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1

Comparison of flat cleaved and cylindrical diffusing fibers as treatment sources for interstitial photodynamic therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: For interstitial photodynamic therapy (iPDT) of bulky tumors, careful treatment planning is required in order to ensure that a therapeutic dose is delivered to the tumor, while minimizing damage to surrounding normal tissue. In clinical contexts, iPDT has typically been performed with either flat cleaved or cylindrical diffusing optical fibers as light sources. Here, the authors directly compare these two source geometries in terms of the number of fibers and duration of treatment required to deliver a prescribed light dose to a tumor volume. Methods: Treatment planning software for iPDT was developed based on graphics processing unit enhanced Monte Carlo simulations. This software was used to optimize the number of fibers, total energy delivered by each fiber, and the position of individual fibers in order to deliver a target light dose (D{sub 90}) to 90% of the tumor volume. Treatment plans were developed using both flat cleaved and cylindrical diffusing fibers, based on tissue volumes derived from CT data from a head and neck cancer patient. Plans were created for four cases: fixed energy per fiber, fixed number of fibers, and in cases where both or neither of these factors were fixed. Results: When the number of source fibers was fixed at eight, treatment plans based on flat cleaved fibers required each to deliver 7180–8080 J in order to deposit 90 J/cm{sup 2} in 90% of the tumor volume. For diffusers, each fiber was required to deliver 2270–2350 J (333–1178 J/cm) in order to achieve this same result. For the case of fibers delivering a fixed 900 J, 13 diffusers or 19 flat cleaved fibers at a spacing of 1 cm were required to deliver the desired dose. With energy per fiber fixed at 2400 J and the number of fibers fixed at eight, diffuser fibers delivered the desired dose to 93% of the tumor volume, while flat cleaved fibers delivered this dose to 79%. With both energy and number of fibers allowed to vary, six diffusers delivering 3485–3600 J were required, compared to ten flat cleaved fibers delivering 2780–3600 J. Conclusions: For the same number of fibers, cylindrical diffusers allow for a shorter treatment duration compared to flat cleaved fibers. For the same energy delivered per fiber, diffusers allow for the insertion of fewer fibers in order to deliver the same light dose to a target volume.

Baran, Timothy M., E-mail: timothy.baran@rochester.edu; Foster, Thomas H. [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States)] [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

BERAC Subcommittee Report on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Clinical  

Office of Science (SC) Website

BERAC Subcommittee Report on Boron Neutron Capture BERAC Subcommittee Report on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Clinical Trials. Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) BERAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Current BERAC Charges Archive of BERAC Reports Charter .pdf file (40KB) BER Committees of Visitors BER Home Charges/Reports BERAC Subcommittee Report on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Clinical Trials. Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page BERAC Subcommittee Report on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Clinical Trials. In response to the charge letter from Dr. Martha Krebs, Office of Science, dated November 5, 1998. Committee members: Bijay Mukherji, M.D., Chair, University of Connecticut Health Sciences Center, Walter Curran, M.D., Thomas Jefferson University;

3

Interstitial Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography as a Local Tumor Necrosis Predictor in Photodynamic Therapy of Prostatic Carcinoma: An In vivo Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...diameter spot size. The optical power was measured before each treatment with a calibrated optical power meter (840-C; Newport Instruments...portable spectrometer (SD2000; Ocean Optics). Although a wide range...therapy can be assessed with power Doppler ultrasonography. Lasers...

Beau A. Standish; Kenneth K.C. Lee; Xiao Jin; Adrian Mariampillai; Nigel R. Munce; Michael F.G. Wood; Brian C. Wilson; I. Alex Vitkin; and Victor X.D. Yang

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Brief Report: Tracheal Allotransplantation after Withdrawal of Immunosuppressive Therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...decided to reconstruct a long-segment tracheal defect in a patient by using an allograft that was initially revascularized by heterotopic wrapping in vascularized fascia. Case Report. The patient was a 55-year-old woman who had been involved in a car accident 25 years earlier and had undergone tracheotomy... A donor trachea, harvested from a cadaver, was transplanted into the forearm of a recipient and wrapped in the recipient's fascia. Months later, a vascular supply to the allograft had become established, and the tracheal epithelium had repopulated with a buccal mucosa graft from the recipient. Immunosuppressive therapy was stopped, and the allograft was used to repair the recipient's tracheal defect. The graft continues to function more than 1 year later.

Delaere P.Vranckx J.Verleden G.De Leyn P.Van Raemdonck D.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

5

Carborane derivative development for boron neutron capture therapy. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy [BNCT] is a binary method of cancer therapy based on the capture of neutrons by a boron-10 atom [{sup 10}B]. Cytotoxic {sup 7}Li nuclei and {alpha}-particles are emitted, with a range in tissue of 9 and 5 {micro}m, respectively, about one cell diameter. The major obstacle to clinically viable BNCT is the selective localization of 5-30 ppm {sup 10}B in tumor cells required for effective therapy. A promising approach to BNCT is based on hydrophilic boron-rich oligomeric phosphate diesters, or ''trailers'' that have been shown to concentrate selectively in tumor tissue. Examples of these compounds were prepared previously at high cost using an automated DNA synthesizer. Direct synthesis methods are needed for the production of gram-scale quantities for further biological evaluation. The work accomplished as a result of the collaboration between Fluorochem, Inc. and UCLA demonstrates that short oligomers containing at least five carborane units with four phosphodiester linkages can be prepared in substantial quantities. This work was accomplished by the application of standard phosphoramidite coupling chemistry.

Barnum, Beverly A.; Yan Hao; Moore, Roger; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Baum, Kurt

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Parental reports on the efficacy of treatments and therapies for their children with autism spectrum disorders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) try many and varied interventions and therapies in the hopes of improving their children's outcomes; however, empirical evidence supporting (or opposing) the vast majority of treatments is limited or nonexistent. This study examined caregiver efficacy ratings for a wide range of biological and educational/behavioral treatments commonly used for children with ASD. A web-based questionnaire regarding the development of children with ASD was distributed nationally and internationally through more than 200 autism-support organizations; results were analyzed from 479 parents (91% mothers) who reported on their children with autism, Asperger's syndrome, or PDD-NOS (M age = 8.3 years, 80.2% male). Improvement – whether small or dramatic – was rated for 50–80% of children in each of 9 drug categories, while ratings of “child became worse” were reported for 15–20.3%. Approximately half of children were said to improve while on a special diet; 51% of those on a gluten-free and/or casein-free (GF/CF) diet were reportedly improved, while no observable effects of the GF/CF diet were indicated for about one quarter of participating children. For 10 of the 16 educational/behavioral therapies, parents reported improvement for approximately 70% of children. The most common rating was “child improved somewhat” followed by “child improved dramatically.” Results are discussed relative to the meaning of “improvement” in ASD and in light of both placebo effects and cost of treatments/therapies.

Robin P. Goin-Kochel; Virginia H. Mackintosh; Barbara J. Myers

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Plasma Protein Concentrations in Interstitial Fluid from Human Aortas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

22 December 1982 research-article Plasma Protein Concentrations in Interstitial...Eileen M. Staples The concentration of plasma proteins was examined in interstitial...quantitative immunoelectrophoresis for three plasma proteins covering a range of molecular...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Self-Reported Cognitive Outcomes in Patients With Brain Metastases Before and After Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patients with brain metastases may experience treatment-related cognitive deficits. In this study, we prospectively assessed the self-reported cognitive abilities of patients with brain metastases from any solid primary cancer before and after irradiation of the brain. Methods and Materials: The treatment group (TG) consisted of adult patients (n=50) with brain metastases who received whole or partial irradiation of the brain without having received prior radiation therapy (RT). The control group (CG) consisted of breast cancer patients (n=27) without cranial involvement who were treated with adjuvant RT. Patients were recruited between May 2008 and December 2010. Self-reported cognitive abilities were acquired before RT and 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after irradiation. The information regarding the neurocognitive status was collected by use of the German questionnaires for self-perceived deficits in attention (FEDA) and subjectively experienced everyday memory performance (FEAG). Results: The baseline data showed a high proportion of self-perceived neurocognitive deficits in both groups. A comparison between the TG and the CG regarding the course of self-reported outcomes after RT showed significant between-group differences for the FEDA scales 2 and 3: fatigue and retardation of daily living activities (P=.002) and decrease in motivation (P=.032) with an increase of attention deficits in the TG, but not in the CG. There was a trend towards significance in FEDA scale 1: distractibility and retardation of mental processes (P=.059) between the TG and the CG. The FEAG assessment presented no significant differences. An additional subgroup analysis within the TG was carried out. FEDA scale 3 showed significant differences in the time-related progress between patients with whole-brain RT and those receiving hypofractionated stereotactic RT (P=.025), with less decrease in motivation in the latter group. Conclusion: Self-reported attention declined in patients with brain metastases after RT to the brain, whereas it remained relatively stable in breast cancer patients.

Cole, Ansa Maer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Scherwath, Angela [Department of Medical Psychology, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Ernst, Gundula [Department of Medical Psychology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Lanfermann, Heinrich [Institute for Neuroradiology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Bremer, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Steinmann, Diana, E-mail: steinmann.diana@mh-hannover.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Structure and high-temperature properties of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} with interstitial additions  

SciTech Connect

This study was motivated by the fact that previous research on the structure and properties of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} showed unacceptably inconsistent results. The primary reason for these inconsistencies was interstitial contamination of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} by carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. Thus, this study measured the effects that these interstitial atoms have on some of the previously reported properties. These properties include crystalline structure, thermal expansion anisotropy, electronic structure and bonding, and high temperature oxidation resistance. In Chapter 2 of this study, the lattice parameters and atomic positions of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} as a function of carbon, nitrogen or oxygen content were measured via x-ray and neutron diffraction. Comparing these lattice parameters to those reported in other studies on supposedly pure Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} confirmed that the majority of the previous studies had samples with a considerable amount of interstitial impurities. In fact, the lattice parameter trends given in Chapter 2 can be used to estimate the types and level of impurities in these studies. Furthermore, Chapter 2 discusses how atomic positions change as interstitial atoms are incorporated into the lattice. These changes in atomic separations suggest that strong bonds form between the interstitial atoms and the surrounding titanium atoms. This is in full agreement with the electronic structure calculations given in Chapter 4. These calculations show that bonding does occur between titanium d-states and interstitial atom p-states at the expense of bonding between some of the titanium and silicon atoms. In addition, carbon seems to be the most strongly bonded interstitial atom. Knowledge of the exact interstitial content and its effect on bonding is important because Chapters 3 and 5 have shown that interstitial atoms have a marked effect on the thermal expansion and oxidation resistance. As discussed in Chapter 3, all interstitial atoms lower the thermal expansion anisotropy of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} due to the formation of bonds between the interstitial atom and the surrounding titanium atoms. Although interstitial atoms do have an effect on the thermal expansion of Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, these effects were not strong enough to explain all the scatter of previous studies. These studies most likely suffered from systematic errors as a result of poor experimental design. The experimental procedure used in this study was designed to significantly reduce these systematic errors.

Williams, Jason

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Recombination-enhanced migration of interstitial aluminum in silicon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the first observation of recombination-enhanced recovery of a defect in silicon which is otherwise normally stable at room temperature. This defect, produced by 1.5-MeV electron irradiation of aluminum-doped material at room temperature, is identified as isolated interstitial aluminum through correlated deep-level transient-capacitance spectroscopy and EPR studies. The recovery rate constant in the absence of minority-carrier injection is 3(109) exp(- 1.2±0.1 eV/kT) sec-1. Under saturated injection conditions, it is 70 exp(- 0.27±0.03 eV/kT) sec-1. This represents an enhancement of the recovery rate by a factor of ? 108 at room temperature. We conclude that this enhancement results from an efficient conversion of the electronic energy available upon carrier capture to local vibrational energy of the defect which assists it over the migration barrier. The second donor level of the defect (Ali+Ali++) is determined to be at EV+0.17 eV. We conclude, however, that the enhancement results from carrier capture and recombination at the first donor level (Ali0Ali+) the position of which has not yet been determined. The implications of these results to the properties of the self-interstitial in silicon are discussed.

J. R. Troxell; A. P. Chatterjee; G. D. Watkins; L. C. Kimerling

1979-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Rotational-vibrational transitions of interstitial HD in Si  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ir spectrum of interstitial HD in Si provides unique insight into the rotational motion of interstitial H2 because the rotational-vibrational transitions for the heteronuclear HD molecule are subject to less restrictive selection rules. ir lines for transitions between rotational-vibrational states of the interstitial HD molecule with rotational quantum numbers J=0, 1, and 2 have been observed. The assignment of the rotational-vibrational spectrum of interstitial HD, with additional transitions that occur for HD but not for H2 or D2, is confirmed by uniaxial stress results.

G. Alvin Shi; Michael Stavola; W. Beall Fowler; E Elinor Chen

2005-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

12

Extensive Interstitial Solid Solutions of Metals in Metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new type of metallic solid solution has been prepared in which <~12.5 at.% of comparatively small metal atoms (Cu) fill interstitial sites in a host metal composed of larger atoms (Y). At higher solute concentrations, both interstitial and substitutional sites are occupied. These solid solutions are metastable; they were formed by ultrarapid quenching from the liquid.

B. C. Giessen; R. Ray; S. H. Hahn

1971-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute interstitial nephritis Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with a possible diagnosis of acute interstitial nephritis in patients treated... of infusion techniques with low-dose bupivacaine and an Interstitial nephritis associated with...

14

Electric Resistivity of Interstitial Compounds of Graphite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assuming that the formation of interstitial compounds is accompanied by creation of excess holes in the otherwise full band of graphite it is shown that a linear energy?momentum relation at the Brillouin zone corners is incapable of explaining the decrease of the electric resistance with oxidation. It appears that for a more general model the decrease in relative resistance should be independent of temperature for large oxidations if suitable corrections for the initial conditions are made. Data for polycrystallinegraphite corrected for the existence of an energy gap and of excess holes in the untreated material give curves which converge for higher oxidation with the curve for natural graphite. Discussion of the low temperature properties of graphite leads to the conclusion that large graphite crystals possess slightly overlapping zones.

S. Mrozowski

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Effects of interstitial flow on tumor cell migration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interstitial flow is the convective transport of fluid through tissue extracellular matrix. This creeping fluid flow has been shown to affect the morphology and migration of cells such as fibroblasts, cancer cells, endothelial ...

Polacheck, William J. (William Joseph)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Photoconductivity Studies of Defects in p-Type Silicon: Boron Interstitial and Aluminum Interstitial Defects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two defects introduced in p-type silicon by 1.5-MeV electron irradiation are studied by means of infrared photoconductivity, including the measurement of the stress-induced dichroism. They are identified as being dopant atoms in interstitial positions produced by the silicon interstitial-impurity atom replacement mechanism proposed by Watkins. They are introduced by room-temperature irradiations as well as by irradiations performed at 77, 20.4, and 4.2°K. They disappear during annealing at temperatures ?250-300°C. The symmetry of these defects C3v is deduced from the low-temperature stress-induced dichroism of the photoconductivity which is associated with electronic reorientation among different configurations. This C3v symmetry can be explained by distortion of a possible Jahn-Teller type of a configuration in which the dopant atom was originally in a tetrahedral position. The defect response to the stress is determined by the value of the term in the piezospectroscopic defect tensor which characterizes the relative change in defect energy per unit strain. This value is ? -12 eV/(unit strain). Numerical values of the dichroic ratios show that the photoconductivity transition which is observed corresponds to a distribution of dipole moments which is an ellipsoid of rotation about the trigonal axis of the defect. They also allow the determination of this distribution.

M. Cherki and A. H. Kalma

1970-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Development and evaluation of a 27 MHz multielectrode current-source interstitial hyperthermia system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hyperthermia is a cancer therapy which is mostly applied in combination with radiotherapy. The aim of hyperthermia is to increase tumortemperatures to 40?°C?45?°C. One of the heating techniques that has been developed to be combined with afterloading interstitial radiotherapy (IRT) is 27 MHz current-source interstitial hyperthermia (IHT). A four-channel version of a current-source IHT system had been developed to study the effectiveness of interstitial hyperthermia in combination with IRT in tumors growing in the flank of a rat. Temperatures up to 46?°C at the edges of various solid tumors with volumes in the range 1500–2000 mm 3 are easily reached within 4–10 min. Furthermore in a collaboration between the University Hospital Utrecht and the Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center in Rotterdam a multielectrode current-source (MECS) IHT-system for clinical use has been developed. Basically this system consists of three units. First the actual heating system including a 27 MHz electromagnetic power unit and multielectrode applicators. Second a 196-channel thermometry system with manganin–constantan thermcouple thermometers. Third a computer plus treatment control software that provides the connection between the first two units and the operator. The power unit has 2 groups of 32 channels with opposite phase. The power can be controlled separately for each channel. Temperatures are measured with seven-point thermocouple probes inside applicators or inside extra nonheating catheters. The performance of the MECS-IHT system was examined focusing on the efficiency of the power deposition in tissue the homogeneity of the temperature distribution and on thermometry accuracy.

Robert S. J. P. Kaatee

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Stability and Migration of Charged Oxygen Interstitials in ThO2...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stability and Migration of Charged Oxygen Interstitials in ThO2 and CeO2. Stability and Migration of Charged Oxygen Interstitials in ThO2 and CeO2. Abstract: Density functional...

19

Evaluation of anelastic evidence for interstitial solute binding in bcc metals  

SciTech Connect

A Direct Spectrum Analysis (DSA) technique has been applied to key internal friction and elastic after-effect data which are involved in the controversy over the existance of interstitial clustering in the refractory metals. It is found that at relatively high interstitial solute concentrations some of the Snoek peak broadening is due to relaxations that are distinct from the main relaxation. This finding supports the view that interstitial solutes have an interaction that produces clusters of interstitials.

Cost, J.R.; Stanley, J.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

THE EFFECT OF INTERSTITIAL N ON GRAIN BOUNDARY COHESIVE STRENGTH IN Fe  

SciTech Connect

Increased nitrogen levels have been correlated with decreased ductility and elevated ductile-to-brittle transition temperature in pressure vessel steels [1]. However, the exact role played by nitrogen in the embrittlement of steels remains unclear. Miller and Burke have reported atom probe ion microscopy findings from neutron-irradiated low-alloy pressure vessel steel showing the presence of a 1 to 2 ruonolayer thick film of Mo, N, and C at prior austenitic grain boundaries (GB's) [2], suggesting a role for nitrogen as an intergranular embrittler. It is of interest for the development of mitigation strategies whether nitrogen must combine with other impurities to form nitride precipitates in order to exert an embrittling effect. Briant et al [1] have associated the embrittling effect of N in steels exclusively with intergranular nitride formation. This association suggests that high nitrogen levels may be acceptable if nitride precipitation at grain boundaries is suppressed. To address whether precipitate formation is indeed essential to the N embrittlement process in pressure vessel steel, a computational study was undertaken to ascertain whether the presence of interstitial nitrogen alone could embrittle an Fe GB. If so, nitrogen in any form must be kept completely away from the grain boundaries, if not out of the material altogether. The effect of interstitial N on the cohesion of an Fe {Sigma}3[110](111) grain boundary (GB) was investigated by ab-initio electronic structure calculations to reveal that free interstitial N produces a large strengthening energy, reduces the magnetic moments of the GB Fe atoms and is embrittling at the GB's.

Miyoung, Kim, Geller, Clint B., Freeman, A.F.

2003-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

On the Origin of Large Interstitial Clusters in Displacement Cascades  

SciTech Connect

Displacement cascades with wide ranges of primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy and mass in iron were simulated using molecular dynamics. New visualisation techniques are introduced to show how the shock-front dynamics and internal structure of a cascade develop over time. These reveal that the nature of the final damage is determined early on in the cascade process. We define a zone (termed 'spaghetti') in which atoms are moved to new lattice sites and show how it is created by a supersonic shock-front expanding from the primary recoil event. A large cluster of self-interstitial atoms can form on the periphery of the spaghetti if a hypersonic recoil creates damage with a supersonic shock ahead of the main supersonic front. When the two fronts meet, the main one injects atoms into the low-density core of the other: these become interstitial atoms during the rapid recovery of the surrounding crystal. The hypersonic recoil occurs in less than 0.1 ps after the primary recoil and the interstitial cluster is formed before the onset of the thermal spike phase of the cascade process. The corresponding number of vacancies is then formed in the spaghetti core as the crystal cools, i.e. at times one to two orders of magnitude longer. By using the spaghetti zone to define cascade volume, the energy density of a cascade is shown to be almost independent of the PKA mass. This throws into doubt the conventional energy-density interpretation of an increased defect yield with increasing PKA mass in ion irradiation.

Andrew, Calder F [University of Liverpool; Barashev, Aleksandr [University of Liverpool; Bacon, David J [University of Liverpool; Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Molecular Medicine: Synthesis and In Vivo Detection of Agents for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the project was the development of in vivo methods for the detection and evaluation of tumors in humans. The project was focused on utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to monitor the distribution and pharamacokinetics of a current boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) by labeling it with a fluorine-18, a positron emitting isotope. The PET data was then used to develop enhanced treatment planning protocols. The study also involved the synthesis of new tumor selective BNCTagents that could be labeled with radioactive nuclides for the in vivo detection of boron.

Kabalka, G. W.

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

Extramedullary progression of multiple myeloma despite concomitant medullary response to multiple combination therapies and autologous transplant: a case report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-line JOURNAL OF MEDICAL CASE REPORTS Kasi Loknath Kumar et al. Journal of Medical Case Reports 2014, 8:299 http://www.jmedicalcasereports.com/content/8/1/299Kansas City, KS, USA Full list of author information is available at the end of the articlesetting..., University of Kansas Medical Center,transplant: a case report Anup Kasi Loknath Kumar1*, Christopher Dakhil2, Megha Teeka Satyan1 and Nisreen Haideri3 Abstract Introduction: Extramedullary myeloma that occurs during the clinical course of multiple myeloma...

Kumar, Anup Kasi Loknarth; Dakhil, Christopher; Satyan, Megha Teeka; Haideri, Nisreen

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

24

Neither Wholly Public, Nor Wholly Private: Interstitial Spaces in Works by Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interstitial spaces: spaces that are neither wholly public nor private but that exist somewhere in between the public and private realms. Interstitial spaces are locations that women writers claim to resist the predominantly private restrictions of the family...

Green-Barteet, Miranda A.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

25

Effect of interstitials on the mechanical behavior of P/M tantalum  

SciTech Connect

Microstructural characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used in an investigation of the effects of interstitial alloy content on the mechanical properties of P/M tantalum. Compacts were prepared by cold isostatic pressing (CIP) at 50 ksi (345 MPa) followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 30 ksi (207 MPa) at 1,600 C. Increases in both yield and flow stresses were observed in ambient temperature, quasi-static compression tests due to increases in interstitial alloy content. Variations in yield stress were attributed to solid solution strengthening due to interstitial elements, since no oxides, nitrides or carbides were observed via TEM.

Strutt, A.J.; Vecchio, K.S. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Sciences; Bingert, S.R.; Gray, G.T. III [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Interstitial-phase precipitation in iron-base alloys: a comparative study  

SciTech Connect

Recent developments have elucidated the atomistic mechanisms of precipitation of interstitial elements in simple alloy systems. However, in the more technologically important iron base alloys, interstitial phase precipitation is generally not well understood. The present experimental study was therefore designed to test the applicability of these concepts to more complex ferrous alloys. Hence, a comparative study was made of interstitial phase precipitation in ferritic Fe-Si-C and in austenitic phosphorus-containing Fe-Cr-Ni steels. These systems were subjected to a variety of quench-age thermal treatments, and the microstructural development was subsequently characterized by transmission electron microscopy.

Pelton, A.R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

A theoretical analysis of interstitial hydrogen : pressure-composition-temperature, chemical potential, enthalpy and entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a first principles analysis of the physics and thermodynamics of interstitial hydrogen in metal. By utilizing recent advances in Density Functional Theory (DFT) to get state energies of the metal-hydrogen system, ...

Orondo, Peter Omondi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Needle-free interstitial fluid acquisition using a Lorentz-force actuated jet injector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interstitial fluid (ISF) provides information on a patient's health as it contains regulatory molecules that are correlated with disease-related processes. However, current ISF acquisition techniques can be slow, resulting ...

Chang, Jean H

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Formation, migration, and clustering of delocalized vacancies and interstitials at a solid-state semicoherent interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomistic simulations are used to study the formation, migration, and clustering of delocalized vacancies and interstitials at a model fcc-bcc semicoherent interface formed by adjacent layers of Cu and Nb. These defects ...

Kolluri, Kedarnath

30

Tailoring couple therapy techniques to client needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have limited the accuracy of client reports on therapy. More research on therapeutic change processes in couple therapy is needed (Heatherington, Friedlander, & Greenberg, 2005) to better understand what therapy is rather than just what it does... (Orlinsky, Grawe, & Parks, 1994). In psychotherapy literature, there has been a longstanding debate centered on two components of therapy (Goldfried & Davila, 2005). One perspective focuses on ?common? or, ?nonspecific? factors such as therapeutic...

Hsueh, Annie C.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

31

Estimation of isodose curves in radiation therapy and related response analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by a review of literature and the second by a computer program. Accompanying the literature review is a bibliography of interstitial and intracavitary radiation therapy dealing with radium and radon sources with emphasis on references dealing...- 2 active seed (usually radon or gold-198) could be made the proper strength to destroy only the tumor when placed in the center of the tumor, However, tumors are rarely or never truly spheroid and, in addition, economic considerations dictate...

Goodlett, James Campbell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

32

Hydrogen and chloride ions effects on the automobile interstitial-free steel corrosion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Hydrogen and chloride ions effects on the automobile interstitial-free steel corrosion L.Q. Guo 1 abilities of deep formability and fatigue resistance [1,2]. As the main material of the automobile's body. The high susceptibility to atmospheric corrosion limits the automobile steel applications. Although

Volinsky, Alex A.

33

Characterization of the nitrogen split interstitial defect in wurtzite aluminum nitride using density functional theory  

SciTech Connect

We carried out Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid density functional theory plane wave supercell calculations in wurtzite aluminum nitride in order to characterize the geometry, formation energies, transition levels, and hyperfine tensors of the nitrogen split interstitial defect. The calculated hyperfine tensors may provide useful fingerprint of this defect for electron paramagnetic resonance measurement.

Szállás, A., E-mail: szallas.attila@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Szász, K. [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Institute of Physics, Eötvös University, Pázmány Péter sétány 1/A, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Trinh, X. T.; Son, N. T.; Janzén, E. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Gali, A., E-mail: gali.adam@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki út 8, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary)

2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

34

Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network Requirements Reviews Reports Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Reports ESnet publishes reports from science network Program Requirements Reviews on a regular basis. View the most recent of these below. Sort by: Date | Author | Type 2012 Eli Dart, Brian Tierney, Editors, "Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements Workshop, November 2012 - Final Report"", November 29, 2012, LBNL LBNL-6395E

35

Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Neither Pinnacle Technologies, Inc. nor any person acting on behalf of Pinnacle: * Makes any warranty or representation, express or implied, with respect to the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of the information contained in this report, or that the use of any apparatus, method or process disclosed in this report may not infringe privately owned rights; or * Assumes any liability with respect to the use of, or for damages resulting from the use of, any information, apparatus, method or process disclosed in this report Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions DE-FC26-02NT41663 Final Report for National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, WV Project No.: USDE-0511 Report Date: December 2005 By:

36

Kinetics of oxygen interstitial injection and lattice exchange in rutile TiO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

The existence of a facile surface pathway for generation of O interstitials (O{sub i}) in rutile that can facilitate annihilation of O undesirable vacancies has been demonstrated recently. Through isotopic self-diffusion experiments, the present work determines a value of approximately 1.8?eV for the activation energy of O{sub i} injection from TiO{sub 2} (110). The mean path length for O{sub i} diffusion decreases by nearly an order of magnitude upon adsorption of 0.1 monolayer of sulfur. Sulfur apparently inhibits the surface annihilation rate of Ti interstitials, lowering their bulk concentration and the corresponding catalytic effect they seem to exert upon O{sub i} exchange with the lattice.

Gorai, Prashun; Hollister, Alice G.; Pangan-Okimoto, Kristine; Seebauer, Edmund G., E-mail: eseebaue@illinois.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

37

Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Researchers For Researchers What You Need to Know and Do The Tech Transfer Process Business Development Services Berkeley Lab LaunchPad Funding - Innovation Grants Forms and Policies Conflict of Interest Outside Employment Export Control Record of Invention Software Disclosure and Abstract See Also FAQs for Researchers Entrepreneurial Resources Webcast: Transferring Technology to the Marketplace Pre-Publication Review Report Invention/Software The next step is for Lab researchers to report the invention or software to the Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Management Department. The invention report is not a patent application and in and of itself secures no intellectual property rights. It is used by the Lab to make a decision as to whether to proceed with a patent application.

38

REPORT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPORT REPORT of the INFRASTRUCTURE TASK FORCE of the DOE NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE January 16, 2003 2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY On October 1, 2002 the DOE Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee was asked to provide specific, focused updates to its Nuclear Science and Technology Infrastructure Roadmap and review the specific issues at the DOE key nuclear energy research and development (R&D) laboratories. This activity was assigned to a five-member Infrastructure Task Force (ITF). After receiving extensive written materials from DOE, the Idaho Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W), on November 6-8, 2002 the ITF visited the Idaho site and received briefings and tours of the INEEL and ANL-W facilities. INEEL and

39

A Multicenter Phase II Study of Local Radiation Therapy for Stage IEA Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphomas: A Preliminary Report From the Japan Radiation Oncology Group (JAROG)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of moderate dose radiation therapy (RT) for mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma in a prospective multicenter phase II trial. Methods and Materials The subjects in this study were 37 patients with MALT lymphoma between April 2002 and November 2004. There were 16 male and 21 female patients, ranging in age from 24 to 82 years, with a median of 56 years. The primary tumor originated in the orbit in 24 patients, in the thyroid and salivary gland in 4 patients each, and 5 in the others. The median tumor dose was 30.6 Gy (range, 30.6–39.6 Gy), depending on the primary site and maximal tumor diameter. The median follow-up was 37.3 months. Results Complete remission (CR) or CR/unconfirmed was achieved in 34 patients (92%). The 3-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and local control probability were 100%, 91.9%, and 97.3%, respectively. Thirteen patients experienced Grade 1 acute toxicities including dermatitis, mucositis, and conjunctivitis. One patient developed Grade 2 taste loss. Regarding late toxicities, Grade 2 reactions including hypothyroidism, and radiation pneumonitis were observed in three patients, and Grade 3 cataract was seen in three patients. Conclusions This prospective phase II study demonstrated that moderate dose RT was highly effective in achieving local control with acceptable morbidity in 37 patients with MALT lymphoma.

