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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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1

Supplemental report on cost estimates'  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have completed an analysis of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 budget request for its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) program. The results were presented to an interagency review group (IAG) of senior-Administration officials for their consideration in the budget process. This analysis included evaluations of the underlying legal requirements and cost estimates on which the ERWM budget request was based. The major conclusions are contained in a separate report entitled, ''Interagency Review of the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program.'' This Corps supplemental report provides greater detail on the cost analysis.

NONE

1992-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

2

Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Protocol Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Method of Measuring Exposure to Pedestrian Accident Risk.Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol. 14, 1982, pp 397-405.Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Protocol Report,

Greene-Roesel, Ryan; Diogenes, Mara Chagas; Ragland, David R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

State energy data report 1992: Consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a report of energy consumption by state for the years 1960 to 1992. The report contains summaries of energy consumption for the US and by state, consumption by source, comparisons to other energy use reports, consumption by energy use sector, and describes the estimation methodologies used in the preparation of the report. Some years are not listed specifically although they are included in the summary of data.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

State energy data report 1993: Consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

State energy data report 1995 - consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

State Energy Data Report, 1991: Consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to the Government, policy makers, and the public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Process Equipment Cost Estimation, Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents generic cost curves for several equipment types generated using ICARUS Process Evaluator. The curves give Purchased Equipment Cost as a function of a capacity variable. This work was performed to assist NETL engineers and scientists in performing rapid, order of magnitude level cost estimates or as an aid in evaluating the reasonableness of cost estimates submitted with proposed systems studies or proposals for new processes. The specific equipment types contained in this report were selected to represent a relatively comprehensive set of conventional chemical process equipment types.

H.P. Loh; Jennifer Lyons; Charles W. White, III

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

State energy data report 1994: Consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), operated by EIA. SEDS provides State energy consumption estimates to members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and provides the historical series needed for EIA`s energy models. Division is made for each energy type and end use sector. Nuclear electric power is included.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Odometer Versus Self-Reported Estimates of Vehicle Miles Traveled  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The findings described here compare odometer readings with self-reported estimates of Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) to investigate to what extent self-reported VMT is a reliable surrogate for odometer-based VMT.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

FAPRI-UMC Report #01-07 Estimating Water Quality,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon and Carbon Sequestration...................................10 CRP EffectsFAPRI-UMC Report #01-07 Estimating Water Quality, Air Quality, and Soil Carbon Benefits Quality, Air Quality, and Soil Carbon Benefits of the Conservation Reserve Program FAPRI-UMC Report #01

12

Estimating Fuel Cycle Externalities: Analytical Methods and Issues, Report 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The activities that produce electric power typically range from extracting and transporting a fuel, to its conversion into electric power, and finally to the disposition of residual by-products. This chain of activities is called a fuel cycle. A fuel cycle has emissions and other effects that result in unintended consequences. When these consequences affect third parties (i.e., those other than the producers and consumers of the fuel-cycle activity) in a way that is not reflected in the price of electricity, they are termed ''hidden'' social costs or externalities. They are the economic value of environmental, health and any other impacts, that the price of electricity does not reflect. How do you estimate the externalities of fuel cycles? Our previous report describes a methodological framework for doing so--called the damage function approach. This approach consists of five steps: (1) characterize the most important fuel cycle activities and their discharges, where importance is based on the expected magnitude of their externalities, (2) estimate the changes in pollutant concentrations or other effects of those activities, by modeling the dispersion and transformation of each pollutant, (3) calculate the impacts on ecosystems, human health, and any other resources of value (such as man-made structures), (4) translate the estimates of impacts into economic terms to estimate damages and benefits, and (5) assess the extent to which these damages and benefits are externalities, not reflected in the price of electricity. Each step requires a different set of equations, models and analysis. Analysts generally believe this to be the best approach for estimating externalities, but it has hardly been used! The reason is that it requires considerable analysis and calculation, and to this point in time, the necessary equations and models have not been assembled. Equally important, the process of identifying and estimating externalities leads to a number of complex issues that also have not been fully addressed. This document contains two types of papers that seek to fill part of this void. Some of the papers describe analytical methods that can be applied to one of the five steps of the damage function approach. The other papers discuss some of the complex issues that arise in trying to estimate externalities. This report, the second in a series of eight reports, is part of a joint study by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commission of the European Communities (EC)* on the externalities of fuel cycles. Most of the papers in this report were originally written as working papers during the initial phases of this study. The papers provide descriptions of the (non-radiological) atmospheric dispersion modeling that the study uses; reviews much of the relevant literature on ecological and health effects, and on the economic valuation of those impacts; contains several papers on some of the more complex and contentious issues in estimating externalities; and describes a method for depicting the quality of scientific information that a study uses. The analytical methods and issues that this report discusses generally pertain to more than one of the fuel cycles, though not necessarily to all of them. The report is divided into six parts, each one focusing on a different subject area.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

REPORT NO. 4 ESTIMATES AND EVALUATION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESTIMATES AND EVALUATION OF FALLOUT IN THE UNITED STATES FROM NUCLEAR WEAPONS TESTING CONDUCTED THROUGH 1962 Section II History of Nuclear Weapons Testing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Section III Atmospheric, "Health Implications of Fallout From Nuclear Weapons Testing Through 1961", May 1962

14

State energy data report: Consumption estimates, 1960--1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Data Report presents estimates of annual energy consumption at the state and national levels by major economic sector and by principal energy type for 1960 through 1987. Included in the report are documentation describing how the estimates were made for each energy source, sources of all input data, and a summary of changes from the State Energy Data Report published in April 1988.

Not Available

1989-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Estimating Externalities of Natural Gas Fuel Cycles, Report 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes methods for estimating the external costs (and possibly benefits) to human health and the environment that result from natural gas fuel cycles. Although the concept of externalities is far from simple or precise, it generally refers to effects on individuals' well being, that result from a production or market activity in which the individuals do not participate, or are not fully compensated. In the past two years, the methodological approach that this report describes has quickly become a worldwide standard for estimating externalities of fuel cycles. The approach is generally applicable to any fuel cycle in which a resource, such as coal, hydro, or biomass, is used to generate electric power. This particular report focuses on the production activities, pollution, and impacts when natural gas is used to generate electric power. In the 1990s, natural gas technologies have become, in many countries, the least expensive to build and operate. The scope of this report is on how to estimate the value of externalities--where value is defined as individuals' willingness to pay for beneficial effects, or to avoid undesirable ones. This report is about the methodologies to estimate these externalities, not about how to internalize them through regulations or other public policies. Notwithstanding this limit in scope, consideration of externalities can not be done without considering regulatory, insurance, and other considerations because these institutional factors affect whether costs (and benefits) are in fact external, or whether they are already somehow internalized within the electric power market. Although this report considers such factors to some extent, much analysis yet remains to assess the extent to which estimated costs are indeed external. This report is one of a series of reports on estimating the externalities of fuel cycles. The other reports are on the coal, oil, biomass, hydro, and nuclear fuel cycles, and on general methodology.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Estimating Externalities of Hydro Fuel Cycles, Report 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are three major objectives of this hydropower study: (1) to implement the methodological concepts that were developed in the background document (ORNL/RFF 1992) as a means of estimating the external costs and benefits of fuel cycles and, by so doing, to demonstrate their application to the hydroelectric fuel cycle (different fuel cycles have unique characteristics that need to be addressed in different ways); (2) to develop, given the time and resources, the best range of estimates of externalities associated with hydroelectric projects, using two benchmark projects at two reference sites in the US; and (3) to assess the state of the information that is available to support the estimation of externalities associated with the hydroelectric fuel cycle and, by so doing, to assist in identifying gaps in knowledge and in setting future research agendas. The main consideration in defining these objectives was a desire to have more information about externalities and a better method for estimating them. As set forth in the agreement between the US and the EC, the study is explicitly and intentionally not directed at any one audience. This study is about a methodology for estimating externalities. It is not about how to use estimates of externalities in a particular policy context.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Free energy differences : Representations, estimators, and sampling strategies   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis we examine methodologies for determining free energy differences (FEDs) of phases via Monte Carlo simulation. We identify and address three generic issues that arise in FED calculations; the choice of representation, the choice...

Acharya, Arjun R

18

Intern report ; IR 2008-01 Site speci c hazard estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intern report ; IR 2008-01 Site speci c hazard estimates for the LNG energy plant in the Europoort for the LNG energy plant in the Europoort area T. van Eck, F.H. Goutbeek, B. Dost De Bilt, February 2008 #12 differ significantly. Figure 1. Situation overview. The site of the LNG plant situated in the center

Stoffelen, Ad

19

Reliability Estimation from Test Data Using Two Different J. Hersant, LASQUO-ISTIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reliability Estimation from Test Data Using Two Different Approaches J. Hersant, LASQUO-ISTIA S: Reliability, Degradation, Stochastic Process, Wear, Fatigue SUMMARY This paper compares two different approaches to estimate the reliability of mechanical components subject to degradation (wear, fatigue, etc

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

20

Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Automated Pedestrian Counting Devices Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

291. Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Draft ProtocolEstimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Draft Protocol39. Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Draft Protocol

Bu, Fanping; Greene-Roesel, Ryan; Diogenes, Mara Chagas; Ragland, David R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Estimating externalities of biomass fuel cycles, Report 7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the analysis of the biomass fuel cycle, in which biomass is combusted to produce electricity. The major objectives of this study were: (1) to implement the methodological concepts which were developed in the Background Document (ORNL/RFF 1992) as a means of estimating the external costs and benefits of fuel cycles, and by so doing, to demonstrate their application to the biomass fuel cycle; (2) to develop, given the time and resources, a range of estimates of marginal (i.e., the additional or incremental) damages and benefits associated with selected impact-pathways from a new wood-fired power plant, using a representative benchmark technology, at two reference sites in the US; and (3) to assess the state of the information available to support energy decision making and the estimation of externalities, and by so doing, to assist in identifying gaps in knowledge and in setting future research agendas. The demonstration of methods, modeling procedures, and use of scientific information was the most important objective of this study. It provides an illustrative example for those who will, in the future, undertake studies of actual energy options and sites. As in most studies, a more comprehensive analysis could have been completed had budget constraints not been as severe. Particularly affected were the air and water transport modeling, estimation of ecological impacts, and economic valuation. However, the most important objective of the study was to demonstrate methods, as a detailed example for future studies. Thus, having severe budget constraints was appropriate from the standpoint that these studies could also face similar constraints. Consequently, an important result of this study is an indication of what can be done in such studies, rather than the specific numerical estimates themselves.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

WILDFIRE IGNITION RESISTANCE ESTIMATOR WIZARD SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a software tool, entitled “WildFire Ignition Resistance Estimator Wizard” (WildFIRE Wizard, Version 2.10). This software was developed within the Wildfire Ignition Resistant Home Design (WIRHD) program, sponsored by the U. S. Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate, Infrastructure Protection & Disaster Management Division. WildFIRE Wizard is a tool that enables homeowners to take preventive actions that will reduce their home’s vulnerability to wildfire ignition sources (i.e., embers, radiant heat, and direct flame impingement) well in advance of a wildfire event. This report describes the development of the software, its operation, its technical basis and calculations, and steps taken to verify its performance.

Phillips, M.; Robinson, C.; Gupta, N.; Werth, D.

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

23

Strategic special nuclear material inventory differences. Semi-annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides and explains the generally small differences between the amounts of nuclear materials charged to DOE facilities and the amounts that could be physically inventoried. These Inventory Differences, previously called Material Unaccounted For (MUF), are being publicly released on a semiannual basis. This report covers data for the period from October 1, 1978, through March 31, 1979, and includes accounting corrections for data from earlier periods.

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Report Now Available: DC Microgrids Scoping Study--Estimate of...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Interim Evaluation Report (February 2015) SGDP Report Now Available: Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY (February 2015) Economic Impact of Recovery...

25

Master thesis Solar Energy Meteorology Comparison of different methods to estimate cloud height for solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Master thesis ­ Solar Energy Meteorology Comparison of different methods to estimate cloud height: · Interest in meteorology and solar energy · Experiences with data handling and analysis · Good programming for solar irradiance calculations In order to derive incoming solar irradiance at the earths surface

Peinke, Joachim

26

Estimating particulate matter health impact related to the combustion of different fossil fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating particulate matter health impact related to the combustion of different fossil fuels generated a web map service that allows to access information on fuel dependent health effects due a simulation. Combined with a dedicated emission inventory PM2.5 maps specified by fuel type were generated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

27

Estimates of the Loss of Main-Chain Conformational Entropy of Different Residues on Protein Folding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimates of the Loss of Main-Chain Conformational Entropy of Different Residues on Protein Folding energy of protein folding is not well understood. We have developed empirical scales for the loss; protein folding; pro- tein engineering INTRODUCTION When a protein folds into a compact globule, the resi

Pal, Debnath

28

COMPARISON OF SEISMIC RISK ESTIMATES USING DIFFERENT METHODS TO MODEL FRAGILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COMPARISON OF SEISMIC RISK ESTIMATES USING DIFFERENT METHODS TO MODEL FRAGILITY Pierre Gehl1 , Ariane Ducellier2 , Caterina Negulescu3 , Jaime Abad4 and John Douglas5 Seismic risk evaluations play of decades hundreds of such studies have been conducted. However, the assessment of seismic risk is always

29

Review of cost estimates for reducing CO2 emissions. Final report, Task 9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the ground breaking work of William Nordhaus in 1977, cost estimates for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions have been developed by numerous groups. The various studies have reported sometimes widely divergent cost estimates for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. Some recent analyses have indicated that large reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions could be achieved at zero or negative costs (e.g. Rocky Mountain Institute 1989). In contrast, a recent study by Alan Manne of Stanford and Richard Richels of the Electric Power Research Institute (Manne-Richels 1989) concluded that in the US the total discounted costs of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 20 percent below the 1990 level could be as much as 3.6 trillion dollars over the period from 1990 to 2100. Costs of this order of magnitude would represent about 5 percent of US GNP. The purpose of this briefing paper is to summarize the different cost estimates for CO{sub 2} emission reduction and to identify the key issues and assumptions that underlie these cost estimates.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Photogrammetry and Laser Imagery Tests for Tank Waste Volume Estimates: Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Feasibility tests were conducted using photogrammetry and laser technologies to estimate the volume of waste in a tank. These technologies were compared with video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates; the current method used for post-retrieval waste volume estimates. This report summarizes test results and presents recommendations for further development and deployment of technologies to provide more accurate and faster waste volume estimates in support of tank retrieval and closure.

Field, Jim G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

31

Estimating Externalities of Coal Fuel Cycles, Report 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The agreement between the US DOE and the EC established the specific objectives of the study: (a) to develop a methodological framework that uses existing data and models to quantify the external costs and benefits of energy; (b) to demonstrate the application of the framework to estimate the externalities of the coal, biomass, oil, natural gas, hydro, nuclear, photovoltaic, and wind fuel cycles (by agreement with the EC, the US addressed the first six of these); and (c) to identify major gaps in the availability of information to quantify impacts, damages, benefits, and externalities of fuel cycles; and to suggest priorities for future research. The main consideration in defining these objectives was a desire to have more information about externalities, and a better method for estimating them.

Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113: Project cost estimate. Preliminary design report. Volume IV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains Volume IV of the Preliminary Design Report for the Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113 which is the Project Cost Estimate and construction schedule. The estimate was developed based upon Title 1 material take-offs, budgetary equipment quotes and Raytheon historical in-house data. The W-113 project cost estimate and project construction schedule were integrated together to provide a resource loaded project network.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Los Alamos Waste Management Cost Estimation Model; Final report: Documentation of waste management process, development of Cost Estimation Model, and model reference manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report completes the Los Alamos Waste Management Cost Estimation Project, and includes the documentation of the waste management processes at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for hazardous, mixed, low-level radioactive solid and transuranic waste, development of the cost estimation model and a user reference manual. The ultimate goal of this effort was to develop an estimate of the life cycle costs for the aforementioned waste types. The Cost Estimation Model is a tool that can be used to calculate the costs of waste management at LANL for the aforementioned waste types, under several different scenarios. Each waste category at LANL is managed in a separate fashion, according to Department of Energy requirements and state and federal regulations. The cost of the waste management process for each waste category has not previously been well documented. In particular, the costs associated with the handling, treatment and storage of the waste have not been well understood. It is anticipated that greater knowledge of these costs will encourage waste generators at the Laboratory to apply waste minimization techniques to current operations. Expected benefits of waste minimization are a reduction in waste volume, decrease in liability and lower waste management costs.

Matysiak, L.M.; Burns, M.L.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Supporting document for the Southeast Quadrant historical tank content estimate report for SY-tank farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical Tank Content Estimate of the Southeast Quadrant provides historical evaluations on a tank by tank basis of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the underground double-shell tanks of the Hanford 200 East and West Areas. This report summarizes historical information such as waste history, temperature profiles, psychrometric data, tank integrity, inventory estimates and tank level history on a tank by tank basis. Tank Farm aerial photos and in-tank photos of each tank are provided. A brief description of instrumentation methods used for waste tank surveillance are included. Components of the data management effort, such as Waste Status and Transaction Record Summary, Tank Layer Model, Supernatant Mixing Model, Defined Waste Types, and Inventory Estimates which generate these tank content estimates, are also given in this report.

Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Consort, S.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, alfalfa, and pasture maintenance in this report are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The estimated costs of corn, corn silage, soybeans, alfalfa, and pasture maintenance in this report significantly over time. Budgets for alfalfa hay establishment with an oat companion crop and by direct seeding are included in this publication. Annual production costs for established alfalfa or alfalfa-grass hay as well

Duffy, Michael D.

36

Cost estimates for near-term depolyment of advanced traffic management systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to provide cost est engineering, design, installation, operation and maintenance of Advanced Traffic Management Systems (ATMS) in the largest 75 metropolitan areas in the United States. This report gives estimates for deployment costs for ATMS in the next five years, subject to the qualifications and caveats set out in following paragraphs. The report considers infrastructure components required to realize fully a functional ATMS over each of two highway networks (as discussed in the Section describing our general assumptions) under each of the four architectures identified in the MITRE Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems (IVHS) Architecture studies. The architectures are summarized in this report in Table 2. Estimates are given for eight combinations of highway networks and architectures. We estimate that it will cost between $8.5 Billion (minimal network) and $26 Billion (augmented network) to proceed immediately with deployment of ATMS in the largest 75 metropolitan areas. Costs are given in 1992 dollars, and are not adjusted for future inflation. Our estimates are based partially on completed project costs, which have been adjusted to 1992 dollars. We assume that a particular architecture will be chosen; projected costs are broken by architecture.

Stevens, S.S.; Chin, S.M.

1993-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Coastal-inland solar radiation difference study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to quantify the characteristics of solar insolation in the coastal zone and to determine the effect of the sea breeze circulation on the global insolation. In order to satisfy these objectives, a six station sampling network was established in the coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina, where previous evidence has indicated that the sea breeze circulation is almost a daily occurrence from late May through October. Three sites (Sloop Point, Onslow Beach, and Cape Fear Technical Institute (CFTI)) were located near the coast (coastal sites) to assess the insolation at the coast. A site (Clinton) was located in an area seldom affected by the sea breeze (about 100 km from the coast). Two additional sites, Wallace and Ellis Airport, located between the coastal sites and the control site, were to be used to assess the transient impact of the sea breeze upon the insolation. Pyranometers were located at each site to measure the global insolation. Direct normal insolation measured by a pyrheliometer and ultraviolet radiation measured by uv radiometers were observed at the Sloop Point and Clinton sites only. Data were collected during the calendar year 1978. The results of the study indicated that the global insolation had greater variability over the network during the summer season (June, July, and August). During the summer, there was a systematicdiurnal variation of the difference in global insolation between the inland and the coastal sites.

Bach, W.D. Jr.; Vukovich, F.M.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Letter report: Population estimates by age, sex and race for 10-county study area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Environmental Does Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation doses that people could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. To identify groups that may have received doses, population estimates containing age, race, and sex detail for ten counties in Washington and Oregon for the years 1940 to 1980 were prepared by the Demographics Laboratory under a subcontract with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A data base of population information was developed from census reports and published and unpublished collections from the Washington State Office of Financial Management and Center for Population Research. Three estimation methods were then explored: the cohort-component model, cohort interpolation, and age-group interpolation. The estimates generated through cohort and age-group interpolation are considered adequate for initial use in the HEDR Project. Results are presented in two forms: (1) county populations by sex and single year of age and (2) county populations by sex and race for age groupings. These results are made available to the HEDR Project for further refinement into population estimates by county census divisions.

Pittenger, D.B.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

A Monte Carlo Investigation of Three Different Estimation Methods in Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling Under Conditions of Data Nonnormality and Varied Sample Sizes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

various sample sizes and differing estimators (maximum likelihood, generalized least squares, and weighted least squares). The finding revealed that the regression coefficients were estimated with little to no bias among the study design conditions...

Byrd, Jimmy

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

40

Extraction abilities of methods used for estimating of different phosphorus fractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

readily available P (P CaCl2 ). Anion exchange (AE)methods (P ar =100%) P CaCl2 P ex P DL P M3 P in P org P M-for different methods P CaCl2 P ex P DL P M3 P in P org P

Kulhanek, Martin; Balik, Jiri; Cerny, Jindrich; Kozlovsky, Ondrej; Nedved, Vaclav

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

CONTRACTOR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INVENTORY REPORT Project Name: ORNL Y-12 Project Begin Date: Estimated Project End Date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTRACTOR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INVENTORY REPORT Project Name: ORNL Y-12 Project Begin Date: Phone Numbers: Project Manager: Field Representative: SHEST Representative: List of Hazardous Materials: Estimated Project End Date: Contractor/Service Subcontractor Name: Contractor/Service Subcontractor Address

Pennycook, Steve

42

2003 status report savings estimates for the energy star(R)voluntary labeling program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating and cooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subset of ENERGY STAR program activities, focused primarily on labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2002, what we expect in 2003, and provide savings forecasts for two market penetration scenarios for the period 2003 to 2020. The target market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of future ENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goals for each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumption of 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasers buy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiency products throughout the analysis period.

Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; McWhinney, Marla

2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

43

2002 status report: Savings estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) voluntary labeling program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ENERGY STAR [registered trademark] is a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating and cooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subset of ENERGY STAR program activities, focused primarily on labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2001, what we expect in 2002, and provide savings forecasts for two market penetration scenarios for the period 2002 to 2020. The target market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of future ENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goals for each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumption of 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasers buy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiency products throughout the analysis period.

Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; McWhinney, Marla; Koomey, Jonathan

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

44

2007 Status Report: Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R)VoluntaryLabeling Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more thanthirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2006, whatwe expect in 2007, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2007 to 2015 and 2007 to 2025. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

Sanchez, Marla; Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Homan,Gregory K.

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

45

2004 status report: Savings estimates for the Energy Star(R)voluntarylabeling program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more thanthirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2003, whatwe expect in 2004, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2004 to 2010 and 2004 to 2020. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; McWhinney, Marla

2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

46

2006 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R)Voluntary Labeling Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more thanthirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2005, whatwe expect in 2006, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2006 to 2015 and 2006 to 2025. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla; Homan,Gregory K.

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

47

2005 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R)Voluntary Labeling Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Star labels exist for more thanforty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2004, whatwe expect in 2005, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2005 to 2010 and 2005 to 2020. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

48

A Novel Approach to Estimate Iron Distribution within Different Pore Domains of Structured Media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The iron content of soils and aquifer solids usually is quantified using different extraction solutions performed with homogenized samples in a well-mixed batch experiment. For structured media where preferential flow prevails over the matrix flow, however, the iron content determined from homogenized samples may not well represent the iron available for biogeochemical reactions. In this study we performed ammonium oxalate extraction on a core of intact saprolite where physical structure was preserved. An unsaturated flow setup was modified with the intent to allow the extraction under two pore tensions, 15 cm and 0 cm of water, although a malfunctioning vacuum regulator made this more difficult than anticipated. Approximately 85% of the oxalate-extractable Fe was contained within the finer pore domain (matrix potential larger than 15 cm). Less than 15.5% of the extracted Fe mass (an upper bound) was present in domains of pore tension less than 15 cm. To the extent that Fe(III) oxides play an important role in contaminant biogeochemistry and solute transport, their distribution in structured subsurface media is critical to our understanding of these processes.

Kamolpornwijit, Wiwat [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Kim, Young Jin [ORNL; Scheibe, Timothy D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Licensed fuel facility status report: Inventory difference data, July 1, 1994--June 30, 1995. Volume 15  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is committed to the periodic publication of licensed fuel facility inventory difference data, following agency review of the information and completion of any related NRC investigations. Information in this report includes inventory difference data for active fuel fabrication facilities possessing more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material.

Joy, D.R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Licensed fuel facility status report. Inventory difference data, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992: Volume 12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NRC is committed to the periodic publication of licensed fuel facilities inventory difference data, following agency review of the information and completion of any related NRC investigations. Information in this report includes inventory difference data for active fuel fabrication facilities possessing more than one effective kilogram of high enriched uranium, low enriched uranium, plutonium, or uranium-233.

Joy, D.; Brown, C.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Licensed fuel facility status report: Inventory difference data, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1991. Volume 11  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NRC is committed to the periodic publication of licensed fuel facilities inventory difference data, following agency review of the information and completion of any related NRC investigations. Information in this report includes inventory difference data for active fuel fabrication facilities possessing more than one effective kilogram of high enriched uranium, low enriched uranium, plutonium, or uranium-233.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Los Alamos PC estimating system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Cost Estimating System (QUEST) is being converted to run on IBM personal computers. This very extensive estimating system is capable of supporting cost estimators from many different and varied fields. QUEST does not dictate any fixed method for estimating. QUEST supports many styles and levels of detail estimating. QUEST can be used with or without data bases. This system allows the estimator to provide reports based on levels of detail defined by combining work breakdown structures. QUEST provides a set of tools for doing any type of estimate without forcing the estimator to use any given method. The level of detail in the estimate can be mixed based on the amount of information known about different parts of the project. The system can support many different data bases simultaneously. Estimators can modify any cost in any data base.

Stutz, R.A.; Lemon, G.D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Annual report on strategic special nuclear material inventory differences, April 1, 1990--March 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report of unclassified Inventory Difference (ID's) covers the twelve months from April 1, 1990 through March 31, 1991 for all key Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractor operated facilities possessing strategic special nuclear materials. Classified information is not included in this report. This classified information includes data for the Rocky Flats and Y-12 nuclear weapons production facilities or facilities under ID investigation. However, classified ID data from such facilities receive the same scrutiny and analyses as the included data.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 7, Estimate data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This report is organized according to the sections and subsections outlined by Attachment III-2 of DOE Document AL 4700.1, Project Management System. It is organized into seven parts. This document, Part VII - Estimate Data, contains the project cost estimate information.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

55

Licensed fuel facility. Volume 14. Inventory difference data, status report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is committed to an annual publication of licensed fuel facilities` inventory difference (ID) results, after Agency review of the information and completion of any related investigations. Information in this report includes ID results for active fuel fabrication and/or recovery facilities.

Joy, D R

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Primate polonium metabolic models and their use in estimation of systemic radiation doses from bioassay data. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Polonium metabolic model was derived and incorporated into a Fortran algorithm which estimates the systemic radiation dose from {sup 210}Po when applied to occupational urine bioassay data. The significance of the doses estimated are examined by defining the degree of uncertainty attached to them through comprehensive statistical testing procedures. Many parameters necessary for dosimetry calculations (such as organ partition coefficients and excretion fractions), were evaluated from metabolic studies of {sup 210}Po in non-human primates. Two tamarins and six baboons were injected intravenously with {sup 210}Po citrate. Excreta and blood samples were collected. Five of the baboons were sacrificed at times ranging from 1 day to 3 months post exposure. Complete necropsies were performed and all excreta and the majority of all skeletal and tissue samples were analyzed radiochemically for their {sup 210}Po content. The {sup 210}Po excretion rate in the baboon was more rapid than in the tamarin. The biological half-time of {sup 210}Po excretion in the baboon was approximately 15 days while in the tamarin, the {sup 210}Po excretion rate was in close agreement with the 50 day biological half-time predicted by ICRP 30. Excretion fractions of {sup 210}Po in the non-human primates were found to be markedly different from data reported elsewhere in other species, including man. A thorough review of the Po urinalysis procedure showed that significant recovery losses resulted when metabolized {sup 210}Po was deposited out of raw urine. Polonium-210 was found throughout the soft tissues of the baboon but not with the partition coefficients for liver, kidneys, and spleen that are predicted by the ICRP 30 metabolic model. A fractional distribution of 0.29 for liver, 0.07 for kidneys, and 0.006 for spleen was determined. Retention times for {sup 210}Po in tissues are described by single exponential functions with biological half-times ranging from 15 to 50 days.

Cohen, N. [New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental Medicine

1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Supporting document for the north east quadrant historical tank content estimate report for C-Tank Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information gathered on C-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature data, sampling data, and drywell and liquid observation well data for Historical Tank Content Estimate Report of the NE Quadrant and the Hanford 200 East Areas.

Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Supporting document for the North East Quandrant Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for BX-Tank Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This supporting document provides historical in-depth characterization information gathered on BX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature data, sampling data, and drywell and liquid observation well data for Historical Tank Content Estimate Report of the NE Quandrant and the Hanford 200 East Areas.

Brevick, C.H.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Annual report on strategic special nuclear material inventory differences, April 1, 1990--March 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report of unclassified Inventory Difference (ID`s) covers the twelve months from April 1, 1990 through March 31, 1991 for all key Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractor operated facilities possessing strategic special nuclear materials. Classified information is not included in this report. This classified information includes data for the Rocky Flats and Y-12 nuclear weapons production facilities or facilities under ID investigation. However, classified ID data from such facilities receive the same scrutiny and analyses as the included data.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

CY 1995 radiation dose reconciliation report and resulting CY 1996 dose estimate for the 324 nuclear facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, the dose estimate for CY 1995 is reconciled by month wih actual doses received. Results of the reconciliation were used to revise estimates of worker dose for CY 1996. Resulting dose estimate for the facility is also included. Support for two major programs (B-Cell Cleanout and Surveillance and Maintenance) accounts for most of the exposure received by workers in the faility. Most of the expousre received by workers comes from work in the Radiochemical Engineering Complex airlock. In spite of schedule and work scope changes during CY 1995, dose estimates were close to actual exposures received. A number of ALARA measures were taken throughout the year; exposure reduction due to those was 20.6 Man-Rem, a 28% reduction from the CY 1995 estimate. Baseline estimates for various tasks in the facility were used to compile the CY 1996 dose estimate of 45.4 Man-Rem; facility goal for CY 1996 is to reduce worker dose by 20%, to 36.3 Man-Rem.

Landsman, S.D.; Thornhill, R.E.; Peterson, C.A.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

2006 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) Voluntary Labeling Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10,000 hours) than incandescent lamps (usually estimated atcurrent plus several future incandescent lamp purchases. Themany times longer than incandescent lamps, maintenance costs

Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla; Homan, Gregory K.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

2007 Status Report: Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) VoluntaryLabeling Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10,000 hours) than incandescent lamps (usually estimated atcurrent plus several future incandescent lamp purchases. Themany times longer than incandescent lamps, maintenance costs

Sanchez, Marla; Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Homan, Gregory K.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

2005 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) Voluntary Labeling Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10,000 hours) than incandescent lamps (usually estimated atcurrent plus several future incandescent lamp purchases. Themany times longer than incandescent lamps, maintenance costs

Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Gas temperature profiles at different flow rates and heating rates suffice to estimate kinetic parameters for fluidised bed combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental work on estimation kinetic parameters for combustion was conducted in a bench-scale fluidised bed (FB: 105x200mm). Combustion medium was obtained by using an electrical heater immersed into the bed. The ratio of heating rate (kJ/s) to molar flow rate of air (mol/s) regulated by a rheostat so that the heat of combustion (kJ/mol) can be synthetically obtained by an electrical power supply for relevant O{sub 2}-feedstock concentration (C{sub 0}). O{sub 2}-restriction ratio ({beta}) was defined by the ratio of O{sub 2}-feedstock concentration to O{sub 2}-air concentration (C{sub O{sub 2}-AIR}) at prevailing heating rates. Compressed air at further atmospheric pressure ({approx_equal}102.7kPa) entered the bed that was alumina particles (250{mu}m). Experiments were carried out at different gas flow rates and heating rates. FB was operated with a single charge of (1300g) particles for obtaining the T/T{sub 0} curves, and than C/C{sub 0} curves. The mathematical relationships between temperature (T) and conversion ratio (X) were expressed by combining total energy balance and mass balance in FB. Observed surface reaction rate constants (k{sub S}) was obtained from the combined balances and proposed model was also tested for these kinetic parameters (frequency factor: k{sub 0}, activation energy: E{sub A}, and reaction order: n) obtained from air temperature measurements. It was found that the model curves allow a good description of the experimental data. Thus, reaction rate for combustion was sufficiently expressed. (author)

Suyadal, Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Ankara University, 06100-Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

FY 2011 Third Quarter Report Estimate of Historical Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects estimated from Community Earth System Model (CESM) simulations are -0.06 W m-2 and -1.39 W m-2, respectively.

