN PHOTOVOLTAICS: RESEARCH Photovoltaics Centre of Excellence, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia

  7. Overview of Light-Ion Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, William T.

    2006-03-16

    In 1930, Ernest Orlando Lawrence at the University of California at Berkeley invented the cyclotron. One of his students, M. Stanley Livingston, constructed a 13-cm diameter model that had all the features of early cyclotrons, accelerating protons to 80 keV using less than 1 kV on a semi-circular accelerating electrode, now called the ''dee''. Soon after, Lawrence constructed the first two-dee 27-Inch (69-cm) Cyclotron, which produced protons and deuterons of 4.8 MeV. In 1939, Lawrence constructed the 60-Inch (150-cm) Cyclotron, which accelerated deuterons to 19 MeV. Just before WWII, Lawrence designed a 184-inch cyclotron, but the war prevented the building of this machine. Immediately after the war ended, the Veksler-McMillan principle of phase stability was put forward, which enabled the transformation of conventional cyclotrons to successful synchrocyclotrons. When completed, the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron produced 340-MeV protons. Following it, more modern synchrocyclotrons were built around the globe, and the synchrocyclotrons in Berkeley and Uppsala, together with the Harvard cyclotron, would perform pioneering work in treatment of human cancer using accelerated hadrons (protons and light ions). When the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron was built, Lawrence asked Robert Wilson, one of his former graduate students, to look into the shielding requirements for of the new accelerator. Wilson soon realized that the 184-Inch would produce a copious number of protons and other light ions that had enough energy to penetrate human body, and could be used for treatment of deep-seated diseases. Realizing the advantages of delivering a larger dose in the Bragg peak when placed inside deep-seated tumors, he published in a medical journal a seminal paper on the rationale to use accelerated protons and light ions for treatment of human cancer. The precise dose localization provided by protons and light ions means lower doses to normal tissues adjacent to the treatment volume compared to those in conventional (photon) treatments. Wilson wrote his personal account of this pioneering work in 1997. In 1954 Cornelius Tobias and John Lawrence at the Radiation Laboratory (former E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) of the University of California, Berkeley performed the first therapeutic exposure of human patients to hadron (deuteron and helium ion) beams at the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron. By 1984, or 30 years after the first proton treatment at Berkeley, programs of proton radiation treatments had opened at: University of Uppsala, Sweden, 1957; the Massachusetts General Hospital-Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory (MGH/HCL), USA, 1961; Dubna (1967), Moscow (1969) and St Petersburg (1975) in Russia; Chiba (1979) and Tsukuba (1983) in Japan; and Villigen, Switzerland, 1984. These centers used the accelerators originally constructed for nuclear physics research. The experience at these centers has confirmed the efficacy of protons and light ions in increasing the tumor dose relative to normal tissue dose, with significant improvements in local control and patient survival for several tumor sites. M.R. Raju reviewed the early clinical studies. In 1990, the Loma Linda University Medical Center in California heralded in the age of dedicated medical accelerators when it commissioned its proton therapy facility with a 250-MeV synchrotron. Since then there has been a relatively rapid increase in the number of hospital-based proton treatment centers around the world, and by 2006 there are more than a dozen commercially-built facilities in use, five new facilities under construction, and more in planning stages. In the 1950s larger synchrotrons were built in the GeV region at Brookhaven (3-GeV Cosmotron) and at Berkeley (6-GeV Bevatron), and today most of the world's largest accelerators are synchrotrons. With advances in accelerator design in the early 1970s, synchrotrons at Berkeley and Princeton accelerated ions with atomic numbers between 6 and 18, at energies that permitted the initiation of several biological studies. It is worth noting that when th

  8. Report from the Radiation Therapy Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG): Research Objectives Workshop 2008.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    sur- vival following brachytherapy for clinically localizedfree survival after brachytherapy for clinically localized

  9. Report from the Radiation Therapy Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG): Research Objectives Workshop 2008.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    2008 It is likely that low-dose radiation combined with anthe impact of low dose radiation in Rituxan-resistantal. Low dose pulsed paclitaxel and concurrent radiation for

  10. Feasibility of combination allogeneic stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury: a case report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    models [99-103], the risk of oncogenesis raises concerns forbased approaches in terms of oncogenesis and allodynia. Case

  11. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Translational Research Program Stem Cell Symposium: Incorporating Stem Cell Hypotheses into Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, Wendy A. Bristow, Robert G.; Clarke, Michael F.; Coppes, Robert P.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Duda, Dan G.; Fike, John R.; Hambardzumyan, Dolores; Hill, Richard P.; Jordan, Craig T.; Milas, Luka; Pajonk, Frank; Curran, Walter J.; Dicker, Adam P.; Chen Yuhchyau

    2009-08-01

    At a meeting of the Translation Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group held in early 2008, attendees focused on updating the current state of knowledge in cancer stem cell research and discussing ways in which this knowledge can be translated into clinical use across all disease sites. This report summarizes the major topics discussed and the future directions that research should take. Major conclusions of the symposium were that the flow cytometry of multiple markers in fresh tissue would remain the standard technique of evaluating cancer-initiating cells and that surrogates need to be developed for both experimental and clinical use.

  12. CRD Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Ucilia

    2007-12-18

    This report has the following articles: (1) Deconstructing Microbes--metagenomic research on bugs in termites relies on new data analysis tools; (2) Popular Science--a nanomaterial research paper in Nano Letters drew strong interest from the scientific community; (3) Direct Approach--researchers employ an algorithm to solve an energy-reduction issue essential in describing complex physical system; and (4) SciDAC Special--A science journal features research on petascale enabling technologies.

  13. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Paul Drake

    2001-11-30

    This final report describes work involving 22 investigators from 11 institutions to explore the dynamics present in supernova explosions by means of experiments on the Omega laser. The specific experiments emphasized involved the unstable expansion of a spherical capsule and the coupling of perturbations at a first interface to a second interface by means of a strong shock. Both effects are present in supernovae. The experiments were performed at Omega and the computer simulations were undertaken at several institutions. B139

  14. Noise as Therapy: A Prelude to Computationally-Based Neurology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milton, John G.

    Noise as Therapy: A Prelude to Computationally-Based Neurology? Disturbances of the autonomic of pharmacological agents. The benefits were obtained by stimulating the vestibular nuclei with noise, i.e. electri de- signed to have the 1/f-type power spectrum character- istic of noise measured in the nervous

  15. Proceedings of the first international symposium on neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Brownell, G.L. (eds.)

    1982-01-01

    This meeting was arranged jointly by MIT and BNL in order to illuminate progress in the synthesis and targeting of boron compounds and to evaluate and document progress in radiobiological and dosimetric aspects of neutron capture therapy. It is hoped that this meeting will facilitate transfer of information between groups working in these fields, and encourage synergistic collaboration.

  16. The Particle Therapy Cancer Research Institute is a member of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nova? To deliver a lower-cost, smaller, lighter, more energy efficient solution for Proton Therapy without for commercial distribution at this time #12;Who is ProNova? ProNova has a strong History of Innovation Developed accessible to the cancer community #12;ProNova Design Principles - Workflow Precision, Productivity, Cost RT

  17. Construction of SAGA HIMAT for carbon ion cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudo, Sho; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Endo, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Totoki, Tadahide [Ion Beam Therapy Center , SAGA HIMAT Foundation, 1-802-3 Hondori-machi, Tosu, Saga 841-0033 (Japan)

    2013-04-19

    SAGA HIMAT is now under construction in Tosu city, Saga prefecture, Kyushu island, Japan. It will open in 2013 and become the fourth carbon ion beam cancer therapy center in Japan. It is a collaborative project among the local governments, industries and universities in northern Kyushu area.

  18. Miniature scintillating detector for small field radiation therapy D. Letourneaua)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pouliot, Jean

    are immersed in water into the radiation field. The detection device consists of two identical 10 m longMiniature scintillating detector for small field radiation therapy D. Le´tourneaua) Centre dosimeter consists of two identical radiation-resistant 10 m long silica optical fibers, each connected

  19. Synchrotron Radiation Therapy from a Medical Physics point of view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prezado, Y.; Berkvens, P.; Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Renier, M.; Bravin, A. [ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Adam, J. F. [INSERM, U836, Equipe 6, BP 170, Grenoble Cedex 9, F-38042 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, B.P. 51, Grenoble Cedex 9, F-38041 (France); ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, B.P. 217, Grenoble Cedex 9, F-38043 (France); Martinez-Rovira, I. [ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fois, G. [ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Cagliari, Strada Provinciale Monserrato Sestu km 0.700, Monserrato, Cagliari 09042 (Italy); Thengumpallil, S. [ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Dipartimento di Fisica E. Amaldi, Universita degli Studi Roma Tre, 84 Via della Vasca Navale, 00146 Roma (Italy); Edouard, M.; Deman, P. [INSERM, U836, Equipe 6, BP 170, Grenoble Cedex 9, F-38042 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, B.P. 51, Grenoble Cedex 9, F-38041 (France); ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Vautrin, M. [INSERM, U836, Equipe 6, BP 170, Grenoble Cedex 9, F-38042 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, B.P. 51, Grenoble Cedex 9, F-38041 (France); DOSIsoft, Cachan (France)

    2010-07-23

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) therapy is a promising alternative to treat brain tumors, whose management is limited due to the high morbidity of the surrounding healthy tissues. Several approaches are being explored by using SR at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), where three techniques are under development Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SSRT), Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) and Minibeam Radiation Therapy (MBRT).The sucess of the preclinical studies on SSRT and MRT has paved the way to clinical trials currently in preparation at the ESRF. With this aim, different dosimetric aspects from both theoretical and experimental points of view have been assessed. In particular, the definition of safe irradiation protocols, the beam energy providing the best balance between tumor treatment and healthy tissue sparing in MRT and MBRT, the special dosimetric considerations for small field dosimetry, etc will be described. In addition, for the clinical trials, the definition of appropiate dosimetry protocols for patients according to the well established European Medical Physics recommendations will be discussed. Finally, the state of the art of the MBRT technical developments at the ESRF will be presented. In 2006 A. Dilmanian and collaborators proposed the use of thicker microbeams (0.36-0.68 mm). This new type of radiotherapy is the most recently implemented technique at the ESRF and it has been called MBRT. The main advantage of MBRT with respect to MRT is that it does not require high dose rates. Therefore it can be more easily applied and extended outside synchrotron sources in the future.

  20. Transcriptional Targeting for Ovarian Cancer Gene Therapy E. Casado,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemminki, Akseli

    REVIEW Transcriptional Targeting for Ovarian Cancer Gene Therapy E. Casado,*, D. M. Nettelbeck Paz, Madrid, Spain Received November 10, 2000 Ovarian carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer death patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer are still low. Therefore, novel molecular therapeutic strat- egies

  1. A Systems Approach to Breast Cancer Carcinogenesis to Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Systems Approach to Breast Cancer ­ Carcinogenesis to Therapy Speaker: Dr. Joe Gray Director, Center for Spatial Systems Biomedicine Oregon Health & Science University Date: Monday, April 18, 2011 that influence cancer behavior, (b) systems biology approaches to elucidate mechanisms by which cancer

  2. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, January--March 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health and safety and requires a Quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period January 1 to March 31, 1989. For this reporting period, there were two abnormal occurrences at nuclear power plants licensed to operate. The first had generic implications and involved a plug failure resulting in a steam generator tube leak at North Anna Unit 1. The second involved a steam generator tube rupture at McGuire Unit 1. There were three abnormal occurrences under other NRC-issued licenses. Two involved medical therapy misadministrations and one involved a medical diagnostic misadministration. There were no abnormal occurrences reported by the Agreement States. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences.

  3. Impact of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder on the Neural Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    Impact of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder on the Neural Dynamics Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD) is thought to enhance cognitive-beliefs embedded in autobiographical social anxiety situations. RESULTS During reactivity trials, compared

  4. Thiourea derivatives, methods of their preparation and their use in neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gabel, D.

    1991-06-04

    The present invention pertains to boron containing thiouracil derivatives, their method of preparations, and their use in the therapy of malignant melanoma using boron neutron capture therapy. No Drawings

  5. Boron containing compounds and their preparation and use in neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gabel, D.

    1992-09-01

    The present invention pertains to boron containing thiouracil derivatives, their method of preparations, and their use in the therapy of malignant melanoma using boron neutron capture therapy. No Drawings

  6. Quantitative analysis of non-viral gene therapy in primary liver culture systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedford, Nathan C

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy has the potential to cure thousands of diseases caused by genetic abnormalities, provide novel combination therapies for cancers and viral infections, and offer a new and effective platform for next generation ...

  7. [Purification of {sup 67}Cu]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1994-09-01

    This report documents progress made in several areas of research and describes results which have not yet been published. These areas include: Purification of {sup 67}Cu; Macrocyclic chelates for targeted therapy; Studies of biologic activation associated with molecular receptor increase and tumor response in ChL6/L6 protocol patients; Lym-1 single chain genetically engineered molecules; Analysis of molecular genetic coded messages to enhance tumor response; Human dosimetry and therapeutic human use radiopharmaceuticals; studies in phantoms; Quantitative SPECT; Preclinical studies; and Clinical studies.

  8. 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT

  9. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jingya [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Caimiao [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lin, Steven H., E-mail: SHLin@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and ?{sup 2} or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  10. Human neural stem cell therapy in a primate model for Parkinson's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wakeman, Dustin Robert

    2010-01-01

    therapies by either directly integrating and replacing host neural circuitry, or, secondarily, by rescuing and restoring the endogenous host milieu

  11. Updated 06/13 Doctor of Physical Therapy Stratford (DPT-South)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    of Physical Therapy degree program is offered by Rutgers, School of Health-Related Professions (SHRP in physical therapy. The Physical Therapy degree program is located on the Stratford campus of New Jersey, The State University, School of Health Related Professions. Our program's unique character is enriched

  12. Adaptive Robot Design with Hand and Face Tracking for Use in Autism Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Kane, Jason

    Adaptive Robot Design with Hand and Face Tracking for Use in Autism Therapy Laura Boccanfuso1 interactive games using hand and face tracking with a robot as a tool for autism therapy. The robot robotics 1 Introduction Robot-assisted autism therapy employs robots as social mediators for promot- ing

  13. HADRON CANCER THERAPY COMPLEX EMPLOYING NON-SCALING FFAG ACCELERATOR AND FIXED FIELD GANTRY DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, Eberhard

    HADRON CANCER THERAPY COMPLEX EMPLOYING NON-SCALING FFAG ACCELERATOR AND FIXED FIELD GANTRY DESIGN, Upton NY, USA Abstract Non-scaling FFAG rings for cancer hadron therapy offer reduced physical aperture of energies. INTRODUCTION Cancer proton therapy exists today in many medical facilities and many more

  14. Cancer photothermal therapy in the near-infrared region by using single-walled carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resasco, Daniel

    Cancer photothermal therapy in the near-infrared region by using single-walled carbon nanotubes of SWNTs provide an opportunity for selective photothermal therapy for cancer treatment. Specifically, Co photothermal therapy for cancer treatment. © 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. DOI: 10

  15. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-12

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

  16. Data Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1 Rev. 033DOElAU62350-43 REV. 2well

  17. Data Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1 Rev. 033DOElAU62350-43 REV.

  18. Data Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1 Rev. 033DOElAU62350-43 REV.well,

  19. Data Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1 Rev. 033DOElAU62350-43

  20. Data Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1 Rev. 033DOElAU62350-43Site: Gas

  1. Data Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1 Rev. 033DOElAU62350-43Site:

  2. Data Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1 Rev. 033DOElAU62350-43Site:well

  3. Annual Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And StatisticsProgram ManagerCorridor Designations inEnergy 4 Report AnnualAnnual Planning09

  4. Monthly Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress New WebpageJune0 Monthly9Report 2015

  5. Monthly Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress New WebpageJune0 Monthly9Report 2015

  6. Monthly Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress New WebpageJune0 Monthly9Report 2015

  7. Monthly Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress New WebpageJune0 Monthly9Report 2015

  8. Monthly Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStress New WebpageJune0 Monthly9Report

  9. REPORT OF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on Global TechnologyProceeding Sign In About REPORT OF TO

  10. REPORT OF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on Global TechnologyProceeding Sign In About REPORT OF

  11. SANDIA REPORT

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLEDSpeeding FINAL2-4260 Unlimited Release79159229!4V

  12. SANDIA REPORT

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLEDSpeeding FINAL2-4260 Unlimited Release79159229!4V1-0516

  13. Final Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street Lighting FINAL TECHNICAL REPORTFiberProjectto:

  14. ONTRACTOR REPORT

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFromJuneb O S T I Cos

  15. Annual Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: Achievements of structural genomics CitationImagingdecays (JournalAlpha

  16. Trip Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB100 Ambrosia'1(DOE) isa briefd ' . ,$!

  17. Trip Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB100 Ambrosia'1(DOE) isa briefd ' . ,$!Site

  18. SPECIAL REPORT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|inWestMay 13, 2015reports issued byForms

  19. Final Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) |Final Report Document Number 11123-23.Final Field

  20. Report2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAboutNuclear Nonproliferation Report of

  1. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The EnergyRyan REPORT SAND 2011-3958 Unlimited

  2. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The EnergyRyan REPORT SAND 2011-3958

  3. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The EnergyRyan REPORT SAND 2011-39582-4417

  4. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The EnergyRyan REPORT SAND 2011-39582-44175-4277

  5. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. SWUTC/05/167830-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 5. Report Date May 2005 4. Title and Subtitle Methodologies for Reducing Truck Turn. Michael Walton 8. Performing Organization Report No. Research Report 167830-1 10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS)9

  6. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. SWUTC/10/161026-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 Environmental Impact 5. Report Date August 2010 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) Erin M. Ferguson, Jennifer Duthie and S. Travis Waller 8. Performing Organization Report No. Report 161026-1 9. Performing

  7. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. SWUTC/04/167121-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 5. Report Date March 2004 4. Title and Subtitle Evaluation of the Air Quality Organization Code 7. Author(s) Jeffrey D. Borowiec and L.D. White 8. Performing Organization Report No. Report

  8. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. SWUTC/06/473700-00072-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 5. Report Date September 2006 4. Title and Subtitle An Investigation Wang and C. Michael Walton 8. Performing Organization Report No. Report 473700-00072-1 10. Work Unit No

  9. Journal Citation Reports 2014 Journal Citation Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Journal Citation Reports® 2014 2015 #12; · · Journal Citation Reports · Journal Citation Reports · Journal Citation Reports · #12; Web of Science (SCIE, SSCI, AHCI) EndNote Journal Citation · · · · · · #12;JCR #12;Journal Citation Reports Edition ­JCR Science Edition171 8,618 ­JCR Social Sciences

  10. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Robert C.; Kamon, Teruki; Toback, David; Safonov, Alexei; Dutta, Bhaskar; Dimitri, Nanopoulos; Pope, Christopher; White, James

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  11. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurney, Kevin R

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  12. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yelton, John Martin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Korytov, Andrey; Avery, Paul; Furic, Ivan; Acosta, Darin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Field, Richard; Matchev, Konstantin; Ramond, Pierre; Thorn, Richard; Sikivie, Pierre; Ray, Heather; Tanner, David

    2013-10-10

    We report on progress in a series of different directions within high energy physics research. 1. Neutrino research in hardware and software on the Minerva and MiniBooNE experiments 2. Experimental particle physics at the hadron colliders, with emphasis on research and development and data analysis on the CMS experiment operating at the CERN LHC. This includes research on the discovery and properties on the Higgs Boson. 3. Educational outreach through the Quarknet program, taking physics research into High School classrooms. 4. Theoretical and Phenomenological High Energy research, covering a broad range of activities ranging from fundamental theoretical issues to areas of immediate phenomenological importance. 5. Experiment searches for the Axion, as part of the ADMX experiment.