Koichi Isobe; Yoshikazu Kagami; Keiko Higuchi; Takeshi Kodaira; Masatoshi Hasegawa; Naoto Shikama; Masanori Nakazawa; Ichiro Fukuda; Keiji Nihei; Kana Ito; Teruki Teshima; Yoshihiro Matsuno; Masahiko Oguchi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Reports  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Reports Reports . . . . , Book -1. Service Open File Information for Project Rulison, Production Testing Phase, . , August 28,1970 : . "; DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. DESCRIPTION O F PU1:T41C I-l!lkI,T;-1 SE1:VICh: 0P:SN F I L E INPOPt4ATION i[ ' 7 S&u-~%uestcrn E a d i o l o g i c a l H e a l t h 1,aboratol-p r? U. S. Depaieraent o f I l e a l t h ,. E d u c a t i o n aud Welfa,re i i I t - - . L-J~ub-l-ic H e a l t h ' ~ c r v i c e : Y T h i s s u r v e i l l a ~ l c e p e r f o r m e d u n d e r r e , a Memorandum o f ~ n d e k s t a n d i n ~ (No. SF 5 1 & L A U. S . . A t o m i c E n e r g y Commission i hk, ! i ilYo.,jh,asic g r o u p s o f i n f o r m a t i o n a r e p l a c e d i n t h e P u b l i c H e a l t h i k e l ~ e r v i k e , \ ~ o u t h w e s t c r n R a t i i o l o g i c a l H

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Pressure dependence of deep levels of the As antisite, the Ga-vacancy–As-interstitial pair, and of the stable and metastable states of EL2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report density-functional theory calculations of the tetrahedral, isolated arsenic antisite (AsGa) in GaAs and of its metastable structure, gallium-vacancy–arsenic-interstitial pair (VGaAsi). In order to determine the pressure dependence of the defect levels, the self-consistent Green-function method is applied. The calculated results are in agreement with experimental data on the stable and metastable states of EL2. This implies that the stable state of EL2 is indeed well described by the properties of the isolated As antisite. Furthermore, the results support the identification of the metastable state of EL2 with the VGaAsi pair and identify the symmetry of the pressure-induced defect level.

Christine Ziegler; Udo Scherz; Matthias Scheffler

1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Treatment Evolution and Mature Results  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial (IRT) brachytherapy (BRT) as sole treatment (monotherapy) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2009, 718 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided HDR monotherapy. Three treatment protocols were applied; 141 patients received 38.0 Gy using one implant in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy with computed tomography-based treatment planning; 351 patients received 38.0 Gy in 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy, using 2 implants (2 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning; and 226 patients received 34.5 Gy, using 3 single-fraction implants of 11.5 Gy (3 weeks apart) and intraoperative TRUS real-time treatment planning. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix consensus, and toxicity was evaluated using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 52.8 months. The 36-, 60-, and 96-month biochemical control and metastasis-free survival rates for the entire cohort were 97%, 94%, and 90% and 99%, 98%, and 97%, respectively. Toxicity was scored per event, with 5.4% acute grade 3 genitourinary and 0.2% acute grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 3.5% and 1.6%, respectively. Two patients developed grade 4 incontinence. No other instance of grade 4 or greater acute or late toxicity was reported. Conclusion: Our results confirm IRT-HDR-BRT is safe and effective as monotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Tselis, Nikolaos, E-mail: ntselis@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Baltas, Dimos [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Buhleier, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Martin, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany); Milickovic, Natasa; Papaioannou, Sokratis [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany)] [Institute of Biostatistics, J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Tunn, Ulf W. [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)] [Department of Urology, Klinikum Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Interstitials, Vacancies and Dislocations in Flux-Line Lattices: A Theory of Vortex Crystals, Supersolids and Liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a three dimensional Abrikosov vortex lattice in the presence of an equilibrium concentration of vacancy, interstitial and dislocation loops. Vacancies and interstitials renormalize the long-wavelength bulk and tilt elastic moduli. Dislocation loops lead to the vanishing of the long-wavelength shear modulus. The coupling to vacancies and interstitials - which are always present in the liquid state - allows dislocations to relax stresses by climbing out of their glide plane. Surprisingly, this mechanism does not yield any further independent renormalization of the tilt and compressional moduli at long wavelengths. The long wavelength properties of the resulting state are formally identical to that of the ``flux-line hexatic'' that is a candidate ``normal'' hexatically ordered vortex liquid state.

M. Cristina Marchetti; Leo Radzihovsky

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Increase in specific heat and possible hindered rotation of interstitial C2 molecules in neutron-irradiated graphite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Irradiation-induced increase in the low-temperature specific heat has been measured in the temperature range of 1.9–43 K in graphite neutron-irradiated to 1.4×1020?n/cm2 (E>1?MeV) around 333 K. The increase of the lattice specific heat is interpreted as due to the hindered rotation of interstitial C2 molecules in the periodic potential of V(?)=(V0/2)(1+cos?2?), where ? is the angle of rotation and V0 is 0.040 eV. The first-excited rotational level is 0.0058 eV above the ground state and the rotational frequency is 1.39×1012?s?1. This result shows that C2 molecules do not form covalent bonds with atoms in the surrounding graphite layers. It is in marked contrast with the result of recent first-principles theoretical calculations that interstitial atoms form strong covalent bonds with atoms in the graphite layers. The concentration of C2 molecules is estimated to be f=1.16%. The hole concentration, deduced from the electronic specific heat and the SWMcC band model, suggests that one single vacancy creates one hole and the single vacancy concentration is 2f. Since the measurement of the lattice specific heat gave the concentration of the defects directly, we could evaluate some physical properties for a unit concentration of the defects. The volume changes by a single interstitial atom, an interstitial C2 molecule, and a single vacancy are deduced to be 2.6±0.3, 9.3±1.4, and ?0.46±0.07 atomic volumes, respectively. The formation energy of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 12.6±2.5?eV. The phonon scattering with a reciprocal relaxation time proportional to ?1.5, where ? is the angular frequency of phonons, is attributed to the scattering of phonons by the disklike strain around interstitial C2 molecule clusters. A broad dip in the a-axis thermal conductivity observed below room temperature is attributed to the resonance scattering of phonons by the hindered rotation of interstitial C2 molecules as well as by the vibration of these molecules as rigid units. The positron lifetime of 350 ps is suggested to be the lifetime of positrons trapped in an open space on the periphery of the interstitial clusters of C2 molecules. The well-known Wigner energy is stored mainly as interstitial C2 molecules and single vacancies.

Tadao Iwata and Mitsuo Watanabe

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

45

Diffusion of Te vacancy and interstitials of Te, Cl, O, S, P and Sb in CdTe: A density functional theory study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diffusion of Te vacancy and interstitials of Te, Cl, O, S, P and Sb in CdTe: A density functional profiles in CdTe of native, Te adatom and vacancy, and anionic non-native interstitial adatoms P, Sb, O, S B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Cadmium telluride (CdTe) based thin films have emerged

Khare, Sanjay V.

46

Radiation therapy for esophageal cancer: results of the patterns of Care Study in Japan 1995–1997  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To report the characteristics and treatment process of esophageal cancer patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) in Japan.

Masahiro Kenjo; Masahiko Oguchi; Kotaro Gomi; Takashi Yamashita; Takashi Uno…

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Nuclear Physics and Hadron Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Hadron therapy uses light charged particles beams (mainly proton and {sup 12}C ions) to irradiate tumors. These beams present a ballistic advantage with a maximum energy deposition at the end of the path. A large dose can be delivered inside a deep tumor while the surrounding healthy tissues are preserved. There is an obvious advantage in using these beams but the beam control has to be achieved and all the physical processes leading to the energy deposition have to be fully under control. This treatment protocol requires accurate control devices and a good knowledge of the physical processes occurring all along the path of the projectile in human tissues. In this report, we will present one example of a beam monitor for the proton therapy. We will also present the experimental program which has been initiated to obtain fundamental data on the nuclear fragmentation process.

Braunn, B. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3 Caen (France); CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SPhN, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Colin, J.; Courtois, C.; Cussol, D.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Labalme, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3 Caen (France)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

48

Accelerators for Cancer Therapy  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

Lennox, Arlene J.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

Imaging Tumor Variation in Response to Photodynamic Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Models  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: A treatment monitoring study investigated the differential effects of orthotopic pancreatic cancer models in response to interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT), and the validity of using magnetic resonance imaging as a surrogate measure of response was assessed. Methods and Materials: Different orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenograft models (AsPC-1 and Panc-1) were used to represent the range of pathophysiology observed in human beings. Identical dose escalation studies (10, 20, and 40J/cm) using interstitial verteporfin PDT were performed, and magnetic resonance imaging with T2-weighted and T1-weighted contrast were used to monitor the total tumor volume and the vascular perfusion volume, respectively. Results: There was a significant amount of necrosis in the slower-growing Panc-1 tumor using high light dose, although complete necrosis was not observed. Lower doses were required for the same level of tumor kill in the faster-growing AsPC-1 cell line. Conclusions: The tumor growth rate and vascular pattern of the tumor affect the optimal PDT treatment regimen, with faster-growing tumors being relatively easier to treat. This highlights the fact that therapy in human beings shows a heterogeneous range of outcomes, and suggests a need for careful individualized treatment outcomes assessment in clinical work.

Samkoe, Kimberley S., E-mail: samkoe@dartmouth.ed [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Chen, Alina [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Rizvi, Imran [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); O'Hara, Julia A. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Hoopes, P. Jack [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Department of Surgery, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH (United States); Pereira, Stephen P. [Institute of Hepatology, University College London Medical School, London (United Kingdom); Hasan, Tayyaba [Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Pogue, Brian W. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Surgery, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH (United States)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Investigation of the Integration of Interstitial Building Spaces on Costs and Time of Facility Maintenance for U.S. Army Hospitals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD) has used the interstitial building system (IBS) as a design component for some of the hospitals in its healthcare infrastructure portfolio. Department of Defense (DoD) leadership is aware of increases...

Leveridge, Autumn Tamara

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

The effect of strain and path change on the mechanical properties and microstructural evolution of ultrafine grained interstitial free steel during equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to examine the effect of strain and path change on the microstructural evolution of ultrafine grained interstitial free (IF) steel during equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE); to determine the mechanical...

Sutter, Steven George

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

52

Interstitial BiO molecule as a broadband IR luminescence centre in bismuth-doped silica glass  

SciTech Connect

Experimental data on absorption and luminescence in optical fibres with a Bi : SiO{sub 2} glass core are compared to experimentally determined and calculated spectroscopic properties of the BiO molecule. The results suggest that the IR luminescence of Bi : SiO{sub 2} glass is due to interstitial BiO molecules. This assumption is supported by quantum-chemical simulation results for a BiO molecule in a ring interstice of the silica glass network.

Sokolov, V O; Plotnichenko, V G; Dianov, Evgenii M [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Quality of Life of Oral Cancer Patients After Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the quality of life (QOL) of oral cancer patients treated with low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (LDR-BT) alone. Methods and Materials: Between June 2005 and July 2006, a total of 56 patients with oral cancer were enrolled in this prospective study. QOL was assessed by means of the core questionnaire and head and neck questionnaire module of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 [QLQ-C30] and QLQ Head and Neck 35 [H and N35]). The questionnaires were distributed to the patients before the start of treatment and 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after the start of LDR-BT. Results: It was possible to analyze the results for 20 of the initial 56 patients because they did not experience metastasis or recurrence during this study. No functions or symptoms asked about in the QLQ-C30 deteriorated during the first year. The emotional function score steadily and significantly increased. No symptoms in the QLQ-H and N35 significantly deteriorated. The scores for pain, trouble with social eating, and weight loss on the QLQ-H and N35 steadily and significantly decreased. Age, gender, and LDR-BT source had no effect on the change in QOL during the first year, but T-stage significantly affected the change in global health status, tumor site affected the changes in swallowing, sensory problems, sticky saliva, and complications affected the changes in pain, swallowing, and mouth opening. Conclusions: QOL of oral cancer patients treated with LDR-BT is high. However, tumor stage, tumor site, and complications affected the changes in a few functions and symptoms during the first year.

Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: ryoshimu@ncc.go.jp; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Miura, Masahiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Ayukawa, Fumio; Hayashi, Keiji; Toda, Kazuma [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Electroconvulsive Therapy for Depression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...poor response to antidepressant medications.– ECT for the treatment of depression and other psychiatric disorders involves the application of electricity to the scalp in order to induce seizure activity. This form of therapy has a range of effects on the neurobiologic features of depression. ECT increases... An 82-year-old woman with severe depression, including psychotic symptoms, is referred for consideration of electroconvulsive therapy. She has had four episodes of major depression consisting of crying spells, loss of interest in usual activities, insomnia, loss of appetite and weight, difficulty with concentration, feelings of helplessness and hopelessness, and thoughts of suicide.

Lisanby S.H.

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

55

Enzyme replacement therapy for Pompe disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport of Active Enzymes to Lysosomes. Molecular therapyOF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Enzyme Replacement Therapy forDisease……………………………… 3 1.3 Enzyme Replacement Therapy for

Burris, Ryan Jonathan William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Department of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Science Doctor of Physical Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Medicine, Dept. of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Science (PTRS) DPT Program Student Handbook Education Handbook This handbook is designed to guide the physical therapy student, the Center Coordinator's (PTRS) Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) curriculum. It is the intent of this handbook to improve

Weber, David J.

57

Department of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Science Doctor of Physical Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Medicine, Dept. of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Science (PTRS) DPT Program Student Handbook Purpose of the Clinical Education Handbook This handbook is designed to guide the physical therapy student and Rehabilitation Sciences (PTRS) Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) curriculum. It is the intent of this handbook

Weber, David J.

58

MANTRA: mobile anticoagulant therapy management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The MANTRA (Mobile for ANticoagulant TheRApy) project is aimed at introducing mobile devices and innovative interaction design in anticoagulant therapy practice to improve the quality of life of patients and to support doctor-patient communication. This ... Keywords: mhealth, mobile communication, oral anticoagulant therapy, self-testing devices, telemedicine

Barbara Rita Barricelli; Yanet Devis; Jose Abdelnour-Nocera; Jennie Wilson; John Moore

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

PHYSICAL THERAPY PROGRAM STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UTEP PHYSICAL THERAPY PROGRAM STUDENT HANDBOOK DPT Class of 2012 Summer 2010 Information herein;3 INTRODUCTION Dear Class of 2012, Welcome to the UTEP's Physical Therapy Program inaugural Doctor of Physical Therapy class. Your perseverance has paid off as you begin you academic career as a Student Physical

Ward, Karen

60

Salt diffusion in interstitial waters and halite removal from sediments: Examples from the Red Sea and Illinois basins  

SciTech Connect

Large thicknesses of bedded halite can be removed in subsiding sedimentary basins by verticla diffusion of dissolved salt in interstitial waters over geologic time scales. Calculations show that at least 10 m to 40 m of halite may have dissolved and diffused through the Red Sea sediments overlying the salt beds, since cessation of salt deposition approximatley 5.3 million years ago. The total amount of salt diffused out of the sediment column over geologic time is five to twenty times the amount of salt that currently exists in the porewater column. If upward flow in the past occurred at even small rates, 10{sup {minus}3} m/yr, the amount of halite removed could have been ten times as great, 500 m. Unlike the Red Sea Basin, no halite beds are known in the Illinois Basin in spite of the fact that interstitial waters with as much as 200{per thousand} TDS (approximately 220 g/L) occur. Calculations show that if a halite bed had been deposited at the base of the Illinois Basin in Cambrian time, it would have been completely removed from the stratigraphic record had it initially been less than 60 m to 130 m in thickness. A significant thickness of halite deposited in sedimentary basins may thus be removed during active burial of salt beds, and before exhumation and exposure of the salt beds to shallow meteoric waters.

Ranganathan, V. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

OVARIAN CANCER GENE THERAPY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although systemic gene therapy is certainly the ultimate goal for strategies directed towards patient cancer therapy, present problems with systemic vector delivery suggest that initial gene therapy strategies may involve regional approaches directed towards the few specific tumors that exhibit a predominantly regional pattern of spread: ovarian cancers and brain tumors. The model system of metastatic ovarian cancer growing within peritoneal fluid has several advantages of safety and efficacy for retroviral-mediated gene transfer into solid tumors. First, the pathology of metastasis into mesothelial-lined spaces consists of relatively thin tumor plaques with extravasation of cancer cells into the fluid, potentially allowing a reservoir for delivering retroviral vectors to malignant cells. This spreading pattern is in contrast to primary tumors and more solid metastatic sites, where cancer grows as a large three-dimensional mass that could prevent delivery of retroviral vectors or other agents into the majority of tumor cells. In addition, infusion of retroviral vectors into these fluids should produce a greater effect on the growing cells within the fluid (predominantly cancer cells) than on proliferating host cells in regions of the body that do not directly connect to the mesothelial-lined spaces. Second, ovarian cancer provides a model system in which regional therapy could be curative in a high percentage of cases. This is true because ovarian cancer is confined to the peritoneal cavity at patient presentation in 60% of cases. The uptake and expression of the viral vectors can be readily assessed in these model systems because these fluids are readily accessible for cytologic, biochemical, and molecular analysis. Cancer gene therapy strategies include immunotherapy, introduction of drug sensitivity or resistance genes, oncogene inactivation, introduction of cytolytic genes, and tumor suppressor gene replacement. Examples of gene therapy protocols designed to target ovarian cancer include immunotherapy approaches, introduction of cytolytic genes, and tumor suppressor gene therapy approaches (reviewed in Roth and Cristiano22). The BRCA1 gene is mutated in the majority of cases of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and exhibits loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and/or decreased expression in many sporadic cases.5,6,7,9,11,16,17,30,31 Multiple studies have demonstrated that overexpression of the BRCA1 gene results in growth inhibition and/or cell death, suggesting that BRCA1 can function directly as a growth inhibitor or tumor suppressor.10,21,28,31,33,34 Alternatively, growth inhibition may not be the major or sole mechanism for tumor suppression,13 because BRCA1 also functions during differentiation8,14,15 and may modulate DNA repair.13,27 The antitumor effect may be due to secretion of the BRCA1 gene product and a resulting paracrine inhibitory effect,12 although the precise biochemical function of BRCA1 is controversial and may involve nuclear functions4,26 such as DNA repair27 or transcriptional activation.3,18 Preclinical studies in nude mice xenografts have shown that intraperitoneal injection of retroviral vectors expressing \\{BRCA1sv\\} (a normal splice variant form of BRCA1) can inhibit the growth of established intraperitoneal tumors.10 Control retroviral vectors do not exhibit a significant antitumor effect, indicating that this is not merely a nonspecific effect of retroviral injection, but an effect of BRCA1 gene transfer.10 These studies showed transduction of tumor cells and expression of BRCA1 mRNA and protein following intraperitoneal injection of established intraperitoneal tumors10 or intratumoral injection of subcutaneous tumors (Obermiller and Holt, unpublished data). This article describes the development and phase I testing of BRCA1 gene therapy for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

David L. Tait; Patrice S. Obermiller; Roy A. Jensen; Jeffrey T. Holt

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Proton beam therapy facility  

SciTech Connect

It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

Not Available

1984-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

63

Clinical Use of the Utrecht Applicator for Combined Intracavitary/Interstitial Brachytherapy Treatment in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose The aims of this study were to investigate the benefit of the Utrecht interstitial CT/MR applicator for combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC/IS) approach, using magnetic resonance imaging—guided brachytherapy, over the intracavitary approach alone in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer and to analyze the clinical use of needles. Methods and Materials This study includes the first 20 patients treated with the new applicator. Brachytherapy consisted of two pulsed dose rate applications, and the second application was performed with the IC/IS approach. The number of needles, chosen guiding holes through the ovoids, and insertion depths were based on the dose distribution and dosimetric shortcomings of the first application (IC alone). We investigated the dosimetric gain by comparing the clinical interstitial optimized plan (IC/ISclinical) with an additionally generated optimized plan without needle use (ICstudy). Furthermore, we studied the relation of the inserted needles and their source loading patterns with the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV). Results A total of 54 needles (range, 1–6 per application) were applied with an average depth of 25 mm. The chosen needle positions corresponded with the location of the HR-CTV extensions. The total and individual needle treatment times per application were on average 19% (range, 4–35%) and 7% (range, 2–14%) of the implant treatment time, respectively. The total (external-beam radiotherapy + brachytherapy) D90 HR-CTV for the \\{ICstudy\\} and the IC/ISclinical were on average 79.5 (SD 7.4) Gy?/?10 and 83.9 (SD 6.7) Gy?/?10, respectively, with an average gain of 4.4 (SD 2.3) Gy?/?10 for the second application. Conclusions Needle placement was feasible in all patients and resulted in a gain in dose and better coverage of HR-CTV. Defining the location of HR-CTV protrusions and analyzing the associated needles has given us deeper understanding of the possibilities in magnetic resonance imaging—guided (pre)treatment planning with the IC/IS Utrecht applicator.

Christel N. Nomden; Astrid A.C. de Leeuw; Marinus A. Moerland; Judith M. Roesink; Robbert J.H.A. Tersteeg; Ina Maria Jürgenliemk-Schulz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Combined Interstitial Irradiation and Localized Current Field Hyperthermia: Results and Conclusions from Clinical Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...considerations dictated the catheter configuration. The investi gators expressed concern "about the difficulty to assess the contribution...83 Furthermore, the 38 and 83% CR rates reported by investi gators at 2 separate institutions (UA, IGR), using similar tech...

Silvio A. Aristizabal and James R. Oleson

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Testosterone-Replacement Therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...took a quiz on a commercial website. On the basis of his answers to the questions on the quiz — he answered "yes" to questions about decreased energy, decreased ability to play sports, and decreased sexual pleasure and erectile function — the site suggested that he talk to his doctor. Martin adds... Testosterone-replacement therapy for aging men is controversial and is being debated amid heightened concern about associated cardiovascular risks. This Clinical Decisions article features expert opinions from both sides of the debate. Vote and comment at NEJM.org.

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

66

Neutron capture therapies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In one embodiment there is provided an application of the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.).sup.7 Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

Yanch, Jacquelyn C. (Cambridge, MA); Shefer, Ruth E. (Newton, MA); Klinkowstein, Robert E. (Winchester, MA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Department of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Science Doctor of Physical Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook and Resources http://pt.umaryland.edu/current_edpt.asp American Physical Therapy Association (APTA EEdduuccaattiioonn Purpose of the Clinical Education Handbook This handbook is designed to guide the physical therapy and ongoing function of PTRS clinical education program. The handbook, however, does not replace the necessary

Weber, David J.

68

Parallelization of Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning(RTTP) : A Case Study \\Lambda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Radiation therapy uses ionizing radiation to treat cancer­ ous tumors. This paper reports our, thereby concentrating radiation dose in the tumor. The maximum dose that can be delivered to the tumorParallelization of Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning(RTTP) : A Case Study \\Lambda V. Chaudhary

Xu, Cheng-Zhong

69

Parallelization of Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning(RTTP) : A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation therapy uses ionizing radiation to treat cancer- ous tumors. This paper reports our experiences with the parallelization of a real-world 3-D radiation therapy treat- ment planning (RTTP) system on a wide range of plat at the tumor in a patient from different directions, thereby concentrating radiation dose in the tumor

Chaudhary, Vipin

70

Dietary Therapy in Hypertension  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...schedule a consultation with a dietitian, including a regular schedule of follow-up visits. The patient should monitor her blood pressure at home, with an automated machine, at least once a month, preferably more frequently. A trial of intensive dietary treatment is warranted for 6 months to try to achieve... A 57-year-old woman is seen in an outpatient clinic, where her blood pressure reading is 155/95 mm Hg. Dietary therapy is recommended. Dietary changes that have been shown to reduce blood pressure include reduced sodium intake, reduced caloric intake (for weight loss), and diets high in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products, whole grains, poultry, fish, nuts, and unsaturated vegetable oils.

Sacks F.M.; Campos H.

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

71

Measurement of scintillation responses of scintillation fibers for dose verification in proton therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Here, we report on the measurement of scintillation responses of scintillation fibers for precision dose verification in proton therapy. A detector equipped with...?2. Quenching of the scintillation responses of ...

C. Kim; B. Hong; G. Jhang; E. Joo; K. S. Lee…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Targeted radionuclide therapy  

SciTech Connect

Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) seeks molecular and functional targets within patient tumor sites. A number of agents have been constructed and labeled with beta, alpha, and Auger emitters. Radionuclide carriers spanning a broad range of sizes; e.g., antibodies, liposomes, and constructs such as nanoparticles have been used in these studies. Uptake, in percent-injected dose per gram of malignant tissue, is used to evaluate the specificity of the targeting vehicle. Lymphoma (B-cell) has been the primary clinical application. Extension to solid tumors will require raising the macroscopic absorbed dose by several-fold over values found in present technology. Methods that may effect such changes include multistep targeting, simultaneous chemotherapy, and external sequestration of the agent. Toxicity has primarily involved red marrow so that marrow replacement can also be used to enhance future TRT treatments. Correlation of toxicities and treatment efficiency has been limited by relatively poor absorbed dose estimates partly because of using standard (phantom) organ sizes. These associations will be improved in the future by obtaining patient-specific organ size and activity data with hybrid SPECT/CT and PET/CT scanners.

Williams, Lawrence E.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Meredith, Ruby F. [Radiology Division, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California 91010 (United States); Internal Medicine, University of California Davis Medical Center, 1508 Alhambra Boulevard, Suite 3100, Sacramento, California 95816 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Wallace Tumor Institute WTI No. 117, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Fuzzy Logic in Stuttering Therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Artificial intelligence (AI) was always widely explored by medical systems. We follow the trend, and try to use AI techniques to develop Orator...– a system that would be helpful in a therapy of stuttering patien...

Halina Kwasnicka; Blazej Zak

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Ethics of Gene Therapy Debated  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ethics of Gene Therapy Debated ... A press conference at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C., last month turned into an impromptu debate on the ethical and policy implications of human gene therapy. ... The protagonists were biomedical ethicist LeRoy Walters of Georgetown University, and attorney Andrew Kimbrell of the Foundation on Economic Trends, an activist group that has filed many lawsuits relating to biotechnology. ...

STU BORMAN

1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

75

A Report on Reports  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Synopsis of Report on Reports, a Project Kaleidoscope commentary on the education of undergraduates in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in the U.S. and elsewhere.

John W. Moore

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

PHYSICAL THERAPY PROGRAM STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UTEP PHYSICAL THERAPY PROGRAM STUDENT HANDBOOK DPT Class of 2013 Summer 2011 Information herein Clinical Education 51 Physical Safety 52 Signature Pages 53 Emergency Evacuation 54 Student Grievance Procedure 55 Practical Exams (new) 56 #12;3 INTRODUCTION Dear Class of 2013, Welcome to the UTEP's Physical

Ward, Karen

77

Binary therapies in the treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Typical 10B concentrations, 15 µg/g in Blood and Brain, 52.5 µg/g in Tumour BPA administered is approx 20g for an average person. BPA pharmacokinetics #12;Photon Capture Therapy (PCT) - Physics · Physics of the photo Japan (various) >300 (BSH / BPA) Mainly GBM Brookhaven, NY 54 (BPA) GBM MIT, Boston

78

STANFORD REDWOOD CITY INFUSION THERAPY CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STANFORD REDWOOD CITY INFUSION THERAPY CENTER Stanford Redwood City Infusion Therapy Center 450 that the new Stanford Redwood City Infusion Therapy Center opened on January 6, 2014. This new state previously received infusion treatments in the Infusion Treatment Area (ITA) at the Stanford Cancer Center

Bejerano, Gill

79

Magnetization and Fe57 hyperfine fields in Y2Fe17Z3-?(Z=H, C, or N) interstitial compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measured magnetization and Fe57 hyperfine fields at T?0 K for Y2Fe17 and Y2Fe17Z3-?, with Z=H, C, or N and ??0.5, are analyzed to determine the influence of the interstitial atoms on the 3d magnetism. All are weak ferromagnets with a nearly-full 3d subband, although when Z=N, the magnetic moment of 38.1?B is very close to the fully saturated value of 39.4?B. On a local scale, the order of hyperfine fields Bhf4f(=35 T)>Bhf6g (=33 T)>Bhf12j (=30 T)>Bhf12k (=28 T) is different from that of the local magnetic moments given by several recent band calculations for Y2Fe17, ?4f (=2.5?B)>?12j (=2.2?B)>?12k (=2.0?B)>?6g (=1.9 ?B), reflecting a large 4s-transferred hyperfine field at 6g sites which have very short Fe-Fe distances. The volume of samples with Z=C and N are identical, and so the chemical effects of the interstitials can be distinguished; both the local magnetic moment and hyperfine fields are systematically smaller in the carbide than the nitride by 5% and 12%, respectively.

Qi-nian Qi, Hong Sun, R. Skomski, and J. M. D. Coey

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Therapie  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Die spezifische Behandlung der Leukosen erfolgt in erster Linie mit cytotoxisch wirksamen Medikamenten, die in den DNS-, RNS- und Proteinstoffwechsel proliferationsfähiger Zellen eingreifen und hierdurch den K...

W. Wilmanns; K. Wilms; M. F. Rajewsky; H. O. Klein; K. J. Lennartz…

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Enabling individualized therapy through nanotechnology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Individualized medicine is the healthcare strategy that rebukes the idiomatic dogma of ‘losing sight of the forest for the trees’. We are entering a new era of healthcare where it is no longer acceptable to develop and market a drug that is effective for only 80% of the patient population. The emergence of “-omic” technologies (e.g. genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) and advances in systems biology are magnifying the deficiencies of standardized therapy, which often provide little treatment latitude for accommodating patient physiologic idiosyncrasies. A personalized approach to medicine is not a novel concept. Ever since the scientific community began unraveling the mysteries of the genome, the promise of discarding generic treatment regimens in favor of patient-specific therapies became more feasible and realistic. One of the major scientific impediments of this movement towards personalized medicine has been the need for technological enablement. Nanotechnology is projected to play a critical role in patient-specific therapy; however, this transition will depend heavily upon the evolutionary development of a systems biology approach to clinical medicine based upon “-omic” technology analysis and integration. This manuscript provides a forward looking assessment of the promise of nanomedicine as it pertains to individualized medicine and establishes a technology “snapshot” of the current state of nano-based products over a vast array of clinical indications and range of patient specificity. Other issues such as market driven hurdles and regulatory compliance reform are anticipated to “self-correct” in accordance to scientific advancement and healthcare demand. These peripheral, non-scientific concerns are not addressed at length in this manuscript; however they do exist, and their impact to the paradigm shifting healthcare transformation towards individualized medicine will be critical for its success.

