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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

CTBTO Contractor Laboratory Test Sample Production Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 2012 scientists from both Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the CTBTO contact laboratory at Seibersdorf, Austria designed a system and capability test to determine if the INL could produce and deliver a short lived radio xenon standard in time for the standard to be measured at the CTBTO contact laboratory at Seibersdorf, Austria. The test included sample standard transportation duration and potential country entrance delays at customs. On October 23, 2012 scientists at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prepared and shipped a Seibersdorf contract laboratory supplied cylinder. The canister contained 1.0 scc of gas that consisted of 70% xenon and 30% nitrogen by volume. The t0 was October 24, 2012, 1200 ZULU. The xenon content was 0.70 +/ 0.01 scc at 0 degrees C. The 133mXe content was 4200 +/ 155 dpm per scc of stable xenon on t0 (1 sigma uncertainty). The 133Xe content was 19000 +/ 800 dpm per scc of stable xenon on t0 (1 sigma uncertainty).

Bob Hague; Tracy Houghton; Nick Mann; Matt Watrous

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Product Pipeline Reports Tutorial  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey Forms> Petroleum Survey Forms Tutorial Product Pipeline Reports Tutorial Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player...

3

Monthly Biodiesel Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Biodiesel Production Monthly Biodiesel Production Report November 2013 With Data for September 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Monthly Biodiesel Production Report This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or

4

EIA Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Drilling Productivity Report Drilling Productivity Report For Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University October 29, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources Adam Sieminski, EIA Drilling Productivity Report October 29, 2013 2 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) 0.0 0.4 0.8 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (MT & ND) Granite Wash (OK & TX) Bonespring (TX Permian) Wolfcamp (TX Permian) Spraberry (TX Permian) Niobrara-Codell (CO) Woodford (OK)

5

Sample Performance Characterization Report Template  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 2000 October 2000 AQMD CONTRACT #00192 Project Number: TC-00-0101 Report Number: TC-00-0101-TR01 Electric Vehicle Technical Center Prepared by: Ricardo Solares Juan C. Argueta Charles J. Kim (EMF Tests) Brian Thorson (EMF Tests) Southern California Edison October 31, 2000 Page i DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES This report was prepared by the Electric Transportation Division of Southern California Edison, a subsidiary of Edison International. Neither the Electric Transportation Division of Southern California Edison, Southern California Edison, Edison International, nor any person working for or on behalf of any of them makes any warranty or representation, express or implied, (i) with respect to the use of any information, product, process or procedure discussed in this report, including

6

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012 10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012 million pounds U3O8 Forward Cost2 Uranium Reserve Estimates1 by Mine and Property Status, Mining Method, and State(s) $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work W W 102.0 Properties Under Development for Production W W W Mines in Production W 21.4 W Mines Closed Temporarily and Closed Permanently W W 133.1 In-Situ Leach Mining W W 128.6 Underground and Open Pit Mining W W 175.4 Arizona, New Mexico and Utah 0 W 164.7 Colorado, Nebraska and Texas W W 40.8 Wyoming W W 98.5 Total 51.8 W 304.0 1 Sixteen respondents reported reserve estimates on 71 mines and properties. These uranium reserve estimates cannot be compared with the much larger historical data set of uranium reserves that were published in the July 2010 report U.S. Uranium Reserves Estimates at http://www.eia.gov/cneaf/nuclear/page/reserves/ures.html. Reserves, as reported here, do not necessarily imply compliance with U.S. or Canadian government definitions for purposes of investment disclosure.

7

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

6. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by category, 2003-13 person-years Year Exploration Mining Milling Processing Reclamation Total 2003 W W W W 117 321 2004 18...

8

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 Production / Mining Method 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Underground (estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W Open Pit (estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching (thousand pounds U3O8) W W 2,681 4,259 W W W W W W Other1 (thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W Total Mine Production (thousand pounds U3O8) E2,200 2,452 3,045 4,692 4,541 3,879 4,145 4,237 4,114 4,335 Number of Operating Mines Underground 1 2 4 5 6 10 14 4 5 6 Open Pit 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching 2 3 4 5 5 6 4 4 5 5 Other Sources1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1

9

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012 9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012 Item 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 E2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Exploration and Development Surface Drilling (million feet) 1.1 0.7 1.3 3.0 4.9 4.6 2.5 1.0 0.7 W W 1.2 1.7 2.7 5.1 5.1 3.7 4.9 6.3 7.2 Drilling Expenditures (million dollars)1 5.7 1.1 2.6 7.2 20.0 18.1 7.9 5.6 2.7 W W 10.6 18.1 40.1 67.5 81.9 35.4 44.6 53.6 66.6 Mine Production of Uranium (million pounds U3O8) 2.1 2.5 3.5 4.7 4.7 4.8 4.5 3.1 2.6 2.4 2.2 2.5 3.0 4.7 4.5 3.9 4.1 4.2 4.1 4.3 Uranium Concentrate Production (million pounds U3O8) 3.1 3.4 6.0 6.3 5.6 4.7 4.6 4.0 2.6 2.3 2.0 2.3 2.7 4.1 4.5 3.9 3.7 4.2 4.0 4.1

10

MONTHLY NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

No. 1905-0205 No. 1905-0205 Expiration Date: 05/31/2015 Burden: 3 hours MONTHLY NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION REPORT Version No.: 2011.001 REPORT PERIOD: Month: Year: If any respondent identification data has changed since the last report, enter an "X" in the box: - - - - Mail to: - Oklahoma 2. Natural Gas Lease Production 1. Gross Withdrawals of Natural Texas Contact Title: COMMENTS: Identify any unusual aspects of your operations during the report month. (To start a new line, use alt + enter.) Wyoming Other States Alaska New Mexico City: Gas Louisiana Company Name: Address 1:

11

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. U.S. uranium expenditures, 2003-2012 8. U.S. uranium expenditures, 2003-2012 million dollars Year Drilling Production Land and Other Total Expenditures Total Land and Other Land Exploration Reclamation 2003 W W 31.3 NA NA NA W 2004 10.6 27.8 48.4 NA NA NA 86.9 2005 18.1 58.2 59.7 NA NA NA 136.0 2006 40.1 65.9 115.2 41.0 23.3 50.9 221.2 2007 67.5 90.4 178.2 77.7 50.3 50.2 336.2 2008 81.9 221.2 164.4 65.2 50.2 49.1 467.6 2009 35.4 141.0 104.0 17.3 24.2 62.4 280.5 2010 44.6 133.3 99.5 20.2 34.5 44.7 277.3 2011 53.6 168.8 96.8 19.6 43.5 33.7 319.2 2012 66.6 186.9 99.4 16.8 33.3 49.3 352.9 Drilling: All expenditures directly associated with exploration and development drilling. Production: All expenditures for mining, milling, processing of uranium, and facility expense.

12

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 In-Situ-Leach Plant Owner In-Situ-Leach Plant Name County, State (existing and planned locations) Production Capacity (pounds U3O8 per year) Operating Status at End of the Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cameco Crow Butte Operation Dawes, Nebraska 1,000,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Hydro Resources, Inc. Crownpoint McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Hydro Resources,Inc. Church Rock McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed

13

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Domestic Uranium Production Report June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report ii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity,

14

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 million pounds U 3 O 8 $0 to $30 per pound $0 to $50 per pound $0 to $100 per pound Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work W W 102.0 Properties Under Development for Production W W W Mines in Production W 21.4 W Mines Closed Temporarily and Closed Permanently W W 133.1 In-Situ Leach Mining W W 128.6 Underground and Open Pit Mining W W 175.4 Arizona, New Mexico and Utah 0 W 164.7 Colorado, Nebraska and Texas W W 40.8 Wyoming W W 98.5 Total 51.8 W 304.0 W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report"

15

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Sample Report | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Score Sample Report Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Sample Report Example report showing the results of an energy asset score rating on a building energyassetscoresample...

16

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cameco Crow Butte Operation Dawes, Nebraska 1,000,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Hydro Resources, Inc. Church Rock McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Hydro Resources, Inc. Crownpoint McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Lost Creek ISR LLC Lost Creek Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 2,000,000 Developing

17

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 State(s) 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Wyoming 134 139 181 195 245 301 308 348 424 512 Colorado and Texas 48 140 269 263 557 696 340 292 331 248 Nebraska and New Mexico 92 102 123 160 149 160 159 134 127 W Arizona, Utah, and Washington 47 40 75 120 245 360 273 281 W W Alaska, Michigan, Nevada, and South Dakota 0 0 0 16 25 30 W W W W California, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia 0 0 0 0 9 17 W W W W Total 321 420 648 755 1,231 1,563 1,096 1,073 1,191 1,196 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012). Table 7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-2012 person-years

18

MONTHLY NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

205 205 Expiration Date: 09/20/2012 Burden: 3 hours MONTHLY NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION REPORT Version No.: 2011.001 REPORT PERIOD: Month: Year: If any respondent identification data has changed since the last report, enter an "X" in the box: - - - - Mail to: - Oklahoma 2. Natural Gas Lease Production 1. Gross Withdrawals of Natural Texas Contact Title: COMMENTS: Identify any unusual aspects of your operations during the report month. (To start a new line, use alt + enter.) Wyoming Other States Alaska New Mexico City: Gas Louisiana Company Name: Address 1: Address 2: Questions? Contact Name: Phone No.: Email: If this is a resubmission, enter an "X" in the box: This form may be submitted to the EIA by mail, fax, e-mail, or secure file transfer. Should you choose to submit your data via e-mail, we must advise you that e-mail is an insecure means of transmission because the data are not encrypted, and there is

19

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Number of Holes Feet (thousand) Number of Holes Feet (thousand) Number of Holes Feet (thousand) 2003 NA NA NA NA W W 2004 W W W W 2,185 1,249 2005 W W W W 3,143 1,668 2006 1,473 821 3,430 1,892 4,903 2,713 2007 4,351 2,200 4,996 2,946 9,347 5,146 2008 5,198 2,543 4,157 2,551 9,355 5,093 2009 1,790 1,051 3,889 2,691 5,679 3,742 2010 2,439 1,460 4,770 3,444 7,209 4,904 2011 5,441 3,322 5,156 3,003 10,597 6,325 2012 5,112 3,447 5,970 3,709 11,082 7,156 NA = Not available. W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-

20

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Production / Mining Method 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 (estimated contained thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (estimated contained thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W 2,681 4,259 W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E2,200 2,452 3,045 4,692 4,541 3,879 4,145 4,237 4,114 4,335 Underground 1 2 4 5 6 10 14 4 5 6 Open Pit 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching 2 3 4 5 5 6 4 4 5 5 Other Sources 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 Total Mines and Sources 4 6 10 11 12 17 20 9 11 12 Other 1 Number of Operating Mines Table 2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 Underground Open Pit In-Situ Leaching Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Year Exploration Mining Milling Processing Reclamation Total 2003 W W W W 117 321 2004 18 108 W W 121 420 2005 79 149 142 154 124 648 2006 188 121 W W 155 755 2007 375 378 107 216 155 1,231 2008 457 558 W W 154 1,563 2009 175 441 W W 162 1,096 2010 211 400 W W 125 1,073 2011 208 462 W W 102 1,191 2012 161 462 W W 179 1,196 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012). Table 6. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by category, 2003-2012 person-years W = Data withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

22

Work Element B: 157. Sampling in Fish-Bearing Reaches [Variation in Productivity in Headwater Reaches of the Wenatchee Subbasin], Final Report for PNW Research Station.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied variation in productivity in headwater reaches of the Wenatchee subbasin for multiple field seasons with the objective that we could develop methods for monitoring headwater stream conditions at the subcatchment and stream levels, assign a landscape-scale context via the effects of geoclimatic parameters on biological productivity (macroinvertebrates and fish) and use this information to identify how variability in productivity measured in fishless headwaters is transmitted to fish communities in downstream habitats. In 2008, we addressed this final objective. In collaboration with the University of Alaska Fairbanks we found some broad differences in the production of aquatic macroinvertebrates and in fish abundance across categories that combine the effects of climate and management intensity within the subbasin (ecoregions). From a monitoring standpoint, production of benthic macroinvertebrates was not a good predictor of drifting macroinvertebrates and therefore might be a poor predictor of food resources available to fish. Indeed, there is occasionally a correlation between drifting macroinvertebrate abundance and fish abundance which suggests that headwater-derived resources are important. However, fish in the headwaters appeared to be strongly food-limited and there was no evidence that fishless headwaters provided a consistent subsidy to fish in reaches downstream. Fish abundance and population dynamics in first order headwaters may be linked with similar metrics further down the watershed. The relative strength of local dynamics and inputs into productivity may be constrained or augmented by large-scale biogeoclimatic control. Headwater streams are nested within watersheds, which are in turn nested within ecological subregions; thus, we hypothesized that local effects would not necessarily be mutually exclusive from large-scale influence. To test this we examined the density of primarily salmonid fishes at several spatial and temporal scales within a major sub-basin of the Columbia River and associations of density with ecoregion and individuals drainages within the sub-basin. We further examined habitat metrics that show positive associations with fish abundance to see if these relationships varied at larger spatial scales. We examined the extent to which headwater fish density and temporal variation in density were correlated between the headwaters and the main tributaries of the sub-basin, and the influence of ecoregion influence on density differences, particularly at wider temporal scales. Finally, we examined demographic parameters such as growth and emigration to determine whether density-dependence differs among ecoregions or whether responses were more strongly influenced by the demography of the local fish population.

Polivka, Karl; Bennett, Rita L. [USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Wenatchee, WA

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Activity at U.S. Mills and In-Situ-Leach Plants 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Ore from Underground Mines and Stockpiles Fed to Mills 1 0 W W W 0 W W W W W Other Feed Materials 2 W W W W W W W W W W Total Mill Feed W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W W W W W W W W (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E2,000 2,282 2,689 4,106 4,534 3,902 3,708 4,228 3,991 4,146 (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) E1,600 2,280 2,702 3,838 4,050 4,130 3,620 5,137 4,000 3,911 Deliveries (thousand pounds U 3 O 8 ) W W W 3,786 3,602 3,656 2,044 2,684 2,870 3,630 Weighted-Average Price (dollars per pound U 3 O 8 ) W W W 28.98 42.11 43.81 36.61 37.59 52.36 49.63 Notes: The 2003 annual amounts were estimated by rounding to the nearest 200,000 pounds to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Totals may not equal sum of components

24

Health and Productivity Questionnaire (HPQ) Survey Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The report is an analysis of a study/survey conducted at several DOE sites to better understand the relationship between health and productivity management. Final Report - 2012

25

Monthly Biodiesel Production Report - Energy Information Administratio...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Crude reserves and production Refining and processing Importsexports & movements Stocks Consumptionsales All petroleum & other liquids data reports Analysis & Projections Major...

26

ARM - Value-Added Product Status Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Status Reports Status Reports Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information Materials Image Library Videos Publication Resources Submit a Publication Publishing Procedures ARM Style Guide (PDF, 448KB) Acronyms Glossary Logos Contacts RSS for Publications Value-Added Product Status Reports ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report July 1-September 30, 2013 (PDF, 1MB) ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report April 1-June 30, 2013 (PDF, 1MB) ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report January 1-March 31, 2013 (PDF, 268KB) ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report October 1-December 31, 2012 (PDF, 271KB) ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report

27

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Item 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 E2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Surface Drilling (million feet) 1.1 0.7 1.3 3.0 4.9 4.6 2.5 1.0 0.7 W W 1.2 1.7 2.7 5.1 5.1 3.7 4.9 6.3 7.2 Drilling Expenditures (million dollars) 1 5.7 1.1 2.6 7.2 20.0 18.1 7.9 5.6 2.7 W W 10.6 18.1 40.1 67.5 81.9 35.4 44.6 53.6 66.6 (million pounds U 3 O 8 ) 2.1 2.5 3.5 4.7 4.7 4.8 4.5 3.1 2.6 2.4 2.2 2.5 3.0 4.7 4.5 3.9 4.1 4.2 4.1 4.3 (million pounds U 3 O 8 ) 3.1 3.4 6.0 6.3 5.6 4.7 4.6 4.0 2.6 2.3 2.0 2.3 2.7 4.1 4.5 3.9 3.7 4.2 4.0 4.1 (million pounds U 3 O 8 ) 3.4 6.3 5.5 6.0 5.8 4.9 5.5 3.2 2.2 3.8 1.6 2.3 2.7 3.8 4.0 4.1 3.6 5.1 4.0 3.9 (person-years) 871 980 1,107 1,118 1,097 1,120 848 627 423 426 321 420 648 755 1,231 1,563 1,096 1,073 1,191 1,196

28

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Milling Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cotter Corporation Canon City Mill Fremont, Colorado 0 Standby Standby Standby Reclamation Demolished EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Developing Developing Developing Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000 Standby Standby Standby Standby Standby Uranium One Americas, Inc. Shootaring Canyon Uranium Mill Garfield, Utah 750 Changing License To Operational Standby

29

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

11 11 2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: June 6, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Total Land and Other 2003 W W 31.3 NA NA NA W 2004 10.6 27.8 48.4 NA NA NA 86.9 2005 18.1 58.2 59.7 NA NA NA 136.0 2006 40.1 65.9 115.2 41.0 23.3 50.9 221.2 2007 67.5 90.4 178.2 77.7 50.3 50.2 336.2 2008 81.9 221.2 164.4 65.2 50.2 49.1 467.6 2009 35.4 141.0 104.0 17.3 24.2 62.4 280.5 2010 44.6 133.3 99.5 20.2 34.5 44.7 277.3 2011 53.6 168.8 96.8 19.6 43.5 33.7 319.2 2012 66.6 186.9 99.4 16.8 33.3 49.3 352.9 Notes: Expenditures are in nominal U.S. dollars. Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report" (2003-2012). Reclamation Drilling: All expenditures directly associated with exploration and development drilling.

