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1

BERAC Subcommittee Report on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Clinical  

Office of Science (SC) Website

BERAC Subcommittee Report on Boron Neutron Capture BERAC Subcommittee Report on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Clinical Trials. Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Current BERAC Charges Archive of BERAC Reports Charter .pdf file (40KB) BER Committees of Visitors BER Home Charges/Reports BERAC Subcommittee Report on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Clinical Trials. Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page BERAC Subcommittee Report on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Clinical Trials. In response to the charge letter from Dr. Martha Krebs, Office of Science, dated November 5, 1998. Committee members: Bijay Mukherji, M.D., Chair, University of Connecticut Health Sciences Center, Walter Curran, M.D., Thomas Jefferson University;

2

Fractionalization of Interstitials in Curved Colloidal Crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the out-of equilibrium behaviour of point defects in crystals, yields insights into the nature and fragility of the ordered state, as well as being of great practical importance. In some rare cases defects are spontaneously healed - a one-dimensional crystal formed by a line of identical charged particles, for example, can accommodate an interstitial (extra particle) by a re-adjusting all particle positions to even out the spacing. In sharp contrast, particles organized into a perfect hexagonal crystal in the plane cannot accommodate an interstitial by a simple re-adjustment of the particle spacing - the interstitial remains instead trapped between lattice sites and diffuses by hopping, leaving the crystal permanently defected. Here we report on the behavior of interstitials in colloidal crystals on curved surfaces. Using optical tweezers operated independently of three dimensional imaging, we insert a colloidal interstitial in a lattice of similar particles on flat and curved (positively and negatively) oil-glycerol interfaces and image the ensuing dynamics. We find that, unlike in flat space, the curved crystals self-heal through a collective rearrangement that re-distributes the increased density associated with the interstitial. The self-healing process can be interpreted in terms of an out of equilibrium interaction of topological defects with each other and with the underlying curvature. Our observations suggest the existence of "particle fractionalization" on curved surface crystals.

William T. M. Irvine; Mark J. Bowick; Paul M. Chaikin

2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

3

Nb Interstitial Free High - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 16, 2007 ... Effect of Aluminum Content on the Mechanical Properties of Dual Stabilized Ti- Nb Interstitial Free High Strength Steel (IF-HSS) by Heejae...

4

Ectrodactyly and proximal/intermediate interstitial deletion 7q  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on an individual with severe mental retardation, seizures, microcephaly, unusual face, scoliosis, and cleft feet and cleft right hand. The chromosomal study showed a proximal interstitial deletion 7q (q11.23q22). From our review of the literature, 11 patients have been reported with ectrodactyly (split hand/split foot malformation) and proximal/intermediate interstitial deletions or rearrangements of 7q. The critical segment for ectrodactyly seems to be located between 7q21.2 and 7q22.1. This malformation is present in 41% of the patients whose deletion involves the critical segment. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

McElveen, C.; Carvajal, M.V.; Moscatello, D. [Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States)] [and others

1995-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

5

Phase I, study of a miniature X-ray source for interstitial radiotherapy of brain metastases  

SciTech Connect

Despite a variety of stereotactic techniques used to increase intracranical local control, dose escalation strategies remain controversial, with respect to therapeutric gain, convenience, and cost effectiveness, in the setting of brain metastases. In this report, we summarize our experience with the safety and efficacy of a new miniature X-ray device for interstitial radiosurgical treatment of intracranial metastatic neoplasms. Although the role of surgical resection of solitary metastases is established, aggressive treatment with proton, gamma knife, and linac radiation therapy for these lesions is under investigation. The new miniature X-ray device offers a very localized, convenient, time and cost efficient means of delivering radiotherapy to these lesions, with lower normal tissue exposure than gamma knife or proton beam techniques. Retreatment of previously irradiated areas are also now under investigation as part of a Phase II trial. The photon radiosurgery system is a miniature battery operated 40 kV x-ray device designed by the Photoelectron Corporation for use in the interstitial treatment of small tumors ({ge}3 cm in diameter) in humans. This 10 cm long, low current, high voltage X-ray generator is easily mounted in a stereotactic frame and produces low energy (10-20 KeV) x-rays to be emitted from the 10 cm long, 3.2 mm diameter probe, after stereotactic insertion into the tumor. Two scintillation detectors positioned on the stereotactic frame near the patient`s scalp monitor radiation. The spherical X-ray beam behaves essentially as a point source, with dose rate nominally 150 cGy/min. at a distance of 10mm, for a beam current of 40 {mu}A and a voltage of 40 kv.

Douglas, R.M.; Beatty, J.; Biggs, P. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others] [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

Intraoperative radiation therapy using mobile electron linear accelerators: Report of AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group No. 72  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) has been customarily performed either in a shielded operating suite located in the operating room (OR) or in a shielded treatment room located within the Department of Radiation Oncology. In both cases, this cancer treatment modality uses stationary linear accelerators. With the development of new technology, mobile linear accelerators have recently become available for IORT. Mobility offers flexibility in treatment location and is leading to a renewed interest in IORT. These mobile accelerator units, which can be transported any day of use to almost any location within a hospital setting, are assembled in a nondedicated environment and used to deliver IORT. Numerous aspects of the design of these new units differ from that of conventional linear accelerators. The scope of this Task Group (TG-72) will focus on items that particularly apply to mobile IORT electron systems. More specifically, the charges to this Task Group are to (i) identify the key differences between stationary and mobile electron linear accelerators used for IORT (ii) describe and recommend the implementation of an IORT program within the OR environment, (iii) present and discuss radiation protection issues and consequences of working within a nondedicated radiotherapy environment, (iv) describe and recommend the acceptance and machine commissioning of items that are specific to mobile electron linear accelerators, and (v) design and recommend an efficient quality assurance program for mobile systems.

Sam Beddar, A.; Biggs, Peter J.; Chang Sha; Ezzell, Gary A.; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Hensley, Frank W.; Mills, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Physics, Division of Radiation Oncology, Unit 94, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Scottsdale, Arizona 85259 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky 40202 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Unfaulting mechanism of trapped self-interstitial atom clusters in bcc Fe: A kinetic study based on the potential energy landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the complete unfaulting mechanism of a trapped self-interstitial atom cluster in the form of a nonparallel configuration (NPC), investigated using the autonomous basin climbing (ABC) method. A detailed set of ...

Yildiz, Bilge

8

Fire Performance of an Interstitial Space Construction System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The load bearing sand boxes are shown in figure 13. ... Viewing interstitial space through window: Duct penetrations continue to appear to be tight. ...

1996-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

9

Influence of Interstitial Content and Stress State of the Shock ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Influence of Interstitial Content and Stress State of the Shock- Induced Phase Transitions in Zr, Ti, and Fe. Author(s), George Thompson Gray,...

10

Bistability of Cation Interstitials in II-VI Semiconductors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stability of cation interstitials in II-VI semiconductors is studied using ab initio methods. We find that interstitials in the neutral charge state are more stable in the tetrahedral interstitial site near the cation, whereas in the (2+) charge state, they are more stable near the anion. The diffusion energy barrier changes when the defect charge state changes. Therefore, if electrons/holes are taken from the defect level by light, changing its charge state, the interstitial atom will be able to diffuse almost spontaneously due to a reduced diffusion barrier.

Wei, S. H.; Dalpian, G. M.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Interstitial embrittlement in vanadium laser welds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efficiencies of interstitial absorption during pulsed ND:YAG laser welding of vanadium were compared for nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, and water vapor. Influence of interstitial levels on the embrittlement of vanadium laser welds was also measured. For 1000 ppM contaminant levels in the weld atmosphere, weld hydrogen content increased 9 ppM, nitrogen content increased 190 ppM, and oxygen content increased from 500 ppM relative to baseplate levels. Welds in ultrahigh-purity argon atmospheres contained 3 ppM hydrogen, 40 ppM nitrogen, and 250 ppM oxygen. Longitudinal all-weld tensile specimens and notched-plate specimens were used to measure weld metal tensile properties at {minus}55C. All of the laser weld notch-strength ratios exceeded unity and weld metal tensile strengths all exceeded the baseplate values. For 1000 ppM atmosphere contaminant levels, the only significant decrease in ductility, as measured by reduction-in-area at fracture was for the weld atmosphere containing oxygen. Weld atmospheres containing 1% nitrogen also reduced the weld ductility, and resulted in the onset of cleavage fracture.

Strum, M.J.; Wagner, L.M.

1992-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

12

Interstitial embrittlement in vanadium laser welds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efficiencies of interstitial absorption during pulsed ND:YAG laser welding of vanadium were compared for nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, and water vapor. Influence of interstitial levels on the embrittlement of vanadium laser welds was also measured. For 1000 ppM contaminant levels in the weld atmosphere, weld hydrogen content increased 9 ppM, nitrogen content increased 190 ppM, and oxygen content increased from 500 ppM relative to baseplate levels. Welds in ultrahigh-purity argon atmospheres contained 3 ppM hydrogen, 40 ppM nitrogen, and 250 ppM oxygen. Longitudinal all-weld tensile specimens and notched-plate specimens were used to measure weld metal tensile properties at [minus]55C. All of the laser weld notch-strength ratios exceeded unity and weld metal tensile strengths all exceeded the baseplate values. For 1000 ppM atmosphere contaminant levels, the only significant decrease in ductility, as measured by reduction-in-area at fracture was for the weld atmosphere containing oxygen. Weld atmospheres containing 1% nitrogen also reduced the weld ductility, and resulted in the onset of cleavage fracture.

Strum, M.J.; Wagner, L.M.

1992-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

13

Self-interstitial configurations in hcp Zr: a first principles analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of microstructure evolution in irradiated Zr and Zr alloys based on the modern radiation damage theory suggests some important features of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs). Alignment of vacancy loops and voids along basal planes requires anisotropic interstitial transport with a dominant contribution along the basal plane. Under neutron irradiation this can be explained by one-dimensional mobility of SIA clusters but experiments under electron irradiation indicate unambiguously that even the single SIA should exhibit anisotropic diffusion. No experimental information is available on SIA properties in Zr and the data obtained by ab initio calculations within the last decade reported stable SIA configurations that should provide essentially three-dimensional diffusion. To clarify this issue, an extensive investigation of SIAs in Zr has been performed from first principles using two different codes. It was demonstrated that simulation cell size, type of pseudopotential, the exchange-correlation functional, and the c/a ratio are crucially important for determining the properties of interstitials in hcp Zr. The most stable SIA configurations lie in the basal plane, which should lead to SIA diffusion mainly along basal planes. The results provide a confirmation of basic mechanisms for microstructural evolution under irradiation.

Samolyuk, German D [ORNL; Golubov, Stanislav I [ORNL; Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

[A clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors]. Technical progress report 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress made in refining of neutron-induced alpha tract autoradiography, in designing epithermal neutron bean at MITR-II and in planning treatment dosimetry using Monte Carlo techniques.

Zamenhof, R.G.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Off-label use of medical products in radiation therapy: Summary of the Report of AAPM Task Group No. 121  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Medical products (devices, drugs, or biologics) contain information in their labeling regarding the manner in which the manufacturer has determined that the products can be used in a safe and effective manner. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves medical products for use for these specific indications which are part of the medical product's labeling. When medical products are used in a manner not specified in the labeling, it is commonly referred to as off-label use. The practice of medicine allows for this off-label use to treat individual patients, but the ethical and legal implications for such unapproved use can be confusing. Although the responsibility and, ultimately, the liability for off-label use often rests with the prescribing physician, medical physicists and others are also responsible for the safe and proper use of the medical products. When these products are used for purposes other than which they were approved, it is important for medical physicists to understand their responsibilities. In the United States, medical products can only be marketed if officially cleared, approved, or licensed by the FDA; they can be used if they are not subject to or specifically exempt from FDA regulations, or if they are being used in research with the appropriate regulatory safeguards. Medical devices are either cleared or approved by FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Drugs are approved by FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, and biological products such as vaccines or blood are licensed under a biologics license agreement by FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. For the purpose of this report, the process by which the FDA eventually clears, approves, or licenses such products for marketing in the United States will be referred to as approval. This report summarizes the various ways medical products, primarily medical devices, can legally be brought to market in the United States, and includes a discussion of the approval process, along with manufacturers' responsibilities, labeling, marketing and promotion, and off-label use. This is an educational and descriptive report and does not contain prescriptive recommendations. This report addresses the role of the medical physicist in clinical situations involving off-label use. Case studies in radiation therapy are presented. Any mention of commercial products is for identification only; it does not imply recommendations or endorsements of any of the authors or the AAPM. The full report, containing extensive background on off-label use with several appendices, is available on the AAPM website (http://www.aapm.org/pubs/reports/).

Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Thompson, Heaton H. II; Jani, Shirish K. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Hagerstown, Maryland 21740 (United States); and others

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Determination of Interstitial Water Chemistry and Porosity in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a petroleum hydrocarbon plume in the U.K. Upper Chalk aquifer as part of a natural attenuation assessment to the composition of the host material (1). Data on interstitial water chemistry are important for correlating hydraulic and gas- pressure squeezing (12-15), centrifugation (1, 3), porous suction samplers (2, 7

Sheffield, University of

17

Rotational and vibrational dynamics of interstitial molecular hydrogen T. Yildirim  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the hindered roton-phonon energy levels of a hydrogen molecule in a confining potential with different such as gas separation and hydrogen storage.1­3 In particular, hydrogen molecules trapped in interstitial like hydrogen or deuterium. The energy levels of a free ro- tator are EJ BJ J 1 , 1 where B 2 /(2I), I

Yildirim, Taner

18

Phase-field Model for Interstitial Loop Growth Kinetics and Thermodynamic and Kinetic Models of Irradiated Fe-Cr Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microstructure evolution kinetics in irradiated materials has strongly spatial correlation. For example, void and second phases prefer to nucleate and grow at pre-existing defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and cracks. Inhomogeneous microstructure evolution results in inhomogeneity of microstructure and thermo-mechanical properties. Therefore, the simulation capability for predicting three dimensional (3-D) microstructure evolution kinetics and its subsequent impact on material properties and performance is crucial for scientific design of advanced nuclear materials and optimal operation conditions in order to reduce uncertainty in operational and safety margins. Very recently the meso-scale phase-field (PF) method has been used to predict gas bubble evolution, void swelling, void lattice formation and void migration in irradiated materials,. Although most results of phase-field simulations are qualitative due to the lake of accurate thermodynamic and kinetic properties of defects, possible missing of important kinetic properties and processes, and the capability of current codes and computers for large time and length scale modeling, the simulations demonstrate that PF method is a promising simulation tool for predicting 3-D heterogeneous microstructure and property evolution, and providing microstructure evolution kinetics for higher scale level simulations of microstructure and property evolution such as mean field methods. This report consists of two parts. In part I, we will present a new phase-field model for predicting interstitial loop growth kinetics in irradiated materials. The effect of defect (vacancy/interstitial) generation, diffusion and recombination, sink strength, long-range elastic interaction, inhomogeneous and anisotropic mobility on microstructure evolution kinetics is taken into account in the model. The model is used to study the effect of elastic interaction on interstitial loop growth kinetics, the interstitial flux, and sink strength of interstitial loop for interstitials. In part II, we present a generic phase field model and discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic properties in phase-field models including the reaction kinetics of radiation defects and local free energy of irradiated materials. In particular, a two-sublattice thermodynamic model is suggested to describe the local free energy of alloys with irradiated defects. Fe-Cr alloy is taken as an example to explain the required thermodynamic and kinetic properties for quantitative phase-field modeling. Finally the great challenges in phase-field modeling will be discussed.

Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Migration Mechanisms of Oxygen Interstitial Clusters in UO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the migration kinetics of radiation-induced point defects and defect clusters is a key to predicting the microstructural evolution and mass transport in nuclear fuels. Although the diffusion kinetics of point defects in UO2 is well explored both experimentally and theoretically, the kinetics of defect clusters is not well understood. In this work the migration mechanisms of oxygen interstitial clusters of size one to five atoms (1Oi 5Oi) in UO2 are investigated by temperature-accelerated dynamics simulations without any a priori assumptions of migration mechanisms. It is found that the migration paths of oxygen interstitial clusters are complex and non-intuitive and that multiple migration paths and barriers exist for some clusters. It is also found that the cluster migration barrier does not increase with increasing cluster size and its magnitude has the following order: 2Oi < 3Oi < 1Oi < 5Oi < 4Oi. Possible finite-size effects are checked with three different sized systems. The results show good agreement with other available experimental and theoretical data. In particular, the relatively large migration barriers of cuboctahedral clusters (4Oi and 5Oi) are in good agreement with the experimentally measured oxygen diffusion activation energy in U4O9, which is thought to contain many such clusters. The cluster migration sequence may explain the interesting relationship between the oxygen diffusivity and stoichiometry in UO2+x.

Xian-Ming Bai; Anter El-Azab; Jianguo Yu; Todd R. Allen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Molecular Medicine: Synthesis and In Vivo Detection of Agents for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the project was the development of in vivo methods for the detection and evaluation of tumors in humans. The project was focused on utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to monitor the distribution and pharamacokinetics of a current boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) by labeling it with a fluorine-18, a positron emitting isotope. The PET data was then used to develop enhanced treatment planning protocols. The study also involved the synthesis of new tumor selective BNCTagents that could be labeled with radioactive nuclides for the in vivo detection of boron.

Kabalka, G. W.

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr Janne potentials give lower interstitial formation energy, but predict too small thermal expansion. We also show vacancy activation energy. Thermal expansion coefficients as function of temperature are displayed in Fig

22

Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation therapy (or radiotherapy) has become one of the most common treatment methods ...... v ? dv ?Uv. However, in a number of preliminary tests we run,.

23

Dose-Volume Effects on Patient-Reported Acute Gastrointestinal Symptoms During Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Research on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in rectal cancer is limited. We examined whether dose-volume parameters of the small bowel and large bowel were associated with patient-reported gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: 66 patients treated at the Brigham and Women's Hospital or Massachusetts General Hospital between 2006 and 2008 were included. Weekly during treatment, patients completed a questionnaire assessing severity of diarrhea, urgency, pain, cramping, mucus, and tenesmus. The association between dosimetric parameters and changes in overall GI symptoms from baseline through treatment was examined by using Spearman's correlation. Potential associations between these parameters and individual GI symptoms were also explored. Results: The amount of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V15) was significantly associated with acute symptoms (p = 0.01), and other dosimetric parameters ranging from V5 to V45 also trended toward association. For the large bowel, correlations between dosimetric parameters and overall GI symptoms at the higher dose levels from V25 to V45 did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.1), and a significant association was seen with rectal pain from V15 to V45 (p < 0.01). Other individual symptoms did not correlate with small bowel or large bowel dosimetric parameters. Conclusions: The results of this study using PROs are consistent with prior studies with physician-assessed acute toxicity, and they identify small bowel V15 as an important predictor of acute GI symptoms during 5-FU-based chemoradiation treatment. A better understanding of the relationship between radiation dosimetric parameters and PROs may allow physicians to improve radiation planning to optimize patient outcomes.

Chen, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Killoran, Joseph H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Crowley, Elizabeth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wo, Jennifer Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ryan, David P. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Machine therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Machine Therapy is a new practice combining art, design, psychoanalysis, and engineering work in ways that access and reveal the vital, though often unnoticed, relevance of people's interactions and relationships with ...

Dobson, Kelly E. (Kelly Elizabeth), 1970-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network Requirements Reviews Reports Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Reports ESnet publishes reports from science network Program Requirements Reviews on a regular basis. View the most recent of these below. Sort by: Date | Author | Type 2012 Eli Dart, Brian Tierney, Editors, "Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements Workshop, November 2012 - Final Report"", November 29, 2012, LBNL LBNL-6395E

26

New methods for determination of interstitial liquid levels in Hanford waste tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The key to the leak detection program for many tanks at Hanford is the method used to evaluate the apparent interstitial liquid interface (ILL) within the pore space of the solid waste medium (either crystalline or sludge). Three new approaches were introduced in the summer of 1993 (count rate, derivative, and sigmoid), all of which significantly improved the accuracy and repeatability of interstitial liquid level values from neutron survey data. This paper summarizes the three new methods and details a case study in which, as a direct result of this improved analysis, a tank that had been declared an ``assumed leaker`` was reclassified as ``sound`` for the first time in Hanford`s 50 year history.

Barnes, D.A.; Raymond, R.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Whitney, P.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Interstitial BiO molecule as a center of broadband IR luminescence in bismuth-doped silica glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IR luminescence and absorption in bismuth-doped silica glass-core fibers observed recently (see [arXiv:1106.2969v1 [physics.optics]) are argued to be caused by transitions in interstitial BiO molecules

Sokolov, V O; Dianov, E M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Neither Pinnacle Technologies, Inc. nor any person acting on behalf of Pinnacle: * Makes any warranty or representation, express or implied, with respect to the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of the information contained in this report, or that the use of any apparatus, method or process disclosed in this report may not infringe privately owned rights; or * Assumes any liability with respect to the use of, or for damages resulting from the use of, any information, apparatus, method or process disclosed in this report Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions DE-FC26-02NT41663 Final Report for National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, WV Project No.: USDE-0511 Report Date: December 2005 By:

29

Carbon, oxygen and their interaction with intrinsic point defects in solar silicon ribbon material. Annual report, September 1982-September 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report first provides some background information on intrinsic point defects, and on carbon and oxygen in silicon in so far as it may be relevant for the efficiency of solar cells fabricated from EFG ribbon material. We discuss the co-precipitation of carbon and oxygen and especially of carbon and silicon self interstitials. A simple model for the electrical activity of carbon-self-interstitial agglomerates is presented. We assume that the self-interstitial content of these agglomerates determines their electrical activity and that both compressive stresses (high self-interstitial content) and tensile stresses (low self-interstitial content) give rise to electrical activity of the agglomerates. The self-interstitial content of these carbon-related agglomerates may be reduced by an appropriate high-temperature treatment and enhanced by a supersaturation of self-interstitials generated during formation of the p-n junction of solar cells. It is suggested that oxygen present in supersaturation in carbon-rich silicon may be induced to form SiO/sub 2/ precipitates by self-interstitials generated during phosphorus diffusion. It is proposed that the SiO/sub 2/-Si interface of the precipates gives rise to a continuum of donor states and that these interface states are responsible for at least part of the light-enhancement effects observed in oxygen containing EFG silicon after phosphorus diffusion.

Goesele, U.; Ast, D.G.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Researchers For Researchers What You Need to Know and Do The Tech Transfer Process Business Development Services Berkeley Lab LaunchPad Funding - Innovation Grants Forms and Policies Conflict of Interest Outside Employment Export Control Record of Invention Software Disclosure and Abstract See Also FAQs for Researchers Entrepreneurial Resources Webcast: Transferring Technology to the Marketplace Pre-Publication Review Report Invention/Software The next step is for Lab researchers to report the invention or software to the Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Management Department. The invention report is not a patent application and in and of itself secures no intellectual property rights. It is used by the Lab to make a decision as to whether to proceed with a patent application.

31

REPORT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPORT REPORT of the INFRASTRUCTURE TASK FORCE of the DOE NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE January 16, 2003 2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY On October 1, 2002 the DOE Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee was asked to provide specific, focused updates to its Nuclear Science and Technology Infrastructure Roadmap and review the specific issues at the DOE key nuclear energy research and development (R&D) laboratories. This activity was assigned to a five-member Infrastructure Task Force (ITF). After receiving extensive written materials from DOE, the Idaho Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W), on November 6-8, 2002 the ITF visited the Idaho site and received briefings and tours of the INEEL and ANL-W facilities. INEEL and

32

Reports  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Reports Reports . . . . , Book -1. Service Open File Information for Project Rulison, Production Testing Phase, . , August 28,1970 : . "; DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. DESCRIPTION O F PU1:T41C I-l!lkI,T;-1 SE1:VICh: 0P:SN F I L E INPOPt4ATION i[ ' 7 S&u-~%uestcrn E a d i o l o g i c a l H e a l t h 1,aboratol-p r? U. S. Depaieraent o f I l e a l t h ,. E d u c a t i o n aud Welfa,re i i I t - - . L-J~ub-l-ic H e a l t h ' ~ c r v i c e : Y T h i s s u r v e i l l a ~ l c e p e r f o r m e d u n d e r r e , a Memorandum o f ~ n d e k s t a n d i n ~ (No. SF 5 1 & L A U. S . . A t o m i c E n e r g y Commission i hk, ! i ilYo.,jh,asic g r o u p s o f i n f o r m a t i o n a r e p l a c e d i n t h e P u b l i c H e a l t h i k e l ~ e r v i k e , \ ~ o u t h w e s t c r n R a t i i o l o g i c a l H

33

High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Gleason Score 8-10 and PSA Level {<=}15 ng/ mL Treated With Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: With widespread prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, there has been an increase in men diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer defined by a Gleason score (GS) {>=}8 coupled with a relatively low PSA level. The optimal management of these patients has not been defined. Cause-specific survival (CSS), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated in brachytherapy patients with a GS {>=}8 and a PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL with or without androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to October 2005, 174 patients with GS {>=}8 and a PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL underwent permanent interstitial brachytherapy. Of the patients, 159 (91%) received supplemental external beam radiation, and 113 (64.9%) received ADT. The median follow-up was 6.6 years. The median postimplant Day 0 minimum percentage of the dose covering 90% of the target volume was 121.1% of prescription dose. Biochemical control was defined as a PSA level {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on survival. Results: Ten-year outcomes for patients without and with ADT were 95.2% and 92.5%, respectively, for CSS (p = 0.562); 86.5% and 92.6%, respectively, for bPFS (p = 0.204); and 75.2% and 66.0%, respectively, for OS (p = 0.179). The median post-treatment PSA level for biochemically controlled patients was <0.02 ng/mL. Multivariate analysis failed to identify any predictors for CSS, whereas bPFS and OS were most closely related to patient age. Conclusions: Patients with GS {>=}8 and PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL have excellent bPFS and CSS after brachytherapy with supplemental external beam radiotherapy. The use of ADT did not significantly impact bPFS, CSS, or OS.

Fang, L. Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Murray, Brian C.; Reed, Joshua L. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Veterans Affairs Hospital, Seattle, WA (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Accelerators for Cancer Therapy  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

Lennox, Arlene J.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

35

Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven's Medical Research Center program.

Farr, L.E.

1991-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

36

Cytometric Therapies for Cell Delivery  

Stem cell therapies are a viable treatment options for some human diseases. Efficacy of such therapies can be maximized by addressing critical issues ...

37

USC Division of Biokinesiology & Physical Therapy Admissions Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USC Division of Biokinesiology & Physical Therapy Admissions Office 1540 Alcazar Street, CHP 155 or Certificate Major Graduation Date SELF-REPORTED TEST SCORES Graduate Record Exam (GRE): Verbal Score

Valero-Cuevas, Francisco

38

Interstitial brachytherapy of periorificial skin carcinomas of the face: A retrospective study of 97 cases  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To analyze outcomes after interstitial brachytherapy of facial periorificial skin carcinomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 97 skin carcinomas (88 basal cell carcinomas, 9 squamous cell carcinomas) of the nose, periorbital areas, and ears from 40 previously untreated patients (Group 1) and 57 patients who had undergone surgery (Group 2). The average dose was 55 Gy (range, 50-65 Gy) in Group 1 and 52 Gy (range, 50-60 Gy) in Group 2 (mean implantation times: 79 and 74 hours, respectively). We calculated survival rates and assessed functional and cosmetic results de visu. Results: Median age was 71 years (range, 17-97 years). There were 29 T1, 8 T2, 1 T3, and 2 Tx tumors in Group 1. Tumors were <2 cm in Group 2. Local control was 92.5% in Group 1 and 88% in Group 2 (median follow-up, 55 months; range, 6-132 months). Five-year disease-free survival was better in Group 1 (91%; range, 75-97) than in Group 2 (80%; range, 62-90; p = 0.23). Of the 34 patients whose results were reassessed, 8 presented with pruritus or epiphora; 1 Group 2 patient had an impaired eyelid aperture. Cosmetic results were better in Group 1 than in Group 2 with, respectively, 72% (8/11) vs. 52% (12/23) good results and 28 (3/11) vs. 43% (10/23) fair results. Conclusions: Brachytherapy provided a high level of local control and good cosmetic results for facial periorificial skin carcinomas that pose problems of surgical reconstruction. Results were better for untreated tumors than for incompletely excised tumors or tumors recurring after surgery.

Rio, Emmanuel [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France)]. E-mail: e-rio@nantes.fnclcc.fr; Bardet, Etienne [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Ferron, Christophe [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, CHU Hotel Dieu, Saint Herblain (France); Peuvrel, Patrick [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Supiot, Stephane [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Campion, Loic [Department of Biostatistics, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Beauvillain De Montreuil, Claude [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, CHU Hotel Dieu, Saint Herblain (France); Mahe, Marc Andre [Department of Radiotherapy, CRLCC-Nantes-Atlantique, Saint Herblain (France); Dreno, Brigitte [Department of Dermatology, CHU Hotel Dieu, Saint Herblain (France)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

HAE international home therapy consensus document  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. : HAE international home therapy consensus document.Access HAE international home therapy consensus documenttreatment results in delays. Home therapy offers the

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection  

SciTech Connect

This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven`s Medical Research Center program.

Farr, L.E.

1991-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

American Art Therapy Association Research Committee Art Therapy Outcome Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We hope you will find this listing of art therapy outcome and single subject studies useful for purposes of research, grant writing, demonstrating support for your art therapy program, and as evidence of the effects of art therapy with various client populations. Listings are grouped primarily by client populations. Abstracts are provided for the two journals that gave copyright permissions without a fee: Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art Therapy Association and American Journal of Art Therapy. Abstracts written or modified by Research Committee members appear for some listings. Links to the abstracts or articles are provided for some articles. The AATA Research Committee plans to update this listing annually. When time permits we hope to also write abstracts to provide the best assessment of the contents, strengths, and weaknesses of each study. We welcome input from art therapists who become aware of studies that we may have

Der Vennet

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Small-Field Therapy Using EPR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and the AAPM to address the difficult problems of small-field dosimetry in radiation therapy (eg, GammaKnife, IMRT, Cyber Knife, TomoTherapy ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

43

Targeted radionuclide therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) seeks molecular and functional targets within patient tumor sites. A number of agents have been constructed and labeled with beta, alpha, and Auger emitters. Radionuclide carriers spanning a broad range of sizes; e.g., antibodies, liposomes, and constructs such as nanoparticles have been used in these studies. Uptake, in percent-injected dose per gram of malignant tissue, is used to evaluate the specificity of the targeting vehicle. Lymphoma (B-cell) has been the primary clinical application. Extension to solid tumors will require raising the macroscopic absorbed dose by several-fold over values found in present technology. Methods that may effect such changes include multistep targeting, simultaneous chemotherapy, and external sequestration of the agent. Toxicity has primarily involved red marrow so that marrow replacement can also be used to enhance future TRT treatments. Correlation of toxicities and treatment efficiency has been limited by relatively poor absorbed dose estimates partly because of using standard (phantom) organ sizes. These associations will be improved in the future by obtaining patient-specific organ size and activity data with hybrid SPECT/CT and PET/CT scanners.

Williams, Lawrence E.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Meredith, Ruby F. [Radiology Division, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California 91010 (United States); Internal Medicine, University of California Davis Medical Center, 1508 Alhambra Boulevard, Suite 3100, Sacramento, California 95816 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Wallace Tumor Institute WTI No. 117, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Metals With Toxicity Related To Medical Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...respectively, so they do have importance in medical therapy. Toxicologic effects are unlikely and seldom occur....