  13. Papers and Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Non-U.S Citizens Mentors, Projects Papers, Reports Photos NSEC IGPPS Space Weather Summer School Papers, Reports Papers and Reports Bringing together top, space...

  14. A Novel Linear Accelerator For Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding Xiaodong; Boucher, Salime [RadiaBeam Technologies, 1717 Stewart St., Santa Monica, CA 90404 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    RadiaBeam is developing a novel linear accelerator which produces both kilovoltage ({approx}100 keV) X-rays for imaging, and megavoltage (6 to 20 MeV) X-rays for therapy. We call this system the DEXITron: Dual Energy X-ray source for Imaging and Therapy. The Dexitron is enabled by an innovation in the electromagnetic design of the linac, which allows the output energy to be rapidly switched from high energy to low energy. In brief, the method involves switching the phase of the radiofrequency (RF) power by 180 degrees at some point in the linac such that, after that point, the linac decelerates the beam, rather than accelerating it. The Dexitron will have comparable cost to other linacs, and avoids the problems associated with current IGRT equipment.

  15. Study on neutron radiation field of carbon ions therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun-Kui; Li, Wu-Yuan; Yan, Wei-Wei; Chen, Xi-Meng; Mao, Wang; Pang, Cheng-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Carbon ions offer significant advantages for deep-seated local tumors therapy due to their physical and biological properties. Secondary particles, especially neutrons caused by heavy ion reactions should be carefully considered in treatment process and radiation protection. For radiation protection purposes, the FLUKA Code was used in order to evaluate the radiation field at deep tumor therapy room of HIRFL in this paper. The neutron energy spectra, neutron dose and energy deposition of carbon ion and neutron in tissue-like media was studied for bombardment of solid water target by 430MeV/u C ions. It is found that the calculated neutron dose have a good agreement with the experimental date, and the secondary neutron dose may not exceed one in a thousand of the carbon ions dose at Bragg peak area in tissue-like media.

  16. Study on neutron radiation field of carbon ions therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun-Kui Xu; You-Wu Su; Wu-Yuan Li; Wei-Wei Yan; Xi-Meng Chen; Wang Mao; Cheng-Guo Pang

    2015-03-18

    Carbon ions offer significant advantages for deep-seated local tumors therapy due to their physical and biological properties. Secondary particles, especially neutrons caused by heavy ion reactions should be carefully considered in treatment process and radiation protection. For radiation protection purposes, the FLUKA Code was used in order to evaluate the radiation field at deep tumor therapy room of HIRFL in this paper. The neutron energy spectra, neutron dose and energy deposition of carbon ion and neutron in tissue-like media was studied for bombardment of solid water target by 430MeV/u C ions. It is found that the calculated neutron dose have a good agreement with the experimental date, and the secondary neutron dose may not exceed one in a thousand of the carbon ions dose at Bragg peak area in tissue-like media.

  17. Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: From Energy Applications to Advanced Medical Therapies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tijana Rajh

    2010-01-08

    Dr. Rajh will present a general talk on nanotechnology ? an overview of why nanotechnology is important and how it is useful in various fields. The specific focus will be on Solar energy conversion, environmental applications and advanced medical therapies. She has broad expertise in synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials that are used in nanotechnology including novel hybrid systems connecting semiconductors to biological molecules like DNA and antibodies. This technology could lead to new gene therapy procedures, cancer treatments and other medical applications. She will also discuss technologies made possible by organizing small semiconductor particles called quantum dots, materials that exhibit a rich variety of phenomena that are size and shape dependent. Development of these new materials that harnesses the unique properties of materials at the 1-100 nanometer scale resulted in the new field of nanotechnology that currently affects many applications in technological and medical fields.

  18. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  19. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  20. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  1. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized. by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  2. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  3. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  4. Development of a fast neutron therapy beam placement film technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baron, Robert Layton

    1971-01-01

    , producing a recoiling neutron; and (3) evaporation of neutrons (23). All three processes contribute to a total neutron yield estimated to be about 4 x 10 11 neutrons per microcoulomb of deuteron current (23). An actual measurement has not been made.... 55 REFERENCES 1. The Ameri. can Peoples Encyclopedia, 4, pg. 203, Grolier Incorporated, New York, 1969. 2. J. P. Barton, Some possibilities of neutron radiography. ~Ph s. Med. Biol. , 9, 33-42 (1964). 3. R. S. Stone, Neutron therapy and specific...

  5. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Only Intraoperative Electron Radiation Therapy in Early Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maluta, Sergio; Dall'Oglio, Stefano; Marciai, Nadia; Gabbani, Milena; Franchini, Zeno; Pietrarota, Paolo; Meliado, Gabriele; Guariglia, Stefania; Cavedon, Carlo

    2012-10-01

    Background: We report the results of a single-institution, phase II trial of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using a single dose of intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) in patients with low-risk early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 226 patients with low-risk, early stage breast cancer were treated with local excision and axillary management (sentinel node biopsy with or without axillary node dissection). After the surgeon temporarily reapproximated the excision cavity, a dose of 21 Gy using IOERT was delivered to the tumor bed, with a margin of 2 cm laterally. Results: With a mean follow-up of 46 months (range, 28-63 months), only 1 case of local recurrence was reported. The observed toxicity was considered acceptable. Conclusions: APBI using a single dose of IOERT can be delivered safely in women with early, low-risk breast cancer in carefully selected patients. A longer follow-up is needed to ascertain its efficacy compared to that of the current standard treatment of whole-breast irradiation.

  6. Constitutive STAT5 Activation Correlates With Better Survival in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Helen H.W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chou, Cheng-Yang [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Wu, Yuan-Hua; Hsueh, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Chiung-Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Guo, How-Ran [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lee, Wen-Ying, E-mail: 7707@so-net.net.tw [Department of Pathology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan (China) and Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Su, Wu-Chou, E-mail: sunnysu@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Medical College and Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Constitutively activated signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) factors, in particular STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, have been detected in a wide variety of human primary tumors and have been demonstrated to directly contribute to oncogenesis. However, the expression pattern of these STATs in cervical carcinoma is still unknown, as is whether or not they have prognostic significance. This study investigated the expression patterns of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in cervical cancer and their associations with clinical outcomes in patients treated with radical radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 165 consecutive patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stages IB to IVA cervical cancer underwent radical radiation therapy, including external beam and/or high-dose-rate brachytherapy between 1989 and 2002. Immunohistochemical studies of their formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify and to evaluate the effects of these factors affecting patient survival. Results: Constitutive activations of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 were observed in 11%, 22%, and 61% of the participants, respectively. While STAT5 activation was associated with significantly better metastasis-free survival (p < 0.01) and overall survival (p = 0.04), STAT1 and STAT3 activation were not. Multivariate analyses showed that STAT5 activation, bulky tumor ({>=}4 cm), advanced stage (FIGO Stages III and IV), and brachytherapy (yes vs. no) were independent prognostic factors for cause-specific overall survival. None of the STATs was associated with local relapse. STAT5 activation (odds ratio = 0.29, 95% confidence interval = 0.13-0.63) and advanced stage (odds ratio = 2.54; 95% confidence interval = 1.03-6.26) were independent predictors of distant metastasis. Conclusions: This is the first report to provide the overall expression patterns and prognostic significance of specific STATs in cervical carcinoma. Our results indicate that constitutive STAT5 activation correlates with better metastasis-free survival and overall survival in cervical cancer patients who have received radiation therapy.

  7. Malfunctions of Implantable Cardiac Devices in Patients Receiving Proton Beam Therapy: Incidence and Predictors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Poenisch, Falk [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pinnix, Chelsea C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sheu, Tommy [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Memon, Nada [Department of Cardiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rozner, Marc A. [Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dougherty, Anne H. [Department of Cardiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Photon therapy has been reported to induce resets of implanted cardiac devices, but the clinical sequelae of treating patients with such devices with proton beam therapy (PBT) are not well known. We reviewed the incidence of device malfunctions among patients undergoing PBT. Methods and Materials: From March 2009 through July 2012, 42 patients with implanted cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED; 28 pacemakers and 14 cardioverter-defibrillators) underwent 42 courses of PBT for thoracic (23, 55%), prostate (15, 36%), liver (3, 7%), or base of skull (1, 2%) tumors at a single institution. The median prescribed dose was 74 Gy (relative biological effectiveness; range 46.8-87.5 Gy), and the median distance from the treatment field to the CIED was 10 cm (range 0.8-40 cm). Maximum proton and neutron doses were estimated for each treatment course. All CIEDs were checked before radiation delivery and monitored throughout treatment. Results: Median estimated peak proton and neutron doses to the CIED in all patients were 0.8 Gy (range 0.13-21 Gy) and 346 Sv (range 11-1100 mSv). Six CIED malfunctions occurred in 5 patients (2 pacemakers and 3 defibrillators). Five of these malfunctions were CIED resets, and 1 patient with a defibrillator (in a patient with a liver tumor) had an elective replacement indicator after therapy that was not influenced by radiation. The mean distance from the proton beam to the CIED among devices that reset was 7.0 cm (range 0.9-8 cm), and the mean maximum neutron dose was 655 mSv (range 330-1100 mSv). All resets occurred in patients receiving thoracic PBT and were corrected without clinical incident. The generator for the defibrillator with the elective replacement indicator message was replaced uneventfully after treatment. Conclusions: The incidence of CIED resets was about 20% among patients receiving PBT to the thorax. We recommend that PBT be avoided in pacing-dependent patients and that patients with any type of CIED receiving thoracic PBT be followed closely.

  8. Monte Carlo and analytical model predictions of leakage neutron exposures from passively scattered proton therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Zhang, Rui; Newhauser, Wayne [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 1202, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Stray neutron radiation is of concern after radiation therapy, especially in children, because of the high risk it might carry for secondary cancers. Several previous studies predicted the stray neutron exposure from proton therapy, mostly using Monte Carlo simulations. Promising attempts to develop analytical models have also been reported, but these were limited to only a few proton beam energies. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytical model to predict leakage neutron equivalent dose from passively scattered proton beams in the 100-250-MeV interval.Methods: To develop and validate the analytical model, the authors used values of equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose (H/D) predicted with Monte Carlo simulations. The authors also characterized the behavior of the mean neutron radiation-weighting factor, w{sub R}, as a function of depth in a water phantom and distance from the beam central axis.Results: The simulated and analytical predictions agreed well. On average, the percentage difference between the analytical model and the Monte Carlo simulations was 10% for the energies and positions studied. The authors found that w{sub R} was highest at the shallowest depth and decreased with depth until around 10 cm, where it started to increase slowly with depth. This was consistent among all energies.Conclusion: Simple analytical methods are promising alternatives to complex and slow Monte Carlo simulations to predict H/D values. The authors' results also provide improved understanding of the behavior of w{sub R} which strongly depends on depth, but is nearly independent of lateral distance from the beam central axis.

  9. Replanning During Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Improved Quality of Life in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Haihua; Hu Wei; Wang Wei; Chen Peifang; Ding Weijun; Luo Wei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Anatomic and dosimetric changes have been reported during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of replanning on quality of life (QoL) and clinical outcomes during the course of IMRT for NPC patients. Methods and Materials: Between June 2007 and August 2011, 129 patients with NPC were enrolled. Forty-three patients received IMRT without replanning, while 86 patients received IMRT replanning after computed tomography (CT) images were retaken part way through therapy. Chinese versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and Head and Neck Quality of Life Questionnaire 35 were completed before treatment began and at the end of treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the completion of treatment. Overall survival (OS) data were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: IMRT replanning had a profound impact on the QoL of NPC patients, as determined by statistically significant changes in global QoL and other QoL scales. Additionally, the clinical outcome comparison indicates that replanning during IMRT for NPC significantly improved 2-year local regional control (97.2% vs 92.4%, respectively, P=.040) but did not improve 2-year OS (89.8% vs 82.2%, respectively, P=.475). Conclusions: IMRT replanning improves QoL as well as local regional control in patients with NPC. Future research is needed to determine the criteria for replanning for NPC patients undergoing IMRT.

  10. Journal Citation Reports Journal Citation Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Journal Citation Reports® 1 #12;· · Journal Citation Reports · Journal Citation Reports · Journal Citation Reports · 2 #12;JCR 3 #12; Web of Science (SCIE, SSCI, AHCI) EndNote Journal Citation;· · · · · · JCR 5 #12;JCR 6 #12;· ­ JCR Science Edition170 8005 ­ JCR Social Sciences Edition 502678 Journal

  11. Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayser, Dan

    2011-01-31

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2010. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. In 2010, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local regulations and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2010. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2010. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2010. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, miscellaneous electronic office equipment, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling and corrugated cardboard recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, foamed polystyrene peanuts, batteries, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-Ames Site Office (AMSO), through the Laboratory's Performance Evaluation Measurement Plan, on its Affirmative Procurement Performance Measure. A performance level of 'A-' was achieved in 2010 for Integrated Safety, Health and Environmental Protection. As reported in Site Environmental Reports for prior years, the Laboratory's Environmental Management System (EMS) has been integrated into the Laboratory's Integrated Safety Management System since 2005. The integration of EMS into the way the Laboratory does business allows the Laboratory to systematically review, address and respond to the Laboratory's environmental impacts. The Laboratory's EMS was audited in April 2009 by DOE-CH. There were four 'Sufficiently in Conformity' findings as a result of the audit. All four findings were tracked in the Laboratory's corrective action database for completion. Beryllium was used routinely at Ames Laboratory in the 1940's and 1950's in processes developed for the production of highly pure uranium and thorium in support of the historic Manhattan Project. Laboratory metallurgists also worked on a process to produce pure beryllium metal from beryllium fluoride. In the early 1950's, beryllium oxide powder was used to produce shaped beryllium and crucibles. As a result of that work, beryllium contamination now exists in many interstitial spaces (e.g., utility chases) and ventilation systems in Wilhelm, Spedding and Metals Development buildings. Extensive characterization and remediation efforts have occurred in 2009 and 2010 in order to better understand the extent of the contamination. Analysis of extensive sampling data suggests that a fairly wide dispersion of beryllium occurred (most likely in the 1950's and 60's) in Wilhelm Hall and in certain areas of Spedding Hall and Metals Development. Area air-sampling results and work-area surface characterizations indicate the exposure potential to current workers, building visitors and the public remains extremely low. This information is now used to guide cleaning efforts and to provide worker protection during remodeling and maintenance activities. Results were shared with the DOE's Former Worker Program to support former worker medical test

  12. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph H. Simmons; Tracie J. Bukowski

    2002-08-07

    This grant was a continuation of research conducted at the University of Florida under Grant No. DE-FG05-91ER45462 in which we investigated the energy bandgap shifts produced in semiconductor quantum dots of sizes between 1.5 and 40 nm. The investigated semiconductors consisted of a series of Column 2-6 compounds (CdS, CdSe, CdTe) and pure Column IV elements (Si and Ge). It is well-known of course that the 2-6 semiconductors possess a direct-gap electronic structure, while the Column IV elements possess an indirect-gap structure. The investigation showed a major difference in quantum confinement behavior between the two sets of semiconductors. This difference is essentially associated with the change in bandgap energy resulting from size confinement. In the direct-gap semiconductors, the change in energy (blue shift) saturates when the crystals approach 2-3 nm in diameter. This limits the observed shift in energy to less than 1 eV above the bulk value. In the indirect-gap semiconductors, the energy shift does not show any sign of saturation and in fact, we produced Si and Ge nanocrystals with absorption edges in the UV. The reason for this difference has not been determined and will require additional experimental and theoretical studies. In our work, we suggest, but do not prove that mixing of conduction band side valleys with the central valley under conditions of size confinement may be responsible for the saturation in the blue-shift of direct-gap semiconductors. The discovery of large bandgap energy shifts with crystal size prompted us to suggest that these materials may be used to form photovoltaic cells with multi-gap layers for high efficiency in a U.S. Patent issued in 1998. However, this possibility depends strongly on the ability to collect photoexcited carriers from energy-confined crystals. The research conducted at the University of Arizona under the subject grant had a major goal of testing an indirect gap semiconductor in size-confined structures to determine if photocarriers could be collected. Thus, we tested a variety of semiconductor-glass nano-composite structures for photoconductivity. Tests were conducted in collaboration with the Laser Physics Division at Sandia National Laboratories. Nano-composite samples were formed consisting of Ge nanocrystals embedded in an indium-tin-oxide matrix. Photoconductivity measurements were conducted with exposure of the films to sub-bandgap and super-bandgap light. The results showed a clear photoconductivity effect arising from exposure to super-bandgap light only. These results suggest that the high-efficiency photovoltaic cell structure proposed in DOE sponsored U.S. Patent 5,720,827 is viable. The results of fabrication studies, structural characterization studies and photovoltaic measurements are presented in the report. This report is taken from a PhD dissertation of Tracie J. Bukowski submitted to the University of Florida in May 2002. ''The optical and photoconductive response in germanium quantum dots and indium tin oxide composite thin film structures,'' Dr. Bukowski conducted her PhD study under this grant at the University of Arizona and under Grant No DE-FG05-91ER45462 at the University of Florida, as well as during a two-year fellowship at Sandia National Laboratories.

  13. A Role for Adjuvant RFA in Managing Hepatic Metastases from Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) After Treatment with Targeted Systemic Therapy Using Kinase Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakimé, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com; Cesne, Axel Le, E-mail: Axel.LECESNE@igr.fr; Deschamps, Frederic, E-mail: frederic.deschamps@igr.fr; Farouil, Geoffroy, E-mail: g.farouil@gmail.com; Boudabous, Sana, E-mail: s.boudabous@gmail.com; Aupérin, Anne, E-mail: anne.auperin@igr.fr; Domont, Julien, E-mail: julien.domont@igr.fr; Debaere, Thierry, E-mail: Debaere@igr.fr [Gustave Roussy Institute (France)

    2013-04-16

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess the role of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the multimodality management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in patients undergoing targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy (TKI) for liver metastases.MethodsOutcomes of 17 patients who underwent liver RFA for 27 metastatic GIST after TKI therapy, from January 2004 to March 2012, were retrospectively analyzed. Mean maximum tumor diameter was 2.5 ± 1 cm (range 0.9–4.5 cm). In seven patients (group A), RFA of all residual tumors was performed, with curative intent, and TKI therapy was discontinued. In five patients (group B), RFA of all residual tumors was performed upon achieving the best morphological response with TKI therapy, which was maintained after RFA. In another five patients (group C), RFA was performed on individual liver metastases which were progressive under TKI therapy.ResultsAll 27 targeted tumors were completely ablated, without local recurrence during the mean follow-up period of 49 months. No major complications occurred. Two minor complications were reported (11 %). Only two patients (both in group C) died at 20 and 48 months. Two-year progression-free survival (PFS) after RFA was 29 % in group A, 75 % in group B, and 20 % in group C.ConclusionsRFA in patients, previously treated with TKI, is feasible and safe. Our data suggest that RFA is a useful therapeutic option in patients with metastatic GIST and should be performed at the time of best clinical response with patient maintained under TKI after the procedure.