30

Health and Productivity Questionnaire (HPQ) Survey Report | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Health and Productivity Questionnaire (HPQ) Survey Report Health and Productivity Questionnaire (HPQ) Survey Report Health and Productivity Questionnaire (HPQ) Survey Report Final Report - 2012 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been concerned about employees' health and well-being for several years, especially as they relate to workplace productivity and safety. Additionally, the DOE's reliance on an aging workforce makes it even more critical for the Department to ensure that its programs and policies support employees, regardless of their age, to perform their jobs safely, while maintaining productivity, overall health, and well-being. The DOE asked researchers from the University of Maryland, School of Social Work (UMSSW) to study the health and productivity of a sample of the DOE workforce. Specific research objectives

31

Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1991 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) during 1991. These BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. When excavations began at the WIPP in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. Brine studies began as part of the Site Validation Program and were formalized as a program in its own right in 1985. During nine years of observations (1982--1991), evidence has mounted that the amount of brine seeping into the WIPP excavations is limited, local, and only a small fraction of that required to produce hydrogen gas by corroding the metal in the waste drums and waste inventory. The data through 1990 is discussed in detail and summarized by Deal and others (1991). The data presented in this report describes progress made during the calendar year 1991 and focuses on four major areas: (1) quantification of the amount of brine seeping across vertical surfaces in the WIPP excavations (brine ``weeps); (2) monitoring of brine inflow, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled downward from the underground drifts (downholes), upward from the underground drifts (upholes), and from subhorizontal holes; (3) further characterization of brine geochemistry; and (4) preliminary quantification of the amount of brine that might be released by squeezing the underconsolidated clays present in the Salado Formation.

Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Martin, M.L.; Milligan, D.J.; Sobocinski, R.W.; Lipponer, P.P.J. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.] [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Monthly petroleum-product price report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides Congress and the public with information on monthly national weighted average prices for refined petroleum products. the data published are the primary source of price data for refined products for the refining, reselling, and retailing sectors necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to execute its role in monitoring prices. In addition, the data provide the information necessary for Congress, DOE, and the public to perform analyses and projections related to energy supplies, demands, and prices. The legislative authority for this survey is the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (PL 93-275). Price data in this publication were collected fronm separate surveys. Average prices are derived from a survey of refiners, large resellers and/or retailers, and independent gas plant operators. Data from this monthly survey are available from July 1975. Average No. 2 heating oil prices were derived from a sample survye of refiners, resellers, and retailers who sell heating oil. The geographic coverage for this report is the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Not Available

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Independent Statistics & Analysis Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report The six regions analyzed in this report accounted for nearly 90% of domestic oil production growth and virtually all domestic natural gas production growth during 2011-12. December 2013 For key tight oil and shale gas regions U.S. Energy Information Administration Contents Year-over-year summary 2 Bakken 3 Eagle Ford 4 Haynesville 5 Marcellus 6 Niobrara 7 Permian 8 Explanatory notes 9 Sources 10 Bakken Marcellus Niobrara Haynesville Eagle Ford Permian U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville

34

Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Report Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report Data Files Methodology and Analysis Form and Instructions Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report with data for September 2013 Released: December 6, 2013 Next Release: January 7, 2014 The two graphs below show total U.S. and Lower 48 natural gas production on one and the individual State production on the other. U.S. and Lower 48 States Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Figure Data State Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Figure Data In September, Lower 48 States production decreased 0.8 percent or 0.58 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d). Louisiana had the largest volumetric decrease at 5.3 percent or 0.34 Bcf/d as many surveyed operators reported various maintenance issues and normal well decline. Wyoming also dropped

35

2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. U.S. uranium concentrate production, shipments, and sales, 2003-13" "Activity at U.S. Mills and In-Situ-Leach Plants",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013...

36

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012" 2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012" "Production / Mining Method",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Underground" "(estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W" "Open Pit" "(estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8)",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "In-Situ Leaching" "(thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W",2681,4259,"W","W","W","W","W","W" "Other1" "(thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W"

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated corrosion products Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

products Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: activated corrosion products...

38

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated corrosion product Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

product Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: activated corrosion product...

39

Final Report BW Sample Collection& Preparation Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop the technique needed to prepare a field collected sample for laboratory analysis and build a portable integrated biological detection instrument with new miniaturized and automated sample purification capabilities. The device will prepare bacterial spores, bacterial vegetative cells, and viral particles for PCR amplification.

Koopman, R P; Belgrader, P; Meyer, G; Benett, W J; Richards, J B; Hadley, D R; Stratton, P L; Milanovich, F P

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012" 9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012" "Item",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,"E2003",2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Exploration and Development" "Surface Drilling (million feet)",1.1,0.7,1.3,3,4.9,4.6,2.5,1,0.7,"W","W",1.2,1.7,2.7,5.1,5.1,3.7,4.9,6.3,7.2 "Drilling Expenditures (million dollars)1",5.7,1.1,2.6,7.2,20,18.1,7.9,5.6,2.7,"W","W",10.6,18.1,40.1,67.5,81.9,35.4,44.6,53.6,66.6 "Mine Production of Uranium" "(million pounds U3O8)",2.1,2.5,3.5,4.7,4.7,4.8,4.5,3.1,2.6,2.4,2.2,2.5,3,4.7,4.5,3.9,4.1,4.2,4.1,4.3 "Uranium Concentrate Production" "(million pounds U3O8)",3.1,3.4,6,6.3,5.6,4.7,4.6,4,2.6,2.3,2,2.3,2.7,4.1,4.5,3.9,3.7,4.2,4,4.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012" 10. Uranium reserve estimates at the end of 2012" "million pounds U3O8" "Uranium Reserve Estimates1 by Mine and Property Status, Mining Method, and State(s)","Forward Cost 2" ,"$0 to $30 per pound","$0 to $50 per pound","$0 to $100 per pound" "Properties with Exploration Completed, Exploration Continuing, and Only Assessment Work","W","W",101.956759 "Properties Under Development for Production","W","W","W" "Mines in Production","W",21.40601,"W" "Mines Closed Temporarily and Closed Permanently","W","W",133.139239 "In-Situ Leach Mining","W","W",128.576534

42

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-2012" 7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-2012" "person-years" "State(s)",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Wyoming",134,139,181,195,245,301,308,348,424,512 "Colorado and Texas",48,140,269,263,557,696,340,292,331,248 "Nebraska and New Mexico",92,102,123,160,149,160,159,134,127,"W" "Arizona, Utah, and Washington",47,40,75,120,245,360,273,281,"W","W" "Alaska, Michigan, Nevada, and South Dakota",0,0,0,16,25,30,"W","W","W","W" "California, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia",0,0,0,0,9,17,"W","W","W","W"

43

REVIEW OF DIESEL PARTICULATE MATTER SAMPLING METHODS Supplemental Report # 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold University of Minnesota Department of Mechanical Engineering Center for Diesel Research aerosol. This report focuses on the fundamental chemical and physical processes that affect diesel aerosolREVIEW OF DIESEL PARTICULATE MATTER SAMPLING METHODS Supplemental Report # 2 AEROSOL DYMAMICS

Minnesota, University of

44

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Annual Domestic Uranium Production Report - Annual With Data for 2012 | Release Date: June 06, 2013 | Next Release Date: May 2014 |full report Previous domestic uranium production reports Year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 Go Drilling Figure 1. U.S. Uranium drilling by number of holes, 2004-2012 U.S. uranium exploration drilling was 5,112 holes covering 3.4 million feet in 2012. Development drilling was 5,970 holes and 3.7 million feet. Combined, total uranium drilling was 11,082 holes covering 7.2 million feet, 5 percent more holes than in 2011. Expenditures for uranium drilling in the United States were $67 million in 2012, an increase of 24 percent compared with 2011. Mining, production, shipments, and sales U.S. uranium mines produced 4.3 million pounds U3O8 in 2012, 5 percent more

45

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012" 5. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012" "In-Situ-Leach Plant Owner","In-Situ-Leach Plant Name","County, State (existing and planned locations)","Production Capacity (pounds U3O8 per year)","Operating Status at End of the Year" ,,,,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Cameco","Crow Butte Operation","Dawes, Nebraska",1000000,"Operating","Operating","Operating","Operating","Operating" "Hydro Resources, Inc.","Church Rock","McKinley, New Mexico",1000000,"Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed"

46

DOE Releases Biological Monitoring and Sampling Results Report for the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Releases Biological Monitoring and Sampling Results Report for DOE Releases Biological Monitoring and Sampling Results Report for the Amchitka, Alaska, Site DOE Releases Biological Monitoring and Sampling Results Report for the Amchitka, Alaska, Site October 28, 2013 - 3:39pm Addthis Contractor, Judy Miller, S.M. Stoller Corporation Public Affairs, (970) 248-6363 jmiller@lm.doe.gov GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced the availability of the Amchitka Island, Alaska, Biological Monitoring Report 2011 Sampling Results for the Amchitka, Alaska, site. The report provides the results of terrestrial and marine sampling in the areas surrounding Amchitka and Adak Islands in 2011 to determine whether local subsistence- and commercial-catch seafood is safe to eat. "The results confirmed earlier investigations indicating that seafood

47

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Sample Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

COMMERCIAL BUILDING COMMERCIAL BUILDING ENERGY ASSET SCORE 1 SUMMARY BUILDING INFORMATION Example Building 2000 A St., Chicago, IL 60601 Building Type: Mixed-Use Gross Floor Area: 140,000 ft 2 Year Built: 2005 Office: 100,000 ft 2 Retail: 40,000 ft 2 Report #: IL-1234567 Score Date: 02/2013 Building ID #: XXXXX ASSET SCORE DATA LEVEL: ¨ Simple Score ¨ Advanced Score ¨ Verified Advanced Score Current Score Potential Score BUILDING USE TYPES: This report includes a Score for the entire building as well as individual Scores for each of the separate use types. CONTENTS BUILDING ASSET SCORE: * Summary.......................................................... Page 1 * Score................................................................ Pages 2-4 * Upgrade Opportunities

48

EIA-914 Monthly Natural Gas Production Report Data Analysis...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA-914: Monthly Natural Gas Production Report Data Analysis October 2006 Page 1 of 38 EIA-914 Monthly Natural Gas Production Report Data Analysis October 2006 Introduction EIA...

49

3rd Quarter 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Form EIA-851A and Form EIA-851Q, ""Domestic Uranium Production Report.""" " U.S. Energy Information Administration 3rd Quarter 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report...

50

Promoting greater Federal energy productivity [Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a close-out report describing the work done under this DOE grant to improve Federal Energy Productivity. Over the four years covered in this document, the Alliance To Save Energy conducted liaison with the private sector through our Federal Energy Productivity Task Force. In this time, the Alliance held several successful workshops on the uses of metering in Federal facilities and other meetings. We also conducted significant research on energy efficiency, financing, facilitated studies of potential energy savings in energy intensive agencies, and undertook other tasks outlined in this report.

Hopkins, Mark; Dudich, Luther

2003-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

51

Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly - Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All Nuclear Reports All Nuclear Reports Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly Data for 3rd Quarter 2013 | Release Date: October 31, 2013 | Next Release Date: February 2014 | full report Previous Issues Year: 2013-Q2 2013-Q1 2012-Q4 2012-Q3 2012-Q2 2012-Q1 2011-Q4 2011-Q3 2011-Q2 2011-Q1 2010-Q4 2010-Q3 2010-Q2 2010-Q1 2009-Q4 2009-Q3 2009-Q2 2009-Q1 2008-Q4 2008-Q3 2008-Q2 2008-Q1 Go 3rd Quarter 2013 U.S. production of uranium concentrate in the third quarter 2013 was 1,171,278 pounds U3O8, down 16 percent from the previous quarter and up 12 percent from the third quarter 2012. Third quarter 2013 uranium production is at its highest level since 1999. During the third quarter 2013, U.S. uranium was produced at six U.S. uranium facilities. U.S. Uranium Mill in Production (State)

52

REVIEW OF DIESEL PARTICULATE MATTER SAMPLING METHODS Supplemental Report # 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.D. and Megan Arnold University of Minnesota Department of Mechanical Engineering Center for Diesel Research obtained from engine laboratory visits and present results from a diesel aerosol sampling questionnaireREVIEW OF DIESEL PARTICULATE MATTER SAMPLING METHODS Supplemental Report # 1 DIESEL EXHAUST

Minnesota, University of

53

Monthly Biodiesel Production Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum & Other Liquids Reports Petroleum & Other Liquids Reports Monthly Biodiesel Production Report With Data for September 2013 | Release Date: November 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 30, 2013 | full report Previous Issues Month: September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 prior issues Go State Producers Annual capacity (million gallons) Alabama 2 49 Arizona 1 2 Arkansas 3 85 California 9 57 Connecticut 2 3 Florida 1 3 Georgia 3 20 Illinois 6 251 Indiana 2 104 Iowa 8 250 Kansas 1 1 Kentucky 5 68 Louisiana 1 12 Maine 1 1 Maryland 1 3 Massachussetts 1 1 Michigan 2 18 Minnesota 4 107 Mississippi 3 105 Missouri 8 170 Montana 1 0 Nevada 1 1 New Hampshire 1 3 New York 2 20 North Carolina 4 10

54

Argonne premium coal sample program. Annual technical progress report. Reporting period : 2/2006-2/2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project provides highly uniform, premium (unexposed to oxygen) coal samples to researchers investigating coal structure, properties and behavior, and maintains accessible databases of published reports describing work carried out on the Argonne Premium Coal Samples. The samples are made available to DOE researchers and others. The eight carefully selected samples have been kept in as pristine a condition as possible through careful control the conditions in all stages from sample collection throughout processing and packaging. The samples are available in glass ampoules to ensure sample uniformity and maintain premium quality to ensure sample integrity.

Hunt, J. E.; Chemistry

2007-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

55

Acceptance test report for core sample trucks 3 and 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Acceptance Test Report is to provide documentation for the acceptance testing of the rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4, designated as HO-68K-4600 and HO-68K-4647, respectively. This report conforms to the guidelines established in WHC-IP-1026, ``Engineering Practice Guidelines,`` Appendix M, ``Acceptance Test Procedures and Reports.`` Rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4 were based upon the design of the second core sample truck (HO-68K-4345) which was constructed to implement rotary mode sampling of the waste tanks at Hanford. Successful completion of acceptance testing on June 30, 1995 verified that all design requirements were met. This report is divided into four sections, beginning with general information. Acceptance testing was performed on trucks 3 and 4 during the months of March through June, 1995. All testing was performed at the ``Rock Slinger`` test site in the 200 West area. The sequence of testing was determined by equipment availability, and the initial revision of the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was used for both trucks. Testing was directed by ICF-KH, with the support of WHC Characterization Equipment Engineering and Characterization Project Operations. Testing was completed per the ATP without discrepancies or deviations, except as noted.

Corbett, J.E.