45

Genetically engineered multivalent single chain antibody constructs for cancer therapy  

SciTech Connect

Current therapeutic approaches against the advanced stages of human solid tumors are palliative rather than curative. Many modalities, including, surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, either alone or in combination have met with only modest success for advanced metastatic cancers. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) combines the specificity of monoclonal antibodies with cytotxic effects of radioisotopes. It is the ?smart? way of delivering radiation to the known and occult metastatic cancer cells and is independent of drug toxicity and/or hormone resistance. The tumor associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) containing the unique disaccharide sialyl-Tn, is highly expressed in majority of adenocarcinomas, including carcinomas of the prostate, breast, ovaries, pancreas and colon (80-90%) compared to undetectable expression in normal tissues. Monoclonal antibody CC49, reactive with TAG-72, after conjugation to potent gamma- and beta-emitting radionuclides, has been useful in selective systemic radiolocalization of disease and therapy of primary and metastatic tumor sites. However, limited therapeutic responses were observed in patients. Limited success of antibody based delivery of radioisotopes can be attributed to several factors including undesirable pharmacokinetics, poor tumor uptake and high immunogenicity of intact antibodies (IgGs). The primary factors contributing towards the failure of RIT include: 1) longer serum half-lives of the intact IgG molecules resulting in the radiotoxicity, 2) generation of human antibodies against murine antibodies (HAMA) that limits the frequency of dose administration, 3) poor diffusion rates of intact IgG due to the large size and 4) high interstitial fluid pressures (IFP) encountered in solid tumors. The major goal of our multidisciplinary project was to develop specific novel radiopharmaceuticals, with desired pharmacokinetics, for the diagnosis and therapy of solid tumors. To overcome the low uptake of radioactivity by tumors and to increase its tumor: normal tissue ratio for improved therapeutic index, we engineered a variety antibody constructs. These constructs were evaluated using novel approaches like special radionuclides, pretargeting and optimization. Due to the smaller size, the engineered antibody molecules should penetrate better throughout a tumor mass, with less dose heterogeneity, than is the case with intact IgG. Multivalent scFvs with an appropriate radionuclide, therefore, hold promising prospects for cancer therapy and clinical imaging in MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals. In addition, the human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) responses in patients against antibody-based therapy are usually directed against the immunoglobulin constant regions; however, anti-idiotypic responses can also be detected. The HAMA responses reduce the efficacy of treatment by removing the circulating antibody molecules, fragments, and possibly scFvs by altering the pharmacokinetic properties of the antibody. HAMA responses against divalent IgG, divalent Ig fragments, and possibly multimeric scFvs could cause immune complex formation with hypersensitivity or allergic reactions that could be harmful to patients. The use of small molecules, such as scFvs (monomeric as well as multimeric), with their shorter biological half-lives and the lack of the constant regions and humanized variable (binding regions) performed in our studies should reduce the development of HAMA. The generation of humanized and fully human scFvs should further reduce the development of HAMA. Specific accomplishments on the project are the production of large amounts of recombinant antibodies as they are required in large amounts for cancer diagnosis and therapy. A variety of single-chain Fv (scFv) constructs were engineered for the desired pharmacokinetic properties. Tetrameric and dimeric scFvs showed a two-fold advantage: (1) there was a considerable gain in avidity as compared to smaller fragments, and (2) the biological half-life was more compatible with RIT and RIS requirements. For RIT, delivery for sc(Fv)2 and [sc(Fv)2]2 in a fr

Surinder Batra, Ph.D.

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

46

Optical Tracking Technology in Stereotactic Radiation Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last decade has seen the introduction of advanced technologies that have enabled much more precise application of therapeutic radiation. These relatively new technologies include multileaf collimators, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy planning, and intensity modulated radiotherapy in radiotherapy. Therapeutic dose distributions have become more conformal to volumes of disease, sometimes utilizing sharp dose gradients to deliver high doses to target volumes while sparing nearby radiosensitive structures. Thus, accurate patient positioning has become even more important, so that the treatment delivered to the patient matches the virtual treatment plan in the computer treatment planning system. Optical and image-guided radiation therapy systems offer the potential to improve the precision of patient treatment by providing a more robust fiducial system than is typically used in conventional radiotherapy. The ability to accurately position internal targets relative to the linac isocenter and to provide real-time patient tracking theoretically enables significant reductions in the amount of normal tissue irradiated. This report reviews the concepts, technology, and clinical applications of optical tracking systems currently in use for stereotactic radiation therapy. Applications of radiotherapy optical tracking technology to respiratory gating and the monitoring of implanted fiducial markers are also discussed.

Wagner, Thomas H. [Department of Radiation Physics, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States)]. E-mail: thomas.wagner@orhs.org; Meeks, Sanford L. [Department of Radiation Physics, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States); Bova, Frank J. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Friedman, William A. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Willoughby, Twyla R. [Department of Radiation Physics, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States); Kupelian, Patrick A. [Department of Radiation Physics, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL (United States); Tome, Wolfgang [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Investigation of the Integration of Interstitial Building Spaces on Costs and Time of Facility Maintenance for U.S. Army Hospitals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD) has used the interstitial building system (IBS) as a design component for some of the hospitals in its healthcare infrastructure portfolio. Department of Defense (DoD) leadership is aware of increases in healthcare costs and understands the importance of safely reducing costs, which may be possible through design initiatives. An analysis was performed on facility maintenance metrics for ten different U.S. Army hospitals, including IBS design and conventional / non-interstitial building system (NIBS) design. Statistical analysis indicated a significant difference in cost and time data between IBS and NIBS for most of the building systems considered (HVAC, electrical, plumbing, and interior). Scheduled maintenance for the plumbing building system was not found to have a significant difference in costs; scheduled maintenance for the HVAC and plumbing building system was not found to have a significant difference in time expended. The data in this study showed that facility maintenance cost and time were generally lower for IBS than NIBS. Time spent (and associated cost) for scheduled maintenance of the electrical and plumbing building systems were slightly higher in IBS, though not significantly higher for plumbing. It may be easier to reach the plumbing and electrical building systems due to the greater accessibility afforded by IBS design. While a cost premium is estimated for integrating IBS design, the savings provided by life cycle facility maintenance is estimated to be up to three and a half times the initial cost premium.

Leveridge, Autumn Tamara

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Thiourea derivatives, methods of their preparation and their use in neutron capture therapy of maligant melanoma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Boronated thioureas have been proposed for neutron capture therapy, but no boronated analog has been reported in the literature. The major difficulty in synthesizing such derivatives lies in the properties of the dihydroxylboryl group, which is easily cleaved off organic molecules by either acids or alkali. The aim of the present invention is to provide stable boron-containing thiourea derivatives for neutron capture therapy, and give procedures for their synthesis. 17 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Gabel, D.

1989-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

49

PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY MEASUREMENTS IN A REPRESENTATIVE GAS-COOLED PRISMATIC REACTOR CORE MODEL: FLOW IN THE COOLANT CHANNELS AND INTERSTITIAL BYPASS GAPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Core bypass flow is one of the key issues with the prismatic Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, and it refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial, non-cooling passages between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. To determine the bypass flow, a double scale representative model was manufactured and installed in the Matched Index-of-Refraction flow facility; after which, stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the flow field within. PIV images were analyzed to produce vector maps, and flow rates were calculated by numerically integrating over the velocity field. It was found that the bypass flow varied between 6.9-15.8% for channel Reynolds numbers of 1,746 and 4,618. The results were compared to computational fluid dynamic (CFD) pre-test simulations. When compared to these pretest calculations, the CFD analysis appeared to under predict the flow through the gap.

Thomas E. Conder; Richard Skifton; Ralph Budwig

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Redlands, CA); Olsen, Howard B. (Colton, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

51

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (San Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Longmeadow, MA); Olsen, Howard B. (Irvine, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

52

Proton beam therapy control system  

SciTech Connect

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

53

Proton beam therapy control system  

SciTech Connect

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

54

Boron Nanotechnology-driven Cancer Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Boron Nanotechnology-driven Cancer Therapy ... Current research focuses on both the design and synthesis of high boron containing...

55

Biphasic Dose-efficacy in Antiangiogenic Therapy.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Antiangiogenic Therapy. Judah Folkman, M.D., Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Vascular Biology Program, Karp Family Research Laboratories, 12.129, 300...

56

Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Implant Brachytherapy After Wide Local Excision: 12-Year Outcomes From a Prospective Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the long-term toxicity, cosmesis, and local control of accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision for Stage T1N0 breast cancer (BCa). Materials and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 50 patients with Stage T1N0M0 BCa were treated in a Phase I-II protocol using low-dose-rate accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision and lymph node surgery. The total dose was escalated in three groups: 50 Gy (n = 20), 55 Gy (n = 17), and 60 Gy (n = 13). Patient- and physician-assessed breast cosmesis, patient satisfaction, toxicity, mammographic abnormalities, repeat biopsies, and disease status were prospectively evaluated at each visit. Kendall's tau ({tau}{sub {beta}}) and logistic regression analyses were used to correlate outcomes with dose, implant volume, patient age, and systemic therapy. Results: The median follow-up period was 11.2 years (range, 4-14). The patient satisfaction rate was 67%, 67% reported good-excellent cosmesis, and 54% had moderate-severe fibrosis. Higher dose was correlated with worse cosmetic outcome ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.6, p =}1 cm{sup 2}. Grade 3-4 late skin and subcutaneous toxicities were seen in 4 patients (9%) and 6 patients (13%), respectively, and both correlated with higher dose ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.3-0.5, p {Low-dose-rate accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy provides acceptable local control in select early-stage BCa patients. However, treatment-related toxicity and cosmetic complications were significant with longer follow-up and at higher doses.

Hattangadi, Jona A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); MacDonald, Shannon M.; Mauceri, Thomas; Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Freer, Phoebe [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Lawenda, Brian [21st Century Oncology, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Alm El-Din, Mohamed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Clinical Oncology, Tanta University Hospital, Tanta (Egypt); Gadd, Michele A.; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Gene therapy in alcoholic rats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70 70 Sept. 9, 2001 Gene Therapy Reduces Drinking in "Alcoholic" Rats UPTON, NY - Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have shown that increasing the level of a brain protein important for transmitting pleasure signals can turn rats that prefer alcohol into light drinkers, and those with no preference into near teetotalers. The findings, published in the first September 2001 issue of the Journal of Neurochemistry (Vol. 78, No. 5), may have implications for the prevention and treatment of alcoholism in humans. "This is a preliminary study, but when you see a rat that chooses to drink 80 to 90 percent of its daily fluid as alcohol, and then three days later it's down to 20 percent, that's a dramatic drop in alcohol intake - a very clear change in behavior," said Panayotis Thanos, the lead researcher. "This gives us great hope that we can refine this treatment for future clinical use."

58

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation, in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue.

Slatkin, Daniel N. (Sound Beach, NY); Dilmanian, F. Avraham (Yaphank, NY); Spanne, Per O. (Shoreham, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

60

Workshop on neutron capture therapy  

SciTech Connect

Potentially optimal conditions for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) may soon be in hand due to the anticipated development of band-pass filtered beams relatively free of fast neutron contaminations, and of broadly applicable biomolecules for boron transport such as porphyrins and monoclonal antibodies. Consequently, a number of groups in the US are now devoting their efforts to exploring NCT for clinical application. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring these groups together to exchange views on significant problems of mutual interest, and to assure a unified and effective approach to the solutions. Several areas of preclinical investigation were deemed to be necessary before it would be possible to initiate clinical studies. As neither the monomer nor the dimer of sulfhydryl boron hydride is unequivocally preferable at this time, studies on both compounds should be continued until one is proven superior.

Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P. (eds.)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hadron Therapy in Latin America  

SciTech Connect

The use of proton and heavy ion beams for radiotherapy is a well established cancer treatment modality in the first world, which is becoming increasingly widespread, due to its clear advantages over conventional photon-based treatments. This strategy is suitable when the tumor is spatially well localized. Also the use of neutrons has tradition. Here Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) stands out, though on a much smaller scale, being a promising alternative for tumors which are diffuse and infiltrating. On this sector, so far only nuclear reactors have been used as neutron sources. In this paper we briefly describe the situation in Latin America and in particular we discuss the present status of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator for Accelerator-Based (AB)-Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The project goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.4 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams to perform BNCT for deep-seated tumors in less than an hour. The machine being currently designed and constructed is a folded TESQ with a terminal at 0.6 MV as a smaller scale prototype. Since the concept is modular the same structure will be used for the 1.2 MV final accelerator.

Kreiner, A. J.; Minsky, D. M. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia. Universidad Nacional de Gral. San Martin, M. De Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917 (C1033AAJ), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bergueiro, J.; Castell, W.; Thatar Vento, V.; Cartelli, D.; Kesque, J. M.; Ilardo, J. C.; Baldo, M.; Erhardt, J.; Estrada, L.; Hazarabedian, A.; Johann, F.; Suarez Sandin, J. C.; Igarzabal, M.; Repetto, M.; Obligado, M.; Lell, J.; Padulo, J.; Herrera, M. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

62

Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Report Fiscal Year 2011 Office of Environment, Security, Safety and Health

63

A Survey of Hadron Therapy Accelerator Technologies.  

SciTech Connect

Hadron therapy has entered a new age [1]. The number of facilities grows steadily, and 'consumer' interest is high. Some groups are working on new accelerator technology, while others optimize existing designs by reducing capital and operating costs, and improving performance. This paper surveys the current requirements and directions in accelerator technology for hadron therapy.

PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA, T.; FLANZ, J.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

64

Fear therapy for children: a mobile approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile devices have shown to be useful tools in supporting various procedures and therapy approaches for different purposes. However, when applied to children, particular care has to be taken, considering both their abilities and their acceptance towards ... Keywords: fear and anxiety therapy, mobile devices, user centered design

Marco de S; Lus Carrio

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Delivery confirmation of bolus electron conformal therapy combined with intensity modulated x-ray therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that a bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT) dose plan and a mixed beam plan, composed of an intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT plan, can be accurately delivered. Methods: Calculated dose distributions were compared with measured dose distributions for parotid and chest wall (CW) bolus ECT and mixed beam plans, each simulated in a cylindrical polystyrene phantom that allowed film dose measurements. Bolus ECT plans were created for both parotid and CW PTVs (planning target volumes) using 20 and 16 MeV beams, respectively, whose 90% dose surface conformed to the PTV. Mixed beam plans consisted of an IMXT dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT dose plan. The bolus ECT, IMXT, and mixed beam dose distributions were measured using radiographic films in five transverse and one sagittal planes for a total of 36 measurement conditions. Corrections for film dose response, effects of edge-on photon irradiation, and effects of irregular phantom optical properties on the Cerenkov component of the film signal resulted in high precision measurements. Data set consistency was verified by agreement of depth dose at the intersections of the sagittal plane with the five measured transverse planes. For these same depth doses, results for the mixed beam plan agreed with the sum of the individual depth doses for the bolus ECT and IMXT plans. The six mean measured planar dose distributions were compared with those calculated by the treatment planning system for all modalities. Dose agreement was assessed using the 4% dose difference and 0.2 cm distance to agreement. Results: For the combined high-dose region and low-dose region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 98.7% and 96.2%, respectively, for the bolus ECT plans and 97.9% and 97.4%, respectively, for the mixed beam plans. For the high-dose gradient region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 93.1% and 94.62%, respectively, for the bolus ECT plans and 89.2% and 95.1%, respectively, for the mixed beam plans. For all regions, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 98.8% and 97.3%, respectively, for the bolus ECT plans and 97.5% and 95.9%, respectively, for the mixed beam plans. For the IMXT component of the mixed beam plans, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 93.7% and 95.8%. Conclusions: Bolus ECT and mixed beam therapy dose delivery to the phantom were more accurate than IMXT delivery, adding confidence to the use of planning, fabrication, and delivery for bolus ECT tools either alone or as part of mixed beam therapy. The methodology reported in this work could serve as a basis for future standardization of the commissioning of bolus ECT or mixed beam therapy. When applying this technology to patients, it is recommended that an electron dose algorithm more accurate than the pencil beam algorithm, e.g., a Monte Carlo algorithm or analytical transport such as the pencil beam redefinition algorithm, be used for planning to ensure the desired accuracy.

Kavanaugh, James A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Fontenot, Jonas P.; Henkelmann, Gregory [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 and Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States); Chu, Connel; Carver, Robert A. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Tailoring couple therapy techniques to client needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research illuminating which therapist techniques are used in care-as-usual couple therapy, and under what circumstances, can contribute to a fuller understanding of how therapy works. The overall goal of the present study was to better understand care-as-usual couple therapy by investigating session-by-session techniques and session content to determine how therapists modify them based on the timing of the session and couples? pre-treatment characteristics. A total of 123 heterosexual couples were examined. Therapists frequently used acceptance techniques and discussion of recent or ongoing conflict or problem. Therapists typically used the same levels of techniques and session contents over a course of therapy. In addition, there were relatively few predictors of change in therapy techniques and session content.

Hsueh, Annie C.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

High contrast, CdTe portal scanner for radiation therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on one of the most promising new technologies for improving the qualify of radiation therapy, the use of real-time systems to produce portal images. In the authors' approach, they are constructing a linear array of 256 CdTe photovoltaic detectors attached to a very compact linear scanner, all of which will be mounted in a cassette shaped package to be located under the patient table. The high stopping power of the CdTe allows a high contrast image to be made using only a single Linac pulse per line, resulting in a high contrast image in under 5 seconds.

Entine, G.; Squillante, M.R.; Hahn, R.; Cirignano, L.J.; McGann, W. (Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc., Watertown, MA (United States)); Biggs, P.J. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Annual Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Radiation Exposure Occupational Radiation Exposure Home Welcome What's New Register Dose History Request Data File Submittal REMS Data Selection HSS Logo Annual Reports User Survey on the Annual Report Please take the time to complete a survey on the Annual Report. Your input is important to us! The 2012 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2011 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2010 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2009 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2008 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2007 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2006 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2005 Annual Report

69

Direct evidence of the fermi-energy-dependent formation of Mn interstitials in modulation doped Ga1-yAlyAs/Ga1-xMnxAs/Ga1-yAlyAs heterostructures  

SciTech Connect

Using ion channeling techniques, we investigate the lattice locations of Mn in Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As quantum wells between Be-doped Ga{sub 1-y}Al{sub y}As barriers. The earlier results showed that the Curie temperature T{sub C} depends on the growth sequence of the epitaxial layers. A lower T{sub C} was found in heterostructures in which the Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As layer is grown after the modulation-doped barrier. Here we provide direct evidence that this reduction in T{sub C} is directly correlated with an increased formation of magnetically inactive Mn interstitials. The formation of interstitials is induced by a shift of the Fermi energy as a result of the transfer of holes from the barrier to the quantum well during the growth.

Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Wojtowicz, T.; Lim, W.L.; Liu, X.; Dobrowolska, M.; Furdyna, J.K.

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

70

Low level light therapy by Red---Green---Blue LEDs improves healing in an excision model of Sprague---Dawley rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many methods of healing wounds. Among these, light therapy is reported to be beneficial, as beams assist the human body in treating, sterilizing, and regenerating cells. Both Laser and LED irradiation with specific wavelengths induce proliferation ... Keywords: Epithelialization, Light emitting diode, Light therapy, Photobiomodulation, Photostimulation

Min Woo Cheon, Tae Gon Kim, Yang Sun Lee, Seong Hwan Kim

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Find Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reports Hanford DDRS - Declassified Document Retrieval System Other Reports Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) DTIC Online - DOD reports from the Defense...

72

Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA for RTOG clinical trials is feasible and effective. The magnitude of registration discrepancy between institution and reviewer was presented, and the major issues were investigated to further improve this remote evaluation process.

Cui Yunfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Parker, William [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada)] [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Breen, Stephen [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Papiez, Lech S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Bednarz, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen Wenzhou [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Computer simulation of neutron capture therapy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical methods are developed to simulate on a large digital computer the production and use of reactor neutron beams f or boron capture therapy of brain tumors. The simulation accounts for radiation dose distributions ...

Olson, Arne Peter

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Design of Haptic Interfaces for Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Touch is fundamental to our emotional well-being. Medical science is starting to understand and develop touch-based therapies for autism spectrum, mood, anxiety and borderline disorders. Based on the most promising touch ...

Vaucelle, Catherine Nicole

75

Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy: Does Breast Size Matter?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the effects of breast size on dose-volume histogram parameters and clinical toxicity in whole-breast hypofractionated radiation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, all patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy between 2005 and 2009 were screened, and qualifying consecutive patients were included in 1 of 2 cohorts: large-breasted patients (chest wall separation >25 cm or planning target volume [PTV] >1500 cm{sub 3}) (n=97) and small-breasted patients (chest wall separation <25 cm and PTV <1500 cm{sub 3}) (n=32). All patients were treated prone or supine with hypofractionated IMRT to the whole breast (42.4 Gy in 16 fractions) followed by a boost dose (9.6 Gy in 4 fractions). Dosimetric and clinical toxicity data were collected and analyzed using the R statistical package (version 2.12). Results: The mean PTV V95 (percentage of volume receiving >= 95% of prescribed dose) was 90.18% and the mean V105 percentage of volume receiving >= 105% of prescribed dose was 3.55% with no dose greater than 107%. PTV dose was independent of breast size, whereas heart dose and maximum point dose to skin correlated with increasing breast size. Lung dose was markedly decreased in prone compared with supine treatments. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 0, 1, and 2 skin toxicities were noted acutely in 6%, 69%, and 25% of patients, respectively, and at later follow-up (>3 months) in 43%, 57%, and 0% of patients, respectively. Large breast size contributed to increased acute grade 2 toxicity (28% vs 12%, P=.008). Conclusions: Adequate PTV coverage with acceptable hot spots and excellent sparing of organs at risk was achieved by use of IMRT regardless of treatment position and breast size. Although increasing breast size leads to increased heart dose and maximum skin dose, heart dose remained within our institutional constraints and the incidence of overall skin toxicity was comparable to that reported in the literature. Taken together, these data suggest that hypofractionated radiation therapy using IMRT is a viable and appropriate therapeutic modality in large-breasted patients.

Hannan, Raquibul, E-mail: Raquibul.Hannan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Thompson, Reid F.; Chen Yu; Bernstein, Karen; Kabarriti, Rafi; Skinner, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Chen, Chin C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Landau, Evan; Miller, Ekeni; Spierer, Marnee; Hong, Linda; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Monthly Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Management Monthly Reports - FY 2012 The Department of Energy Nevada Field Office Environmental Management Program creates monthly reports for the NSSAB. These...

77

Monthly Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Management Monthly Reports - FY 2013 The Department of Energy Nevada Field Office Environmental Management Program creates monthly reports for the NSSAB. These...

78

License amendment for neutron capture therapy at the MIT research reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports the issuance by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) of a license amendment to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for the use of the MIT Research Reactor's (MITR-II) medical therapy facility beam for the treatment of humans using neutron capture therapy (NCT). This amendment is one of 11 required approvals. The others are those of internal MIT committees, review panels of the Tufts-New England Medical Center (NEMC), which is directing the program jointly with MIT, that of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and an NRC amendment to the NEMC hospital license. This amendment is the first of its type to be issued by NRC, and as such it establishes a precedent for the conduct of human therapy using neutron beams. Neutron capture therapy is a bimodal method for treating cancer that entails the administration of a tumor-seeking boronated drug followed by the irradiation of the target organ with neutrons. The latter cause boron nuclei to fission and thereby release densely ionizing helium and lithium nuclei, which destroy cancerous cells while leaving adjacent healthy cells undamaged. Neutron capture therapy is applicable to glioblastoma multiforme (brain tumors) and metastasized melanoma (skin cancer). Both Brookhaven National Laboratory and MIT conducted trials of NCT more than 30 yr ago. These were unsuccessful because the available boron drugs did not concentrate sufficiently in tumor and because the thermal neutron beams that were used did not enable neutrons to travel deep enough into the brain.

Bernard, J.A. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambride, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Therapist and Adolescent Behavior in Online Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A literature review on the potential of computer-mediated communication (CMC) as a medium for conducting psychotherapy via the Internet revealed that CMC may mediate interpersonally rich interactions if participants are allowed sufficient time and repeated opportunities (anticipate future communications) to exchange information and build relationships. To examine the extent to which the process of online therapy resembles face-to-face therapy, online therapy transcripts were examined through a molecular approach and the results were compared to the extant, psychotherapy processes literature. The participants were six dyads formed by college graduate students enrolled in a clinical practicum course and their online adolescent clients. The clients were highschool freshmen and sophomores referred by their school counselors through the Gulf Coast GEAR UP Partnership Project. Trained undergraduate psychology majors coded therapist and client online behavior according to two well established and validated coding methods, the Helping Skills System (HSS) and the Client Behavior System (CBS; Hill & OBrien, 1999). Although levels of client overall output (grammatical units) remained fairly constant throughout the course of therapy, the ratio of productive to non-productive output per session increased as a function of number of sessions. Using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) methodology, the results revealed that therapist facilitating skills (approval and reassurance, restatements and rephrasing, and reflection of feelings) predicted higher client productive output, whereas interpretations and informative statements predicted lower client productive output. The results confirmed that online therapy can lead to productive therapist-client interactions and that the associations between these interactions are similar to the associations found in faceto- face therapy interactions.

Cepeda, Lisa Marie

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Improved Survival With Radiation Therapy in High-Grade Soft Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremities: A SEER Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The benefit of radiation therapy in extremity soft tissue sarcomas remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of radiation therapy on overall survival among patients with primary soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity who underwent limb-sparing surgery. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database that included data from January 1, 1988, to December 31, 2005. A total of 6,960 patients constituted the study population. Overall survival curves were constructed using the Kaplan-Meir method and for patients with low- and high-grade tumors. Hazard ratios were calculated based on multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. Results: Of the cohort, 47% received radiation therapy. There was no significant difference in overall survival among patients with low-grade tumors by radiation therapy. In high-grade tumors, the 3-year overall survival was 73% in patients who received radiation therapy vs. 63% for those who did not receive radiation therapy (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, patients with high-grade tumors who received radiation therapy had an improved overall survival (hazard ratio 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.57-0.79). In patients receiving radiation therapy, 13.5% received it in a neoadjuvant setting. The incidence of patients receiving neoadjuvant radiation did not change significantly between 1988 and 2005. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the largest population-based study reported in patients undergoing limb-sparing surgery for soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities. It reports that radiation was associated with improved survival in patients with high-grade tumors.

Koshy, Matthew, E-mail: mkoshy@umm.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Rich, Shayna E. [Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Mohiuddin, Majid M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

EMMA: an adaptive display for virtual therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environments used up to now for therapeutic applications are invariable ones. Their contents can not be changed neither by the therapist nor by the patient. However, this is a technical issue that can be solved with current technology. In this paper, ... Keywords: adaptive display, virtual reality, virtual therapy

Mariano Alcaiz; Cristina Botella; Beatriz Rey; Rosa Baos; Jose A. Lozano; Nuria Lasso de la Vega; Diana Castilla; Javier Montesa; Antonio Hospitaler

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Improving Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Using Nuclear Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objectives of this thesis are to produce radioactive antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles to improve the efficacy of targeted radionuclide therapy for the treatment of cancer, and to demonstrate that this product can be produced at Texas A&M University. We have proposed a method for determining the distribution of radioactive nuclei per nanoparticle, which is critical for determining radiotherapeutic efficacy. Using the distribution of radioactive nuclei per nanoparticle, we have produced methods for calculating the radiative dose to tissue using nano-improved targeted radionuclide therapy, but more importantly we propose procedures to experimentally determine the efficacy of targeted radionuclide therapy improved by application of radioactive nanomaterials in combination with immunotherapy, nanomaterial cytotoxicity, and other cancer therapies such as chemotherapy. These methods can also be used to determine the efficacy of combinatory treatments as a function of time. Characterization of the antibody-nanoparticle attachment is critical; we have demonstrated successful antibody-nanoparticle conjugation using atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and agarose gel electrophoresis, providing more conclusive evidence of successful conjugation compared to flow cytometry. We provide a mathematical derivation from basic electron-transport principles which demonstrates the theoretical dosimetric advantages of applying radioactive nanomaterials to targeted radionuclide therapy. The general formulae can be applied to any tumor size, any radionuclide, and any pharmacokinetic nanoparticle distribution throughout the body, ultimately allowing a quick method of approximating the necessary activation time and treatment dosage parameters for a specific patient without burdensome Monte Carlo computational simulations. We further demonstrated that nano-TRT dosage to tumors should be considered as a function of radial position rather than average, as the dose across the tumor may be noticeably non-uniform causing some portions of the tumor to receive (potentially) significantly less dose than average.

Evans, Jordan Andrew

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 161 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

remarkable results from the interstitial pore waters at Blake Nose are the extreme concentrations of lithium Page 15 basement and the shape of the pore-fluid lithium profiles suggest that the source for Li

84

Radiobiology of normal rat lung in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary cancer radiation therapy that utilizes biochemical tumor cell targeting and provides a mixed field of high and low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation with differing ...

Kiger, Jingli Liu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Computational aspects of treatment planning for neutron capture therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted form of binary radiation therapy that has the potential to deliver radiation to cancers with cellular dose selectivity. Accurate and efficient treatment ...

Albritton, James Raymond, 1977-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Certification Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certified Reference Materials AOCS 1206-A and AOCS 1206-B Report of the certification process for Conventional and Roundup Ready

87

Ontologies for Intelligent e-Therapy: Application to Obesity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we propose a new approach for mental e-health treatments named intelligent e-therapy (e-it) with capabilities for ambient intelligence and ubiquitous computing. The proposed e-it system supposes an evolution of cybertherapy and telepsychology ... Keywords: Obesity, ambient intelligence, cognitive behavioural therapy, intelligent e-therapy, ontology

Irene Zaragoz; Jaime Guixeres; Mariano Alcaiz

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Shock Therapy in Poland: Perspectives of Five Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock Therapy in Poland: Perspectives of Five Years JEFFREY SACHS THE TANNER LECTURES O N HUMAN to a market economy.This strategy has subsequently won the somewhat misleading sobriquet of "shock therapy of "shock therapy," see Sachs 1994c.) With five years of experience of economic reform in Eastern Europe

89

Radiation therapy of pediatric brain tumors : comparison of long-term health effects and costs between proton therapy and IMRT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation therapy is an important component of pediatric brain tumor treatment. However, radiation-induced damage can lead to adverse long-term health effects. Proton therapy has the ability to reduce the dose delivered ...

Vu, An T. (An Thien)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Report Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notes Notes 1 "Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi)" is based on AC electricity consumed during charging events which began during the reporting period and distance driven during all trips in the reporting period. 2 "Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)" is based on net DC electricity discharged from or charged to the plug-in battery pack and distance driven during all trips in the reporting period. DC Wh/mi may not be comparable to AC Wh/mi if AC electricity charged prior to the reporting period was discharged during driving within the reporting period, or if AC electricity charged during the reporting period was not discharged during driving within the reporting period. 3 Trips when the plug-in battery pack charge was depleted to propel the vehicle throughout

91

Impaired skin integrity related to radiation therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skin reactions associated with radiation therapy require frequent nursing assessment and intervention. Preventive interventions and early management can minimize the severity of the skin reaction. With the understanding of the pathogenesis of radiation skin reactions, the ET nurse can determine who is at risk and then implement preventive measures. Because radiation treatment is fractionated, skin reactions do not usually occur until midway through the course of therapy and will subside within a few weeks after completion of radiation. Many patients and their families still fear that radiation causes severe burns. Teaching and anticipatory guidance by the ET nurse is needed to assist patients and their families to overcome this fear, and to educate them on preventive skin care regimens.

Ratliff, C.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy Resources with Additional Information Planned radiation treatment Peregrine calculation from Mission Possible: DOE Advanced Biomedical Technology Research, page 10 Over the time span of many years, DOE's research has made many contributions to radiation and cancer therapy, including PEREGRINE and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). 'PEREGRINE, a hardware and software system that addresses the problem of radiation therapy dosage using fundamental physics principles, is a revolutionary new tool for analyzing and planning radiation treatment for cancer patients. About 90 percent of radiation treatment patients receive photon therapy, which is PEREGRINE's principal application. PEREGRINE may also be applied to the less frequently used electron-beam therapy and to brachytherapy, which is radiation therapy from an internally planted radiation source. It is effective for radiography, which predicts the pattern of radiation that is transmitted through a patient or other object.'1

93

Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 09 THROUGH 09/30/2010 The following Annual Freedom of Information Act report covers the Period 10/01/2009, through 09/30/2010, as required by 5 U.S.C. 552. I. BASIC INFORMATION REGARDING REPORT 1. Kevin T. Hagerty, Director Office of Information Resources, MA-90 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 Alexander Morris, FOIA Officer Sheila Jeter, FOIA/Privacy Act Specialist FOIA Office, MA-90 Office of Information Resources U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 2. An electronic copy of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) report can be obtained at http://management.energy.gov/documents/annual_reports.htm. The report can then be accessed by clicking FOIA Annual Reports.