  14. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hameed A. Naseem, Husam H. Abu-Safe

    2007-02-09

    The purpose of this project was to investigate metal-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon at low temperatures using excitation sources such as laser and rapid thermal annealing, as well as, electric field. Deposition of high quality crystalline silicon at low temperatures allows the use of low cost soda-lime glass and polymeric films for economically viable photovoltaic solar cells and low cost large area flat panel displays. In light of current and expected demands on Si supply due to expanding use of consumer electronic products throughout the world and the incessant demand for electric power the need for developing high grade Si thin films on low cost substrate becomes even more important. We used hydrogenated and un-hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and sputtering techniques (both of which are extensively used in electronic and solar cell industries) to fabricate nano-crystalline, poly-crystalline (small as well as large grain), and single-crystalline (epitaxial) films at low temperatures. We demonstrated Si nanowires on flat surfaces that can be used for fabricating nanometer scale transistors. We also demonstrated lateral crystallization using Al with and without an applied electric field. These results are critical for high mobility thin film transistors (TFT) for large area display applications. Large grain silicon (~30-50 µm grain size for < 0.5 µm thick films) was demonstrated on glass substrates at low temperatures. We also demonstrated epitaxial growth of silicon on (100) Si substrates at temperatures as low as 450?C. Thin film Si solar cells are being projected as the material of choice for low cost high efficiency solar cells when properly coupled with excellent light-trapping schemes. Ar ion laser (CW) was shown to produce dendritic nanowire structures at low power whereas at higher powers yielded continuous polycrystalline films. The power density required for films in contact with Al was demonstrated to be at least two orders of magnitude lower that that reported in the literature before. Polysilicon was successfully achieved on polyimide (Kapton©) films. Thin film Si solar cells on lightweight stoable polymer offer great advantage for terrestrial and space power applications. In summary we have demonstrated through this research the viability of producing low cost nano-, poly-, and epitaxial Si material on substrates of choice for applications in economically viable environmentally friendly sustainable solar power systems. This truly enabling technology has widespread applications in multibillion dollar electronic industry and consumer products.

  15. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael C. Weinberg; Lori L. Burgner; Joseph H. Simmons

    2003-05-23

    OAK B135 The formation of metastable crystalline phases in lithium disilicate glass has been a subject of controversy for decades. Here, one aspect of this problem relating to the stability of these non-equilibrium phases when glasses are heated for extended time periods in the nucleation regime is addressed. The results of a systematic experimental investigation on the persistence of metastable phases and the factors that may influence the appearance of such phases, e.g., water content, impurities, glass composition, and glass preparation procedure are presented. Growth rates of lithium disilicate crystals in lithium disilicate glass are measured as a function water concentration in the glass and of temperature in the deeply undercooled regime. The growth rate data obtained in this work are combined with data reported in the literature and used to assess the applicability of standard models of crystal growth for the description of experimental results over a very broad temperature range. The reduced growth rate versus undercooling graph is found to consist of three regimes. For undercoolings less than 140°C, the reduced growth rate curve is suggestive of either 2-D surface nucleation or screw dislocation growth. For undercoolings greater than 400°C, the reduced growth rate plot suggests the operative crystal growth mechanism is 2-D surface nucleation, but detailed calculations cast doubt upon this conclusion. In the intermediate undercooling range, there appears to be some sort of transitional behavior for which none of the standard models appear to be applicable. Further, it is observed that small differences in the viscosity data employed can produce enormous differences in the predicted growth rates at larger undercoolings. Results of the kinetic analyses conducted herein seem to indicate that the nature of the kinetic rate coefficient used in the standard growth models may be incorrect. Nucleation rates of sodium metasilicate crystals in a sodium silicate glass of composition 43Na2O-57SiO2 (mol%) are investigated using the development technique. The results of this study are compared with the nucleation rate results recently obtained for this composition using a novel DTA method. The two techniques are found to agree within experimental error.

  16. SU-E-T-68: Clinical Implementation of Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy: A New- York Presbyterian Hospital Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afghan, M; Shih, R; Chen, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Total skin electron beam therapy (TSET) is used in the treatment of rare skin diseases such as mycosis fungoides, the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. We report our experience with clinical implementation of TSET. Methods: A modified six-dual-field irradiation technique was chosen to deliver TSET. A Varian Trilogy linear accelerator with a nominal 6 MeV beam using high dose rate total skin electron mode (HDTSe) was employed. The recommendations of AAPM task group report 23 were followed for the commissioning. An acrylic plate (energy degrader) of 3.2 mm depth was mounted on the HDTSe applicator. The nominal source to skin distance was set at 450 cm. The optimum tilt angle of the gantry was determined using NACP-02 ionization chamber embedded in certified therapy grade solid water. Percent depth dose measurements were performed using ionization chamber and radiochromic films embedded in solid water and anthropomorphic phantom. For absolute dose measurements, TG-51 formalism was employed. The dose distribution on the entire skin was measured by irradiating the anthropomorphic phantom, with TLDs attached, mimicking the real treatment. Results: The 3.2 mm acrylic plate mounted on the HDTSe applicator degraded the energy of the electron beam to 4.1 MeV in the treatment plane, located at an SSD of 450 cm. The optimum tilt angle was found to be ±20°. A single-dual field had a longitudinal uniformity, measured at a depth of dose maximum, of ±7% over a length of about 200 cm. For the entire treatment the multiplication factor was found to be 2.86. On the surface of the phantom, the dose varied from 108% to 93% of the prescription dose. Conclusion: We have successfully commissioned TSET meeting the guidelines of the TG report 23, and treated our first patient on February 25, 2014.

  17. Topical report review status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    This report provides industry with procedures for submitting topical reports, guidance on how the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) processes and responds to topical report submittals, and an accounting, with review schedules, of all topical reports currently accepted for review schedules, of all topical reports currently accepted for review by the NRC. This report will be published annually. Each sponsoring organization with one or more topical reports accepted for review copies.

  18. Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Medulloblastoma and Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors: Outcomes for Very Young Children Treated With Upfront Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, Rachel B., E-mail: rbjimenez@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sethi, Roshan [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Depauw, Nicolas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Pulsifer, Margaret B. [Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); McBride, Sean M. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ebb, David [Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fullerton, Barbara C.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.; MacDonald, Shannon M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To report the early outcomes for very young children with medulloblastoma or supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (SPNET) treated with upfront chemotherapy followed by 3-dimensional proton radiation therapy (3D-CPT). Methods and Materials: All patients aged <60 months with medulloblastoma or SPNET treated with chemotherapy before 3D-CPT from 2002 to 2010 at our institution were included. All patients underwent maximal surgical resection, chemotherapy, and adjuvant 3D-CPT with either craniospinal irradiation followed by involved-field radiation therapy or involved-field radiation therapy alone. Results: Fifteen patients (median age at diagnosis, 35 months) were treated with high-dose chemotherapy and 3D-CPT. Twelve of 15 patients had medulloblastoma; 3 of 15 patients had SPNET. Median time from surgery to initiation of radiation was 219 days. Median craniospinal irradiation dose was 21.6 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness); median boost dose was 54.0 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness). At a median of 39 months from completion of radiation, 1 of 15 was deceased after a local failure, 1 of 15 had died from a non-disease-related cause, and the remaining 13 of 15 patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence. Ototoxicity and endocrinopathies were the most common long-term toxicities, with 2 of 15 children requiring hearing aids and 3 of 15 requiring exogenous hormones. Conclusions: Proton radiation after chemotherapy resulted in good disease outcomes for a small cohort of very young patients with medulloblastoma and SPNET. Longer follow-up and larger numbers of patients are needed to assess long-term outcomes and late toxicity.

  19. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert D. Cess

    2008-12-05

    Paper number 1 addresses the fact that the procedure used in the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment for identifying the presence of clouds over snow/ice surfaces is known to have shortcomings, and this is corroborated through use of surface insolation measurements at the South Pole as an independent means of identifying clouds. These surface insolation measurements are then used to validate the more detailed cloud identification scheme used in the follow-up Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), and this validation is extended to the polar night through use of CERES measurements of the outgoing longwave radiation. General circulation models (GCMs) are highly sophisticated computer tools for modeling climate change, and they incorporate a large number of physical processes and variables. One of the most important challenges is to properly account for water vapor (clouds and humidity) in climate warming. In this Perspective, Cess discusses results reported in the same issue by Soden et al. in which water vapor feedback effects are tested by studying moistening trends in the upper troposphere. Satellite observations of atmospheric water vapor are found to agree well with moisture predictions generated by one of the key GCMs, showing that these feedback effects are being properly handled in the model, which eliminates a major potential source of uncertainty. Zhou and Cess [2001] developed an algorithm for retrieving surface downwelling longwave radiation (SDLW) based upon detailed studies using radiative transfer model calculations and surface radiometric measurements. Their algorithm linked clear sky SDLW with surface upwelling longwave flux and column precipitable water vapor. For cloudy sky cases, they used cloud liquid water path as an additional parameter to account for the effects of clouds. Despite the simplicity of their algorithm, it performed very well for most geographical regions except for those regions where the atmospheric conditions near the surface tends to be extremely cold and dry. Systematic errors were also found for scenes that were covered with ice clouds. Paper Number 2 provides an improved version of the algorithm that prevents the large errors in the SDLW at low water vapor amounts by taking into account that under such conditions the SDLW and water vapor amount are nearly linear in their relationship. The new algorithm also utilizes cloud fraction and cloud liquid and ice water paths available from the Cloud and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) single scanner footprint (SSF) product to separately compute the clear and cloudy portions of the fluxes. The new algorithm has been validated against surface measurements at 29 stations around the globe for Terra and Aqua satellite. The results show significant improvement over the original version. The revised Zhou-Cess algorithm is also slightly better or comparable to more sophisticated algorithms currently implemented in the CERES processing and will be incorporated as one of the CERES empirical surface radiation algorithms.

  20. System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nigg, David W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wemple, Charles A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention.

  1. Metalloporphyrins and their uses as imageable tumor-targeting agents for radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    2003-05-20

    The present invention covers halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages having the formula ##STR1## which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies including, but not limited to, boron neutron- capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. The present invention also covers methods for using these halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins in tumor imaging and cancer treatment.

  2. Use of novel metalloporphyrins as imageable tumor-targeting agents for radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    2005-10-04

    The present invention covers halogenated derivatives of boronated phorphyrins containing multiple carborane cages having the formula ##STR1## which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies including, but not limited to, boron neutron-capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. The present invention also covers methods for using these halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins in tumor imaging and cancer treatment.

  3. System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nigg, D.W.; Wemple, C.A.

    1999-07-06

    A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy is disclosed. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention. 5 figs.

  4. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transportation Security, Transportation Modes, Entrepreneurship, Geographic Information System, STEM System College Station, Texas 77843-3135 13. Type of Report and Period Covered Final Report 14: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, Virginia 22161 19. Security

  5. The Therapeutic Alliance in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Children with Autism and Anxiety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Sami

    2015-01-01

    in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Children with Autism andAnxiety Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are lifelongHigh-Functioning Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorders.

  6. Novel Approaches to Breast Cancer Therapy: Evaluation of Next Generation Dendrimers for Drug Delivery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snow, Merideth

    2010-07-14

    concentrations while dendrimers F4-1 and F2-1 were not. The dendrimer compounds may represent the future of breast cancer therapy....

  7. Autologous stromal vascular fraction therapy for rheumatoid arthritis: rationale and clinical safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    cell therapy for multiple sclerosis. J Translational Med+ regulatory T cells in multiple sclerosis. Ann Neurol 2010,of relapsing- remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Hum

  8. Safety evaluation of allogeneic umbilical cord blood mononuclear cell therapy for degenerative conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    cell therapy for multiple sclerosis. J Transl Med 2009, 7:19 patients had multiple sclerosis, 12 patients hadParaplegia Ataxia Multiple Sclerosis Amyotrophic Lateral

  9. Efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Treating Anorexia Nervosa: A Review of Literature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakes, Brittany

    2014-01-01

    rates in patients with anorexia nervosa and other eatingfamily therapy for anorexia nervosa patients. EatingLohr, K. N. (2007). Anorexia nervosa treatment: A systematic

  10. Scleromyxedema secondary to hepatitis c virus and successfully treated with antiviral therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, JA; Kalimullah, FA; Erickson, CP; Peng, LS

    2015-01-01

    Therapy For Chronic Active Hepatitis C. J Am Acad Dermatol.scleromyxedema secondary to hepatitis C successfully treatedWe recommend considering hepatitis C virus when working up

  11. Mycobacterium porferae infection in a psoriasis patient on anti-tnf-a therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laquer, Vivian; Ta, Tuan; Nguyen, Tien; Tan, Belinda

    2013-01-01

    biologic therapy for psoriasis. J Dermatolog Treat 2012. [porferae infection in a psoriasis patient on anti-tnf-aIrvine, CA USA Introduction Psoriasis is a chronic, auto-

  12. War, Trauma, and Technologies of the Self : : The Making of Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Marisa Renee

    R. L. (2004). Combat Duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, Mentalservice members who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Militaryevaluation of the Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan exposure therapy

  13. REGISTRATION PROGRESS REPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    ENROL THESIS REGISTRATION PROGRESS REPORTS (every 6 months) THESIS SUBMIISSION Suspension of study Change of supervisor/topic/ department Extension to submission date PROGRESS REPORTS (every 6 months) PROGRESS REPORTS (every 6 months) PROGRESS REPORTS (every 6 months)PROGRESS REPORTS (every 6 months

  14. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. SWUTC/04/167829-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 5. Report Date November 2004 4. Title and Subtitle Analyze the Impact of Traffic on Air Quality and Select Appropriate ITS Strategies for Emissions Mitigation 6. Performing Organization

  15. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. SWUTC/01/167704-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 Transportation Conference Transportation and Tourism Track 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) Katherine This report documents the proceedings from the Transportation and Tourism Track at the Texas Rural

  16. On bolus for megavoltage photon and electron radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyas, Vedang; Palmer, Lisa; Mudge, Ray; Jiang, Runqing; Fleck, Andre; Schaly, Bryan; Osei, Ernest; Charland, Paule

    2013-10-01

    Frequently, in radiation therapy one must treat superficial lesions on cancer patients; these are at or adjacent to the skin. Megavoltage photon radiotherapy penetrates through the skin to irradiate deep-seated tumors, with skin-sparing property. Hence, to treat superficial lesions, one must use a layer of scattering material to feign as the skin surface. Although megavoltage electron beams are used for superficial treatments, one occasionally needs to enhance the dose near the surface. Such is the function of a “bolus,” a natural or synthetically developed material that acts as a layer of tissue to provide a more effective treatment to the superficial lesions. Other uses of boluses are to correct for varying surface contours and to add scattering material around the patient's surface. Materials used as bolus vary from simple water to metal and include various mixtures and compounds. Even with the modernization of the technology for external-beam therapy and the emergence of various commercial boluses, the preparation and utilization of a bolus in clinical radiotherapy remains an art. Considering the varying experiences and practices, this paper briefly summarizes available boluses that have been proposed and are employed in clinical radiotherapy. Although this review is not exhaustive, it provides some initial guidance and answers questions that may arise in clinical practice.

  17. Proton therapy construction projects in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1992-11-01

    Proton and heavy-ion radiation therapy has been taking place now for 40 years, at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these centers built originally for physics research. The high degree of promise shown for using these particles for treating and curing cancer has stimulated the medical community to look seriously at building dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research, and development of effective treatments with these beams. In the United States, the first such facility, at the Loma Linda University Medical Center, has been in operation now for two years, and is currently treating a total of 35 to 40 patients per day. Two new projects are being designed at present, one at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, the second a joint project of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the University of California at Davis Medical Center in Sacramento, California. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to the proton-therapy application, and will present performance and operations characteristics for the Loma Linda facility, as well as details of the plans, process and progress towards construction of the new facilities in Boston and Sacramento.

  18. Quarterly Progress Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarterly Progress Reports Quarterly Progress Reports Investigating the field of high energy physics through experiments that strengthen our fundamental understanding of matter,...

  19. Uranium Purchases Report

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    Final issue. This report details natural and enriched uranium purchases as reported by owners and operators of commercial nuclear power plants. 1996 represents the most recent publication year.

  20. The pharmaco-economics of combination therapies : a study of the effects of component and market factors on combined therapy price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramaniam, Sundar

    2006-01-01

    For a growing number of indications, combination therapies are becoming increasingly common due in part to their superior efficacy, as compared to monotherapies. In fact, in the case of infectious diseases such as AIDS and ...

  1. Five-year Results of Whole Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Early Stage Breast Cancer: The Fox Chase Cancer Center Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, Lanea M.M.; Sopka, Dennis M.; Li Tianyu; Klayton, Tracy; Li Jinsheng; Anderson, Penny R.; Bleicher, Richard J.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Freedman, Gary M.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year outcomes using whole-breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of early-stage-breast cancer at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: A total of 946 women with early-stage breast cancer (stage 0, I, or II) were treated with IMRT after surgery with or without systemic therapy from 2003-2010. Whole-breast radiation was delivered via an IMRT technique with a median whole-breast radiation dose of 46 Gy and median tumor bed boost of 14 Gy. Endpoints included local-regional recurrence, cosmesis, and late complications. Results: With a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 1-97 months), there were 12 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and one locoregional recurrence. The 5-year actuarial IBTR and locoregional recurrence rates were 2.0% and 2.4%. Physician-reported cosmestic outcomes were available for 645 patients: 63% were considered 'excellent', 33% 'good', and <1.5% 'fair/poor'. For physician-reported cosmesis, boost doses {>=}16 Gy, breast size >900 cc, or boost volumes >34 cc were significantly associated with a 'fair/poor' cosmetic outcome. Fibrosis, edema, erythema, and telangectasia were also associated with 'fair/poor' physician-reported cosmesis; erythema and telangectasia remained significant on multivariate analysis. Patient-reported cosmesis was available for 548 patients, and 33%, 50%, and 17% of patients reported 'excellent', 'good', and 'fair/poor' cosmesis, respectively. The use of a boost and increased boost volume: breast volume ratio were significantly associated with 'fair/poor' outcomes. No parameter for patient-reported cosmesis was significant on multivariate analysis. The chances of experiencing a treatment related effect was significantly associated with a boost dose {>=}16 Gy, receipt of chemotherapy and endocrine therapy, large breast size, and electron boost energy. Conclusions: Whole-breast IMRT is associated with very low rates of local recurrence at 5 years, 83%-98% 'good/excellent' cosmetic outcomes, and minimal chronic toxicity, including late fibrosis.

  2. Department Chair, Physical Therapy BYRDINE F. LEWIS SCHOOL OF NURSING AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frantz, Kyle J.

    Department Chair, Physical Therapy BYRDINE F. LEWIS SCHOOL OF NURSING AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS The Department of Physical Therapy in the Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions at Georgia Committee (Log# 16028), Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions, Georgia State University

  3. Silk-based resorbable electronic devices for remotely controlled therapy and in vivo infection abatement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Silk-based resorbable electronic devices for remotely controlled therapy and in vivo infection and integrate in the biological milieu, and technology, through the use of recently developed material platforms the necessary thermal therapy or trigger drug delivery. Such externally control- lable, resorbable devices

  4. A hybrid approach to beam angle optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsimas, Dimitris

    Linear programming Computational experiments a b s t r a c t Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Optimization) is an important problem and is today often based on human experience. In this context, we faceA hybrid approach to beam angle optimization in intensity-modulated radiation therapy D. Bertsimas

  5. Parallelization of Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning(RTTP) : A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Vipin

    the therapy planning process by using parallel computing techniques. Skin Normal Tissues Tumor Cells Beams sensitivity of the cells irradiated * Chemical environment of cells Figure 1: Radiation therapy treatment dose dis- tribution within the patient body. A plan is a total dose dis- tribution obtained by summing

  6. Photodynamic Therapy with Motexafin Lutetium for Rectal Cancer: A Preclinical Model in the Dog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yodh, Arjun G.

    Photodynamic Therapy with Motexafin Lutetium for Rectal Cancer: A Preclinical Model in the Dog H of rectal resection after motexafin lutetium-mediated photodynamic therapy. Methods. Ten mixed breed dogs received the photosensitizing agent motexafin lutetium (MLu, Pharmacyclics, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) of 2 mg

  7. INEL BNCT research program: Annual report, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venhuizen, J.R. [ed.

    1996-04-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1995. Contributions from the principal investigators about their individual projects are included, specifically, physics (treatment planning software, real-time neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (large animal models efficacy studies). Design of a reactor based epithermal neutron extraction facility is discussed in detail. Final results of boron magnetic resonance imagining is included for both borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophenylalanine (BPA) in rats, and BSH in humans. Design of an epithermal neutron facility using electron linear accelerators is presented, including a treatise on energy removal from the beam target. Information on the multiple fraction injection of BSH in rats is presented.