1996-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

56

Chemical production from industrial by-product gases: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for conservation of natural gas is studied and the technical and economic feasibility and the implementation of ventures to produce such chemicals using carbon monoxide and hydrogen from byproduct gases are determined. A survey was performed of potential chemical products and byproduct gas sources. Byproduct gases from the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries were selected for detailed study. Gas sampling, preliminary design, market surveys, and economic analyses were performed for specific sources in the selected industries. The study showed that production of methanol or ammonia from byproduct gas at the sites studied in the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries is technically feasible but not economically viable under current conditions. Several other applications are identified as having the potential for better economics. The survey performed identified a need for an improved method of recovering carbon monoxide from dilute gases. A modest experimental program was directed toward the development of a permselective membrane to fulfill that need. A practical membrane was not developed but further investigation along the same lines is recommended. (MCW)

Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis production test Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

production test Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: analysis production test Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Building Reusable Testing...

58

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials Biomass production potentials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 1 Biomass production potentials in Central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios Final report of WP3 of the VIEWLS project, funded by DG-Tren #12;WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 2 Report Biomass production potentials in central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios

59

Annual report of the Surface Air Sampling Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tropospheric concentrations of radioactive debris from nuclear weapons tests are currently at or below the lower limits of detection of our analytical systems. Following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear reactor in the USSR on April 26, 1986, fission products were detected at all sampling sites located in the Northern Hemisphere. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb at sites in which weekly air filter samples are analyzed probably result from variations in meteorological factors. The data from quality assurance samples indicate that the reliability of the air filter measurements are acceptable. The gross gamma-ray activity and the monthly mean surface air concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}CS, {sup 144}Ce and {sup 210}Pb at sampling sites in the Surface Air Sampling Program during 1985 through 1988 are presented. The weekly mean surface air concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 144}Ce and {sup 210}Pb are also presented for 11 sites. 2 refs., 1 fig., 27 tabs.

Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Trench sampling report Salmon Site Lamar County, Mississippi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes trench excavation and sample-collection activities conducted by IT Corporation (IT) as part of the ongoing Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study at the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (DOE, 1992). During construction, operation, and closure of the site wastes of unknown composition were buried in pits on site. Surface-geophysical field investigations were conducted intermittently between November 1992 and October 1993 to identify potential waste-burial sites and buried metallic materials. The geophysical investigations included vertical magnetic gradient, electromagnetic conductivity, electromagnetic in-phase component, and ground-penetrating radar surveys. A number of anomalies identified by the magnetic gradiometer survey in the Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc., (REECo) pits area indicated buried metallic objects. All of the anomalies were field checked to determine if any were caused by surface features or debris. After field checking, 17 anomalies were still unexplained; trenching was planned to attempt to identify their sources. Between December 8, 1993, and December 17, 1993, 15 trenches were excavated and soil samples were collected at the anomalies. Samples were collected, placed in 250- and 500-milliliter (m{ell}) amber glass containers, and shipped on ice to IT Analytical Services (ITAS) in St. Louis, Missouri, using standard IT chain-of-custody procedures. The samples were analyzed for various chemical and radiological parameters. Data validation has not been conducted on any of the samples. During excavation and sampling, soil samples were also collected by IT for the MSDEQ and the Mississippi Department of Radiological Health, in accordance with their instructions, and delivered into their custody.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: To increase the accuracy and value of information presented in its annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Report, the Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) developed a reporting system, known as the Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions, in 2010. The Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions serve as a guideline to project developers in reporting geothermal project development information to the GEA. A basic understanding of the Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions will also aid the reader in fully understanding the information presented in this

62

Passive sampling methods to determine household and personal care product use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Passive sampling methods to determine household and personal care product use DEBORAH H. BENNETTa, cleaning products, passive sampling, SUPERB, longitudinal. Introduction Personal care and household care products, such as cleaning products and pesticides, are frequently used in most house- holds although

Leistikow, Bruce N.

63

Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production@nmsu.edu #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth i Disclaimer This report States Government or any agency thereof. #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic

Johnson, Eric E.

64

DOE Publishes Report on Color Stability of LED Lighting Products...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Color Stability of LED Lighting Products DOE Publishes Report on Color Stability of LED Lighting Products October 24, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has...

65

RRC - Geothermal Production Test Completion or Recompletion Report...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Test Completion or Recompletion Report and Log Form GT-1 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: RRC - Geothermal Production Test...

66

Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

DOE's Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress summarizes the technology roadmaps for solar- and wind-based hydrogen production. Published in December 2005, it fulfills t

67

Annual report of the Surface Air Sampling Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tropospheric concentrations of radioactive debris from nuclear weapons tests continued to decrease during the period from 1983 to 1985. For the first time since this measurement program was begun, no clear springtime peak was discernible in the concentrations of /sup 90/Sr, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 239,240/Pu in the surface air of the Northern Hemisphere. The data for quality assurance samples measured as part of the program indicate that the low ambient concentrations during this period introduced significant uncertainties into the fission product data for routine monthly samples. Meteorological factors probably produce the large observed week to week variations in the concentrations of /sup 7/Be and /sup 210/Pb at sites that are sampled on a weekly basis. Four such factors are responsible for much of the seasonal variation of /sup 7/Be concentrations. These are variations in the rate of exchange of air between the stratosphere and the troposphere, of vertical transport within the troposphere, of horizontal mixing between high- and mid-latitudes, and of washout by rainfall.

Freely, H.W.; Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report provides an overview of the current state of electrolytic hydrogen production techonologies and an economic analysis of the processes and systems available as of December 2003.

69

Analytical Data Report of Water Samples Collected For I-129 Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an analytical data report for samples received from the central plateau contractor. The samples were analyzed for iodine-129.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

70

Guide to preparing SAND reports and other communication products.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide describes the R&A process, Common Look and Feel requirements, and preparation and publishing procedures for communication products at Sandia National Laboratories. Samples of forms and examples of published communications products are provided. This guide takes advantage of the wealth of material now available on the Web as a resource. Therefore, it is best viewed as an electronic document. If some of the illustrations are too small to view comfortably, you can enlarge them on the screen as needed. The format of this document is considerably different than that usually expected of a SAND Report. It was selected to permit the large number of illustrations and examples to be placed closer to the text that references them. In the case of forms, covers, and other items that are included as examples, a link to the Web is provided so that you can access the items and download them for use. This guide details the processes for producing a variety of communication products at Sandia National Laboratories. Figure I-1 shows the general publication development process. Because extensive supplemental material is available from Sandia on the internal web or from external sources (Table I-1), the guide has been shortened to make it easy to find information that you need.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Coal combustion products 2007 production and use report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The American Coal Ash Association's 2007 Annual Coal Combustion Products (CCP) are derived from data from more than 170 power plants. The amount of CCPs used was 40.55%, a decrease of 2.88% from 2006, attributed to reduced fuel burn and a decrease in demand in the building industry. Figures are given for the production of fly ash, flue gas desulfurization gypsum, bottom ash, FBC ash and boiler slag. The article summarises results of the survey. 1 ref., 1 tab.

NONE

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

EIA-914 Monthly Gas Production Report Methodology  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 1 - t t m m t T T T m A test close to the actual task of estimating monthly 2005 production calibrated to 2003...

73

E-Print Network 3.0 - accountability narrative reporting Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

narrative reporting Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: accountability narrative reporting Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 STORYEVAL: An...

74

South Dakota Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,846 1,947 2,558 2,231 3,431 3,920 4,369 1990's 881 93 1,006 854 1,000 848 0 687 772 702 2000's 648 563 531 550 531 446 455 422 1,099 NA 2010's NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value South Dakota Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

75

Indiana Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Indiana Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 135 394 367 365 217 412 416 1990's 399 232 174 192 107 249 360 526 615 855 2000's 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 3,135 2,921 3,606 4,701 4,927 2010's 6,802 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value Indiana Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

76

Ris-PhD-Report Production, Characterization and Stability of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-PhD-Report Production, Characterization and Stability of Organic Solar Cell Devices PhD Thesis Suren Ashot Gevorgyan #12;#12;RIS? DTU Production, Characterization and Stability of Polymer Solar Cell #12;Author: Suren Ashot Gevorgyan Title: Production, Characterization and Stability of Organic Solar

77

Research Report Determinism in Partially Ordered Production Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Report Determinism in Partially Ordered Production Systems Joseph M. Hellerstein IBM Production Systems Joseph M. Hellerstein IBM Almaden Research Center San Jose, CA 95120­6099 hellerst; Abstract The subtlety of interactions between rules in a production system has motivated research into ways

California at Irvine, University of

78

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

December 2013 December 2013 Explanatory notes Drilling Productivity Report The Drilling Productivity Report uses recent data on the total number of drilling rigs in operation along with estimates of drilling productivity and estimated changes in production from existing oil and natural gas wells to provide estimated changes in oil and natural gas production for six key fields. EIA's approach does not distinguish between oil-directed rigs and gas-directed rigs because once a well is completed it may produce both oil and gas; more than half of the wells do that. Monthly additions from one average rig Monthly additions from one average rig represent EIA's estimate of an average rig's

79

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromous fish production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anadromous fish production Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Environmental Biology of Fishes 64: 229242,...

80

DOE Challenge Home Production Builder Roundtable Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In January 2014, a select group of the top executives from these leading production builders met with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Challenge Home Program to share business and technical...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

WHO Report on the Scientific Basis of Tobacco Product Regulation: Fourth Report of a WHO Study Group Technical Report Series, No 967  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHO Technical Report Series WHO STUDY GROUPON TOBACCO PRODUCT REGULATION Report on the Scienti?c BasisProduct Regulation: Fourth Report of a WHO Study Group WHO

WHO

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Startech Hydrogen Production Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The assigned work scope includes the modification and utilization of the Plasma Converter System, Integration of a StarCell{trademark} Multistage Ceramic Membrane System (StarCell), and testing of the integrated systems towards DOE targets for gasification and membrane separation. Testing and evaluation was performed at the Startech Engineering and Demonstration Test Center in Bristol, CT. The Objectives of the program are as follows: (1) Characterize the performance of the integrated Plasma Converter and StarCell{trademark} Systems for hydrogen production and purification from abundant and inexpensive feedstocks; (2) Compare integrated hydrogen production performance to conventional technologies and DOE benchmarks; (3) Run pressure and temperature testing to baseline StarCell's performance; and (4) Determine the effect of process contaminants on the StarCell{trademark} system.

Startech Engineering Department

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

83

3rd Quarter 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2nd quarter 3rd quarter 4th quarter P Preliminary data. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A and Form EIA-851Q, "Domestic Uranium Production Report."...

84

Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & Production Planning Isotopes, including both radioactive and stable isotopes, make important contributions to research, medicine, and industry in the United States and throughout the world. For nearly fifty years, the Department of Energy (DOE) has actively promoted the use of isotopes by funding (a) production of isotopes at a number of national laboratories with unique nuclear reactors or particle accelerators, (b) nuclear medicine research at the laboratories and in academia, (c) research into industrial applications of isotopes, and (d) research into isotope production and processing methods. The radio- pharmaceutical and radiopharmacy industries have their origin in

85

Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly technical progress report and key personnel staffing report No. 3, July 1, 1995--Sepember 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tasks 1 and 2 involve preparation of a Project Management Plan and establishment of a Participants Agreement/Proprietary Information Agreement for members of the Carbon Products Consortium (CPC). These tasks are now complete. Task 3 is to provide a series of samples of solvent extracted coal to the CPC participants and to incorporate their feedback and suggestions into subsequent samples. As of September 30, 1995, UCAR has received two rounds of samples; Koppers has received one round of samples; ALCOA and AMOCO have not yet specified the types of samples they wish to receive; FMI has received one round of samples and has requested a rather large, five kilogram, sample of coal extracts to do multiple impregnation on a large carbon fiber preform. There are extensive communications between the WVU research team and the five industrial partners. Task 4, cooperation with MITRE on their preparation of an economic analysis of the solvent extraction, is complete. Task 5, Technology Transfer, is an on going endeavor with research team meetings, general CPC meetings, presentations of conference papers, and submission of required reports. The CPC is finally functioning as it has been envisioned, i.e., with the WVU solvent extracted coal materials being evaluated by several companies as precursor for their individual product lines. The companies are comparing the WVU materials with commercially available pitches and cokes.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Release Storage and Disposal Program Product Sampling Support  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document includes recommended capabilities and/or services to support transport, analysis, and disposition of Immobilized High-Level and Low-Activity Waste samples as requested by the US DOE-Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) as specified in the Privatization Contract between DOE-ORP and BNFL Inc. In addition, an approved implementation path forward is presented which includes use of existing Hanford Site services to provide the required support capabilities.

CALMUS, R.B.

2000-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

87

Sample Contract Language for Construction Using Energy-Efficient Products  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CONSTRUCTION USING ENERGY-EFFICIENT CONSTRUCTION USING ENERGY-EFFICIENT PRODUCTS Section C - Performance Work Statement/Descriptions, Specifications The Contractor shall comply with Sections 524 and Sections 525 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007; Section 104 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005; Executive Order 13514, "Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance," dated October 5, 2009; Executive Order 13423, "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," dated

88

Report of tritide study at the Responsive Neutron Generator Product Deployment Center.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a study of sample counting results for wipes from routine surface area monitoring conducted at the Responsive Neutron Generator Product Deployment Center (RNGPDC) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The study was initiated in November 2006, with two samples suspected of containing erbium tritide, after some samples were found to exhibit higher tritium counting rates upon recount at a later time. The main goal of the study was to determine whether the current practice of analyzing tritium wipe samples once, within a few days of sample collection, is adequate to accurately quantify the amount of tritium on the sample when tritides may be present. Recommendations are made toward routine recounting of vials suspected of containing particulate forms of tritium.

Burkhart, Robert; Coffey, Jaime

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Uranium Production Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013 October 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. October 2013

90

Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gasifier selected for development under this contract is an innovative and patented hybrid technology which combines the best features of both fixed-bed and fluidized-bed types. PyGas{trademark}, meaning Pyrolysis Gasification, is well suited for integration into advanced power cycles such as IGCC. It is also well matched to hot gas clean-up technologies currently in development. Unlike other gasification technologies, PyGas can be designed into both large and small scale systems. It is expected that partial repowering with PyGas could be done at a cost of electricity of only 2.78 cents/kWh, more economical than natural gas repowering. It is extremely unfortunate that Government funding for such a noble cause is becoming reduced to the point where current contracts must be canceled. The Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF) project was initiated to provide a test facility to support early commercialization of advanced fixed-bed coal gasification technology at a cost approaching $1,000 per kilowatt for electric power generation applications. The project was to include an innovative, advanced, air-blown, pressurized, fixed-bed, dry-bottom gasifier and a follow-on hot metal oxide gas desulfurization sub-system. To help defray the cost of testing materials, the facility was to be located at a nearby utility coal fired generating site. The patented PyGas{trademark} technology was selected via a competitive bidding process as the candidate which best fit overall DOE objectives. The paper describes the accomplishments to date.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Report Title: Oil and Gas Production and Economic Growth In New Mexico Type of Report: Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report Title: Oil and Gas Production and Economic Growth In New Mexico Type of Report: Technical agency thereof. #12;Page | ii Oil and Gas Production and Economic Growth in New Mexico James Peach and C Mexico's marketed value of oil and gas was $19.2 billion (24.0 percent of state GDP). This paper

Johnson, Eric E.

92

Data Report on Post-Irradiation Dimensional Change of AGC-1 Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the initial dimensional changes for loaded and unloaded AGC-1 samples. The dimensional change for all samples is presented as a function of dose. The data is further presented by graphite type and applied load levels to illustrate the differences between graphite forming processes and stress levels within the graphite components. While the three different loads placed on the samples have been verified [ ref: Larry Hulls report] verification of the AGC-1 sample temperatures and dose levels are expected in the summer of 2012. Only estimated dose and temperature values for the samples are presented in this report to allow a partial analysis of the results.

William Windes

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Analysis report for 241-BY-104 auger samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document details the analytical sample results for two auger samples of the tip 15 cm (6 in.) of tank 241-BY-104 salt cake. The thermal response of tank 241-BY-104 auger samples is generally mild. The level of cyanide and iron, and therefore of ferrocyanide is very low. Evidence of inhomogeneity is present for tank 241-By-104 salt cake. Mass and charge balances were less than ideal. The concentrations found for the major constituents, except chromium, are in line with the expectations.

Beck, M.A.; Bechtold, D.B.; Hey, B.E.

1992-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

94

E-Print Network 3.0 - adverse reaction reporting Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adverse reaction reporting Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Improving pharmacovigilance and the role of the pharmacist...