94

Economic Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transmitted to the Congress February 2008 Transmitted to the Congress February 2008 Together with the Annual Report of the Council of Economic Advisers Economic Report of the President Economic Report of the President For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office Internet: bookstore.gpo.gov Phone: (866) 512-1800; DC area (202) 512-1800 ISBN 978-0-16-079822-1 Transmitted to the Congress February 2008 together with THE ANNUAL REPORT of the COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON : 2008 Fax: (202) 512-2104 Mail Stop: IDCC, Washington, DC 20402-0001 C O N T E N T S ECONOMIC REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT ............................................. ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS* ...

95

SANDIA REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SANDIA REPORT SANDIA REPORT SAND 2011-3958 Unlimited Release Printed June 2011 Site Environmental Report for 2010 Sandia National Laboratories, California B.L. Larsen Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear

96

Gantry for medical particle therapy facility  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particle therapy gantry for delivering a particle beam to a patient includes a beam tube having a curvature defining a particle beam path and a plurality of superconducting, variable field magnets sequentially arranged along the beam tube for guiding the particle beam along the particle path. In a method for delivering a particle beam to a patient through a gantry, a particle beam is guided by a plurality of variable field magnets sequentially arranged along a beam tube of the gantry and the beam is alternately focused and defocused with alternately arranged focusing and defocusing variable field magnets.

Trbojevic, Dejan

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

97

Gantry for medical particle therapy facility  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particle therapy gantry for delivering a particle beam to a patient includes a beam tube having a curvature defining a particle beam path and a plurality of fixed field magnets sequentially arranged along the beam tube for guiding the particle beam along the particle path. In a method for delivering a particle beam to a patient through a gantry, a particle beam is guided by a plurality of fixed field magnets sequentially arranged along a beam tube of the gantry and the beam is alternately focused and defocused with alternately arranged focusing and defocusing fixed field magnets.

Trbojevic, Dejan (Wading River, NY)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

98

Acceleration Of Wound Healing Ny Photodynamic Therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for accelerating wound healing in a mammal. The method includes identifying an unhealed wound site or partially-healed wound site in a mammal; administering a photosensitizer to the mammal; waiting for a time period wherein the photosensitizer reaches an effective tissue concentration at the wound site; and photoactivating the photosensitizer at the wound site. The dose of photodynamic therapy is selected to stimulate the production of one or more growth factor by cells at the wound site, without causing tissue destruction.

Hasan, Tayyaba (Arlington, MA); Hamblin, Michael R. (Revere, MA); Trauner, Kenneth (Sacramento, CA)

2000-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

99

Inspection Report REPORT ON INSPECTION REGARDINGSMALL BUSINESS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REPORT ON INSPECTION REGARDINGSMALL BUSINESS CONTRACTING STATISTICS REPORTING ANDPRESENTATION, INS-O-98-02 Inspection Report REPORT ON INSPECTION REGARDINGSMALL BUSINESS...

100

Comparison Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Report 2009 Department of Energy Annual Employee Survey Results -vs- 2006 & 2008 All Federal Government Federal Human Capital Survey Results This is a summary-by-question of DOE's responses to the 2009 Annual Employee Survey compared to corresponding items on the 2006 and 2008 Federal Human Capital Surveys. This summary displays results by Positive, Neutral, Negative, and where applicable, Do Not Know or No Basis to Judge responses. As shown below, for each response scale two responses are categorized as "Positive," one response is categorized as "Neutral," and two are categorized as "Negative." All of the data in this report is considered unweighted. Positive Responses Neutral Responses Negative Responses Do Not

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Extraction Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Extraction Report Apple iPhone (Physical) Summary Connection Type Cable No. 110 Extraction start date/time 10/23/2012 3:21:58 PM ...

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

102

Report Preparation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

been completed (as described in ETA-GAC002, "Control of Test Conduct") prior to the report being formally issued. 4.2 All necessary test documentation has been completed,...

103

Certification Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certified Reference Material AOCS 0806-A AOCS 0806-B AOCS 0806-C AOCS 0806-D Report of the certification process for Conventional and EH92-527-1 Potato Potato Certified Reference Materials G. Clapper a

104

Certification Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certification Report The certification of Conventional and Liberty Link (T25) Corn Leaf DNA Reference Materials Certified Reference Materials AOCS 0306-C and AOCS 0306-H G. Clapper and R. Ca

105

Interim Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interim Report FOREWORD This report documents the outcome of an evaluation of the Software Quality Assurance (SQA) attributes of the MELCOR computer code for leak path factor applications, relative to established requirements. This evaluation, a gap analysis, is performed to meet Commitment 4.2.1.3 of the Department of Energys Implementation Plan to resolve SQA issues identified in Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2002-1. Suggestions for corrections or improvements to this document should be addressed to:

Melcor Gap Analysis; Intentionally Blank; Chip Lagdon

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

PHENIX REPORTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains individual progress reports for the months of December 1997 through May 1998 on the Phenix program at Hytec. Topics include the Phenix muon detector chamber flow analysis; the Phenix Muon detector deformation and motion/tolerance study of Stations 1, 2, and 3; finite element mount/electron shield structural analysis; South Station 3 muon detector deformation analysis; and Station 1 muon detector panel assembly and fabrication sequences.

TIMOTHY C. THOMPSON - HYTEC, INC.

1998-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

Endoscopic Electron-Beam Cancer Therapy | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Endoscopic Electron-Beam Cancer Therapy Technology available for licensing: A successful and cost-effective means of treating cancer in previously inoperable or radiation-sensitive...

108

Available Technologies: Tissue-Engineering Phage Therapy for ...  

This shows promise both for medical therapies and basic molecular biological research. ... Medical Imaging Mouse Models; Research Tools; Developing World; Energy.

109

Radioisotopes for Medical Diagnostics and Cancer Therapy at BNL...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Radioisotopes for Medical Diagnostics and Cancer Therapy at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications...

110

Effects of gonadal irradiation in clinical radiation therapy: a review  

SciTech Connect

Recent improvements in radiation therapy of some malignancies in lower abdominal sites are leading to prolongation of life in persons of child-bearing age. These successes require an evaluation of the possible undesirable consequences of the unavoidable gonadal irradiation that occurs in these cases. A review of radiobiological data from experimental animal studies and retrospective clinical studies suggests that in most instances human gonadal exposures in both sexes are insufficient to cause permanent sterility, because the exposures are fractionated and the total gonadal dose is much less than 600 rads. As a consequence, return of fertility must be anticipated, and the worrisome questions of radiation-induced genetic damage in subsequent pregnancies must be addressed. This review did not substantiate this fear, because no case reports could be found of malformed infants among the progency of previously irradiated parents. Some experimental studies suggest that radiation-damaged spermatogonia are self-destructive, but any evidence for this phenomenon in the ovary is nonexistent. We suggest that the difference between fact and theory here may be the mathematical result of the interplay of low probability for occurrences and the few patients who until now have survived long enough for study. (auth)

Lushbaugh, C.C.; Casarett, G.W.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

SANDIA REPORT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPORT REPORT SAND2008-6098 Unlimited Release Printed August 2008 National SCADA Test Bed Consequence Modeling Tool Bryan T. Richardson and Lozanne Chavez Prepared by: Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor

112

Archived Reports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings site. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Commercial Buildings site. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Archived Reports Archived Reports Yellow Arrow "Effective Occupied and Vacant Square Footage in Commercial Buildings in 1992" (HTML format) Yellow Arrow "Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings in 1992" Yellow Arrow "Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings" (1989 data - PDF format) Yellow Arrow "Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities" (1989 data - PDF format) Yellow Arrow "Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey (FBSS) 1993" (PDF format) Yellow Arrow micro-data files for FBSS (dBase and ASCII formats)

113

Report2  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Workshop Report on a Future Workshop Report on a Future Information Infrastructure for the Physical Sciences The Facts of the Matter: Finding, understanding, and using information about our physical world Hosted by the Department of Energy at the National Academy of Sciences May 30-31, 2000 Preface Forty years ago it took days, weeks or even months for information regarding an interesting discovery to be communicated to the relevant community of scientists and engineers. At that time, most of us kept a collection of postcards that we used to request reprints of articles as they appeared in the journals we read. This was the situation at the time that Ted Maiman reported his results using ruby as a medium to make a laser. Some twenty years later, this time interval was shortened to days by

114

Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 2011 Annual Report to the Oak Ridge Community Annual Report to the Oak Ridge Community DOE/ORO/2399 Progress Cleanup P Progress Cleanup P 2 This report was produced by URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, DOE's Environmental Management contractor for the Oak Ridge Reservation. About the Cover After recontouring and revegetation, the P1 Pond at East Tennessee Technology Park is flourishing. The contaminated pond was drained, recontoured, and restocked with fish that would not disturb the pond sediment. 1 Message from the Acting Manager Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office To the Oak Ridge Community: Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 marked many accomplishments in Oak Ridge. Our Environmental Management (EM) program completed a majority of its American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)-funded projects,

115

Cruise Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cruise Report Cruise Report The Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Covering the cruise of the Drilling Vessel Uncle John Mobile, Alabama to Galveston, Texas Atwater Valley Blocks 13/14 and Keathley Canyon Block 151 17 April to 22 May 2005 1 DISCLAIMER "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product,

116

Hadron Cancer Therapy: Role of Nuclear Reactions  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Recently it has become feasible to calculate energy deposition and particle transport in the body by proton and neutron radiotherapy beams, using Monte Carlo transport methods. A number of advances have made this possible, including dramatic increases in computer speeds, a better understanding of the microscopic nuclear reaction cross sections, and the development of methods to model the characteristics of the radiation emerging from the accelerator treatment unit. This paper describes the nuclear reaction mechanisms involved, and how the cross sections have been evaluated from theory and experiment, for use in computer simulations of radiation therapy. The simulations will allow the dose delivered to a tumor to be optimized, whilst minimizing the dos given to nearby organs at risk.

Chadwick, M. B.

2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

117

FINAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FINAL REPORT AEC-ERDA Research Contract AT (11-1) 2174 Columbia University's Nevis Laboratories "Research in Neutron Velocity Spectroscopy" James RainwatGr DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or

118

Lidar Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the LiDAR acquisition methodology employed by Woolpert on the 2009 USDA - Savannah River LiDAR Site Project. LiDAR system parameters and flight and equipment information is also included. The LiDAR data acquisition was executed in ten sessions from February 21 through final reflights on March 2, 2009; using two Leica ALS50-II 150kHz Multi-pulse enabled LiDAR Systems. Specific details about the ALS50-II systems are included in Section 4 of this report.

Wollpert.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Multimodality Local Therapy for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Soft-tissue sarcomas of the retroperitoneum are rare tumors comprising less than 1% of all malignancies. Although surgery continues as the mainstay of treatment, the large size of these tumors coupled with their proximity to critical structures make resection with wide margins difficult to achieve. The role and timing of radiotherapy are controversial. This study updates our institutional experience using multimodality local therapy for resectable retroperitoneal sarcoma and identifies prognostic factors impacting disease control and survival. Methods and Materials: Between 1974 and 2007, 58 patients with nonmetastatic retroperitoneal sarcoma were treated with surgery and radiation at University of Florida. The median age at radiotherapy was 57 years old (range, 18-80 years). Forty-two patients received preoperative radiotherapy and 16 received postoperative radiotherapy. Nineteen patients received 1.8 Gy once daily and 39 patients received 1.2 Gy twice daily. Variables analyzed for prognostic value included age, grade, kidney involvement, histology, de novo versus recurrent presentation, tumor diameter, margin status, radiotherapy sequencing (preoperative vs. postoperative), total radiation dose, fractionation scheme, and treatment era. Results: The 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local control rates were 49%, 58%, and 62%, respectively. Nearly two-thirds of disease failures involved a component of local progression. On multivariate analysis, only margin status was significantly associated with improved 5-year local control (85%, negative margins; 63%, microscopic positive margins; 0%, gross positive margins; p < 0.0001) and 5-year overall survival (64%, negative margins; 56%, microscopic positive margins; 13%, gross positive margins; p = 0.0012). Thirty-one Grade 3 or greater toxicities were observed in 22 patients, including two treatment-related deaths (3%). Conclusion: For retroperitoneal sarcoma, local control remains a challenge and combined-modality therapy may be associated with significant acute and late morbidity. Our patterns of failure data suggest that improvements in local control may translate into a survival benefit.

Paryani, Nitesh N.; Zlotecki, Robert A.; Swanson, Erika L.; Morris, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Hochwald, Steven N. [Department of General Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Marcus, Robert B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Indelicato, Daniel J., E-mail: dindelicato@floridaproton.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

From molecular changes to customised therapy A. Hemminki*,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review From molecular changes to customised therapy A. Hemminki*,1 Division of Human Gene Therapy 35294-3300, USA Received 1 October 2001; accepted 9 October 2001 Abstract The revolution in molecular-associated defects, and molecular chemotherapy for delivering toxic substances locally to tumour cells. Viruses which

Hemminki, Akseli

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Dynamic Multidrug Therapies for HIV: Optimal and STI Control Approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic Multidrug Therapies for HIV: Optimal and STI Control Approaches B. M. Adams 1, H. T. Banks and analyzing an optimal control problem using two types of dynamic treatments representing reverse of immune-mediated control of HIV. Our numerical results support a scenario in which STI therapies can lead

122

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location Page 1 of 3 as of 1242011 Report Name Previous Location New Location Brief Description Multi-Project or Single...

123

Activity report  

SciTech Connect

This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

Yu, S W

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

124

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location Page 1 of 3 as of 1/24/2011 Report Name Previous Location New Location Brief Description Multi-Project or Single Project Report 2A Project Summary by Program PARS Reports Monthly Reports All active projects listing Pre/Post CD-2 $ and #'s including RYG status. Multi-Project 3A Red-Yellow Project Status Report PARS Reports Monthly Reports For every project that has been assessed by the OECM Analyst as being either Red or Yellow a worksheet is created that includes the OECM Analyst's written assessment of the project. The FPD, Site and Contractor with its EVM Certification Status are listed in the report. All appropriate EVM metrics, TPC values and CD approved dates as of the current OA Status Date are a part of the report.

125

Radiation Therapy With Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We completed a Phase I trial of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with previously untreated pancreatic cancer. The results of a subset of patients with unresectable disease who went on to receive planned additional therapy are reported here. Methods and Materials: All patients received two 28-day cycles of gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, and 15) and oxaliplatin (40-85 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 15, per a dose-escalation schema). Radiation therapy was delivered concurrently with Cycle 1 (27 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions). At 9 weeks, patients were reassessed for resectability. Those deemed to have unresectable disease were offered a second round of treatment consisting of 2 cycles of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin and 27 Gy of radiation therapy (total, 54 Gy). Radiation was delivered to the gross tumor volume plus 1 cm by use of a three-dimensional conformal technique. We used the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events to assess acute toxicity. Late toxicity was scored per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Computed tomography scans were reviewed to determine pattern of failure, local response, and disease progression. Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox regression models were used to evaluate survival and freedom from failure. Results: Thirty-two patients from the Phase I dose-escalation study had unresectable disease, three of whom had low-volume metastatic disease. Of this group, 16 patients went on to receive additional therapy to complete a total of 4 cycles of chemotherapy and 54 Gy of concurrent radiation. For this subset, 38% had at least a partial tumor response at a median of 3.2 months. Median survival was 11.8 months (range, 4.4-26.3 months). The 1-year freedom from local progression rate was 93.8% (95% confidence interval, 63.2-99.1). Conclusions: Radiation therapy to 54 Gy with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine and oxaliplatin is well tolerated and results in favorable rates of local tumor response and 1-year freedom from local progression.

Hunter, Klaudia U.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Unit, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Francis, Isaac R. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Desai, Sameer [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Murphy, James D. [School of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Zalupski, Mark M. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar, E-mail: edgarb@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Professional Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

St. James Oil St. James Oil Corporation St. James Oil Corporation Phone 949.461.5210 25431 Cabot Road, Suite 107 Fax 949.461.5215 Laguna Hills, CA 92653 Final Technical Report Title Page The Use of Acid Stimulation for Restoring to Production Shut-in Oil Fields Grant Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FG26-03NT 15432 Prepared by Richard C. Russell, Project Director PAGE 1 OF 22 St. James Oil Corporation The Use of Acid Stimulation for Restoring to Production Shut-in Oil Fields Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

127

Informal Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

W-^^ LA-8034-MS ^ - W-^^ LA-8034-MS ^ - - ^ / Informal Report "c o O o -*-* "co > Specific Heat and Thermal Conductivity of Explosives, Mixtures, and Plastic-Bonded Explosives Determined Experimentally \mm ^ts\ LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY Post Office Box 1663 Los Alamos. New Mexico 87545 DISTR!DU7irM o r TdiS BGGbT.lENT IS UNLIMITED DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately

128

Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Final Report to Improved Reservoir Access Through Refracture Treatments in Tight Gas Sands and Gas Shales 07122-41.FINAL June 2013 PI Mukul M. Sharma The University of Texas at Austin 200 E. Dean Keeton St. Stop C0300 Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 471---3257 msharma@mail.utexas.edu LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by The University of Texas at Austin as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT, OR THAT THE

129

Report Cover  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation of the Department of Implementation of the Department of Energy's Beryllium-Associated Worker Registry DOE/IG-0726 April 2006 REPORT ON IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S BERYLLIUM-ASSOCIATED WORKER REGISTRY TABLE OF CONTENTS Implementation of Beryllium Registry Details of Finding 1 Recommendations and Comments 4 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology 6 2. Prior Audit Report 9 3. Management Comments 10 Implementation of Beryllium Registry Page 1 Details of Finding Maintenance and The data in the Department of Energy's (Department) Beryllium- Use of Registry Associated Worker Registry (Registry) was neither complete nor fully accurate. Further, the Department had not used the Registry to evaluate health effects of beryllium exposure or the prevalence

130

Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To identify clinical and treatment-related predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred thirty patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively screened using a standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from completion of radiation therapy was 56 months (range, 6-135 months). One-hundred fifty-five patients (47%) were treated by definitive radiation therapy, and 175 (53%) were treated postoperatively. Radiation doses ranged from 50 to 74 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used in 62% of cases, and 133 patients (40%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Forty patients (12%) reported neuropathic symptoms, with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), motor weakness, and/or muscle atrophy (25%). When patients with <5 years of follow-up were excluded, the rate of positive symptoms increased to 22%. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with brachial plexus symptoms: prior neck dissection (p = 0.01), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed that both neck dissection (p < 0.001) and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001) were independently predictive of symptoms. Conclusion: The incidence of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer may be underreported. In view of the dose-response relationship identified, limiting radiation dose to the brachial plexus should be considered when possible.

Chen, Allen M., E-mail: allen.chen@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Hall, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Li, Judy; Beckett, Laurel [Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)] [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Lau, Derick H. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Boron containing compounds and their preparation and use in neutron capture therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention pertains to boron containing thiouracil derivatives, their method of preparations, and their use in the therapy of malignant melanoma using boron neutron capture therapy.

Gabel, Detlef (Bremen, DE)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

NETL: PPII - Topical Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Topical Reports Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) Topical Reports Topical Report 26: Mercury Control Demonstration Projects - (February 2008) PDF-1.2MB This report...

133

NERSC Publications and Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Publications & Reports Download the NERSC Strategic Plan (PDF | 3.2 MB) NERSC Annual Reports NERSC's annual reports highlight the scientific accomplishments of its users...

134

Report: Communications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS Background In September 2006, the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) issued a report to the Assistant Secretary that contained recommendations pertaining to communications. These recommendations were approved and implemented to varying degrees. Recommendation 2006-06: Establish a permanent position to provide the needed communications role in the Office of the Assistant Secretary. Recommendation 2006-07: Incorporate communications into all aspects of decision-making. Recommendation 2006-08: Incorporate a communications element or standard to performance appraisal plans for key managers, especially field managers. Recommendation 2006-09: Measure the effectiveness of current communications tools.

135

Final Report  

SciTech Connect

In December of 2004, upon hearing of the DOE decision to terminate this grant, a no-cost extension was requested to allow us to expend residual funds from the 2004 calendar year. These funds have been used to support MR-CAT staff as we transition to other funding. As of this writing, the funds have been expended. Over the past four years of DOE operations funding, MR-CAT has become one of the most productive sectors at the Advanced Photon Source. This report will list the overall accomplishments of the collaboration during the time of DOE funding.

Segre, Carlo, Ph.D.

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

Professional Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Thijssen, LLC P: 206 229 6882 J. Thijssen, LLC P: 206 229 6882 4910 163 rd Ave NE Redmond, WA 98052 e: jant@jthijssen.com The Impact of Future Diesel Fuel Specifications and Engine Emissions Standards on SOFC Final Report Date: June 29, 2004 Prepared for: US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Contract Number: DE-AM26-99FT40465; Task NT50909; Sub- Task 19 Table of Contents Table of Contents ..........................................................................................................................a Executive Summary....................................................................................................................... I Diesel Fuel Specification Trends Until 2010 .................................................................................

137

INFORMAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

q?% q?% LA-5031 -MS INFORMAL REPORT krs $ 1 0 s N o t e on Inverse Bremsstrahlung in Strong E!ect:omGgnetic c;alPl I j a l a m o s scientific laboratory of the University of California LOS A L A M O S , NEW MEXICO 8 7 5 4 4 U N I T E D S T A T E S A T O M I C E N E R G Y C O M M I S S I O N a This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Atomic Energy Commission, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contrac- tors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or im- plied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, com- pleteness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process dis- closed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

138

Termination Report  

SciTech Connect

The results of this project include: (1) Development of econometrically estimated marginal abatement and associated production curves describing response of agricultural and forestry emissions/sink/offsets enhancements for use in integrated assessments. Curves were developed that reflected agricultural, and forestry production of traditional commodities, carbon and other greenhouse gas offsets and biofuels given signals of general commodity demand, and carbon and energy prices. (2) Integration of the non-dynamic curves from (1) into a version of the PNNL SGM integrated assessment model was done in cooperation with Dr. Ronald Sands at PNNL. The results were reported at the second DOE conference on sequestration in the paper listed and the abstract is in Annex B of this report. (3) Alternative agricultural sequestration estimates were developed in conjunction with personnel at Colorado State University using CENTURY and analyses can operate under the use of agricultural soil carbon data from either the EPIC or CENTURY models. (4) A major effort was devoted to understanding the possible role and applicable actions from agriculture. (5) Work was done with EPA and EIA to update the biofuel data and assumptions resulting in some now emerging results showing the criticality of biofuel assumptions.

Bruce McCarl and Dhazngilly

2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

139

Dynamic optimization of fractionation schedules in radiation therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we investigate the improvement in treatment effectiveness when dynamically optimizing the fractionation scheme in radiation therapy. In the first part of the thesis, we consider delivering a different dose ...

Ramakrishnan, Jagdish

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Proton Beam Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Esophageal Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Proton beam therapy (PBT) is a promising modality for the management of thoracic malignancies. We report our preliminary experience of treating esophageal cancer patients with concurrent chemotherapy (CChT) and PBT (CChT/PBT) at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: This is an analysis of 62 esophageal cancer patients enrolled on a prospective study evaluating normal tissue toxicity from CChT/PBT from 2006 to 2010. Patients were treated with passive scattering PBT with two- or three-field beam arrangement using 180 to 250 MV protons. We used the Kaplan-Meier method to assess time-to-event outcomes and compared the distributions between groups using the log-rank test. Results: The median follow-up time was 20.1 months for survivors. The median age was 68 years (range, 38-86). Most patients were males (82%) who had adenocarcinomas (76%) and Stage II-III disease (84%). The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (RBE [relative biologic equivalence]) (range, 36-57.6). The most common grade 2 to 3 acute toxicities from CChT/PBT were esophagitis (46.8%), fatigue (43.6%), nausea (33.9%), anorexia (30.1%), and radiation dermatitis (16.1%). There were two cases of grade 2 and 3 radiation pneumonitis and two cases of grade 5 toxicities. A total of 29 patients (46.8%) received preoperative CChT/PBT, with one postoperative death. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate for the surgical cohort was 28%, and the pCR and near CR rates (0%-1% residual cells) were 50%. While there were significantly fewer local-regional recurrences in the preoperative group (3/29) than in the definitive CChT/PBT group (16/33) (log-rank test, p = 0.005), there were no differences in distant metastatic (DM)-free interval or overall survival (OS) between the two groups. Conclusions: This is the first report of patients treated with PBT/CChT for esophageal cancer. Our data suggest that this modality is associated with a few severe toxicities, but the pathologic response and clinical outcomes are encouraging. Prospective comparison with more traditional approach is warranted.

Lin, Steven H., E-mail: shlin@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Caimiao [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Myles, Bevan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Guo Xiaomao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Cancer Hospital, Shanghai (China); Palmer, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

SANDIA REPORT  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

2-2137 * U 2-2137 * U C - 7 0 5 Unlimited Release Printed September 1994 EXODUS II: A Finite Element Data Model Larry A. Schoof, Victor R. Yarberry Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and LIvermore, California 94550 for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited 0Jff*BUT»0» Or THIS DOCUMFW IS UNLIRIITrp Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Govern- ment nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express

142

CIP Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Featured in this month's issue of The Featured in this month's issue of The CIP Report are Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. SCADA systems monitor and control the processes of many of our Nation's infrastructures. fle security and safety of transportation, water, communications, and many other vital parts of our everyday lives all rely on SCADA systems. In this issue we look at some of the difierent SCADA systems and their applications. fle Thrst article provides an overview of George Mason University's research on SCADA systems. flis research focuses on railroad transportation and Positive Train Control systems. fle second article discusses the Energy Sector's response to cyber threats and the efiorts to secure their control systems. An article from Mississippi State

143

Trip Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois May 2013 Page 1 2013 Inspection and Annual Site Status Report for the Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Site Summary Site A/Plot M was inspected on April 10, 2013. The site, located within a county forest preserve with significant tree and grass cover, was in good condition. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. Erosion on top of the grass covered mound at Plot M continues to be a concern. Bike traffic produces ruts which if left unfixed grow and threaten the protectiveness of the soil cover on top of the mound. In 2010 ANL personnel repaired two areas at Plot M by filling in the ruts with clean top soil and re-seeding. In 2012, additional repairs were made by ANL personnel. Three-

144

Termination Report  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 The results produced by this project include: (1) Development of econometrically estimated marginal abatement and associated production curves describing response of agricultural and forestry emissions/sink/offsets enhancements for use in integrated assessments. Curves were developed that reflected agricultural, and forestry production of traditional commodities, carbon and other greenhouse gas offsets and biofuels given signals of general commodity demand, and carbon and energy prices. This work was done jointly with Dr. Ronald Sands at PNNL. A paper from this is forthcoming as follows Gillig, D., B.A. McCarl, and R.D. Sands, ''Integrating Agricultural and Forestry GHG Mitigation Response into General Economy Frameworks: Developing a Family of Response Functions,'' Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, forthcoming, 2004. An additional effort was done involving dynamics and a second paper was prepared that is annex A to this report and is Gillig, D., and B.A. McCarl, ''Integrating Agricultural and Forestry Response to GHG Mitigation into General Economy Frameworks: Developing a Family of Response Functions using FASOM,'' 2004. (2) Integration of the non dynamic curves from (1) into in a version of the PNNL SGM integrated assessment model was done in cooperation with Dr. Ronald Sands at PNNL. The results were reported at the second DOE conference on sequestration in the paper listed just below and the abstract is in Annex B of this report. Sands, R.D., B.A. McCarl, and D. Gillig, ''Assessment of Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Options within a United States Market for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions,'' Presented at the Second Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Alexandria, VA, May 7, 2003. The results in their latest version show about half of the needed offsets by 2030 can be achieved through agriculture through a mix of sequestration and biofuel options. (3) Alternative agricultural sequestration estimates were developed in conjunction with personnel at Colorado State University using CENTURY and analyses can operate under the use of agricultural soil carbon data from either the EPIC or CENTURY models. (4) A major effort was devoted to understanding the possible role and applicable actions from agriculture. Papers have been drafted from this as follows and are in the process of being finalized for publication. Lee, H.C., and B.A. McCarl, ''U.S. Agricultural and Forest Carbon Sequestration Over Time: An Economic Exploration,'' 2004. Lee, H.C., B.A. McCarl, and D. Gillig, ''The Dynamic Competitiveness of U.S. Agricultural and Forest Carbon Sequestration,'' 2004. (5) Results have been presented in front of a number of scientific and policy bodies. These include the CASMGS, Non CO2 Network, Energy Modeling Forum on the science side and the Government of Japan, the Council of Economic Advisors , DOE, USDA and EPA on the policy side. Input has also been provided to the IPCC design of the fourth assessment report. (6) Work was done with EPA and EIA to update the biofuel data and assumptions resulting in some now emerging results showing the criticality of biofuel assumptions.

Bruce McCarl; Dhazn Gillig

2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

145

GALVIN REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories Futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories Prepared by the Secretary Of Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Alternative Futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories February 1995 Figure 1. Department of Energy National Laboratories Under Consideration by the Task Force Search Both Volumes of the Galvin Report To Table of Contents Task Force on Alternative Futures for the DOE National Laboratories Robert Galvin (Chairman) Chairman of the Executive Committee Motorola Inc. Braden Allenby Research Vice President, Technology and Environment AT&T Bob Boylan Successful Presentations A Division of Boylan Enterprises, Inc. Linda Capuano Vice President, Operations and Business Development Conductus, Inc. Ruth Davis President and Chief Executive Officer

146

SANDIA REPORT  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

1-0516 * U 1-0516 * U C - 2 7 4 Unlimited Release Printed May 1991 SEP1 2 1991 PC-1D Installation Manual and User's Guide Version 3.1 Paul A. Basore !- Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-76DP00789 SF2900CH8-81) DISTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLIMITED Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Govern- ment nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express

147

Progress Report:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE26-98FT34174.000 DE26-98FT34174.000 Development of New Drilling Fluids FINAL REPORT Date: May 5, 2003 Title: Development of New Types of Non-Damaging Drill-in and Completion Fluids Project Number: 26-98FT34174.000 From: David B. Burnett, Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering, Texas A&M University Goals and Objectives of Project The goal of the project has been to develop new types of drill-in fluids (DIFs) and completion fluids (CFs) for use in natural gas reservoirs. Phase 1 of the project was a 24- month study to develop the concept of advanced type of fluids usable in well completions. Phase 1 tested this concept and created a kinetic mathematical model to accurately track the fluid's behavior under downhole conditions. Phase 2 includes tests of

148

SANDIA REPORT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

328 328 Unlimited Release November 2007 Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment Raymond C. Parks Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency thereof,

149

Interim report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Interim Report summarizes the research and development activities of the Superconducting Super Collider project carried out from the completion of the Reference Designs Study (May 1984) to June 1985. It was prepared by the SSC Central Design Group in draft form on the occasion of the DOE Annual Review, June 19--21, 1985. Now largely organized by CDG Divisions, the bulk of each chapter documents the progress and accomplishments to date, while the final section(s) describe plans for future work. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides a basic brief description of the SSC, its physics justification, its origins, and the R&D organization set up to carry out the work. Chapter 2 gives a summary of the main results of the R&D program, the tasks assigned to the four magnet R&D centers, and an overview of the future plans. The reader wishing a quick look at the SSC Phase I effort can skim Chapter 1 and read Chapter 2. Subsequent chapters discuss in more detail the activities on accelerator physics, accelerator systems, magnets and cryostats, injector, detector R&D, conventional facilities, and project planning and management. The magnet chapter (5) documents in text and photographs the impressive progress in successful construction of many model magnets, the development of cryostats with low heat leaks, and the improvement in current-carrying capacity of superconducting strand. Chapter 9 contains the budgets and schedules of the COG Divisions, the overall R&D program, including the laboratories, and also preliminary projections for construction. Appendices provide information on the various panels, task forces and workshops held by the CDG in FY 1985, a bibliography of COG and Laboratory reports on SSC and SSC-related work, and on private industrial involvement in the project.