Koch, D

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

66

Reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake- induced settlements at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a reassessment of liquefaction potential and estimation of earthquake-induced settlements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), located southwest of Paducah, KY. The U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) was authorized to conduct this study from FY91 to FY94 by the DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO), Oak Ridge, TN, through Inter- Agency Agreement (IAG) No. DE-AI05-91OR21971. The study was conducted under the Gaseous Diffusion Plant Safety Analysis Report (GDP SAR) Program.

Sykora, D.W.; Yule, D.E.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon through Snake River Dams and Reservoirs, 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot study was conducted to estimate survival of hatchery-reared yearling chinook salmon through dams and reservoirs on the Snake River. The goals of the study were to: (1) field test and evaluate the Single-Release, Modified-Single-Release, and Paired-Release Models for the estimation of survival probabilities through sections of a river and hydroelectric projects; (2) identify operational and logistical constraints to the execution of these models; and (3) determine the usefulness of the models in providing estimates of survival probabilities. Field testing indicated that the numbers of hatchery-reared yearling chinook salmon needed for accurate survival estimates could be collected at different areas with available gear and methods. For the primary evaluation, seven replicates of 830 to 1,442 hatchery-reared yearling chinook salmon were purse-seined from Lower Granite Reservoir, PIT tagged, and released near Nisqually John boat landing (River Kilometer 726). Secondary releases of PIT-tagged smolts were made at Lower Granite Dam to estimate survival of fish passing through turbines and after detection in the bypass system. Similar secondary releases were made at Little Goose Dam, but with additional releases through the spillway. Based on the success of the 1993 pilot study, the authors believe that the Single-Release and Paired-Release Models will provide accurate estimates of juvenile salmonid passage survival for individual river sections, reservoirs, and hydroelectric projects in the Columbia and Snake Rivers.

Iwamoto, Robert N.; Sandford, Benjamin P.; McIntyre, Kenneth W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Letter report: Population estimates by age, sex and race for 10-county study area. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Environmental Does Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation doses that people could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. To identify groups that may have received doses, population estimates containing age, race, and sex detail for ten counties in Washington and Oregon for the years 1940 to 1980 were prepared by the Demographics Laboratory under a subcontract with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). A data base of population information was developed from census reports and published and unpublished collections from the Washington State Office of Financial Management and Center for Population Research. Three estimation methods were then explored: the cohort-component model, cohort interpolation, and age-group interpolation. The estimates generated through cohort and age-group interpolation are considered adequate for initial use in the HEDR Project. Results are presented in two forms: (1) county populations by sex and single year of age and (2) county populations by sex and race for age groupings. These results are made available to the HEDR Project for further refinement into population estimates by county census divisions.

Pittenger, D.B.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Estimate of radionuclide release characteristics into containment under severe accident conditions. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed review of the available light water reactor source term information is presented as a technical basis for development of updated source terms into the containment under severe accident conditions. Simplified estimates of radionuclide release and transport characteristics are specified for each unique combination of the reactor coolant and containment system combinations. A quantitative uncertainty analysis in the release to the containment using NUREG-1150 methodology is also presented.

Nourbakhsh, H.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Estimated groundwater restoration costs associated with commercial underground coal gasification operations. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to complete a preliminary cost estimate for groundwater restoration for the Hoe Creek commercial underground coal gasification (UCG) facility under a set of ground rules based on field data measurements and specific compound removal requirements. Of the three approaches evaluated for disposal of the contaminated groundwater, deep well injection is the least expensive, followed by the alternate treatment approach.

Fischer, D.D.

1985-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

71

Improved estimates of separation distances to prevent unacceptable damage to nuclear power plant structures from hydrogen detonation for gaseous hydrogen storage. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides new estimates of separation distances for nuclear power plant gaseous hydrogen storage facilities. Unacceptable damage to plant structures from hydrogen detonations will be prevented by having hydrogen storage facilities meet separation distance criteria recommended in this report. The revised standoff distances are based on improved calculations on hydrogen gas cloud detonations and structural analysis of reinforced concrete structures. Also, the results presented in this study do not depend upon equivalencing a hydrogen detonation to an equivalent TNT detonation. The static and stagnation pressures, wave velocity, and the shock wave impulse delivered to wall surfaces were computed for several different size hydrogen explosions. Separation distance equations were developed and were used to compute the minimum separation distance for six different wall cases and for seven detonating volumes (from 1.59 to 79.67 lbm of hydrogen). These improved calculation results were compared to previous calculations. The ratio between the separation distance predicted in this report versus that predicted for hydrogen detonation in previous calculations varies from 0 to approximately 4. Thus, the separation distances results from the previous calculations can be either overconservative or unconservative depending upon the set of hydrogen detonation parameters that are used. Consequently, it is concluded that the hydrogen-to-TNT detonation equivalency utilized in previous calculations should no longer be used.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Estimates of health risks associated with radionuclide emissions from fossil-fueled steam-electric generating plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the Title III, Section 112 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment, Congress directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to perform a study of the hazards to public resulting from pollutants emitted by electric utility system generating units. Radionuclides are among the groups of pollutants listed in the amendment. This report updates previously published data and estimates with more recently available information regarding the radionuclide contents of fossil fuels, associated emissions by steam-electric power plants, and potential health effects to exposed population groups.

Nelson, C.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Estimated winter 1980-1981 electric demand and supply, contiguous United States. Staff report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the most recent data available concerning projected electrical peak demands and available power resouces for the 1980-1981 winter peak period, as reported by electric utilities in the contiguous United States. The data, grouped by Regional Reliability Council areas and by Electrical Regions within the Council areas, was obtained from the Form 12E-2 reports filed by utilities with the Department of Energy on October 15, 1980 (data as of September 30). In some instances the data were revised or verified by telephone. Considerations affecting reliability, arising from Nuclear Regulatory Commission actions based on lessons learned from the forced outage of Three Mile Island Nuclear Unit No. 2, were factored into the report. No widespread large-scale reliability problems are foreseen for electric power supply this winter, on the basis of the supply and demand projections furnished by the electric utilities. Reserve margins could drop in some electric regions to levels considered inadequate for reliable service, if historical forced-outage magnitudes recur.

None

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Raman Lidar Profiles Best Estimate Value-Added Product Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARM Raman lidars are semi-autonomous ground-based systems that transmit at a wavelength of 355 nm with 300 mJ, {approx}5 ns pulses, and a pulse repetition frequency of 30Hz. Signals from the various detection channels are processed to produce time- and height-resolved estimates of several geophysical quantities, such as water vapor mixing ratio, relative humidity, aerosol scattering ratio, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization ratio. Data processing is currently handled by a suite of six value-added product (VAP) processes. Collectively, these processes are known as the Raman Lidar Profiles VAP (RLPROF). The top-level best-estimate (BE) VAP process was introduced in order to bring together the most relevant information from the intermediate-level VAPs. As such, the BE process represents the final stage in data processing for the Raman lidar. Its principal function is to extract the primary variables from each of the intermediate-level VAPs, perform additional quality control, and combine all of this information into a single output file for the end-user. The focus of this document is to describe the processing performed by the BE VAP process.

Newson, R

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

75

Estimation of reproductive, production, and progeny growth differences among f1 boer-spanish and spanish females  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

difference between dam breed types. Kid weaning weight and pre-weaning average daily gain were not significantly different between dam breed types. Age at time of leaving the herd for all causes was 6.15 years for F1 Boer-Spanish does and 5.56 years...

Rhone, Jeffrey Andrew

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

76

Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 4: Project cost estimate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. This volume represents the total estimated costs for the W113 facility. Operating Contractor Management costs have been incorporated as received from WHC. The W113 Facility TEC is $19.7 million. This includes an overall project contingency of 14.4% and escalation of 17.4%. A January 2001 construction contract procurement start date is assumed.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Mathematical and numerical studies of nonstandard difference equation models of differential equations. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the complete research findings of the PI. Included are titles and places of publication of all journal, book, and conference papers, and abstracts. A listing of major conferences and meetings where these research results were reported is also provided.

Mickens, Ronald E.

2001-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

78

A new method to estimate annual solar wind parameters and contributions of different solar wind structures to geomagnetic activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we study two sets of local geomagnetic indices from 26 stations using the principal component (PC) and the independent component (IC) analysis methods. We demonstrate that the annually averaged indices can be accurately represented as linear combinations of two first components with weights systematically depending on latitude. We show that the annual contributions of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and high speed streams (HSSs) to geomagnetic activity are highly correlated with the first and second IC. The first and second ICs are also found to be very highly correlated with the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the solar wind speed, respectively, because solar wind speed is the most important parameter driving geomagnetic activity during HSSs while IMF strength dominates during CMEs. These results help in better understanding the long-term driving of geomagnetic activity and in gaining information about the long-term evolution of solar wind parameters and the different sol...

Holappa, Lauri; Asikainen, Timo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2001, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the ninth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tagged fish. We PIT tagged and released at Lower Granite Dam a total of 17,028 hatchery and 3,550 wild steelhead. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream of the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using the Single-Release Model. Primary research objectives in 2001 were to: (1) estimate reach and project survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the yearling chinook salmon and steelhead migrations; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2001 for PIT-tagged yearling chinook salmon and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures with a minimum of text. More details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited in the text. Results for summer-migrating chinook salmon will be reported separately.

Zabel, Richard; Williams, John G.; Smith, Steven G. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Possible differences in biological availability of isotopes of plutonium: Report of a workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a workshop conducted on the apparent different bioavailability of isotopes {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu. There is a substantial body of evidence that {sup 238}Pu as commonly found in the environment is more biologically available than {sup 239}Pu. Studies of the Trinity Site, Nevada Test Site from nonnuclear and nuclear events, Rocky Flats, Enewetak and Bikini, and the arctic tundra support this conclusion and indicate that the bioavailability of {sup 238}Pu is more than an order of magnitude greater than that of {sup 239}Pu. Plant and soil studies from controlled environments and from Savannah River indicate no isotopic difference in availability of Pu to plants; whereas studies at the Trinity Site do suggest a difference. While it is possible that these observations can be explained by problems in the experimental procedure and analytical techniques, this possibility is remote given the ubiquitous nature of the observations. Studies of solubility of Pu in the stomach contents of cattle grazing at the Nevada Test Site and from fish from Bikini Atoll both found that {sup 238}Pu was more soluble than {sup 239}Pu. Studies of the Los Alamos effluent stream indicate that as particle size decreases, the content of {sup 238}Pu relative to {sup 239}Pu increases.

Kercher, J.R.; Gallegos, G.M. [eds.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

New approaches to estimation of magnetotelluric parameters. Final technical report, 1 August 1989--31 July 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fully efficient robust data processing procedures were developed and tested for single station and remote reference magnetotelluric (Mr) data. Substantial progress was made on development, testing and comparison of optimal procedures for single station data. A principal finding of this phase of the research was that the simplest robust procedures can be more heavily biased by noise in the (input) magnetic fields, than standard least squares estimates. To deal with this difficulty we developed a robust processing scheme which combined the regression M-estimate with coherence presorting. This hybrid approach greatly improves impedance estimates, particularly in the low signal-to-noise conditions often encountered in the ``dead band`` (0.1--0.0 hz). The methods, and the results of comparisons of various single station estimators are described in detail. Progress was made on developing methods for estimating static distortion parameters, and for testing hypotheses about the underlying dimensionality of the geological section.

Egbert, G.D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2005, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the thirteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,439 hatchery steelhead, 5,315 wild steelhead, and 6,964 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the ''single-release model''). Primary research objectives in 2005 were: (1) Estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss. (2) Evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions. (3) Evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2005 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here.

Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

In-situ parameter estimation for solar domestic hot water heating systems components. Final report, June 1995--May 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three different solar domestic hot water systems are being tested at the Colorado State University Solar Energy Applications Laboratory; an unpressurized drain-back system with a load side heat exchanger, an integral collector storage system, and an ultra low flow natural convection heat exchanger system. The systems are fully instrumented to yield data appropriate for in-depth analyses of performance. The level of detail allows the observation of the performance of the total system and the performance of the individual components. This report evaluates the systems based on in-situ experimental data and compares the performances with simulated performances. The verification of the simulations aids in the rating procedure. The whole system performance measurements are also used to analyze the performance of individual components of a solar hot water system and to develop improved component models. The data are analyzed extensively and the parameters needed to characterize the systems fully are developed. Also resulting from this indepth analysis are suggested design improvements wither to the systems or the system components.

Smith, T.R.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Individual Permit reports are prepared annually to facilitate public review of activities for the previous year. Contact Environmental Communication & Public...

85

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2004, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the twelfth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 19,621 hatchery steelhead, 8,128 wild steelhead, and 9,227 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2004 were to (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2004 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures; details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2004 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. Overall, the percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses were 68% hatchery-reared yearling Chinook salmon and 32% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 73% hatchery-reared and 27% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.923 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.860 for steelhead. Respective average survival estimates for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead were 0.875 and 0.820 from Little Goose Dam tailrace to Lower Monumental Dam tailrace; 0.818 and 0.519 from Lower Monumental Dam tailrace to McNary Dam tailrace (including passage through Ice Harbor Dam); and 0.809 and 0.465 from McNary Dam tailrace to John Day Dam tailrace. Survival for yearling Chinook salmon from John Day Dam tailrace to Bonneville Dam tailrace (including passage through The Dalles Dam) was 0.735. We were unable to estimate survival through this reach for steelhead during 2004 because too few fish were detected at Bonneville Dam due to operation of the new corner collector at the second powerhouse. Combining average estimates from the Snake River smolt trap to Lower Granite Dam, from Lower Granite Dam to McNary Dam, and from McNary Dam to Bonneville Dam, estimated annual average survival through the entire hydropower system from the head of Lower Granite reservoir to the tailrace of Bonneville Dam (eight projects) was 0.353 (s.e. 0.045) for Snake River yearling Chinook salmon. We could not empirically estimate survival through the entire system for steelhead in 2004 because of low detection rates for this species at Bonneville Dam. For yearling spring Chinook salmon released in the Upper Columbia River, estimated survival from point of release to McNary Dam tailrace was 0.484 (s.e. 0.005) for fish released from Leavenworth Hatchery, 0.748 (s.e. 0.015) for fish released from Entiat Hatchery, 0.738 (s.e. 0.036) for fish released from Winthrop Hatchery, and 0.702 (s.e. 0.048) and 0.747 (s.e.0.047) for those from Methow Hatchery, Chewuch Pond and

Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Estimating Methods  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Based on the project's scope, the purpose of the estimate, and the availability of estimating resources, the estimator can choose one or a combination of techniques when estimating an activity or project. Estimating methods, estimating indirect and direct costs, and other estimating considerations are discussed in this chapter.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

87

Hanford ETR- Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant- Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review- Estimate at Completion (Cost) Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a comprehensive review ofthe Hanford WTP estimate at completion - assessing the project scope, contract requirements, management execution plant, schedule, cost estimates, and risks.

88

Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options.

Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - appendices. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NRC staff is in need of decommissioning bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2) located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clear structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

PMID vs. PMCID: What's the difference? NIH grant proposals, applications and reports are required to include the PubMed Central reference number (PMCID) for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PMID vs. PMCID: What's the difference? NIH grant proposals, applications and reports are requiredMed Central in compliance with the NIH Public Access Policy (mandatory compliance effective April 7). Pub to be submitted to the NIH. Due to similar terminology, there is confusion over where to find the correct number

Stephens, Matthew

91

AN EXPLANATION FOR DIFFERENCES IN REPORTED RESULTS BETWEEN THE PRESENT STUDY AND THOSE OF KERLINGER AND CURRY (2003), PLUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are not as reliable as the mapping and enumeration of burrow system centroids (i.e., the approximate centers of burrow reporting of bird carcasses discovered incidentally by turbine maintenance workers performing maintenance a systematic approach or sampling scheme. It reflects where maintenance workers incidentally encounter dead

92

Cost Estimator  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as a senior cost and schedule estimator who is responsible for preparing life-cycle cost and schedule estimates and analyses associated with the...

93

Estimation of food consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research reported in this document was conducted as a part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation doses that people could have received from operations at the Hanford Site. Information required to estimate these doses includes estimates of the amounts of potentially contaminated foods that individuals in the region consumed during the study period. In that general framework, the objective of the Food Consumption Task was to develop a capability to provide information about the parameters of the distribution(s) of daily food consumption for representative groups in the population for selected years during the study period. This report describes the methods and data used to estimate food consumption and presents the results developed for Phase I of the HEDR Project.

Callaway, J.M. Jr.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

TECHNICAL REPORT STANDARD PAGE 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the GPC analysis of different polymers and binders, and a quantitative estimation of polymers, asphaltenes

Harms, Kyle E.

95

Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » Removing nuclearReporting Unethical or

96

REPORT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket37963American |Purpose This procedurenote: The REPORT

97

Estimation of resources and reserves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report analyzes the economics of resource and reserve estimation. Current concern about energy problems has focused attention on how we measure available energy resources. One reads that we have an eight-year oil ...

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Energy Laboratory.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification National Renewable Energy Laboratory% postconsumer waste #12;i Independent Review Panel Summary Report September 28, 2011 From: Independent Review Panel, Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification To: Mr. Mark Ruth, NREL, DOE

99

Sub-Second Parallel State Estimation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the performance of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) sub-second parallel state estimation (PSE) tool using the utility data from the Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) and discusses the benefits of the fast computational speed for power system applications. The test data were provided by BPA. They are two-days’ worth of hourly snapshots that include power system data and measurement sets in a commercial tool format. These data are extracted out from the commercial tool box and fed into the PSE tool. With the help of advanced solvers, the PSE tool is able to solve each BPA hourly state estimation problem within one second, which is more than 10 times faster than today’s commercial tool. This improved computational performance can help increase the reliability value of state estimation in many aspects: (1) the shorter the time required for execution of state estimation, the more time remains for operators to take appropriate actions, and/or to apply automatic or manual corrective control actions. This increases the chances of arresting or mitigating the impact of cascading failures; (2) the SE can be executed multiple times within time allowance. Therefore, the robustness of SE can be enhanced by repeating the execution of the SE with adaptive adjustments, including removing bad data and/or adjusting different initial conditions to compute a better estimate within the same time as a traditional state estimator’s single estimate. There are other benefits with the sub-second SE, such as that the PSE results can potentially be used in local and/or wide-area automatic corrective control actions that are currently dependent on raw measurements to minimize the impact of bad measurements, and provides opportunities to enhance the power grid reliability and efficiency. PSE also can enable other advanced tools that rely on SE outputs and could be used to further improve operators’ actions and automated controls to mitigate effects of severe events on the grid. The power grid continues to grow and the number of measurements is increasing at an accelerated rate due to the variety of smart grid devices being introduced. A parallel state estimation implementation will have better performance than traditional, sequential state estimation by utilizing the power of high performance computing (HPC). This increased performance positions parallel state estimators as valuable tools for operating the increasingly more complex power grid.

Chen, Yousu; Rice, Mark J.; Glaesemann, Kurt R.; Wang, Shaobu; Huang, Zhenyu

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Cold flow scaleup facility experimental results and comparison of performance at different bed configurations, Volume 1: Topical report, January--December 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

KRW Energy Systems Inc. is engaged in the continuing development of a pressurized, fluidized-bed gasification process at its Waltz Mill Site in Madison, Pennsylvania. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate the viability of the KRW process for the environmentally acceptable production of low- and medium-BTU fuel gas from a variety of fossilized carbonaceous feedstocks for electric power generation, synthetic natural gas, chemical feedstocks and industrial fuels. This report presents analysis of the Cold Flow Scaleup Facility (CFSF) operations. Included is work performed on the 3-meter CFSF model using four different bed configurations to check correlations and scale-up criteria developed from studies conducted in small-scale cold flow units and those available in open literature. The 3-meter model permits full front-face viewing of the fluidized bed through a transparent plastic window and with its instrumentation allows detailed studies of jet behavior, bubble dynamics, solid circulation, gas mixing, and related phenomena important to the design of a large-scale gasifier. 87 refs., 95 figs., 56 tabs.

Schmidt, D.K.; Yang, W.C.; Ettehadieh, B.; Anestis, T.C.; Haldipur, G.B.; Kettering, E.; O'Rourke, R.E.; Weigle, D.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Arnold Schwarzenegger REFINING ESTIMATES OF WATER-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor REFINING ESTIMATES OF WATER- RELATED ENERGY USE IN CALIFORNIA Energy Technologies · Transportation Refining Estimates of WaterRelated Energy Use in California is the final report for the Refining Estimates of EnergyRelated Energy Use in California project (contract

102

Contribution to the development of DOE ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Data (CMBE) products: Satellite data over the ARM permanent and AMF sites: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support the LLNL ARM infrastructure team Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) data development, the University of North Dakota (UND)'s group will provide the LLNL team the NASA CERES and ISCCP satellite retrieved cloud and radiative properties for the periods when they are available over the ARM permanent research sites. The current available datasets, to date, are as follows: the CERES/TERRA during 200003-200812; the CERES/AQUA during 200207-200712; and the ISCCP during 199601-200806. The detailed parameters list below: (1) CERES Shortwave radiative fluxes (net and downwelling); (2) CERES Longwave radiative fluxes (upwelling) - (items 1 & 2 include both all-sky and clear-sky fluxes); (3) CERES Layered clouds (total, high, middle, and low); (4) CERES Cloud thickness; (5) CERES Effective cloud height; (6) CERES cloud microphysical/optical properties; (7) ISCCP optical depth cloud top pressure matrix; (8) ISCCP derived cloud types (r.g., cirrus, stratus, etc.); and (9) ISCCP infrared derived cloud top pressures. (10) The UND group shall apply necessary quality checks to the original CERES and ISCCP data to remove suspicious data points. The temporal resolution for CERES data should be all available satellite overpasses over the ARM sites; for ISCCP data, it should be 3-hourly. The spatial resolution is the closest satellite field of view observations to the ARM surface sites. All the provided satellite data should be in a format that is consistent with the current ARM CMBE dataset so that the satellite data can be easily merged into the CMBE dataset.

Xie, B; Dong, X; Xie, S

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

103

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive Applications: Fuel Cell Tech Team Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation reports on direct hydrogen PEMFC manufacturing cost estimation for automotive applications.

105

Estimating radiogenic cancer risks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a revised methodology for EPA`s estimation of cancer risks due to low-LET radiation exposures in light of information that has become available since the publication of BIER III, especially new information on the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. For most cancer sites, the risk model is one in which the age-specific relative risk coefficients are obtained by taking the geometric mean of coefficients derived from the atomic bomb survivor data employing two different methods for transporting risks from Japan to the U.S. (multiplicative and NIH projection methods). Using 1980 U.S. vital statistics, the risk models are applied to estimate organ-specific risks, per unit dose, for a stationary population.

NONE

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Comparison of Different Internal Dosimetry Systems for Selected Radionuclides Important to Nuclear Power Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compares three different radiation dosimetry systems currently applied by various U.S. Federal agencies and dose estimates based on these three dosimetry systems for a set of radionuclides often identified in power reactor effluents. These dosimetry systems were developed and applied by the International Commission on Radiological Protection at different times over the past six decades. Two primary modes of intake of radionuclides are addressed: ingestion in drinking water and inhalation. Estimated doses to individual organs and to the whole body based on each dosimetry system are compared for each of four age groups: infant, child, teenager, and adult. Substantial differences between dosimetry systems in estimated dose per unit intake are found for some individual radionuclides, but differences in estimated dose per unit intake generally are modest for mixtures of radionuclides typically found in nuclear power plant effluents.

Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Manger, Ryan P [ORNL

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Methodologies for estimating one-time hazardous waste generation for capacity generation for capacity assurance planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains descriptions of methodologies to be used to estimate the one-time generation of hazardous waste associated with five different types of remediation programs: Superfund sites, RCRA Corrective Actions, Federal Facilities, Underground Storage Tanks, and State and Private Programs. Estimates of the amount of hazardous wastes generated from these sources to be shipped off-site to commercial hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities will be made on a state by state basis for the years 1993, 1999, and 2013. In most cases, estimates will be made for the intervening years, also.

Tonn, B.; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Elliot, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Peretz, J.; Bohm, R.; Hendrucko, B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Process Equipment Cost Estimation, Final Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestartNationalSpeeding accessScientific andScientific5$ P80ofl* t , f

109

Site characterization: a spatial estimation approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report the application of spatial estimation techniques or kriging to groundwater aquifers and geological borehole data is considered. The adequacy of these techniques to reliably develop contour maps from various data sets is investigated. The estimator is developed theoretically in a simplified fashion using vector-matrix calculus. The practice of spatial estimation is discussed and the estimator is then applied to two groundwater aquifer systems and used also to investigate geological formations from borehole data. It is shown that the estimator can provide reasonable results when designed properly.

Candy, J.V.; Mao, N.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Vegetation Indices to Aid Areal Evapotranspiration Estimations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation Indices to Aid Areal Evapotranspiration Estimations Jozsef Szilagyi1 Abstract: Multiyear Seevers and Ottmann 1994; Nicholson et al. 1996; Sz- ilagyi et al. 1998; Szilagyi and Parlange 1999; Szilagyi 2000 . Different authors drew differing conclusions about the appli- cability of NDVI to estimate

Szilagyi, Jozsef

111

Budget estimates, fiscal year 1997. Volume 12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal year 1997.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Estimates of US biomass energy consumption 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the seventh in a series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to quantify the biomass-derived primary energy used by the US economy. It presents estimates of 1991 and 1992 consumption. The objective of this report is to provide updated estimates of biomass energy consumption for use by Congress, Federal and State agencies, biomass producers and end-use sectors, and the public at large.

Not Available

1994-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

113

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Application Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the...

114

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

07 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems...

115

Cost Estimation Package  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter focuses on the components (or elements) of the cost estimation package and their documentation.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

116

Experimental program for the development of peat gasification. Process designs and cost estimates for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu/day SNG from peat by the PEATGAS Process. Interim report No. 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents process designs for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu's per day of SNG by the PEATGAS Process from peats. The purpose is to provide a preliminary assessment of the process requirements and economics of converting peat to SNG by the PEATGAS Process and to provide information needed for the Department of Energy (DOE) to plan the scope of future peat gasification studies. In the process design now being presented, peat is dried to 35% moisture before feeding to the PEATGAS reactor. This is the basic difference between the Minnesota peat case discussed in the current report and that presented in the Interim Report No. 5. The current design has overall economic advantages over the previous design. In the PEATGAS Process, peat is gasified at 500 psig in a two-stage reactor consisting of an entrained-flow hydrogasifier followed by a fluidized-bed char gasifier using steam and oxygen. The gasifier operating conditions and performance are necessarily based on the gasification kinetic model developed for the PEATGAS reactor using the laboratory- and PDU-scale data as of March 1978 and April 1979, respectively. On the basis of the available data, this study concludes that, although peat is a low-bulk density and low heating value material requiring large solids handling costs, the conversion of peat to SNG appears competitive with other alternatives being considered for producing SNG because of its very favorable gasification characteristics (high methane formation tendency and high reactivity). As a direct result of the encouraging technical and economic results, DOE is planning to modify the HYGAS facility in order to begin a peat gasification pilot plant project.

Arora, J.L.; Tsaros, C.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Demonstration of Entanglement-Enhanced Phase Estimation in Solid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Precise parameter estimation plays a central role in science and technology. The statistical error in estimation can be decreased by repeating measurement, leading to that the resultant uncertainty of the estimated parameter is proportional to the square root of the number of repetitions in accordance with the central limit theorem. Quantum parameter estimation, an emerging field of quantum technology, aims to use quantum resources to yield higher statistical precision than classical approaches. Here, we report the first room-temperature implementation of entanglement-enhanced phase estimation in a solid-state system: the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre in pure diamond. We demonstrate a super-resolving phase measurement with two entangled qubits of different physical realizations: a NV centre electron spin and a proximal ${}^{13}$C nuclear spin. The experimental data shows clearly the uncertainty reduction when entanglement resource is used, confirming the theoretical expectation. Our results represent a more generalized and elemental demonstration of enhancement of quantum metrology against classical procedure, which fully exploits the quantum nature of the system and probes.

Gang-Qin Liu; Yu-Ran Zhang; Yan-Chun Chang; Jie-Dong Yue; Heng Fan; Xin-Yu Pan

2014-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

118

SECPOP90: Sector population, land fraction, and economic estimation program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1973 Mr. W. Athey of the Environmental Protection Agency wrote a computer program called SECPOP which calculated population estimates. Since that time, two things have changed which suggested the need for updating the original program - more recent population censuses and the widespread use of personal computers (PCs). The revised computer program uses the 1990 and 1992 Population Census information and runs on current PCs as {open_quotes}SECPOP90.{close_quotes} SECPOP90 consists of two parts: site and regional. The site provides population and economic data estimates for any location within the continental United States. Siting analysis is relatively fast running. The regional portion assesses site availability for different siting policy decisions; i.e., the impact of available sites given specific population density criteria within the continental United States. Regional analysis is slow. This report compares the SECPOP90 population estimates and the nuclear power reactor licensee-provided information. Although the source, and therefore the accuracy, of the licensee information is unknown, this comparison suggests SECPOP90 makes reasonable estimates. Given the total uncertainty in any current calculation of severe accidents, including the potential offsite consequences, the uncertainty within SECPOP90 population estimates is expected to be insignificant. 12 refs., 55 figs., 7 tabs.

Humphreys, S.L.; Rollstin, J.A.; Ridgely, J.N.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin, Volume XI; Recommendations on the Design and Analysis of Radiotelemetry Studies of Salmonid Smolts to Estimate Survival and Passage Efficiencies, 1991-1998 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this investigation was to determine the feasibility of extracting detailed survival and passage efficiency estimates from a properly designed smolt radiotelemetry study.

Skalski, John R. (University of Washington, School of Fisheries, Fisheries Research Institute, Seattle, WA); Giorgi, Albert E.; Stevenson, John R. (BioAnalysts, Inc., Redmond, WA)

1998-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

120

Check Estimates and Independent Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Check estimates and independent cost estimates (ICEs) are tools that can be used to validate a cost estimate. Estimate validation entails an objective review of the estimate to ensure that estimate criteria and requirements have been met and well documented, defensible estimate has been developed. This chapter describes check estimates and their procedures and various types of independent cost estimates.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Types of Cost Estimates  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The chapter describes the estimates required on government-managed projects for both general construction and environmental management.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

122

Systems Engineering Cost Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on project, human capital impact. 7 How to estimate Cost? Difficult to know what we are building early on1 Systems Engineering Lecture 3 Cost Estimation Dr. Joanna Bryson Dr. Leon Watts University of Bath: Contrast approaches for estimating software project cost, and identify the main sources of cost

Bryson, Joanna J.

123

Estimation of Evolutionary Distance between Nucleotide Sequences'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation of Evolutionary Distance between Nucleotide Sequences' Fumio Tajima and Masatoshi Nei University of Texas at Houston A mathematical formula for estimating the average number of nucleotide sub rates of substitution among different nucleotide pairs. Although this formula is obtained for the equal

Nei, Masatoshi

124

Estimates of US biofuels consumption, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the sixth in the series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration to quantify the amount of biofuel-derived primary energy used by the US economy. It provides preliminary estimates of 1990 US biofuels energy consumption by sector and by biofuels energy resource type. The objective of this report is to provide updated annual estimates of biofuels energy consumption for use by congress, federal and state agencies, and other groups involved in activities related to the use of biofuels. 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Estimating Specialty Costs  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Specialty costs are those nonstandard, unusual costs that are not typically estimated. Costs for research and development (R&D) projects involving new technologies, costs associated with future regulations, and specialty equipment costs are examples of specialty costs. This chapter discusses those factors that are significant contributors to project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

126

Cooling load estimation methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described. Correlations are described that permit auxiliary cooling estimates from monthly average insolation and weather data. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy required of a given building.