Jason H. Sakamoto; Anne L. van de Ven; Biana Godin; Elvin Blanco; Rita E. Serda; Alessandro Grattoni; Arturas Ziemys; Ali Bouamrani; Tony Hu; Shivakumar I. Ranganathan; Enrica De Rosa; Jonathan O. Martinez; Christine A. Smid; Rachel M. Buchanan; Sei-Young Lee; Srimeenakshi Srinivasan; Matthew Landry; Anne Meyn; Ennio Tasciotti; Xuewu Liu; Paolo Decuzzi; Mauro Ferrari

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Redlands, CA); Olsen, Howard B. (Colton, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

83

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (San Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Longmeadow, MA); Olsen, Howard B. (Irvine, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

84

Proton beam therapy control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

85

Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Report Fiscal Year 2011 Office of Environment, Security, Safety and Health

86

Motivation and Alliance| Implications for Couple Therapy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Factors that affect alliance and outcome in couple therapy are crucial to the therapeutic process, yet currently research on this is scarce. The current… (more)

Lassiter, Candace S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Annual Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Radiation Exposure Occupational Radiation Exposure Home Welcome What's New Register Dose History Request Data File Submittal REMS Data Selection HSS Logo Annual Reports User Survey on the Annual Report Please take the time to complete a survey on the Annual Report. Your input is important to us! The 2012 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2011 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2010 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2009 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2008 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2007 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2006 Annual Report View or print the annual report in PDF format The 2005 Annual Report

88

An overview of the comprehensive proton therapy machine quality assurance procedures implemented at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Center-Houston  

SciTech Connect

The number of proton and carbon ion therapy centers is increasing; however, since the publication of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements report, there has been no dedicated report dealing with proton therapy quality assurance. The purpose of this article is to describe the quality assurance procedures performed on the passively scattered proton therapy beams at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Proton Therapy Center in Houston. The majorities of these procedures are either adopted from procedures outlined in the American Association of Physicists in Medical Task Group (TG) 40 report or are a modified version of the TG 40 procedures. In addition, new procedures, which were designed specifically to be applicable to the synchrotron at the author's center, have been implemented. The authors' procedures were developed and customized to ensure patient safety and accurate operation of synchrotron to within explicit limits. This article describes these procedures and can be used by others as a guideline for developing QA procedures based on particle accelerator specific parameters and local regulations pertinent to any new facility.

Arjomandy, Bijan; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, X. Ronald; Zullo, John R.; Wu, Richard Y.; Zhu Mingping; Ding Xiaoning; Martin, Craig; Ciangaru, George; Gillin, Michael T. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1840 Old Spanish Trail, Houston, Texas 77025 (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Delivery confirmation of bolus electron conformal therapy combined with intensity modulated x-ray therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that a bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT) dose plan and a mixed beam plan, composed of an intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT plan, can be accurately delivered. Methods: Calculated dose distributions were compared with measured dose distributions for parotid and chest wall (CW) bolus ECT and mixed beam plans, each simulated in a cylindrical polystyrene phantom that allowed film dose measurements. Bolus ECT plans were created for both parotid and CW PTVs (planning target volumes) using 20 and 16 MeV beams, respectively, whose 90% dose surface conformed to the PTV. Mixed beam plans consisted of an IMXT dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT dose plan. The bolus ECT, IMXT, and mixed beam dose distributions were measured using radiographic films in five transverse and one sagittal planes for a total of 36 measurement conditions. Corrections for film dose response, effects of edge-on photon irradiation, and effects of irregular phantom optical properties on the Cerenkov component of the film signal resulted in high precision measurements. Data set consistency was verified by agreement of depth dose at the intersections of the sagittal plane with the five measured transverse planes. For these same depth doses, results for the mixed beam plan agreed with the sum of the individual depth doses for the bolus ECT and IMXT plans. The six mean measured planar dose distributions were compared with those calculated by the treatment planning system for all modalities. Dose agreement was assessed using the 4% dose difference and 0.2 cm distance to agreement. Results: For the combined high-dose region and low-dose region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 98.7% and 96.2%, respectively, for the bolus ECT plans and 97.9% and 97.4%, respectively, for the mixed beam plans. For the high-dose gradient region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 93.1% and 94.62%, respectively, for the bolus ECT plans and 89.2% and 95.1%, respectively, for the mixed beam plans. For all regions, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 98.8% and 97.3%, respectively, for the bolus ECT plans and 97.5% and 95.9%, respectively, for the mixed beam plans. For the IMXT component of the mixed beam plans, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 93.7% and 95.8%. Conclusions: Bolus ECT and mixed beam therapy dose delivery to the phantom were more accurate than IMXT delivery, adding confidence to the use of planning, fabrication, and delivery for bolus ECT tools either alone or as part of mixed beam therapy. The methodology reported in this work could serve as a basis for future standardization of the commissioning of bolus ECT or mixed beam therapy. When applying this technology to patients, it is recommended that an electron dose algorithm more accurate than the pencil beam algorithm, e.g., a Monte Carlo algorithm or analytical transport such as the pencil beam redefinition algorithm, be used for planning to ensure the desired accuracy.

Kavanaugh, James A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Fontenot, Jonas P.; Henkelmann, Gregory [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 and Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States); Chu, Connel; Carver, Robert A. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

CRD Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Division Report Deconstructing Microbes Metagenomicon page 2 (Scientific Report SciDAC continued from page 1www.ctwatch.org/quarterly. Report Nano Letters continued

Wang, Ucilia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Annual Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Reports science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Annual Reports x Strategic Plan Annual Report - 2011 (pdf) Advancing Science for National Security See more Los...

92

A Survey of Hadron Therapy Accelerator Technologies.  

SciTech Connect

Hadron therapy has entered a new age [1]. The number of facilities grows steadily, and 'consumer' interest is high. Some groups are working on new accelerator technology, while others optimize existing designs by reducing capital and operating costs, and improving performance. This paper surveys the current requirements and directions in accelerator technology for hadron therapy.

PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA, T.; FLANZ, J.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

93

Proton Therapy Research and Treatment Center  

SciTech Connect

This Grant proposal outlines the steps that will be undertaken to bring the UC Davis Proton Therapy Research and Treatment, known locally as the Proton Therapy Facility (PTF), through its design and construction phases. This application concentrates on the design phase of the PTF project.

Goodnight, J.E. Jr. (University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center); Alonso, J.R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Gene therapy in alcoholic rats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70 70 Sept. 9, 2001 Gene Therapy Reduces Drinking in "Alcoholic" Rats UPTON, NY - Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have shown that increasing the level of a brain protein important for transmitting pleasure signals can turn rats that prefer alcohol into light drinkers, and those with no preference into near teetotalers. The findings, published in the first September 2001 issue of the Journal of Neurochemistry (Vol. 78, No. 5), may have implications for the prevention and treatment of alcoholism in humans. "This is a preliminary study, but when you see a rat that chooses to drink 80 to 90 percent of its daily fluid as alcohol, and then three days later it's down to 20 percent, that's a dramatic drop in alcohol intake - a very clear change in behavior," said Panayotis Thanos, the lead researcher. "This gives us great hope that we can refine this treatment for future clinical use."

95

Workshop on neutron capture therapy  

SciTech Connect

Potentially optimal conditions for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) may soon be in hand due to the anticipated development of band-pass filtered beams relatively free of fast neutron contaminations, and of broadly applicable biomolecules for boron transport such as porphyrins and monoclonal antibodies. Consequently, a number of groups in the US are now devoting their efforts to exploring NCT for clinical application. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring these groups together to exchange views on significant problems of mutual interest, and to assure a unified and effective approach to the solutions. Several areas of preclinical investigation were deemed to be necessary before it would be possible to initiate clinical studies. As neither the monomer nor the dimer of sulfhydryl boron hydride is unequivocally preferable at this time, studies on both compounds should be continued until one is proven superior.

Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P. (eds.)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hadron Therapy in Latin America  

SciTech Connect

The use of proton and heavy ion beams for radiotherapy is a well established cancer treatment modality in the first world, which is becoming increasingly widespread, due to its clear advantages over conventional photon-based treatments. This strategy is suitable when the tumor is spatially well localized. Also the use of neutrons has tradition. Here Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) stands out, though on a much smaller scale, being a promising alternative for tumors which are diffuse and infiltrating. On this sector, so far only nuclear reactors have been used as neutron sources. In this paper we briefly describe the situation in Latin America and in particular we discuss the present status of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator for Accelerator-Based (AB)-Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The project goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.4 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams to perform BNCT for deep-seated tumors in less than an hour. The machine being currently designed and constructed is a folded TESQ with a terminal at 0.6 MV as a smaller scale prototype. Since the concept is modular the same structure will be used for the 1.2 MV final accelerator.

Kreiner, A. J.; Minsky, D. M. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia. Universidad Nacional de Gral. San Martin, M. De Irigoyen 3100 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917 (C1033AAJ), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bergueiro, J.; Castell, W.; Thatar Vento, V.; Cartelli, D.; Kesque, J. M.; Ilardo, J. C.; Baldo, M.; Erhardt, J.; Estrada, L.; Hazarabedian, A.; Johann, F.; Suarez Sandin, J. C.; Igarzabal, M.; Repetto, M.; Obligado, M.; Lell, J.; Padulo, J.; Herrera, M. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

98

A Dual-Armed Robotic System for Intraoperative Ultrasound Guided Hepatic Ablative Therapy:A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Dual-Armed Robotic System for Intraoperative Ultrasound Guided Hepatic Ablative Therapy, we propose the use of a dual robotic arm system that manages both ultrasound manipulation and needle guidance. We report a prototype of the dual arm system and a comparative performance analysis between

Camesano, Terri

99

Interstitial deletion of 8q21{yields}22 associated with minor anomalies, congenital heart defect, and Dandy-Walker variant  

SciTech Connect

We describe an infant with a deletion of 8q21{yields}22 who had distinct clinical manifestations including minor facial anomalies, a congenital heart defect, a Dandy-Walker variant, and mild to moderate developmental delay. Her facial characteristics included small, wide-spaced eyes, asymmetric bilateral epicanthal folds, a broad nasal bridge, a {open_quotes}carp-shaped{close_quotes} mouth, micrognathia, and prominent, apparently low-set ears. Three other reports describe children with larger proximal deletions of 8q that include 8q21 and q22. These four children all have similar facial appearance. Of the others reported, one had a congenital heart defect and one had craniosynostosis. This case, in addition to the previously noted three cases, helps in delineating a recognizable syndrome. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Donahue, M.L. [Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Ryan, R.M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

1995-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

100

Validation of mathematical models for the prediction of organs-at-risk dosimetric metrics in high-dose-rate gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Given the complicated nature of an interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy treatment plan, the use of a quantitative tool to evaluate the quality of the achieved metrics compared to clinical practice would be advantageous. For this purpose, predictive mathematical models to predict the D{sub 2cc} of rectum and bladder in interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy are discussed and validated.Methods: Previous plans were used to establish the relationship between D2cc and the overlapping volume of the organ at risk with the targeted area (C0) or a 1-cm expansion of the target area (C1). Three mathematical models were evaluated: D{sub 2cc}=?*C{sub 1}+? (LIN); D{sub 2cc}=?– exp(–?*C{sub 0}) (EXP); and a mixed approach (MIX), where both C{sub 0} and C{sub 1} were inputs of the model. The parameters of the models were optimized on a training set of patient data, and the predictive error of each model (predicted D{sub 2cc}? real D{sub 2cc}) was calculated on a validation set of patient data. The data of 20 patients were used to perform a K-fold cross validation analysis, with K = 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 20.Results: MIX was associated with the smallest mean prediction error <6.4% for an 18-patient training set; LIN had an error <8.5%; EXP had an error <8.3%. Best case scenario analysis shows that an error ?5% can be achieved for a ten-patient training set with MIX, an error ?7.4% for LIN, and an error ?6.9% for EXP. The error decreases with the increase in training set size, with the most marked decrease observed for MIX.Conclusions: The MIX model can predict the D{sub 2cc} of the organs at risk with an error lower than 5% with a training set of ten patients or greater. The model can be used in the development of quality assurance tools to identify treatment plans with suboptimal sparing of the organs at risk. It can also be used to improve preplanning and in the development of real-time intraoperative planning tools.

Damato, Antonio L.; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Cormack, Robert A. [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)] [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

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101

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

- New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location More Documents & Publications PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location Slide 1 Slide 1...

102

Cancer Therapies: A Bane and a Boon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the surgical decision-making process for breast cancer.Cancer, 112(3), 489-494. 2. Grealy, Lucy (1994).Mifflin. 3. He, Lin (2011). Cancer Therapy. [PowerPoint

Neogi, Sushrita

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Endocrine sequelae of cancer therapy in childhood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New treatments for neoplastic diseases of childhood have significantly increased patients’ long-term survival and the importance of recognizing and correcting late complications of medical therapy. In this rev...

F. B. Diamond; Dr. Barry B. Bercu

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

THE FAMILY THERAPY CENTER of VIRGINIA TECH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the New River Valley and surrounding communities, with clients coming from as far away as eastern West and Family Therapy Serving the New River Valley and Surrounding Communities POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 20142016

Buehrer, R. Michael

105

Computer simulation of neutron capture therapy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical methods are developed to simulate on a large digital computer the production and use of reactor neutron beams f or boron capture therapy of brain tumors. The simulation accounts for radiation dose distributions ...

Olson, Arne Peter

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Computer simulation of neutron capture therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytical methods are developed to simulate on a large digital computer the production and use of reactor neutron beams f or boron capture therapy of brain tumors. The simulation accounts for radiation dose distributions ...

Olson, Arne Peter

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Validation of Gene Therapy Manufacturing Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Specific issues of concern in the validation of gene therapy viral vector manufacturing processes include quality of raw materials, safety testing of cell and viral banks, production and purification of the ve...

Dominick Vacante; Gail Sofer; Stephen Morris…

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy: Does Breast Size Matter?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the effects of breast size on dose-volume histogram parameters and clinical toxicity in whole-breast hypofractionated radiation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, all patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy between 2005 and 2009 were screened, and qualifying consecutive patients were included in 1 of 2 cohorts: large-breasted patients (chest wall separation >25 cm or planning target volume [PTV] >1500 cm{sub 3}) (n=97) and small-breasted patients (chest wall separation <25 cm and PTV <1500 cm{sub 3}) (n=32). All patients were treated prone or supine with hypofractionated IMRT to the whole breast (42.4 Gy in 16 fractions) followed by a boost dose (9.6 Gy in 4 fractions). Dosimetric and clinical toxicity data were collected and analyzed using the R statistical package (version 2.12). Results: The mean PTV V95 (percentage of volume receiving >= 95% of prescribed dose) was 90.18% and the mean V105 percentage of volume receiving >= 105% of prescribed dose was 3.55% with no dose greater than 107%. PTV dose was independent of breast size, whereas heart dose and maximum point dose to skin correlated with increasing breast size. Lung dose was markedly decreased in prone compared with supine treatments. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 0, 1, and 2 skin toxicities were noted acutely in 6%, 69%, and 25% of patients, respectively, and at later follow-up (>3 months) in 43%, 57%, and 0% of patients, respectively. Large breast size contributed to increased acute grade 2 toxicity (28% vs 12%, P=.008). Conclusions: Adequate PTV coverage with acceptable hot spots and excellent sparing of organs at risk was achieved by use of IMRT regardless of treatment position and breast size. Although increasing breast size leads to increased heart dose and maximum skin dose, heart dose remained within our institutional constraints and the incidence of overall skin toxicity was comparable to that reported in the literature. Taken together, these data suggest that hypofractionated radiation therapy using IMRT is a viable and appropriate therapeutic modality in large-breasted patients.

Hannan, Raquibul, E-mail: Raquibul.Hannan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Thompson, Reid F.; Chen Yu; Bernstein, Karen; Kabarriti, Rafi; Skinner, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Chen, Chin C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Landau, Evan; Miller, Ekeni; Spierer, Marnee; Hong, Linda; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Density functional theory study on the interstitial chemical shifts of main-group-element centered hexazirconium halide clusters; synthetic control of speciation in [(Zr6ZCl12)] (Z = B, C)-based mixed ligand complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. For carbide-, boride-, and nitride-centered carbonyl- ligated clusters of the later transition metals, such exceptional chemical shifts have also been observed and are quite comparable to data for hexazirconium clusters.79-86 A number of correlative... make the main contributions to paramagnetic shielding. Kaupp calculated 13C chemical shift tensors for interstitial carbides of a series of transition metal carbonyl clusters using sum-over-states density functional perturbation theory (SOS-DFPT)90...

Shen, Jingyi

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

110

University of British Columbia Department of Physical Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.therapy@ubc.ca The MPT Student Handbook is produced by the Department of Physical Therapy as an information resourceUniversity of British Columbia Department of Physical Therapy Master of Physical Therapy Program Student Handbook 2012-2013 "Movement and Function for Life" #12;MPT Student Handbook 2012-2013 Page | 2

Michelson, David G.

111

University of British Columbia Department of Physical Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.therapy@ubc.ca The MPT Student Handbook is produced by the Department of Physical Therapy as an information resourceUniversity of British Columbia Department of Physical Therapy Master of Physical Therapy Program Student Handbook 2013-2014 "Movement and Function for Life" #12;MPT Student Handbook 2013-2014 Page | 2

Handy, Todd C.

112

Report Card  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Report Card ... Homework, tests, and report cards. ... I don't know how to break the news to them—perhaps gently—that even after they finish college and graduate school, the homework, tests, and report cards continue. ...

MADELEINE JACOBS

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

113

CIOMS Report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CIOMS is the abbreviation for , a sub?organization of the World Health Organization (WHO). Concerning the reporting of adverse reactions the CIOMS reached agreement on a standard form report for reporting adv...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

REPORT OF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REPORT OF TO THE BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT EVALUATOR REVIEW AND VALIDATION OF FILINGS August 19, 2014 Submitted by: ACCION GROUP, LLC 244 North...

115

REPORT OF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RELEASE VERSION REPORT OF TO THE BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT EVALUATOR REVIEW AND VALIDATION OF FILINGS January 31, 2013 Submitted by: ACCION GROUP,...

116

Medical Progress: Risks of Testosterone-Replacement Therapy and Recommendations for Monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...profiles. Testosterone enanthate and testosterone cypionate are supplied as esterified oil-soluble preparations for injection. A typical dose is 100 mg per week, or 200 to 300 mg every two to three weeks. Peak serum levels occur 2 to 5 days after injection, and a return to base line is usually observed... Although some reports suggest that testosterone-replacement therapy may provide benefits for aging men, considerable controversy remains regarding indications for its use. Neither large-scale nor long-term studies have been initiated, in part because of theoretical concern regarding the risks associated with testosterone therapy, especially the possible stimulation of prostate cancer. This article discusses what is known (and not known) about the risks of testosterone-replacement therapy and provides recommendations for monitoring men who are receiving testosterone.

Rhoden E.L.; Morgentaler A.

2004-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

117

Targeted alpha therapy for cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) offers the potential to inhibit the growth of micrometastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The practicality and efficacy of TAT is tested by in vitro and in vivo studies in melanoma, leukaemia, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers, and by a phase 1 trial of intralesional TAT for melanoma. The alpha-emitting radioisotope used is Bi-213, which is eluted from the Ac-225 generator and chelated to a cancer specific monoclonal antibody (mab) or protein (e.g. plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 PAI2) to form the alpha-conjugate (AC). Stable alpha-ACs have been produced which have been tested for specificity and cytotoxicity in vitro against melanoma (9.2.27 mab), leukaemia (WM60), colorectal (C30.6), breast (PAI2, herceptin), ovarian (PAI2, herceptin, C595), prostate (PAI2, J591) and pancreatic (PAI2, C595) cancers. Subcutaneous inoculation of 1–1.5 million human cancer cells into the flanks of nude mice causes tumours to grow in all mice. Tumour growth is compared for untreated controls, nonspecific AC and specific AC, for local (subcutaneous) and systemic (tail vein or intraperitoneal) injection models. The 213Bi-9.2.27 AC is injected into secondary skin melanomas in stage 4 patients in a dose escalation study to determine the effective tolerance dose, and to measure kinematics to obtain the equivalent dose to organs. In vitro studies show that TAT is one to two orders of magnitude more cytotoxic to targeted cells than non-specific ACs, specific beta emitting conjugates or free isotopes. In vivo local TAT at 2 days post-inoculation completely prevents tumour formation for all cancers tested so far. Intra-lesional TAT can completely regress advanced sc melanoma but is less successful for breast and prostate cancers. Systemic TAT inhibits the growth of sc melanoma xenografts and gives almost complete control of breast and prostate cancer tumour growth. Intralesional doses up to 450 µCi in human patients are effective in regressing melanomas, with no concomitant complications. These results point to the application of local and systemic TAT in the management of secondary cancer. Results of the phase 1 clinical trial of TAT of subcutaneous, secondary melanoma indicate proof of the principle that TAT can make tumours in patients regress.

Barry J Allen; Chand Raja; Syed Rizvi; Yong Li; Wendy Tsui; David Zhang; Emma Song; Chang Fa Qu; John Kearsley; Peter Graham; John Thompson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Gene Therapy and Biological Pacing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...stem-cell vehicles to deliver ion-channel genes to the heart, and with the injection of biological pacemakers derived from embryonic stem cells (Figure 1), the report by Hu et al. is only the second in large animals to describe a biological pacemaker that induces heart rates and autonomic function that... TBX18 is a transcription factor critical to the specification of the sinoatrial node during normal development. A recent pig model of heart block suggests that the injection of a vector carrying TBX18 induces physiologically relevant pacemaker activity for 11 days.

Rosen M.R.

2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

119

Technical design of hadron therapy facilities  

SciTech Connect

Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Loma Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

Alonso, J.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Technical Design of Hadron Therapy Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Lorna Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

Alonso, J.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Hyperosmolar Therapy for Raised Intracranial Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...undertaken. Attempts to decompress the cranial contents by removing parts of the skull after traumatic brain injury have lowered intracranial pressure but have not improved the outcome, as compared with standard care. Several other interventions, in addition to hyperosmolar therapy, may be useful in the management... Foreword This Journal feature begins with a case vignette that includes a therapeutic recommendation. A discussion of the clinical problem and the mechanism of benefit of this form of therapy follows. Major clinical studies, the clinical use of this ...

Ropper A.H.

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

122

Research report Bilateral near-infrared monitoring of the cerebral concentration and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research report Bilateral near-infrared monitoring of the cerebral concentration and oxygen therapy (ECT). Non-invasive near infrared spectroscopy has previously been shown to reliably measure: Electro-convulsive therapy; Near-infrared spectroscopy; Seizure; Cerebral hemodynamics 1. Introduction

Boas, David

123

‘Europa Report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

‘Europa Report’ ... Most science-fiction thrillers favor fiction over science, but the faux-documentary “ Europa Report” does its best to stay true to the sci in sci-fi. ...

JOVANA J. GRBI?; C&EN CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

124

Conference reports  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Copyright 1998 Article Conference reports Various Conferences Abduction and Induction in AI: Report of the IJCAI'97...ca/spider/poole/talks/ind-ab.pdf 651 652 Conferences tried to tie together logic and probabilistic approaches......

Various

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Therapy: location-aware assessment and tasks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a system that allows therapists to assess and engage patients' in activities triggered by specific stressing contexts. The system is composed by: 1) a web application that the therapist uses to specify the activities and its ... Keywords: location based services, physiological recording, therapy

Luís Carriço; Marco de Sá; Luís Duarte; Tiago Antunes

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Murine Malignant Gliomas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...September 1992 research-article Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Murine Malignant Gliomas...Washington Street, Boston, MA 02111. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) involves administration of a boron compound followed by neutron irradiation of the target organ. The...

Stephen C. Saris; Guido R. Solares; David E. Wazer; Guillermo Cano; Sarah E. Kerley; Melita A. Joyce; Lester S. Adelman; Otto K. Harling; Hywel Madoc-Jones; Robert G. Zamenhof

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Radiobiology of normal rat lung in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary cancer radiation therapy that utilizes biochemical tumor cell targeting and provides a mixed field of high and low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation with differing ...

Kiger, Jingli Liu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Modeling the response of pneumonia to antimicrobial therapy.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...therapy at which treatment scores predicted outcome. Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis...therapy at which treatment scores predicted outcome. Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis...

J M Hyatt; A B Luzier; A Forrest; C H Ballow; J J Schentag

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Computational aspects of treatment planning for neutron capture therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted form of binary radiation therapy that has the potential to deliver radiation to cancers with cellular dose selectivity. Accurate and efficient treatment ...

Albritton, James Raymond, 1977-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Annual Report 2013 Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Responsibility 36 Audit Committee Report 39 Independent Auditors' Report 41 Consolidated Statement of Financial and Technology Facilities Council and the Wellcome Trust. Diamond generates high-energy beams of electrons

Rambaut, Andrew

131

Report Notes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notes Notes 1 "Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi)" is based on AC electricity consumed during charging events which began during the reporting period and distance driven during all trips in the reporting period. 2 "Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)" is based on net DC electricity discharged from or charged to the plug-in battery pack and distance driven during all trips in the reporting period. DC Wh/mi may not be comparable to AC Wh/mi if AC electricity charged prior to the reporting period was discharged during driving within the reporting period, or if AC electricity charged during the reporting period was not discharged during driving within the reporting period. 3 Trips when the plug-in battery pack charge was depleted to propel the vehicle throughout

132

From molecular changes to customised therapy A. Hemminki*,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Gene Therapy Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, WTI #602, 1824 6th Ave S., Birmingham, AL

Hemminki, Akseli

133

IIIPRISMA System Operator's Manual PRISMA Therapy Options ............................................................................. 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IIIPRISMA System Operator's Manual ... PRISMA Therapy Options .................................................................................................... PRISMA System ............................... xvi Operator's Manual ......................................................... #12;PRISMA System Operator's Manual ia Controller CCA

Kay, Mark A.

134

REVIEW Open Access Cell therapy using tolerogenic dendritic cells in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with cell therapy using regulatory cells. In our laboratory, as part of a European project, we plan to testREVIEW Open Access Cell therapy using tolerogenic dendritic cells in transplantation Aurélie Moreau the safety of tolerogenic dendritic cell (TolDC) therapy in kidney transplant patients. In this mini-review

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

135

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY AND HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Medicine DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENT HANDBOOK 2011-2012 645 NORTH MICHIGAN AVENUE - SUITE 1100 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60611 #12;#12;DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENT HANDBOOK 2011-2012 Published Doctor of Physical Therapy Student Handbook contains the rules, regulations, policies and procedures

Apkarian, A. Vania

136

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY AND HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Medicine DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENT HANDBOOK Clinical Education Section 2013-2014 645 NORTH MICHIGAN AVENUE - SUITE 1100 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60611 #12;#12;DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENT HANDBOOK) 908-8160 August 2013 #12;ii The Doctor of Physical Therapy Student Handbook contains the rules

Chisholm, Rex L.

137

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY AND HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Medicine DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENT HANDBOOK 2013-2014 645 NORTH MICHIGAN AVENUE - SUITE 1100 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60611 #12;DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENT HANDBOOK 2013-2014 Published Doctor of Physical Therapy Student Handbook contains the rules, regulations, policies and procedures

Chisholm, Rex L.

138

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY AND HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Medicine DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENT HANDBOOK Clinical Education Section 2012-2013 645 NORTH MICHIGAN AVENUE - SUITE 1100 CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60611 #12;i DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENT HANDBOOK 2012-8160 August 2012 #12;ii The Doctor of Physical Therapy Student Handbook contains the rules, regulations

Contractor, Anis

139

AN IMPROVED INTERSTITIAL WATER SAMPLER  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Municipal Laboratories,. City of Hamilton, Ontario. FUZFERENCES. PETERS, A. S. 1950. The effect of a floating mat on water waves. Commun. Pure Appl. Math.,.

2000-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

140

Radiation therapy of pediatric brain tumors : comparison of long-term health effects and costs between proton therapy and IMRT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation therapy is an important component of pediatric brain tumor treatment. However, radiation-induced damage can lead to adverse long-term health effects. Proton therapy has the ability to reduce the dose delivered ...

Vu, An T. (An Thien)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 09 THROUGH 09/30/2010 The following Annual Freedom of Information Act report covers the Period 10/01/2009, through 09/30/2010, as required by 5 U.S.C. 552. I. BASIC INFORMATION REGARDING REPORT 1. Kevin T. Hagerty, Director Office of Information Resources, MA-90 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 Alexander Morris, FOIA Officer Sheila Jeter, FOIA/Privacy Act Specialist FOIA Office, MA-90 Office of Information Resources U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 2. An electronic copy of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) report can be obtained at http://management.energy.gov/documents/annual_reports.htm. The report can then be accessed by clicking FOIA Annual Reports.

142

Economic Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transmitted to the Congress February 2008 Transmitted to the Congress February 2008 Together with the Annual Report of the Council of Economic Advisers Economic Report of the President Economic Report of the President For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office Internet: bookstore.gpo.gov Phone: (866) 512-1800; DC area (202) 512-1800 ISBN 978-0-16-079822-1 Transmitted to the Congress February 2008 together with THE ANNUAL REPORT of the COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON : 2008 Fax: (202) 512-2104 Mail Stop: IDCC, Washington, DC 20402-0001 C O N T E N T S ECONOMIC REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT ............................................. ANNUAL REPORT OF THE COUNCIL OF ECONOMIC ADVISERS* ...

143

SANDIA REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SANDIA REPORT SANDIA REPORT SAND 2011-3958 Unlimited Release Printed June 2011 Site Environmental Report for 2010 Sandia National Laboratories, California B.L. Larsen Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear

144

AUDIT REPORT  

Energy Savers (EERE)

(Report No. IG-13-021, July 2013). The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) information technology governance and risk management practices impeded the Agency...

145

Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 12, 2013 ... Technical Report Series: DCC-2013-13. Departamento de Ciência de Computadores. Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto.