NONE

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Name Previous Location New Location Brief Description Multi-Project or Single Project Report 2A Project Summary by Program PARS Reports Monthly Reports All active projects listing Pre/Post CD-2 $ and #'s including RYG status. Multi-Project 3A Red-Yellow Project Status Report PARS Reports Monthly Reports For every project that has been assessed by the OECM Analyst as being either Red or Yellow a worksheet is created that includes the OECM Analyst's written assessment of the project. The FPD, Site and Contractor with its EVM Certification Status are listed in the report. All appropriate EVM metrics, TPC values and CD approved dates as of the current OA Status Date are a part of the report. Multi-Project 4B Projects Post-CD-2 PARS Reports Monthly Reports

151

MT_GEQ_Handbook_July2009.doc MUSIC EDUCATION AND MUSIC THERAPY (MEMT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MT_GEQ_Handbook_July2009.doc MUSIC EDUCATION AND MUSIC THERAPY (MEMT) Music Therapy Graduate Equivalency Program Handbook Music Therapy Graduate Equivalency Program Individuals who hold baccalaureate in Music Therapy planning outline. This handbook is designed to supplement the information in the KU

Peterson, Blake R.

152

Symptom reporting and quality of life in the Estonian Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy Trial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, physical activity was measured by the Duke Activity Status Index, energy and mental health by RAND scales, and depressive symptoms on the Burnam scale [13]. According to the WHI Trial data, combined hormone of breast tenderness during the first year of use...

Veerus, Piret; Fischer, Krista; Hovi, Sirpa-Liisa; Karro, Helle; Rahu, Mati; Hemminki, Elina

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

153

Transcranial LED therapy for cognitive dysfunction in chronic, mild traumatic brain injury: Two case reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases are presented, where cognitive function improved following treatment with transcranial light emitting diodes (LEDs). At age 59, P1 had closed-head injury from a motor vehicle ...

Hamblin, Michael R.

154

Medical accelerator safety considerations: Report of AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group No. 35  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensuring safe operation for a medical accelerator is a difficult task. Users must assume more responsibility in using contemporary equipment. Additionally, users must work closely with manufacturers in promoting the safe and effective use of such complex equipment. Complex treatment techniques and treatment modality changeover procedures merit detailed, unambiguous written procedural instruction at the control console. A thorough hands on training period after receiving instructions, and before assuming treatment responsibilities, is essential for all technologists. Unambiguous written instructions must also be provided to guide technologists in safe response when equipment malfunctions or exhibits unexpected behavior or after any component has been changed or readjusted. Technologists should be given a written list of the appropriate individuals to consult when unexpected machine behavior occurs. They should be assisted in identifying aberrant behavior of equipment. Many centers already provide this instruction, but others may not. Practiced response and discussion with technologists should be a part of an ongoing quality assurance program. An important aspect of a safety program is the need for continuous vigilance. Table III gives a summary of a comprehensive safety program for medical accelerators. Table IV gives a list of summary recommendations as an example of how one might mitigate the consequences of an equipment failure and improve procedures and operator response in the context of the environment described. Most of these recommendations can be implemented almost immediately at any individual treatment center.

Purdy, J.A.; Biggs, P.J.; Bowers, C.; Dally, E.; Downs, W.; Fraass, B.A.; Karzmark, C.J.; Khan, F.; Morgan, P.; Morton, R.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Robust optimization of intensity modulated proton therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is highly sensitive to range uncertainties and uncertainties caused by setup variation. The conventional inverse treatment planning of IMPT optimized based on the planning target volume (PTV) is not often sufficient to ensure robustness of treatment plans. In this paper, a method that takes the uncertainties into account during plan optimization is used to mitigate the influence of uncertainties in IMPT. Methods: The authors use the so-called ''worst-case robust optimization'' to render IMPT plans robust in the face of uncertainties. For each iteration, nine different dose distributions are computed--one each for {+-} setup uncertainties along anteroposterior (A-P), lateral (R-L) and superior-inferior (S-I) directions, for {+-} range uncertainty, and the nominal dose distribution. The worst-case dose distribution is obtained by assigning the lowest dose among the nine doses to each voxel in the clinical target volume (CTV) and the highest dose to each voxel outside the CTV. Conceptually, the use of worst-case dose distribution is similar to the dose distribution achieved based on the use of PTV in traditional planning. The objective function value for a given iteration is computed using this worst-case dose distribution. The objective function used has been extended to further constrain the target dose inhomogeneity. Results: The worst-case robust optimization method is applied to a lung case, a skull base case, and a prostate case. Compared with IMPT plans optimized using conventional methods based on the PTV, our method yields plans that are considerably less sensitive to range and setup uncertainties. An interesting finding of the work presented here is that, in addition to reducing sensitivity to uncertainties, robust optimization also leads to improved optimality of treatment plans compared to the PTV-based optimization. This is reflected in reduction in plan scores and in the lower normal tissue doses for the same coverage of the target volume when subjected to uncertainties. Conclusions: The authors find that the worst-case robust optimization provides robust target coverage without sacrificing, and possibly even improving, the sparing of normal tissues. Our results demonstrate the importance of robust optimization. The authors assert that all IMPT plans should be robustly optimized.

Liu Wei; Zhang Xiaodong; Li Yupeng; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Financial report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) was established by the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 to bring together into a single agency the major energy research and development programs of the Federal Government. For the fiscal year ended September 30, 1977, Congress provided ERDA with $7355 million to carry out its programs. This was comprised of $6332 million in current appropriations, $740 million in reimbursements resulting primarily from the sale of enriched uranium, and $283 million in previously provided but unused appropriations. ERDA employed approximately 9536 scientific, technical, and support personnel and also relied heavily on the private sector to staff and operate Government-owned facilities. Contractors from industry, educational, and other non-profit organizations numbered approximately 128,141. ERDA's financial management system included an integrated accounting and budgeting system involving both Government and major contractor operations. This accrual based accounting system met all the requirements of Government fund accounting and provided management with necessary data. ERDA was abolished and its assets and liabilities were transferred to the Department of Energy on October 1, 1977. This final unclassified Financial Report of the Energy Research and Development Administration contains the financial statements presenting the financial position of ERDA at September 30, 1977, and the results of operations for the period beginning October 1, 1976, and ending September 30, 1977.

Not Available

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Financial report  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) was established by the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 to bring together into a single agency the major energy research and development programs of the Federal Government. For the fiscal year ended September 30, 1977, Congress provided ERDA with $7355 million to carry out its programs. This was comprised of $6332 million in current appropriations, $740 million in reimbursements resulting primarily from the sale of enriched uranium, and $283 million in previously provided but unused appropriations. ERDA employed approximately 9536 scientific, technical, and support personnel and also relied heavily on the private sector to staff and operate Government-owned facilities. Contractors from industry, educational, and other non-profit organizations numbered approximately 128,141. ERDA's financial management system included an integrated accounting and budgeting system involving both Government and major contractor operations. This accrual based accounting system met all the requirements of Government fund accounting and provided management with necessary data. ERDA was abolished and its assets and liabilities were transferred to the Department of Energy on October 1, 1977. This final unclassified Financial Report of the Energy Research and Development Administration contains the financial statements presenting the financial position of ERDA at September 30, 1977, and the results of operations for the period beginning October 1, 1976, and ending September 30, 1977.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A simplified model of saltcake moisture distribution. Letter report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This letter report describes the formulation of a simplified model for finding the moisture distribution in a saltcake waste profile that has been stabilized by pumping out the drainable interstitial liquid. The model is based on assuming that capillarity mainly governs the distribution of moisture in the porous saltcake waste. A stead upward flow of moisture driven by evaporation from the waste surface is conceptualized to occur for isothermal conditions. To obtain hydraulic parameters for unsaturated conditions, the model is calibrated or matched to the relative saturation distribution as measured by neutron probe scans. The model is demonstrated on Tanks 104-BY and 105-TX as examples. A value of the model is that it identifies the key physical parameters that control the surface moisture content in a waste profile. Moreover, the model can be used to estimate the brine application rate at the waste surface that would raise the moisture content there to a safe level. Thus, the model can be applied to help design a strategy for correcting the moisture conditions in a saltcake waste tank.

Simmons, C.S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

REVIEW ARTICLE Preclinical animal research on therapy dosimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into radionuclide therapies based on radiation dosimetry will enable the use of any LETequivalent radionuclide. Radiation dose and dose rate have significant influence on dose effects in the tumour depending on its radiation sensitivity, possibilities for repair of sublethal damage, and repopulation during or after the therapy. Models for radiation response of preclinical tumour models after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy based on the linear quadratic model are presented. The accuracy of the radiation dose is very important for observation of dose-effects. Uncertainties in the radiation dose estimation arise from incomplete assay of the kinetics, low accuracy in volume measurements and absorbed dose S-values for stylized models instead of the actual animal geometry. Normal dose uncertainties in the order of 20 % might easily make the difference between seeing a dose-effect or missing it altogether. This is true for the theoretical case of a homogeneous tumour type behaving in vivo in the same way as its cells do in vitro. Heterogeneity of tumours induces variations in clonogenic cell density, radiation sensitivity, repopulation capacity and repair kinetics. The influence of these aspects are analysed within the linear quadratic model for tumour response to radionuclide therapy. Preclinical tumour models tend to be less heterogenic than the clinical conditions they should represent. The results of various preclinical radionuclide therapy experiments for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy are compared to the outcome of theoretical models and the influence of increased heterogeneity is analysed when the results of preclinical research is transferred to the clinic. When the radiation dose and radiobiology of the tumour response is known well enough it may be possible to leave the current phenomenological approach in preclinical radionuclide therapy

Dual Isotopes; Mark W. Konijnenberg; Marion De Jong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O'Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio Registered-Sign treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

Wong, Sharon [National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine (Singapore); Back, Michael [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun [National University, Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, National University, Hospital, Tower Block (Singapore); Lu, Jaide Jay, E-mail: mdcljj@nus.edu.sg [National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine (Singapore); National University, Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, National University, Hospital, Tower Block (Singapore)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This grant was a continuation of research conducted at the University of Florida under Grant No. DE-FG05-91ER45462 in which we investigated the energy bandgap shifts produced in semiconductor quantum dots of sizes between 1.5 and 40 nm. The investigated semiconductors consisted of a series of Column 2-6 compounds (CdS, CdSe, CdTe) and pure Column IV elements (Si and Ge). It is well-known of course that the 2-6 semiconductors possess a direct-gap electronic structure, while the Column IV elements possess an indirect-gap structure. The investigation showed a major difference in quantum confinement behavior between the two sets of semiconductors. This difference is essentially associated with the change in bandgap energy resulting from size confinement. In the direct-gap semiconductors, the change in energy (blue shift) saturates when the crystals approach 2-3 nm in diameter. This limits the observed shift in energy to less than 1 eV above the bulk value. In the indirect-gap semiconductors, the energy shift does not show any sign of saturation and in fact, we produced Si and Ge nanocrystals with absorption edges in the UV. The reason for this difference has not been determined and will require additional experimental and theoretical studies. In our work, we suggest, but do not prove that mixing of conduction band side valleys with the central valley under conditions of size confinement may be responsible for the saturation in the blue-shift of direct-gap semiconductors. The discovery of large bandgap energy shifts with crystal size prompted us to suggest that these materials may be used to form photovoltaic cells with multi-gap layers for high efficiency in a U.S. Patent issued in 1998. However, this possibility depends strongly on the ability to collect photoexcited carriers from energy-confined crystals. The research conducted at the University of Arizona under the subject grant had a major goal of testing an indirect gap semiconductor in size-confined structures to determine if photocarriers could be collected. Thus, we tested a variety of semiconductor-glass nano-composite structures for photoconductivity. Tests were conducted in collaboration with the Laser Physics Division at Sandia National Laboratories. Nano-composite samples were formed consisting of Ge nanocrystals embedded in an indium-tin-oxide matrix. Photoconductivity measurements were conducted with exposure of the films to sub-bandgap and super-bandgap light. The results showed a clear photoconductivity effect arising from exposure to super-bandgap light only. These results suggest that the high-efficiency photovoltaic cell structure proposed in DOE sponsored U.S. Patent 5,720,827 is viable. The results of fabrication studies, structural characterization studies and photovoltaic measurements are presented in the report. This report is taken from a PhD dissertation of Tracie J. Bukowski submitted to the University of Florida in May 2002. ''The optical and photoconductive response in germanium quantum dots and indium tin oxide composite thin film structures,'' Dr. Bukowski conducted her PhD study under this grant at the University of Arizona and under Grant No DE-FG05-91ER45462 at the University of Florida, as well as during a two-year fellowship at Sandia National Laboratories.

Joseph H. Simmons; Tracie J. Bukowski

2002-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

163

Sandia Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of the contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government, any agency thereof or any of their contractors or subcontractors. The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government, any agency thereof, or any of their contractors or subcontractors. SAND97-8234 Unlimited Release Printed February 1997 UC-406 Mixed-Convective, Conjugate Heat Transfer during Molten Salt Quenching of Small Parts Sandia National Laboratories SUMMARY It is common in free quenching immersion heat treatment calculations to locally apply constant or surface-averaged heat-transfer coefficients obtained from either free or forced steady convection over simple shapes with-small temperature differences from the ambient fluid. This procedure avoids the solution of highly transient, non-Boussinesq conjugate heat transfer problems which often involve mixed convection, but it leaves great uncertainty about the general adequacy of the results. In this paper we demonstrate for small parts (dimensions of the order of inches rather than feet) quenched...

Sand Uc- Unlimited; D. R. Chenoweth; D. R. Chenoweth

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Daily Occurrence Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occurrence Reporting and Processing System Home ORPS Database Access Daily Occurrence Reports Weekly Summary of Significant Occurrences Occurrence Reporting Quality ORPS Training...

165

NERSC Annual Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Annual Reports NERSC Annual Reports Sort by: Default | Name anrep2000.png NERSC Annual Report 2000 Download Image: anrep2000.png | png | 203 KB Download File:...

166

Pantex Site - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Pantex Site Activity Reports 2013 Pantex Plant Operational Awareness Oversight, May 2013 Review Reports 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Pantex Plant,...

167

JGI Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress Report report cover The 2012 DOE Joint Genome Institute Progress Report, highlighting the achievements of the previous year, has been released and can be downloaded here....

168

New Brunswick Laboratory - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports New Brunswick Laboratory Activity Reports 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the New Brunswick Laboratory, July 2012 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the New...

169

Final Report  

SciTech Connect

OAK B135 The formation of metastable crystalline phases in lithium disilicate glass has been a subject of controversy for decades. Here, one aspect of this problem relating to the stability of these non-equilibrium phases when glasses are heated for extended time periods in the nucleation regime is addressed. The results of a systematic experimental investigation on the persistence of metastable phases and the factors that may influence the appearance of such phases, e.g., water content, impurities, glass composition, and glass preparation procedure are presented. Growth rates of lithium disilicate crystals in lithium disilicate glass are measured as a function water concentration in the glass and of temperature in the deeply undercooled regime. The growth rate data obtained in this work are combined with data reported in the literature and used to assess the applicability of standard models of crystal growth for the description of experimental results over a very broad temperature range. The reduced growth rate versus undercooling graph is found to consist of three regimes. For undercoolings less than 140C, the reduced growth rate curve is suggestive of either 2-D surface nucleation or screw dislocation growth. For undercoolings greater than 400C, the reduced growth rate plot suggests the operative crystal growth mechanism is 2-D surface nucleation, but detailed calculations cast doubt upon this conclusion. In the intermediate undercooling range, there appears to be some sort of transitional behavior for which none of the standard models appear to be applicable. Further, it is observed that small differences in the viscosity data employed can produce enormous differences in the predicted growth rates at larger undercoolings. Results of the kinetic analyses conducted herein seem to indicate that the nature of the kinetic rate coefficient used in the standard growth models may be incorrect. Nucleation rates of sodium metasilicate crystals in a sodium silicate glass of composition 43Na2O-57SiO2 (mol%) are investigated using the development technique. The results of this study are compared with the nucleation rate results recently obtained for this composition using a novel DTA method. The two techniques are found to agree within experimental error.

Michael C. Weinberg; Lori L. Burgner; Joseph H. Simmons

2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Efficacy of Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Graves' Orbitopathy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To review our institutional outcomes of patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) for Graves' orbitopathy (GO), assess the role of orbital reirradiation, and identify prognostic factors of complete response (CR). Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of 211 patients who presented with a diagnosis of GO and received RT between January 2000-2010. RT dose was 20 Gy in 10 fractions. Patient median age was 51 years (range, 15-84 years), median follow-up was 11 months (range, 1-88 months). Patient symptoms included any combination of proptosis (90.9%), extraocular muscle dysfunction (78.9%), soft tissue signs (68.4%), and diplopia (58.4%). Corticosteroids were used as first-line therapy in 20.6% of patients. Among those who achieved either CR or partial response (PR), prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: Stabilization of disease without recurrence was clinically achieved overall in 202 patients (96.7%). At the completion of RT, 176 patients (84.2%) reported a symptomatic improvement of pretreatment symptoms. CR of GO symptoms was achieved using multiple treatment modalities, including RT by 93 patients (44.5%), of which 32 patients received RT only. Corticosteroids were discontinued in 97.8% of patients who received them as initial therapy. Surgical intervention following radiotherapy was required for 144 (68.9%) of all patients. Fourteen patients received orbital reirradiation for persistent or recurrent symptoms. Five of these achieved a CR, and the other nine achieved disease stabilization but retained persistent ocular symptoms. Long-term side effects of RT included dry eyes (12%). Of the prognostic factors we investigated, only gender predicted CR, which was less common in men (33.9%) than in women (49.7%) p = 0.0471. Conclusions: Orbital radiation for GO is an established treatment modality for patients. Orbital reirradiation is beneficial for patients who do not respond to initial RT or experience symptom recurrence without an apparent risk of increased morbidity.

Matthiesen, Chance, E-mail: chance-matthiesen@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Thompson, J. Spencer [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Thompson, David [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Farris, Bradley; Wilkes, Byron [Dean A. McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence; Bogardus, Carl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Early Outcomes From Three Prospective Trials of Image-Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We accrued 211 prostate cancer patients on prospective Institutional Review Board-approved trials of 78 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 39 fractions for low-risk disease, dose escalation from 78 to 82 CGE for intermediate-risk disease, and 78 CGE with concomitant docetaxel followed by androgen deprivation for high-risk disease. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. Results: One intermediate-risk patient and 2 high-risk patients had disease progression. Pretreatment genitourinary (GU) symptom management was required in 38% of patients. A cumulative 88 (42%) patients required posttreatment GU symptom management. Four transient Grade 3 GU toxicities occurred, all among patients requiring pretreatment GU symptom management. Multivariate analysis showed correlation between posttreatment GU 2+ symptoms and pretreatment GU symptom management (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.0048). Only 1 Grade 3+ gastrointestinal (GI) symptom occurred. The prevalence of Grade 2+ GI symptoms was 0 (0%), 10 (5%), 12 (6%), and 8 (4%) at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, with a cumulative incidence of 20 (10%) patients at 2 years after proton therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed significant correlation between Grade 2+ rectal bleeding and proctitis and the percentage of rectal wall (rectum) receiving doses ranging from 40 CGE (10 CGE) to 80 CGE. Conclusions: Early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy suggest high efficacy and minimal toxicity with only 1.9% Grade 3 GU symptoms and <0.5% Grade 3 GI toxicities.

Mendenhall, Nancy P., E-mail: menden@shands.ufl.edu [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Li Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Nichols, R. Charles; Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph [Division of Urology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Henderson, Randal [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Jefferson Lab Science Series - Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Science of Chocolate The Science of Chocolate Previous Video (The Science of Chocolate) Science Series Video Archive Next Video (Adventures in Infectious Diseases) Adventures in Infectious Diseases Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives Dr. Cynthia Keppel - Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute October 25, 2011 In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy

173

Progress Report Schedule  

COMPANY PROPRIETARY INFORMATION 1 PROGRESS REPORT (Before First Commercial Sale) Progress Report Schedule Due date For period

174

Tech Transfer Report 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Summary Report on Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer FY 2003 Activity Metrics and Outcomes 2004 Report ...

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

175

Security Enforcement Reporting Criteria  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Classified Information Security Noncompliance Reporting Criteria January 2012 MANDATORY SECURITY INCIDENT REPORTING Classified information security noncompliances are categorized...

176

Audit Report: IG-0709 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Audit Report: IG-0709 November 17, 2005 Management of the Department's Isotope Program Dating back to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, the Development Isotopes Department of Energy's (Department) predecessor agency, the Atomic Energy Commission, was authorized to distribute stable and radioactive isotopes at no charge to assist and encourage research on peaceful uses of isotopes involving medical therapy. More recently, the 1990 Energy and Water Appropriations Act consolidated all isotope production and distribution activities under one Department Program and established a revolving fund for the Isotope Program. Congress authorized this fund to, among other things, produce isotopes for use in research and development (R&D). Audit Report: IG-0709 More Documents & Publications

177

An Ontology for Intelligent E-therapy for Obesity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last few years the use of medical and biomedical ontologies has increased considerably. It is very common to find applications and semantic webs using this kind of ontologies and a large number of papers have been written explaining why ontologies ... Keywords: Ontology, Obesity, intelligent e-therapy

Irene Zaragoz; Jaime Guixeres; Mariano Alcaiz

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Construction of SAGA HIMAT for carbon ion cancer therapy  

SciTech Connect

SAGA HIMAT is now under construction in Tosu city, Saga prefecture, Kyushu island, Japan. It will open in 2013 and become the fourth carbon ion beam cancer therapy center in Japan. It is a collaborative project among the local governments, industries and universities in northern Kyushu area.

Kudo, Sho; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Endo, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Totoki, Tadahide [Ion Beam Therapy Center , SAGA HIMAT Foundation, 1-802-3 Hondori-machi, Tosu, Saga 841-0033 (Japan)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

179

Proceedings of the first international symposium on neutron capture therapy  

SciTech Connect

This meeting was arranged jointly by MIT and BNL in order to illuminate progress in the synthesis and targeting of boron compounds and to evaluate and document progress in radiobiological and dosimetric aspects of neutron capture therapy. It is hoped that this meeting will facilitate transfer of information between groups working in these fields, and encourage synergistic collaboration.

Fairchild, R.G.; Brownell, G.L. (eds.)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Importance of physical interaction between human and robot for therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mental health care of the elderly people is a common problem in advanced countries. Recently, high technology has developed robots for use not only in factories but also for our living environment. In particular, human interactive robots for psychological ... Keywords: elderly care, human-robot interaction, mental commitment robot, robot therapy

Takanori Shibata

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2010. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. In 2010, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local regulations and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2010. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2010. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2010. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, miscellaneous electronic office equipment, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling and corrugated cardboard recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, foamed polystyrene peanuts, batteries, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-Ames Site Office (AMSO), through the Laboratory's Performance Evaluation Measurement Plan, on its Affirmative Procurement Performance Measure. A performance level of 'A-' was achieved in 2010 for Integrated Safety, Health and Environmental Protection. As reported in Site Environmental Reports for prior years, the Laboratory's Environmental Management System (EMS) has been integrated into the Laboratory's Integrated Safety Management System since 2005. The integration of EMS into the way the Laboratory does business allows the Laboratory to systematically review, address and respond to the Laboratory's environmental impacts. The Laboratory's EMS was audited in April 2009 by DOE-CH. There were four 'Sufficiently in Conformity' findings as a result of the audit. All four findings were tracked in the Laboratory's corrective action database for completion. Beryllium was used routinely at Ames Laboratory in the 1940's and 1950's in processes developed for the production of highly pure uranium and thorium in support of the historic Manhattan Project. Laboratory metallurgists also worked on a process to produce pure beryllium metal from beryllium fluoride. In the early 1950's, beryllium oxide powder was used to produce shaped beryllium and crucibles. As a result of that work, beryllium contamination now exists in many interstitial spaces (e.g., utility chases) and ventilation systems in Wilhelm, Spedding and Metals Development buildings. Extensive characterization and remediation efforts have occurred in 2009 and 2010 in order to better understand the extent of the contamination. Analysis of extensive sampling data suggests that a fairly wide dispersion of beryllium occurred (most likely in the 1950's and 60's) in Wilhelm Hall and in certain areas of Spedding Hall and Metals Development. Area air-sampling results and work-area surface characterizations indicate the exposure potential to current workers, building visitors and the public remains extremely low. This information is now used to guide cleaning efforts and to provide worker protection during remodeling and maintenance activities. Results were shared with the DOE's Former Worker Program to support former worker medical test

Kayser, Dan

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation. Current and proposed test methods are introduced and evaluated. Both conventional and innovativeTechnical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-0-4098-1 2. Government Accession No. 3-of-the-Art Review 5. Report Date June 11, 2001 6. Performing Organization Code7. Author(s) Michael D. Brown, Greg

Texas at Austin, University of

183

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the heat of hydration, diurnal temperature changes, and solar radiation. Current and proposed test methodsTechnical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-04/0-4098-4 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 5. Report Date October 2003 4. Title and Subtitle Evaluation of Alternative

Texas at Austin, University of

184

NSLS Activity Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activity Report Activity Report 2009 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2008 - September 30, 2009 Periodic Table Dust Jacket 2008 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008 2007 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2006 - September 30, 2007 Science Highlights PDF Publications PDF 2006 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2005 - September 30, 2006 2005 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2004 - September 30, 2005 2004 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2003 - September 30, 2004 2003 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2002 - September 30, 2003 2002 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2001 - September 30, 2002 2001 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2000 - September 30, 2001 2000 Activity Report Covering October 1, 1999 - September 30, 2000 1999 Activity Report Covering October 1, 1998 - September 30, 1999

185

Quantitative analysis of non-viral gene therapy in primary liver culture systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gene therapy has the potential to cure thousands of diseases caused by genetic abnormalities, provide novel combination therapies for cancers and viral infections, and offer a new and effective platform for next generation ...

Tedford, Nathan C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A survey of insulin-dependent diabetes-part I: therapies and devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper surveys diabetes therapies from telemedicine viewpoint. In type 1 diabetes therapies, the exogenous insulin replacement is generally considered as a primary treatment. However, the complete replacement of exogenous insulin is still a challenging ...

Daisuke Takahashi; Yang Xiao; Fei Hu; Michael Lewis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Lasers and photodynamic therapy in the treatment of onychomycosis: a review of the literature.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rothermel E, Apfelberg D. Carbon dioxide laser for certainLaser Therapy Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) lasers have been used

Becker, Caitlin; Bershow, Andrea

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

User_RunReports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Running Standard Reports Running Standard Reports © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Running Standard Reports Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of running standard reports in SuccessFactors Learning. Task A. Run Standard Report From the Home page, click the Reports easy link. In the Report Name table, locate the report you want to generate. Click the expand icon ( ) to expand the report group. Click the title link. For this example, select the User Curriculum Status Group by Item Details report. Note: Click Help ( ) for additional information on reports. 1 1 2 2 3 3 Run Standard Report 13 Steps Task A SuccessFactors Learning v 6.4 User Job Aid

189

NERSC Annual Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Reports NERSC Annual Reports Sort by: Default | Name annrep2011.png NERSC Annual Report 2011 Download Image: annrep2011.png | png | 2.7 MB Download File: annrep2011.pdf |...

190

Accuracy of Real-time Couch Tracking During 3-dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of real-time couch tracking for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional motion trajectories of 15 prostate cancer patients were the basis for this phantom study; prostate motion had been monitored with the Calypso System. An industrial robot moved a phantom along these trajectories, motion was detected via an infrared camera system, and the robotic HexaPOD couch was used for real-time counter-steering. Residual phantom motion during real-time tracking was measured with the infrared camera system. Film dosimetry was performed during delivery of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Results: Motion of the prostate was largest in the anterior-posterior direction, with systematic ( N-Ary-Summation ) and random ({sigma}) errors of 2.3 mm and 2.9 mm, respectively; the prostate was outside a threshold of 5 mm (3D vector) for 25.0%{+-}19.8% of treatment time. Real-time tracking reduced prostate motion to N-Ary-Summation =0.01 mm and {sigma} = 0.55 mm in the anterior-posterior direction; the prostate remained within a 1-mm and 5-mm threshold for 93.9%{+-}4.6% and 99.7%{+-}0.4% of the time, respectively. Without real-time tracking, pass rates based on a {gamma} index of 2%/2 mm in film dosimetry ranged between 66% and 72% for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT, on average. Real-time tracking increased pass rates to minimum 98% on average for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT. Conclusions: Real-time couch tracking resulted in submillimeter accuracy for prostate cancer, which transferred into high dosimetric accuracy independently of whether 3D-CRT, IMRT, or VMAT was used.

Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Hermann, Christian [Department of Computer Sciences VII, Robotics, and Telematics, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany)] [Department of Computer Sciences VII, Robotics, and Telematics, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Flentje, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Guckenberger, Matthias, E-mail: guckenberger_m@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Uranium Purchases Report  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue. This report details natural and enriched uranium purchases as reported by owners and operators of commercial nuclear power plants. 1996 represents the most recent publication year.

Douglas Bonnar

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Sandia National Laboratories - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Sandia National Laboratories Review Reports 2013 Review of the Sandia Site Office Quality Assurance Assessment of the Manzano Nuclear Operations, January 2013 Activity...

193

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(mi) 7.2 43.8 Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted) 76% 80% Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration Fleet Summary Report Reporting period: May 2011 through March...

194

NETL Report format template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

waste: scenario selection procedure; Report of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission NUREGCR-1667 (SAND80-1429); NRC: Washington, DC, 1982. CSLF. Phase I Final Report from CSLF...

195

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Nuclear > Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report Data for: 2005 Release Date: May 15, 2006 Next Release: May 15, 2007

196

FY 2008 Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 The Department of Energy Nevada Field Office Environmental Management Program creates monthly reports for the NSSAB. These reports cover the completed activities for the current...

197

FY 2009 Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 The Department of Energy Nevada Field Office Environmental Management Program creates monthly reports for the NSSAB. These reports cover the completed activities for the current...

198

FY 2010 Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Management Monthly Reports - FY 2010 The Department of Energy Nevada Field Office Environmental Management Program creates monthly reports for the NSSAB. These...

199

FY 2007 Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Management Monthly Reports - FY 2007 The Department of Energy Nevada Field Office Environmental Management Program creates monthly reports for the NSSAB. These...

200

FY 2011 Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Management Monthly Reports - FY 2011 The Department of Energy Nevada Field Office Environmental Management Program creates monthly reports for the NSSAB. These...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Elegant Parallelization Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Elegant Parallelization Progress Report 102407 Yusong Wang Michael Borland Hairong Shang Robert Soliday Elegant Parallelization Progress Report Y. Wang, 102407 Simulations with...

202

2009 ECR Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth Annual Report January 2010 U.S. Department of Energy ECR 2009 Final Report 2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) defines environmental...

203

Propane Market Status Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Propane Market Status Report 07272000 Click here to start Table of Contents Propane Market Status Report Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil Propane Demand by Sector Demand Impacted...

204

Annual Coal Distribution Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: December 19, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 2014 | full report | RevisionCorrection Revision to the Annual Coal Distribution...

205

Berkeley Lab - ARRA - Reporting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REPORTING To learn what the Department of Energy's Office of Inspector General is doing regarding the Recovery Act, or to report fraud, waste, abuse or mismanagement in DOE...

206

2007 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Report United States Department of Energy Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 1 Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2007 Annual Report US Department of...