McFarland, R.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Crop acreage estimators based on satellite imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acreages have been pooled during the creation of the two data sets. Each data set refers to a particular part of the state of Texas. The two regions are shown in Figure 1. The partitioning is made according to crop reporting districts (CRD), which... studies are reported: (1) a comparison of sample behavior with theoretical asymptotic behavior, (2) an evaluation using CAMS data and fixed size sampling units of the improvement of the estimators under the new decision process over the old multinomial...

Vidart, Stephane

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Microhole Tubing Bending Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

Oglesby, Ken

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Microhole Tubing Bending Report  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

Oglesby, Ken

130

Methodological Approaches for Estimating the Benefits and Costs of Smart Grid Demonstration Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a comprehensive framework for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid projects and a step-by-step approach for making these estimates. The framework identifies the basic categories of benefits, the beneficiaries of these benefits, and the Smart Grid functionalities that lead to different benefits and proposes ways to estimate these benefits, including their monetization. The report covers cost-effectiveness evaluation, uncertainty, and issues in estimating baseline conditions against which a project would be compared. The report also suggests metrics suitable for describing principal characteristics of a modern Smart Grid to which a project can contribute. This first section of the report presents background information on the motivation for the report and its purpose. Section 2 introduces the methodological framework, focusing on the definition of benefits and a sequential, logical process for estimating them. Beginning with the Smart Grid technologies and functions of a project, it maps these functions to the benefits they produce. Section 3 provides a hypothetical example to illustrate the approach. Section 4 describes each of the 10 steps in the approach. Section 5 covers issues related to estimating benefits of the Smart Grid. Section 6 summarizes the next steps. The methods developed in this study will help improve future estimates - both retrospective and prospective - of the benefits of Smart Grid investments. These benefits, including those to consumers, society in general, and utilities, can then be weighed against the investments. Such methods would be useful in total resource cost tests and in societal versions of such tests. As such, the report will be of interest not only to electric utilities, but also to a broad constituency of stakeholders. Significant aspects of the methodology were used by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop its methods for estimating the benefits and costs of its renewable and distributed systems integration demonstration projects as well as its Smart Grid Investment Grant projects and demonstration projects funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The goal of this report, which was cofunded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and DOE, is to present a comprehensive set of methods for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid projects. By publishing this report, EPRI seeks to contribute to the development of methods that will establish the benefits associated with investments in Smart Grid technologies. EPRI does not endorse the contents of this report or make any representations as to the accuracy and appropriateness of its contents. The purpose of this report is to present a methodological framework that will provide a standardized approach for estimating the benefits and costs of Smart Grid demonstration projects. The framework also has broader application to larger projects, such as those funded under the ARRA. Moreover, with additional development, it will provide the means for extrapolating the results of pilots and trials to at-scale investments in Smart Grid technologies. The framework was developed by a panel whose members provided a broad range of expertise.

Lee, Russell [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

: Helmholtz machine estimation .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Helmholtz machine density estimation . . : . . . (supervised learning) , (active learning) (query learning) [1, 3]. . (unsupervised learning), . , [5]. . Helmholtz machine , . Helmholtz machine : Helmholtz machine [2] . Helmholtz machine (generative network) (recognition network) . , , . Helmholtz machine (self

132

Operated device estimation framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protective device estimation is a challenging task because there are numerous protective devices present in a typical distribution system. Among various protective devices, auto-reclosers and fuses are the main overcurrent protection on distribution...

Rengarajan, Janarthanan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Cost Estimating Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices that describe the methods and procedures that could be used in all programs and projects at DOE for preparing cost estimates. No cancellations.

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

134

EXPLORATION Actual Estimate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2013 President's Budget Request 3,821.2 3,712.8 3,932.8 4,076.5 4,076.5 4 Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2013EXPLORATION EXP-1 Actual Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014

135

About the EV Project Reports  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

About the EV Project Reports The EV Project fact sheets and reports are based on data from several different sources (vehicle and electric vehicle supply equipment EVSE...

136

Estimating vehicle height using homographic projections  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multiple homography transformations corresponding to different heights are generated in the field of view. A group of salient points within a common estimated height range is identified in a time series of video images of a moving object. Inter-salient point distances are measured for the group of salient points under the multiple homography transformations corresponding to the different heights. Variations in the inter-salient point distances under the multiple homography transformations are compared. The height of the group of salient points is estimated to be the height corresponding to the homography transformation that minimizes the variations.

Cunningham, Mark F; Fabris, Lorenzo; Gee, Timothy F; Ghebretati, Jr., Frezghi H; Goddard, James S; Karnowski, Thomas P; Ziock, Klaus-peter

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

137

Certification reporting forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The required information and formats for the certification report including the cover sheet, compliance statement, and body of the report are given in this document. The body of the reports is different for each product. There are no product-to-product differences in the forms of the other parts of the reports. The products covered in this document include: furnaces, water heaters, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioners, room air conditioners, and freezers.

Not Available

1981-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

138

World Biofuels Assessment; Worldwide Biomass Potential: Technology Characterizations (Milestone Report)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Milestone report prepared by NREL to estimate the worldwide potential to produce and transport ethanol and other biofuels.

Bain, R. L.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

MELE: Maximum Entropy Leuven Estimators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Generalized Maximum Entropy Estimator of the Generaland Douglas Miller, Maximum Entropy Econometrics, Wiley andCalifornia Davis MELE: Maximum Entropy Leuven Estimators by

Paris, Quirino

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Using Photogrammetry to Estimate Tank Waste Volumes from Video  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) contracted with HiLine Engineering & Fabrication, Inc. to assess the accuracy of photogrammetry tools as compared to video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates. This test report documents the results of using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste in tank 241-C-I04 from post-retrieval videos and results using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste piles in the CCMS test video.

Field, Jim G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Data Report on Post-Irradiation Dimensional Change of AGC-1 Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the initial dimensional changes for loaded and unloaded AGC-1 samples. The dimensional change for all samples is presented as a function of dose. The data is further presented by graphite type and applied load levels to illustrate the differences between graphite forming processes and stress levels within the graphite components. While the three different loads placed on the samples have been verified [ ref: Larry Hull’s report] verification of the AGC-1 sample temperatures and dose levels are expected in the summer of 2012. Only estimated dose and temperature values for the samples are presented in this report to allow a partial analysis of the results.

William Windes

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR Voluntary Labeling Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This paper presents past and predicted savings for the ENERGY STAR ® labeling program, operated jointly appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subset of ENERGY STAR program activities, focused primarily on labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savings achieved

143

Fringe Visibility Estimators for the Palomar Testbed Interferometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visibility estimators and their performance are presented for use with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI). One operational mode of PTI is single-baseline visibility measurement using pathlength modulation with synchronous readout by a NICMOS-3 infrared array. Visibility is estimated from the fringe quadratures, either incoherently, or using source phase referencing to provide a longer coherent integration time. The visibility estimators differ those used with photon-counting detectors in order to account for biases attributable to detector offsets and read noise. The performance of these estimators is affected not only by photon noise, but also by the detector read noise and errors in estimating the bias corrections, which affect the incoherent and coherent estimators differently. Corrections for visibility loss in the coherent estimators using the measured tracking jitter are also presented.

M. M. Colavita

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

144

A simple method to estimate interwell autocorrelation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The estimation of autocorrelation in the lateral or interwell direction is important when performing reservoir characterization studies using stochastic modeling. This paper presents a new method to estimate the interwell autocorrelation based on parameters, such as the vertical range and the variance, that can be estimated with commonly available data. We used synthetic fields that were generated from stochastic simulations to provide data to construct the estimation charts. These charts relate the ratio of areal to vertical variance and the autocorrelation range (expressed variously) in two directions. Three different semivariogram models were considered: spherical, exponential and truncated fractal. The overall procedure is demonstrated using field data. We find that the approach gives the most self-consistent results when it is applied to previously identified facies. Moreover, the autocorrelation trends follow the depositional pattern of the reservoir, which gives confidence in the validity of the approach.

Pizarro, J.O.S.; Lake, L.W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

External Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; - calculated separately for the most important radionuclides produced in nuclear weapons tests. Those would averages for all tests. 2. Provide a list of references regarding: (1) the history of nuclear weapons to the Population of the Continental U.S. from Nevada Weapons Tests and Estimates of Deposition Density

146

Radiation Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary: Radiation Dose Estimates from Hanford Radioactive Material Releases to the Air and the Columbia River April 21,1994 TheTechnid Steering Panel of the Hanford - Environmental Dose Reconstruction than 40years, the U.S. Government made plutonium for nuclear weapons at the Hanford

147

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-470E-20Ì1 Radionuclide Air Emission Report for Preparedfor Estimating Fugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides fromStandards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Radionuclides),

Wahl, Linnea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

D&D Waste Estimate Validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rocky Flats Closure Project (Site) includes several multi-year decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects which, over the next four years, will dismantle and demolish four major plutonium facilities, four major uranium facilities, and over 400 additional facilities of different types. The projects are currently generating large quantities of transuranic, low-level, mixed, hazardous, and sanitary wastes. A previous paper described the initial conceptual estimates and methods, and the evolution of these methods based on the actual results from the decommissioning of a ''pilot'' facility. The waste estimating method that resulted from that work was used for the waste estimates incorporated into the current Site baseline. This paper discusses subsequent developments on the topic of waste estimating that have occurred since the baseline work. After several months of operation under the current Site baseline, an effort was initiated to either validate or identify improvements to the waste basis-of-estimate. Specific estimate and estimating method elements were identified for additional analysis based on the element's potential for error and the impact of that error on Site activities. The analysis took advantage of actual, more detailed data collected both from three years additional experience in decommissioning a second plutonium facility and from experience in deactivating certain non-plutonium facilities. It compared the actual transuranic and low-level waste generation against their respective estimates based on overall distribution and for individual media (i.e. equipment type), and evaluated trends. Finally, it projected the quantity of lead-characteristic low-level mixed waste that will be generated from plutonium building decommissioning and upgraded the decommissioning waste estimates of the non-plutonium buildings.

Sanford, P. C.; Templeton, J. H.; Stevens, J. L.; Dorr, K.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

149

Use of Cost Estimating Relationships  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Cost Estimating Relationships (CERs) are an important tool in an estimator's kit, and in many cases, they are the only tool. Thus, it is important to understand their limitations and characteristics. This chapter discusses considerations of which the estimator must be aware so the Cost Estimating Relationships can be properly used.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

150

Rater reliability of fragile X mutation size estimates: A multilaboratory analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Notwithstanding the use of comparable molecular protocols, description and measurement of the fra(X) (fragile X) mutation may vary according to its appearance as a discrete band, smear, multiple bands, or mosaic. Estimation of mutation size may also differ from one laboratory to another. We report on the description of a mutation size estimate for a large sample of individuals tested for the fra(X) pre- or full mutation. Of 63 DNA samples evaluated, 45 were identified previously as fra(X) pre- or full mutations. DNA from 18 unaffected individuals was used as control. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood, and DNA fragments from each of four laboratories were sent to a single center where Southern blots were prepared and hybridized with the pE5.1 probe. Photographs from autoradiographs were returned to each site, and raters blind to the identity of the specimens were asked to evaluate them. Raters` estimates of mutation size compared favorably with a reference test. Intrarater reliability was good to excellent. Variability in mutation size estimates was comparable across band types. Variability in estimates was moderate, and was significantly correlated with absolute mutation size and band type. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Fisch, G.S. [Kings County Hospital Center and SUNY/Health Science Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States)] [Kings County Hospital Center and SUNY/Health Science Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Carpenter, N. [Chapman Institute of Medical Genetics, Tulsa, OK (United States)] [Chapman Institute of Medical Genetics, Tulsa, OK (United States); Maddalena, A. [Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA (United States)] [and others] [Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA (United States); and others

1996-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

151

Estimating exposure of terrestrial wildlife to contaminants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes generalized models for the estimation of contaminant exposure experienced by wildlife on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The primary exposure pathway considered is oral ingestion, e.g. the consumption of contaminated food, water, or soil. Exposure through dermal absorption and inhalation are special cases and are not considered hereIN. Because wildlife mobile and generally consume diverse diets and because environmental contamination is not spatial homogeneous, factors to account for variation in diet, movement, and contaminant distribution have been incorporated into the models. To facilitate the use and application of the models, life history parameters necessary to estimate exposure are summarized for 15 common wildlife species. Finally, to display the application of the models, exposure estimates were calculated for four species using data from a source operable unit on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Estimating Corn Grain Yields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can collect samples from a corn field and use this data to calculate the yield estimate. An interactive grain yield calculator is provided in the Appendix of the pdf version of this publication. The calculator is also located in the publication.... Plan and prepare for sample and data collection. 2. Collect field samples and record data. 3. Analyze the data using the interactive grain yield calculator in the Appendix. Plan and prepare for sample and data collection Predetermine sample locations...

Blumenthal, Jurg M.; Thompson, Wayne

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

153

Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Budget estimates fiscal year 1995: Volume 10  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal year 1995. The NRC 1995 budget request is $546,497,000. This is an increase of $11,497,000 above the proposed level for FY 1994. The NRC FY 1995 budget request is 3,218 FTEs. This is a decrease of 75 FTEs below the 1994 proposed level.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Estimating the Value of Utility-Scale Solar Technologies in California...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Estimating the Value of Utility- Scale Solar Technologies in California Under a 40% Renewable Portfolio Standard J. Jorgenson, P. Denholm, and M. Mehos Technical Report NREL...

156

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Application Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application This presentation reports on the status of mass production cost...

157

Estimation of Groundwater Recharge at Pahute Mesa using the Chloride Mass-Balance Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater recharge on Pahute Mesa was estimated using the chloride mass-balance (CMB) method. This method relies on the conservative properties of chloride to trace its movement from the atmosphere as dry- and wet-deposition through the soil zone and ultimately to the saturated zone. Typically, the CMB method assumes no mixing of groundwater with different chloride concentrations; however, because groundwater is thought to flow into Pahute Mesa from valleys north of Pahute Mesa, groundwater flow rates (i.e., underflow) and chloride concentrations from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat were carefully considered. Precipitation was measured with bulk and tipping-bucket precipitation gauges installed for this study at six sites on Pahute Mesa. These data, along with historical precipitation amounts from gauges on Pahute Mesa and estimates from the PRISM model, were evaluated to estimate mean annual precipitation. Chloride deposition from the atmosphere was estimated by analyzing quarterly samples of wet- and dry-deposition for chloride in the bulk gauges and evaluating chloride wet-deposition amounts measured at other locations by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program. Mean chloride concentrations in groundwater were estimated using data from the UGTA Geochemistry Database, data from other reports, and data from samples collected from emplacement boreholes for this study. Calculations were conducted assuming both no underflow and underflow from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat. Model results estimate recharge to be 30 mm/yr with a standard deviation of 18 mm/yr on Pahute Mesa, for elevations >1800 m amsl. These estimates assume Pahute Mesa recharge mixes completely with underflow from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat. The model assumes that precipitation, chloride concentration in bulk deposition, underflow and its chloride concentration, have been constant over the length of time of recharge.

Cooper, Clay A [DRI] [DRI; Hershey, Ronald L [DRI] [DRI; Healey, John M [DRI] [DRI; Lyles, Brad F [DRI] [DRI

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

SPACE TECHNOLOGY Actual Estimate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPACE TECHNOLOGY TECH-1 Actual Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY.6 29.5 29.5 29.5 29.5 29.5 29.5 Crosscutting Space Tech Development 120.4 187.7 293.8 272.1 266.6 259.7 247.0 Exploration Technology Development 144.6 189.9 202.0 215.5 215.7 214.5 216.5 Notional SPACE

159

The First Estimates of Kinematically Forbidden D Meson Decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The weak hadronic decay D^+ -> K^0\\bar a_1^+ is kinematically forbidden at the peak mass values of the particles involved. However, occurrence of this decay has been reported with branching fraction (9.1 \\plusminus 1.8) \\cross 10^{-3} in the analysis of D^+ -> K^\\bar0 4 \\pi decay data. This is due to smearing effects on this decay caused mainly by the large width of a_1-resonance, which extends the phase space and allows this decay. Using a factorization model to evaluate decay amplitudes for external and internal W-emission diagrams, and incorporating Breit-Wigner smearing using the total a_1 width of 400 MeV, we obtain the first estimate for branching fraction of this decay to be 3.3 \\cross 10^{-3} and 7.0 \\cross 10^{-3}, for |V_1^{Da1} (0)|=0.40 and 1.50 respectively corresponding to different theoretical models, where |V_1^{Da1} (q^2)| is the vector form factor appearing in the D -> a_1 s-wave transition. The estimates are of the desired order of magnitude. We also predict branching fractions of its count...

Verma, R C; Odagiri, Kosuke

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Estimating pixel variances in the scenes of staring sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A technique for detecting changes in a scene perceived by a staring sensor is disclosed. The technique includes acquiring a reference image frame and a current image frame of a scene with the staring sensor. A raw difference frame is generated based upon differences between the reference image frame and the current image frame. Pixel error estimates are generated for each pixel in the raw difference frame based at least in part upon spatial error estimates related to spatial intensity gradients in the scene. The pixel error estimates are used to mitigate effects of camera jitter in the scene between the current image frame and the reference image frame.

Simonson, Katherine M. (Cedar Crest, NM); Ma, Tian J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Internal Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States from the Ingestion of Food Contaminated with Radionuclides from Nuclear Tests at the Nevada Test of the Continental United States from the Ingestion of Food Contaminated with Radionuclides from High-yield Weapons Tests Conducted by the U.S., U.K., and U.S.S.R. between 1952 and 1963 Final Report Lynn R. Anspaugh Lynn

162

State energy price and expenditure report 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates for the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the United States. The estimates are provided by energy source (e.g., petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity) and by major consuming or economic sector. This report is an update of the State Energy Price and Expenditure Report 1988 published in September 1990. Changes from the last report are summarized in a section of the documentation. Energy price and expenditure estimates are published for the years 1970, 1975, 1980, and 1985 through 1989. Documentation follows the tables and describes how the price estimates are developed, including sources of data, methods of estimation, and conversion factors applied. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures, and the documentation for those estimates, are from the State Energy Data Report, Consumption Estimates, 1960--1989 (SEDR), published in May 1991. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, adjusted to remove process fuel and intermediate product consumption. All expenditures are consumer expenditures, that is, they represent estimates of money directly spent by consumers to purchase energy, generally including taxes. 11 figs., 43 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and solar panel installation. The Phase II installation utilized a more powerful datalogger at the Mustang. Type of Report and Period Covered Project Summary Report (9/99-12/99) 12. Sponsoring Agency Name ultrasonic sensors mounted on four different bridge piers. Researchers had access to the scour and stage data

Texas at Austin, University of

164

Augmenting Satellite Precipitation Estimation with Lightning Information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used lightning information to augment the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Imagery using an Artificial Neural Network - Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS). Co-located lightning data are used to segregate cloud patches, segmented from GOES-12 infrared data, into either electrified (EL) or non-electrified (NEL) patches. A set of features is extracted separately for the EL and NEL cloud patches. The features for the EL cloud patches include new features based on the lightning information. The cloud patches are classified and clustered using self-organizing maps (SOM). Then brightness temperature and rain rate (T-R) relationships are derived for the different clusters. Rain rates are estimated for the cloud patches based on their representative T-R relationship. The Equitable Threat Score (ETS) for daily precipitation estimates is improved by almost 12% for the winter season. In the summer, no significant improvements in ETS are noted.

Mahrooghy, Majid [Mississippi State University (MSU); Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Younan, Nicolas H. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Petersen, Walter A. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL; Hsu, Kuo-Lin [University of California, Irvine; Behrangi, Ali [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Aanstoos, James [Mississippi State University (MSU)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Quantum limits to estimation of photon deformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We address potential deviations of radiation field from the bosonic behaviour and employ local quantum estimation theory to evaluate the ultimate bounds to precision in the estimation of these deviations using quantum-limited measurements on optical signals. We consider different classes of boson deformation and found that intensity measurement on coherent or thermal states would be suitable for their detection making, at least in principle, tests of boson deformation feasible with current quantum optical technology. On the other hand, we found that the quantum signal-to-noise ratio (QSNR) is vanishing with the deformation itself for all the considered classes of deformations and probe signals, thus making any estimation procedure of photon deformation inherently inefficient. A partial way out is provided by the polynomial dependence of the QSNR on the average number of photon, which suggests that, in principle, it would be possible to detect deformation by intensity measurements on high-energy thermal states.

Giovanni De Cillis; Matteo G. A. Paris

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

166

A difference based approach to the semiparametric partial linear model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A commonly used semiparametric partial linear model is considered. We propose analyzing this model using a difference based approach. The procedure estimates the linear component based on the differences of the observations ...

Wang, Lie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy Expenditure Estimation DEMO Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and against the SenseWear, a dedicated commercial product for energy expenditure estimation. Keywords: humanEnergy Expenditure Estimation DEMO Application Bozidara Cvetkovi´c1,2 , Simon Kozina1,2 , Bostjan://www.mps.si Abstract. The paper presents two prototypes for the estimation of hu- man energy expenditure during normal

Lu?trek, Mitja

168

Local Harmonic Estimation in Musical Sound Rafael A. IRIZARRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local Harmonic Estimation in Musical Sound Signals Rafael A. IRIZARRY Statistical modeling so a local harmonic model that tracks changes in pitch and in the amplitudes of the harmonics is fit estimates of the harmonic signal and of the noise signal. Different musical composition applications may

Irizarry, Rafael A.

169

Estimate Impact of Strategies on Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To estimate the GHG impact of a business travel reduction program, a Federal agency or program should quantify the number of trips that could be avoided each year. If an agency has a large proportion of international travel, the agency may estimate changes in domestic and international trips separately because the associated savings in miles can be very different.

170

State energy price and expenditure report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970, 1975, 1980, and 1985 through 1991. Data for all years, 1970 through 1991, are available on personal computer diskettes. Documentation in Appendix A describes how the price estimates are developed, including sources of data, methods of estimation, and conversion factors applied. This report is an update of the State Energy Price and Expenditure Report 1990, published in September 1992.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

IDC RP2 & 3 US Industry Standard Cost Estimate Summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has prepared a ROM cost estimate for budgetary planning for the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 effort, using a commercial software cost estimation tool calibrated to US industry performance parameters. This is not a cost estimate for Sandia to perform the project. This report provides the ROM cost estimate and describes the methodology, assumptions, and cost model details used to create the ROM cost estimate. ROM Cost Estimate Disclaimer Contained herein is a Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost estimate that has been provided to enable initial planning for this proposed project. This ROM cost estimate is submitted to facilitate informal discussions in relation to this project and is NOT intended to commit Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) or its resources. Furthermore, as a Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC), Sandia must be compliant with the Anti-Deficiency Act and operate on a full-cost recovery basis. Therefore, while Sandia, in conjunction with the Sponsor, will use best judgment to execute work and to address the highest risks and most important issues in order to effectively manage within cost constraints, this ROM estimate and any subsequent approved cost estimates are on a 'full-cost recovery' basis. Thus, work can neither commence nor continue unless adequate funding has been accepted and certified by DOE.

Harris, James M.; Huelskamp, Robert M.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

PHENIX Conceptual Design Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the detector design of the PHENIX experiment for Day-1 operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The CDR presents the physics capabilities, technical details, cost estimate, construction schedule, funding profile, management structure, and possible upgrade paths of the PHENIX experiment. The primary goals of the PHENIX experiment are to detect the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and to measure its properties. Many of the potential signatures for the QGP are measured as a function of a well-defined common variable to see if any or all of these signatures show a simultaneous anomaly due to the formation of the QGP. In addition, basic quantum chromodynamics phenomena, collision dynamics, and thermodynamic features of the initial states of the collision are studied. To achieve these goals, the PHENIX experiment measures lepton pairs (dielectrons and dimuons) to study various properties of vector mesons, such as the mass, the width, and the degree of yield suppression due to the formation of the QGP. The effect of thermal radiation on the continuum is studied in different regions of rapidity and mass. The e[mu] coincidence is measured to study charm production, and aids in understanding the shape of the continuum dilepton spectrum. Photons are measured to study direct emission of single photons and to study [pi][sup 0] and [eta] production. Charged hadrons are identified to study the spectrum shape, production of antinuclei, the [phi] meson (via K[sup +]K[sup [minus

Not Available

1993-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

173

Cost Estimating, Analysis, and Standardization  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policy and responsibilities for: (a) developing and reviewing project cost estimates; (b) preparing independent cost estimates and analysis; (c) standardizing cost estimating procedures; and (d) improving overall cost estimating and analytical techniques, cost data bases, cost and economic escalation models, and cost estimating systems. Cancels DOE O 5700.2B, dated 8-5-1983; DOE O 5700.8, dated 5-27-1981; and HQ 1130.1A, dated 12-30-1981. Canceled by DOE O 5700.2D, dated 6-12-1992

1984-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

174

CRD Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Division Report Deconstructing Microbes Metagenomicon page 2 (Scientific Report SciDAC continued from page 1www.ctwatch.org/quarterly. Report Nano Letters continued

Wang, Ucilia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

State energy price and expenditure report 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates developed in the State Energy Price and Expenditure Data System (SEPEDS) are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970 through 1994. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures and the documentation for those estimates are taken from the State Energy Data Report 1994, Consumption Estimates (SEDR), published in October 1996. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, which are adjusted to remove process fuel; intermediate petroleum products; and other consumption that has no direct fuel costs, i.e., hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar, and photovoltaic energy sources. Documentation is included describing the development of price estimates, data sources, and calculation methods. 316 tabs.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Autonomous intelligent assembly systems LDRD 105746 final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a three-year to develop technology that enables mobile robots to perform autonomous assembly tasks in unstructured outdoor environments. This is a multi-tier problem that requires an integration of a large number of different software technologies including: command and control, estimation and localization, distributed communications, object recognition, pose estimation, real-time scanning, and scene interpretation. Although ultimately unsuccessful in achieving a target brick stacking task autonomously, numerous important component technologies were nevertheless developed. Such technologies include: a patent-pending polygon snake algorithm for robust feature tracking, a color grid algorithm for uniquely identification and calibration, a command and control framework for abstracting robot commands, a scanning capability that utilizes a compact robot portable scanner, and more. This report describes this project and these developed technologies.

Anderson, Robert J.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Nonlinear filtering for narrow-band time delay estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a method for improving passive acoustic tracking. A large family of acoustic tracking systems combine estimates of the time difference of arrival (TDoA) between pairs of spatially separated sensors - ...

Tobenkin, Mark M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Spatial correlation structure estimation using geophysical and hydrogeological data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial correlation structure estimation using geophysical and hydrogeological data Susan S investigate the use of tomographic geophysical data in combination with hydrogeological data in the spatial of data having different support scales and spatial sampling windows was facilitated. Comparison

Hubbard, Susan

179

Is newer better? Penn World Table Revisions and their impact on growth estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper sheds light on two problems in the Penn World Table (PWT) GDP estimates. First, we show that these estimates vary substantially across different versions of the PWT despite being derived from very similar ...

Johnson, Simon

180

Report on the TESLA Engineering Study/Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March, 2001, the TESLA Collaboration published its Technical Design Report (TDR, see references and links in Appendix), the first sentence of which stated ''...TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Collider) (will be) a superconducting electron-positron collider of initially 500 GeV total energy, extendable to 800 GeV, and an integrated X-ray laser laboratory.'' The TDR included cost and manpower estimates for a 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider (250 on 250 GeV) based on superconducting RF cavity technology. This was submitted as a proposal to the German government. The government asked the German Science Council to evaluate this proposal. The recommendation from this body is anticipated to be available by November 2002. The government has indicated that it will react on this recommendation by mid-2003. In June 2001, Steve Holmes, Fermilab's Associate Director for Accelerators, commissioned Helen Edwards and Peter Garbincius to organize a study of the TESLA Technical Design Report and the associated cost and manpower estimates. Since the elements and methodology used in producing the TESLA cost estimate were somewhat different from those used in preparing similar estimates for projects within the U.S., it is important to understand the similarities, differences, and equivalences between the TESLA estimate and U.S. cost estimates. In particular, the project cost estimate includes only purchased equipment, materials, and services, but not manpower from DESY or other TESLA collaborating institutions, which is listed separately. It does not include the R&D on the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) nor the costs of preparing the TDR nor the costs of performing the conceptual studies so far. The manpower for the pre-operations commissioning program (up to beam) is included in the estimate, but not the electrical power or liquid Nitrogen (for initial cooldown of the cryogenics plant). There is no inclusion of any contingency or management reserve. If the U.S. were to become involved with the TESLA project, either as a collaborator for an LC in Germany, or as host country for TESLA in the U.S., it is important to begin to understand the scope and technical details of the project, what R&D still needs to be done, and how the U.S. can contribute. The charge for this study is included in the Appendix to this report.

Cornuelle, John C.

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Comparative Cost Estimates Caliente Rail Corridor Summary Report  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACME | NationalTbilisi08 to17 2.7 i R iii

182

State Energy Profiles and Estimates (SEDS) Report Archives  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781 2,328AdministrationRelease ScheduleU.S. Energy Information

183

POINTWISE ESTIMATES AND MONOTONICITY FORMULAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POINTWISE ESTIMATES AND MONOTONICITY FORMULAS WITHOUT MAXIMUM PRINCIPLE MARCELO MONTENEGRO;2 MARCELO MONTENEGRO AND ENRICO VALDINOCI In this paper, a central role will be played by the following

184

Linear Constrained Moving Horizon Estimator With Pre-Estimating Observer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the literature, e.g. Rao et al. (2001, 2003); Alessandri et al. (2003, 2004). The idea of MHE is to estimate of robustness in the presence of uncertainties such as noise, disturbances and modeling errors, see Alessandri in the literature, e.g. Rao et al. (2001, 2003); Alessandri et al. (2003, 2004). The pre-estimator leads

Johansen, Tor Arne

185

Frequency tracking and parameter estimation for robust quantum state estimation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the problem of tracking the state of a quantum system via a continuous weak measurement. If the system Hamiltonian is known precisely, this merely requires integrating the appropriate stochastic master equation. However, even a small error in the assumed Hamiltonian can render this approach useless. The natural answer to this problem is to include the parameters of the Hamiltonian as part of the estimation problem, and the full Bayesian solution to this task provides a state estimate that is robust against uncertainties. However, this approach requires considerable computational overhead. Here we consider a single qubit in which the Hamiltonian contains a single unknown parameter. We show that classical frequency estimation techniques greatly reduce the computational overhead associated with Bayesian estimation and provide accurate estimates for the qubit frequency.

Ralph, Jason F. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Jacobs, Kurt [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts at Boston, 100 Morrissey Blvd, Boston, Massachusetts 02125 (United States); Hill, Charles D. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

The use of NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute has conducted a study of different methods of coal drying as pretreatment steps before liquefaction. The objectives of this study were to develop a combined chemical dehydration/nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for measuring the moisture content of coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during drying, and to determine the effects of different drying methods on liquefaction reactivity of coals. Different methods of drying were investigated to determine whether coal drying can be accomplished without reducing the reactivity of coals toward liquefaction. Drying methods included thermal, microwave, and chemical dehydration. Coals of rank lignite to high volatile bituminous were studied. Coals that were dried or partially dried thermally and with microwaves had lower liquefaction conversions than coals containing equilibrium moisture contents. However, chemically dried coals had conversions equal to or greater than the premoisturized coals. The conversion behavior is consistent with changes in the physical structure and cross linking reactions because of drying. Thermal and microwave drying appear to cause a collapse in the pore structure, thus preventing donor solvents such as tetralin from contacting reactive sites inside the coals. Chemical dehydration does not appear to collapse the pore structure. These results are supported by the solvent swelling measurements in which the swelling ratios of thermally dried and microwave-dried coals were lower than those of premoisturized coals, indicating a greater degree of cross linking in the dried coals. The swelling ratios of the chemically dried coals were greater than those of the premoisturized coals because the pore structure remaining unchanged or increased when water was removed. These results are consistent with the NMR results, which did not show significant changes in coal chemical structure.

Netzel, D.A.; Miknis, F.P.; Wallace, J.C. Jr.; Butcher, C.H.; Mitzel, J.M.; Turner, T.F.; Hurtubise, R.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Estimate of the scatter component in SPECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical expressions that describe the dependence of slopes and amplitudes of the scatter distribution functions (SDF) on source depth and media density are used to estimate a scatter component in SPECT projection data. Since the ratio of detected scattered to total photons (S/T), SDF amplitude and slope depend strongly on line source length (SL) used to obtain SDFs, we compared estimated scattered components using SDFs, obtained for lengths of 2-21 cm. At 10 cm source depth, S/T changes from 0.19 to 0.36 when SL changes from 2 to 21 cm. Scatter amplitude`s dependence on source depth (d) in water was described by 6.38e{sup -0.186d} for a 2 cm and 16.15e{sup -0.129d} for a 21 cm SL. Slope was described by 0.292d{sup -0.601} for a cm SL and by 0.396d{sup -0.82} for a 21 cm SL. The estimated scatter components are compared with simulated SPECT projection data obtained with Monte Carlo modeling of six hot spheres placed in a cylindrical water filled phantom. The comparison of estimated with simulated total counts/projection shows very good agreement when approaching SDF for a point source (the % difference varied from 2 to 13% for 2 cm SL). Significant overestimate is seen when source length increases.