Filipe Brandao

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

146

Optimization of triiodothyronine therapy in beagles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPTIMIZATION OF TRI IODOTHYRONINE Tl-IE RAP Y IN BEAGLES A Thesis by Victoria Carnahan Approved as to style and content by: airman Committee ea o partmen m er Mem er December 1976 ABSTRACT Optimization of Triiodothyronine Therapy... in Beagles. (December, 1976) Victoria Carnahan, B. A. , University of New Mexico; Chai rman: Dan Hightower, D. V. M. , M. S. A three part experiment was done to determine the best dosing sched- ule for hypothyroid beagles being maintained...

Carnahan, Victoria

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy Resources with Additional Information Planned radiation treatment Peregrine calculation from Mission Possible: DOE Advanced Biomedical Technology Research, page 10 Over the time span of many years, DOE's research has made many contributions to radiation and cancer therapy, including PEREGRINE and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). 'PEREGRINE, a hardware and software system that addresses the problem of radiation therapy dosage using fundamental physics principles, is a revolutionary new tool for analyzing and planning radiation treatment for cancer patients. About 90 percent of radiation treatment patients receive photon therapy, which is PEREGRINE's principal application. PEREGRINE may also be applied to the less frequently used electron-beam therapy and to brachytherapy, which is radiation therapy from an internally planted radiation source. It is effective for radiography, which predicts the pattern of radiation that is transmitted through a patient or other object.'1

148

Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Ductal Carcinoma In Situ  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Conventional radiation therapy (RT) administered in 25 fractions after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is the standard treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. Although accelerated hypofractionated regimens in 16 fractions have been shown to be equivalent to conventional RT for invasive breast cancer, few studies have reported results of using hypofractionated RT in DCIS. Methods and Materials: In this multicenter collaborative effort, we retrospectively reviewed the records of all women with DCIS at 3 institutions treated with BCS followed by hypofractionated whole-breast RT (WBRT) delivered in 16 fractions. Results: Between 2003 and 2010, 440 patients with DCIS underwent BCS followed by hypofractionated WBRT in 16 fractions for a total dose of 42.5 Gy (2.66 Gy per fraction). Boost RT to the surgical bed was given to 125 patients (28%) at a median dose of 10 Gy in 4 fractions (2.5 Gy per fraction). After a median follow-up time of 4.4 years, 14 patients had an ipsilateral local relapse, resulting in a local recurrence-free survival of 97% at 5 years. Positive surgical margins, high nuclear grade, age less than 50 years, and a premenopausal status were all statistically associated with an increased occurrence of local recurrence. Tumor hormone receptor status, use of adjuvant hormonal therapy, and administration of additional boost RT did not have an impact on local control in our cohort. On multivariate analysis, positive margins, premenopausal status, and nuclear grade 3 tumors had a statistically significant worse local control rate. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions provides excellent local control for patients with DCIS undergoing BCS.

Hathout, Lara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l'Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hijal, Tarek [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Théberge, Valérie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, L'Hôtel-Dieu de Québec, Quebec (Canada); Centre des maladies du sein Deschênes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l'Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Vulpe, Horia [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Hogue, Jean-Charles [Centre des maladies du sein Deschênes-Fabia, Quebec (Canada); Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec, Hôpital St-Sacrement, Quebec (Canada); Lambert, Christine [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Bahig, Houda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Centre affilié à l'Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); and others

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Comparison Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Report 2009 Department of Energy Annual Employee Survey Results -vs- 2006 & 2008 All Federal Government Federal Human Capital Survey Results This is a summary-by-question of DOE's responses to the 2009 Annual Employee Survey compared to corresponding items on the 2006 and 2008 Federal Human Capital Surveys. This summary displays results by Positive, Neutral, Negative, and where applicable, Do Not Know or No Basis to Judge responses. As shown below, for each response scale two responses are categorized as "Positive," one response is categorized as "Neutral," and two are categorized as "Negative." All of the data in this report is considered unweighted. Positive Responses Neutral Responses Negative Responses Do Not

150

Assessment Report  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Assessment Report Assessment of Audit Coverage of Cost Allowability for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 during...

151

Belmont Report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the USA, the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research in their document known as the “Belmont Report”, in 1979 underlined three basic principle...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This the final report for the project "Large-Scale Optimization for Bayesian Inference in Complex Systems," for the work in the group of the co-PI George Biros.

Biros, George

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

153

Monthly Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

month. Should you have questions about the EM Monthly Reports please contact envmgt@nv.doe.gov or call (702) 295-3521. October 2012 November 2012 December 2012 January 2013...

154

Monthly Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

month. Should you have questions about the EM Monthly Reports please contact envmgt@nv.doe.gov or call (702) 295-3521. October 2013 November 2013 December 2013 January 2014...

155

SANDIA REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Telephone: (865) 576-8401 Facsimile: (865) 576-5728 E-Mail: reports@adonis.osti.gov Online ordering: http:www.osti.govbridge Available to the public...

156

SANDIA REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Sandia National Laboratories, managed and operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work...

157

SANDIA REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To improve upon and evolve existing solar PV O&M approaches, this report: 1. Provides perspective on the concept of PV "system" reliability and how it can inform plant design,...

158

Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

159

Recent advances in neutron capture therapy (NCT)  

SciTech Connect

The application of the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction to cancer radiotherapy (Neutron Capture therapy, or NCT) has intrigued investigators since the discovery of the neutron. This paper briefly summarizes data describing recently developed boronated compounds with evident tumor specificity and extended biological half-lives. The implication of these compounds to NCT is evaluated in terms of Therapeutic Gain (TG). The optimization of NCT using band-pass filtered beams is described, again in terms of TG, and irradiation times with these less intense beams are estimated. 24 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Fairchild, R.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Acceleration Of Wound Healing Ny Photodynamic Therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for accelerating wound healing in a mammal. The method includes identifying an unhealed wound site or partially-healed wound site in a mammal; administering a photosensitizer to the mammal; waiting for a time period wherein the photosensitizer reaches an effective tissue concentration at the wound site; and photoactivating the photosensitizer at the wound site. The dose of photodynamic therapy is selected to stimulate the production of one or more growth factor by cells at the wound site, without causing tissue destruction.

Hasan, Tayyaba (Arlington, MA); Hamblin, Michael R. (Revere, MA); Trauner, Kenneth (Sacramento, CA)

2000-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Feasibility of Postmastectomy Treatment With Helical TomoTherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the potential of helical tomotherapy for postmastectomy radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: By use of the TomoTherapy Hi-Art II treatment-planning system (TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI), helical tomotherapy dose plans were developed for 5 patients and compared with the mixed-beam (electron-photon) plans with which they had been treated. The TomoTherapy plans were evaluated by use of dose-volume quantities, tumor control probability, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and secondary cancer complication probability (SCCP). Results: The TomoTherapy plans showed better dose homogeneity in the planning treatment volume containing the chest wall and internal mammary nodes (p = 0.001) and eliminated the need for abutting fields. For the normal tissues, the TomoTherapy plans showed a smaller fractional volume receiving 20Gy or greater for the ipsilateral lung (p = 0.05), no change in NTCP for postradiation pneumonitis, increased SCCP for each lung and both lungs together (p < 0.02), no change in the volume of the heart receiving more than 15Gy, no change in NTCP for excess cardiac mortality, and a larger mean dose and SCCP in the contralateral breast (p < 0.001). For nonspecific tissues, the volume receiving between 5Gy and 25Gy and SCCP were both larger for the TomoTherapy plans (p < 0.01). Total SCCP was larger for the TomoTherapy plans (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Overall, the TomoTherapy plans had comparable tumor control probability and NTCP to the mixed-beam plans and increased SCCP. The TomoTherapy plans showed significantly greater dose homogeneity in the chest wall, which offers the potential for improved cosmesis after treatment. These factors have resulted in TomoTherapy often being the treatment of choice for postmastectomy radiation therapy in our clinic.

Ashenafi, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, Louisiana (United States); Boyd, Robert A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, Louisiana (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana (United States); Lee, Tae K.; Lo, Kenneth K. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana (United States)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Targeted cancer therapies struggle in Mexico and Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Mexico and Brazil targeted therapies for cancer such as rituximab... The Impact of LATAM (Brazil and Mexico) Payer Policy on Prescribing in...

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Retail therapy: A qualitative investigation and scale development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The principle goal of this research was to enhance understanding of retail therapy, defined as shopping to alleviate negative moods. The specific research objectives were… (more)

Kang, Minjeong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A Critical Assessment of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy: An Overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the nuclear reaction that occurs when boron-10 is irradiated with neutrons of the appropriate...

Rolf F. Barth

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Pre-Clinical Studies on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the nuclear reaction that occurs when boron-10 is irradiated with thermal neutrons to yield...1

Rolf F. Barth; Albert H. Soloway…

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Nanoparticle preconditioning for enhanced thermal therapies in cancer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nanoparticles show tremendous promise in the safe and effective delivery of molecular adjuvants to enhance local cancer therapy. One important form of local cancer treatment… (more)

Shenoi, Mithun M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Archived Reports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings site. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Commercial Buildings site. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Archived Reports Archived Reports Yellow Arrow "Effective Occupied and Vacant Square Footage in Commercial Buildings in 1992" (HTML format) Yellow Arrow "Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings in 1992" Yellow Arrow "Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings" (1989 data - PDF format) Yellow Arrow "Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities" (1989 data - PDF format) Yellow Arrow "Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey (FBSS) 1993" (PDF format) Yellow Arrow micro-data files for FBSS (dBase and ASCII formats)

168

Report2  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Workshop Report on a Future Workshop Report on a Future Information Infrastructure for the Physical Sciences The Facts of the Matter: Finding, understanding, and using information about our physical world Hosted by the Department of Energy at the National Academy of Sciences May 30-31, 2000 Preface Forty years ago it took days, weeks or even months for information regarding an interesting discovery to be communicated to the relevant community of scientists and engineers. At that time, most of us kept a collection of postcards that we used to request reprints of articles as they appeared in the journals we read. This was the situation at the time that Ted Maiman reported his results using ruby as a medium to make a laser. Some twenty years later, this time interval was shortened to days by

169

Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 2011 Annual Report to the Oak Ridge Community Annual Report to the Oak Ridge Community DOE/ORO/2399 Progress Cleanup P Progress Cleanup P 2 This report was produced by URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, DOE's Environmental Management contractor for the Oak Ridge Reservation. About the Cover After recontouring and revegetation, the P1 Pond at East Tennessee Technology Park is flourishing. The contaminated pond was drained, recontoured, and restocked with fish that would not disturb the pond sediment. 1 Message from the Acting Manager Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office To the Oak Ridge Community: Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 marked many accomplishments in Oak Ridge. Our Environmental Management (EM) program completed a majority of its American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)-funded projects,

170

Cruise Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cruise Report Cruise Report The Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Covering the cruise of the Drilling Vessel Uncle John Mobile, Alabama to Galveston, Texas Atwater Valley Blocks 13/14 and Keathley Canyon Block 151 17 April to 22 May 2005 1 DISCLAIMER "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product,

171

SANDIA REPORT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPORT REPORT SAND2008-6098 Unlimited Release Printed August 2008 National SCADA Test Bed Consequence Modeling Tool Bryan T. Richardson and Lozanne Chavez Prepared by: Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor

172

Multigroup neutron dose calculations for proton therapy  

SciTech Connect

We have developed tools for the preparation of coupled multigroup proton/neutron cross section libraries. Our method is to use NJOY to process evaluated nuclear data files for incident particles below 150 MeV and MCNPX to produce data for higher energies. We modified the XSEX3 program of the MCNPX code system to produce Legendre expansions of scattering matrices generated by sampling the physics models that are comparable to the output of the GROUPR routine of NJOY. Our code combines the low and high energy scattering data with user input stopping powers and energy deposition cross sections that we also calculated using MCNPX. Our code also calculates momentum transfer coefficients for the library and optionally applies an energy straggling model to the scattering cross sections and stopping powers. The motivation was initially for deterministic solution of space radiation shielding calculations using Attila, but noting that proton therapy treatment planning may neglect secondary neutron dose assessments because of difficulty and expense, we have also investigated the feasibility of multi group methods for this application. We have shown that multigroup MCNPX solutions for secondary neutron dose compare well with continuous energy solutions and are obtainable with less than half computational cost. This efficiency comparison neglects the cost of preparing the library data, but this becomes negligible when distributed over many multi group calculations. Our deterministic calculations illustrate recognized obstacles that may have to be overcome before discrete ordinates methods can be efficient alternatives for proton therapy neutron dose calculations.

Kelsey Iv, Charles T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prinja, Anil K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

FINAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FINAL REPORT AEC-ERDA Research Contract AT (11-1) 2174 Columbia University's Nevis Laboratories "Research in Neutron Velocity Spectroscopy" James RainwatGr DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or

174

Lidar Report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the LiDAR acquisition methodology employed by Woolpert on the 2009 USDA - Savannah River LiDAR Site Project. LiDAR system parameters and flight and equipment information is also included. The LiDAR data acquisition was executed in ten sessions from February 21 through final reflights on March 2, 2009; using two Leica ALS50-II 150kHz Multi-pulse enabled LiDAR Systems. Specific details about the ALS50-II systems are included in Section 4 of this report.

Wollpert.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Effect of thermal annealing on charge exchange between oxygen interstitial defects within HfO{sub 2} and oxygen-deficient silicon centers within the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface  

SciTech Connect

We compare the charging response of rapid thermally annealed (800 and 1000 deg. C) 4 nm thick HfO{sub 2} to as-deposited HfO{sub 2} on Si by measuring the surface potential of the HfO{sub 2} layers after vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation with 11.6 eV photons. From VUV spectroscopy, we determined all HfO{sub 2} layers show the presence of oxygen-interstitial defects (OIDs). The electronic states of OID in HfO{sub 2} line up in energy with oxygen-deficient Si centers within the SiO{sub 2} interfacial layer. This implies charge exchange between OIDs within HfO{sub 2} and the O-deficient silicon centers within the SiO{sub 2} interfacial layer are very important for controlling the radiation-induced trapped charge in HfO{sub 2} dielectric stacks.

Lauer, J. L.; Shohet, J. L. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Plasma Processing and Technology Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Nishi, Y. [Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

176

Measurement of photodynamic therapy drug concentrations in a tissue  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of a one-year laboratory-directed research and development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an experimental treatment modality for cancer in which a photoactive molecule with an affinity for tumors in administered to the patient, then excited by light. Photoactivation creates singlet oxygen consequently killing the tissue. Knowledge of the concentration of the photoactive compound in the tissue is necessary for proper light dosimetry during PDT. Presently, the control of light application is problematic. If too much light is applied, damage to the surrounding tissue will occur. If insufficient light is applied, the targeted tissue volume will remain viable. The ideal implementation of PDT would use a feedback system for light delivery that incorporates the optical properties of the tissue and knowledge of the concentration of the photoactive compound. This project sought to develop a method for measuring photosensitizer concentrations in tissue phantoms that will lead to a noninvasive, endoscopically compatible, in vivo method of measuring PST drug concentrations.

Mourant, J.; Biglo, I.; Johnson, T.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Therapeutic alliance in couples therapy: the influence of gender, who initiated therapy, split alliance, and the presenting problem.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Therapeutic alliance is an essential component of successful therapy. All forms of individual psychotherapy have demonstrated a connection between outcome and therapeutic alliance. Despite the… (more)

Delaney, Robin Ostrom

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location Page 1 of 3 as of 1/24/2011 Report Name Previous Location New Location Brief Description Multi-Project or Single Project Report 2A Project Summary by Program PARS Reports Monthly Reports All active projects listing Pre/Post CD-2 $ and #'s including RYG status. Multi-Project 3A Red-Yellow Project Status Report PARS Reports Monthly Reports For every project that has been assessed by the OECM Analyst as being either Red or Yellow a worksheet is created that includes the OECM Analyst's written assessment of the project. The FPD, Site and Contractor with its EVM Certification Status are listed in the report. All appropriate EVM metrics, TPC values and CD approved dates as of the current OA Status Date are a part of the report.

179

Report 86  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of low-level biological or industrial waste. It is well established that radioactive...synchrotron-radiation beam lines on elec- tron storage rings (Kobayashi et al., 1987; Konishi...Research Institute, Annual Report on Long-Term Dose-Response Studies of Inhaled or......

Report 86

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Occurrence Reporting  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish and maintain a system for reporting operations information related to DOE-owned or -operated facilities and processing that information to identify the root causes of Unusual, Off-Normal, and Emergency Occurrences and provide for appropriate corrective action. Cancels DOE 5000.3B.

1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Quality Assurance of Radiation Therapy Planning Systems: Current Status and Remaining Challenges  

SciTech Connect

Computerized radiation therapy planning systems (RTPSs) are pivotal for treatment planning. The acceptance, commissioning, and quality control of RTPSs are uniquely complex and are described in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group Report 53 (1998) and International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Report Series No. 430 (2004). The International Atomic Energy Agency also developed a document and data package for use by vendors and purchasers to aid with acceptance testing of RTPSs. This document is based on International Electrotechnical Commission standard 62083 (2000) and describes both 'type' tests to be performed in the factory and 'site' tests to be performed in the clinic. The American Association of Physicists Task Group Report 67 described benchmark tests for the validation of dose calculation algorithms. Test data are being produced with the backing of the U.S. National Cancer Institute. However, significant challenges remain. Technology keeps evolving rapidly, thus requiring new quality assurance (QA) procedures. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy with its use of inverse optimization has added a new dimension to QA, because the results are not intuitively obvious. New technologies such as real-time ultrasound guidance for brachytherapy, TomoTherapy, and Cyberknife, require their own specialized RTPSs with unique QA requirements. On-line imaging allows for the generation of dose reconstructions using image warping techniques to determine the daily dose delivered to the patient. With increasing computer speeds, real-time reoptimization of treatment plans will become a reality. Gating technologies will require four-dimensional dose calculations to determine the actual dose delivered to tissue voxels. With these rapidly changing technologies, it is essential that a strong QA culture is invoked in every institution implementing these procedures and that new protocols are developed as a part of the clinical implementation process.

Van Dyk, Jacob [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program/London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON (Canada); Departments of Oncology, Medical Biophysics, Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, and Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)], E-mail: jake.vandyk@lhsc.on.ca

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Department of Health Professions Program in Physical Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-time pass rate on their licensure examination, which was 12% higher than the national average. ClinicallyDepartment of Health Professions Program in Physical Therapy UCF Clinical Education Update 2011 The past year in the University of Central Florida's Doctoral Program in Physical Therapy has brought

Wu, Shin-Tson

183

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of a Murine Melanoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Basic Sciences Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of a Murine Melanoma 1...for reprints should be addressed. Boron neutron capture therapy has been carried out on...Irradiations with a predominantly thermal neutron beam were performed at the Brookhaven...

Jeffrey A. Coderre; John A. Kalef-Ezra; Ralph G. Fairchild; Peggy L. Micca; Lawrence E. Reinstein; John D. Glass

1988-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Roadmap: Respiratory Therapy Technology Associate of Applied Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Respiratory Therapy Technology ­ Associate of Applied Science [RE-AAS-RTT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 1-Apr-2013/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended Hours] Requirement: Admission into the Respiratory Therapy Technology program RTT 11000 Introduction

Sheridan, Scott

185

Roadmap: Respiratory Therapy Technology Associate of Applied Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Respiratory Therapy Technology ­ Associate of Applied Science [RE-AAS-RTT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 16-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended Hours] Requirement: Admission into the Respiratory Therapy Technology program RTT 11000 Introduction

Sheridan, Scott

186

Workshop on photon activation therapy: proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This Workshop was held concurrently with an IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on Exploration of the Possibility of High-LET Radiation for Non-conventional Radiotherapy in Cancer. The Workshop on Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) was given as a special session on April 18, as it was thoght PAT might eventually be found to be attractive to developing countries, which is a major concern of the IAEA. An effort was made to bring together representatives of the various groups known to be actively working on PAT; these included investigators from Sweden and Japan as well as the US. It is hoped that this compendium of papers will be of use to those currently active in this developing field, as well as to those who might join this area of endeavor in the future.

Fairchild, R.G. (ed.)

1985-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

187

Dosimetry for radiocolloid therapy of cystic craniopharyngiomas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dosimetry for radiocolloid therapy of cystic craniopharyngiomas is investigated. Analytical calculations based on the Loevinger and the Berger formulae for electrons and photons, respectively, are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The role of the material of which the colloid introduced inside the craniopharyngioma is made of as well as that forming the cyst wall is analyzed. It is found that the analytical approaches provide a very good description of the simulated data in the conditions where they can be applied (i.e., in the case of a uniform and infinite homogeneous medium). However, the consideration of the different materials and interfaces produces a strong reduction of the dose delivered to the cyst wall in relation to that predicted by the Loevinger and the Berger formulae.

Rojas, E L; Lallena, A M; Bodineau, C; Galan, P; Al-Dweri, Feras M.O.; Lallena, Antonio M.; Bodineau, Coral; Galan, Pedro

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Hadron Cancer Therapy: Role of Nuclear Reactions  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Recently it has become feasible to calculate energy deposition and particle transport in the body by proton and neutron radiotherapy beams, using Monte Carlo transport methods. A number of advances have made this possible, including dramatic increases in computer speeds, a better understanding of the microscopic nuclear reaction cross sections, and the development of methods to model the characteristics of the radiation emerging from the accelerator treatment unit. This paper describes the nuclear reaction mechanisms involved, and how the cross sections have been evaluated from theory and experiment, for use in computer simulations of radiation therapy. The simulations will allow the dose delivered to a tumor to be optimized, whilst minimizing the dos given to nearby organs at risk.

Chadwick, M. B.

2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

189

Professional Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

St. James Oil St. James Oil Corporation St. James Oil Corporation Phone 949.461.5210 25431 Cabot Road, Suite 107 Fax 949.461.5215 Laguna Hills, CA 92653 Final Technical Report Title Page The Use of Acid Stimulation for Restoring to Production Shut-in Oil Fields Grant Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FG26-03NT 15432 Prepared by Richard C. Russell, Project Director PAGE 1 OF 22 St. James Oil Corporation The Use of Acid Stimulation for Restoring to Production Shut-in Oil Fields Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

190

Informal Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

W-^^ LA-8034-MS ^ - W-^^ LA-8034-MS ^ - - ^ / Informal Report "c o O o -*-* "co > Specific Heat and Thermal Conductivity of Explosives, Mixtures, and Plastic-Bonded Explosives Determined Experimentally \mm ^ts\ LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY Post Office Box 1663 Los Alamos. New Mexico 87545 DISTR!DU7irM o r TdiS BGGbT.lENT IS UNLIMITED DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately

191

Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Final Report to Improved Reservoir Access Through Refracture Treatments in Tight Gas Sands and Gas Shales 07122-41.FINAL June 2013 PI Mukul M. Sharma The University of Texas at Austin 200 E. Dean Keeton St. Stop C0300 Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 471---3257 msharma@mail.utexas.edu LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by The University of Texas at Austin as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT, OR THAT THE

192

Report Cover  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation of the Department of Implementation of the Department of Energy's Beryllium-Associated Worker Registry DOE/IG-0726 April 2006 REPORT ON IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S BERYLLIUM-ASSOCIATED WORKER REGISTRY TABLE OF CONTENTS Implementation of Beryllium Registry Details of Finding 1 Recommendations and Comments 4 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology 6 2. Prior Audit Report 9 3. Management Comments 10 Implementation of Beryllium Registry Page 1 Details of Finding Maintenance and The data in the Department of Energy's (Department) Beryllium- Use of Registry Associated Worker Registry (Registry) was neither complete nor fully accurate. Further, the Department had not used the Registry to evaluate health effects of beryllium exposure or the prevalence

193

2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - WCH Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 30 2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - WCH Report Prepared by EurekaFacts LLC 2 Introduction The...

194

2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - WRPS Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 30 2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - WRPS Report Prepared by EurekaFacts LLC 2 Introduction The...

195

2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - MSA Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 30 2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - MSA Report Prepared by EurekaFacts LLC 2 Introduction The...

196

2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - ATL Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 30 2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - ATL Report Prepared by EurekaFacts LLC 2 Introduction The...

197

2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - CHPRC Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 30 2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - CHPRC Report Prepared by EurekaFacts LLC 2 Introduction The...

198

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of Intracerebral Melanoma Using Boronophenylalanine as a Capture Agent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Experimental Therapeutics Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of Intracerebral Melanoma...the Fourth International Symposium on Neutron Capture Therapy, Sydney, Australia...at the Fifth International Symposium on Neutron Therapy, Columbus, OH, September 13-17...

Khalid Z. Matalka; Michael Q. Bailey; Rolf F. Barth; Alfred E. Staubus; Albert H. Soloway; Melvin L. Moeschberger; Jeffrey A. Coderre; Einar K. Rofstad

1993-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

active projects listing PrePost CD-2 and 's including RYG status. Multi-Project 3A Red-Yellow Project Status Report PARS Reports Monthly Reports For every project that has...

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - antiviral therapy preliminary Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

therapy, which exposes the patient to the risk of developing antiviral drug... and to design new trials of combination therapy to delay drug resistance. In the future, antiviral...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Boron containing compounds and their preparation and use in neutron capture therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention pertains to boron containing thiouracil derivatives, their method of preparations, and their use in the therapy of malignant melanoma using boron neutron capture therapy.

Gabel, Detlef (Bremen, DE)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Thiourea derivatives, methods of their preparation and their use in neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention pertains to boron containing thiouracil derivatives, their method of preparations, and their use in the therapy of malignant melanoma using boron neutron capture therapy.

Gabel, Detlef (Bremen, DE)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Anxiety: Adapting Interventions for Children with Autism and Intellectual Disability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1996). Family enhancement of cognitive style in anxious andC. R. (2006). Understanding cognitive behaviour therapy: AJ. , et al. (2010). Cognitive behavioral therapy for 4- to7-

Danial, John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in breast cancer survivors : randomized controlled crossover study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. , & Bouchard, S. (2004). Cognitive-behavioral therapy forQuillian, R. E. (2001). Cognitive behavioral therapy forT. , & Posner, D. (2005). Cognitive behavioral treatment of

Fiorentino, Lavinia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - art therapy Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Law, Natural Sciences, Summary: of Creative Art Therapies Where Inspiration Meets Innovation Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences... of Creative Art Therapies The...

206

Optimizing Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) System for Image Guided Radiation Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation therapy, on- line re-planning, real-time dose estimationradiation therapy, on-line re-planning, real-time dose estimation,

Park, Chun Joo

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc therapy development Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development and Family Studies Gifford Building Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1570 Ph: 970-491-5991 Fax: 970... or couple therapy Family Therapy Premarital and couple...

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - antiretroviral therapy rollout Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are likely to be eligible for treatment. The rollout of antiretroviral therapy in Africa plans... resistance (Fig. 4b). The primary purpose of the antiretroviral therapy...

209

Report: Communications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS Background In September 2006, the Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) issued a report to the Assistant Secretary that contained recommendations pertaining to communications. These recommendations were approved and implemented to varying degrees. Recommendation 2006-06: Establish a permanent position to provide the needed communications role in the Office of the Assistant Secretary. Recommendation 2006-07: Incorporate communications into all aspects of decision-making. Recommendation 2006-08: Incorporate a communications element or standard to performance appraisal plans for key managers, especially field managers. Recommendation 2006-09: Measure the effectiveness of current communications tools.

210

Professional Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Thijssen, LLC P: 206 229 6882 J. Thijssen, LLC P: 206 229 6882 4910 163 rd Ave NE Redmond, WA 98052 e: jant@jthijssen.com The Impact of Future Diesel Fuel Specifications and Engine Emissions Standards on SOFC Final Report Date: June 29, 2004 Prepared for: US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Contract Number: DE-AM26-99FT40465; Task NT50909; Sub- Task 19 Table of Contents Table of Contents ..........................................................................................................................a Executive Summary....................................................................................................................... I Diesel Fuel Specification Trends Until 2010 .................................................................................

211

INFORMAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

q?% q?% LA-5031 -MS INFORMAL REPORT krs $ 1 0 s N o t e on Inverse Bremsstrahlung in Strong E!ect:omGgnetic c;alPl I j a l a m o s scientific laboratory of the University of California LOS A L A M O S , NEW MEXICO 8 7 5 4 4 U N I T E D S T A T E S A T O M I C E N E R G Y C O M M I S S I O N a This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Atomic Energy Commission, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contrac- tors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or im- plied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, com- pleteness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process dis- closed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

212

Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to better understand the 'Multiscale Dynamics of Relaxor Ferroelectrics'. The output of the project is summarized in the narrative. The results of the work were presented at a number of different conferences and four papers were written, the references to which are also indicated in the report and which have also been uploaded on e-link. The multiscale dynamics of relaxors was clearly identified in the three characteristic temperatures that were identified. In particular, we were the first group to identify an intermediate temperature, T*, at which the correlations between off-center ions in relaxor cross-over from being dynamic to being static and giving rise to the characteristic relaxor behavior in the dielectric constant. Other groups have now confirmed the existence of such an intermediate temperature. We also made and reported two other observations: (1) a coherent interference phenomena (EIT-like effect) near the transition of several relaxors, which provides information on the nature and mechanism of the transition; and (2) in a similar way, inelastic neutron scattering results were interpreted as resonant scattering of acoustic phonons by localized modes in polar nanodomains. In parallel with the neutron scattering work, we also developed a theory of the scattering of phonons by the above localized modes. The theoretical development is very formal at this point and did not allow an easy comparison with the experimental results. This work is in progress.

J. Toulouse

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

213

Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Transition metal carbides have recently attracted a great deal of interest due to their potential to replace noble metal catalysts in a variety of reactions. To date, attempts to develop commercial applications with bulk metal carbides have been unsuccessful, however, the catalytic behavior of nanometer-sized carbide particles are reported to be sufficiently different from the bulk materials that new research in this area is warranted. In this report, Mo/W carbides were synthesized using carbon nanotubes both as carbon source and as a catalyst support. These carbon nanotubes (FIBRIL[TM] Nanotubes) are composed of parallel layers of trigonal carbon, but in the form of a series of concentric tubes disposed about the longitudinal axis of the fibrils with diameter of 8{approx}10 nm. The special dimensions of nanotubes stabilize fine dispersion of catalytic entities as only particles with limited sizes, ca <8nm, could be supported on this nanoscale substrate. Two types of catalysts have been prepared in this manner. First, highly dispersed Mo carbide particles were generated on the carbon nanotube surface with average particle size of 3{approx}10 nm. Furthermore, stoichiometric Mo carbide was also obtained in the form of highly porous assemblages of nanorods by careful control of the reaction conditions. The prepared Mo and W carbide catalysts were tested in several industrial reactions with significant energy savings. Results from these studies demonstrated the ''poor man's platinum'' hypothesis as well as many great potentials associated with these novel catalysts in chemical and refinery industries.