  8. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouvea de Lima, Aline; Villar, Rosangela Correa; Castro, Gilberto de; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral; Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might translate into improved CRT efficacy.

  9. Cyclotron Produced Radionuclides for Diagnosis and Therapy of Human Neoplasms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Larson MD

    2009-09-21

    This project funded since 1986 serves as a core project for cancer research throughout MSKCC, producing key radiotracers as well as basic knowledge about thel physics of radiation decay and imaging, for nuclear medicine applications to cancer diagnosis and therapy. In recent years this research application has broadened to include experiments intended to lead to an improved understanding of cancer biology and into the discovery and testing of new cancer drugs. Advances in immune based radiotargeting form the basis for this project. Both antibody and cellular based immune targeting methods have been explored. The multi-step targeting methodologies (MST) developed by NeoRex (Seattle,Washington), have been adapted for use with positron emitting isotopes and PET allowing the quantification and optimization of targeted delivery. In addition, novel methods for radiolabeling immune T-cells with PET tracers have advanced our ability to track these cells of prolonged period of time.

  10. Postmastectomy Hypofractionated and Accelerated Radiation Therapy With (and Without) Subcutaneous Amifostine Cytoprotection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) provides major local control and survival benefits. More aggressive radiation therapy schemes may, however, be necessary in specific subgroups, provided they are safely administered. We report the tolerance and efficacy of a highly accelerated and hypofractionated regimen (HypoARC). Methods and Materials: One hundred twelve high-risk patients who had undergone mastectomy received 10 consecutive fractions of 3.5 Gy in 12 days (thoracic wall and axillary/supraclavicular areas). Two consecutive additional fractions of 4 Gy were given to the surgical scar area (electrons 8-10 MeV) and 1 3.5-Gy fraction to the axilla (in cases with extensive nodal involvement). A minimum follow-up of 24 months (median, 44 months) was allowed before analysis. Of 112 patients, 21 (18.7%) refused to receive amifostine, the remaining receiving tolerance-based individualized doses (500-1000 mg/day subcutaneously). Results: By use of a dose individualization algorithm, 68.1%, 11%, and 18.7% of patients received 1000 mg, 750 mg, and 500 mg/day of amifostine. Patchy moist skin desquamation outside and inside the booster fields was noted in 14 of 112 (12.5%) and 26 of 112 (23.2%) patients, respectively. No case of acute pneumonitis was recorded. High amifostine dose offered a significant skin protection. Within a median follow-up time of 44 months, moderate subcutaneous edema outside and within the booster thoracic area was noted in 5 of 112 (4.4%) and 8 of 112 (7.1%) cases, respectively. Intense asymptomatic radiographic findings of in field lung fibrosis were noted in 4 of 112 (3.6%) patients. Amifostine showed a significant protection against lung and soft tissue fibrosis. A 97% projected 5-year local relapse free survival and 84% 5-year disease-specific survival were recorded. Lack of steroid receptor expression, simple human epidermal growth factor 2 positivity, or triple negative phenotype defined higher metastasis rates but had no effect on local control. Conclusions: PMRT with HypoARC showed an excellent early and short-term late toxicity profile, and amifostine further reduced early and late radiation sequelae. Encouraging local control rates are obtained in high-risk subgroups.

  11. Measurements and simulations of focused beam for orthovoltage therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas, Hassan; Mahato, Dip N.; Satti, Jahangir; MacDonald, C. A.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Megavoltage photon beams are typically used for therapy because of their skin-sparing effect. However, a focused low-energy x-ray beam would also be skin sparing, and would have a higher dose concentration at the focal spot. Such a beam can be produced with polycapillary optics. MCNP5 was used to model dose profiles for a scanned focused beam, using measured beam parameters. The potential of low energy focused x-ray beams for radiation therapy was assessed. Methods: A polycapillary optic was used to focus the x-ray beam from a tungsten source. The optic was characterized and measurements were performed at 50 kV. PMMA blocks of varying thicknesses were placed between optic and the focal spot to observe any variation in the focusing of the beam after passing through the tissue-equivalent material. The measured energy spectrum was used to model the focused beam in MCNP5. A source card (SDEF) in MCNP5 was used to simulate the converging x-ray beam. Dose calculations were performed inside a breast tissue phantom. Results: The measured focal spot size for the polycapillary optic was 0.2 mm with a depth of field of 5 mm. The measured focal spot remained unchanged through 40 mm of phantom thickness. The calculated depth dose curve inside the breast tissue showed a dose peak several centimeters below the skin with a sharp dose fall off around the focus. The percent dose falls below 10% within 5 mm of the focus. It was shown that rotating the optic during scanning would preserve the skin-sparing effect of the focused beam. Conclusions: Low energy focused x-ray beams could be used to irradiate tumors inside soft tissue within 5 cm of the surface.

  12. Introduction: Western States Budget Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubenow, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    the reports in 2011, and reports dating back to 1997 areWestern States Budget Reports This special issue onthe Western States Budget Reports is produced in collabora-

  13. 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-01-01

    This annual report includes: a brief overview of Western; FY 2008 operational highlights; and financial data.

  14. Early Childhood Education Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Early Childhood Education Report 2014 #12;Early Childhood Education Report 2014 is published by in Education holds the copyright to the Early Childhood Education Report 2014. It encourages digital or hard: Akbari, E., McCuaig, K. (2014) Early Childhood Education Report 2014. Toronto: Ontario Institute

  15. STEP Program Benchmark Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Program Benchmark Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  16. Technical Consultant Report Template

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Technical Consultant Report Template, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  17. Quarterly Progress Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quarterly Progress Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  18. STEP Participant Survey Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Participant Survey Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  19. Feasibility of a predictive model of Hsp70b-activated gene therapy protein expression during ultrasound hyperthermia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silcox, Christina Elise

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy has been heralded as a possible approach to a variety of diseases and conditions, ranging from cancer and heart disease to blindness and neurodegenerative diseases. However, progress in gene therapy requires ...

  20. A Spectrum of Nerve Injury after Thermal Ablation: A Report of Four Cases and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip, Asher; Gupta, Sanjay Ahrar, Kamran Tam, Alda L.

    2013-10-15

    Thermal ablation is an accepted alternative for the palliation of pain from bone metastases. Although rare, neurologic complications after thermal ablation have been reported. We present four cases, including two cases of rapid reversal of postcryoablation neurapraxia after the administration of steroid therapy, and review the literature.

  1. Pathologic and biologic response to preoperative endocrine therapy in patients with ER-positive ductal carcinoma in situ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    and the effect of neoadju- vant hormone therapy in thefor DCIS. The neoadju- vant approach described in our study

  2. Evaluation of fracture risk and potential drug holidays for postmenopausal women on long-term bisphosphonate therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostoff, Matthew D.; Saseen, Joseph J.; Borgelt, Laura M.

    2014-04-28

    or discontinuation. These data emphasize the need to accurately assess risk and benefit in patients treated with bisphosphonate therapy....

  3. 2014 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Reporting Calendar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, reporting, grants, quarterly report, recovery act report, davis-bacon report, historic preservation report, pmc

  4. Nomograms Predicting Response to Therapy and Outcomes After Bladder-Preserving Trimodality Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coen, John J., E-mail: jcoen@harthosp.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Paly, Jonathan J.; Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kaufman, Donald S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Heney, Niall M. [Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Spiegel, Daphne Y.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Shipley, William U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Selective bladder preservation by use of trimodality therapy is an established management strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Individual disease features have been associated with response to therapy, likelihood of bladder preservation, and disease-free survival. We developed prognostic nomograms to predict the complete response rate, disease-specific survival, and likelihood of remaining free of recurrent bladder cancer or cystectomy. Methods and Materials: From 1986 to 2009, 325 patients were managed with selective bladder preservation at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and had complete data adequate for nomogram development. Treatment consisted of a transurethral resection of bladder tumor followed by split-course chemoradiation. Patients with a complete response at midtreatment cystoscopic assessment completed radiation, whereas those with a lesser response underwent a prompt cystectomy. Prognostic nomograms were constructed predicting complete response (CR), disease-specific survival (DSS), and bladder-intact disease-free survival (BI-DFS). BI-DFS was defined as the absence of local invasive or regional recurrence, distant metastasis, bladder cancer-related death, or radical cystectomy. Results: The final nomograms included information on clinical T stage, presence of hydronephrosis, whether a visibly complete transurethral resection of bladder tumor was performed, age, sex, and tumor grade. The predictive accuracy of these nomograms was assessed. For complete response, the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve was 0.69. The Harrell concordance index was 0.61 for both DSS and BI-DFS. Conclusions: Our nomograms allow individualized estimates of complete response, DSS, and BI-DFS. They may assist patients and clinicians making important treatment decisions.

  5. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    increasing, urban and suburban communities growing and global warming and environmental impact getting prices increasing, urban and suburban settlements growing and global warming and environmental impactTechnical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. SWUTC/12/476660-00050-1 2. Government Accession

  6. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. SWUTC/99/472840-00021-1 2. Government Accession. of Recreation, Park and Texas Transportation Institute Tourism Sciences The Texas A&M University System Texas A 1999 DEPARTMENT OF RECREATION, PARK AND TOURISM SCIENCES Texa

  7. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. SWUTC/99/167107-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle SUSTAINABLE TOURISM PLANNING AND TRANSPORTATION IN TEXAS 5. Research Project Title: Sustainable Tourism Planning and Transportation in Texas 16. Abstract Because

  8. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the U.S.-Brazil Trade Corridor 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) Leigh B. Boske and John C. Cuttino 8. Performing Organization Research Report 167221-1 10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS)9. Performing and steel from Brazil to the U.S.-destination Port of Houston. It is the second of a two-report series

  9. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Brazil utilizes sugarcane whereas the United States employs corn. A four parameter comparison focusing Report No. Report 167271-1 10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS)9. Performing Organization Name and Address Center and therefore commands the bulk of this narrative. The world's primary producers of ethanol are Brazil

  10. Annual Report 2001 Annual Report 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    The Arctic Institute of North America Annual Report 2001 The Arctic Institute of North America Annual Report 2001 #12;2000 Board of Directors · James Raffan,Seeley's Bay,Ontario (Chair until September 2001) · Murray B. Todd, Calgary,Alberta (Chair as of September 2001) · Luc Bouthillier,Québec City

  11. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Network and Electric Grid 5. Report Date September 2011 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) Seok Springfield, Virginia 22161 19. Security Classif.(of this report) Unclassified 20. Security Classif and Electric Grid Seok Kim Graduate Student Assistant Department of Civil Engineering Texas A&M University

  12. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    applied to intermodal freight. The report concludes with a summary, and observations to assist others for Intermodal Freight by Glenn Standifer C. Michael Walton Research Report SWUTC/00/167509-1 Combined final EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The intermodal freight industry is a constantly evolving business. Emerging trends include

  13. Housing market report Capital city market report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    Housing market report Capital city market report Prepared February 2014 Dr Andrew Wilson, Senior mortgage interest rates, the current, once in a decade energy of the Sydney housing market is set house price growth since 2009 with the median house price increasing by 9.8 percent. All capital cities

  14. Housing market report Capital city market report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    Housing market report Capital city market report Prepared January 2014 Dr Andrew Wilson, Senior economies. The national housing market will record positive growth again in 2014, although the level will impact other local housing markets, particularly in Sydney and Melbourne. Over 2013, the Australian

  15. Library Annual Report Library Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    Library Annual Report 2007 Library Annual Report 2007 #12;www.library.uwa.edu.au Our mission: By delivering excellent information resources and services the Library is integral to the University's mission of advancing, transmitting and sustaining knowledge. Our vision: The Library will continue to be at the heart

  16. REPORT POLLUTION Report-A-Polluter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    laboratory chemicals and waste into or near a storm drain structure Soil from construction sites being@purdue.edu . To report construction sites issues, e.g. erosion & sediment control problems, please call the Purdue University Construction Department at 765-494-0580. To report leaking sanitary sewer lines, failing septic

  17. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Office P.O. Box 5080 Austin, TX 78763-5080 13. Type of Report and Period Covered Technical Report with potentially significant cost implications. This research project is designed to address issues associated, floodplain, Weir equations, culvert, flow, test channel, return channel, Pitot tube 18. Distribution

  18. Annual Reports | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in PDF and will require Adobe Reader for viewing. Freedom of Information Act Annual Reports Annual Report for 2014 Annual Report for 2013 Annual Report for 2012 Annual Report...

  19. Long-term Follow-up Results of a Multi-institutional Phase 2 Study of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer in East and Southeast Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Shingo; Ohno, Tatsuya; Thephamongkhol, Kullathorn; Chansilpa, Yaowalak; Cao, Jianping; Xu, Xiaoting; Devi, C. R. Beena; Swee, Tang Tieng; Calaguas, Miriam J.C.; Reyes, Rey H. de los; Cho, Chul-Koo; Dung, To Anh; Supriana, Nana; Erawati, Dyah; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Nakano, Takashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term survival and toxicity of a multi-institutional phase 2 study of concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. Methods and Materials: Ten institutions from 8 Asian countries participated in the study. Between April 2003 and March 2006, 120 patients (60 with bulky stage IIB and 60 with stage IIIB) were treated with CCRT. Radiation therapy consisted of pelvic external beam radiation therapy and either high-dose-rate or low-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Five cycles of weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) were administered during the course of radiation therapy. Treatment results were evaluated by the rates of local control, overall survival, and late toxicities. Results: Median follow-up was 63.7 months, and the follow-up rate at 5 years was 98%. The 5-year local control and overall survival rates for all patients were 76.8% and 55.1%, respectively. The 5-year rates of major late toxicities of the rectum and bladder were 7.9% and 0%, respectively. Conclusions: The long-term results have suggested that CCRT is safe and effective for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. However, further efforts are needed to improve overall survival.

  20. Artificial Intelligence Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minsky, Marvin

    1972-01-01

    Research at the Laboratory in vision, language, and other problems of intelligence. This report is an attempt to combine a technical progress report with an exposition of our point of view about certain problems in the ...

  1. BES Workshop Reports

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (more) JPG .jpg file (440KB) PDF file of this of report .pdf file (7.9MB) The Mesoscale Science Report: From Quanta to the Continuum: Opportunities for Mesoscale Science...

  2. Hazard analysis results report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemi, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-30

    This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Results for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

  3. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boytsov, A Yu; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Katagiri, K; Noda, K; Ponkin, D O; Ramzdorf, A Yu; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B

    2015-01-01

    The Electron String type of Ion Sources (ESIS) was developed, constructed and tested first in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. These ion sources can be the appropriate sources for production of pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams which can be used for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact the test ESIS Krion-6T already now at the solenoid magnetic field only 4.6 T provides more than 10^10 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5*10^9 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable for application at synchrotrons. It was also found, that Krion-6T can provide more than 10^11 C6+ ions per second at 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. As for production of 11C radioactive ion beams ESIS can be the most economic kind of ion source. To proof that the special cryogenic cell for pulse injection of gaseous species into electron string was successfully tested using the ESIS Krion-2M.

  4. Osteogenic Sarcoma of the Maxilla: Neutron Therapy for Unresectable Disease

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smoron, Geoffrey L.; Lennox, Arlene J.; Mcgee, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. To present a case study involving the use of fast neutron therapy to treat an extensive unresectable osteogenic sarcoma arising from the left maxilla. Patient. A 14-year-old male presented with a massive tumor producing severe distortion of his facial structures. He had already received six courses of chemotherapy, which had reduced his pain, but had not measurably reduced the tumor. Methods. The patient was treated with 66 MeV fast neutrons to a dose of 20.4 Gy in 13 fractions over 35 days. Results. CT assessments indicate gradually increasing calcification and noticeable reductionmore »of soft-tissue disease in the frontal sinus, orbit and maxillary antrum.There has been some recontouring of the facial structures.The boy conducts an active life, has no pain, and feels well. He was 17 years old at the last follow-up. Discussion. Fast neutrons have a greater biological effectiveness than conventional photon beams. Their use has been associated with improved chance for local control of unresectable disease.This case illustrates their effectiveness in controlling an unusual and aggressive osteogenic sarcoma of the facial bone and sinuses. « less

  5. Radiant{trademark} Liquid Radioisotope Intravascular Radiation Therapy System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eigler, N.; Whiting, J.; Chernomorsky, A.; Jackson, J.; Knapp, F.F., Jr.; Litvack, F.

    1998-01-16

    RADIANT{trademark} is manufactured by United States Surgical Corporation, Vascular Therapies Division, (formerly Progressive Angioplasty Systems). The system comprises a liquid {beta}-radiation source, a shielded isolation/transfer device (ISAT), modified over-the-wire or rapid exchange delivery balloons, and accessory kits. The liquid {beta}-source is Rhenium-188 in the form of sodium perrhenate (NaReO{sub 4}), Rhenium-188 is primarily a {beta}-emitter with a physical half-life of 17.0 hours. The maximum energy of the {beta}-particles is 2.1 MeV. The source is produced daily in the nuclear pharmacy hot lab by eluting a Tungsten-188/Rhenium-188 generator manufactured by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Using anion exchange columns and Millipore filters the effluent is concentrated to approximately 100 mCi/ml, calibrated, and loaded into the (ISAT) which is subsequently transported to the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The delivery catheters are modified Champion{trademark} over-the-wire, and TNT{trademark} rapid exchange stent delivery balloons. These balloons have thickened polyethylene walls to augment puncture resistance; dual radio-opaque markers and specially configured connectors.

  6. Vertebral Compression Fracture (VCF) After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT): Analysis of Predictive Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunha, Marcelo V.R.; Al-Omair, Ameen; Atenafu, Eshetu G.; Masucci, Giuseppina Laura; Letourneau, Daniel; Korol, Renee; Yu, Eugene; Howard, Peter; Lochray, Fiona; Costa, Leodante B. da; Fehlings, Michael G.; Sahgal, Arjun; Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) are increasingly observed after spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). The aim of this study was to determine the risk of VCF after spine SBRT and identify clinical and dosimetric factors predictive for VCF. The analysis incorporated the recently described Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) criteria. Methods and Materials: The primary endpoint of this study was the development of a de novo VCF (ie, new endplate fracture or collapse deformity) or fracture progression based on an existing fracture at the site of treatment after SBRT. We retrospectively scored 167 spinal segments in 90 patients treated with spine SBRT according to each of the 6 SINS criteria. We also evaluated the presence of paraspinal extension, prior radiation, various dosimetric parameters including dose per fraction ({>=}20 Gy vs <20 Gy), age, and histology. Results: The median follow-up was 7.4 months. We identified 19 fractures (11%): 12 de novo fractures (63%) and 7 cases of fracture progression (37%). The mean time to fracture after SBRT was 3.3 months (range, 0.5-21.6 months). The 1-year fracture-free probability was 87.3%. Multivariate analysis confirmed that alignment (P=.0003), lytic lesions (P=.007), lung (P=.03) and hepatocellular (P<.0001) primary histologies, and dose per fraction of 20 Gy or greater (P=.004) were significant predictors of VCF. Conclusions: The presence of kyphotic/scoliotic deformity and the presence of lytic tumor were the only predictive factors of VCF based on the original 6 SINS criteria. We also report that patients with lung and hepatocellular tumors and treatment with SBRT of 20 Gy or greater in a single fraction are at a higher risk of VCF.