Ivanovic, M.; Weber, D.A. [Univ. of California, Sacramento, CA (United States); Loncaric, S. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

- New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location More Documents & Publications PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location Slide 1 Slide 1...

189

State energy price and expenditure report, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the US. The estimates developed in the State Energy Price and Expenditure Data System (SEPEDS) are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970 through 1995. Data for all years are available on a CD-ROM and via Internet. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures and the documentation for those estimates are taken from the State Energy Data Report 1995, Consumption Estimates (SEDR), published in December 1997. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, which are adjusted to remove process fuel; intermediate petroleum products; and other consumption that has no direct fuel costs, i.e., hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar, and photovoltaic energy sources.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

2006 Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2006 Annual Report Sections Diffuse Knapweed...

191

UC Sustainability Office Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 UC Sustainability Office Report Introduction Welcome to the second annual UC Sustainability Office Report. 2012 saw the Sustainability Office focus its attentions on enhancing the student experience and building on UC's statement of strategic intent of `people prepared to make a difference'. We

Hickman, Mark

192

Examples of Cost Estimation Packages  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Estimates can be performed in a variety of ways. Some of these are for projects for an undefined scope, a conventional construction project, or where there is a level of effort required to complete the work. Examples of cost estimation packages for these types of projects are described in this appendix.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

Characterization strategy report for the organic safety issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a logical approach to resolving potential safety issues resulting from the presence of organic components in hanford tank wastes. The approach uses a structured logic diagram (SLD) to provide a pathway for quantifying organic safety issue risk. The scope of the report is limited to selected organics (i.e., solvents and complexants) that were added to the tanks and their degradation products. The greatest concern is the potential exothermic reactions that can occur between these components and oxidants, such as sodium nitrate, that are present in the waste tanks. The organic safety issue is described in a conceptual model that depicts key modes of failure-event reaction processes in tank systems and phase domains (domains are regions of the tank that have similar contents) that are depicted with the SLD. Applying this approach to quantify risk requires knowing the composition and distribution of the organic and inorganic components to determine (1) how much energy the waste would release in the various domains, (2) the toxicity of the region associated with a disruptive event, and (3) the probability of an initiating reaction. Five different characterization options are described, each providing a different level of quality in calculating the risks involved with organic safety issues. Recommendations include processing existing data through the SLD to estimate risk, developing models needed to link more complex characterization information for the purpose of estimating risk, and examining correlations between the characterization approaches for optimizing information quality while minimizing cost in estimating risk.

Goheen, S.C.; Campbell, J.A.; Fryxell, G.E. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transition metal carbides have recently attracted a great deal of interest due to their potential to replace noble metal catalysts in a variety of reactions. To date, attempts to develop commercial applications with bulk metal carbides have been unsuccessful, however, the catalytic behavior of nanometer-sized carbide particles are reported to be sufficiently different from the bulk materials that new research in this area is warranted. In this report, Mo/W carbides were synthesized using carbon nanotubes both as carbon source and as a catalyst support. These carbon nanotubes (FIBRIL[TM] Nanotubes) are composed of parallel layers of trigonal carbon, but in the form of a series of concentric tubes disposed about the longitudinal axis of the fibrils with diameter of 8{approx}10 nm. The special dimensions of nanotubes stabilize fine dispersion of catalytic entities as only particles with limited sizes, ca <8nm, could be supported on this nanoscale substrate. Two types of catalysts have been prepared in this manner. First, highly dispersed Mo carbide particles were generated on the carbon nanotube surface with average particle size of 3{approx}10 nm. Furthermore, stoichiometric Mo carbide was also obtained in the form of highly porous assemblages of nanorods by careful control of the reaction conditions. The prepared Mo and W carbide catalysts were tested in several industrial reactions with significant energy savings. Results from these studies demonstrated the ''poor man's platinum'' hypothesis as well as many great potentials associated with these novel catalysts in chemical and refinery industries.

Ma, Jun; Hoch, Robert

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The complementary relationship in estimation of regional evapotranspiration: An enhanced Advection-Aridity model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collins, Colorado Abstract. Long-term monthly evapotranspiration estimates from Brutsaert and Stricker and Stricker's [1979] Advection- Aridity (AA) model, exhibit two very different approaches to parameterizing

Ramírez, Jorge A.

196

7. Estimates for the Green's function in terms of asymmetry, with T ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capacities of condensers in [2] by very different methods. The analysis in [2] was based on estimates for subcondensers, possessing special geometry, and was ...

1910-30-82T23:59:59.000Z

197

Quantum enhanced estimation of optical detector efficiencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum mechanics establishes the ultimate limit to the scaling of the precision on any parameter, by iden- tifying optimal probe states and measurements. While this paradigm is, at least in principle, adequate for the metrology of quantum channels involving the estimation of phase and loss parameters, we show that estimat- ing the loss parameters associated with a quantum channel and a realistic quantum detector are fundamentally different. While Fock states are provably optimal for the former, we identify a crossover in the nature of the optimal probe state for estimating detector imperfections as a function of the loss parameter. We provide explicit results for on-off and homodyne detectors, the most widely used detectors in quantum photonics technologies.

Barbieri, Marco; Bartley, Tim J; Jin, Xian-Min; Kolthammer, W Steven; Walmsley, Ian A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Considering Workload Input Variations in Error Coverage Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

different parts of the workload code to be executed different number of times. By using the results from in the workload input when estimating error detection coverage using fault injection are investigated. Results sequence based on results from fault injection experiments with another input sequence is presented

Karlsson, Johan

199

SRNL LDRD Program Report 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported on 20 different projects in a wide variety of areas ranging from nuclear chemistry and radiation detection to energy storage and renewable energy.

Hoffman, E.

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

Estimating Air Chemical Emissions from Research Activities Using Stack Measurement Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current methods of estimating air emissions from research and development (R&D) activities use a wide range of release fractions or emission factors with bases ranging from empirical to semi-empirical. Although considered conservative, the uncertainties and confidence levels of the existing methods have not been reported. Chemical emissions were estimated from sampling data taken from four research facilities over ten years. The approach was to use a Monte Carlo technique to create distributions of annual emission estimates for target compounds detected in source test samples. Distributions were created for each year and building sampled for compounds with sufficient detection frequency to qualify for the analysis. The results using the Monte Carlo technique without applying a filter to remove negative emission values showed almost all distributions spanning zero, and forty percent of the distributions having a negative mean. This indicates that emissions are so low as to be indistinguishable from building background. Application of a filter to allow only positive values in the distribution provided a more realistic value for emissions and increased the distribution mean by an average of sixteen percent. Release fractions were calculated by dividing the emission estimates by a building chemical inventory quantity. Two variations were used for this quantity: chemical usage, and chemical usage plus one-half standing inventory. Filters were applied so that only release fraction values from zero to one were included in the resulting distributions. Release fractions had a wide range among chemicals and among data sets for different buildings and/or years for a given chemical. Regressions of release fractions to molecular weight and vapor pressure showed weak correlations. Similarly, regressions of mean emissions to chemical usage, chemical inventory, molecular weight and vapor pressure also gave weak correlations. These results highlight the difficulties in estimating emissions from R&D facilities using chemical inventory data.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Duchsherer, Cheryl J.; Woodruff, Rodger K.; Larson, Timothy V.

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Regional Differences in the Price-Elasticity of Demand for Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the RAND Corporation examined the relationship between energy demand and energy prices with the focus on whether the relationships between demand and price differ if these are examined at different levels of data resolution. In this case, RAND compares national, regional, state, and electric utility levels of data resolution. This study is intended as a first step in helping NREL understand the impact that spatial disaggregation of data can have on estimating the impacts of their programs. This report should be useful to analysts in NREL and other national laboratories, as well as to policy nationals at the national level. It may help them understand the complex relationships between demand and price and how these might vary across different locations in the United States.

Bernstein, M. A.; Griffin, J.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Cost uncertainty for different levels of technology maturity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is difficult at best to apply a single methodology for estimating cost uncertainties related to technologies of differing maturity. While highly mature technologies may have significant performance and manufacturing cost data available, less well developed technologies may be defined in only conceptual terms. Regardless of the degree of technical maturity, often a cost estimate relating to application of the technology may be required to justify continued funding for development. Yet, a cost estimate without its associated uncertainty lacks the information required to assess the economic risk. For this reason, it is important for the developer to provide some type of uncertainty along with a cost estimate. This study demonstrates how different methodologies for estimating uncertainties can be applied to cost estimates for technologies of different maturities. For a less well developed technology an uncertainty analysis of the cost estimate can be based on a sensitivity analysis; whereas, an uncertainty analysis of the cost estimate for a well developed technology can be based on an error propagation technique from classical statistics. It was decided to demonstrate these uncertainty estimation techniques with (1) an investigation of the additional cost of remediation due to beyond baseline, nearly complete, waste heel retrieval from underground storage tanks (USTs) at Hanford; and (2) the cost related to the use of crystalline silico-titanate (CST) rather than the baseline CS100 ion exchange resin for cesium separation from UST waste at Hanford.

DeMuth, S.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Franklin, A.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

Using Distance Estimates in Heuristic Search Jordan T. Thayer and Wheeler Ruml  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-distance-to-go estimate. Operators frequently have different costs and cost-to-go is not the same as search both the estimated cost-to-go, given by a heuristic evaluation function h, as well as the searchUsing Distance Estimates in Heuristic Search Jordan T. Thayer and Wheeler Ruml Department

Ruml, Wheeler

204

Reported Energy and Cost Savings from the DOE ESPC Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to determine the realization rate of energy and cost savings from the Department of Energy's Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) program based on information reported by the energy services companies (ESCOs) that are carrying out ESPC projects at federal sites. Information was extracted from 134 Measurement and Verification (M&V) reports to determine reported, estimated, and guaranteed cost savings and reported and estimated energy savings for the previous contract year. Because the quality of the reports varied, it was not possible to determine all of these parameters for each project. For 133 of the 134 projects, there was sufficient information to compare estimated, reported, and guaranteed cost savings. For this group, the total estimated cost savings for the reporting periods addressed were $95.7 million, total reported cost savings were $96.8 million, and total guaranteed cost savings were $92.1 million. This means that on average: ESPC contractors guaranteed 96% of the estimated cost savings, projects reported achieving 101% of the estimated cost savings, and projects reported achieving 105% of the guaranteed cost savings. For 129 of the projects examined, there was sufficient information to compare estimated and reported energy savings. On the basis of site energy, estimated savings for those projects for the previous year totaled 5.371 million MMBtu, and reported savings were 5.374 million MMBtu, just over 100% of the estimated energy savings. On the basis of source energy, total estimated energy savings for the 129 projects were 10.400 million MMBtu, and reported saving were 10.405 million MMBtu, again, just over 100.0% of the estimated energy savings.

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Slattery, Bob S [ORNL; Atkin, Erica [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Estimation of hydrologic properties of an unsaturated, fractured rock mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this document, two distinctly different approaches are used to develop continuum models to evaluate water movement in a fractured rock mass. Both models provide methods for estimating rock-mass hydrologic properties. Comparisons made over a range of different tuff properties show good qualitative and quantitative agreement between estimates of rock-mass hydrologic properties made by the two models. This document presents a general discussion of: (1) the hydrology of Yucca Mountain, and the conceptual hydrological model currently being used for the Yucca Mountain site, (2) the development of two models that may be used to estimate the hydrologic properties of a fractured, porous rock mass, and (3) a comparison of the hydrologic properties estimated by these two models. Although the models were developed in response to hydrologic characterization requirements at Yucca Mountain, they can be applied to water movement in any fractured rock mass that satisfies the given assumptions.

Klavetter, E.A.; Peters, R.R.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

ELECTRICITY CASE: ECONOMIC COST ESTIMATION FACTORS FOR ECONOMIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICITY CASE: ECONOMIC COST ESTIMATION FACTORS FOR ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF TERRORIST ATTACKS Zimmerman, R. CREATE REPORT Under FEMA Grant EMW-2004-GR-0112 May 31, 2005 Center for Risk and Economic #12;2 Abstract The major economic effects of electric power outages are usually associated with three

Wang, Hai

207

Phasor Measurement Unit Data in Power System State Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) devices. The incorporation of PMU measurementsPhasor Measurement Unit Data in Power System State Estimation Intermediate Project Report Power Center since 1996 PSERC #12;Power Systems Engineering Research Center Phasor Measurement Unit Data

208

Measurement enhancement for state estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a few phasor measurement units (PMU) in the system can significantly increase measurement redundancy, which in turn can improve the capability of state estimation to detect and identify bad data, even during loss of measurements. Meanwhile, strategic...

Chen, Jian

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Engineered Trench #3 Infiltration Estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the appropriate ET#3 infiltration rates to utilize as part of the ET#3 Special Analysis (SA).

Phifer, M. A.

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

210

Using doppler radar images to estimate aircraft navigational heading error  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A yaw angle error of a motion measurement system carried on an aircraft for navigation is estimated from Doppler radar images captured using the aircraft. At least two radar pulses aimed at respectively different physical locations in a targeted area are transmitted from a radar antenna carried on the aircraft. At least two Doppler radar images that respectively correspond to the at least two transmitted radar pulses are produced. These images are used to produce an estimate of the yaw angle error.

Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Jordan, Jay D. (Albuquerque, NM); Kim, Theodore J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

211

Performance estimation using correlation methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Correlation methods of prediction have advantages in greatly simplifying the time and complexity of performance predictions of passive solar buildings but are severely constrained in the number of variables which can be considered. Their accuracy is generally adequate for design purposes provided they are applied to buildings which correspond reasonably closely to the reference designs used in developing the correlations. The most simplified correlation procedures (such as the SLR method) are amenable to use with hand calculators, especially if pre-calculated tables are available corresponding to the weather data for the location of interest. When reporting the results of these calculations, the designer should be especially careful to specify the range of validity of the analysis, especially as pertains to both operating characteristics and design parameters. Correlation techniques are especially amenable to use in microcomputer routines which can be used in a design office. Very quick answers can be obtained during the schematic design and design development phases of a building to aid in deciding between different design options. This would include trade-offs between various conservation options and passive solar options.

Balcomb, J.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

ESTIMATING THE UNCERTAINTY IN REACTIVITY ACCIDENT NEUTRONIC CALCULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the uncertainty in calculations of the rod ejection accident in a pressurized water reactor is being carried out for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper is a progress report on that study. Results are presented for the sensitivity of core energy deposition to the key parameters: ejected rod worth, delayed neutron fraction, Doppler reactivity coefficient, and fuel specific heat. These results can be used in the future to estimate the uncertainty in local fuel enthalpy given some assumptions about the uncertainty in the key parameters. This study is also concerned with the effect of the intra-assembly representation in calculations. The issue is the error that might be present if assembly-average power is calculated, and pin peaking factors from a static calculation are then used to determine local fuel enthalpy. This is being studied with the help of a collaborative effort with Russian and French analysts who are using codes with different intra-assembly representations. The US code being used is PARCS which calculates power on an assembly-average basis. The Russian code being used is BARS which calculates power for individual fuel pins using a heterogeneous representation based on a Green's Function method.

DIAMOND,D.J.; YANG,C.Y.; ARONSON,A.L.

1998-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

213

Estimating the uncertainty in reactivity accident neutronic calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the uncertainty in calculations of the rod ejection accident in a pressurized water reactor is being carried out for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper is a progress report on that study. Results are presented for the sensitivity of core energy deposition to the key parameters: ejected rod worth, delayed neutron fraction, Doppler reactivity coefficient, and fuel specific heat. These results can be used in the future to estimate the uncertainty in local fuel enthalpy given some assumptions about the uncertainty in the key parameters. This study is also concerned with the effect of the intra-assembly representation in calculations. The issue is the error that might be present if assembly-average power is calculated, and pin peaking factors from a static calculation are then used to determine local fuel enthalpy. This is being studied with the help of a collaborative effort with Russian and French analysts who are using codes with different intra-assembly representations. The US code being used is PARCS which calculates power on an assembly-average basis. The Russian code being used is BARS which calculates power for individual fuel pins using a heterogeneous representation based on a Green`s Function method.

Diamond, D.J.; Yang, C.Y.; Aronson, A.L.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Methodology for reconstruction of historical food consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was written to provide the food consumption methodology to be used in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HDER) Project beyond Phase I (which ended in July 1990). In Phase I (Callaway 1992), baseline food consumption estimates (grams per day) for 10 primary food types in the original 10-county study region were derived from the 1977--1978 National Food Consumption Survey (USDA 1983). The baseline estimates were multiplied by the 1945:1977 ratios to produce consumption estimates for 1945. This ratio backcasting method used in Phase I to project consumption estimates from 1977 back to 1945 will be refined using additional USDA data to improve and document the acceptability of the ratios for deriving backcast consumption estimates. The number of food types and population groups will be expanded to provide more disaggregated estimates of food consumption. Food consumption estimates will be developed for 1945, 1951, and 1957. A database of individual diets will be created from which daily diets will be randomly selected for use in the dose model to calculate doses for reference individuals.

Anderson, D.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the laboratory for different pier sizes and for a range of subcritical flow conditions. Both water level changes. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. BACKWATER EFFECTS OF PIERS IN SUBCRITICAL FLOW 5. Report Date October 2001 6 or floodplain of natural waterways. These piers will obstruct the flow and may cause an increase in water levels

Texas at Austin, University of

216

Stability and control of singularly perturbed systems. Second annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report surveys the results obtained during the second year of the three-year project entitled, Multimodel Strategies for Stochastic Models, and supported by the US Department of Energy, Electric Energy Systems Division. The report is divided into four parts. Part One presents a new method for studying stability of singularly perturbed systems using quadratic-type Lyapunov functions. The method is less conservative than the previous methods reported in the literature. Several examples are included to demonstrate that. Part Two is a continuation of our effort to study sampled-data control of singularly perturbed systems (see Part Three of the first annual report). Here we study singularly perturbed difference equations resulting from discretizing continious-time singularly perturbed systems. Part Three presents an important development in linear-quadratic Gaussian estimation and control of singularly perturbed systems. Near-optimum estimators and regulators are obtained using a special transformation to decouple slow and fast dynamics. Part Four considers a class of nonlinear singularly perturbed systems driven by wide-band noise and derives a reduced-order diffusion model that represents the behavior of the slow variables.

Khalil, H.; El-Ansary, M.; Gajic, Z.; Litkouhi, B.; Saberi, A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Photovoltaic subsystem marketing and distribution model: programming manual. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complete documentation of the marketing and distribution (M and D) computer model is provided. The purpose is to estimate the costs of selling and transporting photovoltaic solar energy products from the manufacturer to the final customer. The model adjusts for the inflation and regional differences in marketing and distribution costs. The model consists of three major components: the marketing submodel, the distribution submodel, and the financial submodel. The computer program is explained including the input requirements, output reports, subprograms and operating environment. The program specifications discuss maintaining the validity of the data and potential improvements. An example for a photovoltaic concentrator collector demonstrates the application of the model.

Not Available

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A Bayesian Framework for Combining Valuation Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Obtaining more accurate equity value estimates is the starting point for stock selection, value-based indexing in a noisy market, and beating benchmark indices through tactical style rotation. Unfortunately, discounted cash flow, method of comparables, and fundamental analysis typically yield discrepant valuation estimates. Moreover, the valuation estimates typically disagree with market price. Can one form a superior valuation estimate by averaging over the individual estimates, including market price? This article suggests a Bayesian framework for combining two or more estimates into a superior valuation estimate. The framework justifies the common practice of averaging over several estimates to arrive at a final point estimate.

Kenton K. Yee

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

219

A Bayesian Framework for Combining Valuation Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Obtaining more accurate equity value estimates is the starting point for stock selection, value-based indexing in a noisy market, and beating benchmark indices through tactical style rotation. Unfortunately, discounted cash flow, method of comparables, and fundamental analysis typically yield discrepant valuation estimates. Moreover, the valuation estimates typically disagree with market price. Can one form a superior valuation estimate by averaging over the individual estimates, including market price? This article suggests a Bayesian framework for combining two or more estimates into a superior valuation estimate. The framework justifies the common practice of averaging over several estimates to arrive at a final point estimate.

Yee, Kenton K

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Soft-Decision-Driven Channel Estimation for Pipelined Turbo Receivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider channel estimation specific to turbo equalization for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) wireless communication. We develop a soft-decision-driven sequential algorithm geared to the pipelined turbo equalizer architecture operating on orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) symbols. One interesting feature of the pipelined turbo equalizer is that multiple soft-decisions become available at various processing stages. A tricky issue is that these multiple decisions from different pipeline stages have varying levels of reliability. This paper establishes an effective strategy for the channel estimator to track the target channel, while dealing with observation sets with different qualities. The resulting algorithm is basically a linear sequential estimation algorithm and, as such, is Kalman-based in nature. The main difference here, however, is that the proposed algorithm employs puncturing on observation samples to effectively deal with the inherent correlation among the multiple demappe...

Yoon, Daejung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

LBNL-56380 (2004) 2004 Status Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

presents past and predicted savings for the ENERGY STAR ® labeling program, a program operated jointly for a subset of ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savingsLBNL-56380 (2004) 2004 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR ® Voluntary Labeling

222

LBNL-56380 (2006) 2006 Status Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;1 Introduction This paper presents past and predicted savings for the ENERGY STAR ® labeling program, a program for a subset of ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savingsLBNL-56380 (2006) 2006 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR ® Voluntary Labeling

223

Weldon Spring historical dose estimate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine the estimated radiation doses that individuals in five nearby population groups and the general population in the surrounding area may have received as a consequence of activities at a uranium processing plant in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The study is retrospective and encompasses plant operations (1957-1966), cleanup (1967-1969), and maintenance (1969-1982). The dose estimates for members of the nearby population groups are as follows. Of the three periods considered, the largest doses to the general population in the surrounding area would have occurred during the plant operations period (1957-1966). Dose estimates for the cleanup (1967-1969) and maintenance (1969-1982) periods are negligible in comparison. Based on the monitoring data, if there was a person residing continually in a dwelling 1.2 km (0.75 mi) north of the plant, this person is estimated to have received an average of about 96 mrem/yr (ranging from 50 to 160 mrem/yr) above background during plant operations, whereas the dose to a nearby resident during later years is estimated to have been about 0.4 mrem/yr during cleanup and about 0.2 mrem/yr during the maintenance period. These values may be compared with the background dose in Missouri of 120 mrem/yr.

Meshkov, N.; Benioff, P.; Wang, J.; Yuan, Y.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Review of energy efficiency of refrigerator/freezer gaskets. Final report, Jul-Nov 90  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives results of an investigation of the significance of heat leakage through gaskets in household refrigerator/freezers, explores different design features, and suggests further study if necessary. The report gives results of an extensive literature review, interviews with refrigerator/freezer and gasket manufacturers, and some engineering analysis. (NOTE: Home refrigerators are the largest consumers of electricity among household appliances and are consuming an estimated 8% of the total electricity used in the U.S. Recent studies show that gasket area heat leakage may account for as much as 21% of the total thermal load.)

Ghassemi, M.; Shapiro, H.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Constructing Predictive Estimates for Worker Exposure to Radioactivity During Decommissioning: Analysis of Completed Decommissioning Projects - Master Thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis of completed decommissioning projects is used to construct predictive estimates for worker exposure to radioactivity during decommissioning activities. The preferred organizational method for the completed decommissioning project data is to divide the data by type of facility, whether decommissioning was performed on part of the facility or the complete facility, and the level of radiation within the facility prior to decommissioning (low, medium, or high). Additional data analysis shows that there is not a downward trend in worker exposure data over time. Also, the use of a standard estimate for worker exposure to radioactivity may be a best estimate for low complete storage, high partial storage, and medium reactor facilities; a conservative estimate for some low level of facility radiation facilities (reactor complete, research complete, pits/ponds, other), medium partial process facilities, and high complete research facilities; and an underestimate for the remaining facilities. Limited data are available to compare different decommissioning alternatives, so the available data are reported and no conclusions can been drawn. It is recommended that all DOE sites and the NRC use a similar method to document worker hours, worker exposure to radiation (person-rem), and standard industrial accidents, injuries, and deaths for all completed decommissioning activities.

Dettmers, Dana Lee; Eide, Steven Arvid

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Technical Note: Estimating Aerosol Effects on Cloud Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimating anthropogenic aerosol effects on the planetary energy balance through the aerosol influence on clouds using the difference in cloud radiative forcing from simulations with and without anthropogenic emissions produces estimates that are positively biased. A more representative method is suggested using the difference in cloud radiative forcing calculated with aerosol radiative effects neglected. The method also yields an aerosol radiative forcing decomposition that includes a term quantifying the impact of changes in surface albedo. The method requires only two additional diagnostic calculations: the whole-sky and clear-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative flux with aerosol radiative effects neglected.

Ghan, Steven J.

2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

227

Impact of price specials on estimates of retail meat prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ighting Technique V. V. SUM'JARA' AND CONCLUSIONS. 46 55 o3 69 Ti. me-of-the-Week to Collect Prices. Bias Reduced by Regression. Concluding Statement. REFEBENCES. APPENDIX. 89 90 95 100 115 vill LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1-1. Relative...' or individual items in Dallas and Houston. 101 3-1. Simulated BLS price estimates of 46 meat items based upon different sampling rates and weighted average price, or all data, July 1968. . . . . . . . . . . . 107 "Error" of price estimates; differences...

Degner, Robert L

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Optical Flow Estimation versus Motion Estimation Draft: Anita Sellent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In the proposed challenge we aim to estimate the physical motion of objects. In industrial applications in the Camera System In industrial applications, sufficient illumination cannot always be provided. This can in the path of a robot or the trajectories of objects [7,12,13,17]. Video cameras provide information

Heermann, Dieter W.

229

Component failure data handbook. Technical evaluation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

Gentillon, C.D.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The role of structure and entropy in determining differences in dynamics for glass formers with different interaction potentials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a study of two model liquids with different interaction potentials, exhibiting similar structure but significantly different dynamics at low temperatures. By evaluating the configurational entropy, we show that the differences in the dynamics of these systems can be understood in terms of their thermodynamic differences. Analyzing their structure, we demonstrate that differences in pair correlation functions between the two systems, through their contribution to the entropy, dominate the differences in their dynamics, and indeed overestimate the differences. Including the contribution of higher order structural correlations to the entropy leads to smaller estimates for the relaxation times, as well as smaller differences between the two studied systems.

Atreyee Banerjee; Shiladitya Sengupta; Srikanth Sastry; Sarika Maitra Bhattacharyya

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

231

2001 annual report 2001 annual report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual reportelectrical & computer engineering 2001 annual report the university of new mexico department of 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual report 2001 annual

New Mexico, University of

232

Estimates of Savings Achievable from Irrigation Controller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper performs a literature review and meta-analysis of water savings from several types of advanced irrigation controllers: rain sensors (RS), weather-based irrigation controllers (WBIC), and soil moisture sensors (SMS).The purpose of this work is to derive average water savings per controller type, based to the extent possible on all available data. After a preliminary data scrubbing, we utilized a series of analytical filters to develop our best estimate of average savings. We applied filters to remove data that might bias the sample such as data self-reported by manufacturers, data resulting from studies focusing on high-water users, or data presented in a non-comparable format such as based on total household water use instead of outdoor water use. Because the resulting number of studies was too small to be statistically significant when broken down by controller type, this paper represents a survey and synthesis of available data rather than a definitive statement regarding whether the estimated water savings are representative.

Williams, Alison; Fuchs, Heidi; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

233

Microsphere estimates of blood flow: Methodological considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microsphere technique is a standard method for measuring blood flow in experimental animals. Sporadic reports have appeared outlining the limitations of this method. In this study the authors have systematically assessed the effect of blood withdrawals for reference sampling, microsphere numbers, and anesthesia on blood flow estimates using radioactive microspheres in dogs. Experiments were performed on 18 conscious and 12 anesthetized dogs. Four blood flow estimates were performed over 120 min using 1 {times} 10{sup 6} microspheres each time. The effects of excessive numbers of microspheres pentobarbital sodium anesthesia, and replacement of volume loss for reference samples with dextran 70 were assessed. In both conscious and anesthetized dogs a progressive decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow and cardiac output was observed over 120 min. This was also observed in the pancreas in conscious dogs. The major factor responsible for these changes was the volume loss due to the reference sample withdrawals. Replacement of the withdrawn blood with dextran 70 led to stable blood flows to all organs. The injection of excessive numbers of microspheres did not modify hemodynamics to a greater extent than did the injection of 4 million microspheres. Anesthesia exerted no influence on blood flow other than raising coronary flow. The authors conclude that although blood flow to the gastric mucosa and the pancreas is sensitive to the minor hemodynamic changes associated with the microsphere technique, replacement of volume loss for reference samples ensures stable blood flow to all organs over a 120-min period.

von Ritter, C.; Hinder, R.A.; Womack, W.; Bauerfeind, P.; Fimmel, C.J.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.; Blum, A.L. (Univ. of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa) Louisianna State Univ. Medical Center, Shreveport (USA) Universitaire Vaudois (Switzerland))

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The Spectral Density Estimation of Stationary Time Series with Missing Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reported in literature (see, e.g. Green et al., 2002, Kaneoke and Vitek, 1996, Fortin and Mackey, 1999, and Laguna et al., 1998). Here we consider estimating the spectral density of stationary time series

Schellekens, Michel P.

235

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Application: 2009 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application: 2009 Update This report is the third annual update of a...

236

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update This report is the fourth annual update of a comprehensive...

237

BPA Metering Services Editing and Estimating Procedures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Editing and Estimating Interval Data 1. Introduction This section defines the meter interval data editing and estimation techniques performed by BPA's Metering Services...

238

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review This independent review is...

239

Hanford Site Environmental Report 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Environmental Report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, describe environmental management performance, and demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations. The report also highlights major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet reporting requirements and Guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) an to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to (a) describe the Hanford Site and its mission, (b) summarize the status in 1993 of compliance with environmental regulations, (c) describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site, (d) discuss estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1993 Hanford activities, (e) present information on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance, including ground-water protection and monitoring, (f) discuss activities to ensure quality. More detailed information can be found in the body of the report, the appendixes, and the cited references.

Dirkes, R.L.; Hanf, R.W.; Woodruff, R.K. [eds.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Quantum phase estimation using a multi-headed cat state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It was recently shown that an entangled coherent state, which is a superposition of two different coherent states, can surpass the performance of N00N state in estimating an unknown phase-shift. This may hint at further enhancement in phase estimation by incorporating more component states in the superposition of resource state. We here study a four-headed cat state (4HCS), a superposition of four different coherent states, and propose its application to quantum phase estimation. We first investigate how the 4HCS is more nonclassical than a 2HCS in view of some nonclassical measures including sub-Poissonian statistics, negativity of Wigner distribution, and entanglement potential. We then demonstrate the enhanced performance in phase estimation by employing an entangled state via the 4HCS, which can surpass that of the 2HCS particularly in the regime of small average photon number. Moreover, we show that an entangled state modified from the 4HCS can further enhance the phase estimation even in the regime of large average photon number under a photon-loss channel. Our investigation further extends to incorporate an increasingly large number of component states in the resource superposition state and clearly show its merit in phase estimation.

Su-Yong Lee; Chang-Woo Lee; Hyunchul Nha; Dagomir Kaszlikowski

2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Ultrasonic Porosity Estimation of Low-Porosity Ceramic Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on efforts to extend the applicability of an airborne ultrasonic pulse-reflection (UPR) method towards lower porosities. UPR is a method that has been used successfully to estimate porosity and tortuosity of high porosity foams. UPR measures acoustical reflectivity of a target surface at two or more incidence angles. We used ceramic samples to evaluate the feasibility of extending the UPR range into low porosities (<35%). The validity of UPR estimates depends on pore size distribution and probing frequency as predicted by the theoretical boundary conditions of the used equivalent fluid model under the high-frequency approximation.