Ma, Jun; Hoch, Robert

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

COMMUNITY REPORT September 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY REPORT September 2014 BIAS REPORT AND SUPPORT SYSTEM #12;8 Bias Report and Support System Charge: The Bias Report at Washington University. Through the BRSS, students will be able to report incidents of bias. The working group

Larson-Prior, Linda

215

2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT

Jawitz, James W.

216

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Name Previous Location New Location Brief Description Multi-Project or Single Project Report 2A Project Summary by Program PARS Reports Monthly Reports All active projects listing Pre/Post CD-2 $ and #'s including RYG status. Multi-Project 3A Red-Yellow Project Status Report PARS Reports Monthly Reports For every project that has been assessed by the OECM Analyst as being either Red or Yellow a worksheet is created that includes the OECM Analyst's written assessment of the project. The FPD, Site and Contractor with its EVM Certification Status are listed in the report. All appropriate EVM metrics, TPC values and CD approved dates as of the current OA Status Date are a part of the report. Multi-Project 4B Projects Post-CD-2 PARS Reports Monthly Reports

217

Dental root agenesis secondary to irradiation therapy in a case of rhabdomyosarcoma of the middle ear  

SciTech Connect

There have been only a few published reports on the dental-facial effects of radiation therapy and the subsequent oral management of these patients. A case involving a 13-year-old black male patient with a history of rhabdomyosarcoma is presented. The patient received 4,050 rads of radiation to the right middle ear when he was 2 years of age. His residual medical and dental difficulties are apparently complications from the initial therapy. Examination of the oral cavity revealed bimaxillary micrognathia and marked loss of vertical dimension. A Class II facial profile with Class I molar relationship was observed. The mandible was thin and hypoplastic, with a small knife-edge alveolar ridge. The remaining eighteen erupted permanent teeth were very mobile, and root development had ceased after only initial formation. All of the teeth except the first permanent molars were extracted, and immediate partial dentures were inserted at the time of surgery. A discussion of therapeutic considerations follows the case report.

Dury, D.C.; Roberts, M.W.; Miser, J.S.; Folio, J.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

GALVIN REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories Futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories Prepared by the Secretary Of Energy Advisory Board Task Force on Alternative Futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories February 1995 Figure 1. Department of Energy National Laboratories Under Consideration by the Task Force Search Both Volumes of the Galvin Report To Table of Contents Task Force on Alternative Futures for the DOE National Laboratories Robert Galvin (Chairman) Chairman of the Executive Committee Motorola Inc. Braden Allenby Research Vice President, Technology and Environment AT&T Bob Boylan Successful Presentations A Division of Boylan Enterprises, Inc. Linda Capuano Vice President, Operations and Business Development Conductus, Inc. Ruth Davis President and Chief Executive Officer

219

SANDIA REPORT  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

1-0516 * U 1-0516 * U C - 2 7 4 Unlimited Release Printed May 1991 SEP1 2 1991 PC-1D Installation Manual and User's Guide Version 3.1 Paul A. Basore !- Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-76DP00789 SF2900CH8-81) DISTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLIMITED Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Govern- ment nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express

220

Progress Report:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE26-98FT34174.000 DE26-98FT34174.000 Development of New Drilling Fluids FINAL REPORT Date: May 5, 2003 Title: Development of New Types of Non-Damaging Drill-in and Completion Fluids Project Number: 26-98FT34174.000 From: David B. Burnett, Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering, Texas A&M University Goals and Objectives of Project The goal of the project has been to develop new types of drill-in fluids (DIFs) and completion fluids (CFs) for use in natural gas reservoirs. Phase 1 of the project was a 24- month study to develop the concept of advanced type of fluids usable in well completions. Phase 1 tested this concept and created a kinetic mathematical model to accurately track the fluid's behavior under downhole conditions. Phase 2 includes tests of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

SANDIA REPORT  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

2-2137 * U 2-2137 * U C - 7 0 5 Unlimited Release Printed September 1994 EXODUS II: A Finite Element Data Model Larry A. Schoof, Victor R. Yarberry Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and LIvermore, California 94550 for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited 0Jff*BUT»0» Or THIS DOCUMFW IS UNLIRIITrp Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Govern- ment nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express

222

CIP Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Featured in this month's issue of The Featured in this month's issue of The CIP Report are Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. SCADA systems monitor and control the processes of many of our Nation's infrastructures. fle security and safety of transportation, water, communications, and many other vital parts of our everyday lives all rely on SCADA systems. In this issue we look at some of the difierent SCADA systems and their applications. fle Thrst article provides an overview of George Mason University's research on SCADA systems. flis research focuses on railroad transportation and Positive Train Control systems. fle second article discusses the Energy Sector's response to cyber threats and the efiorts to secure their control systems. An article from Mississippi State

223

Trip Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois May 2013 Page 1 2013 Inspection and Annual Site Status Report for the Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Site Summary Site A/Plot M was inspected on April 10, 2013. The site, located within a county forest preserve with significant tree and grass cover, was in good condition. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. Erosion on top of the grass covered mound at Plot M continues to be a concern. Bike traffic produces ruts which if left unfixed grow and threaten the protectiveness of the soil cover on top of the mound. In 2010 ANL personnel repaired two areas at Plot M by filling in the ruts with clean top soil and re-seeding. In 2012, additional repairs were made by ANL personnel. Three-

224

SANDIA REPORT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

328 328 Unlimited Release November 2007 Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment Raymond C. Parks Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency thereof,

225

Boron thermal/epithermal neutron capture therapy  

SciTech Connect

The development of various particle beams for radiotherapy represents an attempt to improve dose distribution, and to provide high LET radiations which are less sensitive to ambient physical and radiobiological factors such as oxygen tension, cell cycle, and dose rate. In general, a compromise is necessary as effective RBE is reduced in order to spread the dose distribution over the anticipated tumor volume. The approach of delivering stable non-toxic isotopes to tumor, and then activating these atoms subsequently via an external radiation beam has mator advantages; problems associated with high uptake of these isotopes in competing cell pools are obviated, and the general tumor volume can be included in the treatment field of the activating beam. As long as the normal tissues supporting tumor show a low uptake of the isotope to be activated, and as long as the range of the reaction products is short, dose will be restricted to tumor, with a consequent high therapeutic ratio. Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) is generally carried out by activating boron-10 with low energy neutrons. The range of the high LET, low OER particles from the /sup 10/B(n, ..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction is approx. 10..mu.., or one cell diameter, a situation that is optimal for cell killing. Significant advantages may be gained by using the NCT procedure in conjunction with improved tissue penetration provided with epithermal or filtered beams, and new compounds showing physiological binding to tumor.

Fairchild, R.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Cold atmospheric plasma in cancer therapy  

SciTech Connect

Recent progress in atmospheric plasmas has led to the creation of cold plasmas with ion temperature close to room temperature. This paper outlines recent progress in understanding of cold plasma physics as well as application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) in cancer therapy. Varieties of novel plasma diagnostic techniques were developed recently in a quest to understand physics of CAP. It was established that the streamer head charge is about 10{sup 8} electrons, the electrical field in the head vicinity is about 10{sup 7} V/m, and the electron density of the streamer column is about 10{sup 19} m{sup ?3}. Both in-vitro and in-vivo studies of CAP action on cancer were performed. It was shown that the cold plasma application selectively eradicates cancer cells in-vitro without damaging normal cells and significantly reduces tumor size in-vivo. Studies indicate that the mechanism of action of cold plasma on cancer cells is related to generation of reactive oxygen species with possible induction of the apoptosis pathway. It is also shown that the cancer cells are more susceptible to the effects of CAP because a greater percentage of cells are in the S phase of the cell cycle.

Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alex; Volotskova, Olga [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)] [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States); Ann Stepp, Mary [Medical School, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)] [Medical School, George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States); Srinivasan, Priya; Sandler, Anthony [Childrens National Medical Center, Washington DC 20010 (United States)] [Childrens National Medical Center, Washington DC 20010 (United States); Trink, Barry [Head and Neck Cancer Research Division, Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)] [Head and Neck Cancer Research Division, Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Interim report  

SciTech Connect

This Interim Report summarizes the research and development activities of the Superconducting Super Collider project carried out from the completion of the Reference Designs Study (May 1984) to June 1985. It was prepared by the SSC Central Design Group in draft form on the occasion of the DOE Annual Review, June 19--21, 1985. Now largely organized by CDG Divisions, the bulk of each chapter documents the progress and accomplishments to date, while the final section(s) describe plans for future work. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides a basic brief description of the SSC, its physics justification, its origins, and the R&D organization set up to carry out the work. Chapter 2 gives a summary of the main results of the R&D program, the tasks assigned to the four magnet R&D centers, and an overview of the future plans. The reader wishing a quick look at the SSC Phase I effort can skim Chapter 1 and read Chapter 2. Subsequent chapters discuss in more detail the activities on accelerator physics, accelerator systems, magnets and cryostats, injector, detector R&D, conventional facilities, and project planning and management. The magnet chapter (5) documents in text and photographs the impressive progress in successful construction of many model magnets, the development of cryostats with low heat leaks, and the improvement in current-carrying capacity of superconducting strand. Chapter 9 contains the budgets and schedules of the COG Divisions, the overall R&D program, including the laboratories, and also preliminary projections for construction. Appendices provide information on the various panels, task forces and workshops held by the CDG in FY 1985, a bibliography of COG and Laboratory reports on SSC and SSC-related work, and on private industrial involvement in the project.

NONE

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hepatocellular Carcinoma Radiation Therapy: Review of Evidence and Future Opportunities  

SciTech Connect

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of global cancer death. Curative therapy is not an option for most patients, often because of underlying liver disease. Experience in radiation therapy (RT) for HCC is rapidly increasing. Conformal RT can deliver tumoricidal doses to focal HCC with low rates of toxicity and sustained local control in HCC unsuitable for other locoregional treatments. Stereotactic body RT and particle therapy have been used with long-term control in early HCC or as a bridge to liver transplant. RT has also been effective in treating HCC with portal venous thrombosis. Patients with impaired liver function and extensive disease are at increased risk of toxicity and recurrence. More research on how to combine RT with other standard and novel therapies is warranted. Randomized trials are also needed before RT will be generally accepted as a treatment option for HCC. This review discusses the current state of the literature and opportunities for future research.

Klein, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Dawson, Laura A., E-mail: laura.dawson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Radiation Therapy for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration  

SciTech Connect

In the enormity of the public health burden imposed by age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), much effort has been directed toward identifying effective and efficient treatments. Currently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections have demonstrated considerably efficacy in treating neovascular ARMD, but patients require frequent treatment to fully benefit. Here, we review the rationale and evidence for radiation therapy of ARMD. The results of early photon external beam radiation therapy are included to provide a framework for the sequential discussion of evidence for the usage of stereotactic radiation therapy, proton therapy, and brachytherapy. The evidence suggests that these 3 modern modalities can provide a dose-dependent benefit in the treatment of ARMD. Most importantly, preliminary data suggest that all 3 can be used in conjunction with anti-VEGF therapeutics, thereby reducing the frequency of anti-VEGF injections required to maintain visual acuity.

Kishan, Amar U. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Modjtahedi, Bobeck S.; Morse, Lawrence S. [Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, California (United States)] [Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, California (United States); Lee, Percy, E-mail: percylee@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Effects of Low Level Laser Therapy on Orthodontic Pain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of low level laser therapy applied extra orally on the reduction of orthodontic pain. Materials and Methods: Sixty dental students were voluntarily recruited for this randomized, double-blinded, placebo...

Buchwald, Bradley

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

231

Biomarkers and predictors of restorative therapy effects after stroke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hours after acute ischemic stroke. N Engl J Med. 2008; 359(the human brain after stroke. II. Restorative therapies.recovery from ischemic stroke. J Magn Reson Imaging. 2010;

Burke, Erin; Cramer, Steven C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Boron neutron capture therapy of primary and metastatic brain tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the nuclear reaction that occurs when a stable isotope, boron-10, is irradiated with low energy (0....n th) to yield alpha (4He) particles and,7Li ...

Rolf F. Barth; Albert H. Soloway

233

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of a Murine Melanoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...glioblastoma multiforme treated by neutron capture therapy using boron-10. Cancer (Phila.), S: 601-615, 1955. 11. Asbury...of fourteen cases of malignant brain tumor treated by boron-10 slow neutron capture radiation. J. Neuropathol. Exp...

Jeffrey A. Coderre; John A. Kalef-Ezra; Ralph G. Fairchild; Peggy L. Micca; Lawrence E. Reinstein; John D. Glass

1988-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Hypoxia-selective compounds for boron neutron capture therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted form of radiotherapy for cancer. In BNCT, a compound labeled with the stable isotope boron-10 is systemically administered, and tumor cells selectively uptake ...

Shah, Jungal (Jugal Kaushik)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Mindfulness and Attachment Security as Predictors of Sucess in Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

its effectiveness (Stricker & Gold, 2001). While there is considerable research concerning common aspects of effective therapy, few studies have explicitly examined which client variables best explain differences in therapeutic outcomes (Castonquay...

Martin, David Matthew

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Chlorophyll-a Analogs for Cancer Imaging and Therapy (Theranostics)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The utility of porphyrin-based compounds as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been evolving since the mid-1970s. There are a large number of publications including research papers, reviews, an...

Shunqing Zhang; Nayan J. Patel; Ravindra K. Pandey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

A novel nanodelivery system for combination tumor therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anti-angiogenic therapy offers many benefits over traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy including fewer toxic side effects and the reduced development of drug resistance. Anti-angiogenics alone have not proven effective in ...

Eavarone, David A. (David Alan)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Cell replacement therapy in neurological disease  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...extensions to the olfactory bulb (Lois Alvarez-Buylla...cultured cells with fluorescent reporters placed under...analyses as well. This has led to the generation of...EGFP, enhanced green fluorescent protein; MAGS, magnetic...Prasher, D1994Green fluorescent protein as a marker...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

An Examination of Music Therapy with Adolescent Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

who shared their knowledge and supported me throughout my studies. Special thanks to Dr. Colwell who patiently worked with me on this thesis and worked hard to help me finish it up this semester. Thank you to my Mom, Dad, and sister for all..., and traumatic brain injury. Juvenile delinquents, pregnant teens, abused adolescents and grieving adolescents have also received music therapy services. See Appendix A for article citations. This same review of music therapy journal articles revealed...

Seagren, Stephanie

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Annual Coal Distribution Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distribution Report Release Date: December 19, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 12, 2014 | full report | RevisionCorrection Revision to the Annual Coal Distribution Report...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Basic Energy Sciences Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basic Energy Sciences Reports Basic Energy Sciences Reports The list below of Basic Energy Sciences workshop reports addresses the status of some important research areas that can...

242

E-Print Network 3.0 - antiretroviral therapy studies Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

active antiretroviral therapy ... Source: Bonhoeffer, Sebastian - Institut fr Integrative Biologie, Eidgenssische Technische Hochschule Zrich (ETHZ) Collection:...

243

E-Print Network 3.0 - antiretroviral therapy smart Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

active antiretroviral therapy ... Source: Bonhoeffer, Sebastian - Institut fr Integrative Biologie, Eidgenssische Technische Hochschule Zrich (ETHZ) Collection:...

244

Aptamer-conjugated nanomaterials for specific cancer cell recognition and targeted cancer therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with multifunctional theranostic capability show promising potential in cancer therapy.4 These nanomaterials can

Tan, Weihong

245

Scatter factors assessment in microbeam radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The success of the preclinical studies in Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) paved the way to the clinical trials under preparation at the Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Within this framework, an accurate determination of the deposited dose is crucial. With that aim, the scatter factors, which translate the absolute dose measured in reference conditions (2 x 2 cm{sup 2} field size at 2 cm-depth in water) to peak doses, were assessed. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed with two different widely used codes, PENELOPE and GEANT4, for the sake of safety. The scatter factors were obtained as the ratio of the doses that are deposited by a microbeam and by a field of reference size, at the reference depth. The calculated values were compared with the experimental data obtained by radiochromic (ISP HD-810) films and a PTW 34070 large area chamber. Results: The scatter factors for different microbeam field sizes assessed by the two MC codes were in agreement and reproduced the experimental data within uncertainty bars. Those correction factors were shown to be non-negligible for the future MRT clinical settings: an average 30% lower dose was deposited by a 50 {mu}m microbeam with respect to the reference conditions. Conclusions: For the first time, the scatter factors in MRT were systematically studied. They constitute an essential key to deposit accurate doses in the forthcoming clinical trials in MRT. The good agreement between the different calculations and the experimental data confirms the reliability of this challenging micrometric dose estimation.

Prezado, Y.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Sanchez, M. [Laboratoire Imagerie et Modelisation en Neurobiologie et Cancerologie IMNC-UMR 8165, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Campus Universitaire, Bat. 440, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain) and ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Servicio de Radiofisica, Complejo Hospitalario de Santiago de Compostela, Rua Choupana S/N, 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ?0.5 × baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ?2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ?2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ?3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ?2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a larger patient cohort are warranted.

Pugh, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Andrew K., E-mail: aklee@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Report 1: JISC Good APIs Management Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report 1: JISC Good APIs Management Report A review of good practice in the provision of machine) Document Name: good_api_JISC_report_v0.8.doc Notes: Acknowledgements UKOLN is funded by the MLA to all those who gave up time to help with the report. Vital to this work were the people who filled

Rzepa, Henry S.

248

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. Preliminary Review Copy FHWA/TX-03/1833-01-imp-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 5. Report Date October 2002 4. Title Harrison Michael Bomba 8. Performing Organization Report No. 1833-01-imp-1 10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS)9

Texas at Austin, University of

249

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-1713-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 5. Report Date October 1997 / Revised May 1998 4. Title and Subtitle EVALUATION Zhang, and W. Ronald Hudson 8. Performing Organization Report No. 0-1713-1 10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS)9

Texas at Austin, University of

250

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-08/0-5708-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle Design of CrackScope (VCrack) [Reprint] 5. Report Date October Organization Report No. 0-5708-1 9. Performing Organization Name and Address Center for Transportation Research

Texas at Austin, University of

251

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-09/0-5546-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 of Incompatible Uses 5. Report Date September 2007; Rev. January 2008 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) Lisa Loftus-Otway, C. Michael Walton, Lynn Blais, Nathan Hutson 8. Performing Organization Report No. 0

Texas at Austin, University of

252

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-0-4197-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 of Intelligent Transportation Systems 5. Report Date May 2001 6. Performing Organization Code7. Authors Tejas Mehta, Hani S. Mahmassani, and Chandra Bhat 8. Performing Organization Report No. 10. Work Unit No

Texas at Austin, University of

253

REPORT OF MEETING Convalescent plasma and Ig-based therapies for influenza treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Williamson, Tim Wallington, Richard Tedder Procurement, safety and distribution issues discussion p6

Rambaut, Andrew

254

Report from the Radiation Therapy Committee of the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG): Research Objectives Workshop 2008  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1222-6. 37 Martin LP , Hamilton TC Schilder RJ. Platinum resistance: the...178-81. 68 Fuster JJ , Sanz-Gonzalez SM, Moll UM Andres V. Classic and novel...nonane thiosemicarbazone complexes: radiopharmaceuticals for PET of topoisomerase II expression...

Paul Okunieff; Lisa A. Kachnic; Louis S. Constine; Clifton D. Fuller; Laurie E. Gaspar; Daniel F. Hayes; Jean Hooks; Clifton Ling; Frank L. Meyskens, Jr.; Philip A. Philip; David Raben; Stephen R. Smalley; Gregory P. Swanson; Beverly A. Teicher; Charles R. Thomas, Jr.; Bhadrasain Vikram; Michael J. Zelefsky; and Laurence H. Baker

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Self-Reported and Observed Cultural Competence and Therapeutic Alliance in Family Therapy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Because of its political and philosophical launching ground (Arredondo & Perez, 2006), cultural competence did not begin as an empirical research program, and as a… (more)

Mayorga, Carla Cecilia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy (66 Gy in 22 Fractions at 3 Gy per Fraction) for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: Long-term Outcomes  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report long-term outcomes of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with high-dose hypofractionated radiation therapy (HypoRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer were treated using 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy to a dose of 66 Gy in 22 daily fractions of 3 Gy without hormonal therapy. A uniform 7-mm margin was created around the prostate for the planning target volume, and treatment was prescribed to the isocenter. Treatment was delivered using daily ultrasound image-guided radiation therapy. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to prospectively score toxicity. Biochemical failure was defined as the nadir prostate-specific antigen level plus 2 ng/mL. Results: A total of 129 patients were treated between November 2002 and December 2005. With a median follow-up of 90 months, the 5- and 8-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 97% and 92%, respectively. The 5- and 8-year actuarial overall survival rates were 92% and 88%, respectively. Only 1 patient died from prostate cancer at 92 months after treatment, giving an 8-year actuarial cancer-specific survival of 98%. Radiation therapy was well tolerated, with 57% of patients not experiencing any acute gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity. For late toxicity, the worst grade ?2 rate for GI and GU toxicity was 27% and 33%, respectively. There was no grade >3 toxicity. At last follow-up, the rate of grade ?2 for both GI and GU toxicity was only 1.5%. Conclusions: Hypofractionation with 66 Gy in 22 fractions prescribed to the isocenter using 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy produces excellent biochemical control rates, with moderate toxicity. However, this regimen cannot be extrapolated to the intensity modulated radiation therapy technique.

Patel, Nita [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Faria, Sergio, E-mail: sergio.faria@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Cury, Fabio; David, Marc; Duclos, Marie; Shenouda, George; Ruo, Russell; Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Efficacy of Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Graves' Orbitopathy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To review our institutional outcomes of patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) for Graves' orbitopathy (GO), assess the role of orbital reirradiation, and identify prognostic factors of complete response (CR). Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of 211 patients who presented with a diagnosis of GO and received RT between January 2000-2010. RT dose was 20 Gy in 10 fractions. Patient median age was 51 years (range, 15-84 years), median follow-up was 11 months (range, 1-88 months). Patient symptoms included any combination of proptosis (90.9%), extraocular muscle dysfunction (78.9%), soft tissue signs (68.4%), and diplopia (58.4%). Corticosteroids were used as first-line therapy in 20.6% of patients. Among those who achieved either CR or partial response (PR), prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: Stabilization of disease without recurrence was clinically achieved overall in 202 patients (96.7%). At the completion of RT, 176 patients (84.2%) reported a symptomatic improvement of pretreatment symptoms. CR of GO symptoms was achieved using multiple treatment modalities, including RT by 93 patients (44.5%), of which 32 patients received RT only. Corticosteroids were discontinued in 97.8% of patients who received them as initial therapy. Surgical intervention following radiotherapy was required for 144 (68.9%) of all patients. Fourteen patients received orbital reirradiation for persistent or recurrent symptoms. Five of these achieved a CR, and the other nine achieved disease stabilization but retained persistent ocular symptoms. Long-term side effects of RT included dry eyes (12%). Of the prognostic factors we investigated, only gender predicted CR, which was less common in men (33.9%) than in women (49.7%) p = 0.0471. Conclusions: Orbital radiation for GO is an established treatment modality for patients. Orbital reirradiation is beneficial for patients who do not respond to initial RT or experience symptom recurrence without an apparent risk of increased morbidity.

Matthiesen, Chance, E-mail: chance-matthiesen@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Thompson, J. Spencer [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Thompson, David [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Farris, Bradley; Wilkes, Byron [Dean A. McGee Eye Institute, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence; Bogardus, Carl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Audit Report: IG-0709 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Audit Report: IG-0709 November 17, 2005 Management of the Department's Isotope Program Dating back to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, the Development Isotopes Department of Energy's (Department) predecessor agency, the Atomic Energy Commission, was authorized to distribute stable and radioactive isotopes at no charge to assist and encourage research on peaceful uses of isotopes involving medical therapy. More recently, the 1990 Energy and Water Appropriations Act consolidated all isotope production and distribution activities under one Department Program and established a revolving fund for the Isotope Program. Congress authorized this fund to, among other things, produce isotopes for use in research and development (R&D). Audit Report: IG-0709 More Documents & Publications

259

Developing Quality Assurance Processes for Image-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Quality assurance has long been implemented in radiation treatment as systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that the radiation oncology service will satisfy the given requirements for quality care. The existing reports from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Groups 40 and 53 have provided highly detailed QA guidelines for conventional radiotherapy and treatment planning. However, advanced treatment processes recently developed with emerging high technology have introduced new QA requirements that have not been addressed previously in the conventional QA program. Therefore, it is necessary to expand the existing QA guidelines to also include new considerations. Image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) is a closed-loop treatment process that is designed to include the individual treatment information, such as patient-specific anatomic variation and delivered dose assessed during the therapy course in treatment evaluation and planning optimization. Clinical implementation of IGART requires high levels of automation in image acquisition, registration, segmentation, treatment dose construction, and adaptive planning optimization, which brings new challenges to the conventional QA program. In this article, clinical QA procedures for IGART are outlined. The discussion focuses on the dynamic or four-dimensional aspects of the IGART process, avoiding overlap with conventional QA guidelines.

Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)], E-mail: dyan@beaumont.edu

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer After Mastectomy: Early Outcomes of a Prospective Clinical Trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Dosimetric planning studies have described potential benefits for the use of proton radiation therapy (RT) for locally advanced breast cancer. We report acute toxicities and feasibility of proton delivery for 12 women treated with postmastectomy proton radiation with or without reconstruction. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective clinical trial. The patients were assessed for skin toxicity, fatigue, and radiation pneumonitis during treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. All patients consented to have photographs taken for documentation of skin toxicity. Results: Eleven of 12 patients had left-sided breast cancer. One patient was treated for right-sided breast cancer with bilateral implants. Five women had permanent implants at the time of RT, and 7 did not have immediate reconstruction. All patients completed proton RT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) to the chest wall and 45 to 50.4 Gy (RBE) to the regional lymphatics. No photon or electron component was used. The maximum skin toxicity during radiation was grade 2, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The maximum CTCAE fatigue was grade 3. There have been no cases of RT pneumonitis to date. Conclusions: Proton RT for postmastectomy RT is feasible and well tolerated. This treatment may be warranted for selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, immediate reconstruction, or both that otherwise limits optimal RT delivery using standard methods.

MacDonald, Shannon M., E-mail: smacdonald@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Patel, Sagar A.; Hickey, Shea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Isakoff, Steven J. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Kooy, Hanne; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Jefferson Lab Science Series - Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Science of Chocolate The Science of Chocolate Previous Video (The Science of Chocolate) Science Series Video Archive Next Video (Adventures in Infectious Diseases) Adventures in Infectious Diseases Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives Dr. Cynthia Keppel - Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute October 25, 2011 In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy

262

Insulin-Pump Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...established that the serious microvascular complications of diabetes are linked to the duration and severity of hyperglycemia; there have therefore been renewed efforts to help patients achieve near-normal blood glucose levels. The mainstay of current management of type 1 diabetes is "physiological insulin... A 39-year-old man with type 1 diabetes mellitus is referred for consideration of insulin-pump therapy because of poor glycemic control and episodes of severe hypoglycemia. Insulin-pump therapy can improve blood glucose control but requires a willing and motivated patient.

Pickup J.C.

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

263

Paradigm Shifts in Heart-Failure Therapy — A Timeline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...our understanding of heart failure to a level unimaginable today. Heart-Failure Therapy Articles in the New England Journal of Medicine. 1986. V-HeFT I. Cohn JN, Archibald DG, Ziesche S, et al. Effect of vasodilator therapy on mortality in chronic congestive heart failure. 314:1547-52. 1987. CONSENSUS... As we enter a new era of treatment for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, historical perspective is provided in a timeline (at NEJM.org) of 26 randomized, controlled trials in heart-failure treatment that have been published in the Journal since 1986.

Sacks C.A.Jarcho J.A.Curfman G.D.