  7. Therapy against organophosphate poisoning: The importance of anticholinergic drugs with antiglutamatergic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissman, Ben Avi [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona 74100 (Israel)], E-mail: aviw@iibr.gov.il; Raveh, Lily [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona 74100 (Israel)

    2008-10-15

    Potent cholinesterase inhibitors (e.g., soman, sarin), induce a wide range of deleterious effects including convulsions, behavioral impairments and ultimately, death. Due to the likelihood of various scenarios of military or terrorist attacks by these and other chemical weapons, research has to be aimed at finding optimal therapies. Early accumulation of acetylcholine in synaptic clefts was suggested to trigger an array of toxic events including an excessive release of glutamate, culminating in the activation of its receptors. Stimulation of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) subtype of these receptors was associated with the neuronal injury that initiates organophosphate-induced brain damage. The notion of a stepwise mechanism yielded treatments based on a combination of an immediate administration of enzyme reactivators and anticholinergic drugs. This strategy dramatically increased survival rates but did not abolish convulsions and failed to prevent the ensuing cognitive dysfunction. Efforts to improve this paradigm by adding anticonvulsants or antiglutamatergic drugs with anti-epileptic characteristics produced dubious results. Under these conditions, benactyzine and caramiphen, agents with anticholinergic and antiglutamatergic properties, provided improved protection when introduced as adjunct agents to oximes, reversible cholinesterase inhibitors and/or specific antimuscarinic drugs such as atropine. In contrast, the specific antimuscarinic drug scopolamine failed to block soman-induced changes in glutamatergic and behavioral parameters even when given prophylactically. These findings along with a large number of additional reports led towards the conclusion that the therapeutic advantage of drugs such as benactyzine and caramiphen could derive from their ability to modulate central cholinergic and glutamate neurotransmission.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Therapy-Induced Necrosis Using Gadolinium-Chelated Polyglutamic Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Edward F.; Esparza-Coss, Emilio; Wen Xiaoxia; Ng, Chaan S.; Daniel, Sherita L.; Price, Roger E.; Rivera, Belinda; Charnsangavej, Chusilp; Gelovani, Juri G.; Li Chun . E-mail: cli@di.mdacc.tmc.edu

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Necrosis is the most common morphologic alteration found in tumors and surrounding normal tissues after radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Accurate measurement of necrosis may provide an early indication of treatment efficacy or associated toxicity. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the selective accumulation of polymeric paramagnetic magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents-gadolinium p-aminobenzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-poly(glutamic acid) (L-PG-DTPA-Gd and D-PG-DTPA-Gd)-in necrotic tissue. Methods and Materials: Two different solid tumor models, human Colo-205 xenograft and syngeneic murine OCA-1 ovarian tumors, were used in this study. Necrotic response was induced by treatment with poly(L-glutamic acid)-paclitaxel conjugate (PG-TXL). T{sub 1}-weighted spin-echo images were obtained immediately and up to 4 days after contrast injection and compared with corresponding histologic specimens. Two low-molecular-weight contrast agents, DTPA-Gd and oligomeric(L-glutamic acid)-DTPA-Gd, were used as nonspecific controls. Results: Initially, there was minimal tumor enhancement after injection of either L-PG-DTPA-Gd or D-PG-DTPA-Gd, but rapid enhancement after injection of low-molecular-weight agents. However, polymeric contrast agents, but not low-molecular-weight contrast agents, caused sustained enhancement in regions of tumor necrosis in both tumors treated with PG-TXL and untreated tumors. These data indicate that high molecular weight, rather than in vivo biodegradation, is necessary for the specific localization of polymeric MR contrast agents to necrotic tissue. Moreover, biotinylated L-PG-DTPA-Gd colocalized with macrophages in the tumor necrotic areas, suggesting that selective accumulation of L- and D-PG-DTPA-Gd in necrotic tissue was mediated through residing macrophages. Conclusions: Our data suggest that MR imaging with PG-DTPA-Gd may be a useful technique for noninvasive characterization of treatment-induced necrosis.

  9. Cell Reports Molecular Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    Cell Reports Report Molecular Architecture of the Yeast Monopolin Complex Kevin D. Corbett1 report here biochemical characterization of the monopolin complex subunits Mam1 and Hrr25). In these organisms, sister kinetochore co-orientation in meiosis I depends on the Aurora B/Ipl1 kinase, as well

  10. 2014 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paquette, Douglas; Remien, Jason; Foley, Brian; Burke, John; Dorsch, William; Ratel, Karen; Howe, Robert; Welty, Tim; Williams, Jeffrey; Pohlpt, Peter; Lagattolla, Richard; Metz, Robert; Milligan, James; Lettieri, Lawrence

    2015-10-01

    BNL prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory’s environmental performance during the calendar year in review.

  11. Data Network Weather Service Reporting - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Frey

    2012-08-30

    A final report is made of a three-year effort to develop a new forecasting paradigm for computer network performance. This effort was made in co-ordination with Fermi Lab's construction of e-Weather Center.

  12. FusionArc optimization: A hybrid volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matuszak, Martha M.; McShan, Daniel L.; Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Steers, Jennifer M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 and Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Long, Troy; Edwin Romeijn, H. [Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Fraass, Benedick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California 90048 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To introduce a hybrid volumetric modulated arc therapy/intensity modulated radiation therapy (VMAT/IMRT) optimization strategy called FusionArc that combines the delivery efficiency of single-arc VMAT with the potentially desirable intensity modulation possible with IMRT.Methods: A beamlet-based inverse planning system was enhanced to combine the advantages of VMAT and IMRT into one comprehensive technique. In the hybrid strategy, baseline single-arc VMAT plans are optimized and then the current cost function gradients with respect to the beamlets are used to define a metric for predicting which beam angles would benefit from further intensity modulation. Beams with the highest metric values (called the gradient factor) are converted from VMAT apertures to IMRT fluence, and the optimization proceeds with the mixed variable set until convergence or until additional beams are selected for conversion. One phantom and two clinical cases were used to validate the gradient factor and characterize the FusionArc strategy. Comparisons were made between standard IMRT, single-arc VMAT, and FusionArc plans with one to five IMRT/hybrid beams.Results: The gradient factor was found to be highly predictive of the VMAT angles that would benefit plan quality the most from beam modulation. Over the three cases studied, a FusionArc plan with three converted beams achieved superior dosimetric quality with reductions in final cost ranging from 26.4% to 48.1% compared to single-arc VMAT. Additionally, the three beam FusionArc plans required 22.4%-43.7% fewer MU/Gy than a seven beam IMRT plan. While the FusionArc plans with five converted beams offer larger reductions in final cost-32.9%-55.2% compared to single-arc VMAT-the decrease in MU/Gy compared to IMRT was noticeably smaller at 12.2%-18.5%, when compared to IMRT.Conclusions: A hybrid VMAT/IMRT strategy was implemented to find a high quality compromise between gantry-angle and intensity-based degrees of freedom. This optimization method will allow patients to be simultaneously planned for dosimetric quality and delivery efficiency without switching between delivery techniques. Example phantom and clinical cases suggest that the conversion of only three VMAT segments to modulated beams may result in a good combination of quality and efficiency.

  13. 1995 PVUSA progress report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale (US) photovoltaic (PV) electric generation systems and recent developments in PV module technology. This report updates the project`s progress, reviews the status and performance of the various PV installations during 1995, summarizes key accomplishments and conclusions, and serves as the final report under Pacific Gas and Electric Company`s project management.

  14. Fast Monte Carlo for radiation therapy: the PEREGRINE Project (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street Lighting FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Projecti FORCE|

  15. Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treated With 3-Week Accelerated Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy and Concomitant Boost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadha, Manjeet; Woode, Rudolph; Sillanpaa, Jussi; Lucido, David; Boolbol, Susan K.; Kirstein, Laurie; Osborne, Michael P.; Feldman, Sheldon; Harrison, Louis B.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To report early outcomes of accelerated whole-breast radiation therapy with concomitant boost. Methods and Materials: This is a prospective, institutional review board-approved study. Eligibility included stage TisN0, T1N0, and T2N0 breast cancer. Patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were ineligible. The whole breast received 40.5 Gy in 2.7-Gy fractions with a concomitant lumpectomy boost of 4.5 Gy in 0.3-Gy fractions. Total dose to the lumpectomy site was 45 Gy in 15 fractions over 19 days. Results: Between October 2004 and December 2010, 160 patients were treated; stage distribution was as follows: TisN0, n=63; T1N0, n=88; and T2N0, n=9. With a median follow-up of 3.5 years (range, 1.5-7.8 years) the 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 90% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84-0.94) and 97% (95% CI 0.93-0.99), respectively. Five-year local relapse-free survival was 99% (95% CI 0.96-0.99). Acute National Cancer Institute/Common Toxicity Criteria grade 1 and 2 skin toxicity was observed in 70% and 5%, respectively. Among the patients with ?2-year follow-up no toxicity higher than grade 2 on the Late Effects in Normal Tissues–Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic scale was observed. Review of the radiation therapy dose–volume histogram noted that ?95% of the prescribed dose encompassed the lumpectomy target volume in >95% of plans. The median dose received by the heart D{sub 05} was 215 cGy, and median lung V{sub 20} was 7.6%. Conclusions: The prescribed accelerated schedule of whole-breast radiation therapy with concomitant boost can be administered, achieving acceptable dose distribution. With follow-up to date, the results are encouraging and suggest minimal side effects and excellent local control.

  16. Liposome-anchored local delivery of immunomodulatory agents for tumor therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwong, Brandon (Brandon Wai-Sing)

    2012-01-01

    Immunostimulatory therapies that activate immune response pathways are of great interest for overcoming the immunosuppression present in advanced tumors. Agonistic antibodies against the co-stimulatory receptors CD40 and ...

  17. Home ultraviolet light therapy for psoriasis: Why patients choose other options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dothard, Emily H.; Sandoval, Laura F.; Yentzer, Brad A.; Feldman, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    of psoriasis [5]. A home light unit may therefore be theyou/your child for a home UV light device. I just need aboutFebruary 2015 Commentary Home ultraviolet light therapy for

  18. Relative Merits of X-ray, Proton and Carbon Beam Therapy | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Relative Merits of X-ray, Proton and Carbon Beam Therapy Apr 09 2014 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM Prof. Oliver Jkel, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany ORNL, Physics Division...

  19. OUTCOMES OF ANTHROPOLOGICALLY BASED CULTURAL COMPETENCY EDUCATION FOR DOCTORAL STUDENTS IN PHYSICAL THERAPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drassen Ham, Amy

    2013-08-31

    understand the usefulness of cultural competency education for students in physical therapy. This research examines (1) how participants used cultural competency education at the point of clinical engagement, (2) if increased amount of education translates...

  20. Moral obligation and the human germ-line gene therapy debate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Alan B

    1998-01-01

    genetic engineering, there are few arguments made for a positive moral obligation to genetic intervention. This is especially so with respect to human germ-line gene therapy. Burke. K. Zimmerman makes one of the few arguments that society...

  1. A microfluidic platform for combinatorial synthesis and optimization of targeted polymeric nanoparticles for cancer therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valencia, Pedro M. (Pedro Miguel)

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanotechnology to engineer drug delivery vehicles comprised of controlled release polymers with targeting molecules has the potential to revolutionize cancer therapy, among other diseases. Although a myriad of ...

  2. The effectiveness of cognitive processing therapy and prolonged exposure in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutt, Benjamin T.

    2015-08-31

    Multiple randomized clinical trials have shown that cognitive processing therapy (CPT) and prolonged exposure (PE) are evidence-based treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, additional research should ...

  3. High-throughput approaches to sourcing of human hepatocytes for cell-based therapies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Jing (Jing Meghan)

    2014-01-01

    Chronic liver disease affects more than 500 million people worldwide. The only therapy shown to directly prevent mortality is organ transplantation. However, there is growing discrepancy between supply and demand of ...

  4. A novel means of cardiac catheter guidance for ablation therapy of ventricular tachycardia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lv, Wener

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a system for identifying the site of origin of ventricular tachycardia (VT) and guiding a catheter to that site in order to deliver radio-frequency (RF) ablation therapy. Myocardial infarction (MI), also ...

  5. Overcoming cancer therapy resistance by targeting inhibitors of apoptosis proteins and nuclear factor-kappa B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Yao; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Xu, Liang

    2008-10-25

    Chemo- or radioresistance markedly impairs the efficacy of cancer therapy and involves anti-apoptotic signal transduction pathways that prevent cell death. In resistant cancer cells, both inhibitors of apoptosis proteins ...

  6. Radiobiological evaluation of new boron delivery agents for boron neutron capture therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Yoonsun

    2008-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the radiobiological effectiveness of three new boron compounds namely a boronated porphyrin (BOPP) and two liposome formulations for neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The methodology utilizes in vitro ...

  7. The investigation of controlled release microchips, nanoparticles, and sirna for gene therapy in tissue engineering applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chern, Christina

    2009-05-15

    The study of drug delivery for the treatment of illnesses and injuries is an important area of pharmaceutical technology. A relatively new area of drug delivery being explored is gene therapy, which utilizes the idea that genes can be used...

  8. The impact of poetry therapy on symptoms of secondary posttraumatic stress disorder in domestic violence counselors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Beth Carol

    2009-05-15

    This study examines the effectiveness of internet-based poetry therapy on symptoms of secondary posttraumatic stress disorder (SPTSD) in domestic violence counselors, and explores correlations between demographic, workplace and personality variables...

  9. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, January--March 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from January 1 through March 31, 1990. for this reporting period, there were 10 abnormal occurrences. One involved the loss of vital ac power with a subsequent reactor coolant system heat-up at the Vogtle Unit 1 nuclear power plant during shutdown. The event was investigated by an NRC Incident Investigation Team (IIT). The other nine abnormal occurrences involved nuclear material licensees and are described in detail under other NRC-issued licenses: eight of these involved medical therapy misadministrations; the other involved the receipt of an unshielded radioactive source at Amersham Corporation in Burlington, Massachusetts. The latter event was also investigated by an NRC IIT. No abnormal occurrences were reported by the Agreement States. The report also contains information that updates a previously reported abnormal occurrence.

  10. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 07: Design and production of 3D printed bolus for electron radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Shiqin; Moran, Kathryn; Robar, James L.

    2014-08-15

    This is a proof-of-concept study demonstrating the capacity for modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) using 3D printed bolus. Previous reports have involved bolus design using an electron pencil beam model and fabrication using a milling machine. In this study, an in-house algorithm is presented that optimizes the dose distribution with regard to dose coverage, conformity and homogeneity within planning target volume (PTV). The algorithm uses calculated result of a commercial electron Monte Carlo dose calculation as input. Distances along ray lines from distal side of 90% isodose to distal surface of PTV are used to estimate the bolus thickness. Inhomogeneities within the calculation volume are accounted for using coefficient of equivalent thickness method. Several regional modulation operators are applied to improve dose coverage and uniformity. The process is iterated (usually twice) until an acceptable MERT plan is realized, and the final bolus is printed using solid polylactic acid. The method is evaluated with regular geometric phantoms, anthropomorphic phantoms and a clinical rhabdomyosarcoma pediatric case. In all cases the dose conformity is improved compared to that with uniform bolus. The printed boluses conform well to the surface of complex anthropomorphic phantoms. For the rhabdomyosarcoma patient, the MERT plan yields a reduction of mean dose by 38.2% in left kidney relative to uniform bolus. MERT using 3D printed bolus appears to be a practical, low cost approach to generating optimized bolus for electron therapy. The method is effective in improving conformity of prescription isodose surface and in sparing immediately adjacent normal tissues.

  11. SU-E-T-572: Beam Characteristics and Treatment Planning Commissioning for a New Proton Therapy Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, T; Sun, B; Grantham, K; Santanam, L; Goddu, S; Klein, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A single-room proton system, the Mevion S250, was introduced into the arena of proton radiotherapy by Mevion Medical Systems. The first unit was installed and operates at the S. Lee Kling Proton Therapy Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. The objective of this abstract is to report the system's beam characteristics and Eclipse commissioning. Methods: Commissioning data were acquired for modelling longitudinal fluence, virtual source position, effective source position, source size and Bragg peaks in Eclipse. Stoichiometric CT calibration was generated via ICRU44 human. Spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBP) were measured with Parallel Plate Chamber and profiles with solid state detector for model validation. Heterogeneity effects were measured with bone and lung inserts in the beam line. RT dose was computed in a virtual water phantom, and exported from Eclipse to compare with measurements at various depths and axis. SOBPs were fine-tuned with partial shining correction and entry correction to match measurements. Output factor was measured for each individual field with an ADCL ion chamber in a water tank and fitted to a polynomial function to cross-check the monitor unit verification. Results: Ranges of all 24 options were measured within ±1mm tolerance. Modulations met a ±1mm or ±2% tolerance. SOBP flatness met a ±3% tolerance. Distal fall off (80%-20%) were measured between 6mm and 7mm for all options. Virtual source positions varied between 177cm and 195cm, decreasing with field size and range. SOBP generated by Eclipse agreed with measurements within ±3% in the entry region, and ±1%/±1mm in other regions. Sanity check for output achieved 5% accuracy in 98% of cases. Conclusion: The commissioning of the first Mevions S250 proton therapy system met specifications. The unit has been put in clinical operation since 12/17/2013.

  12. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.N.

    1985-05-01

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  13. CLAP DETECTION AND DISCRIMINATION FOR RHYTHM THERAPY Nathan Lesser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Dan

    by the direct-to-reverberant energy balance. We present a set of features to capture these cues, and report our and background claps from other nearby users. Available cues for this discrimination include the absolute energy of the spatial origin of sound sources is a challenging problem, particularly in real-world, reverberant situ

  14. Automatic CT simulation optimization for radiation therapy: A general strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Tan, Jun; Gay, Hiram; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Yu, Lifeng [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Anastasio, Mark A. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: In radiation therapy, x-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation protocol specifications should be driven by the treatment planning requirements in lieu of duplicating diagnostic CT screening protocols. The purpose of this study was to develop a general strategy that allows for automatically, prospectively, and objectively determining the optimal patient-specific CT simulation protocols based on radiation-therapy goals, namely, maintenance of contouring quality and integrity while minimizing patient CT simulation dose. Methods: The authors proposed a general prediction strategy that provides automatic optimal CT simulation protocol selection as a function of patient size and treatment planning task. The optimal protocol is the one that delivers the minimum dose required to provide a CT simulation scan that yields accurate contours. Accurate treatment plans depend on accurate contours in order to conform the dose to actual tumor and normal organ positions. An image quality index, defined to characterize how simulation scan quality affects contour delineation, was developed and used to benchmark the contouring accuracy and treatment plan quality within the predication strategy. A clinical workflow was developed to select the optimal CT simulation protocols incorporating patient size, target delineation, and radiation dose efficiency. An experimental study using an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom with added-bolus layers was used to demonstrate how the proposed prediction strategy could be implemented and how the optimal CT simulation protocols could be selected for prostate cancer patients based on patient size and treatment planning task. Clinical IMRT prostate treatment plans for seven CT scans with varied image quality indices were separately optimized and compared to verify the trace of target and organ dosimetry coverage. Results: Based on the phantom study, the optimal image quality index for accurate manual prostate contouring was 4.4. The optimal tube potentials for patient sizes of 38, 43, 48, 53, and 58 cm were 120, 140, 140, 140, and 140 kVp, respectively, and the corresponding minimum CTDIvol for achieving the optimal image quality index 4.4 were 9.8, 32.2, 100.9, 241.4, and 274.1 mGy, respectively. For patients with lateral sizes of 43–58 cm, 120-kVp scan protocols yielded up to 165% greater radiation dose relative to 140-kVp protocols, and 140-kVp protocols always yielded a greater image quality index compared to the same dose-level 120-kVp protocols. The trace of target and organ dosimetry coverage and the ? passing rates of seven IMRT dose distribution pairs indicated the feasibility of the proposed image quality index for the predication strategy. Conclusions: A general strategy to predict the optimal CT simulation protocols in a flexible and quantitative way was developed that takes into account patient size, treatment planning task, and radiation dose. The experimental study indicated that the optimal CT simulation protocol and the corresponding radiation dose varied significantly for different patient sizes, contouring accuracy, and radiation treatment planning tasks.