Eskelinen, J.; Hoffren, H. [Electronics Research Unit, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64 FIN-00014 (Finland); Kohout, T.; Pesonen, L. J. [Division of Geophysics, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64 FIN-00014 (Finland); Haeggstroem, E. [Electronics Research Unit, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64 FIN-00014 (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, PO Box 64, FIN-00014 (Finland)

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

242

Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads of the SSG Kvitsy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads of the SSG Kvitsøy Pilot Engineering No. 32 ISSN: 1603-9874 Model Test Setup and Program for Experimental Estimation of Surface Loads University October, 2005 #12;#12;Preface This report presents the preparations done prior to model tests

243

Estimation of Air-Sea Gas Transfer Using Conically Scanning SeaWinds Scatterometer Normalized Backscatter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Backscatter David M. Glover Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry Woods Hole Oceanographic 2001 -- 31 March 2005 FINAL REPORT #12;Estimation of Air-Sea Gas Transfer from Scatterometry; Glover et . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-23 #12;Estimation of Air-Sea Gas Transfer from Scatterometry; Glover et al. ii B Daily Non

Glover, David M.

244

IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation SYSTEMÃ?KOLOGIE ETHZ., 2008. IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation Systems Ecology Report. Photo by Nathalie Baumgartner (2005) #12;A. Fischlin Emissions from land-use change (deforestation) 1

Fischlin, Andreas

245

Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We assess developable on-shore wind potential in India at three different hub-heights and under two sensitivity scenarios – one with no farmland included, the other with all farmland included. Under the “no farmland included” case, the total wind potential in India ranges from 748 GW at 80m hub-height to 976 GW at 120m hub-height. Under the “all farmland included” case, the potential with a minimum capacity factor of 20 percent ranges from 984 GW to 1,549 GW. High quality wind energy sites, at 80m hub-height with a minimum capacity factor of 25 percent, have a potential between 253 GW (no farmland included) and 306 GW (all farmland included). Our estimates are more than 15 times the current official estimate of wind energy potential in India (estimated at 50m hub height) and are about one tenth of the official estimate of the wind energy potential in the US.

Phadke, Amol; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Khangura, Jagmeet

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Portfolio Selection with Robust Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Management Science and Operations, London Business School ... (1952). To implement these portfolios in practice, one has to estimate the mean and the covariance matrix of ... have good properties not only for the assumed distribution but also for any distribution in a ...... KNITRO user's manual. version 4.0.

2007-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

247

An Improved Cluster Richness Estimator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Minimizing the scatter between cluster mass and accessible observables is an important goal for cluster cosmology. In this work, we introduce a new matched filter richness estimator, and test its performance using the maxBCG cluster catalog. Our new estimator significantly reduces the variance in the L{sub X}-richness relation, from {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.86 {+-} 0.02){sup 2} to {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.69 {+-} 0.02){sup 2}. Relative to the maxBCG richness estimate, it also removes the strong redshift dependence of the richness scaling relations, and is significantly more robust to photometric and redshift errors. These improvements are largely due to our more sophisticated treatment of galaxy color data. We also demonstrate the scatter in the L{sub X}-richness relation depends on the aperture used to estimate cluster richness, and introduce a novel approach for optimizing said aperture which can be easily generalized to other mass tracers.

Rozo, Eduardo; /Ohio State U.; Rykoff, Eli S.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Koester, Benjamin P.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; McKay, Timothy; /Michigan U.; Hao, Jiangang; /Michigan U.; Evrard, August; /Michigan U.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /SLAC; Hansen, Sarah; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Sheldon, Erin; /New York U.; Johnston, David; /Houston U.; Becker, Matthew R.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Annis, James T.; /Fermilab; Bleem, Lindsey; /Chicago U.; Scranton, Ryan; /Pittsburgh U.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

248

HYPERPARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR EMISSION COMPUTED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYPERPARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY DATA A. López (a) , R. Molina (b) (a limited due to several factors. These factors include the need of greater computational time than to the projection data to obtain two-dimensional slices or cross sections (images) of activity distribution. #12

Granada, Universidad de

249

Summary of the cost analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the Cost Analysis Report which provides comparative cost data for the management strategy alternatives. The PEIS and the Cost Analysis Report will help DOE select a management strategy. The Record of Decision, expected in 1998, will complete the first part of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. The second part of the Program will look at specific sites and technologies for carrying out the selected strategy. The Cost Analysis Report estimates the primary capital and operating costs for the different alternatives. It reflects the costs of technology development construction of facilities, operation, and decontamination and decommissioning. It also includes potential revenues from the sale of by-products such as anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (ABF). These estimates are based on early designs. They are intended to help in comparing alternatives, rather than to indicate absolute costs for project budgets or bidding purposes. More detailed estimates and specific funding sources will be considered in part two of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program.

Dubrin, J.W.; Rahm-Crites, L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Chapter 11Chapter 11 Estimating the Weighted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 11Chapter 11 Estimating the Weighted Average Cost of Capital DES Chapter 11 1 #12;U i th C.xls for shortfor short. DES Chapter 11 2 #12;S i l i hSteps to estimate value using the Corporate Valuation stockholders DES Chapter 11 7 #12;Estimating Target Weights Page 223: To calculate WACC, we need to estimate

Schubart, Christoph

251

Best Linear Unbiased Estimate Motivation for BLUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Chapter 6 Best Linear Unbiased Estimate (BLUE) #12;2 Motivation for BLUE Except for Linear Model to a sub-optimal estimate BLUE is one such sub-optimal estimate Idea for BLUE: 1. Restrict estimate) Advantage of BLUE:Needs only 1st and 2nd moments of PDF Mean & Covariance Disadvantages of BLUE: 1. Sub

Fowler, Mark

252

Uniform and optimal error estimates of an exponential wave ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the error propagation, cut-off of the nonlinearity, and the energy method. ...... gives Lemma 3.4 for the local truncation error, which is of spectral order in ... estimates, we adopt a strategy similar to the finite difference method [4] (cf. diagram.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Analysis of power estimation techniques in CDMA systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) is the estimator of i-th user's j-t. h paralneter Zl, (j). Figures 1I ? 14 show the performance of the three t, echniques for SNR=--10, 0, 10 anrl 20dB with different number of users. For I, he EM algorithm, thc initial values are zeros and the number...

Pei, Ying

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEISMIC WAVES ESTIMATION AND WAVE FIELD DECOMPOSITION WITH FACTOR GRAPHS Stefano Maranò Christoph, Dept. Information Technology & Electr. Eng., 8092 Zürich ABSTRACT Physical wave fields are often from sensors of different kinds. In this paper we propose a technique for the analysis of vector wave

Loeliger, Hans-Andrea

255

Nonparametric estimation of econometric models with categorical variables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-validated smoothing parameters differ in their asymptotic behavior depending on whether a variable is uniformly distributed or not. In chapter IV, we consider a k-n-n estimation of regression function with k selected by a cross validation method. We consider both...

Ouyang, Desheng

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

256

Electricity transmission congestion costs: A review of recent reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, independent system operators (ISOs) and others have published reports on the costs of transmission congestion. The magnitude of congestion costs cited in these reports has contributed to the national discussion on the current state of U.S. electricity transmission system and whether it provides an adequate platform for competition in wholesale electricity markets. This report reviews reports of congestion costs and begins to assess their implications for the current national discussion on the importance of the U.S. electricity transmission system for enabling competitive wholesale electricity markets. As a guiding principle, we posit that a more robust electricity system could reduce congestion costs; and thereby, (1) facilitate more vibrant and fair competition in wholesale electricity markets, and (2) enable consumers to seek out the lowest prices for electricity. Yet, examining the details suggests that, sometimes, there will be trade-offs between these goals. Therefore, it is essential to understand who pays, how much, and how do they benefit in evaluating options (both transmission and non-transmission alternatives) to address transmission congestion. To describe the differences among published estimates of congestion costs, we develop and motivate three ways by which transmission congestion costs are calculated in restructured markets. The assessment demonstrates that published transmission congestion costs are not directly comparable because they have been developed to serve different purposes. More importantly, critical information needed to make them more comparable, for example in order to evaluate the impacts of options to relieve congestion, is sometimes not available.

Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Eto, Joseph H.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dec 12, 2013 ... Technical Report Series: DCC-2013-13. Departamento de Ciência de Computadores. Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto.

Filipe Brandao

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

258

California Energy Commission FINAL STAFF REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential estimates and targets, excluding Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and Sacramento Municipal Utility District. The investorowned utilities report energy savings of 4,607 gigawatt hours. In 2010, the 39 reporting publicly owned utilities provided energy savings of 523 gigawatt hours, a 19

259

California Energy Commission DRAFT STAFF REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential estimates and targets, excluding Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and Sacramento Municipal Utility District. The investorowned utilities report energy savings of 4,607 gigawatt hours. In 2010, the 39 reporting publicly owned utilities provided energy savings of 523 gigawatt hours, a 19

260

To estimate vapor pressure easily  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vapor pressures as functions of temperature for approximately 700 major organic chemical compounds are given. The tabulation also gives the temperature range for which the data are applicable. Minimum and maximum temperatures are denoted by TMIN and TMAX. The Antoine equation that correlates vapor pressure as a function of temperature is described. A representative comparison of calculated and actual data values for vapor pressure is shown for ethyl alcohol. The coefficient tabulation is based on both literature (experimental data) and estimated values.

Yaws, C.L.; Yang, H.C. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Stable Difference Schemes for the Neutron Transport Equation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial boundary value problem for the neutron transport equation is considered. The first and second orders of accuracy difference schemes for the approximate solution of this problem are presented. In applications, the stability estimates for solutions of difference schemes for the approximate solution of the neutron transport equation are obtained. Numerical techniques are developed and algorithms are tested on an example in MATLAB.

Ashyralyev, Allaberen [Department of Mathematics Fatih University, 34500, Istanbul (Turkey); Department of Mathematics, ITTU, Ashgabat (Turkmenistan); Taskin, Abdulgafur [Department of Mathematics Fatih University, 34500, Istanbul (Turkey)

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

262

Development of an integrated system for estimating human error probabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project had as its main objective the development of a Human Reliability Analysis (HRA), knowledge-based expert system that would provide probabilistic estimates for potential human errors within various risk assessments, safety analysis reports, and hazard assessments. HRA identifies where human errors are most likely, estimates the error rate for individual tasks, and highlights the most beneficial areas for system improvements. This project accomplished three major tasks. First, several prominent HRA techniques and associated databases were collected and translated into an electronic format. Next, the project started a knowledge engineering phase where the expertise, i.e., the procedural rules and data, were extracted from those techniques and compiled into various modules. Finally, these modules, rules, and data were combined into a nearly complete HRA expert system.

Auflick, J.L.; Hahn, H.A.; Morzinski, J.A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

autoregressive spectral estimation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Estimation: A Tunable High-Resolution Spectral Estimator CiteSeer Summary: Traditional maximum entropy spectral estimation determines a power spectrum from covariance estimates....

264

Chapter 17: Estimating Net Savings: Common Practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter focuses on the methods used to estimate net energy savings in evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) studies for energy efficiency (EE) programs. The chapter provides a definition of net savings, which remains an unsettled topic both within the EE evaluation community and across the broader public policy evaluation community, particularly in the context of attribution of savings to particular program. The chapter differs from the measure-specific Uniform Methods Project (UMP) chapters in both its approach and work product. Unlike other UMP resources that provide recommended protocols for determining gross energy savings, this chapter describes and compares the current industry practices for determining net energy savings, but does not prescribe particular methods.

Violette, D. M.; Rathbun, P.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Technical Report Computer Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process by examining the relationship between human perception of depth and three-dimensional computerTechnical Report Number 546 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-546 ISSN 1476-2986 Depth perception-generated imagery (3D CGI). Depth is perceived when the human visual system combines various different sources

Haddadi, Hamed

266

ARM - Different Climates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation DataDatastreamswacrspeccmaskcopolDatastreamsxsacrslrAlaskaDefensive Shotgun -ListDifferent Climates

267

Atmospheric Inverse Estimates of Methane Emissions from Central California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methane mixing ratios measured at a tall-tower are compared to model predictions to estimate surface emissions of CH{sub 4} in Central California for October-December 2007 using an inverse technique. Predicted CH{sub 4} mixing ratios are calculated based on spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and simulated atmospheric trajectories. The atmospheric trajectories, along with surface footprints, are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. An uncertainty analysis is performed to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated CH{sub 4} emissions. Three inverse model estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions are reported. First, linear regressions of modeled and measured CH{sub 4} mixing ratios obtain slopes of 0.73 {+-} 0.11 and 1.09 {+-} 0.14 using California specific and Edgar 3.2 emission maps respectively, suggesting that actual CH{sub 4} emissions were about 37 {+-} 21% higher than California specific inventory estimates. Second, a Bayesian 'source' analysis suggests that livestock emissions are 63 {+-} 22% higher than the a priori estimates. Third, a Bayesian 'region' analysis is carried out for CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions, which shows that inventory CH{sub 4} emissions from the Central Valley are underestimated and uncertainties in CH{sub 4} emissions are reduced for sub-regions near the tower site, yielding best estimates of flux from those regions consistent with 'source' analysis results. The uncertainty reductions for regions near the tower indicate that a regional network of measurements will be necessary to provide accurate estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions.

Zhao, Chuanfeng; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Bianco, Laura; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Hirsch, Adam; MacDonald, Clinton; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Fischer, Marc L.

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

268

Methodology for uncertainty estimation in NUREG-1150 (Draft): Conclusions of a review panel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review has been undertaken by a panel of experts, of the methodology for estimation of uncertainty in severe accident risk resulting from accidents to nuclear power plants as presented in the Draft NUREG-1150 report. This report provides detailed dicussions and conclusions resulting from this review process.

Kouts, H.; Cornell, A.; Farmer, R.; Hanauer, S.; Rasmussen, N.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Annual Report 2013 Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Responsibility 36 Audit Committee Report 39 Independent Auditors' Report 41 Consolidated Statement of Financial scientists from the Universities of Oxford and Reading and researchers at the Pirbright Institute, which and Technology Facilities Council and the Wellcome Trust. Diamond generates high-energy beams of electrons

Rambaut, Andrew

270

Report2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » Removing nuclear waste,ReportReportReport on a

271

Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

differ slightly from official EIA data reports." " Sources: 2006 and 2007 data based on: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Annual Coal Report 2007, DOEEIA-0584(2007)...

272

MSU Fruit Team 2011 Apple Maturity Report Northwest Region Reports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MSU Fruit Team 2011 Apple Maturity Report Northwest Region Reports During the harvest season, apples from different regions are collected for maturity testing. The data is then compiled by MSU Extension educators into recommendations for harvest and storage of the most commonly grown apple varieties

273

MSU Fruit Team 2010 Apple Maturity Report Northwest Region Reports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MSU Fruit Team 2010 Apple Maturity Report Northwest Region Reports During the harvest season, apples from different regions are collected for maturity testing. The data is then compiled by MSU Extension educators into recommendations for harvest and storage of the most commonly grown apple varieties

274

Toward understanding of differences in current cloud retrievals of ARM ground-based measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate observations of cloud microphysical properties are needed for evaluating and improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models and better estimate of the Earth radiative budget. However, large differences are found in current cloud products retrieved from ground-based remote sensing measurements using various retrieval algorithms. Understanding the differences is an important step to address uncertainties in the cloud retrievals. In this study, an in-depth analysis of nine existing ground-based cloud retrievals using ARM remote sensing measurements is carried out. We place emphasis on boundary layer overcast clouds and high level ice clouds, which are the focus of many current retrieval development efforts due to their radiative importance and relatively simple structure. Large systematic discrepancies in cloud microphysical properties are found in these two types of clouds among the nine cloud retrieval products, particularly for the cloud liquid and ice particle effective radius. Note that the differences among some retrieval products are even larger than the prescribed uncertainties reported by the retrieval algorithm developers. It is shown that most of these large differences have their roots in the retrieval theoretical bases, assumptions, as well as input and constraint parameters. This study suggests the need to further validate current retrieval theories and assumptions and even the development of new retrieval algorithms with more observations under different cloud regimes.

Zhao C.; Dunn M.; Xie, S.; Klein, S. A.; Protat, A.; Shupe, M. D.; McFarlane, S. A.; Comstock, J. M.; Delanoë, J.; Deng, M.; Hogan, R. J.; Huang, D.; Jensen, M. P.; Mace, G. G.; McCoy, R.; O’Connor, E. J.; Turner, D. D.; Wang, Z.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

PARTICLES OF DIFFERENCE.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is no longer appropriate, if it ever was, to think of atmospheric aerosols as homogeneous spheres of uniform composition and size. Within the United States, and even more globally, not only the mass loading but also the composition, morphology, and size distribution of atmospheric aerosols are highly variable, as a function of location, and at a given location as a function of time. Particles of a given aerodynamic size may differ from one another, and even within individual particles material may be inhomogeneously distributed, as for example, carbon spherules imbedded in much larger sulfate particles. Some of the particulate matter is primary, that is, introduced into the atmosphere directly as particles, such as carbon particles in diesel exhaust. Some is secondary, that is, formed in the atmosphere by gas-to-particle conversion. Much of the material is inorganic, mainly sulfates and nitrates resulting mainly from energy-related emissions. Some of the material is carbonaceous, in part primary, in part secondary, and of this material some is anthropogenic and some biogenic. While the heterogeneity of atmospheric aerosols complicates the problem of understanding their loading and distribution, it may well be the key to its solution. By detailed examination of the materials comprising aerosols it is possible to infer the sources of these materials. It may be possible as well to identify specific health impairing agents. The heterogeneity of aerosol particles is thus the key to identifying their sources, to understanding the processes that govern their loading and properties, and to devising control strategies that are both effective and efficient. Future research must therefore take cognizance of differences among aerosol particles and use these differences to advantage.

SCHWARTZ,S.E.

2000-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

276

Estimation of a Noise Level Using Coarse-Grained Entropy of Experimental Time Series of Internal Pressure in a Combustion Engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report our results on non-periodic experimental time series of pressure in a single cylinder spark ignition engine. The experiments were performed for different levels of loading. We estimate the noise level in internal pressure calculating the coarse-grained entropy from variations of maximal pressures in successive cycles. The results show that the dynamics of the combustion is a nonlinear multidimensional process mediated by noise. Our results show that so defined level of noise in internal pressure is not monotonous function of loading.

Grzegorz Litak; Rodolfo Taccani; Krzysztof Urbanowicz; Janusz A. Holyst; Miroslaw Wendeker; Alessandro Giadrossi

2004-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Filter Difference Spectrometer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2Different ImpactsTheRolling Stone"TheThe

278

Fuel Cell System for Transportation -- 2005 Cost Estimate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Independent review report of the methodology used by TIAX to estimate the cost of producing PEM fuel cells using 2005 cell stack technology. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Manager asked the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to commission an independent review of the 2005 TIAX cost analysis for fuel cell production. The NREL Systems Integrator is responsible for conducting independent reviews of progress toward meeting the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) technical targets. An important technical target of the Program is the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell cost in terms of dollars per kilowatt ($/kW). The Program's Multi-Year Program Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan established $125/kW as the 2005 technical target. Over the last several years, the Program has contracted with TIAX, LLC (TIAX) to produce estimates of the high volume cost of PEM fuel cell production for transportation use. Since no manufacturer is yet producing PEM fuel cells in the quantities needed for an initial hydrogen-based transportation economy, these estimates are necessary for DOE to gauge progress toward meeting its targets. For a PEM fuel cell system configuration developed by Argonne National Laboratory, TIAX estimated the total cost to be $108/kW, based on assumptions of 500,000 units per year produced with 2005 cell stack technology, vertical integration of cell stack manufacturing, and balance-of-plant (BOP) components purchased from a supplier network. Furthermore, TIAX conducted a Monte Carlo analysis by varying ten key parameters over a wide range of values and estimated with 98% certainty that the mean PEM fuel cell system cost would be below DOE's 2005 target of $125/kW. NREL commissioned DJW TECHNOLOGY, LLC to form an Independent Review Team (the Team) of industry fuel cell experts and to evaluate the cost estimation process and the results reported by TIAX. The results of this independent review will permit NREL and DOE to better understand the credibility of the TIAX cost estimation process and to implement changes in future cost analyses, if necessary. The Team found the methodology used by TIAX to estimate the cost of producing PEM fuel cells to be reasonable and, using 2005 cell stack technology and assuming production of 500,000 units per year, to have calculated a credible cost of $108/kW.

Wheeler, D.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

SANDIA REPORT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

To improve upon and evolve existing solar PV O&M approaches, this report: 1. Provides perspective on the concept of PV "system" reliability and how it can inform plant design,...

280

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This the final report for the project "Large-Scale Optimization for Bayesian Inference in Complex Systems," for the work in the group of the co-PI George Biros.

Biros, George

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DOE Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

C. E., M. F. Baker, R. L. Eng, J. S. Gashwiler, and M. H. Schroeder, 1976, "Conservation Committee Report on Effects of Alteration of Sagebrush Communities on the Associated...

282

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

283

Informal Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

mm ts LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY Post Office Box 1663 Los Alamos. New Mexico 87545 DISTRDU7irM o r TdiS BGGbT.lENT IS UNLIMITED DISCLAIMER This report was...

284

In situ estimation of tendon material properties: Differences between muscles of the feline hindlimb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), such as storage and recovery of elastic energy (Alexander and Bennet-Clark, 1977; Cavagna, 1977). These functions

Perreault, Eric J.

285

Estimates for Laplacian Eigenvalues on Domains with Subdomains of Different Dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] is an artificial satellite, with a three-dimensional body, bi-dimensional solar panels, and one- dimensional cables. Abstract. In this work we study the asymptotic behavior of eigenvalues of an elliptic problem in a domain }k { (1) k }k. However, for any fixed , we may try to find the asymptotic behavior of k, and we

Pinasco, Juan Pablo

286

Econometric Analysis on Efficiency of Estimator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper investigates the efficiency of an alternative to ratio estimator under the super population model with uncorrelated errors and a gamma-distributed auxiliary variable. Comparisons with usual ratio and unbiased estimators are also made.

M. Khoshnevisan; F. Kaymram; Housila P. Singh; Rajesh Singh; Florentin Smarandache

2003-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

287

Bayesian estimation of resistivities from seismic velocities   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I address the problem of finding a background model for the estimation of resistivities in the earth from controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data by using seismic data and well logs as constraints. Estimation of ...

Werthmüller, Dieter

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Cost Model and Cost Estimating Software  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter discusses a formalized methodology is basically a cost model, which forms the basis for estimating software.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

289

Highly Automated Dipole EStimation , A. Pascarella2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

filter, HADES (Highly Automatic Dipole EStimation). HADES is an open-source, freely downloadable, Matlab-based

Piana, Michele

290

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining% accuracy. ­ 2-5% of pre-production capital Types of Cost Estimates #12;3. Definitive ­ Based on definitive-even $ Production Level Fixed Cost Break-even $ Production Level Cost-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or

Boisvert, Jeff

291

Transductive Reliability Estimation for Kernel Based Classifiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transductive Reliability Estimation for Kernel Based Classifiers Dimitris Tzikas1 , Matjaz Kukar2@cs.uoi.gr Abstract. Estimating the reliability of individual classifications is very important in several applications such as medical diagnosis. Recently, the transductive approach to reliability estimation has been

Likas, Aristidis

292

Statistical Exposure Estimation Spatial Confounding Bias  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and 3 Account for spatial correlation in the health outcome data. Applications include air pollution Epidemiology Estimates of chronic health effects of air pollution are identified from cross-sectional (i Exposure Estimation Methods for Air Pollution Often researchers estimate ambient concentrations and use

Paciorek, Chris

293

Bounded Suboptimal Search: A Direct Approach Using Inadmissible Estimates Jordan T. Thayer and Wheeler Ruml  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combines estimates of solution length and solution cost to predict which node will lead most quickly that Explicit Estimation Search is competitive with the previous state of the art in do- mains with unit-cost cost and length can differ. 1 Introduction When resources are plentiful, algorithms like A [Hart et al

Ruml, Wheeler

294

Estimate of fine sediment deposit dynamics on a gravel bar using photography analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimate of fine sediment deposit dynamics on a gravel bar using photography analysis B. CAMENEN1 , M. JODEAU2 , and M. JABALLAH3 Abstract Three different methods to analyse fine sediment deposits the ground. These methods were used to estimate the surface of fine sediment deposits before and after

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

295

Research opportunities to improve DSM impact estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was commissioned by the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) as part of its research mission to advance the energy efficiency and productivity of all end-use sectors in California. Our specific goal in this effort has been to identify viable research and development (R&D) opportunities that can improve capabilities to determine the energy-use and demand reductions achieved through demand-side management (DSM) programs and measures. We surveyed numerous practitioners in California and elsewhere to identify the major obstacles to effective impact evaluation, drawing on their collective experience. As a separate effort, we have also profiled the status of regulatory practices in leading states with respect to DSM impact evaluation. We have synthesized this information, adding our own perspective and experience to those of our survey-respondent colleagues, to characterize today`s state of the art in impact-evaluation practices. This scoping study takes a comprehensive look at the problems and issues involved in DSM impact estimates at the customer-facility or site level. The major portion of our study investigates three broad topic areas of interest to CIEE: Data analysis issues, field-monitoring issues, issues in evaluating DSM measures. Across these three topic areas, we have identified 22 potential R&D opportunities, to which we have assigned priority levels. These R&D opportunities are listed by topic area and priority.

Misuriello, H.; Hopkins, M.E.F. [Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

2007 Estimated International Energy Flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An energy flow chart or 'atlas' for 136 countries has been constructed from data maintained by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and estimates of energy use patterns for the year 2007. Approximately 490 exajoules (460 quadrillion BTU) of primary energy are used in aggregate by these countries each year. While the basic structure of the energy system is consistent from country to country, patterns of resource use and consumption vary. Energy can be visualized as it flows from resources (i.e. coal, petroleum, natural gas) through transformations such as electricity generation to end uses (i.e. residential, commercial, industrial, transportation). These flow patterns are visualized in this atlas of 136 country-level energy flow charts.

Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

297

CALIBRATING C-IV-BASED BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the single-epoch black hole mass estimators based on the C IV {lambda}1549 broad emission line, using the updated sample of the reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei and high-quality UV spectra. By performing multi-component spectral fitting analysis, we measure the C IV line widths (FWHM{sub C{sub IV}} and line dispersion, {sigma}{sub C{sub IV}}) and the continuum luminosity at 1350 A (L{sub 1350}) to calibrate the C-IV-based mass estimators. By comparing with the H{beta} reverberation-based masses, we provide new mass estimators with the best-fit relationships, i.e., M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.50{+-}0.07}{sigma}{sub C{sub IV}{sup 2}} and M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.52{+-}0.09} FWHM{sub C{sub IV}{sup 0.56{+-}0.48}}. The new C-IV-based mass estimators show significant mass-dependent systematic difference compared to the estimators commonly used in the literature. Using the published Sloan Digital Sky Survey QSO catalog, we show that the black hole mass of high-redshift QSOs decreases on average by {approx}0.25 dex if our recipe is adopted.

Park, Daeseong; Woo, Jong-Hak; Shin, Jaejin [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Denney, Kelly D., E-mail: pds2001@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jjshin@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: kelly@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

298

Proton Resonance Spectroscopy -- Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work supported by the DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER40990 during its duration from June 1996 to May 2009. Topics studied include (1) statistical descriptions of nuclear levels and measurements of proton resonances relevant to such descriptions, including measurements toward a complete level scheme for 30P, (2) the development of methods to estimate the missing fraction of levels in a given measurement, and (3) measurements at HRIBF relevant to nuclear astrophysics.

Shriner, Jr, J F

2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

299

2012 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION STATISTICS Issued April 2013 OF OIL, GAS, AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Figures in this report are estimates based on ten months of production data. Final figures will be published in the 2012 Annual Report of the State Oil and Gas

300

2010 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 PRELIMINARY REPORT OF CALIFORNIA OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION STATISTICS Issued August 2011 DIVISION OF OIL, GAS, AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Figures in this report are estimates based on ten months of production data. Final figures will be published in the 2010 Annual Report of the State Oil and Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Off-Highway Gasoline Consuption Estimation Models Used in the Federal Highway Administration Attribution Process: 2008 Updates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is designed to document the analysis process and estimation models currently used by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to estimate the off-highway gasoline consumption and public sector fuel consumption. An overview of the entire FHWA attribution process is provided along with specifics related to the latest update (2008) on the Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model and the Public Use of Gasoline Model. The Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model is made up of five individual modules, one for each of the off-highway categories: agricultural, industrial and commercial, construction, aviation, and marine. This 2008 update of the off-highway models was the second major update (the first model update was conducted during 2002-2003) after they were originally developed in mid-1990. The agricultural model methodology, specifically, underwent a significant revision because of changes in data availability since 2003. Some revision to the model was necessary due to removal of certain data elements used in the original estimation method. The revised agricultural model also made use of some newly available information, published by the data source agency in recent years. The other model methodologies were not drastically changed, though many data elements were updated to improve the accuracy of these models. Note that components in the Public Use of Gasoline Model were not updated in 2008. A major challenge in updating estimation methods applied by the public-use model is that they would have to rely on significant new data collection efforts. In addition, due to resource limitation, several components of the models (both off-highway and public-us models) that utilized regression modeling approaches were not recalibrated under the 2008 study. An investigation of the Environmental Protection Agency's NONROAD2005 model was also carried out under the 2008 model update. Results generated from the NONROAD2005 model were analyzed, examined, and compared, to the extent that is possible on the overall totals, to the current FHWA estimates. Because NONROAD2005 model was designed for emission estimation purposes (i.e., not for measuring fuel consumption), it covers different equipment populations from those the FHWA models were based on. Thus, a direct comparison generally was not possible in most sectors. As a result, NONROAD2005 data were not used in the 2008 update of the FHWA off-highway models. The quality of fuel use estimates directly affect the data quality in many tables published in the Highway Statistics. Although updates have been made to the Off-Highway Gasoline Use Model and the Public Use Gasoline Model, some challenges remain due to aging model equations and discontinuation of data sources.

Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL; Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

State energy price and expenditure report 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 states and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the US. The five economic sectors used in SEPER correspond to those used in SEDR and are residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility. Documentation in appendices describe how the price estimates are developed, provide conversion factors for measures used in the energy analysis, and include a glossary. 65 tabs.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

State energy price and expenditure report 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970, 1980, and 1985 through 1992. Data for all years, 1970 through 1992, are available on personal computer diskettes.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Weigel, Southworth, and Meyer 1 Calculators for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weigel, Southworth, and Meyer 1 Calculators for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public Transit Agency Vehicle Fleet Operations ABSTRACT This paper reviews calculation tools available for quantifying the greenhouse gas emissions associated with different types

305

Estimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) relies on the availability of temperature differencesEstimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model Krishnakumar Rajagopalan Postdoctoral Fellow Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawai'i Abstract

Frandsen, Jannette B.

306

Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model ...

Locatelli, R.

307

The role of unbiased perturbations towards providing estimator robustness with pragmatic geometric methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

linear estimator and then attempt to model the system performance and robustness in a graphical manner, which admits an analysis using the differential geometric concepts of slope. We try to compare two different types of slopes, namely the slope...

Varma, Vishal Vinod

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Distributed Dynamic State Estimator, Generator Parameter Estimation and Stability Monitoring Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for this project that was performed in the period: October1, 2009 to June 30, 2013. In this project, a fully distributed high-fidelity dynamic state estimator (DSE) that continuously tracks the real time dynamic model of a wide area system with update rates better than 60 times per second is achieved. The proposed technology is based on GPS-synchronized measurements but also utilizes data from all available Intelligent Electronic Devices in the system (numerical relays, digital fault recorders, digital meters, etc.). The distributed state estimator provides the real time model of the system not only the voltage phasors. The proposed system provides the infrastructure for a variety of applications and two very important applications (a) a high fidelity generating unit parameters estimation and (b) an energy function based transient stability monitoring of a wide area electric power system with predictive capability. Also the dynamic distributed state estimation results are stored (the storage scheme includes data and coincidental model) enabling an automatic reconstruction and “play back” of a system wide disturbance. This approach enables complete play back capability with fidelity equal to that of real time with the advantage of “playing back” at a user selected speed. The proposed technologies were developed and tested in the lab during the first 18 months of the project and then demonstrated on two actual systems, the USVI Water and Power Administration system and the New York Power Authority’s Blenheim-Gilboa pumped hydro plant in the last 18 months of the project. The four main thrusts of this project, mentioned above, are extremely important to the industry. The DSE with the achieved update rates (more than 60 times per second) provides a superior solution to the “grid visibility” question. The generator parameter identification method fills an important and practical need of the industry. The “energy function” based transient stability monitoring opens up new ways to protect the power grid, better manage disturbances, confine their impact and in general improve the reliability and security of the system. Finally, as a by-product of the proposed research project, the developed system is able to “play back” disturbances by a click of a mouse. The importance of this by-product is evident by considering the tremendous effort exerted after the August 2003 blackout to piece together all the disturbance recordings, align them and recreate the sequence of events. This project has moved the state of art from fault recording by individual devices to system wide disturbance recording with “play back” capability.