95

Virginia Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Virginia Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,342 8,928 15,041 15,427 19,223 18,424 17,935 1990's 14,283 14,906 24,734 37,840 50,259 49,818 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value Virginia Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

96

Oregon Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Oregon Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3 2,790 4,080 4,600 3,800 4,000 2,500 1990's 2,815 2,741 2,580 4,003 3,221 1,923 1,439 1,173 1,067 1,291 2000's 1,214 1,069 837 688 467 433 NA 390 751 751 2010's 1,376 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value Oregon Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

97

Nebraska Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Nebraska Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,091 2,300 1,944 1,403 1,261 910 878 1990's 793 785 1,177 1,375 2,098 1,538 1,332 1,194 1,285 1,049 2000's 879 883 892 1,168 1,172 1,172 NA 1,555 3,082 2,908 2010's 2,231 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value Nebraska Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed Production

98

SmartSolar Site Report and Appendix- Sample  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This site report provides SmartSolars identified opportunities for energy efficiency and solar projects, guides on how to move forward with these projects, and supporting documents.

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative fuels production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alternative fuels production Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 A U.S. Department of Energy...

100

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: October 31, 2013 Next Release Date: February 2014 Capacity (short tons of ore per day) 2012 1st Quarter 2013 2nd Quarter 2013 3rd Quarter 2013 EFR White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating-Processing Alternate Feed Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Permitted And Licensed Energy Fuels Wyoming Inc Sheep Mountain Fremont, Wyoming 725 - Undeveloped Undeveloped Undeveloped Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Mobile on-site sample collection, preparation, and analysis in Iraq. Final report, January-April 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center has developed mobile on-site sample collection, preparation, and analysis equipment to collect environmental samples in highly contaminated areas. This equipment is being used by the United Nations Special Commission at the Baghdad Monitoring and Verification Center (BMVC), which provides long-term monitoring of dual-purpose chemical sites in Iraq, especially those with potential for chemical warfare (CW) production. A mobile laboratory was set-up in the BMVC to prepare and analyze samples collected throughout Iraq. Automatic air samplers were installed at various sites to collect vapor samples on absorption tubes that were analyzed using a gas chromatographic (GC) flame photometric detector (FPD). Mobile sample collection kits were used to collect solid, liquid, air, and wipe samples during challenge inspections. These samples were prepared using a sample preparation kit, which concentrates CW agent, breakdown products, and their precursors in complex matrices down to sub part per million levels for chemical analysis by a GC mass selective detector (MSD). This report describes the problems and solutions encountered with setting up a self-sufficient mobile analytical laboratory. Details of the various components associated with the laboratory and the collection kits are included.

Swahn, I.D.; Brzezinski, J.H.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

NNLO W Pair Production at the LHC: Status Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the result with full mass dependence for the virtual NNLO QCD corrections to the W boson pair production in the quark-anti-quark annihilation channel. We also report on our progress regarding the treatment of the double-real radiative corrections which, along with the virtual-real corrections, are the other two necessary ingredients for a theoretical prediction of the total cross section for W+ W- production to NNLO accuracy.

Grigorios Chachamis

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

103

Alaska Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 211,569 211,579 222,637 304,841 271,120 228,284 192,760 1990's 191,798 200,557 206,259 224,786 201,891 227,797 193,278 191,017 192,982 186,727 2000's 189,896 197,735 200,871 199,616 413,667 502,887 494,323 368,344 337,359 397,077 2010's 316,546 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead

104

Alabama Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 59,051 56,685 42,925 34,164 35,674 45,488 41,614 1990's 37,229 35,972 51,219 75,474 70,489 54,964 493,069 583,370 560,414 544,020 2000's 521,215 376,241 370,753 348,722 304,212 285,237 274,176 259,062 246,747 225,666 2010's 212,769 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead

105

Pennsylvania Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 118,372 166,342 150,234 159,889 163,318 167,089 191,774 1990's 177,609 152,500 138,675 189,443 187,113 177,139 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value Pennsylvania Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed

106

Montana Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 47,751 47,534 46,113 42,203 42,814 47,748 52,044 1990's 45,998 48,075 50,359 58,810 51,953 46,739 46,868 50,409 51,967 55,780 2000's 67,294 78,493 86,075 86,027 90,771 101,666 106,843 110,942 802,619 293,941 2010's 87,539 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead

107

North Dakota Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 69,319 60,111 62,371 58,593 51,671 21,240 12,290 1990's 11,537 5,138 3,994 4,420 0 0 0 52,401 53,185 52,862 2000's 48,714 57,949 57,015 57,808 59,513 57,972 53,675 54,745 52,469 59,369 2010's 81,837 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead

108

California Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) California Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 282,639 343,079 361,739 329,366 346,720 327,399 283,509 1990's 275,738 211,841 195,515 76,381 199,649 263 37,823 219,216 264,810 382,715 2000's 323,864 328,778 309,399 293,691 276,520 274,817 278,933 268,016 263,107 241,916 2010's 251,559 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead

109

Mississippi Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 211,116 206,871 178,426 197,217 195,299 196,912 148,167 1990's 149,012 126,637 129,340 131,450 105,646 95,349 88,805 98,075 88,723 83,232 2000's 70,965 76,986 112,979 133,901 145,692 52,923 60,531 73,460 96,641 97,258 2010's 73,721 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead

110

Colorado Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 139,820 143,552 126,037 163,684 164,557 191,544 216,737 1990's 242,997 271,159 314,105 388,016 441,343 511,513 559,473 637,375 696,321 705,477 2000's 735,332 800,712 819,205 989,678 1,058,383 1,106,993 1,170,819 1,280,638 1,436,203 1,409,172 2010's 1,548,576 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead

111

Michigan Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 138,910 144,537 131,855 127,287 146,996 146,145 155,988 1990's 106,193 189,497 190,637 199,746 216,268 238,203 245,740 305,950 278,076 277,364 2000's 296,556 275,036 274,476 236,987 259,681 261,112 NA NA 153,130 159,400 2010's 151,886 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead

112

Arkansas Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 78,097 75,575 86,552 68,206 42,688 102,046 42,226 1990's 99,456 83,864 85,177 122,596 24,326 180,117 76,671 71,449 61,012 54,382 2000's 55,057 16,901 161,871 166,329 183,299 190,533 193,491 269,886 446,551 680,613 2010's 936,600 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead

113

West Virginia Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 130,078 143,730 144,883 135,431 160,000 174,942 177,192 1990's 95,271 198,605 202,775 171,024 55,756 50,439 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 NA 0 NA NA NA NA NA NA 2010's NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value West Virginia Natural Gas Wellhead Value and Marketed

114

Kentucky Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 46,720 61,518 73,126 80,195 70,125 44,725 72,417 1990's 75,333 78,904 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 79,547 81,868 76,770 2000's 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,609 94,259 92,795 95,320 95,437 114,116 NA 2010's 135,355 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead

115

Ohio Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 149,096 184,651 180,458 180,287 164,960 166,690 159,730 1990's 154,619 146,189 143,381 135,939 130,855 125,085 119,251 116,246 108,542 102,505 2000's 98,551 97,272 103,158 120,081 119,847 83,523 86,315 88,095 84,858 88,824 2010's 78,122 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead

116

New York Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) New York Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 17,836 25,200 31,561 22,964 25,676 23,455 20,433 1990's 25,023 21,704 22,543 20,620 19,684 17,325 0 15,415 15,415 15,426 2000's 17,166 27,187 35,941 35,044 45,436 54,377 55,344 54,942 50,320 44,849 2010's 35,241 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Quantity of Natural Gas Production Associated with Reported Wellhead

117

Assessment of the magnesium primary production technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At current production levels, direct energy savings achievable in primary magnesium production are 1.2 milliquads of energy per annum. Were magnesium to penetrate the automotive market to an average level of 50 pounds per vehicle, the resultant energy savings at the production stage would be somewhat larger, but the resulting savings in gasoline would conserve an estimated 325 milliquads of energy per year. The principal barrier to more widespread use of magnesium in the immediate future is its price. A price reduction of magnesium of 10% would lead to widespread conversion of aluminum die and permanent mold castings to magnesium. This report addresses the technology of electrolytic and thermic magnesium production and the economics of expanded magnesium production and use.

Flemings, M.C.; Kenney, G.B.; Sadoway, D.R.; Clark, J.P.; Szekely, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly technical progress report and key personnel staffing report No. 6, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main goal of this program is to demonstrate the utility of coal extracts from the West Virginia University (WVU) extraction process as suitable base raw materials for the carbon products encompassed by the Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) team. This quarterly report covers activities during the period from April 1, 1996 through June 30, 1996. The first year of the project ended in February, 1996; however, the WVU research effort has continued on a no-cost extension of the original contract. Samples have been supplied to CPC participants so they could conduct their portions of the project as contracted through ORNL. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: project planning and administration; consortium administration and reporting; coal extraction; technical/economic evaluation of WVU extraction process; and technology transfer. Previous work has shown that the WVU coal extraction process coupled with hydrotreatment, does have the potential for producing suitable base raw materials for carbon products. Current effort, therefore, involved the screening and evaluation of extracts produced by the WVU Group and recommending appropriate materials for scaleup for subsequent evaluation by Consortium Team members. As part of this program, the activation of the coal extraction residues was investigated for the purpose of producing a useful active carbon. A further task, which was started towards the end of the program, was to fabricate a small graphite artifact using Coke derived from coal extract as the filler and the coal extract itself as a binder. The results of these studies are summarized in this report.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

USDA Biofuels Strategic Production Report June 23, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USDA Biofuels Strategic Production Report June 23, 2010 1 A USDA Regional Roadmap to Meeting the Biofuels Goals of the Renewable Fuels Standard by 2022 I. INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Agriculture. The strategy targets barriers to the development of a successful biofuels market that will achieve, or surpass

120

Development of a coal combustion product (CCP) database system. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nearly 90 million tons of coal combustion products (CCPs) are produced annually in the United States. The value of CCPs is well established by research and commercial practice; however, only 25% of these products are utilized. The objective of this project was to develop a computer program containing a database of advanced analytical and comprehensive engineering information on CCPs, accessible through a user-friendly interface. Version 1.0 of the ACAA CCP Data Manager was specifically designed to: perform multiple-criteria queries to produce a set of sample for in-depth study; view and print standard test reports, such as C618 reports; compare and contrast analytical results in graphs and tables; graph utilization information by application and region; and save data to a file for use in other computer applications, such as spreadsheet programs. The program was designed to contain descriptive information about a given CCP sample, including sample formation data (material type, sample location, fuel type, collection device etc.), combustion system design data (steam generator type, furnace type, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control information, ash-handling configurations), test data (chemical, mineralogical, and physical characterization data), and utilization potential of the CCP. The location of the plant is identified by region. The database has been initially populated with information on over 800 CCP samples, taken from the Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC). An installation package and user`s guide was developed for unlimited distribution by the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA).

O`Leary, E.M.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

REPORT ON ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TESTING FOR TANK 241-AN-106 USING 2009 SAMPLING CAMPAIGN GRAB SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on an ENRAF waste surface measurement taken February 1, 2009, double-shell tank (DST) 24l-AN-l06 (AN-106) contained approximately 278.98 inches (793 kgal) of waste. A zip cord measurement from the tank on February 1, 2009, indicated a settled solids layer of 9l.7 inches in height (280 kgal). The supernatant layer in February 2009, by difference, was approximately 187 inches deep (514 kgal). Laboratory results from AN-l06 February 1, 2009 (see Table 2) grab samples indicated the supernatant was below the chemistry limit that applied at the time as identified in HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006, 'Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements', Administrative Control (AC) 5.16, 'Corrosion Mitigation Controls.' The limits have since been removed from the Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) and are captured in OSD-T-15l-00007, 'Operating Specifications for the Double-Shell Storage Tanks.' Problem evaluation request WRPS-PER-2009-0218 was submitted February 9,2009, to document the finding that the supernatant chemistry for grab samples taken from the middle and upper regions of the supernatant was noncompliant with the chemistry control limits. The lab results for the samples taken from the bottom region of the supernatant met AC 5.16 limits.

WYRWAS RB

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

122

TA Orientation 2005 Activity 14 Evaluating Sample Laboratory Report from Laboratory Manual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Please keep in mind the information from Activities 17 & #18a as you go through the following 2 student is expected in each section of the report). 2. Individually evaluate the sample laboratory report ­ mark down laboratory report. 5. Mark down any and all comments made during the presentation on the example student

Minnesota, University of

123

Operability test report for rotary mode core sampling system number 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the successful completion of operability testing for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) system {number_sign}3. The Report includes the test procedure (WHC-SD-WM-OTP-174), exception resolutions, data sheets, and a test report summary.

Corbett, J.E.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Environmental Monitoring program. Volume 1 - sampling progrom report. Baseline Sampling Program report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project at its Sparrows Point, Maryland Coke Oven Plant. This innovative coke oven gas cleaning system combines several existing technologies into an integrated system for removing impurities from Coke Oven Gas (COG) to make it an acceptable fuel. DOE provided cost-sharing under a Cooperative Agreement with BSC. This Cooperative Agreement requires BSC to develop and conduct and Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Clean Coal Technology project and to report the status of the EMP on a quarterly basis. It also requires the preparation of a final report on the results of the Baseline Compliance and Supplemental Sampling Programs that are part of the EMP and which were conducted prior to the startup of the innovative coke oven gas cleaning system. This report is the Baseline Sampling Program report.

Stuart, L.M.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

125

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

500000,2344107 500000,2344107 2003,400000,600000,400000,600000,2000000 2004,600000,400000,588738,600000,2282406 2005,709600,630053,663068,686456,2689178 2006,931065,894268,1083808,1196485,4105626 2007,1162737,1119536,1075460,1175845,4533578 2008,810189,1073315,980933,1037946,3902383 2009,880036,982760,956657,888905,3708358 2010,876084,1055102,1150725,1146281,4228192 2011,1063047,1189083,846624,892013,3990767 2012,1078404,1061289,1048018,957936,4145647 "P2013",1147031,1394232,1171278,"NA","--" "E = Estimated data." "P = Preliminary data." "NA = Not available." "-- = Not applicable." "Notes: The reported 4th quarter 2002 production amount was adjusted by rounding to the nearest 100,000 pounds to avoid disclosure of individual company data. This also affects the 2002 annual production. The reported 2003 and 1st, 2nd, and 4th quarter 2004 production amounts were adjusted by rounding to the nearest 200,000 pounds to avoid disclosure of individual company data. The reported 2004 total is the actual production for 2004. Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding."

126

New Mexico Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 884,517 925,298 880,307 676,886 790,639 752,629 833,593 1990's 949,735 1,029,824 1,274,220 1,489,052 1,510,804 1,480,327 1,553,103 1,540,157 1,483,370 1,511,671 2000's 1,685,664 1,670,644 1,614,045 1,576,639 1,578,773 1,571,920 1,562,754 1,495,615 895,675 1,370,727 2010's 1,287,399 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014

127

Oklahoma Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,730,061 1,985,869 1,936,341 1,917,493 2,004,797 2,106,632 2,185,204 1990's 2,186,153 2,119,161 1,937,224 2,005,971 1,879,257 1,765,788 1,751,487 1,452,233 1,644,531 1,577,961 2000's 1,612,890 1,477,058 1,456,375 1,531,657 1,584,905 1,571,615 1,683,563 1,589,871 1,765,988 1,621,316 2010's 1,408,061 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014

128

Texas Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6,227,995 6,630,246 6,367,936 6,465,964 6,414,021 6,386,544 6,276,968 1990's 6,476,032 6,066,256 5,893,069 5,769,437 5,834,671 5,592,323 4,684,140 4,716,304 4,777,945 5,719,128 2000's 5,869,901 5,159,233 5,166,315 5,186,213 5,271,306 5,539,052 5,993,702 6,454,249 7,483,842 7,623,747 2010's 7,470,752 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014

129

Louisiana Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,149,192 3,650,412 3,179,306 2,986,468 3,243,795 3,158,903 3,066,789 1990's 3,780,551 3,355,867 3,404,963 3,454,646 3,562,360 3,709,015 3,976,305 5,398,216 5,410,523 5,265,670 2000's 3,587,815 1,529,733 1,365,925 1,350,399 1,357,366 1,296,048 1,361,119 1,275,806 1,292,478 1,449,809 2010's 2,140,525 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014

130

Wyoming Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Quantity of Production Associated with Reported Wellhead Value (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 395,656 447,615 416,565 352,858 407,863 471,095 623,915 1990's 690,356 711,799 765,254 63,667 14,283 12,449 27,821 719,933 1,004,020 1,079,375 2000's 1,240,038 1,359,868 1,533,724 1,561,322 1,724,725 1,729,760 1,811,992 1,916,238 2,116,818 2,239,778 2010's 2,318,486 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages:

131

Final Report_Production Hydrualic Packer Test.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CENTER CENTER Production Hydraulic Packer Field Test i DOE/RMOTC/020120 PRODUCTION HYDRAULIC PACKER FIELD TEST Field Report for the period of October 21, 1999 - November 01, 1999 Date Published: June 30, 2000 Tricia Schneller, Halliburton Energy Services Jose Salas, RMOTC (PDVSA, Venezuela) PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Work Performed Under Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) CRADA No. 2000-001 PROTECTED CRADA INFORMATION This product contains Protected CRADA Information which was produced on June 30, 2000 under CRADA No. 2000-001 and is not to be further disclosed for a period of 5 years from the date it was produced except as expressly provided for in the CRADA. Distribution E. Further dissemination authorized to the Department of Energy

132

x2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT The Environmental Services Field Sampling Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Environmental Services Division Barbara Pierce, Plant Engineering Jason Remien, Environmental Services Divisionx2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT The Environmental Services Field Sampling Team (Back from left). The Analytical Services Laboratory Team Back row from left to right) Lisa Muench, William

Homes, Christopher C.