  15. MCNP speed advances for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goorley, J.T.; McKinney, G.; Adams, K.; Estes, G.

    1998-04-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatment planning process of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center-M.I.T team relies on MCNP to determine dose rates in the subject`s head for various beam orientations. In this time consuming computational process, four or five potential beams are investigated. Of these, one or two final beams are selected and thoroughly evaluated. Recent advances greatly decreased the time needed to do these MCNP calculations. Two modifications to the new MCNP4B source code, lattice tally and tracking enhancements, reduced the wall-clock run times of a typical one million source neutrons run to one hour twenty five minutes on a 200 MHz Pentium Pro computer running Linux and using the GNU FORTRAN compiler. Previously these jobs used a special version of MCNP4AB created by Everett Redmond, which completed in two hours two minutes. In addition to this 30% speedup, the MCNP4B version was adapted for use with Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) on personal computers running the Linux operating system. MCNP, using PVM, can be run on multiple computers simultaneously, offering a factor of speedup roughly the same as the number of computers used. With two 200 MHz Pentium Pro machines, the run time was reduced to forty five minutes, a 1.9 factor of improvement over the single Linux computer. While the time of a single run was greatly reduced, the advantages associated with PVM derive from using computational power not already used. Four possible beams, currently requiring four separate runs, could be run faster when each is individually run on a single machine under Windows NT, rather than using Linux and PVM to run one after another with each multiprocessed across four computers. It would be advantageous, however, to use PVM to distribute the final two beam orientations over four computers.

  16. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Dose Painting to Treat Rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Joanna C.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Wexler, Leonard H.; La Quaglia, Michael P.; Happersett, Laura; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To examine local control and patterns of failure in rhabdomyosarcoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) with dose painting (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 41 patients underwent DP-IMRT with chemotherapy for definitive treatment. Nineteen also underwent surgery with or without intraoperative RT. Fifty-six percent had alveolar histologic features. The median interval from beginning chemotherapy to RT was 17 weeks (range, 4-25). Very young children who underwent second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT received reduced doses of 24-36 Gy in 1.4-1.8-Gy fractions. Young adults received 50.4 Gy to the primary tumor and lower doses of 36 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to at-risk lymph node chains. Results: With 22 months of median follow-up, the actuarial local control rate was 90%. Patients aged {<=}7 years who received reduced overall and fractional doses had 100% local control, and young adults had 79% (P=.07) local control. Three local failures were identified in young adults whose primary target volumes had received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Conclusions: DP-IMRT with lower fractional and cumulative doses is feasible for very young children after second-look procedures with or without intraoperative RT. DP-IMRT is also feasible in adolescents and young adults with aggressive disease who would benefit from prophylactic RT to high-risk lymph node chains, although dose escalation might be warranted for improved local control. With limited follow-up, it appears that DP-IMRT produces local control rates comparable to those of sequential IMRT in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

  17. INTERAGENCY REPORT: ASTROGEOLOGY 7 ADVANCED SYSTEMS TRAVERSE RESEARCH PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    #12;INTERAGENCY REPORT: ASTROGEOLOGY 7 ADVANCED SYSTEMS TRAVERSE RESEARCH PROJECT REPORT By G. E Page 13 #12;ADVANCED SYSTEMS TRAVERSE RESEARCH PROJECT REPORT by G. E. Ulrich ABSTRACT This report

  18. Architecture, Engineering and Construction Sustainability Report Biannual Sustainability Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Architecture, Engineering and Construction Sustainability Report i Biannual Sustainability Report Projects $5 Million and Over August 2012 Active Projects

  19. LANSCE Activity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Robinson; Audrey Archuleta; Barbara Maes; Dan Strottman; Earl Hoffman; Garth Tietjen; Gene Farnum; Geoff Greene; Joyce Roberts; Ken Johnson; Paul Lewis; Roger Pynn; Stan Schriber; Steve Sterbenz; Steve Wender; Sue Harper

    1999-02-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Activity Report describes scientific and technological progress and achievements in LANSCE Division during the period of 1995 to 1998. This report includes a message from the Division Director, an overview of LANSCE, sponsor overviews, research highlights, advanced projects and facility upgrades achievements, experimental and user program accomplishments, news and events, and a list of publications. The research highlights cover the areas of condensed-matter science and engineering, accelerator science, nuclear science, and radiography. This report also contains a compact disk that includes an overview, the Activity Report itself, LANSCE operations progress reports for 1996 and 1997, experiment reports from LANSCE users, as well as a search capability.

  20. 2006 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; RATEL,K.

    2007-10-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

  1. 2009 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratel, K.M.; Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2010-09-30

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

  2. 2005 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2006-08-29

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

  3. Drug Resistance and Molecular Cancer Therapy: Apoptosis Versus Autophagy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marquez, Rebecca T.; Tsao, Bryan W.; Faust, Nicholas F.; Xu, Liang

    2013-04-15

    with AML refractory to a single induction regimen.[87] YM155 Advanced refractory solid tumors Phase 1 None The safety profile, plasma concentrations achieved, and antitumor activity.[209] NSCLC Phase 2 None Modest single-agent activity... in patients with refractory, advanced NSCLC. A favorable safety/tolerability profile was reported.[210] AML– Acute myeloid leukemia; Non-small cell lung cancer – NSCLC Table 1. Selective list of IAP antagonists undergoing clinical trials with and without...

  4. Reporting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnowRedoxRelatedFraud toReporting Reporting

  5. Psychometric properties of the parent daily report and its potential for use in child welfare settings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, Vivien

    2007-01-01

    groups focusing on milieu therapy, coping and social skillsOstrove C Facilitated milieu therapy in inpatient child and

  6. SU-E-T-28: A Treatment Planning Comparison of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Vs. Proton Therapy for Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, M; Zhang, R; Sanders, M; Newhauser, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The delivery of post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) can be challenging for patients with left-sided breast cancer due to the PTV size and proximity to critical organs. This study investigates the use of protons for PMRT in a clinically-representative cohort of patients, and quantitatively compares volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to proton therapy to have an evidence-based rationale for selecting a treatment modality for these patients. Methods: Eight left-sided PMRT patients previously treated at our clinic with VMAT were identified for the study. PTVs included the chest wall and regional lymph nodes. Passively scattered (PS) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were constructed using the Eclipse proton planning system. The resulting plans were compared to the original VMAT plan on the basis of PTV coverage; dose homogeneity index (DHI) and conformity index (CI); dose to organs at risk (OAR); tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and secondary cancer complication probability (SCCP). Differences were tested for significance using the paired Student's t-test (p<0.01). Results: All modalities produced clinically acceptable PMRT plans. The comparison demonstrated proton treatment plans provide significantly lower NTCP values for the heart and the lung while maintaining significantly better CI and DHI. At a prescribed dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in the PTV, the calculated mean NTCP value for the patients decreased from 1.3% to 0.05% for the whole heart (cardiac mortality) and from 3.8% to 1.1% for the lungs (radiation pneumonitis) for both proton therapy plans from VMAT plans. Both proton modalities showed a significantly lower SCCP for the contralateral breast compared to VMAT. Conclusion: All three plans (VMAT, PS, and IMPT) provide acceptable treatment plans for PMRT. However, proton therapy shows a significant advantage over VMAT with regards to sparing OARs and may be more advantageous for patients with unfavorable anatomy.

  7. Seismic Design Expectations Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    flood, and lightning. This report only focuses on the seismic design expectations. NPH safety requirements are described in 10 CFR Part 830, Nuclear Safety Management, DOE O...

  8. Visual Resource Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment Visual Resource Report in Support of the I-5 Corridor Reinforcement Project Environmental Impact Statement Prepared for: Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621...

  9. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    This report provides information on current international petroleum production, demand, imports, and stocks. World oil demand and OECD demand data are presented for the years 1970 thru 1995.

  10. 2007 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratel,K.

    2008-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the-length report.

  11. LED Market Intelligence Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    around dimming capabilities. 16 LED Market Intelligence Report Home Depot Walmart Cree Philips TCP GE LSG Osram Feit Costco Lowe's Retail, Regulations, and LEDs Like...

  12. Capital Reporting Company Quadrennial ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 05-27-2014 (866) 448 - DEPO www.CapitalReportingCompany.com 2014 1 QUADRENNIAL ENERGY REVIEW STAKEHOLDER MEETING 3 PETROLEUM TRANSMISSION, STORAGE AND DISTRIBUTION ISSUES...

  13. Capital Reporting Company Quadrennial ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - DEPO www.CapitalReportingCompany.com 2014 1 UNITED STATE OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ---: : IN RE: : : QUADRENNIAL ENERGY REVIEW : : NEW...

  14. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrin, David L

    2011-04-21

    This report summarizes many of the projects, and lists all of the publications and persons trained with support from the grant.

  15. EMSL 2009 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.; Wiley, Julie G.; Reed, Jennifer R.

    2010-02-26

    The EMSL 2009 Annual Report describes the science conducted at EMSL during 2009 as well as outreach activities and awards and honors received by users and staff.

  16. ORNL TM Report Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http:...

  17. 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2002-09-01

    THE SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 2001, AS REQUIRED BY DOE ORDER 231.1.

  18. 1994 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  19. DOE Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D.; Long, James; Newby, Greg B.

    2014-01-08

    This final report contains a summary of work accomplished in the establishment of a Climate Data Center at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

  20. Market Report Highlights

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Technologies Market Report Highlights August 2015 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Prepared by Lawrence Berkeley National...

  1. SFU LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SFU LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT 2006/07 #12;22 TABLE OF CONTENTS Message from the University Librarian................................................... ....................................... 7 WAC Bennett Library.................................................................. ....................................... 8 Samuel and Frances Belzberg Library

  2. Public Affairs Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute of Governmental Studies, UC Berkeley

    2014-01-01

    Padilla speaks at a forum on drones; then-Assembly Speakerinterrogation techniques, drones, and the use of executiveAffairs Report 33 Demystifying Drones – IGS Teams Up with

  3. Navigant Market Report 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    this report, the authors thank the entire U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind & Water Power Technologies Office, particularly Patrick Gilman and Michael Hahn. Navigant would also...

  4. WACR Calibration Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, D

    2010-03-23

    Calibration report for the W-Band (95 GHz) ARM Cloud Radar performed for the ARM Climate Research Facility by ProSensing Inc.

  5. Tobacco Smoking During Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer Is Associated With Unfavorable Outcome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allen M.; Chen, Leon M.; Vaughan, Andrew; Sreeraman, Radhika; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Lau, Derick H.; Stuart, Kerri; Purdy, James A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of continued cigarette smoking among patients undergoing radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer by comparing the clinical outcomes among active smokers and quitters. Methods and Materials: A review of medical records identified 101 patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who continued to smoke during radiation therapy. Each active smoker was matched to a control patient who had quit smoking before initiation of radiation therapy. Matching was based on tobacco history (pack-years), primary site, age, sex, Karnofsky Performance Status, disease stage, radiation dose, chemotherapy use, year of treatment, and whether surgical resection was performed. Outcomes were compared by use of Kaplan-Meier analysis. Normal tissue effects were graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: With a median follow-up of 49 months, active smokers had significantly inferior 5-year overall survival (23% vs. 55%), locoregional control (58% vs. 69%), and disease-free survival (42% vs. 65%) compared with the former smokers who had quit before radiation therapy (p < 0.05 for all). These differences remained statistically significant when patients treated by postoperative or definitive radiation therapy were analyzed separately. The incidence of Grade 3 or greater late complications was also significantly increased among active smokers compared with former smokers (49% vs. 31%, p = 0.01). Conclusions: Tobacco smoking during radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer is associated with unfavorable outcomes. Further studies analyzing the biologic and molecular reasons underlying these differences are planned.

  6. A possible usage of a CDK4 inhibitor for breast cancer stem cell-targeted therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Ga-Young; Chun, Sung Hak; Han, Jeong Yun; Kim, Sung Dae; Lee, Janet; Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746 ; Lee, Chang-Woo; Center for Molecular Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746; Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746 ; Yang, Kwangmo; Department of Radiation Oncology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan 619-953; Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-709 ; Lee, Chang Geun

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ? A CDK4 inhibitor may be used for breast cancer stem cell-targeted therapy. ? The CDK4 inhibitor differentiated the cancer stem cell population (CD24{sup ?}/CD44{sup +}) of MDA-MB-231. ? The differentiation of the cancer stem cells by the CDK4 inhibitor radiosensitized MDA-MB-231. -- Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are one of the main reasons behind cancer recurrence due to their resistance to conventional anti-cancer therapies. Thus, many efforts are being devoted to developing CSC-targeted therapies to overcome the resistance of CSCs to conventional anti-cancer therapies and decrease cancer recurrence. Differentiation therapy is one potential approach to achieve CSC-targeted therapies. This method involves inducing immature cancer cells with stem cell characteristics into more mature or differentiated cancer cells. In this study, we found that a CDK4 inhibitor sensitized MDA-MB-231 cells but not MCF7 cells to irradiation. This difference appeared to be associated with the relative percentage of CSC-population between the two breast cancer cells. The CDK4 inhibitor induced differentiation and reduced the cancer stem cell activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, which are shown by multiple marker or phenotypes of CSCs. Thus, these results suggest that radiosensitization effects may be caused by reducing the CSC-population of MDA-MB-231 through the use of the CDK4 inhibitor. Thus, further investigations into the possible application of the CDK4 inhibitor for CSC-targeted therapy should be performed to enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy for breast cancer.

  7. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Improved Passenger Rail Service among Urban Areas in the South Central High-Speed Rail Corridor 5. Report the State of Texas. 16. Abstract High-speed passenger rail is seen by many in the U.S. transportation policy urban areas that form the endpoints of a federally designated intercity high-speed rail corridor

  8. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    are scheduled for replacement. The use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites to increase-2 Research Project 0-1776 DEVELOPMENT OF METHODS TO STRENGTHEN EXISTING STRUCTURES WITH COMPOSITES conducted Concrete 5. Report Date May 2001 Bridges in Texas Using Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers 6. Performing

  9. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    types. In addition, as a result of this project, the library of roadway cross-sections in the driving Springfield, Virginia 22161 19. Security Classification.(of this report) Unclassified 20. Security Classification.(of this page) Unclassified 21. No. of Pages 141 22. Price Form DOT F 1700.7 (8-72) Reproduction

  10. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    can be used to control, manage, and shape individual traveler behavior and aggregate travel demand multinomial logit-ordered response structure that (a) accommodates differential sensitivity to the built The contents of this report reflect the views of the authors, who are responsible for the facts

  11. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Recipient's Catalog No. 5. Report Date March 2001 4. Title and Subtitle An Assessment of Options been ongoing since the oil crises of the 1970s. While there are some commonalties in the regulatory-72) Reproduction of completed page authorized #12;#12;AN ASSESSMENT OF OPTIONS FOR INTEGRATING TAXICABS

  12. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle SUSTAINABLE INTERSECTION CONTROL TO ACCOMMODATE URBAN FREIGHT MOBILITY 5. Report Date August, 2009 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) Bruce X.7 (8-72) Reproduction of completed page authorized #12;#12;Sustainable Intersection Control

  13. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , particularly in wind power generation and extraction of oil and natural gas. While energy developments recommendations). 17. Key Words Energy Developments, Oil and Gas, Wind Farms, Pavement, Utilities, Driveway://www.ntis.gov 19. Security Classif. (of this report) Unclassified 20. Security Classif. (of this page) Unclassified

  14. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    financial cut-backs as revenue sources become fully committed to bond servicing, user taxes, loose Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, Virginia 22161 19. Security Classif.(of this report financial cut-backs as revenue sources become fully committed to bond servicing, user taxes, loose

  15. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    smaller communities and rural areas an audience not previously exposed to transportation career. Recipient's Catalog No. 5. Report Date December 2006 4. Title and Subtitle The Texas Rural Summer students grow up in rural or small urban centers that are a significant distance from the large

  16. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the United States and Brazil 5. Report Date May 2009 6. Performing Organization Code 6. Author(s) Dr. Leigh B in The United States Midwest and Brazil by Dr. Leigh B. Boske Professor Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public, Suite 200 Austin, Texas 78705-2650 10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS) 11. Contract or Grant No. 10727 12

  17. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Carbon Sequestration Using a Controlled Environment 5. Report Date May 2012 6. Performing Organization carbon sequestration techniques are rapidly becoming part of how environmental mitigation business is conducted, not only in Texas but globally. Terrestrial carbon sequestration is the general term used

  18. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    G. Zornberg 8. Performing Organization Report No. 0-5202-2 10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS)9. Performing suction values as well as the effect of cracking on the hydraulic properties of compacted highly plastic, water content and suction profiles were measured. Analysis was conducted using the results

  19. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of vehicle fleets to alternative fuels, transportation officials proceeded to influence home-to-work trips of Potential Energy Savings and Other Benefits from Alternative Fuel Utilization and Employer Trip Reduction. Recipient's Catalog No. 5. Report Date April 2000 4. Title and Subtitle An Assessment of Potential Energy

  20. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in 1994, U.S.-Mexico trade has continued to increase and so have of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in 1994, U.S.-Mexico trade has continued to increase and so No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 5. Report Date August 2001 4. Title and Subtitle Truck Trade Corridors

  1. Nuclear proliferation status report. Status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-07-01

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear proliferation status of the following countries: (1) Russia, (2) Ukraine, (3) Belarus, (4) Kazakhstan, (5) Israel, (6) India, (7) Pakistan, (8) South Africa, (9) North Korea, (10) Iraq, (11) Iran, (12) Lybia, (13) Algeria, (14) Syria, (15) Brazil, (16) Argentina, and (17) Taiwan.

  2. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Recipient's Catalog No. 5. Report Date February 2002 4. Title and Subtitle GIS to Identify Strategic Freight that the weighting scheme had no effect on the selection of highways for the SFC network. 17. Key Words ITS, GIS. of Pages 140 22. Price Form DOT F 1700.7 (8-72) Reproduction of completed page authorized #12;ii #12;GIS

  3. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOR TEXAS 5. Report Date Published: April 2014 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) Ed Seymour Seymour, Ph.D., P.E. Associate Director Beverly Kuhn, Ph.D., P.E. Senior Research Engineer Kevin Balke, Ph

  4. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    and Technology Implementation Office P.O. Box 5080 Austin, TX 78763-5080 13. Type of Report and Period Covered rehabilitation projects with potentially significant cost implications. This research project is designed channel, Pitot tube 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

  5. Discrete beta dose kernel matrices for nuclides applied in targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) calculated with MCNP5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiner, Dora; Blaickner, Matthias; Rattay, Frank

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Radiopharmaceuticals administered in targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) rely to a great extent not only on beta-emitting nuclides but also on emitters of monoenergetic electrons. Recent advances like combined PET/CT devices, the consequential coregistration of both data, the concept of using beta couples for diagnosis and therapy, respectively, as well as the development of voxel models offer a great potential for developing TRT dose calculation systems similar to those available for external beam treatment planning. The deterministic algorithms in question for this task are based on the convolution of three-dimensional matrices, one representing the activity distribution and the other the dose point kernel. This study aims to report on three-dimensional kernel matrices for various nuclides used in TRT. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNP5 was used to calculate discrete dose kernels of beta particles including the contributions from their respective secondary radiation in soft tissue for the following nuclides: {sup 32}P, {sup 33}P, {sup 67}Cu, {sup 89}Sr, {sup 90}Y, {sup 103}Rh{sup m}, {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 186}Re, and {sup 188}Re. For each nuclide a kernel cube of 10x10x10 mm{sup 3} was calculated, the dimensions of a voxel being 1 mm{sup 3}. Additional kernels with voxel sizes of 3x3x3 mm{sup 3} were simulated. Results: Comparison with the S-value data regarding {sup 32}P, {sup 89}Sr, {sup 90}Y, and {sup 131}I of the MIRD committee which were calculated with the EGS4 code showed a very good agreement, the secondary particle transport of {sup 90}Y being the only exception. Documented analytical kernels on the other side show deviations very close and very far to the source. Conclusions: The good accordance with the only discrete dose kernels published up to date justifies the method chosen. Together with the additional six nuclides, this report provides a considerable database for three-dimensional kernel matrices with regard to beta radionuclides applied in TRT. In contrast to analytical dose point kernels, the discrete kernels elude the problem of overestimation near the source and take energy depositions into account, which occur beyond the range of the continuous-slowing-down approximation (csda range). Recalculation of the 1x1x1 mm{sup 3} kernels to other dose kernels with varying voxel dimensions, cubic or noncubic, is shown to be easily manageable and thereby provides a resolution-independent system of dose calculation.