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

264

NSLS Activity Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activity Report Activity Report 2009 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2008 - September 30, 2009 Periodic Table Dust Jacket 2008 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008 2007 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2006 - September 30, 2007 Science Highlights PDF Publications PDF 2006 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2005 - September 30, 2006 2005 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2004 - September 30, 2005 2004 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2003 - September 30, 2004 2003 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2002 - September 30, 2003 2002 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2001 - September 30, 2002 2001 Activity Report Covering October 1, 2000 - September 30, 2001 2000 Activity Report Covering October 1, 1999 - September 30, 2000 1999 Activity Report Covering October 1, 1998 - September 30, 1999

265

Cruise Report 2010 RMP Sediment Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cruise Report 2010 RMP Sediment Report February 1 ­ 12, 2010 #12;2010 RMP Sediment Cruise Report sediment cruise. The cruise was redesigned in 2002 to adopt a randomized sampling strategy in place). The objectives of the sampling effort were to: 1. Collect sediment samples from 27 sites for analysis of trace

266

Cruise Report 2005 RMP Sediment Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cruise Report 2005 RMP Sediment Report August 23-30, 2005 A P P L I E D S C I E N C E S #12;2005 RMP Sediment Cruise Report August 23 - 30, 2005 Applied Marine Sciences, Inc. Page 2 1.0 INTRODUCTION Francisco Estuary (RMP) annual sediment cruise. The cruise was redesigned in 2002 to adopt a randomized

267

Cruise Report 2008 RMP Sediment Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cruise Report 2008 RMP Sediment Report July 23 ­ August 1, 2008 #12;2008 RMP Sediment Cruise Report sediment cruise. The cruise was redesigned in 2002 to adopt a randomized sampling strategy in place sediment samples from 47 sites for analysis of trace organics by East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD

268

Cruise Report 2007 RMP Sediment Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cruise Report 2007 RMP Sediment Report August 21-29, 2007 #12;2007 RMP Sediment Cruise Report sediment cruise. The cruise was redesigned in 2002 to adopt a randomized sampling strategy in place was conducted from the R/V Endeavor. The objectives of the sampling effort were to: 1. Collect sediment samples

269

Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2010. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. In 2010, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local regulations and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2010. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2010. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2010. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, miscellaneous electronic office equipment, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling and corrugated cardboard recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, foamed polystyrene peanuts, batteries, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-Ames Site Office (AMSO), through the Laboratory's Performance Evaluation Measurement Plan, on its Affirmative Procurement Performance Measure. A performance level of 'A-' was achieved in 2010 for Integrated Safety, Health and Environmental Protection. As reported in Site Environmental Reports for prior years, the Laboratory's Environmental Management System (EMS) has been integrated into the Laboratory's Integrated Safety Management System since 2005. The integration of EMS into the way the Laboratory does business allows the Laboratory to systematically review, address and respond to the Laboratory's environmental impacts. The Laboratory's EMS was audited in April 2009 by DOE-CH. There were four 'Sufficiently in Conformity' findings as a result of the audit. All four findings were tracked in the Laboratory's corrective action database for completion. Beryllium was used routinely at Ames Laboratory in the 1940's and 1950's in processes developed for the production of highly pure uranium and thorium in support of the historic Manhattan Project. Laboratory metallurgists also worked on a process to produce pure beryllium metal from beryllium fluoride. In the early 1950's, beryllium oxide powder was used to produce shaped beryllium and crucibles. As a result of that work, beryllium contamination now exists in many interstitial spaces (e.g., utility chases) and ventilation systems in Wilhelm, Spedding and Metals Development buildings. Extensive characterization and remediation efforts have occurred in 2009 and 2010 in order to better understand the extent of the contamination. Analysis of extensive sampling data suggests that a fairly wide dispersion of beryllium occurred (most likely in the 1950's and 60's) in Wilhelm Hall and in certain areas of Spedding Hall and Metals Development. Area air-sampling results and work-area surface characterizations indicate the exposure potential to current workers, building visitors and the public remains extremely low. This information is now used to guide cleaning efforts and to provide worker protection during remodeling and maintenance activities. Results were shared with the DOE's Former Worker Program to support former worker medical test

Kayser, Dan

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Impact of Concurrent Androgen Deprivation on Fiducial Marker Migration in External-beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the extent of gold fiducial marker (FM) migration in patients treated for prostate cancer with concurrent androgen deprivation and external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Three or 4 gold FMs were implanted in 37 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in conjunction with 70-78 Gy. Androgen deprivation therapy was started a median of 3.9 months before EBRT (range, 0.3-12.5 months). To establish the extent of FM migration, the distance between each FM was calculated for 5-8 treatments once per week throughout the EBRT course. For each treatment, the distance between FMs was compared with the distance from the digitally reconstructed radiographs generated from the planning CT. A total of 281 treatments were analyzed. Results: The average daily migration was 0.8 {+-} 0.3 mm, with distances ranging from 0.2 mm-2.6 mm. Two of the 281 assessed treatments (0.7%) showed migrations >2 mm. No correlation between FM migration and patient weight or time delay between ADT and start of EBRT was found. There was no correlation between the extent of FM migration and prostate volume. Conclusion: This is the largest report of implanted FM migration in patients receiving concomitant ADT. Only 0.7% of the 281 treatments studied had significant marker migrations (>2 mm) throughout the course of EBRT. Consequently, the use of implanted FMs in these patients enables accurate monitoring of prostate gland position during treatment.

Tiberi, David A.; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Beauchemin, Marie-Claude; Nguyen, Thu Van; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominic [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Taussky, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

User_RunReports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Running Standard Reports Running Standard Reports © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Running Standard Reports Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of running standard reports in SuccessFactors Learning. Task A. Run Standard Report From the Home page, click the Reports easy link. In the Report Name table, locate the report you want to generate. Click the expand icon ( ) to expand the report group. Click the title link. For this example, select the User Curriculum Status Group by Item Details report. Note: Click Help ( ) for additional information on reports. 1 1 2 2 3 3 Run Standard Report 13 Steps Task A SuccessFactors Learning v 6.4 User Job Aid

272

Economic Impact Reporting Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2007/08 November 2008 #12;#12;Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2007/08 #12;STFC Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2007/08 Contents: Introduction..............................................................................................................................................2 1: Overall Economic Impacts

273

Economic Impact Reporting Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2008/09 #12;#12;Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2008/09 #12;STFC Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2008/09 Contents: Introduction..............................................................................................................................................2 1: Overall Economic Impacts

274

Neutron capture therapy at the MEPhI reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article discusses the results of the creation and development of the irradiation base for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) at the MEPhI Reactor, development and studies of boron- and gadolinium-containing compounds, and presents the results of pre-clinical NCT studies in large laboratory animals â?? dogs with spontaneous melanoma.

K.N. Zaitsev; A.A. Portnov; O.V. Mishcherina; V.N. Kulakov; V.F. Khokhlov; I.N. Sheino; V.V. Meshcherikova; V.N. Mitin; N.G. Kozlovskaya; I.A. Shikunova

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology) ­ Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTAA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 1-May-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

276

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology) ­ Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTAA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 21-May-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

277

Leading Edge Studying Circuits with Therapy in Mind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

frameworks for information processing. Without these, it is unclear whether the ``big data'' produced by new on all of the time, winter or summer. Now imagine the fuel supplied to be the same for every house, big or small. That is the state of current electrical brain stimulation therapies in Parkinson's disease

Shenoy, Krishna V.

278

Systemic Toxicity in Mice Induced by Localized Porphyrin Photodynamic Therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...dye laser (Spectra-Physics, Inc., Mountain...However, the resistance does not appear to be related...lethality observed in mice does not appear to be clinically...Patterson, M. S. The physics of photodynamic therapy...Altura et al. (eds.), Handbook of Shock and Trauma...

Angela Ferrario and Charles J. Gomer

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Annual Report Generator.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This report analyzes the needs to build an annual report generator which has the properties of Modularity, Simplicity in use and Maintainability based on… (more)

Lin, Yingwei

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Design that report!  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Design that report! ... Describes the many considerations that must go into designing an effective technical report, and how they can be incorporated into instruction regarding this process. ...

James W. Southern

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

ARM - Annual Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Reports Program Fact Sheets Campaign Backgrounders Education and Outreach Posters Brochures Research Highlights Summaries Annual Reports For proper viewing, the ARM...

282

Policy and Reporting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

default Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Policy & Reporting Expand Policy & Reporting EE Sectors Expand EE Sectors Technology & Innovation Expand...

283

Capital Reporting Company  

Energy Savers (EERE)

devices and energy 22 management systems. Capital Reporting Company Quadrennial Energy Review Public Meeting 5 07-11-2014 (866) 448 - DEPO www.CapitalReportingCompany.com...

284

Refinery Capacity Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Report --- Full report in PDF (1 MB) XLS --- Refinery Capacity Data by individual refinery as of January 1, 2006 Tables 1 Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum...

285

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-invasive cancer therapy Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cancer therapy Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anti-invasive cancer therapy Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Critical Reviews in...

286

Treatment of Canine Osseous Tumors with Photodynamic Therapy: A Pilot Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Momma T, Hamblin MR, Wu HC, Hasan T. Photodynamic therapy ofSzeto D, Lampros E, Hasan T, Cincotta AH. BenzophenothiazineGoodwin IA, Chen B, Swartz HM, Hasan T. Photodynamic therapy

Burch, S.; London, C.; Seguin, B.; Rodriguez, C.; Wilson, B. C.; Bisland, S. K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Nanoparticle-Delivered Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Reduces Ovarian Tumor Burden in Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Molecular Targets, and Chemical Biology Nanoparticle-Delivered Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively...treatment with nanoparticles. DT-A nanoparticle therapy suppressed tumor growth more...indicating MSLN promoter function following nanoparticle delivery of DNA (Fig. 1E ). Xenograft...

Yu-Hung Huang; Gregory T. Zugates; Weidan Peng; David Holtz; Charles Dunton; Jordan J. Green; Naushad Hossain; Michael R. Chernick; Robert F. Padera, Jr.; Robert Langer; Daniel G. Anderson; Janet A. Sawicki

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Uranium-loaded apoferritin with antibodies attached: molecular design for uranium neutron-capture therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Molecular design for uranium neutron-capture therapy (cancer/immunotherapy...methodology for cancer therapy. Boron...system using uranium, as described...800 to =400 uranium atoms per apoferritin...uranyl ions were depleted, and loading...

J F Hainfeld

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - arterial infusion therapy Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arterial infusion therapy Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 HUMAN GENE THERAPY 16:299306 (March 2005) Mary...

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-motion sickness therapy Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Therapy Dalhousie University If I am sick with flu-like symptoms (i.e., fever andor cough... School of Occupational Therapy Room 215, 5869 University Avenue Halifax, NS...

291

E-Print Network 3.0 - anticoagulant therapy inr Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1371 OR Charge Nurse 1616 Respiratory Therapy-Adult 1716 1684 1742... Respiratory Therapy-Pediatric 1989 Radiology-Portables 1384 Social Worker-ED 284-2845 3462 Trauma Center......

292

Cell Culture Processes for the Production of Viral Vectors for Gene Therapy Purposes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gene therapy is a promising technology for the treatment of several acquired and inherited diseases. However, for gene therapy to be a commercial and clinical success, scalable cell culture processes must be i...

James N. Warnock; Otto-Wilhelm Merten; Mohamed Al-Rubeai

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Home-Based Therapy: Effectiveness and Processes--A Brief Review of the National Literature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the late 1980s, home-based family therapy has become an increasingly popular service. The delivery of family therapy in families’ homes presents various advantages and challenges. This review focuses on empirical ...

Walter, Uta M.; Petr, Chris

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Involved-Lesion Radiation Therapy After Chemotherapy in Limited-Stage Head-and-Neck Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report treatment outcomes after combined-modality therapy in patients with Stage I/II head-and-neck (HN) diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBL). Methods and Materials: Eighty-six eligible patients received sequential chemotherapy and involved-lesion radiation therapy from 1995 to 2006. After a median of four cycles of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) or rituximab-plus-CHOP chemotherapy, a median of 41.4 Gy was delivered to the known initial gross lesion with adequate margin (2 to 3 cm). Results: After a median follow-up of 57 months, eight treatment failures were observed: distant metastasis in 8 patients; and locoregional failure in 4 patients. Among the 4 patients with locoregional failure, 3 presented with in-field failures, and 1 both in-field and out-of-field failure (contralateral neck). Rates of overall survival (OS) and freedom from progression (FFP) at 10 years were 74.1% and 88.9%, respectively. There was no severe side effect except 1 patient with Grade 3 mucositis during and after completion of radiation therapy. Multivariate analyses showed that absence of B symptom (p = 0.022) and normal lactate dehydrogenase (p = 0.017) were related to favorable OS, age >60 years (p = 0.033) was related to favorable FFP, and international prognostic index of 0 or 1 was related to favorable OS (p = 0.003) and FFP (p = 0.03). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that patients with Stage I/II HN DLBL did not need whole-neck irradiation. Involved-lesion radiation therapy might reduce radiation toxicity with favorable treatment results.

Yu, Jeong Il; Nam, Heerim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Yong Chan, E-mail: ahnyc@skku.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won Seog; Park, Keunchil; Kim, Seok Jin [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-platelet therapy including Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

management including exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy 3. ... Source: Messersmith, Phillip B.- Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University...

296

E-Print Network 3.0 - aetiologie therapie und Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

und tiefenpsychologisch fundierte Therapie. Bd. 3: Verhaltenstherapie. Mnchen: CIP... Institut fr Psychotherapeutische Aus- und Weiterbildung (IPAW) ... Source:...

297

Cruise Report 2003 RMP Sediment Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cruise Report 2003 RMP Sediment Report August 18 - 26, 2003 A P P L I E D S C I E N C E S #12;2003 RMP Sediment Cruise Report August 18-26, 2003 Applied Marine Sciences, Inc. Page 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION in the San Francisco Estuary (RMP) sediment cruise. The cruise was redesigned in 2002 to adopt a randomized

298

Quarterly Progress Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Quarterly Progress Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

299

STEP Participant Survey Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

STEP Participant Survey Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

300

Annual Fire Safety Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 Annual Fire Safety Report University of California, Irvine HIGHER EDUCATION OPPORTUNITY to the Fire Safety in Student Housing Buildings of current or perspective students and employees be reported publish an annual fire safety report, keep a fire log, and report fire statistics to the Secretary

Loudon, Catherine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Technical Consultant Report Template  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Technical Consultant Report Template, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

302

PRI Annual Report 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Annual Report highlights the activities and people that make PRI a multidisciplinary research center.

Maynard-Moody, Steven

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

303

Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol  

SciTech Connect

It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

304

Technical Review Panel Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRP Report v7, 12 Aug 2012 TRP Report Final December 2012 TRP Report v7, 12 Aug 2012 TRP Report Final December 2012 Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report Evaluation and Identification of future R&D on eight Advanced Reactor Concepts, conducted April - September 2012 December 2012 Public release version 2 Public release version 3 Table of Contents Summary ................................................................................................................................... 4 1. Overview of the Technical Review Panel Process ............................................................... 5 2. Technical Review Panel Criteria ......................................................................................... 6 3. Concept Summaries ........................................................................................................... 8

305

Federal Financial Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

FEDERAL FINANCIAL REPORT FEDERAL FINANCIAL REPORT (Follow form instructions) 1. Federal Agency and Organizational Element 2. Federal Grant or Other Identifying Number Assigned by Federal Agency Page of to Which Report is Submitted (To report multiple grants, use FFR Attachment) 1 pages 3. Recipient Organization (Name and complete address including Zip code) 4a. DUNS Number 4b. EIN 5. Recipient Account Number or Identifying Number 6. Report Type 7. Basis of Accounting

306

State Report forState Report forState Report forState Report for From the Research Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State Report forState Report forState Report forState Report for From the Research Project State Report forState Report forState Report forState Report for Washington University In cooperation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife FINAL REPORT April 2011

307

Annual Reports | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documents Documents » Annual Reports Annual Reports Note: Some of the following documents are in PDF and will require Adobe Reader for viewing. Freedom of Information Act Annual Reports Annual Report for 2012 Annual Report for 2011 Annual Report for 2010 Annual Report for 2009 Annual Report for 2008 (pdf) Annual Report for 2007 (pdf) Annual Report for 2006 (pdf) Annual Report for 2005 (pdf) Annual Report for 2004 (pdf) Annual Report for 2003 (pdf) Annual Report for 2002 (pdf) (Revised 11/03/03) Annual Report for 2001 (pdf) Annual Report for 2000 (pdf) Annual Report for 1999 (pdf) Annual Report for 1998 (pdf) Annual Report for 1997 (pdf) Annual Report for 1996 (pdf) Annual Report for 1995 (pdf) Annual Report for 1994 (pdf) Chief FOIA Officers Reports Aviation Management Green Leases

308

Accuracy of Real-time Couch Tracking During 3-dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy, Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of real-time couch tracking for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional motion trajectories of 15 prostate cancer patients were the basis for this phantom study; prostate motion had been monitored with the Calypso System. An industrial robot moved a phantom along these trajectories, motion was detected via an infrared camera system, and the robotic HexaPOD couch was used for real-time counter-steering. Residual phantom motion during real-time tracking was measured with the infrared camera system. Film dosimetry was performed during delivery of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Results: Motion of the prostate was largest in the anterior-posterior direction, with systematic ( N-Ary-Summation ) and random ({sigma}) errors of 2.3 mm and 2.9 mm, respectively; the prostate was outside a threshold of 5 mm (3D vector) for 25.0%{+-}19.8% of treatment time. Real-time tracking reduced prostate motion to N-Ary-Summation =0.01 mm and {sigma} = 0.55 mm in the anterior-posterior direction; the prostate remained within a 1-mm and 5-mm threshold for 93.9%{+-}4.6% and 99.7%{+-}0.4% of the time, respectively. Without real-time tracking, pass rates based on a {gamma} index of 2%/2 mm in film dosimetry ranged between 66% and 72% for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT, on average. Real-time tracking increased pass rates to minimum 98% on average for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT. Conclusions: Real-time couch tracking resulted in submillimeter accuracy for prostate cancer, which transferred into high dosimetric accuracy independently of whether 3D-CRT, IMRT, or VMAT was used.

Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Hermann, Christian [Department of Computer Sciences VII, Robotics, and Telematics, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany)] [Department of Computer Sciences VII, Robotics, and Telematics, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Flentje, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Guckenberger, Matthias, E-mail: guckenberger_m@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle Phase 1 Report on the Development of Predictive Model for Bridge Deck Cracking and Strength Development 5. Report Date January 2009 6. Performing Organization Code coupled with autogenous and thermal shrinkage), can have several detrimental effects on long-term behavior

Texas at Austin, University of

310

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Williams, Eun Sug Park 8. Performing Organization Report No. Report 167142-1 10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS)9. Chrysler, Ph.D. Research Scientist Texas Transportation Institute Alicia A. Williams Research Associate variables. Texas A&M students Sara Meischen and Jeff

311

PROJECT REPORT COOLERADO H80 FIELD REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the UC Davis Energy Efficiency Center in 2007 through a grant from the California Clean Energy FundPROJECT REPORT COOLERADO H80 FIELD REPORT University House at UC Davis & Embry-Riddle Aeronautical.0 About the Technology 5 3.0 Demonstration at University House, UC Davis 6 3.1 Results 6 4.0 Demonstration

California at Davis, University of

312

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. A survey of the Houston dray industry and its driver workforce is then reported. Since other deep-water Project performed in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway: 0-5068-2 Report Date: November 2006; Revised February 2007 Project: 0-5068 Project Title: Planning

Texas at Austin, University of

313

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Network and Electric Grid 5. Report Date September 2011 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) Seok Springfield, Virginia 22161 19. Security Classif.(of this report) Unclassified 20. Security Classif and Electric Grid Seok Kim Graduate Student Assistant Department of Civil Engineering Texas A&M University

314

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Transportation Institute Arthur P. James Texas A&M University at Galveston Gretchen A. Chabot Texas Transportation Institute and Tim A. Sain Texas A&M University at Galveston Report SWUTC/03 GULF- TEXAS PORTS 5. Report Date November 2003 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) David H

315

Library Annual Report Library Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Library Annual Report 2007 Library Annual Report 2007 #12;www.library.uwa.edu.au Our mission: By delivering excellent information resources and services the Library is integral to the University's mission of advancing, transmitting and sustaining knowledge. Our vision: The Library will continue to be at the heart

Tobar, Michael

316

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

satellite coverage was poor. Both monitoring systems are evaluated in this report. 17. Key Words bridge No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, Virginia 22161. 19. Security Classif. (of report) Unclassified 20. Security Classif. (of

Texas at Austin, University of

317

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN A CHANGING WORLD OF TOLLING AND RISING FUEL PRICES 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) Sharada R. Vadali, Rajorshi Sen Gupta, K. N. Womack, and Madhav Pappu 8. Performing Organization Report No. Report Sharada R. Vadali (Ph.D) Associate Research Scientist Texas Transportation Institute Texas A&M University

318

Robot-Assisted Therapy for Long-Term Upper-Limb Impairment after Stroke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...patients with deficits more than 6 months after a stroke has not been definitively shown. Robotic rehabilitation devices have the potential to deliver high-intensity, reproducible therapy. Advances in robotics and an increased understanding of the latent neurologic potential for stroke recovery led to... In this randomized study evaluating rehabilitative therapies in patients with long-term upper-limb impairment after stroke, outcomes at 12 weeks were similar with robot-assisted therapy, intensive comparison therapy, and usual care. In secondary analyses, modest improvements were observed over 36 weeks in both intensive-therapy groups, as compared with the usual-care group.

Lo A.C.; Guarino P.D.; Richards L.G.

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

319

LNG Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LNG Reports LNG Reports LNG Reports December 9, 2013 LNG Monthly Report - November 2013 LNG Monthly Report - November 2013 March 21, 2013 LNG Annual Report - 2012 LNG Annual Report - 2012 January 28, 2013 LNG Export Study - Related Documents EIA and NERA analysis of LNG exports, and associated documents March 15, 2012 LNG Annual Report - 2011 LNG Annual Report - 2011 March 1, 2011 LNG Annual Report - 2010 LNG Annual Report - 2010 March 1, 2010 LNG Annual Report - 2009 LNG Annual Report - 2009 October 14, 2009 LNG Annual Report - 2008 LNG Annual Report - 2008 October 10, 2008 LNG Annual Report - 2007 LNG Annual Report - 2007 March 1, 2007 LNG Annual Report - 2006 LNG Annual Report - 2006 March 1, 2006 LNG Annual Report - 2005 LNG Annual Report - 2005 March 1, 2005 LNG Annual Report - 2004

320

Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

322

Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

323

Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

324

Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized. by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

325

Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: From Energy Applications to Advanced Medical Therapies  

SciTech Connect

Dr. Rajh will present a general talk on nanotechnology – an overview of why nanotechnology is important and how it is useful in various fields. The specific focus will be on Solar energy conversion, environmental applications and advanced medical therapies. She has broad expertise in synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials that are used in nanotechnology including novel hybrid systems connecting semiconductors to biological molecules like DNA and antibodies. This technology could lead to new gene therapy procedures, cancer treatments and other medical applications. She will also discuss technologies made possible by organizing small semiconductor particles called quantum dots, materials that exhibit a rich variety of phenomena that are size and shape dependent. Development of these new materials that harnesses the unique properties of materials at the 1-100 nanometer scale resulted in the new field of nanotechnology that currently affects many applications in technological and medical fields.

Tijana Rajh

2009-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

326

Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: From Energy Applications to Advanced Medical Therapies  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Dr. Rajh will present a general talk on nanotechnology ? an overview of why nanotechnology is important and how it is useful in various fields. The specific focus will be on Solar energy conversion, environmental applications and advanced medical therapies. She has broad expertise in synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials that are used in nanotechnology including novel hybrid systems connecting semiconductors to biological molecules like DNA and antibodies. This technology could lead to new gene therapy procedures, cancer treatments and other medical applications. She will also discuss technologies made possible by organizing small semiconductor particles called quantum dots, materials that exhibit a rich variety of phenomena that are size and shape dependent. Development of these new materials that harnesses the unique properties of materials at the 1-100 nanometer scale resulted in the new field of nanotechnology that currently affects many applications in technological and medical fields.

Tijana Rajh

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

327

CID Standard Reports  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

CID Reports > Standard CID Reports > Standard Reports Central Internet Database CID Photo Banner Standard Reports Radioactive Waste WIMS-1: WASTE STREAM DISPOSITION FORECAST REPORT Adobe PDF Document Detailed waste stream disposition report by reporting site and disposition site that provides forecasted waste disposition volumes. Go directly to WIMS Exit CID Website to generate custom reports. Although WIMS Exit CID Website is a public site you will need to register and provide contact information the first time you enter WIMS Exit CID Website . Contaminated Groundwater GW-1: CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER REPORTS A link to the DOE Groundwater Database web site. This site provides detailed information about groundwater plumes at DOE sites. Information includes contaminants, hydrogeology, and cleanup technologies.

328

Predicting Couple Therapy Dropouts in Veteran Administration Medical Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration (VA) hospital encounter unique challenges that differ from patients in other settings. One unique challenge faced by service members and veterans is the impact of deployment, which may contribute to the high prevalence of physical and mental... PREDICTING COUPLE THERAPY DROPOUTS IN VETERAN ADMINISTRATION MEDICAL CENTERS A Dissertation by ANNIE CHU-CHING HSUEH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Hsueh, Annie

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

329

Heavy-ion tumor therapy: Physical and radiobiological benefits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-energy beams of charged nuclear particles (protons and heavier ions) offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors in comparison to conventional megavolt photon therapy. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum (Bragg peak) near the end of range with a sharp fall-off at the distal edge. Taking full advantage of the well-defined range and the small lateral beam spread, modern scanning beam systems allow delivery of the dose with millimeter precision. In addition, projectiles heavier than protons such as carbon ions exhibit an enhanced biological effectiveness in the Bragg peak region caused by the dense ionization of individual particle tracks resulting in reduced cellular repair. This makes them particularly attractive for the treatment of radio-resistant tumors localized near organs at risk. While tumor therapy with protons is a well-established treatment modality with more than 60?000 patients treated worldwide, the application of heavy ions is so far restricted to a few facilities only. Nevertheless, results of clinical phase I-II trials provide evidence that carbon-ion radiotherapy might be beneficial in several tumor entities. This article reviews the progress in heavy-ion therapy, including physical and technical developments, radiobiological studies and models, as well as radiooncological studies. As a result of the promising clinical results obtained with carbon-ion beams in the past ten years at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator facility (Japan) and in a pilot project at GSI Darmstadt (Germany), the plans for new clinical centers for heavy-ion or combined proton and heavy-ion therapy have recently received a substantial boost.

Dieter Schardt; Thilo Elsässer; Daniela Schulz-Ertner

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

330

2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - CSC/HOHS Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 30 2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - CSCHOHS Report Prepared by EurekaFacts LLC 2 Introduction...

331

FY 2009 Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Performance and financial information FY 2009 DOE/CF-0045 The Reports Consolidation Act of 2000 authorizes Federal agencies, with the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) concurrence, to consolidate various reports in order to provide performance, financial and related information in a more meaningful and useful format. In accordance with the Act, the Department of Energy (Department or DOE), has produced a consolidated Performance and Accountability Report (PAR) in previous years. For fiscal year (FY) 2009, the Department has chosen to produce an alternative report to the consolidated PAR and will produce an Agency Financial Report, an Annual Performance Report and a Summary of Performance and Financial

332

Calendar Year Reports Archive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

reports-archive Office of Inspector reports-archive Office of Inspector General 
1000 Independence Avenue, SW 
 Washington, DC 20585 202-586-4128 en Special Report: DOE/IG-0901 http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/special-report-doeig-0901 report-doeig-0901" class="title-link">Special Report: DOE/IG-0901

333

Evaluation of intakes of transuranics influenced by chelation therapy  

SciTech Connect

Once an intake of transuranics occurs, there are only three therapeutic procedures available to the physician for reducing the intake and mitigating the dose: excision of material from wounds, removal of material from the lungs with lavage, and chelation therapy. The only chelation agents approved in the United States for the treatment of occupational intakes of transuranics are the zinc and calcium salts of diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid, better known as Zn-DTPA and Ca-DTPA. In the past 35 years, approximately 3000 doses of DTPA have been administrated to over 500 individuals who had intakes of transuranics. The drug is considered to be quiet safe and has few side effects. For the internal dosimetrist, perhaps the most important aspects of chelation therapy is that if enhances the excretion rate of a transuranic and perturbs the shape of the urinary excretion curve. These perturbations last for months and are so great that standard urinary excretion models cannot be used to evaluate the intake. We review here a method for evaluating intakes of transuranics influenced by chelation therapy that has been used with some degree of success at the Savannah River Site for over 20 years.

LaBone, T.R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Microsoft Word - Blue Report Cover Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on Critical Asset Vulnerability Report on Critical Asset Vulnerability and Risk Assessments at the Power Marketing Administrations--Follow- up Audit DOE/IG-0842 October 2010 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 7, 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ADMINISTRATORS, BONNEVILLE POWER, WESTERN AREA POWER, AND SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATIONS FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Critical Asset Vulnerability and Risk Assessment at the Power Marketing Administrations--Follow-up Audit" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's largest Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs), Bonneville, Western Area, and Southwestern, provide wholesale electric power to utilities for use in homes,

335

2006 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Emergency Preparedness Program 2006 Annual Report US Department of Energy - Offi ce of Environmental Management Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2006 Annual Report 2 2 Table of Contents Executive Summary.......................................................................................................................4 I. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Purpose.......................................6

336

REPORT. Robert Hooke revivified  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

22 January 2004 research-article REPORT. Robert Hooke revivified M. Hunter School of History, Classics...Royal Society|Gresham College|Royal Academy Of Engineering| REPORT Robert Hooke revivified Michael Hunter, School of History, Classics...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Complex Flow Workshop Report  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Preprint. 21 pp.; NREL Report No. CP-5000-53554. 4. Lew, D.; Milligan, M.; Jordan, G.; Piwko, R. (2011). Value of Wind Power Forecasting. 13 pp.; NREL Report No....

338

Technical Reports & Briefs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This page contains links to technical reports and briefs published by the U.S. Department of Energy, plus information on current studies under way. These reports are intended to present objective...

339

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contain suspended solids, metals, oil and grease, fecal coliform, and oxygen demanding organics. Highway, Springfield, Virginia 22161; www.ntis.gov. 19. Security Classif. (of report) Unclassified 20. Security Classif

Texas at Austin, University of

340

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was based on the "grid cell" analysis, in which a pavement image is divided into grid cells of 8x8 pixels, Virginia 22161; www.ntis.gov. 19. Security Classif. (of report) Unclassified 20. Security Classif. (of

Texas at Austin, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-speed, real-time inspection of pavement cracking. In the algorithm, a pavement image is divided into grid, Virginia 22161; www.ntis.gov. 19. Security Classif. (of report) Unclassified 20. Security Classif. (of

Texas at Austin, University of

342

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to practice in the course of or under this contract, including any art, method, process, machine manufacture Interim Report #2, May 2010: Multi-Tier Pavement Condition Goals: DOT MTG Survey Summary Power

Texas at Austin, University of

343

Annual Report 2008.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cold War FY08 Annual Summary Report Cold War FY08 Annual Summary Report Page 1 of 14 Savannah River Site (SRS) Cold War Built Environment Historic Preservation Annual Summary Report Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 October 2008 Prepared by: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Operations Office (SR) SRS Cold War FY08 Annual Summary Report Page 2 of 14 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page BASIS.............................................................................................3

344

ARRA RECIPIENT REPORTING WEBINARS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARRA RECIPIENT REPORTING WEBINARS ARRA RECIPIENT REPORTING WEBINARS Section 1512 of the Recovery Act requires organizations to report on the use of Recovery Act funding. The Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board ("Recovery Board") has identified and deployed a nationwide data collection system at the website FederalReporting.gov that serves to collect data required by Section 1512. DOE IS PLEASED TO INFORM YOU THAT WE WILL BE HOSTING WEBINARS TO HELP

345

KYUSHU UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KYUSHU UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL REPORT 200992009 #12;1 Kyushu University FINANCIAL REPORT 2009 Kyushu University FINANCIAL REPORT 2009 2 1 3 4 2 5 6 7 9 11 13 14 15 16 3 17 18 19 20 21 22 4 23 24 25 26 5 27 28 6 29 30 FINANCIAL REPORT index2009 #12;1,300 1,200 1,100 1,000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1

Nakamura, Iku

346

Reporting with Microsoft Excel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Excel is Microsoft’s frontline reporting software. Starting originally as a commercial spreadsheet application, it has become much more.

Randal Root; Caryn Mason

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Certification reporting forms  

SciTech Connect

The required information and formats for the certification report including the cover sheet, compliance statement, and body of the report are given in this document. The body of the reports is different for each product. There are no product-to-product differences in the forms of the other parts of the reports. The products covered in this document include: furnaces, water heaters, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioners, room air conditioners, and freezers.