133

Establishment and maintenance of a coal sample bank and data base. Final report, April 8, 1988--September 28, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This DOE contract continued support for the DOE Coal Sample Bank and Data Base at Penn State. At the beginning of the contract, a new type of container was evaluated for long-term storage of coal samples ranging in quantity from a few grams to over 10 kg (22 lbs). Gieseler fluid behavior, oxidation of pyrite to sulfates, loss of heating value, and other properties were monitored over time. Based on preliminary results, these foil and polyethylene laminate bags were believed to be a significant improvement over the drums, buckets and cans previously used. Use of the bags was therefore instituted with DECS-1, the first sample collected under the contract. Twenty-two DECS samples were collected, ranging in rank from lignite to anthracite and representing the five most productive coal provinces of the US. Over 6500 containers of DECS samples were created under the contract and 750 containers of 34 PSOC samples are supported by the contract. Each sample was characterized by proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic (vitrinite reflectance and maceral) analysis, physical and thermoplastic testing, and inorganic element analysis. The resulting data, and geologic data on each sample, were entered in a data base which can be used to produce a formatted five-page or one-page printout for each sample. An interactively operated data base can be searched, sorted or summarized to produce tables of selected data or to identify samples meeting a requestor`s criteria. During the period covered, 2,313 printouts, and 204 special data reports resulting in distribution of data on 34,086 samples, were provided on request.

Davis, A.; Glick, D.C.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Tank 241-C-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-107. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Tank 241-TY-103 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-TY-103. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Tank 241-T-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-T-107. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

Tank 241-C-105 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-105. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Tank 241-C-102 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-102. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Tank 241-C-106 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-106. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Tank 241-B-103 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-B-103. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Tank 241-BX-104 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-BX-104. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

Tank 241-C-109 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-109. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

143

Tank 241-C-111 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-111. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Tank 241-C-110 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-110. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Tank 241-BY-110 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-BY-110. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to the tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, January 1,1996--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Individual quarterly reports of four industrial participants of this project are included in this report. The technical emphasis continues to be the supply of coal-based feedstocks to the industrial participants. There have been several iterations of samples and feedback to meet feedstock characteristics for a wide variety of carbon products. Technology transfer and marketing of the Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) is a continual effort. Interest in the program and positive results from the research continue to grow. In several aspects, the program is ahead of schedule.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: October 31, 2013 Next Release Date: February 2014 Mills - conventional milling 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 Mills - other operations 2 2 3 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 In-Situ-Leach Plants 3 5 6 6 4 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 5 6 3 4 5 5 5 Byproduct Recovery Plants 4 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total 9 11 9 7 6 4 3 2 3 4 6 6 7 4 5 6 6 6 End of 2005 End of 2006 End of 2007 End of 2008 End of 2009 3 Not including in-situ-leach plants that only produced uranium concentrate from restoration. 4 Uranium concentrate as a byproduct from phosphate production. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A and Form EIA-851Q, "Domestic Uranium Production Report." End of 2010 End of 2011 End of 2012 End of 3rd Quarter 2013 1 Milling uranium-bearing ore. 2 Not milling ore, but producing uranium concentrate from other (non-ore) materials.

148

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration / 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: October 31, 2013 Next Release Date: February 2014 Table 1. Total production of uranium concentrate in the United States, 1996 - 3rd Quarter 2013 pounds U 3 O 8 Calendar-Year Quarter 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter Calendar-Year Total 1996 1,734,427 1,460,058 1,691,796 1,434,425 6,320,706 1997 1,149,050 1,321,079 1,631,384 1,541,052 5,642,565 1998 1,151,587 1,143,942 1,203,042 1,206,003 4,704,574 1999 1,196,225 1,132,566 1,204,984 1,076,897 4,610,672 2000 1,018,683 983,330 981,948 973,585 3,975,545 2001 709,177 748,298 628,720 553,060 2,639,256 2002 620,952 643,432 579,723 E500,000 E2,344,107 2003 E400,000 E600,000 E400,000 E600,000

149

Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review Panel Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States government or any agency thereof. Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone: 865.576.8401 fax: 865.576.5728 email: mailto:reports@adonis.osti.gov

150

Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the current state of electrolytic hydrogen production technologies and an economic analysis of the processes and systems available as of December 2003. The operating specifications of commercially available electrolyzers from five manufacturers, i.e., Stuart, Teledyne, Proton, Norsk Hydro, and Avalence, are summarized. Detailed economic analyses of three systems for which cost and economic data were available were completed. The contributions of the cost of electricity, system efficiency, and capital costs to the total cost of electrolysis are discussed.

Ivy, J.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the current state of electrolytic hydrogen production technologies and an economic analysis of the processes and systems available as of December 2003. The operating specifications of commercially available electrolyzers from five manufacturers, i.e., Stuart, Teledyne, Proton, Norsk Hydro, and Avalence, are summarized. Detailed economic analyses of three systems for which cost and economic data were available were completed. The contributions of the cost of electricity, system efficiency, and capital costs to the total cost of electrolysis are discussed.

Ivy, J.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report deals with a study directed towards a modeling effort on production related ground movements and subsidence resulting from hydrate dissociation. The goal of this research study was to evaluate whether there could be subsidence related problems that could be an impediment to hydrate production. During the production of gas from a hydrate reservoir, it is expected that porous reservoir matrix becomes more compressible which may cause reservoir compression (compaction) under the influence of overburden weight. The overburden deformations can propagate its influence upwards causing subsidence near the surface where production equipment will be located. In the present study, the reservoir compaction is modeled by using the conventional ``stress equilibrium`` approach. In this approach, the overburden strata move under the influence of body force (i.e. self weight) in response to the ``cavity`` generated by reservoir depletion. The present study is expected to provide a ``lower bound`` solution to the subsidence caused by hydrate reservoir depletion. The reservoir compaction anticipated during hydrate production was modeled by using the finite element method, which is a powerful computer modeling technique. The ground movements at the reservoir roof (i.e. reservoir compression) cause additional stresses and disturbance in the overburden strata. In this study, the reservoir compaction was modeled by using the conventional ``stress equilibrium`` approach. In this approach, the overburden strata move under the influence of body force (i.e. self weight) in response to the ``cavity`` generated by reservoir depletion. The resulting stresses and ground movements were computed by using the finite element method. Based on the parameters used in this investigation, the maximum ground subsidence could vary anywhere from 0.50 to 6.50 inches depending on the overburden depth and the size of the depleted hydrate reservoir.

Siriwardane, H.J.; Kutuk, B.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Life Cycle Assessment of Renewable Hydrogen Production via Wind/Electrolysis: Milestone Completion Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report summarizes the results of a lifecycle assessment of a renewable hydrogen production process employing wind/electrolysis.

154

Updated Cost Analysis of Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Green Algae: Milestone Completion Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report updates the 1999 economic analysis of NRELs photobiological hydrogen production from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

155

Feed Materials Production Center annual environmental report for calendar 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) has been to process uranium for United States' defense programs. On July 10, 1989, the FMPC suspended production operations, but remains on standby for certain segments of production. The FMPC also manages the storage of some radioactive and hazardous materials. As part of its operations, the FMPC continuously monitors the environment to determine that it is operating within federal and state standards and guidelines regarding emission of radioactive and nonradioactive materials. Data collected from the FMPC monitoring program are used to calculate estimates of radiation dose for residents due to FMPC operations. For 1989, the estimate of dose through the air pathway, excluding radon, indicated that people in the area were exposed to less than 6% of the DOE guideline established to protect the public from radiation exposure. When radon emissions are included, the dose from FMPC operations during 1989 was less than 22% of the annual background radiation dose in the Greater Cincinnati area. This report is a summary of FMPC's environmental activities and monitoring program for 1989. An Environmental Compliance Self-Assessment presents the FMPC's efforts to comply with environmental regulations through June 1990. 44 refs., 48 figs.

Dugan, T.A.; Gels, G.L.; Oberjohn, J.S.; Rogers, L.K.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report Release Date: October 31, 2013 Next Release Date: February 2014 2012 1st Quarter 2013 2nd Quarter 2013 3rd Quarter 2013 Cameco Crow Butte Operation Dawes, Nebraska 1,000,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Hydro Resources, Inc. Church Rock McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Hydro Resources, Inc. Crownpoint McKinley, New Mexico 1,000,000 Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Lost Creek ISR, LLC, a subsidiary of Ur- Energy USA Inc. Lost Creek Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 2,000,000 Under Construction Under Construction

157

Hood River Production Program Review, Final Report 1991-2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a comprehensive review of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded activities within the Hood River Basin from 1991 to 2001. These activities, known as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP), are intended to mitigate for fish losses related to operation of federal dams in the Columbia River Basin, and to contribute to recovery of endangered and/or threatened salmon and steelhead, as directed by Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries). The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the HRPP, which authorized BPA to fund salmon and steelhead enhancement activities in the Hood River Basin, was completed in 1996 (BPA 1996). The EIS specified seven years of monitoring and evaluation (1996-2002) after program implementation to determine if program actions needed modification to meet program objectives. The EIS also called for a program review after 2002, that review is reported here.

Underwood, Keith; Chapman, Colin; Ackerman, Nicklaus

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

SUMMARY REPORT FOR THE ANALYSIS OF THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8) DWPF POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLE FOR CANISTER S03619  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to comply with the Waste Acceptance Specifications in Sludge Batch 7a (Macrobatch 8), Savannah River National Laboratory personnel characterized the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) pour stream glass sample collected while filling canister S03619. This report summarizes the results of the compositional analysis for reportable oxides and radionuclides, and the normalized Product Consistency Test (PCT) results. The PCT responses indicate that the DWPF produced glass that is significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment glass. Results and further details are documented in 'Analysis of DWPF Sludge Batch 7a (Macrobatch 8) Pour Stream Samples,' SRNL-STI-2012-00017.

Johnson, F.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Effect of sampling technique on the measurement of gasoline volatility. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is proposing the adoption of regulations that would reduce the amount of hydrocarbons released to the atmosphere due to evaporation of gasoline. One regulatory alternative under consideration is to put an upper limit on volatility. Volatility is typically quantified by measurement of Reid vapor pressure. The purpose of the report was to identify and quantify any differences in vapor pressure caused by the technique used to obtain the sample. The objective of the effort is identify and document a fast, inexpensive, and reliable method to obtain enforcement-quality samples at service station-type facilities. The report examines the effect of four sampling techniques and two methods of analysis on three types of fuels.

Scarbro, C.A.; White, J.T.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

FY 2013 Summary Report: Post-Irradiation Examination of Zircaloy-4 Samples  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Summary Report: Post-Irradiation Examination of Zircaloy-4 Summary Report: Post-Irradiation Examination of Zircaloy-4 Samples in Target Capsules and Initiation of Bending Fatigue Testing for Used Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Investigations FY 2013 Summary Report: Post-Irradiation Examination of Zircaloy-4 Samples in Target Capsules and Initiation of Bending Fatigue Testing for Used Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Investigations The R&D objective for this work is to conduct the separate effects tests (SET) and small-scale tests that have been identified in the Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Data Gap Prioritization (FCRD-USED-2012-000109). R&D activities conducted during fiscal year 2013 are provided and include information derived from: 1) irradiation of hydrogen-doped zircaloy cladding in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); 2)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Artificial Production Review Report and Recommendations of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................................................................... 21 III. Implementing Reform in Artificial Production Policy and Practices. The Council's recommendations A. Implementing artificial production reform policies The region needs action

162

Analytical Data Report for Sediment Samples Collected From 200 BP 5 OU, C7514 (299-E28-30) L-Well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This an analytical data report for samples received from BP-5 L Well. This report is being prepared for CHPRC.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

Tank 241-SY-102 January 2000 Compatibility Grab Samples Analytical Results for the Final Report [SEC 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-SY-102 (SY-102) grab samples taken in January 2000 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank SY-102 samples were performed as directed in Comparability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 2000 (Sasaki 1999). No notification limits were exceeded. Preliminary data on samples 2SY-99-5, -6, and -7 were reported in ''Format II Report on Tank 241-SY-102 Waste Compatibility Grab Samples Taken in January 2000'' (Lockrem 2000). The data presented here represent the final results.

BELL, K.E.

2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

164

Report of testing and sampling of municipal supply well PM-4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During drilling of regional aquifer characterization borehole R-25, located in the western part of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) at Technical Area (TA) 16, groundwater samples were collected from perched zones of saturation and the regional aquifer that contained elevated levels of high explosive (HE) compounds. One of the nearest Los Alamos County municipal supply wells potentially located down gradient from borehole R-25 is PM-4, located on Mesita del Buey at the west end of TA-54. During the winter of 1998 and 1999 the pump in PM-4 had been removed from the well for scheduled maintenance by the Los Alamos County Public Utilities Department (PUD). Because the pump was removed from PM-4, the opportunity existed to enter the well to (1) perform tests to determine where within the regional aquifer groundwater entered the well and (2) collect groundwater samples from the producing zones for analyses to determine if HE contaminants were present in discrete zones within the regional aquifer. The report of the activities that were performed during March 1999 for the testing and sampling of municipal supply well PM-4 is provided. The report provides a description of the field activities associated with the two phases of the project, including (1) the results of the static and dynamic spinner log surveys, and (2) a description of the sampling activities and the field-measured groundwater quality parameters that were obtained during sampling activities. This report also provides the analytical results of the groundwater samples and a brief discussion of the results of the project.

Richard J. Koch; Patrick Longmire; David B. Rogers; Ken Mullen

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoiding by-product formation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

78 By-Products Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization ECONOMICAL SELF-CONSOLIDATING CONCRETE FOR THE WISCONSIN... production using by-product materials to...

166

Conceptual design report -- Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problems heretofore with coal gasification and IGCC concepts have been their high cost and historical poor performance of fixed-bed gasifiers, particularly on caking coals. The Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF) project is being developed to solve these problems through the development of a novel coal gasification invention which incorporates pyrolysis (carbonization) with gasification (fixed-bed). It employs a pyrolyzer (carbonizer) to avoid sticky coal agglomeration caused in the conventional process of gradually heating coal through the 400 F to 900 F range. In so doing, the coal is rapidly heated sufficiently such that the coal tar exists in gaseous form rather than as a liquid. Gaseous tars are then thermally cracked prior to the completion of the gasification process. During the subsequent endothermic gasification reactions, volatilized alkali can become chemically bound to aluminosilicates in (or added to) the ash. To reduce NH{sub 3} and HCN from fuel born nitrogen, steam injection is minimized, and residual nitrogen compounds are partially chemically reduced in the cracking stage in the upper gasifier region. Assuming testing confirms successful deployment of all these integrated processes, future IGCC applications will be much simplified, require significantly less mechanical components, and will likely achieve the $1,000/kWe commercialized system cost goal of the GPIF project. This report describes the process and its operation, design of the plant and equipment, site requirements, and the cost and schedule. 23 refs., 45 figs., 23 tabs.