207

Five-year Results of Whole Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Early Stage Breast Cancer: The Fox Chase Cancer Center Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the 5-year outcomes using whole-breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of early-stage-breast cancer at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Methods and Materials: A total of 946 women with early-stage breast cancer (stage 0, I, or II) were treated with IMRT after surgery with or without systemic therapy from 2003-2010. Whole-breast radiation was delivered via an IMRT technique with a median whole-breast radiation dose of 46 Gy and median tumor bed boost of 14 Gy. Endpoints included local-regional recurrence, cosmesis, and late complications. Results: With a median follow-up of 31 months (range, 1-97 months), there were 12 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTR) and one locoregional recurrence. The 5-year actuarial IBTR and locoregional recurrence rates were 2.0% and 2.4%. Physician-reported cosmestic outcomes were available for 645 patients: 63% were considered 'excellent', 33% 'good', and =}16 Gy, breast size >900 cc, or boost volumes >34 cc were significantly associated with a 'fair/poor' cosmetic outcome. Fibrosis, edema, erythema, and telangectasia were also associated with 'fair/poor' physician-reported cosmesis; erythema and telangectasia remained significant on multivariate analysis. Patient-reported cosmesis was available for 548 patients, and 33%, 50%, and 17% of patients reported 'excellent', 'good', and 'fair/poor' cosmesis, respectively. The use of a boost and increased boost volume: breast volume ratio were significantly associated with 'fair/poor' outcomes. No parameter for patient-reported cosmesis was significant on multivariate analysis. The chances of experiencing a treatment related effect was significantly associated with a boost dose {>=}16 Gy, receipt of chemotherapy and endocrine therapy, large breast size, and electron boost energy. Conclusions: Whole-breast IMRT is associated with very low rates of local recurrence at 5 years, 83%-98% 'good/excellent' cosmetic outcomes, and minimal chronic toxicity, including late fibrosis.

Keller, Lanea M.M., E-mail: Lanea.Keller@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sopka, Dennis M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Klayton, Tracy; Li Jinsheng; Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bleicher, Richard J.; Sigurdson, Elin R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Freedman, Gary M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Study of the secondary neutral radiation in proton therapy: Toward an indirect in vivo dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Secondary particles produced in the collision of protons with beam modifiers are of concern in proton therapy. Nevertheless, secondary radiation can provide information on the dosimetric parameters through its dependency on the modulating accessories (range shifter and range modulating wheel). Relatively little data have been reported in the literature for low-energy proton beams. The present study aims at characterizing the neutron and photon secondary radiation at the low-energy proton therapy facility of the Centre Antoine Lacassagne (CAL), and studying their correlation to the dosimetric parameters to explore possible practical uses of secondary radiation in the treatment quality for proton therapy. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to simulate the proton therapy facility at CAL. Neutron and photon fluence, {Phi}, and ambient dose equivalent per proton dose, H*(10)/D, were determined across the horizontal main plane spanning the whole treatment room. H*(10)/D was also calculated at two positions of the treatment room where dosimetric measurements were performed for validation of the Monte Carlo calculations. Calculations and measurements were extended to 100 clinical spread-out Bragg Peaks (SOBPs) covering the whole range of therapeutic dose rates (D/MU) employed at CAL. In addition, the values of D and MU were also calculated for each SOBP and the results analyzed to study the relationship between secondary radiation and dosimetric parameters. Results: The largest production of the secondary particles takes place at the modulating devices and the brass collimators located along the optical bench. Along the beam line and off the beam axis to 2.5 m away, H*(10)/D values ranged from 5.4 {mu}Sv/Gy to 5.3 mSv/Gy for neutrons, and were 1 order of magnitude lower for photons. H*(10)/D varied greatly with the distance and angle to the beam axis. A variation of a factor of 5 was found for the different range of modulations (SOBPs). The ratios between calculations and measurements were 2.3 and 0.5 for neutrons and photons, respectively, and remained constant for all the range of SOBPs studied, which provided validation for the Monte Carlo calculations. H*(10)/D values were found to correlate to the proton dose rate D/MU with a power fit, both for neutrons and photons. This result was exploited to implement a system to obtain D/MU values from the measurement of the integrated photon ambient dose equivalent H*(10) during treatment, which provides a method to control the dosimetric parameters D/MU and D. Conclusions: The treatment room at CAL is moderately polluted by secondary particles. The constant ratio between measurements and calculations for all SOBPs showed that simulations correctly predict the dosimetric parameters and the dependence of the production of secondary particles on the modulation. The correlation between H*(10)/D and D/MU is a useful tool for quality control and is currently used at CAL. This system works as an indirect in vivo dosimetry method, which is so far not feasible in proton therapy. This tool requires very simple instrumentation and can be implemented from the measurement of either photons or neutrons.

Carnicer, A.; Letellier, V.; Rucka, G.; Angellier, G.; Sauerwein, W.; Herault, J. [Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Cyclotron Biomedical, 227 Avenue de la Lanterne, 06200 Nice (France); Institut Curie, Centre de Protontherapie, Campus Universitaire d'Orsay, Batiment 101, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Hopital de la Croix Rouge, Centre de radiotherapie St Louis, Rue Andre Blondel, 83100 Toulon (France); Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Cyclotron Biomedical, 227 Avenue de la Lanterne, 06200 Nice (France); Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Strahlenklinik, 45122 Essen (Germany); Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Cyclotron Biomedical, 227 Avenue de la Lanterne, 06200 Nice (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Accelerator Developments and their Application to Cancer Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Basic phenomena in irradiations of X-ray and particle beams and comparison among various radiations are described. Total doses and fractionations for several sites in case of carbon beam are shown in comparison with X-ray and proton beam. Typical results of carbon beam treatments are shown. Original facility was too large. Then, smaller design of 2{sup nd} stage facility of carbon therapy was carried out as well as the further technical developments.

Hirao, Yasuo [Association for Nuclear Technology in Medicine, Toranomon 1-8-16, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

210

TESLA Report 1997-22 TESLA Report 1997-22  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12

211

TESLA Report 1998-28 TESLA Report 1998-28  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TESLA Report 1998-28 #12;TESLA Report 1998-28 #12;TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA Report 1998-28 Page 3 TESLA Report 1998-28 Page 1 #12;TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA Report 1998-28 Page 4 TESLA Report 1998-28 Page 2 #12;TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA

212

Recovery Act Recipient Reporting on FederalReporting.gov | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Recovery Act recipient reporting on FederalReporting.gov for Smart Grid Investment Grant recipients Recovery Act Recipient Reporting on FederalReporting.gov More...

213

Urethral Pain Among Prostate Cancer Survivors 1 to 14 Years After Radiation Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate how treatment-related and non-treatment-related factors impact urethral pain among long-term prostate cancer survivors. Methods and Materials: Men treated for prostate cancer with radiation therapy at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Goeteborg, Sweden from 1993 to 2006 were approached with a study-specific postal questionnaire addressing symptoms after treatment, including urethral burning pain during urination (n=985). The men had received primary or salvage external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or EBRT in combination with brachytherapy (BT). Prescribed doses were commonly 70 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions for primary and salvage EBRT and 50 Gy plus 2 Multiplication-Sign 10.0 Gy for EBRT + BT. Prostatic urethral doses were assessed from treatment records. We also recruited 350 non-pelvic-irradiated, population-based controls matched for age and residency to provide symptom background rates. Results: Of the treated men, 16% (137 of 863) reported urethral pain, compared with 11% (27 of 242) of the controls. The median time to follow-up was 5.2 years (range, 1.1-14.3 years). Prostatic urethral doses were similar to prescription doses for EBRT and 100% to 115% for BT. Fractionation-corrected dose and time to follow-up affected the occurrence of the symptom. For a follow-up {>=}3 years, 19% of men (52 of 268) within the 70-Gy EBRT + BT group reported pain, compared with 10% of men (23 of 222) treated with 70 Gy primary EBRT (prevalence ratio 1.9; 95% confidence interval 1.2-3.0). Of the men treated with salvage EBRT, 10% (20 of 197) reported urethral pain. Conclusions: Survivors treated with EBRT + BT had a higher risk for urethral pain compared with those treated with EBRT. The symptom prevalence decreased with longer time to follow-up. We found a relationship between fractionation-corrected urethral dose and pain. Among long-term prostate cancer survivors, the occurrence of pain was not increased above the background rate for prostatic urethral doses up to 70 Gy{sub 3}.

Pettersson, Niclas, E-mail: niclas.pettersson@vgregion.se [Department of Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)] [Department of Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden); Olsson, Caroline [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Goeteborg (Sweden)] [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Goeteborg (Sweden); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Alsadius, David; Wilderaeng, Ulrica [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Goeteborg (Sweden)] [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Goeteborg (Sweden); Johansson, Karl-Axel [Department of Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)] [Department of Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden); Steineck, Gunnar [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Goeteborg (Sweden)] [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Goeteborg (Sweden)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Technical Review Panel Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRP Report v7, 12 Aug 2012 TRP Report Final December 2012 TRP Report v7, 12 Aug 2012 TRP Report Final December 2012 Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report Evaluation and Identification of future R&D on eight Advanced Reactor Concepts, conducted April - September 2012 December 2012 Public release version 2 Public release version 3 Table of Contents Summary ................................................................................................................................... 4 1. Overview of the Technical Review Panel Process ............................................................... 5 2. Technical Review Panel Criteria ......................................................................................... 6 3. Concept Summaries ........................................................................................................... 8

215

Federal Financial Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

FEDERAL FINANCIAL REPORT FEDERAL FINANCIAL REPORT (Follow form instructions) 1. Federal Agency and Organizational Element 2. Federal Grant or Other Identifying Number Assigned by Federal Agency Page of to Which Report is Submitted (To report multiple grants, use FFR Attachment) 1 pages 3. Recipient Organization (Name and complete address including Zip code) 4a. DUNS Number 4b. EIN 5. Recipient Account Number or Identifying Number 6. Report Type 7. Basis of Accounting

216

Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring for Prostate Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy: First Clinical Results  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Most linear accelerators purchased today are equipped with a gantry-mounted kilovoltage X-ray imager which is typically used for patient imaging prior to therapy. A novel application of the X-ray system is kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM), in which the 3-dimensional (3D) tumor position is determined during treatment. In this paper, we report on the first use of KIM in a prospective clinical study of prostate cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with implanted fiducial markers undergoing conventionally fractionated IMAT (RapidArc) were enrolled in an ethics-approved study of KIM. KIM involves acquiring kV images as the gantry rotates around the patient during treatment. Post-treatment, markers in these images were segmented to obtain 2D positions. From the 2D positions, a maximum likelihood estimation of a probability density function was used to obtain 3D prostate trajectories. The trajectories were analyzed to determine the motion type and the percentage of time the prostate was displaced {>=}3, 5, 7, and 10 mm. Independent verification of KIM positional accuracy was performed using kV/MV triangulation. Results: KIM was performed for 268 fractions. Various prostate trajectories were observed (ie, continuous target drift, transient excursion, stable target position, persistent excursion, high-frequency excursions, and erratic behavior). For all patients, 3D displacements of {>=}3, 5, 7, and 10 mm were observed 5.6%, 2.2%, 0.7% and 0.4% of the time, respectively. The average systematic accuracy of KIM was measured at 0.46 mm. Conclusions: KIM for prostate IMAT was successfully implemented clinically for the first time. Key advantages of this method are (1) submillimeter accuracy, (2) widespread applicability, and (3) a low barrier to clinical implementation. A disadvantage is that KIM delivers additional imaging dose to the patient.

Ng, Jin Aun [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School and Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia) [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School and Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Booth, Jeremy T. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia) [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Poulsen, Per R.; Fledelius, Walther; Worm, Esben Schjodt [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University (Denmark)] [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University (Denmark); Eade, Thomas; Hegi, Fiona; Kneebone, Andrew [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)] [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Kuncic, Zdenka [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)] [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Keall, Paul J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School and Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Replanning During Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Improved Quality of Life in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Anatomic and dosimetric changes have been reported during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of replanning on quality of life (QoL) and clinical outcomes during the course of IMRT for NPC patients. Methods and Materials: Between June 2007 and August 2011, 129 patients with NPC were enrolled. Forty-three patients received IMRT without replanning, while 86 patients received IMRT replanning after computed tomography (CT) images were retaken part way through therapy. Chinese versions of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and Head and Neck Quality of Life Questionnaire 35 were completed before treatment began and at the end of treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the completion of treatment. Overall survival (OS) data were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: IMRT replanning had a profound impact on the QoL of NPC patients, as determined by statistically significant changes in global QoL and other QoL scales. Additionally, the clinical outcome comparison indicates that replanning during IMRT for NPC significantly improved 2-year local regional control (97.2% vs 92.4%, respectively, P=.040) but did not improve 2-year OS (89.8% vs 82.2%, respectively, P=.475). Conclusions: IMRT replanning improves QoL as well as local regional control in patients with NPC. Future research is needed to determine the criteria for replanning for NPC patients undergoing IMRT.

Yang Haihua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang Province (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Hu Wei, E-mail: huw@enzemed.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Wang Wei; Chen Peifang; Ding Weijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang Province (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Taizhou Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Taizhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Luo Wei [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Pitfalls of tungsten multileaf collimator in proton beam therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Particle beam therapy is associated with significant startup and operational cost. Multileaf collimator (MLC) provides an attractive option to improve the efficiency and reduce the treatment cost. A direct transfer of the MLC technology from external beam radiation therapy is intuitively straightforward to proton therapy. However, activation, neutron production, and the associated secondary cancer risk in proton beam should be an important consideration which is evaluated. Methods: Monte Carlo simulation with FLUKA particle transport code was applied in this study for a number of treatment models. The authors have performed a detailed study of the neutron generation, ambient dose equivalent [H*(10)], and activation of a typical tungsten MLC and compared with those obtained from a brass aperture used in a typical proton therapy system. Brass aperture and tungsten MLC were modeled by absorber blocks in this study, representing worst-case scenario of a fully closed collimator. Results: With a tungsten MLC, the secondary neutron dose to the patient is at least 1.5 times higher than that from a brass aperture. The H*(10) from a tungsten MLC at 10 cm downstream is about 22.3 mSv/Gy delivered to water phantom by noncollimated 200 MeV beam of 20 cm diameter compared to 14 mSv/Gy for the brass aperture. For a 30-fraction treatment course, the activity per unit volume in brass aperture reaches 5.3 x 10{sup 4} Bq cm{sup -3} at the end of the last treatment. The activity in brass decreases by a factor of 380 after 24 h, additional 6.2 times after 40 days of cooling, and is reduced to background level after 1 yr. Initial activity in tungsten after 30 days of treating 30 patients per day is about 3.4 times higher than in brass that decreases only by a factor of 2 after 40 days and accumulates to 1.2 x 10{sup 6} Bq cm{sup -3} after a full year of operation. The daily utilization of the MLC leads to buildup of activity with time. The overall activity continues to increase due to {sup 179}Ta with a half-life of 1.82 yr and thus require prolonged storage for activity cooling. The H*(10) near the patient side of the tungsten block is about 100 {mu}Sv/h and is 27 times higher at the upstream side of the block. This would lead to an accumulated dose for therapists in a year that may exceed occupational maximum permissible dose (50 mSv/yr). The value of H*(10) at the upstream surface of the tungsten block is about 220 times higher than that of the brass. Conclusions: MLC is an efficient way for beam shaping and overall cost reduction device in proton therapy. However, based on this study, tungsten seems to be not an optimal material for MLC in proton beam therapy. Usage of tungsten MLC in clinic may create unnecessary risks associated with the secondary neutrons and induced radioactivity for patients and staff depending on the patient load. A careful selection of material for manufacturing of an optimal MLC for proton therapy is thus desired.

Moskvin, Vadim; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States) and Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center (Formerly Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute), Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

2012 Wind Technologies Market Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Wind Technologies Market Report Title 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6356E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Wiser, Ryan...

220

Annual Reports | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documents Documents » Annual Reports Annual Reports Note: Some of the following documents are in PDF and will require Adobe Reader for viewing. Freedom of Information Act Annual Reports Annual Report for 2012 Annual Report for 2011 Annual Report for 2010 Annual Report for 2009 Annual Report for 2008 (pdf) Annual Report for 2007 (pdf) Annual Report for 2006 (pdf) Annual Report for 2005 (pdf) Annual Report for 2004 (pdf) Annual Report for 2003 (pdf) Annual Report for 2002 (pdf) (Revised 11/03/03) Annual Report for 2001 (pdf) Annual Report for 2000 (pdf) Annual Report for 1999 (pdf) Annual Report for 1998 (pdf) Annual Report for 1997 (pdf) Annual Report for 1996 (pdf) Annual Report for 1995 (pdf) Annual Report for 1994 (pdf) Chief FOIA Officers Reports Aviation Management Green Leases

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

CID Standard Reports  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

CID Reports > Standard CID Reports > Standard Reports Central Internet Database CID Photo Banner Standard Reports Radioactive Waste WIMS-1: WASTE STREAM DISPOSITION FORECAST REPORT Adobe PDF Document Detailed waste stream disposition report by reporting site and disposition site that provides forecasted waste disposition volumes. Go directly to WIMS Exit CID Website to generate custom reports. Although WIMS Exit CID Website is a public site you will need to register and provide contact information the first time you enter WIMS Exit CID Website . Contaminated Groundwater GW-1: CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER REPORTS A link to the DOE Groundwater Database web site. This site provides detailed information about groundwater plumes at DOE sites. Information includes contaminants, hydrogeology, and cleanup technologies.

222

Calendar Year Reports Archive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

reports-archive Office of Inspector reports-archive Office of Inspector General 
1000 Independence Avenue, SW 
 Washington, DC 20585 202-586-4128 en Special Report: DOE/IG-0901 http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/special-report-doeig-0901 report-doeig-0901" class="title-link">Special Report: DOE/IG-0901

223

FY 2009 Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Performance and financial information FY 2009 DOE/CF-0045 The Reports Consolidation Act of 2000 authorizes Federal agencies, with the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) concurrence, to consolidate various reports in order to provide performance, financial and related information in a more meaningful and useful format. In accordance with the Act, the Department of Energy (Department or DOE), has produced a consolidated Performance and Accountability Report (PAR) in previous years. For fiscal year (FY) 2009, the Department has chosen to produce an alternative report to the consolidated PAR and will produce an Agency Financial Report, an Annual Performance Report and a Summary of Performance and Financial

224

LNG Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LNG Reports LNG Reports LNG Reports December 9, 2013 LNG Monthly Report - November 2013 LNG Monthly Report - November 2013 March 21, 2013 LNG Annual Report - 2012 LNG Annual Report - 2012 January 28, 2013 LNG Export Study - Related Documents EIA and NERA analysis of LNG exports, and associated documents March 15, 2012 LNG Annual Report - 2011 LNG Annual Report - 2011 March 1, 2011 LNG Annual Report - 2010 LNG Annual Report - 2010 March 1, 2010 LNG Annual Report - 2009 LNG Annual Report - 2009 October 14, 2009 LNG Annual Report - 2008 LNG Annual Report - 2008 October 10, 2008 LNG Annual Report - 2007 LNG Annual Report - 2007 March 1, 2007 LNG Annual Report - 2006 LNG Annual Report - 2006 March 1, 2006 LNG Annual Report - 2005 LNG Annual Report - 2005 March 1, 2005 LNG Annual Report - 2004

225

Microsoft Word - Blue Report Cover Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on Critical Asset Vulnerability Report on Critical Asset Vulnerability and Risk Assessments at the Power Marketing Administrations--Follow- up Audit DOE/IG-0842 October 2010 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 7, 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ADMINISTRATORS, BONNEVILLE POWER, WESTERN AREA POWER, AND SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATIONS FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Critical Asset Vulnerability and Risk Assessment at the Power Marketing Administrations--Follow-up Audit" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's largest Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs), Bonneville, Western Area, and Southwestern, provide wholesale electric power to utilities for use in homes,

226

House Report 109-272 FY 2006 Conference Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Taken from House Report 109-272 FY 2006 Conference Report SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

227

House Conference Report 106-1005, NIST Report Language  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Taken from House Conference Report 106-1005 FY 2001 Appropriations bill Conference Report". NATIONAL INSTITUTE ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hypofractionated High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Multi-Institutional Phase II Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity, biochemical and clinical outcomes, and overall survival after hypofractionated radiation therapy for prostate cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Three institutions included 113 patients with T1 to T3N0M0 PC in a phase II study. Patients were treated with 56 Gy in 16 fractions over 4 weeks. Late toxicity was scored using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria extended with additional symptoms. Biochemical outcome was reported according to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure. Results: The incidence of late GI and GU toxicity was low. The 3-year actuarial risk of developing late GU and GI toxicity of grade {>=}2 was 13% and 8% respectively. Five-year biochemical non-evidence of disease (bNED) was 94%. Risk group, T stage, and deviation from planned hormone treatment were significant predictive factors for bNED. Deviation from hormone treatment remained significant in multivariate analysis. Five-year clinical non evidence of disease and overall survival was 95% and 91% respectively. No patient died from PC. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose radiation therapy is a valuable treatment option for patients with PC, with excellent biochemical and clinical outcome and low toxicity.

Fonteyne, Valerie, E-mail: valerie.fonteyne@uzgent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Soete, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium); Arcangeli, Stefano [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Rappe, Bernard [Department of Urology, Algemeen Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium)] [Department of Urology, Algemeen Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium); Storme, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)] [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Arcangeli, Giorgio [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); De Meerleer, Gert [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clearance, Legal Issues, ITS, Partnerships, Public-Private 18. Distribution Statement No Restrictions report for the following two SWUTC projects: Trends and Issues in Public Private Partnerships ­ 472840

230

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Sequestration, Environmental Chamber, Right-of-Way, Roadside Vegetation 18. Distribution Statement for Carbon Sequestration Using a Controlled Environment 5. Report Date May 2012 6. Performing Organization University Transportation Centers Program. 16. Abstract Carbon footprints, carbon credits and associated

231

Data Network Weather Service Reporting - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A final report is made of a three-year effort to develop a new forecasting paradigm for computer network performance. This effort was made in co-ordination with Fermi Lab's construction of e-Weather Center.

Michael Frey

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Jolly Tiger data report. Monthly report  

SciTech Connect

This is the 17th monthly report on the Jolly Tiger (Albany, NY) Restaurant Project and presents tabulated data on: sales, energy consumption, water usage, heating and cooling requirements, and weather conditions. The data were acquired throughout April 1978. (LCL)

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Jolly Tiger data report. Monthly report  

SciTech Connect

This is the 19th monthly report on the Jolly Tiger (Albany, NY) Restaurant Project and presents tabulated data on: sales, energy consumption, water usage, heating and cooling requirements, and weather conditions. The data were acquired throughout June 1978. (LCL)

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Jolly Tiger data report. Monthly report  

SciTech Connect

This is the 18th monthly report on the Jolly Tiger (Albany, NY) Restaurant Project and presents tabulated data on: sales, energy consumption water usage, heating and cooling requirements, and weather conditions. The data were acquired throughout May 1978. (LCL)

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

1995 PVUSA progress report. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale (US) photovoltaic (PV) electric generation systems and recent developments in PV module technology. This report updates the project`s progress, reviews the status and performance of the various PV installations during 1995, summarizes key accomplishments and conclusions, and serves as the final report under Pacific Gas and Electric Company`s project management.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

RLE progress report number 117. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

This report, No. 117 in a series of progress reports issued by the M.I.T. Research Laboratory of Electronics, reviews the research activities of the entire laboratory for the half-year period ending December 31, 1975. Progress for each research unit support by the Joint Services Electronics Program (Contract DAAB07-75-C-1346) is summarized and is designated by the letters JSEP in the outside margin. (Author) (GRA)

Zimmermann, H.J.; King, J.G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Wellness Planning Session Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wellness Planning Session Report September 12, 2008 #12;Wellness Planning Session Report Printed.............................................................................1 Explored what wellness program should look like at NMSU .......................2 Considered for the Wellness committee..................................2 Identified the next meeting date and meeting agenda

Castillo, Steven P.

238

2006 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Emergency Preparedness Program 2006 Annual Report US Department of Energy - Offi ce of Environmental Management Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2006 Annual Report 2 2 Table of Contents Executive Summary.......................................................................................................................4 I. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Purpose.......................................6

239

Nordic Market Report 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

....................................................................17 5 ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION..................................................19 5.1 TRANSMISSION..............................................................................................20 5.3 ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION: CONCLUSIONSNordic Market Report 2009 Development in the Nordic Electricity Market Report 4/2009 #12;Nordic

240

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

number of charging events per day when the vehicle was driven 1.4 EV Project Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Summary Report Region: ALL Number of vehicles: 45 Reporting period: October...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

number of charging events per day when the vehicle was driven 1.4 EV Project Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Summary Report Region: ALL Number of vehicles: 809 Reporting period: July 2012...

242

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(mi) 6.6 44.1 Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted) 84% 85% Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration Fleet Summary Report Reporting period: May 2011 through June 2011...

243

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

number of charging events per day when the vehicle was driven 1.5 EV Project Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Summary Report Region: ALL Number of vehicles: 1895 Reporting period: April...

244

Background - State Data Reporting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State Data Reporting State-reported motor fuel data is a critical component of the process that distributes HTF monies to the States. Currently, motor-fuel-based apportionment...

245

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MonthlyReportAllFleet Summary Report - Hymotion Prius (Kvaser 1 2102010 4:19:25 PM Vehicle Technologies Program 30 Notes: 1 - 9. Please see http:avt.inel.govphevreportnotes...

246

Dietary guidelines report released  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Report of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 was released in June by the US Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services. Dietary guidelines report released Health Nutrition Tran

247

Methane Hydrate Annual Reports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Section 968 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the Department of Energy to submit to Congress an annual report on the results of Methane Hydrate research. Listed are the Annual Reports per...

248

Radiation therapy of the nasopharynx: a 30 year view  

SciTech Connect

A 15 to 30 year follow-up study has been made of radium therapy to the nasopharynx for Eustachian tube obstruction and serous otitis, with a review of the relevant literature. No malignancies or other complications have been seen or recorded. Objective evaluation leads to the conclusion that this is a safe, effective treatment modality. In spite of this it has been discontinued because of public fear and pressure. A judgement reached for this reason, ignoring scientific medical facts, contains the seeds of decline of quality and effectiveness of medical care.

Loeb, W.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Annual Report 2008.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cold War FY08 Annual Summary Report Cold War FY08 Annual Summary Report Page 1 of 14 Savannah River Site (SRS) Cold War Built Environment Historic Preservation Annual Summary Report Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 October 2008 Prepared by: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Operations Office (SR) SRS Cold War FY08 Annual Summary Report Page 2 of 14 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page BASIS.............................................................................................3

250

ARRA RECIPIENT REPORTING WEBINARS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARRA RECIPIENT REPORTING WEBINARS ARRA RECIPIENT REPORTING WEBINARS Section 1512 of the Recovery Act requires organizations to report on the use of Recovery Act funding. The Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board ("Recovery Board") has identified and deployed a nationwide data collection system at the website FederalReporting.gov that serves to collect data required by Section 1512. DOE IS PLEASED TO INFORM YOU THAT WE WILL BE HOSTING WEBINARS TO HELP

251

Assorted Situation Reports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability issues public Situation Reports during large scale energy emergencies.

252

Hazard Analysis Database report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Database for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

Niemi, B.J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

253

NGP Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... suppression in aircraft. The enclosed CD compiles the collected publications from the program. Final Report (NIST SP 1069). ...

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

254

NCWM Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Page 2. Report of the 93rd National Conference on Weights and Measures Burlington, Vermont July 13 through ...

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

255

2005 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Emergency Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2005 Annual Report Special thanks to participants in the Haralson County, Georgia and Leigh Valley International Airport, Pennsylvania exercises who are featured on the front cover of this report. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2005 Annual Report Table of Contents Executive Summary ..................................................................................................1 I. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Purpose ......................3 II. Training ............................................................................................................3 III. TEPP Central Operations .................................................................................5

256

Organic solvent topical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

Cowley, W.L.

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hydropower Technology Roundup Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's 2002 report, Maintaining and Monitoring Dissolved Oxygen at Hydroelectric Projects: Status Report (1005194) provided a comprehensive review of a wide range of techniques and technologies for improving the dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in releases from hydroelectric projects. This report supplements EPRI 1005194, focusing primarily on aerating turbine technologies for new turbine installations and for turbine upgrades.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

258

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS SRNS Partners with Georgialina Physical Therapy Associates to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partners with Georgialina Physical Therapy Associates to Partners with Georgialina Physical Therapy Associates to Bring Services to SRS Employees AIKEN, S.C. - April 25, 2013 - The days of long drives, even longer wait times, and work challenges associated with ongoing physical therapy appointments are drawing to an end for Savannah River Site (SRS) employees thanks to a partnership between Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (SRNS) and Georgialina Physical Therapy (GPT) Associates. Together, the companies have launched a new program to provide a range of physical therapy services to all SRS employees. "Any SRS employee can schedule an appointment with us at our on-site location," said Brett Brannon, co-owner, Georgialina Physical Therapy Associates. "We provide the same services at our SRS clinic that we do in any of our

259

System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention.

Nigg, David W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wemple, Charles A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy is disclosed. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention. 5 figs.

Nigg, D.W.; Wemple, C.A.

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Neutron capture therapy beams at the MIT Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Several neutron beams that could be used for neutron capture therapy at MITR-II are dosimetrically characterized and their suitability for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and other types of tumors are described. The types of neutron beams studied are: (1) those filtered by various thicknesses of cadmium, D2O, 6Li, and bismuth; and (2) epithermal beams achieved by filtration with aluminum, sulfur, cadmium, 6Li, and bismuth. Measured dose vs. depth data are presented in polyethylene phantom with references to what can be expected in brain. The results indicate that both types of neutron beams are useful for neutron capture therapy. The first type of neutron beams have good therapeutic advantage depths (approximately 5 cm) and excellent in-phantom ratios of therapeutic dose to background dose. Such beams would be useful for treating tumors located at relatively shallow depths in the brain. On the other hand, the second type of neutron beams have superior therapeutic advantage depths (greater than 6 cm) and good in-phantom therapeutic advantage ratios. Such beams, when used along with bilateral irradiation schemes, would be able to treat tumors at any depth in the brain. Numerical examples of what could be achieved with these beams, using RBEs, fractionated-dose delivery, unilateral, and bilateral irradiation are presented in the paper. Finally, additional plans for further neutron beam development at MITR-II are discussed.

Choi, J.R.; Clement, S.D.; Harling, O.K.; Zamenhof, R.G. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Report number codes  

SciTech Connect

This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

Nelson, R.N. (ed.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Argonne National Laboratory - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Argonne National Laboratory Activity Reports 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility, July 2012 Review Reports 2011 Review of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility Readiness Assessment (Implementation Verification Review Sections), November 2011 Nuclear Safety Enforcement Regulatory Assistance Review of UChicago Argonne, LLC at the Argonne National Laboratory, October 3, 2011 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the Argonne National Laboratory, August 2011 Review Reports 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety and Health Programs at Argonne National Laboratory, Summary Report, Vol. 1, May, 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Argonne National Laboratory, Technical Appendices, Volume II, May 2005

264

EIR Report Template  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Template Report Template An EIR typically results in both a Draft and Final EIR Report. Where follow-up actions are required, a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) Review Report and Addendum to the Final EIR Report is also generated. The EIR Report shall be organized into the following sections:. Acronyms Key Definitions Executive Summary 1.0 Cost 2.0 Schedule 3.0 Scope 4.0 Risk 5.0 Management (Contract and Project) 6.0 ES&H, QA, Safety Report Appendices: A. EIR Team Members, Assignments, and Biographical Sketches B. Detailed Comments on Project Execution Plan (if applicable) C. Detailed Comments on Other Documents (if applicable) D. Corrective Action Plan (CAP) Recommendations OECM and the EIR Contractor may mutually agree to add or delete particular sections, based

265

Internet-based Family Therapy from the Perspective of the Therapist: A Qualitative Inquiry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological study was to learn more about the process of Internet-based Family Therapy and to discover the advantages and disadvantages (more)

Hall, Tracy D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Evaluation of a Thermoplastic Immobilization System for Breast and Chest Wall Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

We report on the impact of a thermoplastic immobilization system on intra- and interfraction motion for patients undergoing breast or chest wall radiation therapy. Patients for this study were treated using helical tomotherapy. All patients were immobilized using a thermoplastic shell extending from the shoulders to the ribcage. Intrafraction motion was assessed by measuring maximum displacement of the skin, heart, and chest wall on a pretreatment 4D computed tomography, while inter-fraction motion was inferred from patient shift data arising from daily image guidance procedures on tomotherapy. Using thermoplastic immobilization, the average maximum motion of the external contour was 1.3 {+-} 1.6 mm, whereas the chest wall was found to be 1.6 {+-} 1.9 mm. The day-to-day setup variation was found to be large, with random errors of 4.0, 12.0, and 4.5 mm in the left-right, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively, and the standard deviations of the systematic errors were found to be 2.7, 9.8, and 4.1 mm. These errors would be expected to dominate any respiratory motion but can be mitigated by daily online image guidance. Using thermoplastic immobilization can effectively reduce respiratory motion of the chest wall and external contour, but these gains can only be realized if daily image guidance is used.