  6. Environmental Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Cerruti, S; Dibley, V; Doman, J L; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Kumamoto, G; MacQueen, D H; Nelson, J C; Paterson, L; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, A M; Wilson, K; Woollett, J

    2009-09-16

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2008 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites - the Livermore site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1A, Environmental Safety and Health Reporting, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The report is distributed electronically and is available at https://saer.lln.gov/, the website for the LLNL annual environmental report. Previous LLNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1994 are also on the website. Some references in the electronic report text are underlined, which indicates that they are clickable links. Clicking on one of these links will open the related document, data workbook, or website that it refers to. The report begins with an executive summary, which provides the purpose of the report and an overview of LLNL's compliance and monitoring results. The first three chapters provide background information: Chapter 1 is an overview of the location, meteorology, and hydrogeology of the two LLNL sites; Chapter 2 is a summary of LLNL's compliance with environmental regulations; and Chapter 3 is a description of LLNL's environmental programs with an emphasis on the Environmental Management System including pollution prevention. The majority of the report covers LLNL's environmental monitoring programs and monitoring data for 2008: effluent and ambient air (Chapter 4); waters, including wastewater, storm water runoff, surface water, rain, and groundwater (Chapter 5); and terrestrial, including soil, sediment, vegetation, foodstuff, ambient radiation, and special status wildlife and plants (Chapter 6). Complete monitoring data, which are summarized in the body of the report, are provided in Appendix A. The remaining three chapters discuss the radiological impact on the public from LLNL operations (Chapter 7), LLNL's groundwater remediation program (Chapter 8), and quality assurance for the environmental monitoring programs (Chapter 9). The report uses Systeme International units, consistent with the federal Metric Conversion Act of 1975 and Executive Order 12770, Metric Usage in Federal Government Programs (1991). For ease of comparison to environmental reports issued prior to 1991, dose values and many radiological measurements are given in both metric and U.S. customary units. A conversion table is provided in the glossary. The report is the responsibility of LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Monitoring data were obtained through the combined efforts of the Environmental Protection Department; Environmental Restoration Department; Physical and Life Sciences Environmental Monitoring Radiation Laboratory; and the Hazards Control Department.

  7. Preoperative Short-Course Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy Followed by Delayed Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Phase 2 Multicenter Study (KROG 10-01)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan ; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong; Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Sun Young; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Min Ju; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Jun-Gi; Lee, Myung Ah; Nam, Taek-Keun

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase 2 multicenter trial was performed to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative short-course concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiation therapy of 25 Gy in 5 fractions was delivered over 5 consecutive days using helical tomotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered on the same 5 days with intravenous bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day). After 4 to 8 weeks, total mesorectal excision was performed. The primary endpoint was the pathologic downstaging (ypStage 0-I) rate, and secondary endpoints included tumor regression grade, tumor volume reduction rate, and toxicity. Results: Seventy-one patients completed the planned preoperative CRT and surgery. Downstaging occurred in 20 (28.2%) patients, including 1 (1.4%) with a pathologic complete response. Favorable tumor regression (grade 4-3) was observed in 4 (5.6%) patients, and the mean tumor volume reduction rate was 62.5 ± 21.3%. Severe (grade ?3) treatment toxicities were reported in 27 (38%) patients from CRT until 3 months after surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative short-course concurrent CRT followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer demonstrated poor pathologic responses compared with conventional long-course CRT, and it yielded considerable toxicities despite the use of an advanced radiation therapy technique.

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Can Be Used Safely to Boost Residual Disease in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feddock, Jonathan; Arnold, Susanne M.; Department of Medical Oncology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky ; Shelton, Brent J.; Sinha, Partha; Conrad, Gary; Chen, Li; Rinehart, John; McGarry, Ronald C.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a prospective, single-institution study evaluating the feasibility of conventional chemoradiation (CRT) followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as a means of dose escalation for patients with stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with residual disease. Methods and Materials: Patients without metastatic disease and with radiologic evidence of limited residual disease (?5 cm) within the site of the primary tumor and good or complete nodal responses after standard CRT to a target dose of 60 Gy were considered eligible. The SBRT boost was done to achieve a total combined dose biological equivalent dose >100 Gy to the residual primary tumor, consisting of 10 Gy × 2 fractions (20 Gy total) for peripheral tumors, and 6.5 Gy × 3 fractions (19.5 Gy total) for medial tumors using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0813 definitions. The primary endpoint was the development of grade ?3 radiation pneumonitis (RP). Results: After a median follow-up of 13 months, 4 patients developed acute grade 3 RP, and 1 (2.9%) developed late and persistent grade 3 RP. No patients developed grade 4 or 5 RP. Mean lung dose, V2.5, V5, V10, and V20 values were calculated for the SBRT boost, and none were found to significantly predict for RP. Only advancing age (P=.0147), previous smoking status (P=.0505), and high CRT mean lung dose (P=.0295) were significantly associated with RP development. At the time of analysis, the actuarial local control rate at the primary tumor site was 82.9%, with only 6 patients demonstrating recurrence. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SBRT for dose escalation of limited residual NSCLC after definitive CRT was feasible and did not increase the risk for toxicity above that for standard radiation therapy.

  9. Brief Report: Effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Parent-Reported Autism Symptoms in School-Age Children with High-Functioning Autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    Rutter, M. (2003). The autism diagnostic interview-revised.P. C. , & Risi, S. (2002). Autism diagnostic observationor high- functioning autism: A review and recommendations.

  10. Annual Fire Safety Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    1 2014 Annual Fire Safety Report University of California Campus Fire Marshals HIGHER EDUCATION to the Fire Safety in Student Housing Buildings of current or perspective students and employees be reported INTRODUCTION Fire Safety is an essential tool in protecting a campus community from injuries, deaths, business

  11. CHARACTERIZATION Volume 1: Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;EFFLUENT CHARACTERIZATION STUDY Volume 1: Report for FRASER RIVER ESTUARY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Report No.: F07201RP.J11 #12;EFFLUENT CHARACTERIZATION STUDY i PREFACE The Fraser River Estuary Resource Inc. (TRI) was contracted to characterize the effluent from eleven industrial sites. Mc

  12. Microhole Tubing Bending Report

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Oglesby, Ken

    2012-01-01

    A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

  13. Financial Reporting Organizational Chart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    , Internal Financial Reporting Chiu Szeto Asset Management Team Lead Ed Lee Asset Management Analyst Joanne Kuang Asset Management Analyst Kevin Tsui Asset Management Admin. Christina Wright Asset Management (Finance) Les Tochor Director, Financial Reporting Brad Klaiber General Ledger Manager, General Ledger

  14. Microhole Tubing Bending Report

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Oglesby, Ken

    A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

  15. Forest Research Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2005­2006 The research agency of the Forestry Commission #12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts I 2005­2006 Together with the Comptroller and Auditor to be printed 24 July 2006 HC 1407 The research agency of the Forestry Commission Edinburgh: The Stationery

  16. Research Publications Report 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    Research Publications Report 2011 Compiled 13th February 2014 #12;Preface This annual Research Publications Report is now only a web-based publication which draws together for each calendar year the information on the publications by Kent staff which are held on our Kent Academic Repository. The Kent

  17. Research Publications Report 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    Research Publications Report 2012 Compiled 13th February 2014 #12;Preface This annual Research Publications Report is now only a web-based publication which draws together for each calendar year the information on the publications by Kent staff which are held on our Kent Academic Repository. The Kent

  18. Research Publications Report 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    Research Publications Report 2014 Compiled 13th February 2014 #12;Preface This annual Research Publications Report is now only a web-based publication which draws together for each calendar year the information on the publications by Kent staff which are held on our Kent Academic Repository. The Kent

  19. harvard university financial report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that it is a realistic and affordable option. Education is fundamental to the future of individuals and the nation the president 3 financial highlights 8 annual report of the harvard management company 15 report of independent academic agenda. With an exceptionally strong leadership team now in place, planning is moving forward

  20. Environmental Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, S; Gallegos, G; Berg, L L; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Cerruti, S; Doman, J L; Ferry, L S; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Kumamoto, G; Larson, J; MacQueen, D H; Paterson, L; Revelli, M A; Ridley, M; Rueppel, D; Wegrecki, A M; Wilson, K; Woollett, J

    2008-09-24

    The purposes of the 'Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2007' are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites--the Livermore site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1A, Environmental Safety and Health Reporting, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The report is distributed electronically and is available at https://saer.lln.gov/, the website for the LLNL annual environmental report. Previous LLNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1994 are also on the website. Some references in the electronic report text are underlined, which indicates that they are clickable links. Clicking on one of these links will open the related document, data workbook, or website that it refers to. The report begins with an executive summary, which provides the purpose of the report and an overview of LLNL's compliance and monitoring results. The first three chapters provide background information: Chapter 1 is an overview of the location, meteorology, and hydrogeology of the two LLNL sites; Chapter 2 is a summary of LLNL's compliance with environmental regulations; and Chapter 3 is a description of LLNL's environmental programs with an emphasis on the Environmental Management System including pollution prevention. The majority of the report covers LLNL's environmental monitoring programs and monitoring data for 2007: effluent and ambient air (Chapter 4); waters, including wastewater, storm water runoff, surface water, rain, and groundwater (Chapter 5); and terrestrial, including soil, sediment, vegetation, foodstuff, ambient radiation, and special status wildlife and plants (Chapter 6). Complete monitoring data, which are summarized in the body of the report, are provided in Appendix A. The remaining three chapters discuss the radiological impact on the public from LLNL operations (Chapter 7), LLNL's groundwater remediation program (Chapter 8), and quality assurance for the environmental monitoring programs (Chapter 9). The report uses Systeme International units, consistent with the federal Metric Conversion Act of 1975 and Executive Order 12770, Metric Usage in Federal Government Programs (1991). For ease of comparison to environmental reports issued prior to 1991, dose values and many radiological measurements are given in both metric and U.S. customary units. A conversion table is provided in the glossary.

  1. Primary Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer in the Setting of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Emily A.; Guiou, Michael; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Lau, Derick H.; Stuart, Kerri; Vaughan, Andrew; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Chen, Allen M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer among a cohort of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods and Materials: The medical records of 12 patients with serologic evidence of HIV who subsequently underwent radiation therapy to a median dose of 68 Gy (range, 64-72 Gy) for newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were reviewed. Six patients (50%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in 6 cases (50%). All patients had a Karnofsky performance status of 80 or 90. Nine patients (75%) were receiving antiretroviral therapies at the time of treatment, and the median CD4 count was 460 (range, 266-800). Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group / European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: The 3-year estimates of overall survival and local-regional control were 78% and 92%, respectively. Acute Grade 3+ toxicity occurred in 7 patients (58%), the most common being confluent mucositis (5 patients) and moist skin desquamation (4 patients). Two patients experienced greater than 10% weight loss, and none experienced more than 15% weight loss from baseline. Five patients (42%) experienced treatment breaks in excess of 10 cumulative days, although none required hospitalization. There were no treatment-related fatalities. Conclusions: Radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer seems to be relatively well tolerated among appropriately selected patients with HIV. The observed rates of toxicity were comparable to historical controls without HIV.

  2. Assessing the feasibility of volumetric-modulated arc therapy using

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Assessing the Role of Iron

  3. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valicenti, Richard K., E-mail: Richard.valicenti@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Davis, California (United States); Thompson, Ian [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Albertsen, Peter [Division of Urology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Goldenberg, S. Larry [Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wolf, J. Stuart [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sartor, Oliver [Department of Medicine and Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Klein, Eric [Glickman Urological Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hahn, Carol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Faraday, Martha M. [Four Oaks, Inc (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

  4. Interferon alpha therapy for hepatitis C: Treatment completion and response rates among patients with substance use disorders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huckans, MS; Loftis, JM; Blackwell, AD; Linke, A; Hauser, P

    2007-01-01

    alpha therapy for hepatitis C: treatment completion andAddress: 1 Northwest Hepatitis C Resource Center, Portlandare at increased risk for hepatitis C viral infection (HCV),

  5. Report Number R99/0497 Report Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, Helene

    Report Number R99/0497 Report Title IMPROVING THE ACCURACY OF AERIAL SURVEYS FOR DUGONGS. Report Date December 2004 #12;AFMA Report Number R99/0497 2 IMPROVING THE ACCURACY OF AERIAL SURVEYS, Raleigh, NC 27695-8203, USA AFMA Project Number R 99/0497 December 2004 #12;AFMA Report Number R99/0497 3

  6. A report language 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinney, Melvin Howard

    1972-01-01

    form. with each requiring positional placement of parameters to describe s report. A specialist is required for the task of filling out the forms, A tedious task required by both RPG and REPORT WRITER is that of' designing the exact report Format... s decimal point but may not begin with one, (7) X. . . X indicates an slphameric literal. It may be of any length so long as it may be specified on one card, (8) d designates an integer that represents the number of decimal positions of a field. 22...

  7. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world, in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  8. Quarterly Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murty A. Akundi

    1998-12-02

    This report presents the work done on " Investigation of Syngas Interaction in Alcohol Synthesis Catalysts" during the last quarter. FTIR absorption studies on Cu/Co/Cr catalysts using CO as a probe molecule are presented in this report. A comprehensive FTIR investigation on the catalysts was undertaken to unfold the picture of the gas - metal interactions. Our magnetization studies have provided valuable information on the changes in the magnetic character of the ferromagnetic metal due to CO adsorption. The FTIR results showing the effect of the adsorbate-adsorbent interactions on the stretching frequencies of the CO vibrational modes are presented in this report.

  9. Implications of Intercellular Signaling for Radiation Therapy: A Theoretical Dose-Planning Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, Stephen J.; McGarry, Conor K.; Butterworth, Karl T.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Recent in vitro results have shown significant contributions to cell killing from signaling effects at doses that are typically used in radiation therapy. This study investigates whether these in vitro observations can be reconciled with in vivo knowledge and how signaling may have an impact on future developments in radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer treatment plans were generated for a series of 10 patients using 3-dimensional conformal therapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy techniques. These plans were evaluated using mathematical models of survival following modulated radiation exposures that were developed from in vitro observations and incorporate the effects of intercellular signaling. The impact on dose–volume histograms and mean doses were evaluated by converting these survival levels into “signaling-adjusted doses” for comparison. Results: Inclusion of intercellular communication leads to significant differences between the signalling-adjusted and physical doses across a large volume. Organs in low-dose regions near target volumes see the largest increases, with mean signaling-adjusted bladder doses increasing from 23 to 33 Gy in IMRT plans. By contrast, in high-dose regions, there is a small decrease in signaling-adjusted dose due to reduced contributions from neighboring cells, with planning target volume mean doses falling from 74 to 71 Gy in IMRT. Overall, however, the dose distributions remain broadly similar, and comparisons between the treatment modalities are largely unchanged whether physical or signaling-adjusted dose is compared. Conclusions: Although incorporating cellular signaling significantly affects cell killing in low-dose regions and suggests a different interpretation for many phenomena, their effect in high-dose regions for typical planning techniques is comparatively small. This indicates that the significant signaling effects observed in vitro are not contradicted by comparison with clinical observations. Future investigations are needed to validate these effects in vivo and to quantify their ranges and potential impact on more advanced radiation therapy techniques.

  10. Poster — Thur Eve — 57: Evaluation of laryngeal mucosal dose with conventional linac and TomoTherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nusrat, H; Lekx, K; Eapen, L

    2014-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether or not underdosing occurs in the mucosal layer during treatment of glottis cancer. A larynx phantom was produced and regions at risk of recurrence due to suspected underdosing were identified and wells drilled into the phantom for flush placement of TLDs. Seven interest points were chosen. CT simulation was completed prior to the wells being drilled, and again afterwards with the TLD locations indicated using BBs. Treatment plans created for this investigation included: 3DCRT using Elekta-XiO (n=9) and VMAT created using Elekta-Monaco (n=9), both delivered on an Elekta linac; standard TomoTherapy plan (n=11) and a directionally blocked TomoTherapy plan to approximate a 3D-conformal approach (n=5). Imaging dose during TomoTherapy deliveries was accounted for. The average TLD result at each interest point was compared to the planned value using a paired t-test. There was no significant difference between the planned and measured 3DCRT dose (268.9 vs. 267.0 cGy, respectively; p>0.05). Similarly, the planned and measured TomoTherapy treatment did not show any significant differences (271.7 vs 269.7 cGy; p>0.05). In the blocked TomoTherapy plan, significant overdosing was seen (274.5 vs 294.9 cGy; p<0.05) and underdosing was not seen in the VMAT treatment (303.5 vs 321.8 cGy; p>0.05). Further investigation is ongoing to ensure appropriate normalization of results and to investigate the overdosing noted with the blocked TomoTherapy plan. Results from this study suggest that significant underdosing does not occur in the conventional treatment of early glottic cancer using 6MV photons.

  11. Home-Based Therapy: Effectiveness and Processes--A Brief Review of the National Literature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Uta M.; Petr, Chris

    2006-06-01

    -633. Zarski , J.J, Sand-Pringl, C., Greenbank, M., & Cibik, P. (1991). The invisible mirror: in-home family therapy and the supervision, Journal of Marriage and Family Therapy, 17 (2), 133-143. Zarski, J.J., & Fluharty, L.B. (1992). Treating emotionally... show that for a majority of youth difficulties dropped significantly by the end of week eight reaching levels comparable to usual outpatient scores. About 20% of youth did not improve over time. Limitation: Considerable attrition (at 4 th data...

  12. Biologically Guided Radiation Therapy (BGRT)Biologically Guided Radiation Therapy (BGRT) Effects InterEffects Inter Patient andPatient andEffects InterEffects Inter--Patient andPatient and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Robert D.

    ss 77 CancerCancer HeritableHeritable EffectsEffects Germline 101055 ss Self renewal Stewart, JH Park, DJ Carlson, Isoeffect Calculations in Adaptive Radiation TherapyRD Stewart, JH Park, DJ Carlson, Isoeffect Calculations in Adaptive Radiation Therapy and Treatment Individualization, Inand

  13. NETL Report format template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantification of Risk Profiles for Atmosphere and Groundwater 25 January 2013 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-III-003-2013 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of...

  14. 2010 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-01-01

    This annual report includes: an overview of Western; approaches for future hydropower and transmission service; major achievements in FY 2010; FY 2010 customer Integrated Resource Planning, or IRP, survey; and financial data.

  15. 2009 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-01-01

    This annual report includes: a brief overview of Western; some of our major achievements in FY 2009; FY 2009 customer Integrated Resource Planning, or IRP, survey; and financial data.

  16. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; stocks from 1973 through 1995, and trade from 1985 through 1995.

  17. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994.

  18. AGRICULTURAL REPORT AUGUST 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 The Impact of Health Information and Women in the Work Force on Aggregate Meat Demand . . . . . 10 are the lowest reported in the 28 year history of the Purdue Land Value Survey. Area Land Values Survey responses

  19. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, Jack L

    2012-07-26

    The activity reported includes work on several experiments (BNL E871 at Brookhaven National Lab, HERA-B at DESY, MINOS at Fermilab, BABAR at SLAC, and Minerva at Fermilab) and theory.