Sadowski, R.S.; Skinner, W.H.; House, L.S.; Duck, R.R. [CRS Sirrine Engineers, Inc., Greenville, SC (United States); Lisauskas, R.A.; Dixit, V.J. [Riley Stoker Corp., Worcester, MA (United States); Morgan, M.E.; Johnson, S.A. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States). PowerServe Div.; Boni, A.A. [PSI-Environmental Instruments Corp., Andover, MA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

DOE oil shale reference sample bank: Quarterly report, January-March 1987. [Samples from Kentucky and Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Oil Shale Program was restructured in FY84 to implement a 5-year period of basic and applied research in the study of the phenomena involved in oil shale pyrolysis/retorting. The program calls for the study of two reference shales per year for a period of 5 years. Consequently, the program calls for the identification, acquisition, processing, characterization, storage, disbursement, and record keeping for ten reference shales in a period of 5 years. Terra Tek, Inc. received the DOE Reference Shale Sample Bank contract in October, 1985. Two FY86 reference shales have been acquired, processed and stored under inert gas. The Eastern shale, designated E86, was obtained from the Clegg Creek Member of the New Albany Shale at a quarry near Louisville, Kentucky in the first quarter of FY86. The Western shale was obtained from the Exxon Colony Mine, located near Parachute, Colorado, during the first quarter of FY86. Partial distributions of both shales have been made to DOE contractors. Complete descriptions of the reference shale locales, shale processing procedures and analytical characterization are provided in this report. 7 refs., 40 figs.

Owen, L.B.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Utilization of low NO{sub x} coal combustion by-products. Quarterly report, July--September 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three ash samples have been processed in the pilot plant, providing samples for the utilization tasks. The concrete task is nearly complete and efforts are underway to evaluate market potential and ash suitability for use in related concrete products such as block, aggregate, and aerated autoclaved concrete. Use of ash as a filler in plastics has attracted attention from a nationwide filler supplier. The task to evaluate the carbon products is just getting underway, with the preliminary market study indicating that wastewater sorbent applications may be the best way to go with this product. Moving the project into a third or demonstration phase has been discussed with several utilities, including Detroit Edison and American Electric Power. The feedback has been very favorable. This report discusses the work accomplished under each subtask.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Concentrations of Naturally Occuring Radionuclides and Fission Products in Brick Samples Fabricated and Used in and Around Greater Dhaka City  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Radiation Protection Dosimetry Article Concentrations of Naturally Occuring Radionuclides and Fission Products in Brick Samples...measures to minimise the harmful effects of ionising radiation. The radium equivalent activity concentrations......

S. Roy; M.S. Alam; F.K. Miah; B. Alam

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory Report Review of Technologies for the Production and Use of Charcoal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory Report Review of Technologies for the Production of Charcoal Production __________________________________5 The Petroleum Link developing nations. In this paper, we review the current status of biomass harvesting and transport

Kammen, Daniel M.

171

SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR GOLDEN PASS PRODUCTS LLC - FE DKT. NO...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

GOLDEN PASS PRODUCTS LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-88-LNG - ORDER 3147 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR GOLDEN PASS PRODUCTS LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-88-LNG - ORDER 3147 April 2013 October 2013 April...

172

Coal precursors for production of carbon and graphite products. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main goal of this program was to demonstrate the utility of coal extracts from the West Virginia University (WVU) extraction process as suitable base raw materials for the carbon products encompassed by the Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) team. These include binder and impregnation pitches, Coke for graphite electrodes, Cokes for anodes and specialty graphite, matrices for C/C composites and raw material for mesophase pitch fibers. Previous work in this program has shown that the WVU coal extraction process coupled with hydrotreatment, does have the potential for achieving this objective. The current effort involved screening and evaluation of extracts produced by the WVU Group and recommending appropriate materials for scaleup for subsequent evaluation by Consortium Team members. The program involved an initial characterization of small-scale extracts using standard analytical methods and mesophase formation studies. This was followed by feedback to the WVU Group and to the CPC partners with recommendation of material for scaleup. Similar analytical and mesophase studies on some of the scaled-up extracts was performed. The activation of the coal extraction residues for the purpose of producing a useful active carbon was investigated. A further task was to fabricate a small graphite artifact using Coke derived from coal extract as the filler and the coal extract itself as a binder. The results of the studies are summarized in this report.

Lewis, I.C.; Lewis, R.T.; Mayer, H.K. [Ucar Carbon Co., Inc., Parma, OH (United States)

1996-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

173

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report 1 addresses the following technical barriers from the Hydrogen Production section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells Photoelectrodes ." #12;Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report 2

174

Laser sampling system for an inductively-coupled atomic emission spectrometer. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laser sampling system was attached to a Perkin Elmer Optima 3000 inductively-coupled plasma, atomic emission spectrometer that was already installed and operating in the Chemistry and Geochemistry Department at the Colorado School of Mines. The use of the spectrometer has been highly successful. Graduate students and faculty from at least four different departments across the CSM campus have used the instrument. The final report to NSF is appended to this final report. Appendices are included which summarize several projects utilizing this instrument: acquisition of an inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer for the geochemistry program; hydrogen damage susceptibility assessment for high strength steel weldments through advanced hydrogen content analysis, 1996 and 1997 annual reports; and methods for determination of hydrogen distribution in high strength steel welds.

NONE

1998-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Bakken Bakken 0 50 100 Dec 1,000 Mbbl/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 1,025 Mbbl/d thousand barrels/day Bakken +88 -63 +25 Indicated change in oil production (Jan vs. Dec) 0 50 100 Dec 1,092 MMcf/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 1,119 MMcf/d Indicated change in natural gas production (Jan vs. Dec) million cubic feet/day Bakken +83 -55 +28 0 50 100 150 200 250 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 new-well oil production per rig rig count New-well oil production per rig barrels/day Bakken Rig count rigs (70) (60) (50) (40) (30) (20) (10) 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Legacy oil production change thousand barrels/day Bakken (60) (50) (40) (30) (20) (10) 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Legacy gas production change

176

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,600 1,600 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Oil production thousand barrels/day Permian 0 10 20 30 Dec 1,335 Mbbl/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 1,335 Mbbl/d thousand barrels/day Permian +37 -36 +1 Indicated change in oil production (Jan vs. Dec) 0 20 40 60 80 Dec 5,046 MMcf/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 5,046 MMcf/d Indicated change in natural gas production (Jan vs. Dec) million cubic feet/day Permian +88 -88 +0 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 new-well oil production per rig rig count New-well oil production per rig barrels/day Permian Rig count rigs (40) (35) (30) (25) (20) (15) (10) (5) 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Legacy oil production change thousand barrels/day

177

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

barrels/day barrels/day 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Oil production thousand barrels/day Haynesville 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 Dec 54 Mbbl/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 54 Mbbl/d thousand barrels/day Haynesville +2 -2 +0 Indicated change in oil production (Jan vs. Dec) -150 -50 50 150 250 350 Dec 6,492 MMcf/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 6,361 MMcf/d Indicated change in natural gas production (Jan vs. Dec) million cubic feet/day Haynesville +239 -370 -131 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 new-well oil production per rig rig count New-well oil production per rig barrels/day Haynesville Rig count rigs (3) (2) (1) 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Legacy oil production change

178

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Marcellus Marcellus 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Oil production thousand barrels/day Marcellus 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 Dec 39 Mbbl/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 41 Mbbl/d thousand barrels/day Marcellus +4 -2 +2 Indicated change in oil production (Jan vs. Dec) 0 200 400 600 Dec 13,303 MMcf/d Production from new wells Legacy production change Net change Jan 13,721 MMcf/d Indicated change in natural gas production (Jan vs. Dec) million cubic feet/day Marcellus +612 -193 +419 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 new-well oil production per rig rig count New-well oil production per rig barrels/day Marcellus Rig count rigs (3) (2) (1) 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Legacy oil production change

179

Final LDRD report : development of sample preparation methods for ChIPMA-based imaging mass spectrometry of tissue samples.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this short-term LDRD project was to acquire the tools needed to use our chemical imaging precision mass analyzer (ChIPMA) instrument to analyze tissue samples. This effort was an outgrowth of discussions with oncologists on the need to find the cellular origin of signals in mass spectra of serum samples, which provide biomarkers for ovarian cancer. The ultimate goal would be to collect chemical images of biopsy samples allowing the chemical images of diseased and nondiseased sections of a sample to be compared. The equipment needed to prepare tissue samples have been acquired and built. This equipment includes an cyro-ultramicrotome for preparing thin sections of samples and a coating unit. The coating unit uses an electrospray system to deposit small droplets of a UV-photo absorbing compound on the surface of the tissue samples. Both units are operational. The tissue sample must be coated with the organic compound to enable matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and matrix enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry (ME-SIMS) measurements with the ChIPMA instrument Initial plans to test the sample preparation using human tissue samples required development of administrative procedures beyond the scope of this LDRD. Hence, it was decided to make two types of measurements: (1) Testing the spatial resolution of ME-SIMS by preparing a substrate coated with a mixture of an organic matrix and a bio standard and etching a defined pattern in the coating using a liquid metal ion beam, and (2) preparing and imaging C. elegans worms. Difficulties arose in sectioning the C. elegans for analysis and funds and time to overcome these difficulties were not available in this project. The facilities are now available for preparing biological samples for analysis with the ChIPMA instrument. Some further investment of time and resources in sample preparation should make this a useful tool for chemical imaging applications.

Maharrey, Sean P.; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This feasibility study includes all phases of methanol production from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The study examines: production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-day methanol production facility; potential environmental impacts of the whole project; safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol; and development of site specific cost estimates.

Fishkind, H.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

E-Print Network 3.0 - asian livestock production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

production but will produce millions of tons of by-products that can be fed... Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels......

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - a-1 fuel production Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Biomaterials Waste Cooking Oil Crops Intermediate Products Conversion... Technologies Bioenergy Products Ethanol Biodiesel Electricity & Heat Other Fuels, Chemicals, &...

183

REPORT NAME (CLICK FOR A SAMPLE) DESCRIPTION FREQUENCY KEY FIELDS Budget Allocation & Transfer Report Provides a line detail view of budget allocation and transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT NAME (CLICK FOR A SAMPLE) DESCRIPTION FREQUENCY KEY FIELDS Budget Allocation & Transfer Report Provides a line detail view of budget allocation and transfer transactions by department as of a specific mid-month or month-end period (i.e. accounting period). Report can be sorted by Account, Fund

de Lijser, Peter

184

Sample Changes and Issues  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sample and Model Issues Sample and Model Issues Summary Our comprehensive review of the EIA 914 has confirmed that discrepancies can arise between estimates for December of one year and January of the next. These are most evident for Texas estimates between December 2008 and January 2009. Reports now available from HPDI show that production for all the companies we sampled in both 2008 and 2009 rose by about 60 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d) in January and that total production in Texas rose by a similar amount. Our estimate was a decrease of 360 MMcf/d. Why the difference? Computationally, EIA-914 estimates depend on two factors: * Reports from the companies in the survey sample * An expansion factor to estimate total production from the sample's reported

185

A Framework to Report the Production of Renewable Diesel from Algae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, growth conditions, and product composition. Keywords Renewable diesel . Biodiesel . Algae . ReportingA Framework to Report the Production of Renewable Diesel from Algae Colin M. Beal & Colin H. Smith(s) 2010. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract Recently, algae have

186

The impact of sample preparation of the macroalgae Laminaria digitata on the production of the biofuels bioethanol and biomethane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Washing macroalgae is a standard initial pre-treatment step, reported in a number of papers on biofuel production from macroalgae. Washing removes particulate matter; however, in this study, we show that was...

J. M. M. Adams; A. Schmidt; J. A. Gallagher

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Tank 241-AP-103 08/1999 Compatibility Grab Samples and Analytical Results for the Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-AP-103 (AP-103) grab samples taken in August 1999 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank AP-103 samples were performed as directed in ''Compatibility Grub Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 1999'' (Sasaki 1999a). Any deviations from the instructions provided in the tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAP) were discussed in this narrative. No notification limits were exceeded.

BELL, K.E.

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

188

Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent Review Panel Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Independent review report on the available information concerning the technologies needed for forecourts producing 150 kg/day of hydrogen from natural gas.

189

Summary Report For The Analysis Of The Sludge Batch 7b (Macrobatch 9) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample For Canister S04023  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to comply with the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Waste Form Compliance Plan for Sluldge Batch 7b, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel characterized the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) pour stream (PS) glass sample collected while filling canister S04023. This report summarizes the results of the compositional analysis for reportable oxides and radionuclides and the normalized Product Consistency Test (PCT) results. The PCT responses indicate that the DWPF produced glass that is significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment glass.

Johnson, F. C.

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

190

DOE Convening Report on Certification of Commercial HVAC and CRE Products  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Convening Report on Certification of Commercial HVAC and CRE Products, October 2, 2012 Convening Report on Certification of Commercial HVAC and CRE Products, October 2, 2012 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONVENING REPORT ON THE FEASIBILITY OF A NEGOTIATED RULEMAKING TO REVISE THE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM FOR COMMERCIAL HEATING, VENTILATING AIR CONDITIONING AND COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT October 2, 2012 Alan W. Strasser, Esq., MA Convener

191

Production of a High-Level Waste Glass from Hanford Waste Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HLW glass was produced from a HLW sludge slurry (Envelope D Waste), eluate waste streams containing high levels of Cs-137 and Tc-99, solids containing both Sr-90 and transuranics (TRU), and glass-forming chemicals. The eluates and Sr-90/TRU solids were obtained from ion-exchange and precipitation pretreatments, respectively, of other Hanford supernate samples (Envelopes A, B and C Waste). The glass was vitrified by mixing the different waste streams with glass-forming chemicals in platinum/gold crucibles and heating the mixture to 1150 degree C. Resulting glass analyses indicated that the HLW glass waste form composition was close to the target composition. The targeted waste loading of Envelope D sludge solids in the HLW glass was 30.7 wt percent, exclusive of Na and Si oxides. Condensate samples from the off-gas condenser and off-gas dry-ice trap indicated that very little of the radionuclides were volatilized during vitrification. Microstructure analysis of the HLW glass using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX) showed what appeared to be iron spinel in the HLW glass. Further X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the presence of nickel spinel trevorite (NiFe2O4). These crystals did not degrade the leaching characteristics of the glass. The HLW glass waste form passed leach tests that included a standard 90 degree C Product Consistency Test (PCT) and a modified version of the United States Environmental Protection Agency Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

Crawford, C.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Farrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.; Bibler, N.E.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

E-Print Network 3.0 - aboveground biomass production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Aboveground Biomass in a Boreal Bog Meaghan... in an ombrotrophic bog in central Finland by measuring aboveground biomass and belowground production (by in... production....

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic products department Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vapor deposition (CCVD) method has been developed for the possible larger amount production with lower... cost. We have developed a high-quality production of SWNTs at...

194

E-Print Network 3.0 - active natural products Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Woody Biomass in Indiana for Bioenergy Production... that may be used for energy production and the delivered cost of woody biomass. The primary focus Source: Purdue...

195

U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

400 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 Oil production thousand barrels/day 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 Natural gas production million cubic feet/day 0 250 500 750 1,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 New-well oil production per rig barrels/day 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 New-well gas production per rig thousand cubic feet/day (450) (400) (350) (300) (250) (200) (150) (100) (50) 0 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian January-2013 January-2014 Legacy gas production change million cubic feet/day

196

Middlesex Sampling Plant environmental report for calendar year 1989, Middlesex, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The environmental monitoring program, which began in 1980, was continued in 1989 at the former Middlesex Sampling Plant (MSP) site, located in the Borough of Middlesex, New Jersey. The MSP site is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a Department of Energy (DOE) program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain either from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has authorized DOE to remedy. The monitoring program at MSP measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater samples. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard (100 mrem/yr) and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. This report presents the findings of the environmental monitoring program conducted in the area of the Middlesex Sampling Plant (MSP) site during calendar year 1989. 17 refs., 16 figs., 16 tabs.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy 90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board 90-day Interim Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board The Shale Gas Subcommittee of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board is charged with identifying measures that can be taken to reduce the environmental impact and improve the safety of shale gas production. Natural gas is a cornerstone of the U.S. economy, providing a quarter of the country's total energy. Owing to breakthroughs in technology, production from shale formations has gone from a negligible amount just a few years ago to being almost 30 percent of total U.S. natural gas production. This has brought lower prices, domestic jobs, and the prospect of enhanced national security due to the potential of substantial

198

Utilization of low NOx coal combustion by-products. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to commercialize fly ash beneficiation at various facilities around the country. The paper describes laboratory characterization of fly ash samples, pilot plant testing, product testing, and market and economic analyses. Products include concrete, concrete blocks and bricks, plastic fillers, activated carbon, and metal matrix composites.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products (Task 1), Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under US DOE sponsorship, a project team consisting of the Institute of Gas Technology, Peabody Holding Company, and Bechtel Group, Inc. has been developing an advanced, mild gasification process to process all types of coal and to produce solid and condensable liquid co-products that can open new markets for coal. The three and a half year program (September 1987 to June 1991) consisted of investigations in four main areas. These areas are: (1) Literature Survey of Mild Gasification Processes, Co-Product Upgrading and Utilization, and Market Assessment; (2) Mild Gasification Technology Development: Process Research Unit Tests Using Slipstream Sampling; (3) Bench-Scale Char Upgrading Study; (4) Mild Gasification Technology Development: System Integration Studies. In this report, the literature and market assessment of mild gasification processes are discussed.