Strydhorst, Jared H. [Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa (Canada); Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa (Canada); Caudrelier, Jean-Michel [Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada); Clark, Brenda G. [Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa (Canada); Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada); Montgomery, Lynn A.; Fox, Greg [Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa (Canada); MacPherson, Miller S., E-mail: mmacpherson@cvh.on.c [Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 5. Report Date March 2003 A Case Study of an Off-System Historic Metal Truss Bridge in Shackelford bridge is located in Shackelford County, Texas on County Road 188 near Fort Griffin, crosses the North Fork of the Brazos Rive and was originally constructed in 1885. The study of the Shackelford County

Texas at Austin, University of

268

Standard Report Templates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü Metrics Included in Every Report "How To" Series Standard Report Templates EPA's Portfolio Manager offers you eight standard reports with key metrics and information you can use to easily assess your portfolio's performance and progress, and thereby make informed business decisions. This document lists the metrics included in each of the eight reports so you can see what each report offers. Standard Reports Performance Highlights Energy Performance Emissions Performance Water Performance Fuel Performance ENERGY STAR Certification Status

269

Report Title: Mapping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Title: Title: Mapping of Reservoir Properties and Facies Through Integration of Static and Dynamic Data Report Type: Final Technical Report Reporting Period Start Date: October 1, 2000 Reporting Period End Date: September 30, 2004 Principal Authors: Albert C. Reynolds, Dean S. Oliver, Yannong Dong, Ning Liu, Guohua Gao, Fengjun Zhang & Ruijian Li Date Report Issued: December 2004 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-00BC15309 Petroleum Engineering Department The University of Tulsa 600 South College Avenue Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product,

270

Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Coal Report 2012 Annual Coal Report 2012 December 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. iii U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Contacts This publication was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). General information about the data in this report can be obtained from:

271

report | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

report report Dataset Summary Description The Weekly Financial and Activity report section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major Activities" tab lists of the major actions taken to date and major planned actions of likely interest to senior government officials, Congress, and the public. File is in .xls format. Source DOE Date Released November 19th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords activity DOE financial Recovery Act report Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon DOE_Weekly_Financial_and_Activity_Report_20101119.xls (xls, 1.8 MiB)

272

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Uranium Marketing Uranium Marketing Annual Report May 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2010 Uranium Marketing Annual Report ii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium Statistics. Questions about the preparation and content of this report may be directed to Michele Simmons, Team Leader,

273

2012 Microgrid Workshop Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Energy Reliability Smart Grid R&D Program Summary Report: 2012 DOE Microgrid Workshop July 30-31, 2012 Chicago, Illinois 2012 DOE Microgrid Workshop Report Page i Acknowledgment The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) would like to acknowledge the support provided by the organizations represented on the workshop planning committee in developing the workshop process and sessions. The preparation of this workshop report was coordinated by Energy & Environmental Resources Group, LLC (E2RG). The report content is based on the workshop session discussions, with session summary descriptions taken from the report-out presentations by individual teams during the closing plenary. Contributions to this report by all workshop participants, via expressed viewpoints during the

274

LANSCE Activity Report  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Activity Report describes scientific and technological progress and achievements in LANSCE Division during the period of 1995 to 1998. This report includes a message from the Division Director, an overview of LANSCE, sponsor overviews, research highlights, advanced projects and facility upgrades achievements, experimental and user program accomplishments, news and events, and a list of publications. The research highlights cover the areas of condensed-matter science and engineering, accelerator science, nuclear science, and radiography. This report also contains a compact disk that includes an overview, the Activity Report itself, LANSCE operations progress reports for 1996 and 1997, experiment reports from LANSCE users, as well as a search capability.

Amy Robinson; Audrey Archuleta; Barbara Maes; Dan Strottman; Earl Hoffman; Garth Tietjen; Gene Farnum; Geoff Greene; Joyce Roberts; Ken Johnson; Paul Lewis; Roger Pynn; Stan Schriber; Steve Sterbenz; Steve Wender; Sue Harper

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

2009 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

Ratel, K.M.; Brookhaven National Laboratory

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

276

2005 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

277

2006 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; RATEL,K.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Prime Supplier Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Report September 2013 Prime Supplier Report Released: November 26, 2013 Next Update: December 23, 2013 Legend: Petroleum Data Tables Petroleum Data Tables HTML File HTML File PDF File PDF File The Prime Supplier Report presents data collected on Form EIA-782C, "Monthly Report of Prime Supplier Sales of Petroleum Products Sold for Local Consumption." These data measure primary petroleum product deliveries into the States where they are locally marketed and consumed. Petroleum Data Tables HTML File PDF File --- Prime Supplier Sales Volumes in Petroleum Navigator, HTML, and PDF formats. Previous --- Previous reports are available on the historical page. The EIA-782C respondent frame is comprised of approximately 195 prime suppliers representing producers, importers, and inter-State resellers and

279

Report2003.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2003 Annual Report 2003 Annual Report I. Basic Information Regarding Report. A. Abel Lopez, Director FOIA/Privacy Act Group, ME-73 Office of the Executive Secretariat U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 Sandi Beatty, Information Specialist FOIA/Privacy Act Group, ME-73 Office of the Executive Secretariat U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 B. The World Wide Web address to obtain an electronic copy of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) report is www.ma.mbe.doe.gov/execsec/foia.htm. The report can then be accessed by clicking FOIA Annual Reports.

280

INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2001. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, and neutron source design and demonstration are described. Contributions in the fields of physics and biophysics include development of advanced patient treatment planning software, feasibility studies of accelerator neutron source technology for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), and completion of major modifications to the research reactor at Washington State University to produce an epithermal-neutron beam for NCT research applications.

Venhuizen, James Robert

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2001. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, and neutron source design and demonstration are described. Contributions in the fields of physics and biophysics include development of advanced patient treatment planning software, feasibility studies of accelerator neutron source technology for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), and completion of major modifications to the research reactor at Washington State University to produce an epithermal-neutron beam for NCT research applications.

Venhuizen, James R.

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

The pharmaco-economics of combination therapies : a study of the effects of component and market factors on combined therapy price  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a growing number of indications, combination therapies are becoming increasingly common due in part to their superior efficacy, as compared to monotherapies. In fact, in the case of infectious diseases such as AIDS and ...

Subramaniam, Sundar

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Agency Financial Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financial Report Financial Report Fiscal Year 2010 D E/ -00 O CF 56 Foreword Agency Financial Report (AFR) The AFR is organized by the following three major sections: „ Management's Discussion and Analysis section provides executive-level information on the Department's history, mission, organization, Secretarial priorities, analysis of financial statements, systems, controls and legal compliance and other management priorities facing the Department. „ Financial Results section provides a Message from the Chief Financial Officer,

284

Accumulations Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Accumulations Final Report Date: July 15, 2013 Period: October 1, 2008 - June 30, 2013 NETL Manager: Skip Pratt Principal Investigators: Matthew Reagan (LBNL), Philip W. Jones (LLNL) 1. Goal of this report This report will summarize previously reported or published results concerning the behavior of hydrates subjected to warming, highlighting contributing and mitigating factors relating to the possibility of rapid climate feedbacks. We will thus assess various scenarios and possibilities for the relationship between climate and hydrates: i.e., the likelihood of a "clathrate

285

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report"...

286

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes many of the projects, and lists all of the publications and persons trained with support from the grant.

Herrin, David L

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

287

2011 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Department of Energy (DOE) TEPP Annual Report highlights events, outreach, partnerships and training where TEPP has proven to be integral in building radiological...

288

Physical Security Evaluations - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary Report - Independent Oversight Inspection of Safeguards and Security and Cyber Security at the Y-12 Site Office and the Y-12 National Security Complex (U), January...

289

Federal GHG Reporting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogenic CO 2 sources are a little "different" * Biofuel Combustion Example * Biomass, Biogas, and Biofuel Reporting * RECs and T&D Losses * "Crash Course" on the FEMP GHG...

290

Quarterly Coal Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

December 2010 DOEEIA-0121 (201003Q) Revised: July 2012 Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2010 December 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and...

291

FY 2009 LDRD Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The national laboratories included in this report devoted approximately $515 million to LDRD, addressing topics that span the entire range of DOEs broad scientific mandate.

292

FY 2008 LDRD Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The national laboratories included in this report devoted approximately $513 million to LDRD, addressing topics that span the entire range of DOEs broad scientific mandate.

293

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Explanatory Notes Survey Methodology Description of Survey Form The Form EIA-820, Annual Refinery Report, is the primary source of data in the Refinery ...

294

Final Report.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selection and Treatment of Stripper Gas Wells for Production Enhancement, Mocane-Laverne Field, Oklahoma Final Report October, 2000 - September 30, 2003 Scott Reeves Advanced...

295

House Simulation Protocols Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Building America's House Simulation Protocols report is designed to assist researchers in tracking the progress of multiyear, whole-building energy reduction against research goals for new and...

296

Web Survey Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glisson,W.B. Welland,R.C. DCS Technical Report Series pp 27 Dept of Computing Science, University of Glasgow

Glisson, W.B.; Welland, R.C.

297

1994 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Product Pipeline Reports Tutorial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Home > Petroleum > Petroleum Survey Forms> Petroleum Survey Forms Tutorial Product Pipeline Reports Tutorial Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player....

299

NETL Final Report Outline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Active and Passive Gas Imagers for Transmission Pipeline Remote Leak Detection Final Report December 2002 Submitted by Thomas A. Reichardt, Sanjay Devdas, and Thomas...

300

Lab Report - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Unit Process Modeling Developments at the Edison Materials Technology Center" (Forum Lab Report), L.L. Midolo and E.F. Moore, October 1991, pp. 55-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ISIS Project: Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report first presents a description of the database and then further details what has been achieved in the latter workpackages. 2 Data

Jean-Cdric Chappelier; Martin Rajman; Pierrette Bouillon; Susan Armstrong; Vincenzo Pallotta; Afzal Ballim

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

1999 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

The Site Environmental Report for Brookhaven National Laboratory for the calendar year 1999, as required by DOE Order 231.1.

NONE

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Final draft report outline  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subcommittee also found the metrics and processes being developed for DOE by Gretchen Jordan, et al. to be valuable (Reference 2). In the current report the Subcommittee has...

304

SRS Environmental Report 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

free Adobe Acrobat Reader. To download this software from Adobe, please CLICK HERE. DOE Logo DOE-EM logo Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2001 (PDFs) Savannah...

305

2012 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Department of Energy (DOE) TEPP Annual Report highlights events, outreach, partnerships, and training where TEPP has proven to be integral in building radiological...

306

EMSL 2009 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EMSL 2009 Annual Report describes the science conducted at EMSL during 2009 as well as outreach activities and awards and honors received by users and staff.

Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.; Wiley, Julie G.; Reed, Jennifer R.

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

307

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

driven: 344 112010 to 12312010 Number of vehicles: Fleet Summary Report - Hymotion Prius (Kvaser data logger) Date range of data received: North American PHEV Demonstration...

308

MonthlyReportAll  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

driven: 366 112008 to 12312010 Number of vehicles: Fleet Summary Report - Hymotion Prius (Kvaser data logger) Date range of data received: North American PHEV Demonstration...

309

Post Competition Accountability Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

LM has completed its first annual Post Competition Accountability Report - Office of Legacy Management's High Performing Organization: Fiscal Year (FY)2012

310

Annual Coal Report 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0584 (2001) Annual Coal Report 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy

311

2007 Site Environmental Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the-length report.

Ratel,K.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Ranger Fleet Eval Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

report you will find summaries of energy use and cost, graphs illustrating your site's load profile, and results from the driver survey. We believe electric transportation can...

313

Recovery Act Recipient Reporting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipients November 19, 2009 1 Outline of Presentation * OMB Reporting Requirements * Jobs Guidance * FR.gov 2 Section 1512 of American Reinvestment and...

314

Annual Report 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society. Annual. Report. 2007. 50 Years of TMS : Celebrating the Past,. Planning for the Future. 1957 2007...

315

NSLS Activity Report 1996  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submission System PDF Publishing: P. Sutherland (BNL Information Services Division) NSLS Home Page...BNL Home Page...Return to Activity Reports Page...

316

2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

THE SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 2001, AS REQUIRED BY DOE ORDER 231.1.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

2010 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 DOE TEPP Annual Report highlights events, outreach, partnerships and training where TEPP has proven to be integral in building radiological response capabilities of...

318

Uranium Purchases Report 1995  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA0570(95) Distribution Category UC950 Uranium Purchases Report 1995 June 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, ...

319

EV Project Overview Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Project to date through March 2013 Charging Infrastructure Region Number of EV Project Charging Units Installed To Date Number of Charging Events Performed Electricity...

320

EV Project Overview Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EV Project Overview Report Project to Date through March 2011 Charging Infrastructure Number of EV Project Number of Electricity Charging Units Charging Events Consumed Region...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Monthly Biodiesel Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Biodiesel Production Monthly Biodiesel Production Report November 2013 With Data for September 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Monthly Biodiesel Production Report This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or

322

RMOTC - Library - Test Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Reports Test Reports All non-proprietary project reports that are approved for release are posted here. Many of RMOTC's projects have protection extended through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) and may not be available for release at this time. If you have questions about a specific report, Contact Us. Name Partner Category EOR Technology (2011) (PDF) Trimeteor Production Viscosity Reduction (May 2012) (PDF) STWA Production Viscosity Reduction (April 2012) (PDF) STWA Production Viscosity Reduction (October 2011) (PDF) STWA Production Acoustek Assessment (PDF) BP Group Production Airborne Survey (PDF) Electro-Seise, Inc. Production Beam Gas Compressor (PDF) Morrison International Energy Production Bentonite Plugging (PDF) Eagle Cap, Inc. Production

323

Emergency Management Evaluations - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Management Evaluations Reports 2010 Independent Oversight Review of Emergency Management at the Pantex Site Office and Pantex Plant, November 2010 Independent Oversight...

324

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report Title 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Wiser, Ryan H., and Mark Bolinger Date...

325

Microdosimetric investigations at the fast neutron therapy facility at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

Microdosimetry was used to investigate three issues at the neutron therapy facility (NTF) at Fermilab. Firstly, the conversion factor from absorbed dose in A-150 tissue equivalent plastic to absorbed dose in ICRU tissue was determined. For this, the effective neutron kerma factor ratios, i.e., oxygen tissue equivalent plastic and carbon to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic, were measured in the neutron beam. An A-150 tissue equivalent plastic to ICRU tissue absorbed dose conversion factor of 0.92 {+-} 0.04 was determined. Secondly, variations in the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) in the beam were mapped by determining variations in two related quantities, e{sup *} and R, with field size and depth in tissue. Maximal variation in e{sup *} and R of 9% and 15% respectively were determined. Lastly, the feasibility of utilizing the boron neutron capture reaction on boron-10 to selectively enhance the tumor dose in the NTF beam was investigated.

Langen, K.M.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: This was a matched-pair study. From January 2008 to December 2009, 36 patients with 42 lesions of unresectable recurrent HCC were treated with SBRT. The median prescribed dose was 37 Gy (range, 25 to 48 Gy) in 4-5 fractions over 4-5 consecutive working days. Another 138 patients in the historical control group given other or no treatments were selected for matched analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 14 months for all patients and 20 months for those alive. The 1- and 2-year in-field failure-free rates were 87.6% and 75.1%, respectively. Out-field intrahepatic recurrence was the main cause of failure. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 64.0%, and median time to progression was 8.0 months. In the multivariable analysis of all 174 patients, SBRT (yes vs. no), tumor size ({<=}4 cm vs. >4 cm), recurrent stage (stage IIIB/IV vs. I) and Child-Pugh classification (A vs. B/C) were independent prognostic factors for OS. Matched-pair analysis revealed that patients undergoing SBRT had better OS (2-year OS of 72.6% vs. 42.1%, respectively, p = 0.013). Acute toxicities were mild and tolerable. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and efficacious modality and appears to be well-tolerated at the dose fractionation we have used, and its use correlates with improved survival in this cohort of patients with recurrent unresectable HCC. Out-field recurrence is the major cause of failure. Further studies of combinations of SBRT and systemic therapies may be reasonable.

Huang, Wen-Yen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jen, Yee-Min, E-mail: yeeminjen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Meei-Shyuan [School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Li-Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chang-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Ko, Kai-Hsiung [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Kuen-Tze; Lin, Jang-Chun; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Su, Yu-Fu; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Chang, Yao-Wen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Hyperfractionated Concomitant Boost Proton Beam Therapy for Esophageal Carcinoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of hyperfractionated concomitant boost proton beam therapy (PBT) for patients with esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study participants were 19 patients with esophageal cancer who were treated with hyperfractionated photon therapy and PBT between 1990 and 2007. The median total dose was 78 GyE (range, 70-83 GyE) over a median treatment period of 48 days (range, 38-53 days). Ten of the 19 patients were at clinical T Stage 3 or 4. Results: There were no cases in which treatment interruption was required because of radiation-induced esophagitis or hematologic toxicity. The overall 1- and 5-year actuarial survival rates for all 19 patients were 79.0% and 42.8%, respectively, and the median survival time was 31.5 months (95% limits: 16.7- 46.3 months). Of the 19 patients, 17 (89%) showed a complete response within 4 months after completing treatment and 2 (11%) showed a partial response, giving a response rate of 100% (19/19). The 1- and 5-year local control rates for all 19 patients were 93.8% and 84.4 %, respectively. Only 1 patient had late esophageal toxicity of Grade 3 at 6 months after hyperfractionated PBT. There were no other nonhematologic toxicities, including no cases of radiation pneumonia or cardiac failure of Grade 3 or higher. Conclusions: The results suggest that hyperfractionated PBT is safe and effective for patients with esophageal cancer. Further studies are needed to establish the appropriate role and treatment schedule for use of PBT for esophageal cancer.

Mizumoto, Masashi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sugahara, Shinji [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tokyo Medical University Ibaraki Medical Center, Ibaraki (Japan); Okumura, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nakahara, Akira [Department of Gastroenterological Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Terashima, Hideo [Department of Surgery, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tsuboi, Koji [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki, E-mail: hsakurai@pmrc.tsukuba.ac.jp [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

BronCare: clinical multimedia system for new therapies assessment in asthma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the framework of therapy efficiency assessment in asthma, this paper describes a clinical multimedia system, providing the appropriate tools for bronchial reactivity and wall remodeling evaluation from MDCT successive examinations conditional to a ... Keywords: 3D image processing, bronchial reactivity, multimedia system, therapy assessment, wall remodeling

A. Saragaglia; C. Fetita; F. Preteux

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

TH?E?500?01: Formal Radiation Therapy Safety Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern radiation therapy has become increasingly complex. In order to maintain a high level of safety medical physicists are shifting their approach to safety from historical to formal. Quality assurance (QA) is not a unique challenge to radiation therapy let alone medicine. Every industry has an approach to measuring

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

House Report 107-218, TA Report Language  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Taken from House Report 107-218 FY 2003 Commerce, Justice, State Appropriations House Report. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

331

Environmental Report 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2008 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites - the Livermore site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1A, Environmental Safety and Health Reporting, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The report is distributed electronically and is available at https://saer.lln.gov/, the website for the LLNL annual environmental report. Previous LLNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1994 are also on the website. Some references in the electronic report text are underlined, which indicates that they are clickable links. Clicking on one of these links will open the related document, data workbook, or website that it refers to. The report begins with an executive summary, which provides the purpose of the report and an overview of LLNL's compliance and monitoring results. The first three chapters provide background information: Chapter 1 is an overview of the location, meteorology, and hydrogeology of the two LLNL sites; Chapter 2 is a summary of LLNL's compliance with environmental regulations; and Chapter 3 is a description of LLNL's environmental programs with an emphasis on the Environmental Management System including pollution prevention. The majority of the report covers LLNL's environmental monitoring programs and monitoring data for 2008: effluent and ambient air (Chapter 4); waters, including wastewater, storm water runoff, surface water, rain, and groundwater (Chapter 5); and terrestrial, including soil, sediment, vegetation, foodstuff, ambient radiation, and special status wildlife and plants (Chapter 6). Complete monitoring data, which are summarized in the body of the report, are provided in Appendix A. The remaining three chapters discuss the radiological impact on the public from LLNL operations (Chapter 7), LLNL's groundwater remediation program (Chapter 8), and quality assurance for the environmental monitoring programs (Chapter 9). The report uses Systeme International units, consistent with the federal Metric Conversion Act of 1975 and Executive Order 12770, Metric Usage in Federal Government Programs (1991). For ease of comparison to environmental reports issued prior to 1991, dose values and many radiological measurements are given in both metric and U.S. customary units. A conversion table is provided in the glossary. The report is the responsibility of LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Monitoring data were obtained through the combined efforts of the Environmental Protection Department; Environmental Restoration Department; Physical and Life Sciences Environmental Monitoring Radiation Laboratory; and the Hazards Control Department.

Gallegos, G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Cerruti, S; Dibley, V; Doman, J L; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Kumamoto, G; MacQueen, D H; Nelson, J C; Paterson, L; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, A M; Wilson, K; Woollett, J

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

332

Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T <4 cm, N0, M0, or Mx). Severe (grade {>=}3) RP and potential predictive factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. A scoring system was established to predict the risk of RP. Results: At a median follow-up time of 16 months after SABR (range, 4-56 months), 15 patients had severe RP (14 [18.9%] grade 3 and 1 [1.4%] grade 5) and 1 patient (1.4%) had a local recurrence. In univariate analyses, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) before SABR, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and previous planning target volume (PTV) location were associated with the incidence of severe RP. The V{sub 10} and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V{sub 10}-V{sub 40} and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 {<=}65% before SABR (P=.012), V{sub 20} {>=}30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 {<=}65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V{sub 20} {>=}30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

Liu Hui; Zhang Xu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Melanoma Therapy with Rhenium-Cyclized Alpha Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Peptide Analogs  

SciTech Connect

Malignant melanoma is the 6th most commonly diagnosed cancer with increasing incidence in the United States. It is estimated that 54,200 cases of malignant melanoma will be newly diagnosed and 7,600 cases of death will occur in the United States in the year 2003 (1). At the present time, more than 1.3% of Americans will develop malignant melanoma during their lifetime (2). The average survival for patients with metastatic melanoma is about 6-9 months (3). Moreover, metastatic melanoma deposits are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy (3). Systematic chemotherapy is the primary therapeutic approach to treat patients with metastatic melanoma. Dacarbazine is the only single chemotherapy agent approved by FDA for metastatic melanoma treatment (5). However, the response rate to Dacarbazine is only approximately 20% (6). Therefore, there is a great need to develop novel treatment approaches for metastatic melanoma. The global goal of this research program is the rational design, characterization and validation of melanoma imaging and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Significant progress has been made in the design and characterization of metal-cyclized radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides. Therapy studies with {sup 188}Re-CCMSH demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of the receptor-targeted treatment in murine and human melanoma bearing mice (previous progress report). Dosimetry calculations, based on biodistribution data, indicated that a significant dose was delivered to the tumor. However, {sup 188}Re is a very energetic beta-particle emitter. The longer-range beta-particles theoretically would be better for larger tumors. In the treatment of melanoma, the larger primary tumor is usually surgically removed leaving metastatic disease as the focus of targeted radiotherapy. Isotopes with lower beta-energies and/or shorter particle lengths should be better suited for targeting metastases. The {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH and {sup 212}Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH complexes were developed and synthesized to investigate its ability to target and deliver an effective dose to small melanoma tumors and metastatic deposits. Dosimetry calculations for {sup 188}Re-CCMSH and {sup 212}Pb/{sup 212}Bi[DOTA]-Re(Arg11)CCMSH were compared in the B16/F1 mouse melanoma flank tumor model to analyze the delivered dose to tumor and normal organs.

Thomas P Quinn

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

334

Report Cover IG-0728  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilization of Utilization of Fleet Vehicles DOE/IG-0728 May 2006 REPORT ON THE DEPARTMENT'S UTILIZATION OF FLEET VEHICLES TABLE OF CONTENTS Fleet Vehicle Utilization Details of Finding ........................................................................................1 Recommendations and Comments ..............................................................6 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology......................................................9 2. Detailed Site Results ............................................................................11 3. Prior Reports ........................................................................................12 4. Management Comments ......................................................................13

335

Report Cover IG-0730  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Management of Non-Nuclear High Explosives DOE/IG-0730 June 2006 REPORT ON THE DEPARTMENT'S MANAGEMENT OF NON-NUCLEAR HIGH EXPLOSIVES TABLE OF CONTENTS Management of High Explosives Details of Finding ........................................................................................1 Recommendations and Comments ..............................................................9 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology....................................................12 2. Prior Reports ........................................................................................14 3. Management Comments ......................................................................16 MANAGEMENT OF HIGH EXPLOSIVES ________________________________________________________________

336

2004 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Transportation Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2004 Annual Report United States Department of Energy Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) 2004 Annual Report Table of Contents Executive Summary..................................................................................... 1 I. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Purpose ...... 3 II. Training.............................................................................................. 3 III. Outreach and Conferences ............................................................... 5 IV. Go-Kits ............................................................................................... 5 V. TEPP Exercise and Tabletop Activities ..........................................

337

IG-0704 Report Cover  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Energy Regulatory Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program-2005 DOE/IG-0704 October 2005 REPORT ON THE FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION'S UNCLASSIFIED CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM - 2005 TABLE OF CONTENTS Cyber Security Program Details of Finding ..........................................................................................................1 Recommendations and Comments.................................................................................4 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology.........................................................................6 2. Related Audit Reports...............................................................................................8 CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM

338

Environmental Report 2007  

SciTech Connect

The purposes of the 'Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2007' are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites--the Livermore site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1A, Environmental Safety and Health Reporting, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The report is distributed electronically and is available at https://saer.lln.gov/, the website for the LLNL annual environmental report. Previous LLNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1994 are also on the website. Some references in the electronic report text are underlined, which indicates that they are clickable links. Clicking on one of these links will open the related document, data workbook, or website that it refers to. The report begins with an executive summary, which provides the purpose of the report and an overview of LLNL's compliance and monitoring results. The first three chapters provide background information: Chapter 1 is an overview of the location, meteorology, and hydrogeology of the two LLNL sites; Chapter 2 is a summary of LLNL's compliance with environmental regulations; and Chapter 3 is a description of LLNL's environmental programs with an emphasis on the Environmental Management System including pollution prevention. The majority of the report covers LLNL's environmental monitoring programs and monitoring data for 2007: effluent and ambient air (Chapter 4); waters, including wastewater, storm water runoff, surface water, rain, and groundwater (Chapter 5); and terrestrial, including soil, sediment, vegetation, foodstuff, ambient radiation, and special status wildlife and plants (Chapter 6). Complete monitoring data, which are summarized in the body of the report, are provided in Appendix A. The remaining three chapters discuss the radiological impact on the public from LLNL operations (Chapter 7), LLNL's groundwater remediation program (Chapter 8), and quality assurance for the environmental monitoring programs (Chapter 9). The report uses Systeme International units, consistent with the federal Metric Conversion Act of 1975 and Executive Order 12770, Metric Usage in Federal Government Programs (1991). For ease of comparison to environmental reports issued prior to 1991, dose values and many radiological measurements are given in both metric and U.S. customary units. A conversion table is provided in the glossary.

Mathews, S; Gallegos, G; Berg, L L; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Cerruti, S; Doman, J L; Ferry, L S; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Kumamoto, G; Larson, J; MacQueen, D H; Paterson, L; Revelli, M A; Ridley, M; Rueppel, D; Wegrecki, A M; Wilson, K; Woollett, J

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

339

Annual Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Reports Annual Reports Annual Reports OHA Annual Reports Available for Download January 1, 2013 OHA 2012 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2011 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA). Here are highlights for the past year: September 30, 2011 OHA 2011 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2011 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) September 30, 2010 OHA 2010 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2010 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) September 8, 2009 OHA 2009 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2009 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) September 30, 2008 OHA 2008 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2008 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) September 30, 2007 OHA 2007 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2007 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals

340

Phase I report:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stimulation of Oil Wells Producing from Carbonate Stimulation of Oil Wells Producing from Carbonate Reservoirs Final Report Reporting Period Start Date: June 1, 2002 Reporting Period End Date: May 31, 2004 Authors Dr. Xina Xie, Principal Investigator W. W. Weiss, Senior Engineer Report Date: June 30, 2004 DOE Award Number: DE-FG03-01ER83226 Correlations Company P.O. Box 730 115 Court Street Socorro, NM 87801 Disclaimer "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

ECR 2007 Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ECR Annual Report for 2007 U.S. Department of Energy ECR Annual Report for 2007 U.S. Department of Energy 1 Environmental Conflict Resolution Second Annual Report January 2008 U.S. Department of Energy ECR Annual Report for 2007 U.S. Department of Energy 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Number I. Introduction 4 A. Background 4 B. Report Methodology 4 C. Ongoing Benefits of Using Environmental Conflict Resolution 5 II. Extent of Current Use of Environmental Conflict Resolution 5 A. Use of Third-Party Neutrals 5 B. Use of Site Specific Advisory Boards/Citizen Advisory Boards 6 C. Use of Collaborative Decision-making Processes with Regulators and Stakeholders 7

342

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petrolem Reports Petrolem Reports Weekly Petroleum Status Report Data for week ending Dec. 13, 2013 | Release Date: Dec. 18, 2013 | Next Release Date: Dec. 27, 2013 | full report Previous Issues Week: December 18, 2013 December 11, 2013 December 4, 2013 November 27, 2013 November 20, 2013 November 14, 2013 November 6, 2013 October 30, 2013 October 23, 2013 October 21, 2013 October 9, 2013 October 2, 2013 prior issues Go The petroleum supply situation in the context of historical information and selected prices. Released after 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Highlights Weekly Petroleum Status Report Highlights PDF PDF Data Overview (Combined Table 1 and Table 9) PDF Tables 1 U.S. Petroleum Balance Sheet CSV XLS PDF 2 U.S. Inputs and Production by PAD District CSV XLS PDF

343

Savannah River Site - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Savannah River Site Review Reports 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, November 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the Savannah River Operations Office, July 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project, January 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design, January 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013

344

Idaho National Laboratory - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Idaho National Laboratory Review Reports 2013 Review of Radiation Protection Program Implementation at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project of the Idaho Site, April 2013 Review of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site, March 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Demonstration Facility, February 2013 Review Reports 2012 Review of Radiation Protection Program Implementation at the Idaho Site, November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project, November 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Idaho National Laboratory, July 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review, June 2012

345

Radiation monitor reporting requirements  

SciTech Connect

Within High-Level Waste Management (HLWM), CAMs and VAMPs are currently considered Class B equipment, therefore, alarm conditions associated with the CAMs and VAMPs result in an Unusual Occurrence or Off-Normal notification and subsequent occurrence reporting. Recent equipment difficulties associated with Continuous Air Monitors (CAMs) and Victoreen Area Radiation Monitors (VAMPs) have resulted in a significant number of notification reports. These notification have the potential to decrease operator sensitivity to the significance of specific CAM and VAMP failures. Additionally, the reports are extremely costly and are not appropriate as a means for tracking and trending equipment performance. This report provides a technical basis for a change in Waste Management occurrence reporting categorization for specific CAM and VAMP failure modes.

Bates, W.F.