Meliopoulos, Sakis; Cokkinides, George; Fardanesh, Bruce; Hedrington, Clinton

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

Biomass Gasification Technology Assessment: Consolidated Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Harris Group Inc. (HGI) was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to assess gasification and tar reforming technologies. Specifically, the assessments focused on gasification and tar reforming technologies that are capable of producing a syngas suitable for further treatment and conversion to liquid fuels. HGI gathered sufficient information to analyze three gasification and tar reforming systems. This report summarizes the equipment, general arrangement of the equipment, operating characteristics, and operating severity for each technology. The order of magnitude capital cost estimates are supported by a basis-of-estimate write-up, which is also included in this report. The report also includes Microsoft Excel workbook models, which can be used to design and price the systems. The models can be used to analyze various operating capacities and pressures. Each model produces a material balance, equipment list, capital cost estimate, equipment drawings and preliminary general arrangement drawings. Example outputs of each model are included in the Appendices.

Worley, M.; Yale, J.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Lidar Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the LiDAR acquisition methodology employed by Woolpert on the 2009 USDA - Savannah River LiDAR Site Project. LiDAR system parameters and flight and equipment information is also included. The LiDAR data acquisition was executed in ten sessions from February 21 through final reflights on March 2, 2009; using two Leica ALS50-II 150kHz Multi-pulse enabled LiDAR Systems. Specific details about the ALS50-II systems are included in Section 4 of this report.

Wollpert.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

,"2013 Report","2010 Report","% Difference"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperativeA2. World9, 2014 International PetroleumFuelAnnual Energy* j o n p o J

312

Analysis of inventory difference using fuzzy controllers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objectives of an accounting system for safeguarding nuclear materials are as follows: (a) to provide assurance that all material quantities are present in the correct amount; (b) to provide timely detection of material loss; and (c) to estimate the amount of any loss and its location. In fuzzy control, expert knowledge is encoded in the form of fuzzy rules, which describe recommended actions for different classes of situations represented by fuzzy sets. The concept of a fuzzy controller is applied to the forecasting problem in a time series, specifically, to forecasting and detecting anomalies in inventory differences. This paper reviews the basic notion underlying the fuzzy control systems and provides examples of application. The well-known material-unaccounted-for diffusion plant data of Jaech are analyzed using both feedforward neural networks and fuzzy controllers. By forming a deference between the forecasted and observed signals, an efficient method to detect small signals in background noise is implemented.

Zardecki, A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Occurrence Reporting  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish and maintain a system for reporting operations information related to DOE-owned or -operated facilities and processing that information to identify the root causes of Unusual, Off-Normal, and Emergency Occurrences and provide for appropriate corrective action. Cancels DOE 5000.3B.

1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

314

Activity report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

Yu, S W

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

315

Licensed fuel facility status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NRC is committed to the periodic publication of licensed fuel facilities inventory difference data, following agency review of the information and completion of any related NRC investigations. Information in this report includes inventory difference data for active fuel fabrication facilities possessing more than one effective kilogram of high enriched uranium, low enriched uranium, plutonium, or uranium-233.

Joy, D.; Brown, C.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Residential Lighting Usage Estimate Tool, v1.0  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

By improving our understanding of residential lighting-energy usage and quantifying it across many different parameters, the new study will be of use to anyone doing energy estimates – such as utilities, market and investment analysts, and government agencies. It will also help manufacturers design products that not only better serve consumers' needs, but that maximize the energy savings that technologies like SSL make possible.

317

The geometry of second-order statistics - biases in common estimators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Second-order measures, such as the two-point correlation function, are geometrical quantities describing the clustering properties of a point distribution. In this article well-known estimators for the correlation integral are reviewed and their relation to geometrical estimators for the two-point correlation function is put forward. Simulations illustrate the range of applicability of these estimators. The interpretation of the two-point correlation function as the excess of clustering with respect to Poisson distributed points has led to biases in common estimators. Comparing with the approximately unbiased geometrical estimators, we show how biases enter the estimators introduced by Davis and Peebles, Landy and Szalay, and Hamilton. We give recommendations for the application of the estimators, including details of the numerical implementation. The properties of the estimators of the correlation integral are illustrated in an application to a sample of IRAS galaxies. It is found that, due to the limitations of current galaxy catalogues in number and depth, no reliable determination of the correlation integral on large scales is possible. In the sample of IRAS galaxies considered, several estimators using different finite-size corrections yield different results on scales larger than 20 Mpc/h, while all of them agree on smaller scales.

Martin Kerscher

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

318

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005 (NTSER) was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NTS Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts.

Cathy A. Wills

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

2011 EnergyValue Housing Award Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the simulation tool(s) and energy modeling methodology followed in making the energy efficiency estimates and documents the estimated performance of the EVHA award winning houses in comparison with the Building America Benchmark and the associated House Simulation Protocols. A summary of each building and its features is included with a brief description of the project and the judges' comments. The purpose of this report is to assess the energy performance of the 2011 EVHA winners as well as align the EVHA Program with the Building America Program.

Sagan, D.; Del Bianco, M.; Wood, A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

GAMS program used to estimate capacity with the hyperbolic graph efficiency measure, with constant returns to scale and undesirable outputs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. "Estimating Capacity and Efficiency in Fisheries with Undesirable Outputs." VIMS Marine resource Report N(obs) weights gamma(obs,var) ; POSITIVE Variable weight, gamma; EQUATIONS CONSTR1(GOUTPUT, OBS) DEA constraint

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

GAMS program used to estimate capacity with the hyperbolic graph efficiency measure, with variable returns to scale and undesirable outputs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. "Estimating Capacity and Efficiency in Fisheries with Undesirable Outputs." VIMS Marine resource Report N(obs) weights gamma(obs,var) ; POSITIVE Variable weight, gamma; EQUATIONS CONSTR1(GOUTPUT, OBS) DEA constraint

322

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2009 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report is the third annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing cost of complete 80 kWnet direct hydrogen proton exch

323

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2007, 2010, and 2015, and is the first annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

324

Mass Production Cost Estimation For Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systesm for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report is the fourth annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing costs of complete 80 kWnet direct?hydrogen proton ex

325

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the second annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

326

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the second annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

327

Is global warming just a giant natural fluctuation? When estimating voter's intentions, pollsters know that statements like "40%  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Is global warming just a giant natural fluctuation? When estimating voter theory. So what about global warming? Shouldn't we apply the same warming since the mid-20th century" (IPCC, Assessment Report 5, AR5), then surely

Lovejoy, Shaun

328

Estimated cumulative radiation dose from PET/CT in children with malignancies: a 5-year retrospective review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EE, Thomas SR et al (2002) MIRD dose estimate report No. 19:of a mathematical phantom (MIRD phantom) by a range of CTselect using a diagram of the MIRD phantom provided. Based

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

ON THE ESTIMATION OF SYSTEMATIC UNCERTAINTIES OF STAR FORMATION HISTORIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In most star formation history (SFH) measurements, the reported uncertainties are those due to effects whose sizes can be readily measured: Poisson noise, adopted distance and extinction, and binning choices in the solution itself. However, the largest source of error, systematics in the adopted isochrones, is usually ignored and very rarely explicitly incorporated into the uncertainties. I propose a process by which estimates of the uncertainties due to evolutionary models can be incorporated into the SFH uncertainties. This process relies on application of shifts in temperature and luminosity, the sizes of which must be calibrated for the data being analyzed. While there are inherent limitations, the ability to estimate the effect of systematic errors and include them in the overall uncertainty is significant. The effects of this are most notable in the case of shallow photometry, with which SFH measurements rely on evolved stars.

Dolphin, Andrew E., E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com [Raytheon Company, Tucson, AZ 85734 (United States)

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

330

Demonstration Integrated Knowledge-Based System for Estimating Human Error Probabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) is currently comprised of at least 40 different methods that are used to analyze, predict, and evaluate human performance in probabilistic terms. Systematic HRAs allow analysts to examine human-machine relationships, identify error-likely situations, and provide estimates of relative frequencies for human errors on critical tasks, highlighting the most beneficial areas for system improvements. Unfortunately, each of HRA's methods has a different philosophical approach, thereby producing estimates of human error probabilities (HEPs) that area better or worse match to the error likely situation of interest. Poor selection of methodology, or the improper application of techniques can produce invalid HEP estimates, where that erroneous estimation of potential human failure could have potentially severe consequences in terms of the estimated occurrence of injury, death, and/or property damage.

Auflick, Jack L.

1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

331

Analysis of neutron scattering data: Visualization and parameter estimation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, small-angle neutron and x-ray scattering (SANS and SAXS) data analysis requires measurements of the signal and corrections due to the empty sample container, detector efficiency and time-dependent background. These corrections are then made on a pixel-by-pixel basis and estimates of relevant parameters (e.g., the radius of gyration) are made using the corrected data. This study was carried out in order to determine whether treatment of the detector efficiency and empty sample cell in a more statistically sound way would significantly reduce the uncertainties in the parameter estimators. Elements of experiment design are shortly discussed in this paper. For instance, we studied the way the time for a measurement should be optimally divided between the counting for signal, background and detector efficiency. In Section 2 we introduce the commonly accepted models for small-angle neutron and x-scattering and confine ourselves to the Guinier and Rayleigh models and their minor generalizations. The traditional approaches of data analysis are discussed only to the extent necessary to allow their comparison with the proposed techniques. Section 3 describes the main stages of the proposed method: visual data exploration, fitting the detector sensitivity function, and fitting a compound model. This model includes three additive terms describing scattering by the sampler, scattering with an empty container and a background noise. We compare a few alternatives for the first term by applying various scatter plots and computing sums of standardized squared residuals. Possible corrections due to smearing effects and randomness of estimated parameters are also shortly discussed. In Section 4 the robustness of the estimators with respect to low and upper bounds imposed on the momentum value is discussed. We show that for the available data set the most accurate and stable estimates are generated by models containing double terms either of Guinier's or Rayleigh's type. The optimal partitioning of the total experimental time between measuring various signals is discussed in Section 5. We applied a straightforward optimization instead of some special experimental techniques because of the numerical simplicity of the corresponding problem. As a criterion of optimality we selected the variance of the gyration radius maximum likelihood estimator. The statistical background of the proposed approach is given in the appendix. The properties of the maximum likelihood estimators and the corresponding iterated estimator together with its possible numerical realization are presented in subsection A.1. In subsection A.2 we prove that the use of a compound model leads to more efficient estimators than a stage-wise analysis of different components entering that model.

Beauchamp, J.J.; Fedorov, V.; Hamilton, W.A.; Yethiraj, M.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

An indirect transmission measurement-based spectrum estimation method for computed tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The characteristics of an x-ray spectrum can greatly influence imaging and related tasks. In practice, due to the pile-up effect of the detector, it's difficult to directly measure the spectrum of a CT scanner using an energy resolved detector. An alternative solution is to estimate the spectrum using transmission measurements with a step phantom or other CT phantom. In this work, we present a new spectrum estimation method based on indirect transmission measurement and model spectra mixture approach. The estimated x-ray spectrum was expressed as weighted summation of a set of model spectra, which can significantly reduce the degrees of freedom (DOF) of the spectrum estimation problem. Next, an estimated projection can be calculated with the assumed spectrum. By iteratively updating the unknown weights, we minimized the difference between the estimated projection data and the raw projection data. The final spectrum was calculated with these calibrated weights and the model spectra. Both simulation and experim...

Zhao, Wei; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Simultaneous Estimation of Photometric Redshifts and SED Parameters: Improved Techniques and a Realistic Error Budget  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We seek to improve the accuracy of joint galaxy photometric redshift estimation and spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. By simulating different sources of uncorrected systematic errors, we demonstrate that if the uncertainties on the photometric redshifts are estimated correctly, so are those on the other SED fitting parameters, such as stellar mass, stellar age, and dust reddening. Furthermore, we find that if the redshift uncertainties are over(under)-estimated, the uncertainties in SED parameters tend to be over(under)-estimated by similar amounts. These results hold even in the presence of severe systematics and provide, for the first time, a mechanism to validate the uncertainties on these parameters via comparison with spectroscopic redshifts. We propose a new technique (annealing) to re-calibrate the joint uncertainties in the photo-z and SED fitting parameters without compromising the performance of the SED fitting + photo-z estimation. This procedure provides a consistent estimation of the mu...

Acquaviva, Viviana; Gawiser, Eric

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Solution-verified reliability analysis and design of bistable MEMS using error estimation and adaptivity.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results for an FY06 ASC Algorithms Level 2 milestone combining error estimation and adaptivity, uncertainty quantification, and probabilistic design capabilities applied to the analysis and design of bistable MEMS. Through the use of error estimation and adaptive mesh refinement, solution verification can be performed in an automated and parameter-adaptive manner. The resulting uncertainty analysis and probabilistic design studies are shown to be more accurate, efficient, reliable, and convenient.

Eldred, Michael Scott; Subia, Samuel Ramirez; Neckels, David; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Notz, Patrick K.; Adams, Brian M.; Carnes, Brian; Wittwer, Jonathan W.; Bichon, Barron J.; Copps, Kevin D.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Answers to questions about updated estimates of occupational radiation doses at Three Mile Island, Unit 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this question and answer report is to provide a clear, easy-to-understand explanation of revised radiation dose estimates which workers are likely to receive over the course of the cleanup at Three Mile Island, Unit 2, and of the possible health consequences to workers of these new estimates. We will focus primarily on occupational dose, although pertinent questions about public health and safety will also be answered.

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials Biomass production potentials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 1 Biomass production potentials in Central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios Final report of WP3 of the VIEWLS project, funded by DG-Tren #12;WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 2 Report Biomass production potentials in central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios

337

Biosphere Process Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor. Collectively, the potential human receptor and exposure pathways form the biosphere model. More detailed technical information and data about potential human receptor groups and the characteristics of exposure pathways have been developed in a series of AMRs and Calculation Reports.

J. Schmitt

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

338

Improved dose estimates for nuclear criticality accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Slide rules are improved for estimating doses and dose rates resulting from nuclear criticality accidents. The original slide rules were created for highly enriched uranium solutions and metals using hand calculations along with the decades old Way-Wigner radioactive decay relationship and the inverse square law. This work uses state-of-the-art methods and better data to improve the original slide rules and also to extend the slide rule concept to three additional systems; i.e., highly enriched (93.2 wt%) uranium damp (H/{sup 235}U = 10) powder (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) and low-enriched (5 wt%) uranium mixtures (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) with a H/{sup 235}U ratio of 200 and 500. Although the improved slide rules differ only slightly from the original slide rules, the improved slide rules and also the new slide rules can be used with greater confidence since they are based on more rigorous methods and better nuclear data.

Wilkinson, A.D.; Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.L.; Dunn, M.E.; Plaster, M.J.; Dodds, H.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Haught, C.F. [Martin Marietta Utility Systems, Piketon, OH (United States); Yamamoto, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Hopper, C.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the need to reassess wind potential estimates in India andDivision Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India:July 2011 Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India:

Phadke, Amol

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Tank waste remediation system phase I high-level waste feed processability assessment report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the effects of feed composition on the Phase I high-level waste immobilization process and interim storage facility requirements for the high-level waste glass.Several different Phase I staging (retrieval, blending, and pretreatment) scenarios were used to generate example feed compositions for glass formulations, testing, and glass sensitivity analysis. Glass models and data form laboratory glass studies were used to estimate achievable waste loading and corresponding glass volumes for various Phase I feeds. Key issues related to feed process ability, feed composition, uncertainty, and immobilization process technology are identified for future consideration in other tank waste disposal program activities.

Lambert, S.L.; Stegen, G.E., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A robustness application for linear estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, recursive algorithm for yielding estimates of the state of a linear dynamic system (see, for example, the excellent tutorial [1]). Many other applications of this estimation scheme exist in the areas of signal processing, power systems, telecommunications... on robustness causes the coefficient which maximizes J to approach the coefficient which produces maximum robustness. 37 REFERENCES [1] I. B. Rhodes, "A Tutorial Introduction to Estimation and Filtering, "IEEE Trans. on Automatic Control, vol. AC-16, pp...

Kitzman, Kenneth Victor

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Estimating heat of combustion for waste materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Describes a method of estimating the heat of combustion of hydrocarbon waste (containing S,N,Q,C1) in various physical forms (vapor, liquid, solid, or mixtures) when the composition of the waste stream is known or can be estimated. Presents an equation for predicting the heat of combustion of hydrocarbons containing some sulfur. Shows how the method is convenient for estimating the heat of combustion of a waste profile as shown in a sample calculation.

Chang, Y.C.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Budget estimates. Fiscal year 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Congress has determined that the safe use of nuclear materials for peaceful purposes is a legitimate and important national goal. It has entrusted the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with the primary Federal responsibility for achieving that goal. The NRC`s mission, therefore, is to regulate the Nation`s civilian use of byproduct, source, and special nuclear materials to ensure adequate protection of public health and safety, to promote the common defense and security, and to protect the environment. The NRC`s FY 1998 budget requests new budget authority of $481,300,000 to be funded by two appropriations - one is the NRC`s Salaraies and Expenses appropriation for $476,500,000, and the other is NRC`s Office of Inspector General appropriation for $4,800,000. Of the funds appropriated to the NRC`s Salaries and Expenses, $17,000,000, shall be derived from the Nuclear Waste Fund and $2,000,000 shall be derived from general funds. The proposed FY 1998 appropriation legislation would also exempt the $2,000,000 for regulatory reviews and other assistance provided to the Department of Energy from the requirement that the NRC collect 100 percent of its budget from fees. The sums appropriated to the NRC`s Salaries and Expenses and NRC`s Office of Inspector General shall be reduced by the amount of revenues received during FY 1998 from licensing fees, inspection services, and other services and collections, so as to result in a final FY 1998 appropriation for the NRC of an estimated $19,000,000 - the amount appropriated from the Nuclear Waste Fund and from general funds. Revenues derived from enforcement actions shall be deposited to miscellaneous receipts of the Treasury.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Estimating Temperature Distributions In Geothermal Areas Using...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

neuronet temperature estimates based on well log data derive from: (a) the neuronet "education level" (which depends on the amount and structure of information used for teaching)...

345

Flux recovery and a posteriori error estimators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bility and the local efficiency bounds for this estimator are established provided that the ... For simple model problems, the energy norm of the true error is equal.

2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

346

Estimating Methods - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

direct costs, and other estimating considerations are discussed in this chapter. g4301-1chp15.pdf -- PDF Document, 28 KB Writer: John Makepeace Subjects: Administration Management...

347

Estimating Specialty Costs - DOE Directives, Delegations, and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

project specialty costs and methods of estimating costs for specialty projects. g4301-1chp20.pdf -- PDF Document, 56 KB Writer: John Makepeace Subjects: Administration Management...

348

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT PRELIMINARY ESTIMATES5002013051 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: 500-99-013 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Steve Ghadiri Contract Manager Fernando Piña

349

Hanford Site 1998 Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to: describe the Hanford Site and its mission; summarize the status of compliance with environmental regulations; describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; discuss the estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1998 Hanford Site activities; present the effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, and groundwater protection and monitoring information; and discuss the activities to ensure quality.

RL Dirkes; RW Hanf; TM Poston

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

350

Iraq: World Oil Report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that no reliable information on Iraqi E and P operations and only a few reports on oil field facilities damage have been available since last August. Most of what is known originated from the Middle East Economic Survey (MEES), the authoritative newsletter covering the Middle East. According to MEES reports in major northern oil fields (Kirkuk, Bai Hasan and Jambur) is put at 800,000 bpd. The northern fields and the pipeline system through Turkey to the Mediterranean Sea that serves as an export outlet for the area apparently were not damaged much by coalition air strikes or subsequent fighting by the Kurds. Last May production was estimated at 250,000 bpd, presumably from northern fields. If and when U.N. sanctions are lifted, Iraq should be able to export promptly through the Turkish line.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hanford Site Environmental Report 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to: (1) describe the Hanford Site and its mission; (2) summarize the status of compliance with environmental regulations; (3) describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; (4) discuss the estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1999 Hanford Site activities; (5) present the effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, groundwater protection and monitoring information; and (6) discuss the activities to ensure quality.

TM Poston; RW Hanf; RL Dirkes

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

352

Ocean thermal energy. Quarterly report, October-December 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report summarizes work on the following tasks: OTEC methanol; approaches for financing OTEC proof-of-concept experimental vessels; investigation of OTEC-ammonia as an alternative fuel; review of electrolyzer development programs and requirements; hybrid geothermal-OTEC power plants: single-cycle performance; estimates; and hybrid geothermal-OTEC power plants: dual-cycle performance estimates.

Not Available

1981-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

PARSII - New Reports and Reports With New Reporting Folder Location  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

active projects listing PrePost CD-2 and 's including RYG status. Multi-Project 3A Red-Yellow Project Status Report PARS Reports Monthly Reports For every project that has...

354

Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.

NONE

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Optimal Estimation of States in Quantum Image Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An optimal estimator of quantum states based on a modified Kalman Filter is presented in this work. Such estimator acts after state measurement, allowing to obtain an optimal estimation of quantum state resulting in the output of any quantum image algorithm. Besides, a new criteria, logic, and arithmetic based on projections onto vertical axis of Bloch Sphere exclusively are presented too. This approach will allow us: 1) a simpler development of logic and arithmetic quantum operations, where they will closer to those used in the classical digital image processing algorithms, 2) building simple and robust classical-to-quantum and quantum-to-classical interfaces. Said so far is extended to quantum algorithms outside image processing too. In a special section on metrics and simulations, three new metrics based on the comparison between the classical and quantum versions algorithms for filtering and edge detection of images are presented. Notable differences between the results of classical and quantum versions of such algorithms (outside and inside of quantum computer, respectively) show the need for modeling state and measurement noise inside estimation scheme.

Mario Mastriani

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

356

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

R Paul Drake

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

357

Annual Report  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1Annual Fuel Economy Guide with 20141 2011 Annual Report

358

SANDIA REPORT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORT SAND 2011-3958 Unlimited Release

359

SANDIA REPORT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORT SAND 2011-3958 Unlimited Release4-4161

360

SANDIA REPORT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORT SAND 2011-3958 Unlimited

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

FINAL REPORT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolutionFES Committees of9, 2011 FINALOffice of FINAL REPORT

362

Workshop Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campus Working withWorkshop Reports

363

Reporting Requirements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORV 15051SoilWindFraud toDepartmentReporting

364

Economic evaluation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to establish a database of costs associated with operating a circulating fluidized bed boiler for electric power production in a utility environment. Such data and information can be used by others for resource planning and for comparisons with competing technologies. Costs are also presented for the engineering, construction and start-up of the Nucla CFB. These are compared with estimates made in 1981 prior to completing detailed engineering. Detailed monthly operating costs over the testing period covered by the Cooperative Agreement, from September 1988 through January 1991, are presented in Appendix D. An overall summary of cost data for this period is presented in the same format in Appendix C. These data were generated by CUEA using reporting requirements established by the Rural Electrification Administration`s Uniform System of Accounts. This accounting system is consistent with that used by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Uniform System of Accounts, which is prescribed for public utilities and licensees subject to the provisions of the Federal Power Act. The definitions of terms used in the REA code of accounts are contained in Appendix B.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Economic evaluation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to establish a database of costs associated with operating a circulating fluidized bed boiler for electric power production in a utility environment. Such data and information can be used by others for resource planning and for comparisons with competing technologies. Costs are also presented for the engineering, construction and start-up of the Nucla CFB. These are compared with estimates made in 1981 prior to completing detailed engineering. Detailed monthly operating costs over the testing period covered by the Cooperative Agreement, from September 1988 through January 1991, are presented in Appendix D. An overall summary of cost data for this period is presented in the same format in Appendix C. These data were generated by CUEA using reporting requirements established by the Rural Electrification Administration's Uniform System of Accounts. This accounting system is consistent with that used by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Uniform System of Accounts, which is prescribed for public utilities and licensees subject to the provisions of the Federal Power Act. The definitions of terms used in the REA code of accounts are contained in Appendix B.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Essays on Nonparametric Series Estimation with Application to Financial Econometrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation includes two essays. In the first essay, I proposed an alternative estimator for multivariate densities. This estimator can be characterized as a transformation based estimator. The first stage estimates each marginal density...

Chang, Meng-Shiuh

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

367

COMMUNITY REPORT September 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNITY REPORT September 2014 BIAS REPORT AND SUPPORT SYSTEM #12;8 Bias Report and Support System Charge: The Bias Report at Washington University. Through the BRSS, students will be able to report incidents of bias. The working group

Larson-Prior, Linda

368

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop capital assets ­ Three main classes of capital costs: 1. Depreciable Investment: · Investment allocated

Boisvert, Jeff

369

2009 Cost Estimates of Establishing and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009 Cost Estimates of Establishing and Producing Gala Apples in Washington WASHINGTON STATE include estimating 1) the costs of the equipment, materials, supplies, and labor required to establish for any particular orchard operation due to case-specific: · Capital, labor, and natural resources · Crop

Collins, Gary S.

370

2013 Cost Estimation of Establishing a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2013 Cost Estimation of Establishing a Cider Apple Orchard in Western Washington W A S H I N G factors: · Capital, labor, and natural resources · Crop yield · Cultural practices · Input prices Cost estimations in this enterprise budget also vary depending on the budget's intended use. To avoid

Collins, Gary S.

371

MATLAB Functions for Profiled Estimation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATLAB Functions for Profiled Estimation of Differential Equations Giles Hooker June 23, 2010: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2 Example: FitzHugh-Nagumo Equations 5 3 MATLAB Objects Needed for the Estimation. 6 3.1 Cell is designed to accompany a Matlab software package that esti- mates the parameters in differential equation

Keinan, Alon

372

Reservation Price Estimation by Adaptive Conjoint Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservation Price Estimation by Adaptive Conjoint Analysis Christoph Breidert1 , Michael Hahsler1 applied the eco- nomic definition of reservation price in combination with a conjoint study on product pricing. In this paper we present a novel approach to estimate the economic reser- vation price using

Schmidt-Thieme, Lars

373

Systematic Approach for Decommissioning Planning and Estimating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear facility decommissioning, satisfactorily completed at the lowest cost, relies on a systematic approach to the planning, estimating, and documenting the work. High quality information is needed to properly perform the planning and estimating. A systematic approach to collecting and maintaining the needed information is recommended using a knowledgebase system for information management. A systematic approach is also recommended to develop the decommissioning plan, cost estimate and schedule. A probabilistic project cost and schedule risk analysis is included as part of the planning process. The entire effort is performed by a experienced team of decommissioning planners, cost estimators, schedulers, and facility knowledgeable owner representatives. The plant data, work plans, cost and schedule are entered into a knowledgebase. This systematic approach has been used successfully for decommissioning planning and cost estimating for a commercial nuclear power plant. Elements of this approach have been used for numerous cost estimates and estimate reviews. The plan and estimate in the knowledgebase should be a living document, updated periodically, to support decommissioning fund provisioning, with the plan ready for use when the need arises.

Dam, A. S.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

Articulated Human Pose Estimation in Natural Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Articulated Human Pose Estimation in Natural Images by Samuel Alan Johnson Submitted in accordance. c 2012 The University of Leeds and Samuel Alan Johnson 2 #12;Abstract In this thesis the problem. Johnson and M. Everingham, "Learning Effective Human Pose Estimation from In- accurate Annotation

Hogg, David

375

The Importance of Carbon Footprint Estimation Boundaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Importance of Carbon Footprint Estimation Boundaries H . S C O T T M A T T H E W S , C H R I and organizations are pursuing "carbon footprint" projects to estimate their own contributions to global climate change. Protocol definitions from carbon registries help organizations analyze their footprints

Kammen, Daniel M.

376

Density Estimation Trees in High Energy Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Density Estimation Trees can play an important role in exploratory data analysis for multidimensional, multi-modal data models of large samples. I briefly discuss the algorithm, a self-optimization technique based on kernel density estimation, and some applications in High Energy Physics.

Anderlini, Lucio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 1 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES O. Bernard1 , B. Chachuat2 , and J sensors (also called observers) for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). We give an overview model description (e.g., the 1 #12;2 STATE ESTIMATION FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROCESSES extended Kalman

Bernard, Olivier

378

Bayesian surface estimation for white light interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.hamprecht@iwr.uni-heidelberg.de). 1 #12;The development of white light interferometers for industry was first guidedBayesian surface estimation for white light interferometry Michael Hissmann Fred A. Hamprecht 2004/07/05 Abstract In conventional white light interferometry (WLI) surface estimation, data acquisition is followed

Hamprecht, Fred A.

379

Hybrid Estimation of CMB Polarization Power Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper generalises the hybrid power spectrum estimator developed in Efstathiou (2004a) to the estimation of polarization power spectra of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The hybrid power spectrum estimator is unbiased and we show that it is close to optimal at all multipoles, provided the pixel noise satisfies certain reasonable constraints. Furthermore, the hybrid estimator is computationally fast and can easily be incorporated in a Monte-Carlo chain for Planck-sized data sets. Simple formulae are given for the covariance matrices, including instrumental noise, and these are tested extensively against numerical simulations. We compare the behaviour of simple pseudo-Cell estimates with maximum likelihood estimates at low multipoles. For realistic sky cuts, maximum likelihood estimates reduce very significantly the mixing of E and B modes. To achieve limits on the scalar-tensor ratio of r<<0.1 from sky maps with realistic sky cuts, maximum likelihood methods, or pseudo-Cell estimators based on unambiguous E and B modes, will be essential.

G. Efstathiou

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

380

2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT

Jawitz, James W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

Webb, Robert C. [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Kamon, Teruki [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Toback, David [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Safonov, Alexei [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Dutta, Bhaskar [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Dimitri, Nanopoulos [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Pope, Christopher [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; White, James [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

382

New approaches to estimation of magnetotelluric parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fully efficient robust data processing procedures were developed and tested for single station and remote reference magnetotelluric (Mr) data. Substantial progress was made on development, testing and comparison of optimal procedures for single station data. A principal finding of this phase of the research was that the simplest robust procedures can be more heavily biased by noise in the (input) magnetic fields, than standard least squares estimates. To deal with this difficulty we developed a robust processing scheme which combined the regression M-estimate with coherence presorting. This hybrid approach greatly improves impedance estimates, particularly in the low signal-to-noise conditions often encountered in the dead band'' (0.1--0.0 hz). The methods, and the results of comparisons of various single station estimators are described in detail. Progress was made on developing methods for estimating static distortion parameters, and for testing hypotheses about the underlying dimensionality of the geological section.

Egbert, G.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation. Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation. Abstract: Many...

384

Characterization and estimation of permeability correlation structure from performance data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the influence of permeability structure and correlation length on the system effective permeability and recovery factors of 2-D cross-sectional reservoir models, under waterflood, is investigated. Reservoirs with identical statistical representation of permeability attributes are shown to exhibit different system effective permeability and production characteristics which can be expressed by a mean and variance. The mean and variance are shown to be significantly influenced by the correlation length. Detailed quantification of the influence of horizontal and vertical correlation lengths for different permeability distributions is presented. The effect of capillary pressure, P{sub c1} on the production characteristics and saturation profiles at different correlation lengths is also investigated. It is observed that neglecting P{sub c} causes considerable error at large horizontal and short vertical correlation lengths. The effect of using constant as opposed to variable relative permeability attributes is also investigated at different correlation lengths. Next we studied the influence of correlation anisotropy in 2-D reservoir models. For a reservoir under five-spot waterflood pattern, it is shown that the ratios of breakthrough times and recovery factors of the wells in each direction of correlation are greatly influenced by the degree of anisotropy. In fully developed fields, performance data can aid in the recognition of reservoir anisotropy. Finally, a procedure for estimating the spatial correlation length from performance data is presented. Both the production performance data and the system`s effective permeability are required in estimating the correlation length.