Knight, R.A.; Gissy, J.L.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P.; Carty, R.H. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Duthie, R.G. [Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Wootten, J.M. [Peabody Holding Co., Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Methodology and Analysis Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Methodology and Analysis Methodology and Analysis Methodology and Analysis 1 Methodology: Description of the sampling and estimating methodologies implemented in April 2010 PDF 2 Review Results: Description of the problem and the alternative methodologies tested PDF 3 2009 Revisions: A comparison of the current methodology estimates to the previous estimates PDF 4 ICF International Review: ICF International's review paper given to the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics PDF 5 Other Sources: EIA-914 Estimates Compared with Other sources PDF 6 Issues: EIA-914 Sample and Model Issues PDF 7 Data Analysis: EIA-914 Final Clearance Package October 2006 PDF 8 Revision Policy: EIA-914 and Natural Gas Monthly Revision Policy March 2007 PDF 9 Commercial Data Sources:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Final Report Nucleic Acid System - PCR, Multiplex Assays and Sample Preparation Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to reduce to practice the detection and identification of biological warfare pathogens by the nucleic acid recognition technique of PCR (polymerase chain reaction). This entailed not only building operationally functional instrumentation but also developing the chemical assays for detection of priority pathogens. This project had two principal deliverables: (1) design, construct, test and deliver a 24 chamber, multiplex capable suitcase sized PCR instrument, and (2) develop and reduce to practice a multiplex assay for the detection of PCR product by flow cytometry. In addition, significant resources were allocated to test and evaluation of the Hand-held Advanced Nucleic Acid Analyzer (HANAA). This project helps provide the signature and intelligence gathering community the ability to perform, on-site or remote, rapid analysis of environmental or like samples for the presence of a suite of biological warfare pathogens.

Koopman, R.P.; Langlois, R.G.; Nasarabadi, S.; Benett, W.J.; Richards, J.B.; Hadley, D.R.; Miles, R.R.; Brown, S.B.; Stratton, P.L.; Milanovich, F.P.

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

202

Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products: Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research on mild gasification is discussed. The report is divided into three sections: literature survey of mild gasification processes; literature survey of char, condensibles, and gas upgrading and utilization methods; and industrial market assessment of products of mild gasification. Recommendations are included in each section. (CBS) 248 refs., 58 figs., 62 tabs.

Cha, C.Y.; Merriam, N.W.; Jha, M.C.; Breault, R.W.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong Growth December 19, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The Energy Department released three new reports today showcasing...

204

DOE Convening Report on Certification of Commercial HVAC and CRE Products  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is the convening report on the feasibility of a negotiated rulemaking to revise the certification program for commercial HVAC and CRE products published on October 2, 2012.

205

Economic impact study of consumer product efficiencies. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The economic impact study of household appliance efficiencies is briefly reported. Task I, Direct Impact on Industry, contains 4 subtasks: materials, labor inputs, energy inputs, and investment. Task II, Direct Impact on Consumers, contains 3 subtasks: life-cycle cost to the consumer, usage patterns, and long-term demand forecast and analysis. The 2 subtasks in Task III, Energy Savings and Impact on Utilities, are residential energy savings and cost and impact on utility generating capacity.

Not Available

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

90-day Second Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

90-day Second Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy 90-day Second Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board 90-day Second Report on Shale Gas Production - Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Novemeber 18, 2011 The Shale Gas Subcommittee of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board is charged with identifying measures that can be taken to reduce the environmental impact and to help assure the safety of shale gas production. Shale gas has become an important part of the nation's energy mix. It has grown rapidly from almost nothing at the beginning of the century to near 30 percent of natural gas production. Americans deserve assurance that the full economic, environmental and energy security benefits of shale gas development will be realized without sacrificing public health, environmental protection and safety. On August 18, 2011 the Subcommittee

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting milk production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

this test to ensure quality of the final product... gives an indication of on-farm sanitation and milk production practices on the farm The test is done... -coliform...

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative hydrogen production Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a number of countries have quite a substantial production of hydrogen, among these are Germany and the USA... . In the Nordic countries most of the production of hydrogen is...

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute rantes production Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the purified ligation product. Analytical RP-HPLC chromatogram with an inset showing ESI-MS of AOP-RANTES (2... product RANTES (34-68) Non-peptide 100...

210

Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Quarterly report, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report is entirely devoted to presenting samples of the results of the data analyses for horizontal drilling studies. In addition, a data compilation of Excel worksheets containing data on two-phase flow measurements at the Marathon Oil Company is discussed. Complete data analyses will be presented in the next annual report.

Fayers, F.J.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing Reaches  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dept. Reports: U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing Dept. Reports: U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing Reaches Record Highs Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing Reaches Record Highs August 6, 2013 - 8:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The Energy Department released two new reports today showcasing record growth across the U.S. wind market -- increasing America's share of clean, renewable energy and supporting tens of thousands of jobs nationwide. According to these reports, the United States continues to be one of the world's largest and fastest growing wind markets. In 2012, wind energy became the number one source of new U.S. electricity generation capacity for the first time - representing 43 percent of all new electric additions and accounting for $25 billion in U.S. investment.

212

Energy Report: U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing Surges,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report: U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing Report: U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing Surges, Supporting Jobs and Diversifying U.S. Energy Economy Energy Report: U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing Surges, Supporting Jobs and Diversifying U.S. Energy Economy August 14, 2012 - 9:00am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department released a new report today highlighting strong growth in the U.S. wind energy market in 2011, increasing the U.S. share of clean energy and supporting tens of thousands of jobs, and underscoring the importance of continued policy support and clean energy tax credits to ensure that the manufacturing and jobs associated with this booming global industry remain in America According to the 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report, the United States remained one

213

Energy Department Reports U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reports U.S. Wind Energy Production and Reports U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing Reaches Record Highs Energy Department Reports U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing Reaches Record Highs August 6, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Energy Department released two new reports today showcasing record growth across the U.S. wind market, supporting an increase in America's share of clean, renewable energy and tens of thousands of jobs nationwide. According to these reports, the United States continues to be one of the world's largest and fastest growing wind markets. In 2012, wind energy became the number one source of new U.S. electricity generation capacity for the first time-representing 43% of all new electric additions and accounting for $25 billion in U.S. investment. In the first four years of the Obama Administration, American electricity

214

Reports Show Record High U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reports Show Record High U.S. Wind Energy Production and Reports Show Record High U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing Reports Show Record High U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing August 6, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Two men work on the nacelle of a wind turbine. The Energy Department released two new reports today showcasing record growth across the U.S. wind market, supporting an increase in America's share of clean, renewable energy and tens of thousands of jobs nationwide. According to these reports, the United States continues to be one of the world's largest and fastest growing wind markets. In 2012, wind energy became the number one source of new U.S. electricity generation capacity for the first time-representing 43% of all new electric additions and accounting for $25 billion in U.S. investment.

215

Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong Growth Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong Growth December 19, 2013 - 11:36am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department released three new reports today showcasing strong growth across the U.S. fuel cell and hydrogen technologies market - continuing America's leadership in clean energy innovation and providing U.S. businesses more affordable, cleaner transportation and power options. According to these reports, the United States continues to be one of the world's largest and fastest growing markets for fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. In 2012, nearly 80 percent of total investment in the global fuel cell industry was made in U.S.

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - accurate reporting increases Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A-21 Effort Reports Sponsored Programs Office will distribute via the academic unit a formal Effort Report to the individual named in the report Summary: Responsibility...

217

his report summarizes the results of an analysis of CO2 production from the Pacific Northwest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from other sources such as transportation or industrial process- es. The actual CO2 production1 #12;2 T his report summarizes the results of an analysis of CO2 production from the Pacific. The analysis explores how future growth in CO2 produc- tion would be affected by various resource develop- ment

218

Reporting on marginal lands for bioenergy feedstock production -a modest proposal Brian K. Richards1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Reporting on marginal lands for bioenergy feedstock production - a modest proposal Brian K.edu ---PREPRINT In press 2014, BioEnergy Research --- Abstract Growing bioenergy feedstocks can provide a long research. Using marginal lands for bioenergy feedstock production Discussions of renewable bioenergy

Walter, M.Todd

219

Eucalyptus plantations for energy production in Hawaii. Technical status report, October 1, 1978-June 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress made on accomplishing research objectives is reported. The objectives of this project are: (1) to increase the biomass production of Eucalyptus; (2) to determine the optimum requirements to maximize yield; (3) to assess planting, cultivation, harvesting, and transportation equipment requirements; (4) to determine the optimum mixture of biomass (eucalyptus and bagasse) at the generator for the production of electricity; and (5) to evaluate a complete production/conversion system which utilized optimum management conditions in relationship to costs. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

220

3rd Quarter 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status" 4. U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants by owner, location, capacity, and operating status" "In-Situ-Leach Plant Owner","In-Situ-Leach Plant Name","County, State (existing and planned locations)","Production Capacity (pounds U3O8 per year)","Operating Status at End of" ,,,,2012,"1st Quarter 2013","2nd Quarter 2013","3rd Quarter 2013" "Cameco","Crow Butte Operation","Dawes, Nebraska",1000000,"Operating","Operating","Operating","Operating" "Hydro Resources, Inc.","Church Rock","McKinley, New Mexico",1000000,"Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed","Partially Permitted And Licensed"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual reports Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 > >> 1 FINANCIAL INFORMATION ANU Annual Report 2008 57 Summary: FINANCIAL INFORMATION 12;ANU Annual Report 2008 57 AUDIT REPORT 12;58 ANU Annual Report 2008 12... ;ANU Annual...

222

Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report covers activities during the period from July 1, 1996 through September 30, 1996 on the development of carbon products precursor materials from coal. The first year of the project ended in February, 1996; however, the WVU research effort continued through August 14, 1997 on a no-cost extension of the original contract. PETC chose to exercise the option for continuation of the projects and $100,000 became available on August 9, 1996. The objective for year two is to focus on development of those carbon products from coal-based solvent extract precursors which have the greatest possibility for commercial success.

Zondlo, J.; Stiller, A.

1996-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

223

Retail Merchandising & Product Development This sheet has sample occupations, work settings, employers, and career development activities associated with this major. Some of these  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Retail Merchandising & Product Development This sheet has sample occupations, work settings Manufacturers Pattern Companies Retail Companies Specialty Stores Textile Manufacturers Federal & State with a concentration in retail merchandising and product development. HSN - Home Shopping Network JCPenney Kohl

Ronquist, Fredrik

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptance product specifications Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we... the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers...

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - area index products Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Engineering Fuel cells, treatment of waters from gas and oil production... and exploration for hydrocarbons Boadu http:www.cee.duke.edufacultyboaduindex.php ...

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - agreement production sharing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

598TO YOUR AGRICULTURE AND Summary: expenses are to be shared. Rental Agreement Terms Rental agreement terms are often based on customs... of each landowner's production...

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid fermentative production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SUPPLY Summary: , (12) PC for process monitoring. 2.4 Shake flask fermentations acid Biogas Step 1 Wet oxidation Step 2... ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM DIFFERENT CARBON SOURCES USING...

228

E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol fuel production Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

using Electron Microscopy Summary: and better production paths. One of these is using biogas to create alcohol as a fuel. Higher... Characterization of Catalysts for Synthesis of...

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic biosurfactant production Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(1990) Received 25th January Summary: ). High Solids Anaerobic Fermentation for Biogas and Compost Production. Biomass 16, 173-182. Owen, W... Reactor for Anaerobic...

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - above-ground biomass production Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as follows. Design of the "Biomass Town" system Production of local fuels, such as biogas and bioethanol... , under the consideration of the availability of biomass...

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - algerian dairy product Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Medicine, University of Minnesota Collection: Biology and Medicine 46 NETHERLANDS AND GERMANY: DAIRY GOAT PRODUCTS June 15 -June 18, 2009 Summary: NETHERLANDS AND GERMANY:...

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative agricultural products Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wallace Tyner, Purdue... University 2007 Farm Bill: Implications for US & Global BioEnergy Production ... Source: Dyer, Bill - Department of Plant Sciences and Plant...

233

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural biotechnology products Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Elisabeth Sadoulet1 Summary: . Similarly new biotechnologies, as well as emerging new markets for agriculture such as the production... as a growth process of relocating...

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural production Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Theater, MSU-Bozeman 282B Strand Union Building Summary: and outreach programs focus on bioenergy production opportunities, agricultural policy and consumer economics... and...

235

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced biofuels production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biomass supply, . . . how much land? Future Biofuel Production... Program Section 9005: Bioenergy Program for Advanced Biofuels ... Source: Gray, Matthew - Department of...

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural production energeticky Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Theater, MSU-Bozeman 282B Strand Union Building Summary: and outreach programs focus on bioenergy production opportunities, agricultural policy and consumer economics... and...

237

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural products Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Theater, MSU-Bozeman 282B Strand Union Building Summary: and outreach programs focus on bioenergy production opportunities, agricultural policy and consumer economics... and...

238

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced biofuel production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biomass supply, . . . how much land? Future Biofuel Production... Program Section 9005: Bioenergy Program for Advanced Biofuels ... Source: Gray, Matthew - Department of...

239

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc-induced toxic by-products Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as by-products and thus be affected by an allocation coefficient. Indeed, in LCA when a produc- tion Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection:...

240

E-Print Network 3.0 - allocative efficiency productive Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as by-products and thus be affected by an allocation coefficient. Indeed, in LCA when a produc- tion... ratio allocation between ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy production scale-up Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

formed product. However, the alloy is relatively quench sensitive and reasonably rapid cooling... of these principles to aluminium-lithium based alloys would be difficult in the...

242

E-Print Network 3.0 - accessing natural product Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from Natural Gas Production and Use... that natural gas is significantly cleaner than coal in ... Source: Boyer, Elizabeth W. - School of Forest Resources, Pennsylvania State...

243

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-botulinum natural product Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Proceedings of the 2011 Named Entities Workshop, IJCNLP 2011, pages 5864, Chiang Mai, Thailand, November 12, 2011. Summary: , November 12, 2011. Product Name Identification and...

244

E-Print Network 3.0 - amino acid production Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia Collection: Chemistry 24 Rapid Cycling of Organic Nitrogen in Taiga Forest Ecosystems Summary: successional soil as the product of the...

245

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic plant production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for over estimates based... for individual components Study the relationship between gas production and NMOC release Compare anaerobic Source: Barlaz, Morton A. - Department...

246

E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol market production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exposure June 2010 Vol. 2 Issue 4 Summary: are increasingly turning to digital marketing, including promoting their products on social networking sites... endorsement of...

247

E-Print Network 3.0 - allied natural products Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that supply, our industry... the end products are to the fabric of our society. Building homes, educating kids, disseminating news... and information, and protecting all the...

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - amylase production induced Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is subject to sucrose-induced repression of translation... through the production of energy-rich sugar molecules and oxygen by photosynthetic carbon fixation. Sugars... . For...

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - adulterated products Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

May 14, 2010 Rules and Regulations Classification Summary: harvest of adulterated seafood products from an area where oil is actually present. Sale of adulterated... . The...

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - amp production produced Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: amp production produced Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Simulating Autonomous Mobile Programs on Natalia Chechina, Peter King, Rob Pooley and Summary: and...

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeruginosa extracellular products Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

inflammatory cytokine production (30). In summary, P. aeruginosa produces virulence factors... (10):5915-23. 28. Jaeger, K. E., A. Kharazmi, and N. Hoiby. 1991. Extracellular...