1993-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

346

Final Beamline Design Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Beamline Design Report Final Beamline Design Report Guidelines and Review Criteria (SCD 1.20.95) 6.0 Final Beamline Design Report (FDR) Overview The Final Beamline Design Report is part of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline review process and should be planned for when approximately 90% of the total beamline design has been completed. Fifteen copies of the FDR are to be submitted to the APS Users Office. Approval of the Collaborative Access Team's (CAT) designs described in the report is required prior to installation of beamline components in the APS Experiment Hall. Components that have a long lead time for design or procurement can be reviewed separately from the remainder of the beamline, but enough information must be provided so that the reviewer can understand the

347

Reporting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reporting Reporting Reporting The Corporate Reporting Databases provide Web-based systems and data analysis documents to facilitate access to data on occurrences, accidents, illnesses, exposures, environmental impacts, performance, and compliance. Database access is restricted to authorized DOE staff and contractors. To register for database access, please visit the database web site at the link below and submit an access request. Once your request is approved, you will receive a user ID and password which will allow you to access the database. Corporate Reporting Databases Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) System: CEDR is a DOE public-use repository of data from occupational and environmental health studies of workers at DOE facilities and nearby community residents.

348

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy technology. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report Appendix: Sources of Data Presented in this Report Installation Trends

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy technology. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report Appendix: Sources of Data Presented in this Report Installation Trends

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Four-Week Course of Radiation for Breast Cancer Using Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Standard radiation for early breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6 to 7 weeks. This is an inconvenience to many women, and for some a barrier for breast conservation. We present the acute toxicity of a 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 75 patients completed radiation on a Phase II trial approved by the hospital institutional review board. Eligibility criteria were broad to include any patient normally eligible for standard radiation: age {>=}18 years, invasive or in situ cancer, American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage 0 to II, breast-conserving surgery, and any systemic therapy not given concurrently. The median age was 52 years (range, 31-81 years). Of the patients, 15% had ductal carcinoma in situ, 67% T1, and 19% T2; 71% were N0, 17% N1, and 12% NX. Chemotherapy was given before radiation in 44%. Using photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy and incorporated electron beam boost, the whole breast received 45 Gy and the lumpectomy bed 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Results: The maximum acute skin toxicity by the end of treatment was Grade 0 in 9 patients (12%), Grade 1 in 49 (65%) and Grade 2 in 17 (23%). There was no Grade 3 or higher skin toxicity. After radiation, all Grade 2 toxicity had resolved by 6 weeks. Hematologic toxicity was Grade 0 in most patients except for Grade 1 neutropenia in 2 patients, and Grade 1 anemia in 11 patients. There were no significant differences in baseline vs. 6-week posttreatment patient-reported or physician-reported cosmetic scores. Conclusions: This 4-week course of postoperative radiation using intensity-modulated radiation therapy is feasible and is associated with acceptable acute skin toxicity and quality of life. Long-term follow-up data are needed. This radiation schedule may represent an alternative both to longer 6-week to 7-week standard whole-breast radiation and more radically shortened 1-week, partial-breast treatment schedules.

Freedman, Gary M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)]. E-mail: Gary.Freedman@FCCC.edu; Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Goldstein, Lori J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ma Changming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li Jinsheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Swaby, Ramona F. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Litwin, Samuel [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sigurdson, Elin R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Morrow, Monica [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

(A clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress made in refining of neutron-induced alpha tract autoradiography, in designing epithermal neutron bean at MITR-II and in planning treatment dosimetry using Monte Carlo techniques.

Zamenhof, R.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

RADIOACTIVE IODINE IN THE TREATMENT OF HYPERTHYROIDISM (EXPERIENCE AT THE TORONTO GENERAL HOSPITAL, 1950-58). PART III. POSSIBLE BIOLOGICAL HAZARDS FROM RADIOACTIVE IODINE THERAPY  

SciTech Connect

A review of 542 hyperthyroid patients treated by I/sup 131/ at the Toronto General Hospital between 1950 and 1955 is presented. This group included 403 patients with diffuse hyperplastic goitre and 139 patients with toxic nodular goitre. The method for assessing the initial dose of I/sup 131/ is described. In general, patients with toxic nodular goitres received much larger doses. Of the diffuse hyperplastic group 72% were cured with one dose, the remainder requiring two or more doses. A greater percentage of the toxic nodular group required only one dose. No cases of complete resistance to 1/sup 131/ therapy were encountered. Permanent hypothyroidism was produced in 16.3% of those so treated, but in 6.5% it was very mild. The incidence of clinical hypothyroidism was much lower in the toxic nodular group than in the diffuse hyperplastic group. There was a continuing incidence of late hypothyroidism, occurring years after therapy; some of these patients had undergone a transient period of hypothyroidism shortly after treatment, then recovered for some years. Factors possibly related to the response to treatment and to the development of hypothyroidism have been analyzed. Recurrent hyperthyroidism after thyroidectomy was associated with a significant increase in the incidence of post-I/sup 131/ hypothyroidism, while pretreatment with artithyroid drugs seemed to reduce radiosensitivity in the diffuse group. No late recurrences of hyperthyroidism were noted. Twenty-one deaths occurred within two years of therapy. In most, there was no obvious relation to therapy, while in none was there a clear-out cause-and-effect relationship to I/sup 131/ therapy. Nevertheless, elderly or very ill patients should be treated only after they have been rendered euthyroid by antithyroid drugs. Fertility has not been affected by I/sup 131/ therapy, but the use of this isotope in pregnancy is contraindicated because of the possible ill effects on the fetas. The possibility of genetic effects appears to be negligible, as judged by the gonadal radiation doses received in I/sup 131/ therapy. The fear of carcinoma of the thyroid likewise appears to be receding if the therapy is utilized only in adults. Leukemia has been reported in 14 instances. However, the statistical import is not clear, since the total number of cases of leukemia and of persons treated by I/sup 131/ is not known. It may be that there is a slight increase in the incidence of leukemia following radioactive treatment, comparable to that possibly induced by certain diagnostic radiological procedures, but this is insufficient to warrant any change in policy regarding the use of I/sup 131/ After consideration of these hypothetical dangers, it is concluded that the use of radioactive iodine is a safe, effective form of therapy for adult, nonpregnant hyperthyroid patients, and is to be preferred to surgical thyroidectomy. 108 references. (auth)

Volpe, R.; Schatz, D.L.; Scott, A.; Peller, J.A.; Vale, J.M.; Ezrin, C.; Johnston, M.W.

1961-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

353

LNG Annual Report - 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Report - 2012 LNG Annual Report - 2012 LNG Annual Report - 2012 (Revised 3212013) LNG Annual Report - 2012...

354

Summary Site Environmental Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Environmental Report Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2011 ANL-12/02 (Summary) Environment, Safety, and Quality Assurance Division Argonne National Laboratory Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product,

355

Inspection Report: IG-0774  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection Report Inspection Report Material Control and Accountability at Los Alamos National Laboratory DOE/IG-0774 September 2007 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Inspections and Special Inquiries Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 7,2007 MEMORANDUM FOR FROM: Insp~ct& General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Material Control and Accountability at Los Alamos National Laboratory" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has a national security mission that includes responsibility for the science, engineering and technology related to certain radioactive materials supporting the Nation's nuclear weapons program. These include materials

356

OUTLINE FOR PCC REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION PIER Lighting Research Program Project 3.1 Retrofit Fluorescent Dimming with Integrated Lighting Controls FINAL REPORT Consultant Report November 2004 500-01-041-A-5 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor Deliverable 3.1.10 Final Report LBNL/Architectural Energy Corporation PIER Lighting Research Program 2 500-01-041 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Prepared By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Frances Rubinstein, Project Lead Berkeley, CA Managed By: Architectural Energy Corporation Judie Porter Program Director Boulder, CO CEC Contract # 500-01-041 Prepared For: Don Aumann Contract Manager Nancy Jenkins PIER Buildings Program Manager

357

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 2010 DOE/EIA-0121 (2010/01Q) June 2010 DOE/EIA-0121 (2010/01Q) Revised: July 2012 Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2010 June 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.gov/coal/production/quarterly/ _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of

358

Special Report: IG-0767  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Special Report Special Report Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve DOE/IG-0767 June 2007 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 June 19, 2007 pector General SUBJE INFORMATION: Special Report on "Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve" INTRODUCTION The Energy Policy Act of 2005 required the Department of Energy to expand the Strategic Petroleum Reserve's (Reserve) maximum storage capacity to 1 billion barrels of crude oil. The Department stores the oil in large underground caverns, which have been created in salt domes. After evaluating various alternatives, the Department decided to develop a new 160 million barrel storage facility at Richton, Mississippi, and to expand the storage capacity at two existing

359

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1Q) 1Q) Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2008 July 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

360

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2009 September 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7/01Q) 7/01Q) Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2007 June 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

362

Report: EM Communications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS September 25, 2008 Submitted by the EMAB Communications Subcommittee Background: In response to the Environmental Management Advisory Board's (EMAB) expressed concern that a communications function was not part of the Office of Environmental Management's (EM) 2006 proposed reorganization, the Assistant Secretary requested that the Board make a recommendation as to whether EM should create a communications position with direct report to his office. In support of this request, EMAB established a subcommittee to review how communications within the Department and with stakeholders were being handled in EM, and report back to the full Board on its findings. The Communications Subcommittee's original report included five recommendations and

363

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3Q) 3Q) Quarterly Coal Report July - September 2008 December 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

364

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2Q) 2Q) Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2008 September 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

365

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8/04Q) 8/04Q) Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2008 March 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the U.S. Department of Energy or any other organization.

366

Evaluation report II: conservation progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report Volume II, for a project evaluation proposal for the Office of Conservation at Seattle City Light (SCL) presents summaries of the costs to date and comments on projects undertaken in the following areas: commercial/industrial; residential; outreach; in-house conservation; research development, and demonstration; and support activities. Detailed results are presented in Section II. Mr. Dan Geballe from SCL calculates that conservation was running between 55 and 60 MW during the first half of 1978. Currently Seattle load is growing rapidly, but there is no reason to believe that conservation is not continuing at or above the 55 to 60 MW measured, Mr. Geballe concludes. (MCW)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Pathways, Networks and Therapy: A Boolean Approach to Systems Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The area of systems biology evolved in an attempt to introduce mathematical systems theory principles in biology. Although we believe that all biological processes are essentially chemical reactions, describing those using precise mathematical rules is not easy, primarily due to the complexity and enormity of biological systems. Here we introduce a formal approach for modeling biological dynamical relationships and diseases such as cancer. The immediate motivation behind this research is the urgency to find a practicable cure of cancer, the emperor of all maladies. Unlike other deadly endemic diseases such as plague, dengue and AIDS, cancer is characteristically heterogenic and hence requires a closer look into the genesis of the disease. The actual cause of cancer lies within our physiology. The process of cell division holds the clue to unravel the mysteries surrounding this disease. In normal scenario, all control mechanisms work in tandem and cell divides only when the division is required, for instance, to heal a wound platelet derived growth factor triggers cell division. The control mechanism is tightly regulated by several biochemical interactions commonly known as signal transduction pathways. However, from mathematical point of view, these pathways are marginal in nature and unable to cope with the multi-variability of a heterogenic disease like cancer. The present research is possibly one first attempt towards unraveling the mysteries surrounding the dynamics of a proliferating cell. A novel yet simple methodology is developed to bring all the marginal knowledge of the signaling pathways together to form the simplest mathematical abstract known as the Boolean Network. The malfunctioning in the cell by genetic mutations is formally modeled as stuck-at faults in the underlying Network. Finally a mathematical methodology is discovered to optimally find out the possible best combination drug therapy which can drive the cell from an undesirable condition of proliferation to a desirable condition of quiescence or apoptosis. Although, the complete biological validation was beyond the scope of the current research, the process of in-vitro validation has been already initiated by our collaborators. Once validated, this research will lead to a bright future in the field on personalized cancer therapy.

Layek, Ritwik

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Annual Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Annual Reports Services » Annual Reports Annual Reports Annual Reports December 28, 2012 Southeastern Power Administration 2012 Annual Report This report reflects our agency's programs,accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2011, and ending September 30, 2012. December 31, 2011 Southeastern Power Administration 2011 Annual Report This report reflects our agency's programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2010, and ending September 31, 2011. December 27, 2010 Southeastern Power Administration 2010 Annual Report This report reflects our agency's programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2009,

369

Project Report List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

search Go search Go Project Report List ISPO Home Page ISPO Report Number Title Author Task Number ISPO #1 Report on Hough's Visit to GE Wilmington-Cooperative Study with NRC at GE Wilmington, March 1977 A. M. Bieber, Jr. F.7 ISPO #2 Track-Etch Technique-Processing and Readout of Tapes-Consultation & Training, September 1978, NEDG-12682, GE-VNC D. B. Lovett A.15 ISPO #3 Integral Exercises-Reprocessing Facility (Barnwell DIQ), March 1978, BNL-TSO A. M. Bieber, Jr. S. C. Suda C.4 ISPO #4 Results of Tests to Determine Response of Solar Cell Gamma Detector "C" to High Dose Rate Gamma Radiation, June 1977, Sandia Laboratories, Letter Report J. F. Ney E.22 ISPO #5 Cooperative Study with NRC at GE Wilmington, October 1978 A. M. Bieber, Jr. C.M. Vaughn F.7

370

Recovery Act Recipient Reporting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipients Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipients November 19, 2009 1 Outline of Presentation * OMB Reporting Requirements * Jobs Guidance * FR.gov 2 Section 1512 of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act Outlines Recipient Reporting Requirements "Recipient reports required by Section 1512 of the Recovery Act will answer important questions, such as: ▪ Who is receiving Recovery Act dollars and in what amounts? ▪ What projects or activities are being funded with Recovery Act dollars? ▪ What is the completion status of such projects or activities and what impact have they had on job creation and retention?" "When published on www.Recovery.gov, these reports will provide the public with an unprecedented level of transparency into how Federal dollars are being spent and will help drive accountability for the timely,

371

Factory Flow Benchmarking Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LAI benchmarked representative part fabrications and some assembly operations within its member companies of the defense aircraft industry. This paper reports the results of this benchmarking effort. In addition, this ...

Shields, Thomas J.

372

Office Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Office Buildings - Full Report Office Buildings - Full Report file:///C|/mydocs/CBECS2003/PBA%20report/office%20report/office_pdf.html[9/24/2010 3:33:25 PM] Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a

373

BES Workshop Reports  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Resources » Resources » Reports Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Program Summaries Brochures Reports Abstracts Accomplishments Presentations BES and Congress Science for Energy Flow Seeing Matter Scale of Things Chart Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » News & Resources Reports Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Provided below is a listing of BES workshop reports that address the status of some important research areas that are used to help identify research

374

Occurrence Reporting Trends  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reporting and Processing of Reporting and Processing of Operations Information (ORPS): Five Year Trends 1 * The trend of Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) occurrences across the Complex has been steady over the past five years. The trend of occurrence reports appears to trend very closely with changes in man hours worked. * The proportion of those occurrences that are considered high consequence occurrences has decreased from approximately 30 percent in 2007 to 15 percent in 2012. High consequence occurrences are defined as occurrences that are assigned either an ORPS Significance Category 1, 2 or Operational Emergency (OE), or a 13A (HQ Significant highlighted for Management attention). 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2

375

NETL Report Cover (Front)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Topical Report LAND AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT ISSUES RELEVANT TO DEPLOYING IN-SITU THERMAL TECHNOLOGIES Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380 Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January, 2011 Office of Fossil Energy LAND A ND R ESOURCE M ANAGEMENT I SSUES R ELEVANT T O D EPLOYING IN---SITU T HERMAL T ECHNOLOGIES Topical Report Reporting P eriod: O ctober 3 1, 2 009 t hrough D ecember 3 1, 2 010 Principal A uthors: R obert K eiter, J ohn R uple, H eather T anana, a nd M ichelle K line Report I ssued: J anuary 2 011 DOE A ward N o.: D E---FE0001243 University o f U tah Institute f or C lean a nd S ecure E nergy

376

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report June 2013 With Data as of January 1, 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Table 1. Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2013

377

Additional Climate Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Additional Climate Reports Print E-mail Additional Climate Reports Print E-mail Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Reports Internationally, many assessments have been produced to address important questions related to environmental issues such as ozone depletion, climate change, and the loss of biodiversity. Many of these assessments have provided the scientific basis for the elaboration of international agreements, including the Assessment Report Series from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC is a scientific intergovernmental body set up by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). IPCC assesses the scientific, technical and socio-economic information relevant for the understanding of the risk of human-induced climate change. Because of its intergovernmental nature, the IPCC is able to provide scientific technical and socio-economic information in a policy-relevant but policy neutral way to decision makers.

378

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

March 2011 DOEEIA-0121 (201004Q) Revised: July 2012 Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2010 March 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal...

379

ALS Activity Report 2004  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility developments during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information.

Tamura (Ed.), Lori S.

2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

380

Transportation Baseline Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Transportation Program 1999 Transportation Baseline Report presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste and materials transportation. In addition, this Report provides a summary overview of DOEs projected quantities of waste and materials for transportation. Data presented in this report were gathered as a part of the IPABS Spring 1999 update of the EM Corporate Database and are current as of July 30, 1999. These data were input and compiled using the Analysis and Visualization System (AVS) which is used to update all stream-level components of the EM Corporate Database, as well as TSD System and programmatic risk (disposition barrier) information. Project (PBS) and site-level IPABS data are being collected through the Interim Data Management System (IDMS). The data are presented in appendices to this report.

Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kramer, George Leroy Jr.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NETL Report format template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Size Distributions in Atmospheric-Generated Foamed Cement 9 August 2013 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-2-2013 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work...

382

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; stocks from 1973 through 1995, and trade from 1985 through 1995.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Press report African Monsoon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press report AMMA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses RREESSUULLTTSS AANNDD : Multidisziplinäre Analysen African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses Afrikaanse Moesson Multidisciplinaire Analyse ..................................................................................................................... 6 Mechanisms of the African monsoon: new insights from AMMA ................................. 6 I

Brierley, Andrew

384

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Reports on Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Working Groups ATLAS Users Meeting August 8-9, 2009-09-16 Report of working group on Nuclear Structure - Focus on Physics Convenors: D. Hartley, P. Fallon and M.P. Carpenter...

386

OverviewReportNew  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1,511.8 6192012 4:12:44 PM INLMIS-11-24311 ChargePoint America Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Summary Report Includes all charging units that were in use during the...

387

?Electronic monthly Highlight Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42961 Final Report Part 1: Phase I (CATTS Theory), Phase II (Milne Point) Part 2: Phase III (Hydrate Ridge) Submitted by:...

388

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with battery state of charge below 90% (for charging events with SOC reported) Vehicle Usage Number of trips 3,364 Total distance traveled (mi) 21,706 Avg trip distance (mi) 5.8...

389

Technical Report Technologically Enhanced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's National Hard Rock Mining Team and Abandoned Mine Lands Team, who are employees of the following EPA ..............................................................................1-16 Uranium Associations with Other Metal MiningTechnical Report on Technologically Enhanced Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials from Uranium

390

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Weekly Petroleum Status Report/Energy Information Administration v U.S. crude oil refinery inputs averaged about 14.6 million barrels per day during the week ending ...

391

NERSC Annual Report 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NERSC Annual Report highlights major events and accomplishments at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center during FY 1999. Topics include research by NERSC clients and staff and integration of new computing technologies.

Hules (editor), John A.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

ANTT Report to NERAC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Once through implies continuous buildup of Pu inventory. Transmutation stabilizes Pu at lower level. ANTT Report to NERAC 15 April 2002 4 Isotopic Mix 400,000 26 9 5 0...

393

2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2002 Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and summarizes the status of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental programs and performance and restoration efforts, as well as any impacts, both past and present, that Laboratory operations have had on the environment. The document is intended to be technical in nature. A summary of the report is also prepared as a separate document to provide a general overview and includes a CD version of the full report. Operated by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) for the Department of Energy (DOE), BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. BNL's motto, ''Exploring Life's Mysteries...Protecting its Future'', reflects BNL's management philosophy to fully integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of its missions, with a health balance between science and the environment.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Seismic Design Expectations Report (SDER) is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the technical sufficiency of the project seismic design activities prior to...

395

XFD progress report.  

SciTech Connect

In May 2002, the Advanced Photon Source (APS) was reorganized into three divisions: the Accelerator Systems Division (ASD), the APS Operations Division (AOD), and the Experimental Facilities Division (XFD). Parts of the former User Program Division (UPD) were incorporated into XFD; other parts were incorporated into AOD. This Progress Report summarizes the main scientific and technical activities of XFD and parts of the former UPD from January 2001 through June 2002. The report is divided into two major sections, (1) SRI-CAT Beamlines, Technical Developments, and Scientific Applications, and (2) User Technical Support, which describe the technical activities and research and development (R&D) accomplishments of the XFD and former UPD personnel in supporting the synchrotron radiation instrumentation (SRI) collaborative access team (CAT) and the general APS user community. Also included in this report is a comprehensive list of publications by XFD and UPD staff members during the time period covered by this report.

Gluskin, E.

2003-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hydropower Technology Roundup Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a preliminary examination of the practices and problems associated with trash and debris at hydropower installations. The Hydropower Technology Roundup project surveyed the perspectives of multiple hydropower producers with respect to their management of trash and debris.

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

397

MS Report Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the WDRS head is responsible for developing and maintaining the Human Resource Asset Management Assurance System. 1.5.8. Office of Quality and Best Practices Head Reporting to the...

398

MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand versus Time of Day 11182013 3:15:15 PM INLMIS-11-24311 Page 2 of 17 Residential Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Report period: July 2013 through September 2013...

399

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Appendix B Explanatory Notes and Detailed Methods Report 1. Overview .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 34 A. The Energy Information Administration's Quality Guidelines ............................................................................................................ 34 B. Concepts of Product Supply and Demand ........................................................................................................................................... 34 2. Weekly Petroleum Supply Surveys ............................................................................................................................................................

400

Uranium purchases report 1994  

SciTech Connect

US utilities are required to report to the Secretary of Energy annually the country of origin and the seller of any uranium or enriched uranium purchased or imported into the US, as well as the country of origin and seller of any enrichment services purchased by the utility. This report compiles these data and also contains a glossary of terms and additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. 3 tabs.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Decommissioning Technology Experience Reports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents four summary reports on field applications and demonstration tests of several nuclear plant deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. Specifically presented are findings from: (1) concrete decontamination technology tests at Rancho Seco; (2) a large bore piping decontamination and characterization demonstration at Big Rock Point; (3) gamma ray imaging for D&D applications; and (4) novel techniques for large tank and vessel removal at Trojan and Rancho Seco.

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

402

IG-0702 Report Cover  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use of Performance Based Use of Performance Based Incentives by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/IG-0702 September 2005 REPORT ON THE USE OF PERFORMANCE BASED INCENTIVES BY THE OFFICE OF CIVILIAN RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS Performance Based Incentives Details of Finding ......................................................................1 Recommendations and Comments.............................................6 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology....................................7 2. Prior Reports ........................................................................9 3. Listing of Performance Based Incentives ..........................10 4. Management Comments ....................................................12

403

Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

Herrera, Maria S.; Gonzalez, Sara J. [Comision National de Energia Atomica and CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J. [Comision National de Energia Atomica and CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UNSAM, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

404

4.1.2 HEAT OR COLD THERAPY AIM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To reduce pain and provide a comfort measure for women in labour. BACKGROUND INFORMATION Superficial application of hot or cold therapy is a common and popular choice for women in labour, with minimal side effects when appropriately used. 1 Superficial heat may be generated from hot packs, hot moist towels, heated silica gel packs, warm towels, baths and showers. Superficial cold can be produced from covered ice bags, frozen silica gel packs and towels soaked in icy water. 2 Recent research has indicated that the application of warm packs to the perineum during late second 3, 4 stage assists in relieving pain and providing comfort. KEY POINTS 1. Ensure the woman has no contra-indications to hot or cold application prior to use. 2. One to two layers of cloth should be placed between the womans skin and the hot or cold pack. 1 3. Wheat bags / hot water bottles should not be used at KEMH. 4. Microwave ovens should not be used for heating packs. 5. Hot packs shall only be heated in a hospital approved heating device with thermostatic control. The temperature of the heating device is to be checked daily; it must not exceed 50 degrees Celsius. The device is to be emptied and cleaned weekly. 6. See Clinical Guideline Section A 1.5 Local Application of heat for detailed information of local application of heat.

Pain Management; Relaxation Comfort Measures; Heat Or Cold Therapy; Section B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Microdosimetric investigations at the Fast Neutron Therapy Facility at Fermilab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microdosimetry was used to investigate three issues at the neutron therapy facility (NTF) at Fermilab. Firstly, the conversion factor from absorbed dose in A-150 tissue equivalent plastic to absorbed dose in ICRU tissue was determined. For this, the effective neutron kerma factor ratios, i.e. oxygen tissue equivalent plastic and carbon to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic, were measured in the neutron beam. An A-150 tissue equivalent plastic to ICRU tissue absorbed dose conversion factor of 0.92 {+-} 0.04 determined. Secondly, variations in the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) in the beam were mapped by determining variations in two related quantities, e{sup *} and R, with field size and depth in tissue. Maximal variation in e{sup *} and R of 9% and 15% respectively were determined. Lastly, the feasibility of utilizing the boron neutron capture reaction on boron-10 to selectively enhance the tumor dose in the NTF beam was investigated. In the unmodified beam, a negligible enhancement for a 50 ppm boron loading was measured. To boost the boron dose enhancement to 3% it was necessary to change the primary proton energy from 66 MeV and to filter the beam by 90 mm of tungsten.

Langen, K.M.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

406

LNG Annual Report - 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LNG Annual Report - 2011 LNG Annual Report - 2011 LNG Annual Report - 2011 (Revised 3152012) LNG Annual Report 2011 More Documents & Publications LNG Monthly Report - June 2013...

407

Final ECR 2008 Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final ECR 2008 Report Final ECR 2008 Report Final ECR 2008 Report Environmental Conflict Resolution Third Annual Report January 2009 More Documents & Publications ECR Annual Report...

408

Central Internet Database (CID) Reports  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Home > CID Reports Home > CID Reports Central Internet Database CID Photo Banner Reports The CID offers a choice of standard and archived reports. Standard reports are based on the most recently available DOE data related to the information requirements specified in the Settlement Agreement. Report categories include: Radioactive Waste Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Facilities Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste Toxic Release Inventory Waste The standard reports menu includes reports generated directly by the CID and reports generated by other systems. The CID generated reports allow users to select criteria to customize the report output. For the most current radioactive waste reports, CID users are directed to the Waste Information Management System (WIMS) Exit CID Website . WIMS provides radioactive waste disposition reports and disposition maps. While WIMS is a public site, you need to register and provide contact information the first time you enter WIMS.

409

AUDIT REPORT REPORT ON MATTERS IDENTIFIED AT THE IDAHO OPERATIONS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPORT ON MATTERS IDENTIFIED AT THE IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE DURING THE AUDIT OF THE DEPARTMENT'S CONSOLIDATED FISCAL YEAR 1998 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, WR-FS-99-01 AUDIT REPORT REPORT...

410

Impact of Gemcitabine Chemotherapy and 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy/5-Fluorouracil on Quality of Life of Patients Managed for Pancreatic Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL) results for patients receiving chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients (n=41 locally advanced, n=22 postsurgery) entered the B9E-AY-S168 study and received 1 cycle of induction gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly Multiplication-Sign 3 with 1-week break) followed by 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) (54 Gy locally advanced and 45 Gy postsurgery) and concomitant continuous-infusion 5-fluorouracil (5FU) (200 mg/m{sup 2}/d throughout RT). After 4 weeks, patients received an additional 3 cycles of consolidation gemcitabine chemotherapy. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PAN26 questionnaires at baseline, before RT/5FU, at end of RT/5FU, before consolidation gemcitabine, and at treatment completion. Results: The patterns of change in global QOL scores differed between groups. In the locally advanced group global QOL scores were +13, +8, +3, and +1 compared with baseline before RT/5FU (P=.008), at end of RT/5FU, before consolidation gemcitabine, and at treatment completion, respectively. In the postsurgery group, global QOL scores were -3, +4, +15, and +17 compared with baseline at the same time points, with a significant improvement in global QOL before consolidation gemcitabine (P=.03). No significant declines in global QOL were reported by either cohort. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that global QOL and associated function and symptom profiles for pancreatic chemoradiation therapy differ between locally advanced and postsurgery patients, likely owing to differences in underlying disease status. For both groups, the treatment protocol was well tolerated and did not have a negative impact on patients' global QOL.

Short, Michala [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia) [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Western Australia Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care/Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Goldstein, David [Department of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Halkett, Georgia [Western Australia Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care/Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)] [Western Australia Centre for Cancer and Palliative Care/Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Reece, William [Covance Asia Pacific, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)] [Covance Asia Pacific, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Borg, Martin [Adelaide Radiotherapy Centre, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia)] [Adelaide Radiotherapy Centre, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Zissiadis, Yvonne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Kneebone, Andrew [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)] [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Spry, Nigel, E-mail: Nigel.Spry@health.wa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Faculty of Medicine, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Prognosis for Mammographically Occult, Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conservation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare mammographically occult (MamOcc) and mammographically positive (MamPos) early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conservation therapy (BCT), to analyze differences between the two cohorts. Methods and Materials: Our two cohorts consisted of 214 MamOcc and 2168 MamPos patients treated with BCT. Chart reviews were conducted to assess mammogram reports and method of detection. All clinical-pathologic and outcome parameters were analyzed to detect differences between the two cohorts. Results: Median follow-up was 7 years. There were no differences in final margins, T stage, nodal status, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, or 'triple-negative' status. Significant differences included younger age at diagnosis (p < 0.0001), more positive family history (p = 0.0033), less HER-2+ disease (p = 0.0294), and 1{sup o} histology (p < 0.0001). At 10 years, the differences in overall survival, cause-specific survival, and distant relapse between the two groups did not differ significantly. The MamOcc cohort had more breast relapses (15% vs. 8%; p = 0.0357), but on multivariate analysis this difference was not significant (hazard ratio 1.0, 95% confidence interval 0.993-1.007, p = 0.9296). Breast relapses were mammographically occult in 32% of the MamOcc and 12% of the MamPos cohorts (p = 0.0136). Conclusions: Although our study suggests that there are clinical-pathologic variations for the MamOcc cohort vs. MamPos patients that may ultimately affect management, breast relapse after BCT was not significantly different. Breast recurrences were more often mammographically occult in the MamOcc cohort; consideration should be given to closer follow-up and alternative imaging strategies (ultrasound, breast MRI) for routine posttreatment examination. To our knowledge, this represents the largest series addressing the prognostic significance of MamOcc cancers treated with BCT.

Yang, Tzu-I. J. [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Yang Qifeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine, and Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Department of Breast Surgery, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine, and Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.ed [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Verification of dose distribution for volumetric modulated arc therapy total marrow irradiation in a humanlike phantom  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning studies have been reported to provide good target coverage and organs at risk (OARs) sparing in total marrow irradiation (TMI). A comprehensive dosimetric study simulating the clinical situation as close as possible is a norm in radiotherapy before a technique can be used to treat a patient. Without such a study, it would be difficult to make a reliable and safe clinical transition especially with a technique as complicated as VMAT-TMI. To this end, the dosimetric feasibility of VMAT-TMI technique in terms of treatment planning, delivery efficiency, and the most importantly three dimensional dose distribution accuracy was investigated in this study. The VMAT-TMI dose distribution inside a humanlike Rando phantom was measured and compared to the dose calculated using RapidArc especially in the field junctions and the inhomogeneous tissues including the lungs, which is the dose-limiting organ in TMI. Methods: Three subplans with a total of nine arcs were used to treat the planning target volume (PTV), which was determined as all the bones plus the 3 mm margin. Thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) were placed at 39 positions throughout the phantom. The measured TLD doses were compared to the calculated plan doses. Planar dose for each arc was verified using mapcheck. Results: TLD readings demonstrated accurate dose delivery, with a median dose difference of 0.5% (range: -4.3% and 6.6%) from the calculated dose in the junctions and in the inhomogeneous medium including the lungs. Conclusions: The results from this study suggest that RapidArc VMAT technique is dosimetrically accurate, safe, and efficient in delivering TMI within clinically acceptable time frame.