  20. Internet Polling Development Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klima, P.; Lockhart, D.; Haberl, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report which documents the development of Internet-based data logger polling. The project consists of two main tasks: the development of automated polling procedures that can be launched remotely with no operator input...

  1. HEP Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chunhui

    2013-05-21

    In this report, we summarize the research activity funded by the DOE award DE-FG02-12ER41827 (DE-SC0007892) during the funding period (May 1, 2012- March 31, 2013).

  2. Transportation Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kramer, George Leroy Jr.

    1999-12-01

    The National Transportation Program 1999 Transportation Baseline Report presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste and materials transportation. In addition, this Report provides a summary overview of DOE’s projected quantities of waste and materials for transportation. Data presented in this report were gathered as a part of the IPABS Spring 1999 update of the EM Corporate Database and are current as of July 30, 1999. These data were input and compiled using the Analysis and Visualization System (AVS) which is used to update all stream-level components of the EM Corporate Database, as well as TSD System and programmatic risk (disposition barrier) information. Project (PBS) and site-level IPABS data are being collected through the Interim Data Management System (IDMS). The data are presented in appendices to this report.

  3. Decision Phase Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, J.

    1999-11-17

    This report describes the process used and results obtained by the High Level Waste Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team to recommend a path forward for salt disposition at the Savannah River Site.

  4. Capital Reporting Company Quadrenntial ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Quadrenntial Energy Review 04-21-2014 (866) 448 - DEPO www.CapitalReportingCompany.com 2014 1 NEW ENGLAND REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE CONSTRAINTS A Public Meeting on the Quadrennial...

  5. Capital Reporting Company Quadrennial ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    07-21-2014 (866) 448 - DEPO www.CapitalReportingCompany.com 2014 1 QUADRENNIAL ENERGY REVIEW PUBLIC MEETING 6 MONDAY, JULY 21, 2014 HELD AT: RASHID AUDITORIUM-HILLMAN CENTER...

  6. Capital Reporting Company Quadrennial ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    11-2014 (866) 448 - DEPO www.CapitalReportingCompany.com 2014 1 QUADRENNIAL ENERGY REVIEW PUBLIC MEETING 10: Infrastructure Constraints Monday, August 11, 2014 New Mexico State...

  7. ALS Activity Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamura , Lori S.

    2005-07-11

    This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility developments during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information.

  8. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  9. Factory Flow Benchmarking Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shields, Thomas J.

    LAI benchmarked representative part fabrications and some assembly operations within its member companies of the defense aircraft industry. This paper reports the results of this benchmarking effort. In addition, this ...

  10. CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND927005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTRACTOR REPORT SAND92­7005 Unlimited Release UC­261 Fatigue of Fiberglass Wind Turbine Blade . #12;Distribution CategoryUC-261 SAND92-7005 UnlimitedRelease PrintedAugust 1992 FATIGUE OF FIBERGLASS

  11. 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2003-10-01

    The 2002 Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and summarizes the status of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental programs and performance and restoration efforts, as well as any impacts, both past and present, that Laboratory operations have had on the environment. The document is intended to be technical in nature. A summary of the report is also prepared as a separate document to provide a general overview and includes a CD version of the full report. Operated by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) for the Department of Energy (DOE), BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. BNL's motto, ''Exploring Life's Mysteries...Protecting its Future'', reflects BNL's management philosophy to fully integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of its missions, with a health balance between science and the environment.

  12. SEAB Hubs+ Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report presents the findings and recommendations for the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Task Force to Support Evaluation of the new Funding Constructs for Energy Research and...

  13. Aurora final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert, Dross; Amedeo, Conti

    2013-12-06

    Final Technical report detailing the work done by Nuvera and its partners to fulfill the goals of the program "Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell Stacks" (a.k.a. AURORA)

  14. 2009 ECR Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    as well as the examples described at section II.B of this report: National Energy Technology Laboratory - Albany Site (Oregon): As a result of its desire to balance the...

  15. JAHRESBERICHT ANNUAL REPORT07

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falge, Eva

    JAHRESBERICHT ANNUAL REPORT07 #12;Forschungsausblick Klaus J. Hopt über Corporate Governance Ferdi Schüth über zukünftige Energiesysteme Axel Ullrich über innovative Krebsmedikamente Research Outlook Klaus J. Hopt about Corporate Governance Ferdi Schüth about Future Energy Systems Axel Ullrich about New

  16. PROGRESS REPORTS (every 6 months)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    ENROL REGISTER PROGRESS REPORTS (every 6 months) SUBMIT ORAL EXAMINATION Suspension of study Change of supervisor Study away from Christchurch Extension to submission date PROGRESS REPORTS (every 6 months) PROGRESS REPORTS (every 6 months) PROGRESS REPORTS (every 6 months)PROGRESS REPORTS (every 6 months

  17. Annual Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finley, Virginia

    2014-10-02

    This report provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory’s (PPPL) operations. The results of the 2013 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for PPPL’s are presented and discussed. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and community involvement programs that were undertaken in 2013.

  18. 2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - ATL Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmosphericdevicesPPONe β+-DecayUpgrade P.July 31,2ATL Report

  19. 2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - CHPRC Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmosphericdevicesPPONe β+-DecayUpgrade P.July 31,2ATLCHPRC Report

  20. Architecture, Engineering and Construction Sustainability Report Biannual Sustainability Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Architecture, Engineering and Construction Sustainability Report Biannual Sustainability Report Projects $5 Million and Over February 2012 Alice Crocker Lloyd Hall Renovation

  1. Report: EM Tank Waste Subcommittee Full Report for Waste Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    meeting, enclosed please find the Environmental Management Advisory Board EM Tank Waste Subcommittee Report for Waste Treatment Plant; Report Number EMAB EM-TWS WTP-001,...

  2. Call for Papers for 3rd Annual Diabetes Care Symposium "New Drug Therapies, Innovative Management Strategies, and Novel Drug Targets"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    Call for Papers for 3rd Annual Diabetes Care Symposium "New Drug Therapies, Innovative Management submissions for the 3rd Annual Diabetes Care Symposium, titled "New Drug Therapies, Innovative Management, at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/diabetescare. When submitting your manuscript, please mention the 3rd

  3. Radioimmunotoxin Therapy of Experimental Colon and Ovarian Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Vallera, Daniel A.

    2006-02-09

    To pursue the development of radiolabeled immunotoxins (RIT) for colon cancer, it was first necessary to identify an immunotoxin (IT) that could selectively kill colon cancer cell lines. Recently, our collaborators in the Vallera laboratory have observed that potent recombinant IT can be synthesized using recombinant single chain antibodies (sFv) spliced to truncated diphtheria toxin (DT) consisting of the first 390 amino acids of native DT. DT was chosen as a toxin because it is a catalytic bacterial toxin that is easily manipulated in genetic engineering studies. Also, the Vallera lab has developed new procedures for preparing the sFv fusion toxins from bacterial inclusion bodies such as DT and another good genetic engineering toxin pseudomonas exotoxin (PE) based on detergent refolding. This allows for enhanced yields and higher purity that is essential for generating the protein that will be needed for preparation of larger amounts of RIT for therapy. Many potential sFvs were considered for targeting colon cancer. The best results have been obtained with an sFv recognizing EpCam. EpCam, also known as ESA or EGP40, is a 40 kDa epithelial transmembrane glycoprotein found on the basolateral surface of simple, pseudostratified, and transitional epithelia. It has been found overexpressed on 81% of adenocarcinomas of the colon (Went et al. Human pathology 35:122, 2004). EpCam sliced to DT (DTEpCam) was highly potent in studies in which we measured its ability to inhibit the proliferation of the HT-29 and COLO 205 colon cancer cell lines since we measured its IC50 at 1-2 x 10-2 nM. Potency is important, but is also critical that DTEpCam is selective in its cytotoxicity against EpCam-expressing target colon cancer cells. The activity of DTEpCam was highly selective since irrelevant control IT that did not recognize any markers on cancer cells, did not show any activity against the same colon cancer cell lines. Also, blocking studies were performed in which DTEpCam was mixed with the EpCam sFv that was synthesized without any toxin attached. The proliferation studies showed that EpCam sFv was able to block the killing of the EpCam expressing cells by DTEpCam. An irrelevant control protein, 1D10Fc was unable to block. Together, these studies indicated that EpCam was exquisitely selective. In order to produce an IT of even greater potency, we used a toxin containing the Golgi retention sequence KDEL. The same EpCam sFv was spliced to truncated PE containing the terminal KDEL sequence. The addition of KDEL enhanced the potency of the EpCam sFv IT at least 6 logs or 1000-fold with an IC50 of 2 to 7 x 10-8 nM. This conjugate was also shown to be highly selective. Taken together, all of these studies indicate that in vitro experiments have shown that we have a highly potent IT that selectively kills colon cancer cells. The next step was to show that the EpCam IT had the ability to inhibit the growth of flank tumors in vivo in nude mice. The same human colon tumor cells, HT29 used in the in vitro studies were injected into the flank of nude mice. Tumor cells were injected into groups of mice and when tumors reached the size of 0.5 cm3, we injected our best-performing EpCam IT called EpCamKDEL intratumorally. There was a significant drop in tumor size indicating that this agent was very effective against human colon cancer. Since the EpCamKDEL was injected intratumorally, it did not have to travel through the systemic circulation to find its target. Our next step will be to inject EpCamKDEL intravenously into mice with flank tumors to determine if EpCamKDEL has the ability to migrate to the tumor systemically. The next step was to radiolabel EpCamKDEL to see whether it could serve as an RIT. We radiolabeled EpCam with 111In as a surrogate for 90Y and then incubated it with HT29. The labeling efficiency was over 90% indicating that a high percentage of the protein molecules could be readily radiolabeled. However, the immunoreactivity was only 20% indicating that only 20% of those molecules were able to specifically bind antigen once t

  4. INEL BNCT Research Program annual report, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venhuizen, J.R. [ed.

    1993-05-01

    This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1992. Contributions from all the principal investigators about their individual projects are included, specifically, chemistry (pituitary tumor targeting compounds, boron drug development including liposomes, lipoproteins, and carboranylalanine derivatives), pharmacology (murine screenings, toxicity testing, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of biological samples), physics (radiation dosimetry software, neutron beam and filter design, neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (small and large animal models tissue studies and efficacy studies). Information on the potential toxicity of borocaptate sodium and boronophenylalanine is presented, results of 21 spontaneous-tumor-bearing dogs that have been treated with BNCT at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) are discussed, and predictions for an epithermal-neutron beam at the Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) are shown. Cellular-level boron detection and localization by secondary ion mass spectrometry, sputter-initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, low atomization resonance ionization spectroscopy, and alpha track are presented. Boron detection by ICP-AES is discussed in detail. Several boron carrying drugs exhibiting good tumor uptake are described. Significant progress in the potential of treating pituitary tumors with BNCT is presented. Measurement of the epithermal-neutron flux at BNL and comparison to predictions are shown. Calculations comparing the GTRR and BMRR epithermal-neutron beams are also presented. Individual progress reports described herein are separately abstracted and indexed for the database.

  5. Annual Report School of Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Annual Report 1999-2000 School of Engineering University of Connecticut #12;#12;University of Connecticut School of Engineering Annual Report 1999-2000 Table of Contents School of Engineering Annual Departments Chemical Engineering Annual Report Summary

  6. Introduction to RLE Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Jonathan

    This report No. 128 in a series of Progress Reports issued by the Research Laboratory of Electronics, contains the annual statement of research objectives and summary of research for each group. The report covers the period ...

  7. Role of Salvage Radiation Therapy for Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma Who Failed Autologous Stem Cell Transplant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goda, Jayant S.; Massey, Christine; Kuruvilla, John; Gospodarowicz, Mary K.; Wells, Woodrow; Hodgson, David C.; Sun, Alexander; Keating, Armand; Crump, Michael; Tsang, Richard W.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze, through chart review, the efficacy of salvage radiation therapy (sRT) for relapsed or progressive Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients who failed autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). Patients and Methods: Among 347 patients with recurrent/refractory HL who received ASCT from 1986-2006, 163 had post-ASCT progression or relapse. Of these, 56 received sRT and form the basis of this report. Median age at sRT was 30 years (range, 17-59 years). Disease was confined to lymph nodes in 27 patients, whereas 24 had both nodal and extranodal disease. Salvage radiation therapy alone was given in 34 patients (61%), and sRT plus chemotherapy was given in 22 (39%). Median interval from ASCT to sRT was 0.8 years (range, 0.1-5.6 years). The median dose was 35 Gy (range, 8-40.3 Gy). The sRT technique was extended-field in 14 patients (25%) and involved-field in 42 (75%). Results: The median follow-up from sRT was 31.3 months (range, 0.2-205.5 months). Overall response rate was 84% (complete response: 36%; partial response: 48%). The median overall survival was 40.8 months (95% confidence interval, 34.2-56.3 months). The 5-year overall survival was 29% (95% confidence interval, 14%-44%). The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 16%; the 2-year local PFS was 65%, whereas the 2-year systemic PFS was 17%. The 1-year PFS was higher in patients in whom all diseased sites were irradiated (49%) compared with those in whom only the symptomatic site was treated (22%, P=.07). Among 20 alive patients, 5 were disease free (at 6.4, 6.8, 7.4, 7.9, and 17.1 years). Conclusion: For patients with HL who fail ASCT, a selective use of RT provides a durable local control rate of 65% at 2 years and should be considered as part of the standard management plan for the palliation of incurable HL. Occasionally irradiation of truly localized disease can lead to long-term survival.

  8. Chair, Department of Respiratory Therapy BYRDINE F. LEWIS SCHOOL OF NURSING AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frantz, Kyle J.

    Chair, Department of Respiratory Therapy BYRDINE F. LEWIS SCHOOL OF NURSING AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS The Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions invites applications and nominations for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Cancer Society. As part of the new campus master plan

  9. Toward a Dependability Case Language and Workflow for a Radiation Therapy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceze, Luis

    proving, solver-aided languages, and formally defined domain-specific languages--to the development verification and synthesis tools into system development. 1998 ACM Subject Classification D.2.4 Software, Dependability Cases, Domain Specific Languages, Radiation Therapy Digital Object Identifier 10.4230/LIPIcs

  10. Individualized Estimates of Second Cancer Risks After Contemporary Radiation Therapy for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    are largely based on radiation therapy (RT) fields and doses no longer in use, and these estimates do and low-dose (20 Gy) RT for mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma. METHODS. Three RT plans were constructed for 37 tissue doses with the omission of axillary RT. Low-dose (20 Gy) IFRT was associated with a 77% and 57

  11. Original article High-dose and fractionation effects in stereotactic radiation therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    Original article High-dose and fractionation effects in stereotactic radiation therapy: Analysis (hyperfractionation [5], high- vs. low dose-rate brachytherapy [6], prostate hypofractiona- tion [7]) were consistent. Brenner a a Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, New York; b Department of Therapeutic

  12. Fostering a culture of interprofessional education for radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavender, Charlotte, E-mail: charlavender@gmail.com; Miller, Seth; Church, Jessica; Chen, Ronald C.; Muresan, Petronella A.; Adams, Robert D.

    2014-04-01

    A less-studied aspect of radiation therapy and medical dosimetry education is experiential learning through attendance at interprofessional conferences. University of North Carolina radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students regularly attended morning conferences and daily pretreatment peer review, including approximately 145 hours of direct interaction with medical attending physicians and residents, medical physicists, and other faculty. We herein assessed the effect of their participation in these interprofessional conferences on knowledge and communication. The students who graduated from our radiation therapy and medical dosimetry programs who were exposed to the interprofessional education initiative were compared with those who graduated in the previous years. The groups were compared with regard to their knowledge (as assessed by grades on end-of-training examinations) and team communication (assessed via survey). The results for the 2 groups were compared via exact tests. There was a trend for the examination scores for the 2012 cohort to be higher than for the 2007 to 2011 groups. Survey results suggested that students who attended the interprofessional education sessions were more comfortable speaking with attending physicians, residents, physicists, and faculty compared with earlier students who did not attend these educational sessions. Interprofessional education, particularly vertical integration, appears to provide an enhanced educational experience both in regard to knowledge (per the examination scores) and in building a sense of communication (via the survey results). Integration of interprofessional education into radiation therapy and medical dosimetry educational programs may represent an opportunity to enrich the learning experience in multiple ways and merits further study.

  13. A unified approach for inversion problems in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Censor, Yair

    intensities (radiation intensity map) deliverable by all beamlets, that would result in a clinically value, however, this radiation intensity map must be implementable, in a clinically acceptable formA unified approach for inversion problems in intensity-modulated radiation therapy Yair Censor1

  14. A Mathematical Model of Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsygvintsev, Alexey V.

    A Mathematical Model of Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Cancer Alexei Tsygvintsev1, Simeone Introduction Cancer is a major cause of death worldwide, resulting from the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the body. Cells are the body's building blocks, and cancer starts from normal cells. Normal

  15. Gait Rehabilitation Therapy Using Robot Generated Force Fields Applied at the Pelvis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    Gait Rehabilitation Therapy Using Robot Generated Force Fields Applied at the Pelvis ABSTRACT The Robotic Gait Rehabilitation (RGR) Trainer was designed and built to target secondary gait deviations tissue dynamics. KEYWORDS: Force field, robotic gait rehabilitation, pelvis. 1 INTRODUCTION Each year

  16. CLARET: A Fast Deformable Registration Method Applied to Lung Radiation Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLARET: A Fast Deformable Registration Method Applied to Lung Radiation Therapy Chen-Rui Chou1 and accurate image-guided radiother- apy in lung with low-dose imaging. CLARET contains three components: shape. At treatment time, CLARET computes a patient's lung deformations by iteratively apply- ing the learned

  17. Building a Multifunctional Aptamer-Based DNA Nanoassembly for Targeted Cancer Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Weihong

    Building a Multifunctional Aptamer-Based DNA Nanoassembly for Targeted Cancer Therapy Cuichen Wu-dimensional DNA building blocks into two- and three-dimensional nanostructures via DNA/RNA nanotechnology has led delivery. However, the cellular uptake of most nucleic acid nanostructures is dependent on passive delivery

  18. A Mathematical Tumor Model with Immune Resistance and Drug Therapy: An Optimal Control Approach

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    De Pillis, L. G.; Radunskaya, A.

    2001-01-01

    We present a competition model of cancer tumor growth that includes both the immune system response and drug therapy. This is a four-population model that includes tumor cells, host cells, immune cells, and drug interaction. We analyze the stability of the drug-free equilibria with respect to the immune response in order to look for target basins of attraction. One of our goals was to simulate qualitatively the asynchronous tumor-drug interaction known as “Jeffs phenomenon.” The model we develop is successful in generating this asynchronous response behavior. Our other goal was to identify treatment protocols that could improve standard pulsed chemotherapymore »regimens. Using optimal control theory with constraints and numerical simulations, we obtain new therapy protocols that we then compare with traditional pulsed periodic treatment. The optimal control generated therapies produce larger oscillations in the tumor population over time. However, by the end of the treatment period, total tumor size is smaller than that achieved through traditional pulsed therapy, and the normal cell population suffers nearly no oscillations.« less

  19. Use of seal-like robot PARO in sensory group therapy for older adults with dementia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabanovic, Selma

    Use of seal-like robot PARO in sensory group therapy for older adults with dementia Wan-Ling Chang--This work presents the preliminary results of an eight- week study of the seal-like robot PARO being used adapted the concept of MSBT to the use of PARO as a multimodal sensory stimulus in a group activity

  20. Calendar of Events: Offered at the Center for Radiation Therapy (1625 Poplar Street)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenny, Paraic

    Calendar of Events: JUNE 2015 Offered at the Center for Radiation Therapy (1625 Poplar Street): 2nd Jewelry Making Thursday, June 25th : 2:00 ­ 4:00pm Offered at Montefiore Medical Park (1695 Eastchester-Body Support Group Every Friday: 12:00 ­ 1:30pm Offered at Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care (1521