Ershaghi, I.; Al-Qahtani, M. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) Cost Estimate Summary (Leveraged NDC Case).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has prepared a ROM cost estimate for budgetary planning for the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 & 3 effort, based on leveraging a fully funded, Sandia executed NDC Modernization project. This report provides the ROM cost estimate and describes the methodology, assumptions, and cost model details used to create the ROM cost estimate. ROM Cost Estimate Disclaimer Contained herein is a Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost estimate that has been provided to enable initial planning for this proposed project. This ROM cost estimate is submitted to facilitate informal discussions in relation to this project and is NOT intended to commit Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) or its resources. Furthermore, as a Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC), Sandia must be compliant with the Anti-Deficiency Act and operate on a full-cost recovery basis. Therefore, while Sandia, in conjunction with the Sponsor, will use best judgment to execute work and to address the highest risks and most important issues in order to effectively manage within cost constraints, this ROM estimate and any subsequent approved cost estimates are on a 'full-cost recovery' basis. Thus, work can neither commence nor continue unless adequate funding has been accepted and certified by DOE.

Harris, James M.; Prescott, Ryan; Dawson, Jericah M.; Huelskamp, Robert M.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINAL COPY Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-4069-3 2. Government-Service Structures with Premature 5. Report Date October 2004, Rev. September 2005 Concrete Deterioration: Synthesis Report 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) 8. Performing Organization Report No. Amy E. Eskridge

Texas at Austin, University of

387

Decay Oscillations in Electron Capture and the Neutrino Mass Difference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum mechanical theory disallows the model that has been used to infer the neutrino mass difference from the reported "GSI oscillations" in the rates of decay of hydrogen-like ions by electron capture. It has not been proved that the existence of mass-difference-dependent oscillations conflicts with quantum mechanics but no consistent quantum mechanical model has been shown to predict them.

Murray Peshkin

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

Evaluating Bounds and Estimators for Constants of Random Polycrystals Composed of Orthotropic Elastic Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the well-known Voigt and Reuss (VR) bounds, and the Voigt-Reuss-Hill (VRH) elastic constant estimators for random polycrystals are all straightforwardly calculated once the elastic constants of anisotropic crystals are known, the Hashin-Shtrikman (HS) bounds and related self-consistent (SC) estimators for the same constants are, by comparison, more difficult to compute. Recent work has shown how to simplify (to some extent) these harder to compute HS bounds and SC estimators. An overview and analysis of a subsampling of these results is presented here with the main point being to show whether or not this extra work (i.e., in calculating both the HS bounds and the SC estimates) does provide added value since, in particular, the VRH estimators often do not fall within the HS bounds, while the SC estimators (for good reasons) have always been found to do so. The quantitative differences between the SC and the VRH estimators in the eight cases considered are often quite small however, being on the order of ±1%. These quantitative results hold true even though these polycrystal Voigt-Reuss-Hill estimators more typically (but not always) fall outside the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds, while the self-consistent estimators always fall inside (or on the boundaries of) these same bounds.

Berryman, J.G.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Uncertainty Estimation Improves Energy Measurement and Verification Procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Implementing energy conservation measures in buildings can reduce energy costs and environmental impacts, but such measures cost money to implement so intelligent investment strategies require the ability to quantify the energy savings by comparing actual energy used to how much energy would have been used in absence of the conservation measures (known as the baseline energy use). Methods exist for predicting baseline energy use, but a limitation of most statistical methods reported in the literature is inadequate quantification of the uncertainty in baseline energy use predictions. However, estimation of uncertainty is essential for weighing the risks of investing in retrofits. Most commercial buildings have, or soon will have, electricity meters capable of providing data at short time intervals. These data provide new opportunities to quantify uncertainty in baseline predictions, and to do so after shorter measurement durations than are traditionally used. In this paper, we show that uncertainty estimation provides greater measurement and verification (M&V) information and helps to overcome some of the difficulties with deciding how much data is needed to develop baseline models and to confirm energy savings. We also show that cross-validation is an effective method for computing uncertainty. In so doing, we extend a simple regression-based method of predicting energy use using short-interval meter data. We demonstrate the methods by predicting energy use in 17 real commercial buildings. We discuss the benefits of uncertainty estimates which can provide actionable decision making information for investing in energy conservation measures.

Walter, Travis; Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

A maximum entropy-least squares estimator for elastic origin-destination trip matrix estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A maximum entropy-least squares estimator for elastic origin- destination trip matrix estimation propose a combined maximum entropy-least squares (ME-LS) estimator, by which O- D flows are distributed-destination trip table; elastic demand; maximum entropy; least squares; subnetwork analysis; convex combination

Kockelman, Kara M.

391

Accurate Estimation of Gaseous Strength using Transient Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information about the strength of gas sources in buildings has a number of applications in the area of building automation and control, including temperature and ventilation control, fire detection and security systems. Here, we consider the problem of estimating the strength of a gas source in an enclosure when some of the parameters of the gas transport process are unknown. Traditionally, these problems are either solved by the Maximum-Likelihood (ML) method which is accurate but computationally intense, or by Recursive Least Squares (RLS, also Kalman) filtering which is simpler but less accurate. In this paper, we suggest a different statistical estimation procedure based on the concept of Method of Moments. We outline techniques that make this procedure computationally efficient and amenable for recursive implementation. We provide a comparative analysis of our proposed method based on experimental results as well as Monte-Carlo simulations. When used with the building control systems, these algorithms ca...

Kar, Swarnendu; 10.1109/TIM.2010.2084731

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Facilities evaluation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development whose mission is to evaluate different new and existing technologies and determine how well they address DOE community waste remediation problems. Twenty-three Technical Task Plans (TTPs) have been identified to support this mission during FY-92; 10 of these have identified some support requirements when demonstrations take place. Section 1 of this report describes the tasks supported by BWID, determines if a technical demonstration is proposed, and if so, identifies the support requirements requested by the TTP Principal Investigators. Section 2 of this report is an evaluation identifying facility characteristics of existing Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) facilities that may be considered for use in BWID technology demonstration activities.

Sloan, P.A.; Edinborough, C.R.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Interim Report summarizes the research and development activities of the Superconducting Super Collider project carried out from the completion of the Reference Designs Study (May 1984) to June 1985. It was prepared by the SSC Central Design Group in draft form on the occasion of the DOE Annual Review, June 19--21, 1985. Now largely organized by CDG Divisions, the bulk of each chapter documents the progress and accomplishments to date, while the final section(s) describe plans for future work. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides a basic brief description of the SSC, its physics justification, its origins, and the R&D organization set up to carry out the work. Chapter 2 gives a summary of the main results of the R&D program, the tasks assigned to the four magnet R&D centers, and an overview of the future plans. The reader wishing a quick look at the SSC Phase I effort can skim Chapter 1 and read Chapter 2. Subsequent chapters discuss in more detail the activities on accelerator physics, accelerator systems, magnets and cryostats, injector, detector R&D, conventional facilities, and project planning and management. The magnet chapter (5) documents in text and photographs the impressive progress in successful construction of many model magnets, the development of cryostats with low heat leaks, and the improvement in current-carrying capacity of superconducting strand. Chapter 9 contains the budgets and schedules of the COG Divisions, the overall R&D program, including the laboratories, and also preliminary projections for construction. Appendices provide information on the various panels, task forces and workshops held by the CDG in FY 1985, a bibliography of COG and Laboratory reports on SSC and SSC-related work, and on private industrial involvement in the project.

NONE

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

FEMP fiscal year 1999 ESPC business strategy development summary report[Energy Saving Performance Contract  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the US Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to reduce the cost of Government by advancing energy efficiency, water conservation, and the use of solar and other renewable technologies. This is accomplished by creating partnerships, leveraging resources, transferring technology, and providing training and technical guidance and assistance to agencies. Each of these activities is directly related to achieving requirements set forth in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and the goals that have been established in Executive Order 13123 (June 1999), but also those that are inherent in sound management of Federal financial and personnel resources. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) supports the FEMP mission in all activity areas. This responsibility includes working with various Federal energy managers to identify, monitor, and evaluate the performance of new energy efficiency technologies suitable for installation at Federal sites. This report provides the results of a Energy Saving Performance Contracting (ESPC) Business Strategy Development project that PNNL conducted for FEMP. The project provides information regarding the development of Federal market scenarios for FEMP Super-ESPC delivery orders. Two market scenarios were developed. The initial scenario resulted in an estimated delivery order target that was much lower than initially estimated in the spring of 1998. The second scenario yielded a lower estimated number of delivery orders. The main difference between these two scenarios was an estimated increase in utility financed projects in the Federal sector.

KL McMordie-Stoughton; WDM Hunt

2000-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

395

Human genome. 1993 Program report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to update the Human Genome 1991-92 Program Report and provide new information on the DOE genome program to researchers, program managers, other government agencies, and the interested public. This FY 1993 supplement includes abstracts of 60 new or renewed projects and listings of 112 continuing and 28 completed projects. These two reports, taken together, present the most complete published view of the DOE Human Genome Program through FY 1993. Research is progressing rapidly toward 15-year goals of mapping and sequencing the DNA of each of the 24 different human chromosomes.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During second quarter 1995, samples from seven new AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) were analyzed for a comprehensive list of constituents. Two parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. Lead and nickel appear to exceed final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in AMB-18A. These data were suspect and a rerun of the samples showed levels below flagging criteria. This data will be monitored in 3Q95. Aluminum, iron, manganese, boron, silver and total organic halogens exceeded Flag 2 criteria in at least one well each during second quarter 1995. This data, as well, will be confirmed by 3Q95 testing. Groundwater flow directions in the M-Area Aquifer Zone were similar to previous quarters; the flow rate estimate, however, differs because of an error noted in the scales of measurements used for previous estimates. The estimate was 470 ft/year during second quarter 1995. Reliable estimates of flow directions and rates in the Upper Lost Lake Aquifer Zone could not be determined in previous quarters because data were insufficient. The first estimate from second quarter 1995 shows a 530 ft/year rate. Reliable estimates of flow directions and rates in the Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone and in the Middle Sand Aquifer Zone of the CBCU could not be calculated because of the low horizontal gradient and the near-linear distribution of the monitoring wells. During second quarter 1994, SRS received South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control approval for constructing five point-of-compliance wells and two plume definition wells near the Met Lab HWMF. This project began in July 1994 and was completed in March of this year. Analytical data from these wells are presented in this report for the first time.

Chase, J.A.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Parallel State Estimation Assessment with Practical Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a full-cycle parallel state estimation (PSE) implementation using a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm. The developed code is able to solve large-size power system state estimation within 5 seconds using real-world data, comparable to the Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) rate. This achievement allows the operators to know the system status much faster to help improve grid reliability. Case study results of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) system with real measurements are presented. The benefits of fast state estimation are also discussed.

Chen, Yousu; Jin, Shuangshuang; Rice, Mark J.; Huang, Zhenyu

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

A priori estimates for relativistic liquid bodies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate that a sufficiently smooth solution of the relativistic Euler equations that represents a dynamical compact liquid body, when expressed in Lagrangian coordinates, determines a solution to a system of non-linear wave equations with acoustic boundary conditions. Using this wave formulation, we prove that these solutions satisfy energy estimates without loss of derivatives. Importantly, our wave formulation does not require the liquid to be irrotational, and the energy estimates do not rely on divergence and curl type estimates employed in previous works.

Oliynyk, Todd A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. 1732-S 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipients, geometric design, entrance ramps, exit ramps 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document

Texas at Austin, University of

400

FutureGen Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the comprehensive siting, permitting, engineering, design, and costing activities completed by the FutureGen Industrial Alliance, the Department of Energy, and associated supporting subcontractors to develop a first of a kind near zero emissions integrated gasification combined cycle power plant and carbon capture and storage project (IGCC-CCS). With the goal to design, build, and reliably operate the first IGCC-CCS facility, FutureGen would have been the lowest emitting pulverized coal power plant in the world, while providing a timely and relevant basis for coal combustion power plants deploying carbon capture in the future. The content of this report summarizes key findings and results of applicable project evaluations; modeling, design, and engineering assessments; cost estimate reports; and schedule and risk mitigation from initiation of the FutureGen project through final flow sheet analyses including capital and operating reports completed under DOE award DE-FE0000587. This project report necessarily builds upon previously completed siting, design, and development work executed under DOE award DE-FC26- 06NT4207 which included the siting process; environmental permitting, compliance, and mitigation under the National Environmental Policy Act; and development of conceptual and design basis documentation for the FutureGen plant. For completeness, the report includes as attachments the siting and design basis documents, as well as the source documentation for the following: • Site evaluation and selection process and environmental characterization • Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permit Application including well design and subsurface modeling • FutureGen IGCC-CCS Design Basis Document • Process evaluations and technology selection via Illinois Clean Coal Review Board Technical Report • Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance for slurry-fed gasifier configuration • Process flow diagrams and heat/material balance for dry-fed gasifier configuration • Full capital cost report and cost category analysis (CAPEX) • Full operating cost report and assumptions (OPEX) Comparative technology evaluations, value engineering exercises, and initial air permitting activities are also provided; the report concludes with schedule, risk, and cost mitigation activities as well as lessons learned such that the products of this report can be used to support future investments in utility scale gasification and carbon capture and sequestration. Collectively, the FutureGen project enabled the comprehensive site specific evaluation and determination of the economic viability of IGCC-CCS. The project report is bound at that determination when DOE formally proposed the FutureGen 2.0 project which focuses on repowering a pulverized coal power plant with oxy-combustion technology including CCS.

Cabe, Jim; Elliott, Mike

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Refinery Capacity Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refinery Capacity Report Released: June 15, 2006 Refinery Capacity Report --- Full report in PDF (1 MB) XLS --- Refinery Capacity Data by individual refinery as of January 1, 2006...

402

RCRA/UST, superfund, and EPCRA hotline training module. Introduction to toxics release inventory: Estimating releases (EPCRA section 313; 40 CFR part 372). Updated as of November 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The module provides an overview of general techniques that owners and operators of reporting facilities may use to estimate their toxic chemical releases. It exlains the basic release estimation techniques used to determine the chemical quantities reported on the Form R and uses those techniques, along with fundamental chemical or physical principles and properties, to estimate releases of listed toxic chemicals. It converts units of mass, volume, and time. It states the rules governing significant figures and rounding techniques, and references general and industry-specific estimation documents.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Thesis for the Degree of Licentiate of Engineering Estimating Di usion Coecients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thesis for the Degree of Licentiate of Engineering Estimating Di#11;usion CoeÃ?cients in Colloidal Statistics Chalmers University of Technology and Goteborg University Abstract This licentiate thesis deals processing, Hough Transform iii #12; iv #12; Preface The report This licentiate thesis is part of an ongoing

Patriksson, Michael

404

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for BY-Tank farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on BY-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

Brevick, C.H.

1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

405

Estimate of Legacy Tritium in Building 232-H Tritium Facility, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an estimate of how much tritium will be held up in those parts of the 232-H process that will remain in the building after deactivation The anticipated state of this tritium is also discussed. This information will be used to assess the radiological status of the deactivated facility.

Clark, E.A.

2003-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

406

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for the SX-tank farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on SX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southwest Quadrant of the Hanford 200 West Area.

Brevick, C.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

407

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for the S-tank farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on S-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southwest Quadrant of the Hanford 200 West Area.

Brevick, C.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

408

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AW-tank farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AW-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

Brevick, C.H., Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

409

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AP-tank farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AP-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

410

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AN-tank farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AN-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

411

Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AY-tank farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AY-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford, Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

412

Estimating Rooftop Suitability for PV: A Review of Methods, Patents, and Validation Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of methods have been developed using remote sensing data to estimate rooftop area suitable for the installation of photovoltaics (PV) at various geospatial resolutions. This report reviews the literature and patents on methods for estimating rooftop-area appropriate for PV, including constant-value methods, manual selection methods, and GIS-based methods. This report also presents NREL's proposed method for estimating suitable rooftop area for PV using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data in conjunction with a GIS model to predict areas with appropriate slope, orientation, and sunlight. NREL's method is validated against solar installation data from New Jersey, Colorado, and California to compare modeled results to actual on-the-ground measurements.

Melius, J.; Margolis, R.; Ong, S.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program, required by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, records the results of voluntary measures to reduce, avoid, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions. In 1998, 156 US companies and other organizations reported to the Energy information Administration that, during 1997, they had achieved greenhouse gas emission reductions and carbon sequestration equivalent to 166 million tons of carbon dioxide, or about 2.5% of total US emissions for the year. For the 1,229 emission reduction projects reported, reductions usually were measured by comparing an estimate of actual emissions with an estimate of what emissions would have been had the project not been implemented.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Locomotive emission study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work for the report involved the estimation of the air pollution emissions arising from the operation of railroad locomotives in six non-attainment air management basins within California. The six air basins are the Bay Area, the Central Coast (which includes the North Central Coast and the South Central Coast basins), the South Coast, San Diego, San Joaquin, and the Sacramento Valley basins. In addition, the effort involved the development of information about the efficacy and cost of feasible control strategies for locomotive-generated air pollution emissions, for both long and short term implementation.

NONE

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Updating MIT's cost estimation model for shipbuilding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis project will update the MIT ship cost estimation model by combining the two existing models (the Basic Military Training School (BMTS) Cost Model and the MIT Math Model) in order to develop a program that can ...

Smith, Matthew B., Lieutenant, junior grade

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Parameter estimation in ordinary differential equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The parameter estimation problem or the inverse problem of ordinary differential equations is prevalent in many process models in chemistry, molecular biology, control system design and many other engineering applications. It concerns the re...

Ng, Chee Loong

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

417

Statistical Risk Estimation for Communication System Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 2012 SSL # 6-12 #12;#12;Statistical Risk Estimation for Communication System Design Alessandra Babuscia, David W. Miller May 2012 SSL # 6-12 This work is based on the unaltered text of the thesis

418

Distributed Robust Power System State Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deregulation of energy markets, penetration of renewables, advanced metering capabilities, and the urge for situational awareness, all call for system-wide power system state estimation (PSSE). Implementing a centralized estimator though is practically infeasible due to the complexity scale of an interconnection, the communication bottleneck in real-time monitoring, regional disclosure policies, and reliability issues. In this context, distributed PSSE methods are treated here under a unified and systematic framework. A novel algorithm is developed based on the alternating direction method of multipliers. It leverages existing PSSE solvers, respects privacy policies, exhibits low communication load, and its convergence to the centralized estimates is guaranteed even in the absence of local observability. Beyond the conventional least-squares based PSSE, the decentralized framework accommodates a robust state estimator. By exploiting interesting links to the compressive sampling advances, the latter jointly es...

Kekatos, Vassilis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Estimating uncertainties in integrated reservoir studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To make sound investment decisions, decision makers need accurate estimates of the uncertainties present in forecasts of reservoir performance. In this work I propose a method, the integrated mismatch method, that incorporates the misfit...

Zhang, Guohong

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

Nonparametric estimation of multiple structures with outliers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonparametric estimation of multiple structures with outliers Wei Zhang and Jana Kosecka George outliers (pseudo outliers) to it in addition to the true outliers (gross outliers). The problem of robust

Kosecka, Jana

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fracture compliance estimation using borehole tube waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We tested two models, one for tube-wave generation and the other for tube-wave attenuation at a fracture intersecting a borehole that can be used to estimate fracture compliance, fracture aperture, and lateral extent. In ...

Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

422

Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Xcel document describes Version 1 of the the Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator tool. This tool assists federal agencies in estimating the greenhouse gas mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings, for example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office buildings, users can define their own efficiency measures, costs, and savings estimates for inclusion in the portfolio assessment. More information on user-defined measures can be found in Step 2 of the buildings emission reduction guidance. The output of this tool is a prioritized set of activities that can help the agency to achieve its greenhouse gas reduction targets most cost-effectively.

423

Risk Bounds for Mixture Density Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we focus on the problem of estimating a bounded density using a finite combination of densities from a given class. We consider the Maximum Likelihood Procedure (MLE) and the greedy procedure described by ...

Rakhlin, Alexander

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

424

PRELIMINARY TIME ESTIMATES FOR CORING OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EQUATIONS 17 FIGURE 1. DRILL STRING ROUND TRIP 19 FIGURE 2. STANDARD ROTARY CORING (RCB) WIRELINE TRIP 21) WIRELINE TRIP 25 FIGURE 5. ESTIMATED RIGGING, WIRELINE, AND SCANNING TIME FOR REENTRY. 27 #12;Preliminary

425

ESTIMATION OF AIRFLOW IN LIVESTOCK BUILDINGS USING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis, Optical Flow Estimation, Room Airflow. 1. INTRODUCTION At the National Institute of Agricultural in a laser-illuminated plane may be visu- alized. Based on the recording of a sequence of images (a film

426

Data Fusion for Improved Respiration Rate Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an application of a modified Kalman-Filter (KF) framework for data fusion to the estimation of respiratory rate from multiple physiological sources which is robust to background noise. A novel index of the ...

Nemati, Shamim

427

Estimating a mixed strategy employing maximum entropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MIXED STRATEGY EMPLOYING MAXIMUM ENTROPY by Amos Golan LarryMixed Strategy Employing Maximum Entropy Amos Golan Larry S.Abstract Generalized maximum entropy may be used to estimate

Golan, Amos; Karp, Larry; Perloff, Jeffrey M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

gtp_flow_power_estimator.xlsx  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This simple spreadsheet model estimates either the flow rate required to produce a specified level of power output, or the power output that can be produced from a specified flow rate.

429

Safety analysis report for the National Low-Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) at the ORNL Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information concerning: the experiment facility; experiment assembly; instrumentation and controls; materials; radioactivity; shielding; thermodynamics; estimated or measured reactivity effects; procedures; hazards; and quality assurance. (JDB)

Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Kerchner, H.R.; Klabunde, C.E.; Richardson, S.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Oil reservoir properties estimation using neural networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the applicability as well as the accuracy of artificial neural networks for estimating specific parameters that describe reservoir properties based on seismic data. This approach relies on JPL`s adjoint operators general purpose neural network code to determine the best suited architecture. The authors believe that results presented in this work demonstrate that artificial neural networks produce surprisingly accurate estimates of the reservoir parameters.

Toomarian, N.B. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Barhen, J.; Glover, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research; Aminzadeh, F. [UNOCAL Corp., Sugarland, TX (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Lognormal parameter estimation with censored data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[1966] reopened. the case for maximum-likcli- hooc. by exploring iterative echniques i'or the solutions to the maxim~. -likelihood equst, iona for truncated ani ccrsored samples. Tney noted. th. t although the local-msximim-likelihood estimates were... of expected biases for given parsmete. values. In addition, a +echnique is developed for the elimination oi' the bias in the maximum-likelihood estimators for a mu'tiparameter case. The latter two problem- have not pre- viously been discussed...

Zeis, Charles David

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

On Quantum Channel Estimation with Minimal Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We determine the minimal experimental resources that ensure a unique solution in the estimation of trace-preserving quantum channels with both direct and convex optimization methods. A convenient parametrization of the constrained set is used to develop a globally converging Newton-type algorithm that ensures a physically admissible solution to the problem. Numerical simulations are provided to support the results, and indicate that the minimal experimental setting is sufficient to guarantee good estimates.

M. Zorzi; F. Ticozzi; A. Ferrante

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

433

Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Industrial Water Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document provides a methodology to estimate unmetered industrial water use for evaporative cooling systems, steam generating boiler systems, batch process applications, and wash systems. For each category standard mathematical relationships are summarized and provided in a single resource to assist Federal agencies in developing an initial estimate of their industrial water use. The approach incorporates industry norms, general rules of thumb, and industry survey information to provide methodologies for each section.

Boyd, Brian K.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Quantum risk-sensitive estimation and robustness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper studies a quantum risk-sensitive estimation problem and investigates robustness properties of the filter. This is a direct extension to the quantum case of analogous classical results. All investigations are based on a discrete approximation model of the quantum system under consideration. This allows us to study the problem in a simple mathematical setting. We close the paper with some examples that demonstrate the robustness of the risk-sensitive estimator.

Naoki Yamamoto; Luc Bouten

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

On the background estimation by time slides in a network of gravitational wave detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time shifting the outputs of Gravitational Wave detectors operating in coincidence is a convenient way to estimate the background in a search for short duration signals. However this procedure is limited as increasing indefinitely the number of time shifts does not provide better estimates. We show that the false alarm rate estimation error saturates with the number of time shifts. In particular, for detectors with very different trigger rates this error saturates at a large value. Explicit computations are done for 2 detectors, and for 3 detectors where the detection statistic relies on the logical ``OR'' of the coincidences of the 3 couples in the network.

Michal Was; Marie-Anne Bizouard; Violette Brisson; Fabien Cavalier; Michel Davier; Patrice Hello; Nicolas Leroy; Florent Robinet; Vavoulidis Miltiadis

2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

436

Countries with Estimated or Reported Tuberculosis Incidence, 2009 "High Incidence" areas are defined as areas with reported or estimated incidence of 20 cases per 100,000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China India Namibia Sri Lanka Colombia Indonesia Nepal Sudan Comoros Iraq Nicaragua Suriname Congo Japan

Myers, Lawrence C.

437

CA la electricidad de caracas: Arrecifes repowering project. Feasibility study report. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study, conducted by Raytheon Engineers & Constructors, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development agency on behalf of C.A. La Electricidad de Caracas. The report shows the results of a feasibility study conducted to evaluate the repowering of the Arrecifes Power Plant. The study focuses on capital cost for the project, refurbishment of existing equipment, and the installation of new repowering equipment. The study also evaluates combustion turbine generators of different manufacturers and sizes to determine the most beneficial configuration. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) Introduction; (2) Conclusions and Recommendations; (3) Study Basis; (4) Alternatives Analysis; (5) Layout and Equipment Issues; (6) Performance and Economic Analysis; (7) Repowered Facility Description; (8) Mechanical Systems; (9) Civil/Structural/Architectural; (10) Electrical Systems; (11) Instrumentation and Controls; (12) Environmental Overview; (13) Project Implementation Plan; (14) Project Conceptual Cost Estimate.

NONE

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our research program was aimed at elucidating the nature of proton transport in ionomer membranes by means of a combination of analytical theory and molecular modeling. There were two broad thrusts. The first of these was directed towards understanding the equilibrium structure of Nafion and related polymers at various levels of hydration. The second thrust was concerned with the transport of protons through a membrane of this type. The research on structure proceeded by building on existing work, but with the introduction of some novel techniques, among which is a hybrid Molecular Dynamics--Monte Carlo approach. This method permits rapid computations by temporarily decoupling the motion of the polar side chains from that of the perfluorinated backbone, while still retaining the essential aspects of the constraint that phase separation can only continue to a very limited degree. Competition between an elastic energy due to this constraint and the tendency to phase separation lead to the equilibrium structure, which turns out to be qualitatively different at different levels of hydration. The use of a carefully formulated dielectric function was necessary to achieve accurate results. The work on transport of protons in Nafion-like membranes also involved a combination of theory and simulation. Atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations were employed to determine some of the characteristic parameters for the diffusion of hydronium in hydrated membranes. These results were used in a theoretical model of non-linear diffusion to predict transport coefficients. Among our results was the discovery that treatment with strong electric fields may enhance the properties of the polymer membranes. Our computer simulations showed that the vigorous application of a stretching force or an electric field can modify the structure of the ionomer that lies at the heart of a polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cell. If these predictions are verified experimentally, then it should be possible to produce fuel cells capable of delivering much higher currents than those currently available.

Taylor, Philip L.

2012-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

439

Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, Steven K

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Effectiveness Monitoring Report, MWMF Tritium Phytoremediation Interim Measures.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes and presents the results of monitoring activities during irrigation operations for the calendar year 2001 of the MWMF Interim Measures Tritium Phytoremediation Project. The purpose of this effectiveness monitoring report is to provide the information on instrument performance, analysis of CY2001 measurements, and critical relationships needed to manage irrigation operations, estimate efficiency and validate the water and tritium balance model.

Hitchcock, Dan; Blake, John, I.

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reporting difference estimated" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Rocky Flats Plant Site Environmental Report for 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Rats Plant Site Environmental Report provides summary information on the plant`s environmental monitoring programs and the results recorded during 1992. The report contains a compliance summary, results of environmental monitoring and other related programs, a review of environmental remediation activities, information on external gamma radiation dose monitoring, and radiation dose estimates for the surrounding population.

Cirrincione, D.A.; Erdmann, N.L. [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Gender Differences in Seeking Help.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Gender differences in willingness to seek help were examined in this study. Males often appear to not seek help from others, especially from a professional,… (more)

Jackson, Jeff

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Individual differences in sentence processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis aims to elucidate shared mechanisms between retrieval in sentence processing and memory retrieval processes in nonlinguistic domains using an individual differences approach. Prior research in individual ...

Troyer, Melissa L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Building a World of Difference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Building a World of Difference Presentation by Patricia Scanlan, Director of Residuals Treatment Technologies, Black & Veatch

445

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-07/0-5020-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 3208 Red River, Suite 200 Austin, TX 78705-2650 11. Contract or Grant No. 0-5020 13. Type of Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-07/0-5020-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 5

Texas at Austin, University of

446

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-4079-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 Austin, TX 78705-2650 11. Contract or Grant No. Technical Report 0-4079 13. Type of Report and Period in order to expedite the acquisition process, minimize cost, and build property owners' trust in government

Texas at Austin, University of

447

Report 1: JISC Good APIs Management Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report 1: JISC Good APIs Management Report A review of good practice in the provision of machine) Document Name: good_api_JISC_report_v0.8.doc Notes: Acknowledgements UKOLN is funded by the MLA to all those who gave up time to help with the report. Vital to this work were the people who filled

Rzepa, Henry S.

448

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. Preliminary Review Copy FHWA/TX-03/1833-01-imp-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 5. Report Date October 2002 4. Title Harrison Michael Bomba 8. Performing Organization Report No. 1833-01-imp-1 10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS)9

Texas at Austin, University of

449

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-0-4197-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 of Intelligent Transportation Systems 5. Report Date May 2001 6. Performing Organization Code7. Authors Tejas Mehta, Hani S. Mahmassani, and Chandra Bhat 8. Performing Organization Report No. 10. Work Unit No

Texas at Austin, University of

450

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-08/0-5708-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle Design of CrackScope (VCrack) [Reprint] 5. Report Date October Organization Report No. 0-5708-1 9. Performing Organization Name and Address Center for Transportation Research

Texas at Austin, University of

451

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-09/0-5546-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 of Incompatible Uses 5. Report Date September 2007; Rev. January 2008 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) Lisa Loftus-Otway, C. Michael Walton, Lynn Blais, Nathan Hutson 8. Performing Organization Report No. 0

Texas at Austin, University of

452

Estimation of (n,f) Cross-Sections by Measuring Reaction Probability Ratios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron-induced reaction cross-sections on unstable nuclei are inherently difficult to measure due to target activity and the low intensity of neutron beams. In an alternative approach, named the 'surrogate' technique, one measures the decay probability of the same compound nucleus produced using a stable beam on a stable target to estimate the neutron-induced reaction cross-section. As an extension of the surrogate method, in this paper they introduce a new technique of measuring the fission probabilities of two different compound nuclei as a ratio, which has the advantage of removing most of the systematic uncertainties. This method was benchmarked in this report by measuring the probability of deuteron-induced fission events in coincidence with protons, and forming the ratio P({sup 236}U(d,pf))/P({sup 238}U(d,pf)), which serves as a surrogate for the known cross-section ratio of {sup 236}U(n,f)/{sup 238}U(n,f). IN addition, the P({sup 238}U(d,d{prime}f))/P({sup 236}U(d,d{prime}f)) ratio as a surrogate for the {sup 237}U(n,f)/{sup 235}U(n,f) cross-section ratio was measured for the first time in an unprecedented range of excitation energies.