Not Available

1981-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

348

Assorted Situation Reports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability issues public Situation Reports during large scale energy emergencies.

349

Emergency Situation Reports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability issues public Situation Reports during large scale energy emergencies.

350

Hazard Analysis Database report  

SciTech Connect

This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Database for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

Niemi, B.J.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

351

SUMMARY REPORT ANNUAL IABP MEETING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY REPORT THE 7TH ANNUAL IABP MEETING St. Petersburg, Russia, 3 - 6 June 1997 #12;IABP-7 Summary Report 2 Table of Contents Summary Report-ordinator's Report.......................................................... 20 5. Report of the Data Buoy Co

Rigor, Ignatius G.

352

2005 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Emergency Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2005 Annual Report Special thanks to participants in the Haralson County, Georgia and Leigh Valley International Airport, Pennsylvania exercises who are featured on the front cover of this report. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2005 Annual Report Table of Contents Executive Summary ..................................................................................................1 I. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Purpose ......................3 II. Training ............................................................................................................3 III. TEPP Central Operations .................................................................................5

353

Annual Report and Accounts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Report and Accounts 2013�2014 The Research Agency of the Forestry CommissionHC 2 #12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2013�2014 Presented to the House of Commons pursuant to Section 7 Annual Report and Accounts 2013�2014 Forest Research 1 #12;� Crown Copyright 2014 You may re

354

SCHOOL REPORT COMMONAPPLICATIONID#  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCHOOL REPORT COMMONAPPLICATIONID#: Transfer Applicant The Transfer Common Application and Stanford LABELS STANFORD MAILING LABELS 1 OF 2 #12;Note: Stanford requires two Academic Reports with evaluation letters. At least one of your Academic Reports must be from a college instructor. Visit admission

Prinz, Friedrich B.

355

Organic solvent topical report  

SciTech Connect

This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

Cowley, W.L.

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Stereotactic body radiation therapy planning with duodenal sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: A dosimetric analysis  

SciTech Connect

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) achieves excellent local control for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), but may increase late duodenal toxicity. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a rotating gantry rather than multiple fixed beams. This study dosimetrically evaluates the feasibility of implementing duodenal constraints for SBRT using VMAT vs IMRT. Non–duodenal sparing (NS) and duodenal-sparing (DS) VMAT and IMRT plans delivering 25 Gy in 1 fraction were generated for 15 patients with LAPC. DS plans were constrained to duodenal D{sub max} of<30 Gy at any point. VMAT used 1 360° coplanar arc with 4° spacing between control points, whereas IMRT used 9 coplanar beams with fixed gantry positions at 40° angles. Dosimetric parameters for target volumes and organs at risk were compared for DS planning vs NS planning and VMAT vs IMRT using paired-sample Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Both DS VMAT and DS IMRT achieved significantly reduced duodenal D{sub mean}, D{sub max}, D{sub 1cc}, D{sub 4%}, and V{sub 20} {sub Gy} compared with NS plans (all p?0.002). DS constraints compromised target coverage for IMRT as demonstrated by reduced V{sub 95%} (p = 0.01) and D{sub mean} (p = 0.02), but not for VMAT. DS constraints resulted in increased dose to right kidney, spinal cord, stomach, and liver for VMAT. Direct comparison of DS VMAT and DS IMRT revealed that VMAT was superior in sparing the left kidney (p<0.001) and the spinal cord (p<0.001), whereas IMRT was superior in sparing the stomach (p = 0.05) and the liver (p = 0.003). DS VMAT required 21% fewer monitor units (p<0.001) and delivered treatment 2.4 minutes faster (p<0.001) than DS IMRT. Implementing DS constraints during SBRT planning for LAPC can significantly reduce duodenal point or volumetric dose parameters for both VMAT and IMRT. The primary consequence of implementing DS constraints for VMAT is increased dose to other organs at risk, whereas for IMRT it is compromised target coverage. These findings suggest clinical situations where each technique may be most useful if DS constraints are to be employed.

Kumar, Rachit; Wild, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Mark A.; Hooker, Ted K.; Dah, Samson D.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Kang, Jun; Smith, Koren; Zeng, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Herman, Joseph M., E-mail: jherma15@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 401N. Broadway, Weinberg Suite 1440, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

EIR Report Template  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Template Report Template An EIR typically results in both a Draft and Final EIR Report. Where follow-up actions are required, a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) Review Report and Addendum to the Final EIR Report is also generated. The EIR Report shall be organized into the following sections:. Acronyms Key Definitions Executive Summary 1.0 Cost 2.0 Schedule 3.0 Scope 4.0 Risk 5.0 Management (Contract and Project) 6.0 ES&H, QA, Safety Report Appendices: A. EIR Team Members, Assignments, and Biographical Sketches B. Detailed Comments on Project Execution Plan (if applicable) C. Detailed Comments on Other Documents (if applicable) D. Corrective Action Plan (CAP) Recommendations OECM and the EIR Contractor may mutually agree to add or delete particular sections, based

358

Argonne National Laboratory - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Argonne National Laboratory Activity Reports 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility, July 2012 Review Reports 2011 Review of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility Readiness Assessment (Implementation Verification Review Sections), November 2011 Nuclear Safety Enforcement Regulatory Assistance Review of UChicago Argonne, LLC at the Argonne National Laboratory, October 3, 2011 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the Argonne National Laboratory, August 2011 Review Reports 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety and Health Programs at Argonne National Laboratory, Summary Report, Vol. 1, May, 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Argonne National Laboratory, Technical Appendices, Volume II, May 2005

359

Proton Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Medulloblastoma and Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors: Outcomes for Very Young Children Treated With Upfront Chemotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report the early outcomes for very young children with medulloblastoma or supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (SPNET) treated with upfront chemotherapy followed by 3-dimensional proton radiation therapy (3D-CPT). Methods and Materials: All patients aged <60 months with medulloblastoma or SPNET treated with chemotherapy before 3D-CPT from 2002 to 2010 at our institution were included. All patients underwent maximal surgical resection, chemotherapy, and adjuvant 3D-CPT with either craniospinal irradiation followed by involved-field radiation therapy or involved-field radiation therapy alone. Results: Fifteen patients (median age at diagnosis, 35 months) were treated with high-dose chemotherapy and 3D-CPT. Twelve of 15 patients had medulloblastoma; 3 of 15 patients had SPNET. Median time from surgery to initiation of radiation was 219 days. Median craniospinal irradiation dose was 21.6 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness); median boost dose was 54.0 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness). At a median of 39 months from completion of radiation, 1 of 15 was deceased after a local failure, 1 of 15 had died from a non-disease-related cause, and the remaining 13 of 15 patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence. Ototoxicity and endocrinopathies were the most common long-term toxicities, with 2 of 15 children requiring hearing aids and 3 of 15 requiring exogenous hormones. Conclusions: Proton radiation after chemotherapy resulted in good disease outcomes for a small cohort of very young patients with medulloblastoma and SPNET. Longer follow-up and larger numbers of patients are needed to assess long-term outcomes and late toxicity.

Jimenez, Rachel B., E-mail: rbjimenez@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sethi, Roshan [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Depauw, Nicolas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Pulsifer, Margaret B. [Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); McBride, Sean M. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ebb, David [Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fullerton, Barbara C.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.; MacDonald, Shannon M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS SRNS Partners with Georgialina Physical Therapy Associates to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partners with Georgialina Physical Therapy Associates to Partners with Georgialina Physical Therapy Associates to Bring Services to SRS Employees AIKEN, S.C. - April 25, 2013 - The days of long drives, even longer wait times, and work challenges associated with ongoing physical therapy appointments are drawing to an end for Savannah River Site (SRS) employees thanks to a partnership between Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (SRNS) and Georgialina Physical Therapy (GPT) Associates. Together, the companies have launched a new program to provide a range of physical therapy services to all SRS employees. "Any SRS employee can schedule an appointment with us at our on-site location," said Brett Brannon, co-owner, Georgialina Physical Therapy Associates. "We provide the same services at our SRS clinic that we do in any of our

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Development of a fast neutron therapy beam placement film technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the treatment dose is delivered. It was requested by those radiotherapists who will hopefully utilize the TAMVEC fast-neutron therapy beam, however, that sn "on-line" placement check film be made to doubly insure proper tumor positioning. The research... is achieved, the measured intensity, I(x, E) of the unscat- tered neutrons is given by Equation 1. I(x, E) I (x, E) exp [-u(E)x] Equation 1 0 where I (x, E) = INCIDENT NEUTRON INTENSITY, neutrons/cm /sec 2 p(E) = LINEAR ATTENUATION COEFFICIENT, cm x...

Baron, Robert Layton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

362

Vedolizumab as Induction and Maintenance Therapy for Ulcerative Colitis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...vedolizumab induction therapy at week 6 received vedolizumab (300 mg) every 4 weeks and were followed through week 52. Patients in cohort 1 who received placebo continued to receive placebo and were followed in a similar fashion. Randomization was performed centrally with the use of computer-generated randomization... In this 52-week randomized trial, the ?4?7 integrin antibody vedolizumab was effective in treating ulcerative colitis. There were not significantly more adverse events with vedolizumab than with placebo, but the trial was not large or long enough to fully assess safety.

Feagan B.G.; Rutgeerts P.; Sands B.E.

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

363

LNG Annual Report - 2005 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 LNG Annual Report - 2005 LNG Annual Report - 2005 LNG Annual Report - 2005 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2004 LNG Annual Report - 2006 LNG Annual Report -...

364

LNG Annual Report - 2006 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 LNG Annual Report - 2006 LNG Annual Report - 2006 LNG Annual Report - 2006 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2007 LNG Annual Report - 2005 LNG Annual Report -...

365

LNG Annual Report - 2004 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 LNG Annual Report - 2004 LNG Annual Report - 2004 LNG Annual Report - 2004 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2005 LNG Annual Report - 2007 LNG Annual Report -...

366

Calendar Year Reports | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Calendar Year Reports Calendar Year Reports Audit, Inspection and Other Reports The majority of Office of Inspector General reports are public. Certain reports, however,...

367

System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy is disclosed. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention. 5 figs.

Nigg, D.W.; Wemple, C.A.

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

368

System and method for delivery of neutron beams for medical therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron delivery system that provides improved capability for tumor control during medical therapy. The system creates a unique neutron beam that has a bimodal or multi-modal energy spectrum. This unique neutron beam can be used for fast-neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), or both. The invention includes both an apparatus and a method for accomplishing the purposes of the invention.

Nigg, David W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wemple, Charles A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

ANNUAL SECURITY FIRE SAFETY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY REPORT OCTOBER 1, 2013 DARTMOUTH COLLEGE http................................................................................................................................................................... 7 ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT........................................................................................................................9 PREPARATION OF THE REPORT AND DISCLOSURE OF CRIME STATISTICS

370

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Technologies Market Report References Acker, T. 2007.Industry Annual Market Report: Year Ending 2009. Washington,AWEA Mid-Year 2010 Market Report. Washington, DC: American

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

2012 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colorado: Xcel Energy. 2012 Wind Technologies Market ReportDistributed Wind Market Report. PNNL- SA-94583. Washington,2013. 2012 State of the Market Report for PJM. Norristown,

Wiser, Ryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

2012 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colorado: Xcel Energy. 2012 Wind Technologies Market ReportOperator. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report Chadbourne &Power Company. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report EnerNex

Wiser, Ryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Coal Report 2012 Annual Coal Report 2012 December 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. iii U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Contacts This publication was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). General information about the data in this report can be obtained from:

374

report | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

report report Dataset Summary Description The Weekly Financial and Activity report section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes listing of total appropriations, total obligations, and total disbursements for each Treasury Account. The "Major Activities" tab lists of the major actions taken to date and major planned actions of likely interest to senior government officials, Congress, and the public. File is in .xls format. Source DOE Date Released November 19th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords activity DOE financial Recovery Act report Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon DOE_Weekly_Financial_and_Activity_Report_20101119.xls (xls, 1.8 MiB)

375

Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Uranium Marketing Uranium Marketing Annual Report May 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2010 Uranium Marketing Annual Report ii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium Statistics. Questions about the preparation and content of this report may be directed to Michele Simmons, Team Leader,

376

2012 Microgrid Workshop Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Energy Reliability Smart Grid R&D Program Summary Report: 2012 DOE Microgrid Workshop July 30-31, 2012 Chicago, Illinois 2012 DOE Microgrid Workshop Report Page i Acknowledgment The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) would like to acknowledge the support provided by the organizations represented on the workshop planning committee in developing the workshop process and sessions. The preparation of this workshop report was coordinated by Energy & Environmental Resources Group, LLC (E2RG). The report content is based on the workshop session discussions, with session summary descriptions taken from the report-out presentations by individual teams during the closing plenary. Contributions to this report by all workshop participants, via expressed viewpoints during the

377

Standard Report Templates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü ü Metrics Included in Every Report "How To" Series Standard Report Templates EPA's Portfolio Manager offers you eight standard reports with key metrics and information you can use to easily assess your portfolio's performance and progress, and thereby make informed business decisions. This document lists the metrics included in each of the eight reports so you can see what each report offers. Standard Reports Performance Highlights Energy Performance Emissions Performance Water Performance Fuel Performance ENERGY STAR Certification Status

378

Report Title: Mapping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Title: Title: Mapping of Reservoir Properties and Facies Through Integration of Static and Dynamic Data Report Type: Final Technical Report Reporting Period Start Date: October 1, 2000 Reporting Period End Date: September 30, 2004 Principal Authors: Albert C. Reynolds, Dean S. Oliver, Yannong Dong, Ning Liu, Guohua Gao, Fengjun Zhang & Ruijian Li Date Report Issued: December 2004 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-00BC15309 Petroleum Engineering Department The University of Tulsa 600 South College Avenue Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product,

379

Uranium purchases report 1993  

SciTech Connect

Data reported by domestic nuclear utility companies in their responses to the 1991 through 1993 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey,`` Form EIA-858, Schedule B,`` Uranium Marketing Activities,`` are provided in response to the requirements in the Energy Policy Act 1992. Appendix A contains an explanation of Form EIA-858 survey methodologies with emphasis on the processing of Schedule B data. Additional information published in this report not included in Uranium Purchases Report 1992, includes a new data table. Presented in Table 1 are US utility purchases of uranium and enrichment services by origin country. Also, this report contains additional purchase information covering average price and contract duration. Table 2 is an update of Table 1 and Table 3 is an update of Table 2 from the previous year`s report. The report contains a glossary of terms.

Not Available

1994-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

380

Prime Supplier Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Report September 2013 Prime Supplier Report Released: November 26, 2013 Next Update: December 23, 2013 Legend: Petroleum Data Tables Petroleum Data Tables HTML File HTML File PDF File PDF File The Prime Supplier Report presents data collected on Form EIA-782C, "Monthly Report of Prime Supplier Sales of Petroleum Products Sold for Local Consumption." These data measure primary petroleum product deliveries into the States where they are locally marketed and consumed. Petroleum Data Tables HTML File PDF File --- Prime Supplier Sales Volumes in Petroleum Navigator, HTML, and PDF formats. Previous --- Previous reports are available on the historical page. The EIA-782C respondent frame is comprised of approximately 195 prime suppliers representing producers, importers, and inter-State resellers and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Report2003.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2003 Annual Report 2003 Annual Report I. Basic Information Regarding Report. A. Abel Lopez, Director FOIA/Privacy Act Group, ME-73 Office of the Executive Secretariat U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 Sandi Beatty, Information Specialist FOIA/Privacy Act Group, ME-73 Office of the Executive Secretariat U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-5955 B. The World Wide Web address to obtain an electronic copy of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) report is www.ma.mbe.doe.gov/execsec/foia.htm. The report can then be accessed by clicking FOIA Annual Reports.

382

Annual Report Curtin University of Technology Annual Report 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Report 2006 #12;#12;Curtin University of Technology Annual Report 2006 Chancellor's Foreword ........................................................................................................................ 2 Vice-Chancellor's Report ................................................................................................... 25 Report on Operations 28 Governance of the University

383

The 2010 OSU Clery Act Report Fire Safety Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 2010 OSU Clery Act Report And Fire Safety Report The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act #12;#12;Page | i Table of Contents The Annual Clery Act Report..........................................................................................................................................1 Reportable Areas

Escher, Christine

384

Education, Awareness & Prevention 2012 Annual Security Report and Fire Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Education, Awareness & Prevention 2012 Annual Security Report and Fire Report Issue for 2013 criminal activity is being reported, i.e., 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS Item Page Message from the President Action .................................................................. 14 Crimes Reported to FSUPD

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - aversive therapy Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Anthony L. Riley Personal Information Summary: of Psychology Alcohol Aversion Therapy Augusta, Georgia 1979 Consultant Battelle Research...

386

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha interferon therapy Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1998... interferonribavirin therapy. Gastroenterology 2008;135:1561-7. 3. Biermer M, Berg T. Rapid suppression... , Ewing A, et al. RG7128 alone or in combination with pegylated...

387

E-Print Network 3.0 - airway pressurencpap therapy Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or with therapy. Air- way hyperresponsiveness... on a history of recurrent wheeze, cough, or shortness of breath, reversible airway obstruction ... Source: Akabas, Myles -...

388

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced music therapy Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eric RicStar' Winter Music Therapy Camp, Jazz Camp, Rock Camp, Middle School Band Camp, and Musical... are below. MSU Community Music School Summer Camps Eric ... Source:...

389

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing intramyocardial therapy Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Law, Natural Sciences, Summary: of Creative Art Therapies Where Inspiration Meets Innovation Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences... 's Self-Portrait at the...

390

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc therapy planning Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is radiation therapy ? 2. ... Source: Hamza-Lup, Felix G. - School of Computing, Armstrong Atlantic State University Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences...

391

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-platelet therapy aspirin Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Until recently, it was thought that menopausal hormone therapy could lower the risks of heart attack Source: Parsegian, V. Adrian - Laboratory of Physical and Structural Biology,...

392

E-Print Network 3.0 - antiplatelet therapy principles Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the magnitude of the research. Summary: involved in blood clotting. Treatment for a Heart Attack may include: THROMBOLYTIC THERAPY Depending... the chest pain. This is...

393

E-Print Network 3.0 - anticoagulant therapy case Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gene therapy requires appropriate animal models of hemophilia B in which Source: Ponder, Katherine P. - Departments of Medicine & Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Washington...

394

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated cell therapy Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cell burden reaches a threshold ... Source: Collection: Biology and Medicine 37 Barbara Wheeler, Ph.D., MT-BC Director of Music Therapy Summary: -site supervisor for music...

395

E-Print Network 3.0 - antiretroviral arv therapy Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: Abstract: Antiretroviral therapy (ARV) is becoming available in South Africa. Demand will exceed supply... to Evaluate the Ethics of Allocating Antiretrovirals in Africa...

396

E-Print Network 3.0 - adefovir dipivoxil therapy Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in order to earn the Music Therapy Source: Arnold, Jonathan - Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center & Department of Genetics, University of Georgia Collection:...

397

E-Print Network 3.0 - aids gene therapy Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Biology and Medicine 15 PRESS RELEA Oct. 28, 2009 Summary: Therapies for Sickle Cell Disease, HIVAIDS and Brain, Ovarian and Colorectal Cancers Three...

398

E-Print Network 3.0 - antimalarial therapy selection Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in international research networks, such as the WorldWide antimalarial... - optimising the use of artemisinin-based therapies, understanding the biology and mechanisms of...

399

Five-year cost-utility analysis of acute renal replacement therapy: a societal perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessment of the cost utility (CU) of acute renal replacement therapy (RRT) from a societal perspective during a 5-year follow-up.

Annika Laukkanen; Linda Emaus; Ville Pettilä…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

E-Print Network 3.0 - autologous cell therapy Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2009 447 The new england Summary: of nonmyeloablative chemo- therapy followed by an infusion of autologous hematopoietic stem cells that had been trans... autologous CD34+ bone...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Design, Synthesis and Development of Transporter Targeting Agents for Image-guided Therapy and Drug Delivery.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this study was to design, synthesize and develop novel transporter targeting agents for image-guided therapy and drug delivery. Two novel agents,… (more)

Tsao, Ning

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

E-Print Network 3.0 - adding proton therapy Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

results for: adding proton therapy Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Proton and Particle Beams in Cancer Management Sponsored by the Program in Radiation Biology Summary: on...

403

E-Print Network 3.0 - african antiretroviral therapy Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time: 3:30 pm Summary: Abstract: Antiretroviral therapy (ARV) is becoming available in South Africa. Demand will exceed supply... to Evaluate the Ethics of Allocating...

404

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced medical therapy Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for: advanced medical therapy Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Louisiana State University Health Care Services Division Medical Center of Louisiana at New Orleans Summary: are...

405

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative medical therapies Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for: alternative medical therapies Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Louisiana State University Health Care Services Division Medical Center of Louisiana at New Orleans Summary: are...

406

Repairing alliance ruptures in emotionally focused therapy: A preliminary task analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Prior research has shown the therapeutic alliance to be positively related to therapeutic outcome in couple therapy (Johnson & Talitman, 2007; Knoblock-Fedders, Pinsoff, & Mann,… (more)

Swank, Lauren Elizabeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Split Alliance in Couple Therapy: Exploration of Four Types of Alliance Discrepancy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper explores four types of splits in couple therapy alliance - discrepancies where one spouse's rating of an aspect of alliance (alliance with therapist,… (more)

Goldsmith, Jacob Ze'ev Barnett

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The role of alliance and symptomatic change within cognitive behaviour therapy for depression.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores the role of alliance processes and symptomatic change within Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for depression (A. T., Beck, Rush, Shaw, & Emery, 1979).… (more)

Osborne, Carol Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

CLIENT ATTACHMENT, SYMPTOM DISTRESS, MARITAL ADJUSTMENT, AND THERAPEUTIC ALLIANCE IN COUPLE'S THERAPY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis was to examine the relationship between client anxiety, avoidance, symptom distress, marital adjustment and the therapeutic alliance in couple’s therapy.… (more)

NISHIDA, JACOB

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Agency Financial Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financial Report Financial Report Fiscal Year 2010 D E/ -00 O CF 56 Foreword Agency Financial Report (AFR) The AFR is organized by the following three major sections: „ Management's Discussion and Analysis section provides executive-level information on the Department's history, mission, organization, Secretarial priorities, analysis of financial statements, systems, controls and legal compliance and other management priorities facing the Department. „ Financial Results section provides a Message from the Chief Financial Officer,

411

The Hancock Report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Hancock Report ... In the opinion of your editor the most important issue yet published will be the Feb. 17 number, containing the long-awaited Hancock Report, together with an opinion survey entitled "Members Look at the AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY", the latter conducted and prepared by the Opinion Survey Corp. of Princeton, N. J. ... A great: many opinions expressed in the Hancock Report stem from factual datta presented in the opinion survey. ...

WALTER J. MURPHY

1947-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

412

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the United States imports more than half of its oil and overall consumption continues to climb, the 1992 Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, Virginia 22161 19. Security Classif.(of this report) Unclassified 20. Security Classif.(of this page) Unclassified 21. No. of Pages 54 22. Price Form DOT F 1700

413

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and metropolitan areas. Economists have also predicted that oil prices will rise in real terms during the same: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, Virginia 22161 19. Security Classif. (of this report) Unclassified 20. Security Classif. (of this page) Unclassified 21. No. of Pages

414

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been ongoing since the oil crises of the 1970s. While there are some commonalties in the regulatory 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, Virginia 22161 19. Security Classif.(of this report) Unclassified 20. Security Classif.(of this page) Unclassified 21. No. of Pages 51 22. Price Form DOT F 1700.7 (8

415

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the laboratory for different pier sizes and for a range of subcritical flow conditions. Both water level changes. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. BACKWATER EFFECTS OF PIERS IN SUBCRITICAL FLOW 5. Report Date October 2001 6 or floodplain of natural waterways. These piers will obstruct the flow and may cause an increase in water levels

Texas at Austin, University of

416

STAFF REPORT LOCALIZED HEALTH IMPACTS REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the uses of this information will not infringe upon privately owned rights. This report addendum has advanced biofuel production projects recommended for funding. The increased use of alternative and renewable fuels supports California's commitment to curb greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), reduce petroleum

417

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concrete, Coal Combustion By-Products, Fly Ash, High-Volume Fly Ash Concrete, Alkali-Silica Reactivity THROUGH THE USE OF HIGH VOLUME FLY ASH CONCRETE 5. Report Date March 2004 6. Performing Organization Code by substituting high volumes of fly ash in concrete production and to identify the resulting benefits

418

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3208 Red River, Suite 200 Austin, TX 78705-2650 10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS) 11. Contract or Grant No. 0 this need. Associated with a computer tool, the APRA is a method that, if used properly can: 1) help. This document reports in detail the entire process of developing the APRA method and its computer tool

Texas at Austin, University of

419

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, like person delay, fuel consumption, and mobile source emissions, were used to compare alternative Transportation Center Texas Transportation Institute The Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas 77843 in this report used eight months of travel time data (April through November 1994) available through Houston

420

Nuclear proliferation status report. Status report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information concerning the nuclear proliferation status of the following countries: (1) Russia, (2) Ukraine, (3) Belarus, (4) Kazakhstan, (5) Israel, (6) India, (7) Pakistan, (8) South Africa, (9) North Korea, (10) Iraq, (11) Iran, (12) Lybia, (13) Algeria, (14) Syria, (15) Brazil, (16) Argentina, and (17) Taiwan.

NONE

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ettringite Formation in Concrete 5. Report Date November 2008 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author Administration. 16. Abstract Delayed ettringite formation (DEF) in concrete has been identified in recent from the conducted tests. 17. Key Words DEF, delayed ettringite formation, Hoek 18. Distribution

Texas at Austin, University of

422

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

problems associated with using a global positioning system (GPS) with real-time, satellite is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, Virginia 22161. 19. Security Classif. (of report) Unclassified 20. Security Classif. (of this page) Unclassified 21. No

Texas at Austin, University of

423

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, topographical and satellite aerial maps to assist with the identification of the project extents. Once TRMs through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, Virginia 22161; www.ntis.gov. 19. Security Classif. (of report) Unclassified 20. Security Classif. (of this page) Unclassified 21. No

Texas at Austin, University of

424

Accumulations Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Accumulations Final Report Date: July 15, 2013 Period: October 1, 2008 - June 30, 2013 NETL Manager: Skip Pratt Principal Investigators: Matthew Reagan (LBNL), Philip W. Jones (LLNL) 1. Goal of this report This report will summarize previously reported or published results concerning the behavior of hydrates subjected to warming, highlighting contributing and mitigating factors relating to the possibility of rapid climate feedbacks. We will thus assess various scenarios and possibilities for the relationship between climate and hydrates: i.e., the likelihood of a "clathrate

425

1994 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Web Survey Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glisson,W.B. Welland,R.C. DCS Technical Report Series pp 27 Dept of Computing Science, University of Glasgow

Glisson, W.B.; Welland, R.C.

427

BPA 2002 Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STATEMENTS 2002 Annual Report of the Bonneville Power Administration Cover photo BPA fish biologist Andy Thoms (upper right) works with students from H.B. Lee Middle School...

428

2007 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report includes: a brief overview of Western; FY 2007 highlights; FY 2007 Integrated Resource Planning, or IRP, survey; and financial data.

none,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

DOE Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This final report contains a summary of work accomplished in the establishment of a Climate Data Center at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Hinzman, Larry D.; Long, James; Newby, Greg B.

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

430

FY 2008 LDRD Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The national laboratories included in this report devoted approximately $513 million to LDRD, addressing topics that span the entire range of DOE’s broad scientific mandate.

431

International petroleum statistics report  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on current international petroleum production, demand, imports, and stocks. World oil demand and OECD demand data are presented for the years 1970 thru 1995.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Summary Site Environmental Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Online Access: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reports produced after 1991 and a growing number of pre-1991 documents are available free via...

433

ARM - Reporting Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(PDF) Second Quarter (PDF) Third Quarter (PDF) Fourth Quarter (PDF) 2013 Quarterly Reports First Quarter (PDF) Second Quarter (PDF) Third Quarter (PDF) Fourth Quarter (PDF)...

434

Annual Performance Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Performance Report, Shiprock, New Mexico October 2014 Doc. No. S12021 Page i Contents Abbreviations ......

435

Progress Report for Workgroup ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Background: Excerpts from scoping document 10: BPA Role in Verifying Utility Self-funded Savings (utility generated) Summary: BPA has the same requirements for reporting of...

436

FY 2009 LDRD Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The national laboratories included in this report devoted approximately $515 million to LDRD, addressing topics that span the entire range of DOE’s broad scientific mandate.

437

SFU LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SFU LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT 2006/07 #12;22 TABLE OF CONTENTS Message from the University Librarian................................................... ....................................... 7 WAC Bennett Library.................................................................. ....................................... 8 Samuel and Frances Belzberg Library

438

Product Pipeline Reports Tutorial  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey Forms> Petroleum Survey Forms Tutorial Product Pipeline Reports Tutorial Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player...

439

EV Project Overview Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Project to date through March 2013 Charging Infrastructure Region Number of EV Project Charging Units Installed To Date Number of Charging Events Performed Electricity...

440

Monthly Performance Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manpower Reports and Budget Forecasts Walton 101514 10214 NA NA NA NA CD0084 Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Power and Transmission Service Invoice verification...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Monthly Performance Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Wilson 93014 9232014 Approve 90 days 122314 1062014 CD0084 Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Power and Transmission Service Invoice verification and...

442

Monthly Performance Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exercise Reports Hafner 122810 122810 Approve 45 days 21211 CD0084 Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Power & Transmission Service Invoice Verification and Breakdown of...

443

Final_Report.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy, Offi ce of Fossil Energy. Ormat: Low-Temperature Geothermal Power Generation Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Teapot Dome Field, Wyoming Final Report for the...

444

1999 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

The Site Environmental Report for Brookhaven National Laboratory for the calendar year 1999, as required by DOE Order 231.1.

NONE

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Energy, Data Management, Reporting  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Design the Strategy | Deliver Efficiency | Sustain Results Energy, Data Management, Reporting This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise...

446

Report: Discretionary Budgeting  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and Transition," a review of the Focusing EM Resources on Cleanup Project Team Report (September 2003). Board members discussed EM's current budgeting practices, lifecycle...

447

EMSL 2009 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The EMSL 2009 Annual Report describes the science conducted at EMSL during 2009 as well as outreach activities and awards and honors received by users and staff.

Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.; Wiley, Julie G.; Reed, Jennifer R.