Surucu, Murat; Yeginer, Mete; Kavak, Gulbin O.; Fan, John; Radosevich, James A.; Aydogan, Bulent [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology University of Chicago, 5758 South Maryland Avenue, MC 9006, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Center for Molecular Biology of Oral Diseases, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Edwards Hospital, 801 South Washington Street, Naperville, Illinois 60540 (United States); Center for Molecular Biology of Oral Diseases, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States); Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology University of Chicago, 5758 South Maryland Avenue, MC 9006, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Illinois at Chicago Medical Center, 1801 West Taylor Street, C400, Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

2010 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection, of this volume. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the full report. BNL is operated and managed for DOE's Office of Science by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA), a partnership formed by Stony Brook University and Battelle Memorial Institute. For more than 60 years, the Laboratory has played a lead role in the DOE Science and Technology mission and continues to contribute to the DOE missions in energy resources, environmental quality, and national security. BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental issues and community concerns. The Laboratory's motto, 'Exploring Life's Mysteries...Protecting its Future,' and its Environmental, Safety, Security and Health Policy reflect the commitment of BNL's management to fully integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of its mission and operations.

Ratel, K.; Lee, R; Remien, J; Hooda, B; Green, T; Williams, J; Pohlot, P; Dorsch, W; Paquette, D; Burke, J

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Repeat Recipient Reporting in FederalReporting.gov  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy's (DOE) Webinar Transcript Energy's (DOE) Webinar Transcript Repeat Recipient Reporting in FederalReporting.gov Welcome to the Department of Energy's webinar for repeat reporters into FederalReporting.gov. Today we are just going to cover a brief overview of the timeline, give you some helpful hints, reiterate when your reporting is complete, and talk to your briefly about some new features in FederalReporting.gov.

415

2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform the public, regulators, Laboratory employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The report summarizes BNL's environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The SER is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/esd/SER.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD version of the full report. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; SER TEAM; ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SERVICES GROUP; ENVIROMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION FIELD SAMPLING TEAM; (MANY OTHER CONTRIBUTORS)

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

416

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Reporting Guidelines  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reporting Guidelines Reporting Guidelines Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Reporting Guidelines The purpose of the guidelines is to establish the procedures and requirements for filing voluntary reports, and to ensure that the annual reports of greenhouse gas emissions, emission reductions, and sequestration activities submitted by corporations, government agencies, non-profit organizations, households, and other private and public entities to submit are complete, reliable, and consistent. Over time, it is anticipated that these reports will provide a reliable record of the contributions reporting entities have made toward reducing their greenhouse gas emissions. General Guidelines General Guidelines Technical Guidelines Technical Guidelines Appendices to the Technical Guidelines:

417

Report on "Inspection of Reporting at Oak Ridge of Potential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Report on "Inspection of Reporting at Oak Ridge of Potential Noncompliances With DOE Price-Anderson Amendments Act Implementing...

418

Recent breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapy use: the California Teachers Study cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapyA, Ward E, Thun MJ: Recent trends in breast cancer incidencein France: a paradoxical trend. Bull Cancer 10. Katalinic A,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & EChapter 19 Vitamin E in Disease Prevention and Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Antioxidant Vitamins C & E Chapter 19 Vitamin E in Disease Prevention and Therapy Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 19 Vitamin E in

420

A microfluidic platform for combinatorial synthesis and optimization of targeted polymeric nanoparticles for cancer therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of nanotechnology to engineer drug delivery vehicles comprised of controlled release polymers with targeting molecules has the potential to revolutionize cancer therapy, among other diseases. Although a myriad of ...

Valencia, Pedro M. (Pedro Miguel)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ISER - Emergency Situation Reports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

extra space extra space Link: Energy home page About the DOE| Organization| News|Contact Us extra space Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability OE Home ISER Home Services Information Center Mission News You are here: DOE Home > OE Home > Emergency Situation Reports Emergency Situation Reports Banner Graphic Printer-friendly icon Printer-Friendly National Hurricane Center - NOAA Emergency Situation Reports 2013 The year began with a blizzard impacting the Northeast. In early October, Tropical Storm Karen formed and has the ability to potentially impact Florida and the greater Gulf Coast. December brought a major winter storm stretching from Texas to New York. Winter Storm Tropical Storm Karen Northeast Blizzard 2012 Events in 2012 include the Derecho, impacting the Ohio Valley and Mid-Atlantic, Hurricane Isaac, impacting Florida and the Gulf Coast, and Hurricane Sandy, impacting the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast.

422

DOE WEEKLY REPORT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 30, 2009 January 30, 2009 The following program offices did not submit a Weekly Report for this time period: All Program Offices Reported BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION WEEKLY REPORT January 30, 2009 Schedule February 2 - 5: The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Administrator Steve Wright will be in Washington, D.C., to meet with members of the Pacific Northwest congressional delegation and Department of Energy officials. Deputy . . iiuuiJli atut JteVc u ■, acting. February 12: The Administrator will participate in the first meeting of the Oregon Energy Planning Council. Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski invited the Administrator to serve on the 11 member council to provide analysis, advice and assistance on energy planning for the state. February 25: The Administrator is Chairman of the United States Entity for the

423

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

all charging units that were in use by the end of the reporting period all charging units that were in use by the end of the reporting period ² A charging event is defined as the period when a vehicle is connected to a charging unit, during which period some power is transferred ³ Considers the connection status of all charging units every minute Based on 15 minute rolling average power output from all charging units Note: throughout this report, weekdays are defined as the period from Monday 6:00 AM until Saturday 6:00 AM. The weekend is defined as the period from Saturday 6:00 AM until Monday 6:00 AM. Charging Availability: Range of Percent of Charging Units with a Vehicle Connected versus Time of Day³ Charging Unit Usage Residential Level 2 Private Nonresidential Level 2 Publicly Available Level 2 Publicly Available DC Fast

424

Table for Reports - ESG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESG Reports and Documents ESG Reports and Documents Click on any PDF link below to view a file. For best results be sure to use the Adobe Reader, which available for no cost from Adobe. Site Environmental Reports 2012 Volume 1 (PDF) Volume 2 (PDF) Survey Form (PDF) Approval Letter in Volume 1 2011 Volume 1 (PDF) Volume 2 (PDF) Survey Form (PDF) Approval Letter (PDF) 2010 Volume 1 (PDF) Volume 2 (PDF) Survey Form (PDF) Approval Letter (PDF) 2009 Volume 1 (PDF) Volume 2 (PDF) Survey Form (PDF) Approval Letter (PDF) 2008 Volume 1 (PDF) Volume 2 (PDF) Survey Form (PDF) Approval Letter (PDF) 2007 Volume 1 (PDF) Volume 2 (PDF) Survey Form (PDF) Approval Letter (PDF) 2006 Volume 1 (PDF) Volume 2 (PDF) Survey Form (PDF) Approval Letter (PDF) 2005 Volume 1 (PDF) Volume 2 (PDF) Survey Form (PDF) Approval Letter

425

2004 NSLS Activity Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NatioNal NatioNal SyNchrotroN light Source activity report 2004 BNL 73577 National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2004 BNL-73577-2005 UC400 (General Energy Research) DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commerical product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

426

final_report.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Scientific/Technical Report Final Scientific/Technical Report October 1, 2008 - December 31, 2011 Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle Submitted by: The University of Chicago 5801 S. Ellis Avenue Chicago, IL 60637 Principal Author: David Archer Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 10, 2012 Office of Fossil Energy 1 Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle Final Scientific/Technical Report submitted by David Archer 1 and Bruce Buffett 2 Submitted 4-10-2012 1 Department of the Geophysical Sciences University of Chicago Chicago IL 60637 2 University of California, Berkeley Earth & Planetary Science 383 McCone Hall Berkeley, CA 94720-5800 Agency Award Number: DE-NT0006558 Award Dates 1/1/08 to 12/31/11

427

NERSC System Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Usage Reports Batch Job Statistics See queue wait times, hours used, top users and other summary statistics for jobs run at NERSC (login required). Read More » Parallel Job Statistics (Cray aprun) $RestfulQuery4... Read More » Hopper Hours Used Hours used per day on Hopper. Read More » Edison Hours Used Hours used per day on Hopper. Read More » Carver Hours Used Hours used per day on Carver. Read More » Historical Data Hopper Job Size Charts This charts shows the fraction of hours used on Hopper in each of 5 job-core-size bins. 2013 2012 . 2011 . This chart shows the fraction of hours used on Hopper by jobs using greater than 16,384 cores. 2013 2012 ... Read More » Edison Job Size Charts This charts shows the fraction of hours used on Edison in each of 5

428

Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-460 -460 Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report Third Quarter, 1997 October 1997 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. 1 - I : ~vailablk to DOE and DOE contractors from the. Office of Scientific - and Technical .Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 3783 1 ; prices available from (423) 576-840 1. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22 16 1, telephone (703) 487-4650. RULISON SITE GROUNDWATER MONITORING REPORT THIRD QUARTER, 1997 DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada

429

Magellan Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magellan Report on Magellan Report on Cloud Computing for Science U.S. Department of Energy Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) December, 2011 CSO 23179 The Magellan Report on Cloud Computing for Science U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) December, 2011 Magellan Leads Katherine Yelick, Susan Coghlan, Brent Draney, Richard Shane Canon Magellan Staff Lavanya Ramakrishnan, Adam Scovel, Iwona Sakrejda, Anping Liu, Scott Campbell, Piotr T. Zbiegiel, Tina Declerck, Paul Rich Collaborators This research used resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02¬06CH11357, funded through the American Recovery

430

2009 ECR Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth Annual Report Fourth Annual Report January 2010 U.S. Department of Energy ECR 2009 Final Report 2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) defines environmental conflict resolution (ECR) as the use of any collaborative process to prevent or resolve environmental conflicts, including, but not limited to, those processes involving the use of third-party neutrals. This definition is consistent with that provided in the Administration's 2005 Memorandum on Environmental Conflict Resolution, which acknowledged the value of all types of dispute resolution and collaborative problem solving. Collaborative approaches to avoiding or resolving environmental conflicts have been used by DOE sites prior to the issuance of the ECR memorandum and continue to be used

431

MCELROY REPORT; ROUGH DRAFT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combining a New 3-D Seismic S-Wave Propagation Analysis Combining a New 3-D Seismic S-Wave Propagation Analysis for Remote Fracture Detection with a Robust Subsurface Microfracture-Based Verification Technique FINAL REPORT June 6, 2000-December 31, 2003 Principal Authors: Bob Hardage, M. M. Backus, M. V. DeAngelo, R. J. Graebner, S. E. Laubach, and Paul Murray Report Issue Date: February 2004 DOE Contract No. DE-AC26-00NT40690 Submitting Organization: Bureau of Economic Geology The University of Texas at Austin University Station, Box X Austin, TX 78713-8924 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

432

SPEAR3 Quarterly Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April through June April through June 2000 TABLE OF CONTENTS A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 2. Cost Reporting B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 1.2 Vacuum System 1.3 Power Supplies 1.4 RF System 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 1.6 Cable Plant 1.8 Facilities 2.1 Accelerator Physics 2.2 Environmental Safety & Health A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress On June 13-14, 2000, a DOE (Lehman) review committee conducted the third construction management review of the SPEAR 3 project. The charge to the committee was to examine the technical progress together with the cost, schedule, and management of the project. We are pleased to present the following excerpts from the Executive Summary of the committee report: “The project team has made very good progress on the development of

433

Elegant Parallelization Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Elegant Parallelization Progress Report Elegant Parallelization Progress Report 10/24/07 Yusong Wang Michael Borland Hairong Shang Robert Soliday Elegant Parallelization Progress Report Y. Wang, 10/24/07 Simulations with a Large Number of Particles  Recent development  Each slave is allocated memory only for the portion of particles it owns, instead of the memory required for all the particles  On a cluster of quad-cores, configured master to be run on a single node without sharing memory with other slave nodes to allow maximal number of particles to be simulated ( master holds all the particles information for reading and writing)  Current capability and limitations  Simulated with 60 million particles on apex cluster  Can't simulate with 100 million or more particles because of the

434

SPEAR 3 Quarterly Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

through December through December 2000 TABLE OF CONTENTS A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 2. Cost Reporting B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 1.2 Vacuum System 1.3 Power Supplies 1.4 RF System 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 1.6 Cable Plant 1.8 Facilities 2.1 Accelerator Physics 2.2 Environmental Health and Safety A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress Some staff changes have occurred during this quarter as shown in the organization chart (Fig. A1). The Project Management Control System (PMCS) area is now headed by Steve McNiel who replaces Teri Knight. Teri has helped set-up the PMCS operation and reporting system over the last year and we deeply appreciate her efforts. Both Steve and Teri have the experience of utilizing the Primavera/Cobra system for tracking and

435

Seismic Design Expectations Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seismic Design Expectations Report Seismic Design Expectations Report March 2010 CD- This Rev of th Se -0 view Module w he overall Cons OFFICE O eismic De C CD-1 was used to dev struction Projec inco OF ENVIRO Standard esign Exp Critical Deci CD-2 M velop the Revie ct Review cond orporated in the ONMENTA Review Pla pectation ision (CD) A C March 2010 ew Plan for the ducted in 2009 e current versio AL MANAG an (SRP) ns Report Applicability D-3 e Oak Ridge Bl 9. Lessons lear on of the Modu GEMENT t (SDER) CD-4 ldg. 3019 60% rned from this r ule. ) Post Ope design review review have be eration w as part een Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental

436

Cyber Security Evaluations - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cyber Security Reports Cyber Security Reports 2012 Review of the Classified Cyber Security Programs at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, January 2012, (OUO) Independent Oversight Review of the Classified Cyber Security Programs at the Savannah River Site, March 2012, (OUO) Independent Oversight Review of the Unclassified and Classified Cyber Security Programs at the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, March 2012, (OUO) Independent Oversight 2011 Report on Security Vulnerabilities of National Laboratory Computers, April 13, 2012, (OUO) Technical Review of the Office of Health, Safety and Security Classified Local Area Network, May 2012, (OUO) 2011 (U) Unclassified Cyber Security Technical Review of the Bonneville Power Administration Transmission Services Control Center Network, (OUO), May 2011

437

Report.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 FORD RANGER ELECTRIC 8 FORD RANGER ELECTRIC WITH NICKEL/METAL-HYDRIDE BATTERY ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Report prepared by: Ben Sanchez Juan C. Argueta Jordan W. Smith September 1999 DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES THIS REPORT WAS PREPARED BY THE ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON, A SUBSIDIARY OF EDISON INTERNATIONAL. NEITHER THE ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON, EDISON INTERNATIONAL, NOR ANY PERSON WORKING FOR OR ON BEHALF OF ANY OF THEM MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, (I) WITH RESPECT TO THE USE OF ANY INFORMATION, PRODUCT, PROCESS OR PROCEDURE DISCUSSED IN THIS REPORT, INCLUDING MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR (II) THAT SUCH USE DOES NOT

438

Microsoft Word - Report Cover  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audit Services Audit Services Audit Report Status Report: The Department of Energy's State Energy Program Formula Grants Awarded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act OAS-RA-10-17 September 2010 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 21, 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: "Status Report: The Department of Energy's State Energy Program Formula Grants Awarded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act" BACKGROUND Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act), the Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) received $3.1 billion to be distributed through the State Energy Program (SEP) to stimulate the economy

439

Report.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NISSAN ALTRA-EV NISSAN ALTRA-EV WITH LITHIUM-ION BATTERY ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Report prepared by: Christopher Madrid Juan Argueta Jordan Smith September 1999 2 DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES THIS REPORT WAS PREPARED BY THE ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON, A SUBSIDIARY OF EDISON INTERNATIONAL. NEITHER THE ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON, EDISON INTERNATIONAL, NOR ANY PERSON WORKING FOR OR ON BEHALF OF ANY OF THEM MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, (I) WITH RESPECT TO THE USE OF ANY INFORMATION, PRODUCT, PROCESS OR PROCEDURE DISCUSSED IN THIS REPORT, INCLUDING MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR (II) THAT SUCH USE DOES NOT

440

Report2.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHRYSLER EPIC CHRYSLER EPIC WITH SAFT NICKEL/METAL-HYDRIDE BATTERY ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Report prepared by: Ben Sanchez Juan Argueta November 1999 DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES THIS REPORT WAS PREPARED BY THE ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON, A SUBSIDIARY OF EDISON INTERNATIONAL. NEITHER THE ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON, EDISON INTERNATIONAL, NOR ANY PERSON WORKING FOR OR ON BEHALF OF ANY OF THEM MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, (I) WITH RESPECT TO THE USE OF ANY INFORMATION, PRODUCT, PROCESS OR PROCEDURE DISCUSSED IN THIS REPORT, INCLUDING MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR (II) THAT SUCH USE DOES NOT

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

report.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHEVROLET S-10 ELECTRIC CHEVROLET S-10 ELECTRIC Panasonic Lead Acid Battery ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Report prepared by: Alvaro Mendoza Juan Argueta December 1999 DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES THIS REPORT WAS PREPARED BY THE ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON, A SUBSIDIARY OF EDISON INTERNATIONAL. NEITHER THE ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON, EDISON INTERNATIONAL, NOR ANY PERSON WORKING FOR OR ON BEHALF OF ANY OF THEM MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, (I) WITH RESPECT TO THE USE OF ANY INFORMATION, PRODUCT, PROCESS OR PROCEDURE DISCUSSED IN THIS REPORT, INCLUDING MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, OR (II) THAT SUCH USE DOES

442

Beam director design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30/sup 0/ beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project. (LEW)

Younger, F.C.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Blackout Final Implementation Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Report on the Implementation of the Task Force Recommendations U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force Natural Resources Canada U.S. Department of Energy September 2006 Final Report on the Implementation of the Task Force Recommendations U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force September 2006 Natural Resources Canada U.S. Department of Energy Acknowledgments This document was prepared by staff of Natural Resources Canada and the U.S. Department of Energy. The principal contributors are listed in Annex 1. The staff wish to acknowledge the contributions of the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the Ontario Ministry of Energy. The staff also wish to acknowl- edge the support and cooperation of the North American Electric Reliability Council and, in particular, of Mr. David Nevius, Senior Vice President and Direc- tor of Reliability Assessment & Performance

444

ANTT Report to NERAC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 April 2002 5 April 2002 1 April 15, 2002 Burton Richter, Chair Darleane C. Hoffman Sekazi K. Mtingwa Ronald P. Omberg Joy L. Rempe ANTT Report to NERAC 15 April 2002 2 q Last meeting of the subcommittee: February 25-26, 2002. q Comprehensive review of the status of the program. q This report defines the three-phase program: Ø Proof of potential utility. Ø Proof of technical feasibility. Ø Proof of demonstration project operability. ANTT Report to NERAC 15 April 2002 3 Phase I q Cost About $60 million for the first two and a half years. About $80 million to the end of FY2002 q Criteria 1- Radiological Impact: less than ore in < 10,000 years for 1% "leakage." < lifetime of pyramids for ½%. q Criteria 2 - Repository: Yucca Mountain full with spent fuel produced by 2015 Transmutation reduces volume by four times and the

445

QUARTERLY REPORT OUTLINE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INEEL/EXT-04-02482 INEEL/EXT-04-02482 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity NYPA/TH!NK Clean Commute Program Report - Inception through May 2004 TECHNICAL REPORT Don Karner James Francfort Randall Solomon November 2004 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC INEEL/EXT-04-02482 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity NYPA/TH!NK Clean Commute Program Report - Inception through May 2004 Don Karner 1 James Francfort 2 Randall Solomon 3 November 2004 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Transportation Technology and Infrastructure Department Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415

446

EIA Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Drilling Productivity Report Drilling Productivity Report For Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University October 29, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources Adam Sieminski, EIA Drilling Productivity Report October 29, 2013 2 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) 0.0 0.4 0.8 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (MT & ND) Granite Wash (OK & TX) Bonespring (TX Permian) Wolfcamp (TX Permian) Spraberry (TX Permian) Niobrara-Codell (CO) Woodford (OK)

447

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The STI product is the Final Technical Report from ReliOn, Inc. for contract award DE-EE0000487: Recovery Act PEM Fuel Cell Systems Providing Emergency Reserve and Backup Power. The program covered the turnkey deployment of 431 ReliOn fuel cell systems at 189 individual sites for AT&T and PG&E with ReliOn functioning as the primary equipment supplier and the project manager. The Final Technical Report provides an executive level summary, a comparison of the actual accomplishments vs. the goals and objectives of the project, as well as a summary of the project activity from the contract award date of August 1, 2009 through the contract expiration date of December 31, 2011. Two photos are included in the body of the report which show hydrogen storage and bulk hydrogen refueling technologies developed as a result of this program.

Maxwell, Mike, J., P.E.

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

Radiation Therapy Is Associated With Improved Survival in the Adjuvant and Definitive Treatment of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (IHC) are rare tumors for which large randomized studies regarding the use of radiation are not available. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of adjuvant and definitive radiation therapy in the treatment of IHC in a large group of patients. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective analysis of 3,839 patients with IHC collected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Results: Patients received either surgery alone (25%), radiation therapy alone (10%), surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy (7%) or no treatment (58%). The median age of the patient population was 73 years (range, 22-102 years); 52% of patients were male and 81% were Caucasian. Median OS was 11 (95% confidence interval [CI], 9-13), 6 (95% CI, 5-6), 7 (95% CI, 6-8), and 3 months for surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy, sugery alone, radiation therapy alone, and no treatment, respectively. The OS was significantly different between surgery alone and surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy (p = 0.014) and radiation therapy alone and no treatment (p < 0.0001). Use of surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy conferred the greatest benefit on OS (HR = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.34-0.47), followed by surgery alone (hazard ratio [HR], 0.49; 95% CI, 0.44-0.54) and radiation therapy alone (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.59-0.77) compared with no treatment, on multivariate analysis. Propensity score adjusted hazard ratios (controlling for age, race/ethnicity, stage, and year of diagnosis) were also significant (surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy vs. surgery alone (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.70-0.96); radiation therapy alone vs. no treatment (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.58-0.76)). Conclusions: The study results suggest that adjuvant and definitive radiation treatment prolong survival, although cure rates remain low. Future studies should evaluate the addition of chemotherapy and biologics to the treatment of IHC.

Shinohara, Eric T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)], E-mail: Shinohara@xrt.upenn.edu; Mitra, Nandita; Guo Mengye [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

MCNP speed advances for boron neutron capture therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatment planning process of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center-M.I.T team relies on MCNP to determine dose rates in the subject`s head for various beam orientations. In this time consuming computational process, four or five potential beams are investigated. Of these, one or two final beams are selected and thoroughly evaluated. Recent advances greatly decreased the time needed to do these MCNP calculations. Two modifications to the new MCNP4B source code, lattice tally and tracking enhancements, reduced the wall-clock run times of a typical one million source neutrons run to one hour twenty five minutes on a 200 MHz Pentium Pro computer running Linux and using the GNU FORTRAN compiler. Previously these jobs used a special version of MCNP4AB created by Everett Redmond, which completed in two hours two minutes. In addition to this 30% speedup, the MCNP4B version was adapted for use with Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) on personal computers running the Linux operating system. MCNP, using PVM, can be run on multiple computers simultaneously, offering a factor of speedup roughly the same as the number of computers used. With two 200 MHz Pentium Pro machines, the run time was reduced to forty five minutes, a 1.9 factor of improvement over the single Linux computer. While the time of a single run was greatly reduced, the advantages associated with PVM derive from using computational power not already used. Four possible beams, currently requiring four separate runs, could be run faster when each is individually run on a single machine under Windows NT, rather than using Linux and PVM to run one after another with each multiprocessed across four computers. It would be advantageous, however, to use PVM to distribute the final two beam orientations over four computers.

Goorley, J.T.; McKinney, G.; Adams, K.; Estes, G.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

Yoon, Myonggeun, E-mail: mxy131@ncc.re.k [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

quarterly report- Jan03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Inspector General's Message 1 Top Management Challenges 2 Inadequate Controls in Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments Program 2 Nuclear Safety Improvements Needed at the Department's Ashtabula Site 3 Improvements Needed in the Department's Explosive Safety Program 3 Domestic Calutron Isotope Production Capabilities 4 Chiropractor Pleads Guilty to Improper Billing at Hanford 4 Contractor Employee Sentenced for Possession of Child Pornography on a Government Computer 3 Improvements Needed in Business Management Information System Greg Friedman The Office of Inspector General (OIG) is pleased to provide its Quarterly Report to the Secretary as well as the members of the Congress. This report summarizes significant audit, investigation, and

452

Site Environmental Report, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` This 1993 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in the Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Alvaro_Report.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Operations Program Field Operations Program Chevrolet S-10 Electric with NiMH Battery PERFORMANCE CHARACTERIZATION U.S DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Agreement No. DE-FC07-96ID13474 ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Report prepared by: Alvaro Mendoza, Jordan Smith, Juan Argueta, Michel Wehrey, Tom Knipe. September 1999 2 DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES THIS REPORT WAS PREPARED BY THE ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON, A SUBSIDIARY OF EDISON INTERNATIONAL. NEITHER THE ELECTRIC TRANSPORTATION DIVISION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON, EDISON INTERNATIONAL, NOR ANY PERSON WORKING FOR OR ON BEHALF OF ANY OF THEM MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED,

454

2005 report 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CELEBRATING THE WORLD YEAR OF PHYSICS CELEBRATING THE WORLD YEAR OF PHYSICS 2005 Annual Report Fermilab Friends for Science Education FERMILAB FRIENDS FOR SCIENCE EDUCATION f ANNUAL REPORT 2005 2005 HONORARY BOARD OF DIRECTORS Edwin L. Goldwasser Professor of Physics, retired University of Illinois Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs retired, University of Illinois Stanka Jovanovic Manager, retired Fermilab Education Office President, retired Friends of Fermilab Leon M. Lederman Nobel Laureate 1991 President of AAAS Director Emeritus, Fermilab Professor of Physics Illinois Institute of Technology Pier Oddone Director Fermilab John Peoples, Jr. Director Emeritus Fermilab Norman F. Ramsey Nobel Laureate Higgins Professor of Physics Harvard University Judith J. Schramm

455

2011 OMB Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011 Annual Report for The Department of Energy 1. Please describe the importance of standards in the achievement of your agency's mission, how your agency uses standards to deliver its primary services in support of its mission, and provide any examples or case studies of standards success. Please include relevant Internet links and links to your agency's standards website. In accordance with the 2011 OMB Report data call, the Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) asked for input from all DOE organizations. The request included a documentation of new case studies involving the benefits of non- government voluntary consensus standards in DOE work. Based on the input received,

456

PERIODIC GLOW DISCHARGE REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GLOW DISCHARGE REPORT GLOW DISCHARGE REPORT TIME: Jan 11 2014 11:29:09:000PM Power Supply ON/OFF Status OFF Power Supply Fault Status FAULT Power Supply Standby Status ON Power Supply Interlock Status NOT OK HV Power Resistors Status NORMAL Power Supply Voltage 52.00 Power Supply Current -71.00 Electrode 1 Voltage -15.00 Electrode 1 Current -79.00 Electrode 2 Voltage -14.00 Electrode 2 Current -70.00 ROSS 1 Status OPEN ROSS 2 Status OPEN ROSS 1 Common Line OPEN ROSS 2 Common Line OPEN IGBT1 Enable DISABLE IGBT2 Enable DISABLE

457

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Includes all charging units that were in use by the end of the reporting period Includes all charging units that were in use by the end of the reporting period ² A charging event is defined as the period when a vehicle is connected to a charging unit, during which period some power is transferred ³ Considers the connection status of all charging units every minute Based on 15 minute rolling average power output from all charging units Charging Availability: Range of Percent of Charging Units with a Vehicle Connected versus Time of Day³

458

LLW Forum meeting report  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the details of the Quarterly Meeting of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Forum held in San Diego, California during January 23-25, 1991. Topics discussed include: State and Compact Progress Reports; Legal Updates; Update on Technical Assistance; Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Regarding Surcharge Rebates; Update on TCC Activities; NRC Update; Disposal of Commercial Mixed Waste; Update on EPA Activities; ACNW Working Group on Mixed Waste; National Profile on Mixed Waste; Commercial Perspective on Mixed Waste; Update on DOT Activities; Source Terms; Materials and Waste; Storage: and Waste Acceptance Criteria and Packaging.

NONE

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

Arundo Donax Analysis Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a summary report of preliminary analysis conducted on Arundo Donax. Arundo Donax was received from Greenwood Resources via Portland General Electric. PGE plans to transition a coal-fired boiler to 100% biomass by 2020, and has partnered with EPRI and INL to conduct the necessary testing and development to understand what needs to take place to make this transition. Arundo Donax is a promising energy crop for biopower, and is as yet relatively untested and uncharacterized. The INL has begun initial characterization of this material, and this summary report presents the initial findings.

Corrie I. Nichol, Ph.D.; Tyler L. Westover, Ph.D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

PPPL Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

Contained in the following report are data for radioactivity in the environment collected and analyzed by Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratorys Princeton Environmental, Analytical, and Radiological Laboratory (PEARL). The PEARL is located on?site and is certified for analyzing radiological and non?radiological parameters through the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protections Laboratory Certification Program, Certification Number 12471. Non?radiological surface and ground water samples are analyzed by NJDEP certified subcontractor laboratories QC, Inc. and Accutest Laboratory. To the best of our knowledge, these data, as contained in the Annual Site Environmental Report for 2011, are documented and certified to be correct.

Virginia Finley, Robeert Sheneman and Jerry Levine

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Annual report to Congress  

SciTech Connect

This is the eighth annual report submitted by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) to Congress. It covers activities and expenditures during Fiscal Year 1991, which ended September 30, 1991. Chapter 1 of this report describes OCRWM`s mission and objectives. Chapters 2 through 8 cover the following topics: earning public trust and confidence; geological disposal; monitored retrieval storage; transportation; systems integration and regulatory compliance; international programs; and program management. Financial statements for the Nuclear Waste Fund are presented in Chapter 9.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Evaluation of the Role of Radiation Therapy in the Management of Malignant Thymoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The management of patients diagnosed with thymoma remains unclear. This report attempts to identify the impact of adjuvant radiotherapy on overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) in patients diagnosed with thymoma. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with thymic malignancy between 1973 and 2003 were retrospectively identified from centers participating in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. Those patients classified as having thymic carcinoma were excluded from this analysis. OS and CSS were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Outcomes for patients treated with and without radiation therapy were compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed with the Cox proportional hazards model to analyze factors predictive of OS and CSS. Results: A total of 1,464 patients were identified as having thymic malignancy, and of these, 1,254 patients were identified as having malignant thymoma. The median follow-up time was 41 months (range, 4-337 months). Among patients who did not receive radiotherapy (RT), the 10-year rate of OS was 41% compared to 42% for those who did receive RT (p = 0.06). The median OS for the patients who did not receive RT was 80 months compared to 97 months for those who did receive RT. In patients with Masaoka stage II-III malignancy, OS was significantly improved with RT (p = 0.002), and a trend in improved CSS was observed (p = 0.1). Patients were also analyzed based on resection status. For those patients who had an incomplete excision, the 10-year OS was 63% with RT and 46% without RT (p = 0.38). On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of OS included age, extent of surgery, stage, and number of lymph nodes examined. Conclusions: This study reports treatment results of a large cohort of patients who were diagnosed with malignant thymoma. This study demonstrates that the use of RT following resection for thymoma significantly improves OS for those with regional disease and marginally improves CSS.

Patel, Shilpen, E-mail: Shilpenp@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Macdonald, O. Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Providence Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas (United States); Nagda, Suneel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Bittner, Nathan [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Center, Tacoma, Washington (United States); Suntharalingam, Mohan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1970). tpresent address: Chemistry Department, University ofSept. 1970); Nuclear Chemistry Division Annual Report, 1969,S. G. Thompson, in Nuclear Chemistry Division Annual Report

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464