Plettner, C; Ai, H; Beausang, C W; Bernstein, L A; Ahle, L; Amro, H; Babilon, M; Burke, J T; Caggiano, J A; Casten, R F; Church, J A; Cooper, J R; Crider, B; Gurdal, G; Heinz, A; McCutchan, E A; Moody, K; Punyon, J A; Qian, J; Ressler, J J; Schiller, A; Williams, E; Younes, W

2005-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

453

Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

454

Using Distance Estimates in Heuristic Search: A Re-evaluation Jordan T. Thayer and Wheeler Ruml and Jeff Kreis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the cost-to-go to speed up problem-solving. In many domains, operators have different costs and estimated cost-to-go is not the same as estimated search-distance-to- go. We investigate further accelerating benchmark domains all actions have the same cost, and so becoming greedy with respect to the cost

Ruml, Wheeler

455

Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate (CSSEFARMBE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project is working to improve the representation of the hydrological cycle in global climate models, critical information necessary for decision-makers to respond appropriately to predictions of future climate. In order to accomplish this objective, CSSEF is building testbeds to implement uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques to objectively calibrate and diagnose climate model parameterizations and predictions with respect to local, process-scale observations. In order to quantify the agreement between models and observations accurately, uncertainty estimates on these observations are needed. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program takes atmospheric and climate related measurements at three permanent locations worldwide. The ARM VAP called the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) [Xie et al., 2010] collects a subset of ARM observations, performs quality control checks, averages them to one hour temporal resolution, and puts them in a standard format for ease of use by climate modelers. ARMBE has been widely used by the climate modeling community as a summary product of many of the ARM observations. However, the ARMBE product does not include uncertainty estimates on the data values. Thus, to meet the objectives of the CSSEF project and enable better use of this data with UQ techniques, we created the CSSEFARMBE data set. Only a subset of the variables contained in ARMBE is included in CSSEFARMBE. Currently only surface meteorological observations are included, though this may be expanded to include other variables in the future. The CSSEFARMBE VAP is produced for all extended facilities at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site that contain surface meteorological equipment. This extension of the ARMBE data set to multiple facilities at SGP allows for better comparison between model grid boxes and the ARM point observations. In the future, CSSEFARMBE may also be created for other ARM sites. As each site has slightly different instrumentation, this will require additional development to understand the uncertainty characterization associated with instrumentation at those sites. The uncertainty assignment process is implemented into the ARM program’s new Integrated Software Development Environment (ISDE) so that many of the key steps can be used in the future to screen data based on ARM Data Quality Reports (DQRs), propagate uncertainties when transforming data from one time scale into another, and convert names and units into NetCDF Climate and Forecast (CF) standards. These processes are described in more detail in the following sections.

Riihimaki, Laura D.; Gaustad, Krista L.; McFarlane, Sally A.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

456

Emissions estimation for lignite-fired power plants in Turkey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major gaseous emissions (e.g. sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide), some various organic emissions (e.g. benzene, toluene and xylenes) and some trace metals (e.g. arsenic, cobalt, chromium, manganese and nickel) generated from lignite-fired power plants in Turkey are estimated. The estimations are made separately for each one of the thirteen plants that produced electricity in 2007, because the lignite-fired thermal plants in Turkey are installed near the regions where the lignite is mined, and characteristics and composition of lignite used in each power plant are quite different from a region to another. Emission factors methodology is used for the estimations. The emission factors obtained from well-known literature are then modified depending on local moisture content of lignite. Emission rates and specific emissions (per MWh) of the pollutants from the plants without electrostatic precipitators and flue-gas desulfurization systems are found to be higher than emissions from the plants having electrostatic precipitators and flue -gas desulfurization systems. Finally a projection for the future emissions due to lignite-based power plants is given. Predicted demand for the increasing generation capacity based on the lignite-fired thermal power plant, from 2008 to 2017 is around 30%. 39 refs., 13 figs., 10 tabs.

Nurten Vardar; Zehra Yumurtaci [Yildiz Technical University Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Alternative energy estimation from the shower lateral distribution function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The surface detector technique has been successfully used to detect cosmic ray showers for several decades. Scintillators or Cerenkov water tanks can be used to measure the number of particles and/or the energy density at a given depth in the atmosphere and reconstruct the primary particle properties. It has been shown that the experiment configuration and the resolution in reconstructing the core position determine a distance to the shower axis in which the lateral distribution function (LDF) of particles shows the least variation with respect to different primary particles type, simulation models and specific shapes of the LDF. Therefore, the signal at this distance (600 m for Haverah Park and 1000 m for Auger Observatory) has shown to be a good estimator of the shower energy. Revisiting the above technique, we show that a range of distances to the shower axis, instead of one single point, can be used as estimator of the shower energy. A comparison is done for the Auger Observatory configuration and the new estimator proposed here is shown to be a good and robust alternative to the standard single point procedure.

Vitor de Souza; Carlos O. Escobar; Joel Brito; Carola Dobrigkeit; Gustavo Medina-Tanco

2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

458

Annual Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results generated during phase 1 of this project. During this phase, the main tools that are used to compute the thermal neutron scattering kernels for graphite, beryllium, beryllium oxide, zirconium hydride, light water, polyethylene were implemented and tested. This includes a modified NJOY/LEAPR code system, the GASKET code, and the ab initio condensed matter codes VASP and PHONON. Thermal neutron scattering kernels were generated for graphite, beryllium, beryllium oxide. In the case of graphite, new phonon spectra were examined. The first is a spectrum based on experiments performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the early seventies, and the second is generated using the ab initio methods. In the case of beryllium, and beryllium oxide, a synthetic approach for generating the phonon spectra was implemented. In addition, significant progress was made on an experiment to benchmark the graphite scattering kernels was made. The simulations of this experiment show that differences on the order of a few percent, in Pu-239 detector responses, can be expected due to the use of different scattering kernels. (B204) NOT A FINAL REPORT

Ayman I. Hawari

2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

459

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE project DE-FC36-04GO14052 ''Plasma Pilot Plant Test for Treating VOC Emissions from Wood Products Plants'' was conducted by Drexel University in cooperation with Georgia-Pacific (G-P) and Kurchatov Institute (KI). The objective of this project was to test the Plasma Pilot Plant capabilities in wood industry. The final goal of the project was to replace the current state-of-the-art, regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) technology by Low-Temperature Plasma Technology (LTPT) in paper and wood industry for Volatile Organic Components (VOC) destruction in High Volume Low Concentration (HVLC) vent emissions. MetPro Corporation joined the team as an industrial partner from the environmental control business and a potential leader for commercialization. Concurrent Technology Corporation (CTC) has a separate contract with DOE for this technology evaluation. They prepared questionnaires for comparison of this technology and RTO, and made this comparison. These data are presented in this report along with the description of the technology itself. Experiments with the pilot plant were performed with average plasma power up to 3.6 kW. Different design of the laboratory and pilot plant pulsed coronas, as well as different analytical methods revealed many new peculiarities of the VOC abatement process. The work reported herein describes the experimental results for the VOCs removal efficiency with respect to energy consumption, residence time, water effect and initial concentration.

Alexander Fridman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

CREATIVE ARTS ANNUAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 COLLEGE OF CREATIVE ARTS ANNUAL REPORT #12;contents COLLEGE OF CREATIVE ARTS 2012 ANNUAL REPORT 2 COLLEGE OF CREATIVE ARTS NEWS 4 COLLEGE OF CREATIVE ARTS ENROLLMENT & FUNDRAISING 8 ART MUSEUM OF WVU REPORT SCHOOL OF ART & DESIGN REPORT 22SCHOOL OF MUSIC REPORT 30SCHOOL OF THEATRE & DANCE REPORT

Mohaghegh, Shahab

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461

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to investigate metal-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon at low temperatures using excitation sources such as laser and rapid thermal annealing, as well as, electric field. Deposition of high quality crystalline silicon at low temperatures allows the use of low cost soda-lime glass and polymeric films for economically viable photovoltaic solar cells and low cost large area flat panel displays. In light of current and expected demands on Si supply due to expanding use of consumer electronic products throughout the world and the incessant demand for electric power the need for developing high grade Si thin films on low cost substrate becomes even more important. We used hydrogenated and un-hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and sputtering techniques (both of which are extensively used in electronic and solar cell industries) to fabricate nano-crystalline, poly-crystalline (small as well as large grain), and single-crystalline (epitaxial) films at low temperatures. We demonstrated Si nanowires on flat surfaces that can be used for fabricating nanometer scale transistors. We also demonstrated lateral crystallization using Al with and without an applied electric field. These results are critical for high mobility thin film transistors (TFT) for large area display applications. Large grain silicon (~30-50 µm grain size for < 0.5 µm thick films) was demonstrated on glass substrates at low temperatures. We also demonstrated epitaxial growth of silicon on (100) Si substrates at temperatures as low as 450?C. Thin film Si solar cells are being projected as the material of choice for low cost high efficiency solar cells when properly coupled with excellent light-trapping schemes. Ar ion laser (CW) was shown to produce dendritic nanowire structures at low power whereas at higher powers yielded continuous polycrystalline films. The power density required for films in contact with Al was demonstrated to be at least two orders of magnitude lower that that reported in the literature before. Polysilicon was successfully achieved on polyimide (Kapton©) films. Thin film Si solar cells on lightweight stoable polymer offer great advantage for terrestrial and space power applications. In summary we have demonstrated through this research the viability of producing low cost nano-, poly-, and epitaxial Si material on substrates of choice for applications in economically viable environmentally friendly sustainable solar power systems. This truly enabling technology has widespread applications in multibillion dollar electronic industry and consumer products.

Hameed A. Naseem, Husam H. Abu-Safe

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

462

Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2011 World Materials Summit, held on 10/9-12/2011 in Washington DC, provided a forum for top decision makers and energy experts from aropund the world to focus on the materials research needs for the growing energy economy. Organized jointly by the Materials Research Society (MRS), the European MRS (E-MRS), and the Chinese MRS (C-MRS), the goal of the Summit was to explore how the different regions of the world can work together on the critical issue of clean energy, including its relation to environmental sustainability and water. The participants considered the area of materials research as well as advocacy, economics, outreach, and education. Realizing that the concerns are long-term and that young players will ultimately be the ones who are going to need to solve the energy challenges, the chairs of the Summit inaugurated a Student Congress, a program for graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in fields directly related to energy and environmental science, engineering, and/or policy. The top 45 candidates coming from 18 countries were selected on a competititve basis to participate in the Student Congress. The four-day effort culminated in a 2011 Worlds Materials Summit Declaration delineating materials directions related to global access to clean energy and water in a sustainable way.

,; ,; ,

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

CASE REPORT PATHOLOGY/BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for estimating a minimum postmortem interval (PMI) (3). It should be noted, however, that the estimate of PMI

Outerelo. Raimundo

464

Prediction of External Corrosion for Steel Cylinders 2003 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) is stored in over 60,000 steel cylinders at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, and at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Portsmouth, Ohio. The cylinders range in age from six to 52 years. Although when new the cylinders had wall thicknesses specified to within manufacturing tolerances, over the years corrosion has reduced their actual wall thicknesses. The UF{sub 6} Cylinder Project is managed by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to safely maintain the UF{sub 6} and the cylinders containing it. The requirements of the Project are delineated in the System Requirements Document (LMES 1997a), and the actions needed to fulfill those requirements are specified in the System Engineering Management Plan (LMES 1997b). This report documents activities that address requirements and actions involving forecasting cylinder wall thicknesses. Wall thickness forecasts are based on models fit to ultrasonic thickness (UT) measurement data. First, UT data collected during FY02 is combined with UT data collected in earlier years (FY92-FY01), and all of the data is inventoried chronologically and by various subpopulations. Next, the data is used to model either maximum pit depth or minimum thickness as a function of cylinder age, subpopulation (e.g., PGDP G-yard, bottom-row cylinders), and initial thickness estimates. The fitted models are then used to extrapolate minimum thickness estimates into the future and to compute estimates of numbers of cylinders expected to fail various thickness criteria. A model evaluation is performed comparing UT measurements made in FY02 with model-fitted projections based only on data collected before FY02. The FY02 UT data, entered into the corrosion model database and not available for the previous edition of this report (Schmoyer and Lyon 2002), consists of thickness measurements of 48'' thin-wall cylinders: 102 cylinders at Paducah, 104 at ETTP, and 117 at Portsmouth; and 72 thick-wall cylinders at Portsmouth. However, because of missing values, repeated measures on the same cylinders, outliers, and other data problems, not all of these measurements are necessarily used in the corrosion analysis, and some previous measurements may simply be replaced with the new ones. In this edition of the report, cylinder subpopulation definitions and counts are updated using the latest (as of June 2003) information from the Cylinder Inventory Database (CID). Cylinders identified in the CID as painted during the last ten years are excluded from subpopulations considered at-risk of failing minimum thickness criteria, because it is assumed that painting fully arrests corrosion for ten years. As in the previous edition of the report, two different approaches to corrosion modeling are pursued: (1) a direct approach in which minimum thickness is modeled directly as a function of age, subpopulation, and initial thickness estimates; and (2) an indirect approach, in which maximum pit depth is modeled, and the pit-depth model is then combined with a model of initial thickness to compute estimates of minimum thickness.

Schmoyer, RLS

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

465

Final Report to DOE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the accomplished goals and provide a list of the publications and presentations made during the project. The goals of the project were accomplished through the various publications submitted to Journals and presentations done at the DOE and international meetings and conferences. The 8 journal articles related to the goals of this project were accepted or submitted. The 23 presentations related to goals of the project were presented at the meetings. There were some minor changes regarding to project goals because of issues encountered during the analysis of the data. For example, a total water probe sensor mounted on the Convair-580 that can be used for defining mixed phase conditions and parameterization, had some problems to estimate magnitude of total water mass, and this resulted in issues providing an accurate parameterization for cloud fraction. Variability related aerosol number concentrations and their composition for direct and indirect effects were studied and published. Results were given to explain aerosol and ice microphysical effects on climate change studies. It is suggested that developed parameterizations should consider the variability in aerosol and ice parameters over the Arctic regions.

Ismail Gultepe

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

TransCom N[subscript 2]O model inter-comparison – Part 2: Atmospheric inversion estimates of N[subscript 2]O emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examines N[subscript 2]O emission estimates from five different atmospheric inversion frameworks based on chemistry transport models (CTMs). The five frameworks differ in the choice of CTM, meteorological data, ...

Thompson, R. L.

467

Multi-element stochastic spectral projection for high quantile estimation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate quantile estimation by multi-element generalized Polynomial Chaos (gPC) metamodel where the exact numerical model is approximated by complementary metamodels in overlapping domains that mimic the model’s exact response. The gPC metamodel is constructed by the non-intrusive stochastic spectral projection approach and function evaluation on the gPC metamodel can be considered as essentially free. Thus, large number of Monte Carlo samples from the metamodel can be used to estimate ?-quantile, for moderate values of ?. As the gPC metamodel is an expansion about the means of the inputs, its accuracy may worsen away from these mean values where the extreme events may occur. By increasing the approximation accuracy of the metamodel, we may eventually improve accuracy of quantile estimation but it is very expensive. A multi-element approach is therefore proposed by combining a global metamodel in the standard normal space with supplementary local metamodels constructed in bounded domains about the design points corresponding to the extreme events. To improve the accuracy and to minimize the sampling cost, sparse-tensor and anisotropic-tensor quadratures are tested in addition to the full-tensor Gauss quadrature in the construction of local metamodels; different bounds of the gPC expansion are also examined. The global and local metamodels are combined in the multi-element gPC (MEgPC) approach and it is shown that MEgPC can be more accurate than Monte Carlo or importance sampling methods for high quantile estimations for input dimensions roughly below N=8, a limit that is very much case- and ?-dependent.

Ko, Jordan, E-mail: jordan.ko@mac.com; Garnier, Josselin

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

CORONAL MASS EJECTION MASS, ENERGY, AND FORCE ESTIMATES USING STEREO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding coronal mass ejection (CME) energetics and dynamics has been a long-standing problem, and although previous observational estimates have been made, such studies have been hindered by large uncertainties in CME mass. Here, the two vantage points of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) COR1 and COR2 coronagraphs were used to accurately estimate the mass of the 2008 December 12 CME. Acceleration estimates derived from the position of the CME front in three dimensions were combined with the mass estimates to calculate the magnitude of the kinetic energy and driving force at different stages of the CME evolution. The CME asymptotically approaches a mass of 3.4 {+-} 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} g beyond {approx}10 R{sub Sun }. The kinetic energy shows an initial rise toward 6.3 {+-} 3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 29} erg at {approx}3 R{sub Sun }, beyond which it rises steadily to 4.2 {+-} 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg at {approx}18 R{sub Sun }. The dynamics are described by an early phase of strong acceleration, dominated by a force of peak magnitude of 3.4 {+-} 2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} N at {approx}3 R{sub Sun }, after which a force of 3.8 {+-} 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} N takes effect between {approx}7 and 18 R{sub Sun }. These results are consistent with magnetic (Lorentz) forces acting at heliocentric distances of {approx}<7 R{sub Sun }, while solar wind drag forces dominate at larger distances ({approx}>7 R{sub Sun }).

Carley, Eoin P.; Gallagher, Peter T. [Astrophysics Research Group, School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); McAteer, R. T. James [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

469

Rocky Flats Plant Site Environmental Report: 1993 Highlights  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Plant Site Environmental Report provides summary information on the plant`s environmental monitoring programs and the results recorded during 1993. The report contains a compliance summary, results of environmental monitoring and other related programs, a review of environmental remediation activities, information on external gamma radiation dose monitoring, and radiation dose estimates for the surrounding population. This section provides an overview of these topics and summarizes more comprehensive discussions found in the main text of this annual report.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

470

Impact of PMU Technology in State Estimation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent blackouts and the need to manage larger and larger power systems closer to their stability limits are driving electricity utilities to deploy synchronized phasor measurements (PMU) for wide area monitoring and control. At the same time, modern TSOs need accurate, fast and reliable estimation of their networks' real-time conditions. State Estimator (SE), a fundamental function in dispatching control centers, is expected to perform reliably around the clock since it provides the foundation for subsequent critical security analyses, market revenue calculations, etc. PMU technology provides accurate, satellite-synchronized measurements of both magnitude and angle, which naturally fit in the SE algorithm and enhance its robustness and the quality of the results. This paper presents current results of ongoing experiences with electric utilities on the usage of PMU data in state estimation. It focuses on practical implementation aspects, such as data communication and interfacing to the control center EMS, metrics for evaluation of State Estimator results and improvements in state estimation behavior and results thanks to PMU data.

Avila-Rosales, Rene [AREVA T& D; Rice, Mark [AREVA T& D; Lopez, Rafael [AREVA T& D; Beard, Lisa [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Mathur, Tanya [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Galvan, Floyd [Entergy; Gupta, Vinit [Entergy; James, Lambert [Manitoba Hydro; Graffy, James [Bonneville Power Administration (BPA); Papic, Milorad [Idaho Power Company

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excellent progress was made in standardizing three complementary methods: Magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray micro CT, and MALDI imaging linear ion trap mass spectroscopy to image biomass and chemical, anatomical and functional changes that occur during pretreatment and hydrolysis. Magnetic resonance microscopy provides excellent images with as low as 5 uM resolution with hydrated biomass samples. We visualized dramatic changes in signal associated with the hydrolysis of the carbohydrates by strong acids. Quantitative diffusion approaches were used to probe more subtle structural changes in biomass. Diffusion tensor calculations reflect diffusion anisotropy and fractional anisotropy maps clearly show the longer range diffusion within the vessels compared to within the fiber cells. The diffusion is increased along the cell walls of the vessels. Suggesting that further research with NMR imaging should be pursued. X-ray CT provides excellent images at as low as 3.5 uM resolution from dried biomass. Small increases in surface area, and decreases in local density have been quantified in with wood after mild pretreatments; these changes are expected to be underestimates of the hydrated wood, due to the ~12% shrinkage that occurs upon drying untreated wood. MALDI-MS spectra show high ion intensities at most mass to charge ratios in untreated and pretreated woody material. MALDI-MSn is required to improve specificity and reduce background for imaging. MALDI-TOF is not specific enough for carbohydrate identification. Using MALDI-LIT/MSn we can readily identify oligomeric glucans and xylans and their fragmentation patterns as well as those of the glucuronic acid side chains of birch 4-O-methyl glucuronxylan. Imaging of glucan and xylan oligomers show that many contain isobaric ions with different distributions, indicating again that MSn is needed for accurate imaging of lignocellulosic materials. We are now starting to integrate the three imaging methods by using the same set of biomass samples imaged with all three methods, and using common analytical software to quantify parameters from the three dimensional images. In addition to the proposed experiments, we conducted imaging studies with a novel TOF-SIMS instrument available through collaborations with the AMOLF goup led by Ron Heeren at the FOM Institute in Amersterdam, Netherlands. ToF-SIMS was used to image intact cross sections of Populus stems with high spatial resolution, chemically selectivity. ToF-SIMS images were correlated with fluorescence microscopy which allowed for more positive ion identification.

PETER, GARY F. [UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA] [UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

472

FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen storage systems based on the readily reversible adsorption of H{sub 2} in porous materials have a number of very attractive properties with the potential to provide superior performance among candidate materials currently being investigated were it not for the fact that the interaction of H{sub 2} with the host material is too weak to permit viable operation at room temperature. Our study has delineated in quantitative detail the structural elements which we believe to be the essential ingredients for the future synthesis of porous materials, where guest-host interactions are intermediate between those found in the carbons and the metal hydrides, i.e. between physisorption and chemisorption, which will result in H{sub 2} binding energies required for room temperature operation. The ability to produce porous materials with much improved hydrogen binding energies depends critically on detailed molecular level analysis of hydrogen binding in such materials. However, characterization of H{sub 2} sorption is almost exclusively carried by thermodynamic measurements, which give average properties for all the sites occupied by H{sub 2} molecules at a particular loading. We have therefore extensively utilized the most powerful of the few molecular level experimental probes available to probe the interactions of hydrogen with porous materials, namely inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy of the hindered rotations of the hydrogen molecules adsorbed at various sites, which in turn can be interpreted in a very direct way in by computational studies. This technique can relate spectral signatures of various H{sub 2} molecules adsorbed at binding sites with different degrees of interaction. In the course of this project we have synthesized a rather large number of entirely new hybrid materials, which include structural modifications for improved interactions with adsorbed hydrogen. The results of our systematic studies on many porous materials provide detailed information on the effects on hydrogen binding from framework modifications, including charged frameworks and extraframework cations, from reduction in pore sizes, functionalization of the organic linking group, and most importantly, that of the various types of metal sites. We provided a clear demonstration that metal sites are most effective if the metal is highly undercoordinated, open and completely accessible to the H{sub 2} molecule, a condition which is not currently met in MOFs with intra-framework metals. The results obtained from this project therefore will give detailed direction to efforts in the synthesis of new materials that can reach the goal of a practical sorption based hydrogen storage material.

Juergen Eckert; Anthony K. Cheetham (Principal Investigator)

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

473

Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Cost estimate of high-level radioactive waste containers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the bottoms-up cost estimates for fabrication of high-level radioactive waste disposal containers based on the Site Characterization Plan Conceptual Design (SCP-CD). These estimates were acquired by Babcock and Wilcox (B&S) under sub-contract to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). The estimates were obtained for two leading container candidate materials (Alloy 825 and CDA 715), and from other three vendors who were selected from a list of twenty solicited. Three types of container designs were analyzed that represent containers for spent fuel, and for vitrified high-level waste (HLW). The container internal structures were assumed to be AISI-304 stainless steel in all cases, with an annual production rate of 750 containers. Subjective techniques were used for estimating QA/QC costs based on vendor experience and the specifications derived for the LLNL-YMP Quality Assurance program. In addition, an independent QA/QC analysis is reported which was prepared by Kasier Engineering. Based on the cost estimates developed, LLNL recommends that values of $825K and $62K be used for the 1991 TSLCC for the spent fuel and HLW containers, respectively. These numbers represent the most conservative among the three vendors, and are for the high-nickel anstenitic steel (Alloy 825). 6 refs., 7 figs.

Russell, E.W.; Clarke, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Domian, H.A. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States)] [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Madson, A.A. [Kaiser Engineers California Corp., Oakland, CA (United States)] [Kaiser Engineers California Corp., Oakland, CA (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Enhancing e-waste estimates: Improving data quality by multivariate Input–Output Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • A multivariate Input–Output Analysis method for e-waste estimates is proposed. • Applying multivariate analysis to consolidate data can enhance e-waste estimates. • We examine the influence of model selection and data quality on e-waste estimates. • Datasets of all e-waste related variables in a Dutch case study have been provided. • Accurate modeling of time-variant lifespan distributions is critical for estimate. - Abstract: Waste electrical and electronic equipment (or e-waste) is one of the fastest growing waste streams, which encompasses a wide and increasing spectrum of products. Accurate estimation of e-waste generation is difficult, mainly due to lack of high quality data referred to market and socio-economic dynamics. This paper addresses how to enhance e-waste estimates by providing techniques to increase data quality. An advanced, flexible and multivariate Input–Output Analysis (IOA) method is proposed. It links all three pillars in IOA (product sales, stock and lifespan profiles) to construct mathematical relationships between various data points. By applying this method, the data consolidation steps can generate more accurate time-series datasets from available data pool. This can consequently increase the reliability of e-waste estimates compared to the approach without data processing. A case study in the Netherlands is used to apply the advanced IOA model. As a result, for the first time ever, complete datasets of all three variables for estimating all types of e-waste have been obtained. The result of this study also demonstrates significant disparity between various estimation models, arising from the use of data under different conditions. It shows the importance of applying multivariate approach and multiple sources to improve data quality for modelling, specifically using appropriate time-varying lifespan parameters. Following the case study, a roadmap with a procedural guideline is provided to enhance e-waste estimation studies.

Wang, Feng, E-mail: fwang@unu.edu [Institute for Sustainability and Peace, United Nations University, Hermann-Ehler-Str. 10, 53113 Bonn (Germany); Design for Sustainability Lab, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Landbergstraat 15, 2628CE Delft (Netherlands); Huisman, Jaco [Institute for Sustainability and Peace, United Nations University, Hermann-Ehler-Str. 10, 53113 Bonn (Germany); Design for Sustainability Lab, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Landbergstraat 15, 2628CE Delft (Netherlands); Stevels, Ab [Design for Sustainability Lab, Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Landbergstraat 15, 2628CE Delft (Netherlands); Baldé, Cornelis Peter [Institute for Sustainability and Peace, United Nations University, Hermann-Ehler-Str. 10, 53113 Bonn (Germany); Statistics Netherlands, Henri Faasdreef 312, 2492 JP Den Haag (Netherlands)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

Performance estimates for personnel access control systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current performance estimates for personnel access control systems use estimates of Type I and Type II verification errors. A system performance equation which addresses normal operation, the insider, and outside adversary attack is developed. Examination of this equation reveals the inadequacy of classical Type I and II error evaluations which require detailed knowledge of the adversary threat scenario for each specific installation. Consequently, new performance measures which are consistent with the performance equation and independent of the threat are developed as an aid in selecting personnel access control systems.

Bradley, R. G.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Property:EstimatedTime | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to: navigation, search PropertyEstimatedCostLowUSD JumpEstimatedTime

478

New Mexico State University Annual Security Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NMSU Carlsbad Release Date: September 30, 2014 #12;2 | P a g e, policies, and procedures in place at New Mexico State University's Carlsbad campus this report in a different format, please contact the NMSU Carlsbad Student Services

Nishiguchi, Michele

479

Estimated Carbon Dioxide Emissions in 2008: United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of state-level energy use patterns. Approximately 5,800 million metric tons of carbon dioxide were emitted throughout the United States for use in power production, residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation applications in 2008. Carbon dioxide is emitted from the use of three major energy resources: natural gas, coal, and petroleum. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and one national) carbon dioxide flow charts representing a comprehensive systems view of national CO{sub 2} emissions. Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) has published flow charts (also referred to as 'Sankey Diagrams') of important national commodities since the early 1970s. The most widely recognized of these charts is the U.S. energy flow chart (http://flowcharts.llnl.gov). LLNL has also published charts depicting carbon (or carbon dioxide potential) flow and water flow at the national level as well as energy, carbon, and water flows at the international, state, municipal, and organizational (i.e. United States Air Force) level. Flow charts are valuable as single-page references that contain quantitative data about resource, commodity, and byproduct flows in a graphical form that also convey structural information about the system that manages those flows. Data on carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector are reported on a national level. Because carbon dioxide emissions are not reported for individual states, the carbon dioxide emissions are estimated using published energy use information. Data on energy use is compiled by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (U.S. EIA) in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). SEDS is updated annually and reports data from 2 years prior to the year of the update. SEDS contains data on primary resource consumption, electricity generation, and energy consumption within each economic sector. Flow charts of state-level energy usage and explanations of the calculations and assumptions utilized can be found at: http://flowcharts.llnl.gov. This information is translated into carbon dioxide emissions using ratios of carbon dioxide emissions to energy use calculated from national carbon dioxide emissions and national energy use quantities for each particular sector. These statistics are reported annually in the U.S. EIA's Annual Energy Review. Data for 2008 (US. EIA, 2010) was updated in August of 2010. This is the first presentation of a comprehensive state-level package of flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions for the United States.

Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Detailed cost estimate of reference residential photovoltaic designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated installation costs for four reference residential photovoltaic designs. Installation cost estimates ranged from $1.28 to $2.12/W/sub p/ for arrays installed by union labor (4.1 to 6.07 kW/sub p/-systems), and from $1.22 to $1.83 W/sub p/ for non-union installations. Standoff mounting was found to increase costs from $1.63/W/sub p/ to $2.12/W/sub p/ for a representative case, whereas 25 kWh of battery storage capacity increased installation costs from $1.44/W/sub p/ to $2.08/W/sub p/. Overall system costs (union-based were $6000 to $7000 for a 4.1 kW array in the northeast, to approx. $9000 for a 6.07 kW/sub p/ array in the southwest. This range of installation costs, approx. $1 to $2/W/sub p/ (in 1980 dollars), is representative of current installation costs for residential PV systems. Any future cost reductions are likely to be small and can be accomplished only by optimization of mounting techniques, module efficiencies, and module reliability in toto.

Palmer, R.S.; Penasa, D.A.; Thomas, M.G.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

PDE Estimation Techniques for Advanced Battery Management Systems -Part I: SOC Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- cles and renewable energy resources is battery energy storage. Advanced battery systems representPDE Estimation Techniques for Advanced Battery Management Systems - Part I: SOC Estimation S. J sensing and actuation exists to monitor and control the internal state of these systems. As such, battery

Krstic, Miroslav

482

Estimating Biomass Burnt and CarbonEstimating Biomass Burnt and Carbon Emissions from Large Wildfires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Biomass Burnt and CarbonEstimating Biomass Burnt and Carbon Emissions from Large: Global Biomass Burning & Carbon Emissions Standard Emissions Inventories: Burned Area & GFED recently daily. Fire occurrenceoccurrence Roy et al.Roy et al. Carbon emissions (C) = burned area . fuel

483

Verktyg för lönsamhetsberäkningar vid bränslekonvertering av spetslastpannor från olja till pellets; Tool for estimating the profitability of converting a peak-load oil-fired boiler to pellets.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This report summarizes the development of a calculation program estimating the profitability of converting a peak-load oil-fired boiler to pellets. To convert an oil-fired… (more)

Sorby, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Rough order of magnitude cost estimate for immobilization of 50MT of plutonium using new faciliites at the Savannah River site: alternative 12A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Cost Estimate Report is to identify preliminary capital and operating costs for a facility to immobilize 50 metric tons of plutonium using ceramic in a new facility at Savannah River Site (SRS).

DiSabatino, A., LLNL

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glover, and Nicolas Norboge 8. Performing Organization Report No. Report 5-6395-01-1 9. Performing Brianne Glover, J.D. Associate Transportation Researcher Texas Transportation Institute and Nicolas

486

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Report Date April 2009 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s) Jennifer Bennett and Tracy McMillan 8 Sector's Role in Public School Facility Planning by Jennifer Bennett Tracy McMillan Research Report SWUTC

487

2011 ECSE Annual Report Annual Report 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on is the only sustainable driver of economic growth. For these economies engineers are the "professional2011 ECSE Annual Report Annual Report 2011 Electrical, Computer & Systems Engineering & Systems Engineering Department Kim Boyer, Professor and Head Jonsson Engineering Center Rensselaer

Bystroff, Chris

488

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-02/1884-2 2. Government Accession No. 3, paratransit systems 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

Texas at Austin, University of

489

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-09/0-5367-1 2. Government Accession No. 3, deck, slab, shear, fatigue 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

Texas at Austin, University of

490

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-00-1795-S 2. Government Accession No. 3. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical

Texas at Austin, University of

491

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-03/4382-1 2. Government Accession No. 3, concrete pavement, sensitivity, fatigue, distress 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document

Texas at Austin, University of

492

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-10/5-4829-01-1 2. Government Accession No, stiffness 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through

Zornberg, Jorge G.

493

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-05/0-4485-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

Texas at Austin, University of

494

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-00/0-1843-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

Texas at Austin, University of

495

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. 1747-3 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient, Information Technology 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

Texas at Austin, University of

496

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-03/4083-2 2. Government Accession No. 3. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield

Texas at Austin, University of

497

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-12/5-4829-01-3 2. Government Accession No No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

Zornberg, Jorge G.

498

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-10/5-5517-01-1 2. Government Accession No, field monitoring 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public

Zornberg, Jorge G.

499

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-0-1814-1 2. Government Accession No. 3 No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service

Texas at Austin, University of

500

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. FHWA/TX-0-2122-1 2. Government Accession No. 3, regulations, vehicle characteristics 18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available

Texas at Austin, University of