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

448

1982 analyses and reports: equipment availability report; component cause code report; and equipment availability report  

SciTech Connect

This equipment availability report (1973 to 1982, 1982) presents statistical information on the performance of the major types of generating units and their major component groups. (DLC)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Monthly Biodiesel Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Biodiesel Production Monthly Biodiesel Production Report November 2013 With Data for September 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Monthly Biodiesel Production Report This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or

450

RMOTC - Library - Test Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test Reports Test Reports All non-proprietary project reports that are approved for release are posted here. Many of RMOTC's projects have protection extended through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) and may not be available for release at this time. If you have questions about a specific report, Contact Us. Name Partner Category EOR Technology (2011) (PDF) Trimeteor Production Viscosity Reduction (May 2012) (PDF) STWA Production Viscosity Reduction (April 2012) (PDF) STWA Production Viscosity Reduction (October 2011) (PDF) STWA Production Acoustek Assessment (PDF) BP Group Production Airborne Survey (PDF) Electro-Seise, Inc. Production Beam Gas Compressor (PDF) Morrison International Energy Production Bentonite Plugging (PDF) Eagle Cap, Inc. Production

451

2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - BNI/URS Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 30 2012 Hanford Climate Survey Report - BNIURS Report Prepared by EurekaFacts LLC 2 Introduction The...

452

Architecture, Engineering and Construction Sustainability Report Biannual Sustainability Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Architecture, Engineering and Construction Sustainability Report i Biannual Sustainability Report Projects $5 Million and Over August 2012 Active Projects

Kamat, Vineet R.

453

Proton therapy construction projects in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Proton and heavy-ion radiation therapy has been taking place now for 40 years, at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these centers built originally for physics research. The high degree of promise shown for using these particles for treating and curing cancer has stimulated the medical community to look seriously at building dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research, and development of effective treatments with these beams. In the United States, the first such facility, at the Loma Linda University Medical Center, has been in operation now for two years, and is currently treating a total of 35 to 40 patients per day. Two new projects are being designed at present, one at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, the second a joint project of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the University of California at Davis Medical Center in Sacramento, California. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to the proton-therapy application, and will present performance and operations characteristics for the Loma Linda facility, as well as details of the plans, process and progress towards construction of the new facilities in Boston and Sacramento.

Alonso, J.R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

REPORT OF POSSIBLE VIOLATION Campus Community Report 2008.doc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT OF POSSIBLE VIOLATION Campus Community Report 2008.doc 1. Student Information Date of report: Student Last Name (if known): Student First Name: Student ID # 2. Reporting Party Information Your Last in which we may be able to respond to anonymous reports. 3. Type of Report: Honor: Lying Cheating Stealing

Swaddle, John

455

Annual Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Reports Annual Reports Annual Reports OHA Annual Reports Available for Download January 1, 2013 OHA 2012 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2011 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA). Here are highlights for the past year: September 30, 2011 OHA 2011 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2011 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) September 30, 2010 OHA 2010 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2010 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) September 8, 2009 OHA 2009 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2009 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) September 30, 2008 OHA 2008 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2008 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) September 30, 2007 OHA 2007 ANNUAL REPORT Report on the FY 2007 operations of the Office of Hearings and Appeals

456

IG-0704 Report Cover  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Energy Regulatory Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program-2005 DOE/IG-0704 October 2005 REPORT ON THE FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION'S UNCLASSIFIED CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM - 2005 TABLE OF CONTENTS Cyber Security Program Details of Finding ..........................................................................................................1 Recommendations and Comments.................................................................................4 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology.........................................................................6 2. Related Audit Reports...............................................................................................8 CYBER SECURITY PROGRAM

457

Report Cover IG-0728  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utilization of Utilization of Fleet Vehicles DOE/IG-0728 May 2006 REPORT ON THE DEPARTMENT'S UTILIZATION OF FLEET VEHICLES TABLE OF CONTENTS Fleet Vehicle Utilization Details of Finding ........................................................................................1 Recommendations and Comments ..............................................................6 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology......................................................9 2. Detailed Site Results ............................................................................11 3. Prior Reports ........................................................................................12 4. Management Comments ......................................................................13

458

Report Cover IG-0730  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Management of Non-Nuclear High Explosives DOE/IG-0730 June 2006 REPORT ON THE DEPARTMENT'S MANAGEMENT OF NON-NUCLEAR HIGH EXPLOSIVES TABLE OF CONTENTS Management of High Explosives Details of Finding ........................................................................................1 Recommendations and Comments ..............................................................9 Appendices 1. Objective, Scope, and Methodology....................................................12 2. Prior Reports ........................................................................................14 3. Management Comments ......................................................................16 MANAGEMENT OF HIGH EXPLOSIVES ________________________________________________________________

459

2004 TEPP Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Transportation Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program 2004 Annual Report United States Department of Energy Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) 2004 Annual Report Table of Contents Executive Summary..................................................................................... 1 I. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Purpose ...... 3 II. Training.............................................................................................. 3 III. Outreach and Conferences ............................................................... 5 IV. Go-Kits ............................................................................................... 5 V. TEPP Exercise and Tabletop Activities ..........................................

460

Restoration 2013 STRATEGY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the Bonneville Power Administration and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District July 2012 #12 by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Corps) by updating Report. Final report, prepared by the Bonneville Power Administration and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

TRANSPORTATION Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003 CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION STUDIES Annual Report #12;Center for Transportation Studies University of Minnesota 200 Transportation and Safety Building 511 Washington Avenue S.E. Minneapolis, MN publication is a report of transportation research, education, and outreach activities for the period July

Minnesota, University of

462

Reports and other Publications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Tobacco. By. P. J. Anderson. Pp. 89-162. Bulletin 433: Tobacco Substation at Windsor; Report for 1939. By P. J. Anderson, T. R. ... , 1940. By E. M. Bailey. Pp. 121-222. Bulletin 444: Tobacco Substation at Windsor: Report for 1940. By P. J. Anderson, T. R. ...

1946-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

463

Information Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Technology Services 2012­13 Annual Report #12;#12;Contents Administrative Information ______117 Telecommunications and Networking Services __151 #12;#12;5 ITS 2012-13 Administrative Information Services INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES Administrative Information Services 2012­13 Annual Report

Maroncelli, Mark

464

UC Sustainability Office Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 UC Sustainability Office Report Introduction Welcome to the second annual UC Sustainability Office Report. 2012 saw the Sustainability Office focus its attentions on enhancing the student experience and building on UC's statement of strategic intent of `people prepared to make a difference'. We

Hickman, Mark

465

Microhole Tubing Bending Report  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

Oglesby, Ken

466

Internet Polling Development Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the development of a polling engine to launch the above procedures and pass the data on to the database server. This final report describes the automated polling procedures that have been developed for Synergistic, Highland and ABB loggers. This report also...

Klima, P.; Lockhart, D.; Haberl, J. S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Summer 2000 Vol. 15, No. 2 Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Implementing Nontidal Wetlands Protection Mandate Ellen Gilinsky wetland resources, but which occur outside of federal regulation. The General Assembly was motivated

468

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Virginia Wetlands Report Summer 1997 Vol. 12, No. 2The Virginia Wetlands Report Wetlands mitigation banking is a relatively new tool for wetlands managers. It is finding increasing application in the struggle to achieve a "no net loss" goal for our remaining wetland resources. The concept of creating

469

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Virginia Wetlands Report Fall 1997 Vol. 12, No. 3The Virginia Wetlands Report Almost everyone their actions. It is this com- mon sense notion which is motivating a new Wetlands Initiative under the auspices of the Chesapeake Bay Program Wetlands Workgroup. State and federal wet- lands program man- agers are working

470

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Fall 2001 Vol. 16, No. 3 A GIS Approach for Targeting Potential Wetlands Mitigation or Restoration Sites By Marcia Berman and Tamia vegeta- tion, islands, and wetlands. Most activi- ties enhance habitat for living resources, but also

471

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Spring 2002 Vol. 17, No. 1 Update On Virginia's New and Improved Nontidal Wetlands Program By Ellen Gilinsky, Ph.D. PWS Virginia wetlands program. Key changes included the provi- sion of additional jurisdic- tion over: excavation in all

472

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Virginia Wetlands Report Continued on page 2 Spring 1996 Vol. 11, No. 2The Virginia Wetlands Report Completely Updated The Wetlands Program of the Vir- ginia Institute of Marine Science has completed its update of the Vir- ginia Wetlands Management Hand- book, and with the aid of the Marine

473

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VWR 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Summer 1999 Vol. 14, No. 2 Historic Wetland Loss in the Elizabeth River Walter I. Priest, III Introduction Since earliest colonial consumed many of the natural resources of the river basin, including its wetlands, forests, water quality

474

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Winter/Spring 2000 Vol. 15, No. 1 Virginia Debates Nontidal Wetlands Regulation Carl Hershner Wetland regulation is once again- trolling impacts on existing wetlands, as well as creating new wetlands. There is general agreement

475

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Fall 2005 Vol. 20, No. 2 VMRC Adopts Wetland Mitigation/ Compensation Policy Changes By Tom Barnard When the Virginia Wetlands Act went into effect on July 1, thirty- three years ago, no one had ever heard of compensatory mitigation, wetland

476

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Spring 2005 Vol. 20, No. 1 Annual Summary of Permitted Tidal Wetland Impacts - 2004 By Karen Duhring The Wetlands Program has main impact areas based on a site visit and information provided in the permit documents. The Wetlands Program

477

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Winter/Spring 2001 Vol. 16, No. 1 The VIMS Teaching Marsh: A Tidal Wetland Restoration and Education Project Karen Duhring Purpose wetlands education opportunities, including field lessons. Due to the vari- ety and geographic distribution

478

Environmental Report 2007  

SciTech Connect

The purposes of the 'Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2007' are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites--the Livermore site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1A, Environmental Safety and Health Reporting, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The report is distributed electronically and is available at https://saer.lln.gov/, the website for the LLNL annual environmental report. Previous LLNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1994 are also on the website. Some references in the electronic report text are underlined, which indicates that they are clickable links. Clicking on one of these links will open the related document, data workbook, or website that it refers to. The report begins with an executive summary, which provides the purpose of the report and an overview of LLNL's compliance and monitoring results. The first three chapters provide background information: Chapter 1 is an overview of the location, meteorology, and hydrogeology of the two LLNL sites; Chapter 2 is a summary of LLNL's compliance with environmental regulations; and Chapter 3 is a description of LLNL's environmental programs with an emphasis on the Environmental Management System including pollution prevention. The majority of the report covers LLNL's environmental monitoring programs and monitoring data for 2007: effluent and ambient air (Chapter 4); waters, including wastewater, storm water runoff, surface water, rain, and groundwater (Chapter 5); and terrestrial, including soil, sediment, vegetation, foodstuff, ambient radiation, and special status wildlife and plants (Chapter 6). Complete monitoring data, which are summarized in the body of the report, are provided in Appendix A. The remaining three chapters discuss the radiological impact on the public from LLNL operations (Chapter 7), LLNL's groundwater remediation program (Chapter 8), and quality assurance for the environmental monitoring programs (Chapter 9). The report uses Systeme International units, consistent with the federal Metric Conversion Act of 1975 and Executive Order 12770, Metric Usage in Federal Government Programs (1991). For ease of comparison to environmental reports issued prior to 1991, dose values and many radiological measurements are given in both metric and U.S. customary units. A conversion table is provided in the glossary.

Mathews, S; Gallegos, G; Berg, L L; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Cerruti, S; Doman, J L; Ferry, L S; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Kumamoto, G; Larson, J; MacQueen, D H; Paterson, L; Revelli, M A; Ridley, M; Rueppel, D; Wegrecki, A M; Wilson, K; Woollett, J

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

479

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petrolem Reports Petrolem Reports Weekly Petroleum Status Report Data for week ending Dec. 13, 2013 | Release Date: Dec. 18, 2013 | Next Release Date: Dec. 27, 2013 | full report Previous Issues Week: December 18, 2013 December 11, 2013 December 4, 2013 November 27, 2013 November 20, 2013 November 14, 2013 November 6, 2013 October 30, 2013 October 23, 2013 October 21, 2013 October 9, 2013 October 2, 2013 prior issues Go The petroleum supply situation in the context of historical information and selected prices. Released after 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Highlights Weekly Petroleum Status Report Highlights PDF PDF Data Overview (Combined Table 1 and Table 9) PDF Tables 1 U.S. Petroleum Balance Sheet CSV XLS PDF 2 U.S. Inputs and Production by PAD District CSV XLS PDF

480

Savannah River Site - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Savannah River Site Review Reports 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, November 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Safety Basis and Design Development, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review of the Employee Concerns Program at the Savannah River Operations Office, July 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project, January 2013 Review of the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building, Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Selected Aspects of Fire Protection System Design, January 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting interstitial therapy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Idaho National Laboratory - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Idaho National Laboratory Review Reports 2013 Review of Radiation Protection Program Implementation at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project of the Idaho Site, April 2013 Review of the Facility Representative Program at the Idaho Site, March 2013 Activity Reports 2013 Accident Investigation at the Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Demonstration Facility, February 2013 Review Reports 2012 Review of Radiation Protection Program Implementation at the Idaho Site, November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Idaho Cleanup Project Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project, November 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Idaho National Laboratory, July 2012 Review of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project - Integrated Waste Treatment Unit Federal Operational Readiness Review, June 2012

482

Phase I report:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stimulation of Oil Wells Producing from Carbonate Stimulation of Oil Wells Producing from Carbonate Reservoirs Final Report Reporting Period Start Date: June 1, 2002 Reporting Period End Date: May 31, 2004 Authors Dr. Xina Xie, Principal Investigator W. W. Weiss, Senior Engineer Report Date: June 30, 2004 DOE Award Number: DE-FG03-01ER83226 Correlations Company P.O. Box 730 115 Court Street Socorro, NM 87801 Disclaimer "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

483

ECR 2007 Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ECR Annual Report for 2007 U.S. Department of Energy ECR Annual Report for 2007 U.S. Department of Energy 1 Environmental Conflict Resolution Second Annual Report January 2008 U.S. Department of Energy ECR Annual Report for 2007 U.S. Department of Energy 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Number I. Introduction 4 A. Background 4 B. Report Methodology 4 C. Ongoing Benefits of Using Environmental Conflict Resolution 5 II. Extent of Current Use of Environmental Conflict Resolution 5 A. Use of Third-Party Neutrals 5 B. Use of Site Specific Advisory Boards/Citizen Advisory Boards 6 C. Use of Collaborative Decision-making Processes with Regulators and Stakeholders 7

484

Final Beamline Design Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Beamline Design Report Final Beamline Design Report Guidelines and Review Criteria (SCD 1.20.95) 6.0 Final Beamline Design Report (FDR) Overview The Final Beamline Design Report is part of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline review process and should be planned for when approximately 90% of the total beamline design has been completed. Fifteen copies of the FDR are to be submitted to the APS Users Office. Approval of the Collaborative Access Team's (CAT) designs described in the report is required prior to installation of beamline components in the APS Experiment Hall. Components that have a long lead time for design or procurement can be reviewed separately from the remainder of the beamline, but enough information must be provided so that the reviewer can understand the

485

Reporting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reporting Reporting Reporting The Corporate Reporting Databases provide Web-based systems and data analysis documents to facilitate access to data on occurrences, accidents, illnesses, exposures, environmental impacts, performance, and compliance. Database access is restricted to authorized DOE staff and contractors. To register for database access, please visit the database web site at the link below and submit an access request. Once your request is approved, you will receive a user ID and password which will allow you to access the database. Corporate Reporting Databases Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) System: CEDR is a DOE public-use repository of data from occupational and environmental health studies of workers at DOE facilities and nearby community residents.

486

LNG Annual Report - 2009 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 LNG Annual Report - 2009 LNG Annual Report - 2009 LNG Annual Report - 2009 More Documents & Publications LNG Annual Report - 2008...

487

Nuclear magnetic resonance study of Gd-based nanoparticles to tag boron compounds in boron neutron capture therapy  

SciTech Connect

We report the investigation of new organic complexes containing a magnetic moment (Gd-based molecular nanomagnets), which can serve the double purpose of acting as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agents, and at the same time act as contrast agents to detect the molecule in the tissue by a proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We also explore the possibility of monitoring the concentration of the BNCT agent directly via proton and boron NMR relaxation. The absorption of {sup 10}B-enriched molecules inside tumoral liver tissues has been shown by NMR measurements and confirmed by {alpha} spectroscopy. A new molecular Gd-tagged nanomagnet and BNCT agent (GdBPA) has been synthesized and characterized measuring its relaxivity R{sub 1} between 10 kHz and 66 MHz, and its use as a contrast agent in MRI has been demonstrated. The NMR-based evidence of the absorption of GdBPA into living tumoral cells is also shown.

Corti, M.; Bonora, M.; Borsa, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica A.Volta, Unita CNISM e Unita INSTM, Via Bassi 6, Universita di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Bortolussi, S.; Protti, N.; Santoro, D.; Stella, S.; Altieri, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica e INFN Pavia, Via Bassi 6, Universita di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Zonta, C.; Clerici, A. M.; Cansolino, L.; Ferrari, C.; Dionigi, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chirurgiche, Laboratorio di Chirurgia Sperimentale Botta2, Via Ferrata 9, Universita di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Porta, A.; Zanoni, G.; Vidari, G. [Dipartimento di Chimica Organica, Via Taramelli 10, Universita di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Locoregional Failure in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Mastectomy and Adjuvant Systemic Therapy: Which Patients Benefit From Postmastectomy Irradiation?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the locoregional failure in patients with Stage I-II breast cancer treated with radical mastectomy and to evaluate whether a subset of these patients might be at sufficiently high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) to benefit from postmastectomy irradiation (PMRT). Methods and Materials: Stage I-II breast cancer patients (n = 150) treated with radical mastectomy without adjuvant irradiation between 1999 and 2005 were analyzed. The pattern of LRR was reported. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate rates of LRR, and Cox proportional hazards methods were used to evaluate potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 75 months. Mean patient age was 56 years. One-hundred forty-three (95%) patients received adjuvant systemic therapy: 85 (57%) hormonal therapy alone, 14 (9%) chemotherapy alone, and 44 (29%) both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. Statistically significant factors associated with increased risk of LRR were premenopausal status (p = 0.004), estrogen receptor negative cancer (p = 0.02), pathologic grade 3 (p = 0.02), and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.001). T and N stage were not associated with increased risk of regional recurrence. The 5-year LRR rate for patients with zero or one, two, three, and four risk factors was 1%, 10.3%, 24.2%, and 75%, respectively. Conclusions: A subset of patients with early-stage breast cancer is at high risk of LRR, and therefore PMRT might be beneficial.

Trovo, Marco, E-mail: marcotrovo33@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Durofil, Elena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Polesel, Jerry [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Roncadin, Mario [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Perin, Tiziana [Department of Pathology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Mileto, Mario; Piccoli, Erica [Department of Surgery, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Quitadamo, Daniela [Scientific Direction, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Massarut, Samuele [Department of Surgery, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Carbone, Antonino [Department of Pathology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy); Trovo, Mauro G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico of Aviano, Aviano (Italy)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for the Treatment of Oral Cancer in the Hamster Cheek Pouch Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in Brief Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for the Treatment of...pouch model of oral cancer for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) studies and...irradiation with a thermal or epithermal neutron beam with tumor-seeking, boron-containing...

Erica L. Kreimann; Maria E. Itoiz; Juan Longhino; Herman Blaumann; Osvaldo Calzetta; Amanda E. Schwint

2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

490

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of Cancer: Current Status and Future Prospects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for Cancer Research Review Reviews Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of Cancer: Current Status...indicate this fact. Background: Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the...is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha...

Rolf F. Barth; Jeffrey A. Coderre; M. Graça H. Vicente; Thomas E. Blue

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Mechanistic Investigation of Tolfenamic Acid, Betulinic Acid, and Aspirin in Anti-Cancer Therapy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2.2.5 Stages of Breast Cancers ..................................... 32 1.2.3 Breast Cancer Therapies ................................................. 33 1.2.3.1 Surgery and Radiation Therapy... deaths among men and women [1] . 1.1.2 Causal factors of cancer Cancer is not associated with a single cause. Multiple factors including tobacco, infectious organisms, chemicals, radiation, inherited mutations, hormones, immune conditions...

Liu, Xinyi

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

492

Melanoma Therapy with Rhenium-Cyclized Alpha Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Peptide Analogs  

SciTech Connect

Malignant melanoma is the 6th most commonly diagnosed cancer with increasing incidence in the United States. It is estimated that 54,200 cases of malignant melanoma will be newly diagnosed and 7,600 cases of death will occur in the United States in the year 2003 (1). At the present time, more than 1.3% of Americans will develop malignant melanoma during their lifetime (2). The average survival for patients with metastatic melanoma is about 6-9 months (3). Moreover, metastatic melanoma deposits are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy (3). Systematic chemotherapy is the primary therapeutic approach to treat patients with metastatic melanoma. Dacarbazine is the only single chemotherapy agent approved by FDA for metastatic melanoma treatment (5). However, the response rate to Dacarbazine is only approximately 20% (6). Therefore, there is a great need to develop novel treatment approaches for metastatic melanoma. The global goal of this research program is the rational design, characterization and validation of melanoma imaging and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Significant progress has been made in the design and characterization of metal-cyclized radiolabeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides. Therapy studies with {sup 188}Re-CCMSH demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of the receptor-targeted treatment in murine and human melanoma bearing mice (previous progress report). Dosimetry calculations, based on biodistribution data, indicated that a significant dose was delivered to the tumor. However, {sup 188}Re is a very energetic beta-particle emitter. The longer-range beta-particles theoretically would be better for larger tumors. In the treatment of melanoma, the larger primary tumor is usually surgically removed leaving metastatic disease as the focus of targeted radiotherapy. Isotopes with lower beta-energies and/or shorter particle lengths should be better suited for targeting metastases. The {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH and {sup 212}Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH complexes were developed and synthesized to investigate its ability to target and deliver an effective dose to small melanoma tumors and metastatic deposits. Dosimetry calculations for {sup 188}Re-CCMSH and {sup 212}Pb/{sup 212}Bi[DOTA]-Re(Arg11)CCMSH were compared in the B16/F1 mouse melanoma flank tumor model to analyze the delivered dose to tumor and normal organs.

Thomas P Quinn

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

493

Annual Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Annual Reports Services » Annual Reports Annual Reports Annual Reports December 28, 2012 Southeastern Power Administration 2012 Annual Report This report reflects our agency's programs,accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2011, and ending September 30, 2012. December 31, 2011 Southeastern Power Administration 2011 Annual Report This report reflects our agency's programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2010, and ending September 31, 2011. December 27, 2010 Southeastern Power Administration 2010 Annual Report This report reflects our agency's programs, accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2009,

494

Drug Therapy: Management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Pregnancy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An estimated 16.4 million women worldwide are living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection; 600,000 children are infected annually, most of them by mother-to-child transmission. Interventions designed to reduce perinatal transmission of HIV in the developing world have been described... Globally, more than 16 million women are living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Each year, 600,000 children are infected, most of them through mother-to-child transmission. This review focuses on the management of HIV infection during pregnancy in developed countries in which antiretroviral therapy, scheduled cesarean delivery, and alternatives to breast-feeding are available; it discusses strategies for obtaining the best possible outcomes.

Watts D.H.

2002-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

495

Cyclotron Produced Radionuclides for Diagnosis and Therapy of Human Neoplasms  

SciTech Connect

This project funded since 1986 serves as a core project for cancer research throughout MSKCC, producing key radiotracers as well as basic knowledge about thel physics of radiation decay and imaging, for nuclear medicine applications to cancer diagnosis and therapy. In recent years this research application has broadened to include experiments intended to lead to an improved understanding of cancer biology and into the discovery and testing of new cancer drugs. Advances in immune based radiotargeting form the basis for this project. Both antibody and cellular based immune targeting methods have been explored. The multi-step targeting methodologies (MST) developed by NeoRex (Seattle,Washington), have been adapted for use with positron emitting isotopes and PET allowing the quantification and optimization of targeted delivery. In addition, novel methods for radiolabeling immune T-cells with PET tracers have advanced our ability to track these cells of prolonged period of time.

Steven Larson MD

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

496

Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might translate into improved CRT efficacy.

Gouvea de Lima, Aline [Departamento de Radiologia, Disciplina de Oncologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Villar, Rosangela Correa [Instituto de Radiologia, Servico de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Castro, Gilberto de, E-mail: gilberto.castro@usp.br [Department of Clinical Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Antequera, Reynaldo [Divisao de Odontologia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral [Instituto de Radiologia, Servico de Radioterapia, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo [Departamento de Radiologia, Disciplina de Oncologia, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Hyperfractionated Concomitant Boost Proton Beam Therapy for Esophageal Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of hyperfractionated concomitant boost proton beam therapy (PBT) for patients with esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study participants were 19 patients with esophageal cancer who were treated with hyperfractionated photon therapy and PBT between 1990 and 2007. The median total dose was 78 GyE (range, 70-83 GyE) over a median treatment period of 48 days (range, 38-53 days). Ten of the 19 patients were at clinical T Stage 3 or 4. Results: There were no cases in which treatment interruption was required because of radiation-induced esophagitis or hematologic toxicity. The overall 1- and 5-year actuarial survival rates for all 19 patients were 79.0% and 42.8%, respectively, and the median survival time was 31.5 months (95% limits: 16.7- 46.3 months). Of the 19 patients, 17 (89%) showed a complete response within 4 months after completing treatment and 2 (11%) showed a partial response, giving a response rate of 100% (19/19). The 1- and 5-year local control rates for all 19 patients were 93.8% and 84.4 %, respectively. Only 1 patient had late esophageal toxicity of Grade 3 at 6 months after hyperfractionated PBT. There were no other nonhematologic toxicities, including no cases of radiation pneumonia or cardiac failure of Grade 3 or higher. Conclusions: The results suggest that hyperfractionated PBT is safe and effective for patients with esophageal cancer. Further studies are needed to establish the appropriate role and treatment schedule for use of PBT for esophageal cancer.

Mizumoto, Masashi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sugahara, Shinji [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tokyo Medical University Ibaraki Medical Center, Ibaraki (Japan); Okumura, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nakahara, Akira [Department of Gastroenterological Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Terashima, Hideo [Department of Surgery, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tsuboi, Koji [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki, E-mail: hsakurai@pmrc.tsukuba.ac.jp [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

498

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Recurrent Hepatocellular Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of Cyberknife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and its effect on survival in patients of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: This was a matched-pair study. From January 2008 to December 2009, 36 patients with 42 lesions of unresectable recurrent HCC were treated with SBRT. The median prescribed dose was 37 Gy (range, 25 to 48 Gy) in 4-5 fractions over 4-5 consecutive working days. Another 138 patients in the historical control group given other or no treatments were selected for matched analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 14 months for all patients and 20 months for those alive. The 1- and 2-year in-field failure-free rates were 87.6% and 75.1%, respectively. Out-field intrahepatic recurrence was the main cause of failure. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 64.0%, and median time to progression was 8.0 months. In the multivariable analysis of all 174 patients, SBRT (yes vs. no), tumor size ({<=}4 cm vs. >4 cm), recurrent stage (stage IIIB/IV vs. I) and Child-Pugh classification (A vs. B/C) were independent prognostic factors for OS. Matched-pair analysis revealed that patients undergoing SBRT had better OS (2-year OS of 72.6% vs. 42.1%, respectively, p = 0.013). Acute toxicities were mild and tolerable. Conclusion: SBRT is a safe and efficacious modality and appears to be well-tolerated at the dose fractionation we have used, and its use correlates with improved survival in this cohort of patients with recurrent unresectable HCC. Out-field recurrence is the major cause of failure. Further studies of combinations of SBRT and systemic therapies may be reasonable.

Huang, Wen-Yen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Jen, Yee-Min, E-mail: yeeminjen@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Meei-Shyuan [School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [School of Public Health, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Li-Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chang-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Ko, Kai-Hsiung [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Kuen-Tze; Lin, Jang-Chun; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Lin, Chun-Shu; Su, Yu-Fu; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Chang, Yao-Wen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Measurements and simulations of focused beam for orthovoltage therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Megavoltage photon beams are typically used for therapy because of their skin-sparing effect. However, a focused low-energy x-ray beam would also be skin sparing, and would have a higher dose concentration at the focal spot. Such a beam can be produced with polycapillary optics. MCNP5 was used to model dose profiles for a scanned focused beam, using measured beam parameters. The potential of low energy focused x-ray beams for radiation therapy was assessed. Methods: A polycapillary optic was used to focus the x-ray beam from a tungsten source. The optic was characterized and measurements were performed at 50 kV. PMMA blocks of varying thicknesses were placed between optic and the focal spot to observe any variation in the focusing of the beam after passing through the tissue-equivalent material. The measured energy spectrum was used to model the focused beam in MCNP5. A source card (SDEF) in MCNP5 was used to simulate the converging x-ray beam. Dose calculations were performed inside a breast tissue phantom. Results: The measured focal spot size for the polycapillary optic was 0.2 mm with a depth of field of 5 mm. The measured focal spot remained unchanged through 40 mm of phantom thickness. The calculated depth dose curve inside the breast tissue showed a dose peak several centimeters below the skin with a sharp dose fall off around the focus. The percent dose falls below 10% within 5 mm of the focus. It was shown that rotating the optic during scanning would preserve the skin-sparing effect of the focused beam. Conclusions: Low energy focused x-ray beams could be used to irradiate tumors inside soft tissue within 5 cm of the surface.

Abbas, Hassan, E-mail: Hassan.Abbas@Yale.Edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, 344 Lane Street Hamden, Connecticut 06514 (United States)] [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, 344 Lane Street Hamden, Connecticut 06514 (United States); Mahato, Dip N., E-mail: dip.n.mahato@intel.com [Intel Corporation, Mail-Stop RA3-410, 2501 NW 229th Avenue, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Satti, Jahangir, E-mail: sattij@mail.amc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albany Medical Center, 43 New Scotland Avenue, Albany, New York 12208 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Albany Medical Center, 43 New Scotland Avenue, Albany, New York 12208 (United States); MacDonald, C. A., E-mail: c.macdonald@albany.edu [Department of Physics, University at Albany, SUNY, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, New York 12222 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

500

Quarterly Coal Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 2010 DOE/EIA-0121 (2010/01Q) June 2010 DOE/EIA-0121 (2010/01Q) Revised: July 2012 Quarterly Coal Report January - March 2010 June 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.gov/coal/production/quarterly/ _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of