252

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative energy production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on alternative energy but also information on livestock production facilities, green- house... producers must consider alternative energy for their farms. FarmWise:...

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid oxidation products Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of oxidized, S-rich mafic magmas for giant Cu mineralization: Evidence from Pinatubo, Bingham Canyon and El Teniente Summary: eruption products show that mafic magma was...

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural productivity growth Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2009 Agriculture for Development Summary: Crisis 2: Stagnant productivity growth in SS-Africa agriculture 12;11 II. Current crises and resurgence... crises: Rising food insecurity...

255

Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1995 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring trends in juvenile spring and summer chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and steelhead trout, O. mykiss, populations in the Salmon, Clearwater, and lower Snake River drainages for the past 12 years. This work is the result of a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric power plants on the Columbia River. Project 91-73, Idaho Natural Production Monitoring, consists of two subprojects: General Monitoring and Intensive Monitoring. This report updates and summarizes data through 1995 for the General Parr Monitoring (GPM) database to document status and trends of classes of wild and natural chinook salmon and steelhead trout populations. A total of 281 stream sections were sampled in 1995 to monitor trends in spring and summer chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead trout O. mykiss parr populations in Idaho. Percent carrying capacity and density estimates were summarized for 1985--1995 by different classes of fish: wild A-run steelhead trout, wild B-run steelhead trout, natural A-run steelhead trout, natural B-run steelhead trout, wild spring and summer chinook salmon, and natural spring and summer chinook salmon. The 1995 data were also summarized by subbasins as defined in Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s 1992--1996 Anadromous Fish Management Plan.

Hall-Griswold, J.A.; Petrosky, C.E. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Initial Package Design Concepts Integrated Product Team (IPT) Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initially, the question of transporting TRU waste to WIPP was raised as part of the EM Integration activities. The issue was re-examined as part of the system-wide view to re-engineer the TRU waste program. Consequently, the National Transportation Program and the National TRU Waste Program, in a cooperative effort, made a commitment to EM-20 to examine the feasibility of using rail to transport TRU waste material to WIPP. In December of 1999 Mr. Philip Altomare assembled a team of subject matter experts (SME) to define initial concepts for a Type B package capable of shipping TRU waste by rail (see Attachment 1 for a list of team members). This same team of experts also provided input to a preliminary study to determine if shipping TRU waste by rail could offer cost savings or other significant advantages over the current mode of operation using TRUPACT-II packages loaded on truck. As part of the analysis, the team also identified barriers to implementing rail shipments to WIPP and outlined a path forward. This report documents the findings of the study and its initial set of recommendations. As the study progressed, it was expanded to include new packages for truck as well as rail in recognition of the benefits of shipping large boxes and contaminated equipment.

Moss, J.; Luke, Dale Elden

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production. Progress report, October 1--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The grantee will evaluate the influence of hydrate production on ground subsidence near the wellbore and the surface. The objective of this research will be achieved by using computer simulations of what is expected in a hydrate reservoir during the production stage as reported by hydrate production models and available data. The model will be based on theories of continuum mechanics, thermomechanics of hydrate production, principles of rock mechanics and geomechanics, and special features of geomaterials under cold temperatures such as those found in permafrost regions. The research work involved in the proposed investigation will be divided into three major tasks; mechanics of subsidence in permafrost regions, modeling of subsidence, and parametric studies.

Siriwardane, H.J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Establishment and maintenance of an oil shale sample bank: Technical progress report, October-November 1986. [Samples from eastern and western USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Shales - Discussions were held with Union Oil - Parachute, Colorado, concerning sampling of high grade Mahogany zone shale from their mine (35 gpt). Permission was granted by Union for acquisition of a Reference Shale. DOE declined the opportunity because of the proximity of this shale to the EXXON Colony Mine reference shale already acquired (approx. 27 gpt). A substantial effort was expended in discussions with the USBLM regarding sampling at the White River Oil Shale Mine, Vernal, Utah. Permission to sample is pending during preparation of a Land Use Plan by the BLM. We are now evaluating a road cut near Rock Springs, Wyoming as a potential source for the FY-1986 reference shale. The cut is near US I-80 west of Rock Springs. Channel samples have been obtained for Fischer Assay. Formal application to the land owners (USBLM or the Wyoming Grazing Association) for permission to sample will be made pending the outcome of the Fischer Assays. We investigated potential sources of spent shale for use by the University of Wyoming. A report summarizing these efforts is attached. Preliminary analytical results for the FY-86 reacquired Western Shale are attached. Eastern Shale - The FY-86 reference shale was reacquired in October. We resampled the Clegg Creek Member of the New Albany shale at the exposure in Knieriem's Quarry, Louisville, Kentucky. Ten sample splits were submitted for characterization. We agreed to provide up to 20 Fischer Assays of core recovered by HYCRUDE from a quarry in Michigan. Pending actual submittal of samples for analysis and adequate oil yields, we will submit the site for consideration as the source of the FY-87 Eastern Reference Shale.

Not Available

1986-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - abnormal production decline Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with the joint California Cooperative... and hence to decreased ventilation of the deep ocean. Declining oxygen levels have now been reported from Source: National Oceanic and...

260

Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Technical report, September 1, 1995--November 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. Currently only about 30% of the 5 million tons of these coal combustion residues generated in Illinois each year are utilized, mainly as aggregate. These residues are composed largely Of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. The process being developed in this program will use the residues directly in the manufacture of cement products. Therefore, a much larger amount of residues can be utilized. To achieve the above objective, in the first phase (current year) samples of coal combustion residues will be blended and mixed, as needed, with a lime or cement kiln dust (CKD) to adjust the CaO composition. Six mixtures will be melted in a laboratory-scale furnace at CTL. The resulting products will then be tested for cementitious properties. Two preliminary blends have been tested. One blend used fly ash with limestone, while the other used fly ash with CKD. Each blend was melted and then quenched, and the resulting product samples were ground to a specific surface area similar to portland cement. Cementitious properties of these product samples were evaluated by compression testing of 1-inch cube specimens. The specimens were formed out of cement paste where a certain percentage of the cement paste is displaced by one of the sample products. The specimens were cured for 24 hours at 55{degrees}C and 100% relative humidity. The specimens made with the product samples obtained 84 and 89% of the strength of a pure portland cement control cube. For comparison, similar (pozzolanic) materials in standard concrete practice are required to have a compressive strength of at least 75% of that of the control.

Wagner, J.C. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bhatty, J.I.; Mishulovich, A. [Construction Technology Labs., Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - aroma 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline production Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conscious Chemical Process Engineering Summary: :www.rtk.net). 4. Life-cycle analysis (LCA) is discussed as a useful tool for evaluating processes and products... a process or...

262

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated production line Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nov 1994, pp. 18. Summary: for Pharmaceutical and Food Products,'' Presented at the 1994 RIA Flexible Parts Feeding for Automated Handling... and Automation, v. 10,n. 4, Aug 1994,...

263

Guide to preparing SAND reports and other communication products : version 2.0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide describes the R&A process, Common Look and Feel requirements, and preparation and publishing procedures for communication products at Sandia National Laboratories. Samples of forms and examples of published communications products are provided. This guide details the processes for producing a variety of communication products at Sandia National Laboratories. Figure I-1 shows the general publication development process. Because extensive supplemental material is available from Sandia on the internal Web or from external sources (Table I-1), the guide has been shortened to make it easy to find information that you need.

Johnson, Debra M.; Brittenham, Phillip W.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Tank 241-BY-104 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank BY-104 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. Tank BY-104 using the vapor sampling system (VSS) on June 24, 1994 by WHC Sampling and Mobile Laboratories. Air from the tank BY-104 headspace was withdrawn via a heated sampling probe mounted in riser 10A, and transferred via heated tubing to the VSS sampling manifold. Sampling media were prepared and analyzed by WHC, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, and Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology through a contract with Sandia National Laboratories. The 46 tank air samples and 2 ambient air control samples collected are listed in Table X-1 by analytical laboratory. Table X-1 also lists the 10 trip blanks provided by the laboratories.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

265

Wigwam River McNeil Substrate Sampling Program : 1998-2002 Summary Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wigwam River is an important fisheries stream in the East Kootenay region of British Columbia that supports healthy populations of both bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). The river has been characterized as the single most important bull trout spawning steam in the Kootenay Region (Baxter and Westover 2000), and thus has been the focus of numerous studies in the last ten years (Cope 1998; Cope and Morris 2001; Cope, Morris and Bisset 2002; Kohn Crippen Consultants Ltd. 1998; Westover 1999a; Westover 1999b; Westover and Conroy 1997). Although bull trout populations in the East Kootenay region remain healthy, bull trout populations in other parts of British Columbia and within their traditional range in northwestern United States have declined. Thus, bull trout were blue listed as vulnerable in British Columbia by the B.C. Conservation Data Centre (Cannings 1993) and remain a species of special concern. Bull trout in the north-western United States, within the Columbia River watershed, were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In 1999, the Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection applied and received funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to assess and monitor the status of wild, native stocks of bull trout in tributaries to Lake Koocanusa (Libby Reservoir) and the upper Kootenay River. The purpose of this report is to summarize one of the many studies undertaken to ''Monitor and Protect Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir'' (BPA Project Number 2000-04-00). Three permanent sampling sites were established on the Wigwam River in April 1998. At each site, substrate samples were obtained using a McNeil Core sampler in April of each year from 1998 to 2002. The objectives of this study were to assess the quality of stream-bed substrates used by bull trout for spawning prior to major resource development in the Wigwam watershed, thus providing one potential measure of future impact to bull trout spawning habitat.

Tepper, Herb

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production. Progress report, July 1--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The grantee will evaluate the influence of hydrate production on ground subsidence near the wellbore and the surface. The objective of this research will be achieved by using computer simulations of what is expected in a hydrate reservoir during the production stage as reported by hydrate production models and available data. The model will be based on theories of continuum mechanics, thermomechanics of hydrate production, principles of rock mechanics and geomechanics, and special features of geomaterials under cold temperatures such as those found in permafrost regions. The research work involved in the proposed investigation will be divided into three major tasks: (1) Mechanics of subsidence in permafrost regions; (2) modeling of subsidence; and (3) parametric studies. Progress reports are presented for tasks 1 and 2.

Siriwardane, H.J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Green IS for GHG emission reporting on product-level? an action design research project in the meat industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emission reporting gained importance in the last years, due to societal and governmental pressure. However, this task is highly complex, especially in interdependent batch production processes and for reporting on the product-level. Green ... Keywords: GHG emissions, Green IS, PCF, action design research, design science, meat industry, product carbon footprint

Hendrik Hilpert; Christoph Beckers; Lutz M. Kolbe; Matthias Schumann

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

IEA agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 2000 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2000 annual report of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement contains an overview of the agreement, including its guiding principles, latest strategic plan, and a report from the Chairman, Mr. Neil P. Rossmeissl, U.S. Department of Energy. Overviews of the National Hydrogen Programs of nine member countries are given: Canada, Japan, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. Task updates are provided on the following annexes: Annex 12 - Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage, Annex 13 - Design and Optimization of Integrated Systems, Annex 14 - Photoelectrolytic Production of Hydrogen, and, Annex 15 - Photobiological Production of Hydrogen.

Elam, Carolyn C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US)] (ed.)

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Tank 241-BY-110 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank BY-110 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. Tank BY-110 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List. Samples were collected from Tank BY-110 using the vapor sampling system (VSS) on November 11, 1994 by WHC Sampling and Mobile Laboratories. The tank headspace temperature was determined to be 27 C. Air from the Tank BY-110 headspace was withdrawn via a 7.9 m-long heated sampling probe mounted in riser 12B, and transferred via heated tubing to the VSS sampling manifold. All heated zones of the VSS were maintained at approximately 50 C. Sampling media were prepared and analyzed by WHC, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, and Pacific Northwest Laboratories. The 40 tank air samples and 2 ambient air control samples collected are listed in Table X-1 by analytical laboratory. Table X-1 also lists the 14 trip blanks and 2 field blanks that accompanied the samples.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

270

Tank 241-BY-108 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank BY-108 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. Tank BY-108 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List. Samples were collected from Tank BY-108 using the vapor sampling system (VSS) on october 27, 1994 by WHC Sampling and Mobile Laboratories. The tank headspace temperature was determined to be 25.7 C. Air from the Tank BY-108 headspace was withdrawn via a 7.9 m-long heated sampling probe mounted in riser 1, and transferred via heated tubing to the VSS sampling manifold. All heated zones of the VSS were maintained at approximately 50 C. Sampling media were prepared and analyzed by WHC, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, and Pacific Northwest Laboratories. The 40 tank air samples and 2 ambient air control samples collected are listed in Table X-1 by analytical laboratory. Table X-1 also lists the 14 trip blanks and 2 field blanks that accompanied the samples.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

271

Design Review Report for formal review of safety class features of exhauster system for rotary mode core sampling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report documenting Formal Design Review conducted on portable exhausters used to support rotary mode core sampling of Hanford underground radioactive waste tanks with focus on Safety Class design features and control requirements for flammable gas environment operation and air discharge permitting compliance.

JANICEK, G.P.

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

272

Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development: Quarterly report, November 1993--January 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes progress made in the advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. The topics of the report include selection of the Allison GFATS, castcool technology development for industrial engines test plan and schedule, code development and background gathering phase for the ultra low NOx combustion technology task, active turbine clearance task, and water vapor/air mixture cooling of turbine vanes task.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Tank 241-BY-105 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank BY-105 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. Tank BY-105 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List. Samples were collected from Tank BY-105 using the vapor sampling system (VSS) on July 7, 1994 by WHC Sampling and Mobile Laboratories. The tank headspace temperature was determined to be 26 C. Air from the Tank BY-105 headspace was withdrawn via a heated sampling probe mounted in riser 10A, and transferred via heated tubing to the VSS sampling manifold. All heated zones of the VSS were maintained at approximately 65 C. Sampling media were prepared and analyzed by WHC, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, and Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology through a contract with Sandia National Laboratories. The 46 tank air samples and 2 ambient air control samples collected are listed in Table X-1 by analytical laboratory. Table X-1 also lists the 10 trip blanks provided by the laboratories.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

Tank 241-BY-106 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank BY-106 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. Tank BY-106 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List. Samples were collected from Tank BY-106 using the vapor sampling system (VSS) on July 8, 1994 by WHC Sampling and Mobile Laboratories. The tank headspace temperature was determined to be 27 C. Air from the Tank BY-106 headspace was withdrawn via a heated sampling probe mounted in riser 10B, and transferred via heated tubing to the VSS sampling manifold. All heated zones of the VSS were maintained at approximately 65 C. Sampling media were prepared and analyzed by WHC, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, and Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology through a contract with Sandia National Laboratories. The 46 tank air samples and 2 ambient air control samples collected are listed in Table X-1 by analytical laboratory. Table X-1 also lists the 10 trip blanks provided by the laboratories.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

275

Tank 241-C-101 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank C-101 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks of fugitive emissions to tank farm workers. Gas and vapor samples from the Tank C-101 headspace were collected on July 7, 1994 using the in situ sampling (ISS) method, and again on September 1, 1994 using the more robust vapor sampling system (VSS). Gas and vapor concentrations in Tank C-101 are influenced by its connections to other tanks and its ventilation pathways. At issue is whether the organic vapors in Tank C-101 are from the waste in that tank, or from Tanks C-102 or C-103. Tank C-103 is on the Organic Watch List; the other two are not. Air from the Tank C-101 headspace was withdrawn via a 7.9-m long heated sampling probe mounted in riser 8, and transferred via heated tubing to the VSS sampling manifold. The tank headspace temperature was determined to be 34.0 C, and all heated zones of the VSS were maintained at approximately 50 C. Sampling media were prepared and analyzed by WHC, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, and Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology through a contract with Sandia National Laboratories. The 39 tank air samples and 2 ambient air control samples collected are listed in Table X-1 by analytical laboratory. Table X-1 also lists the 14 trip blanks and 2 field blanks provided by the laboratories.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Alkali-silica reaction products: Comparison between samples from concrete structures and laboratory test specimens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alkali-silica gels (ASG) were investigated in concrete from bridge structures (constructed from the 1920s to 2000), as well as in experimental specimens; employing optical microscopy, petrographic image analysis, and scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The main differences were found in the chemical composition and morphology of the ASGs. ASGs which had formed in older concrete samples (50-80 years old) show a partly crystalline structure and higher Ca{sup 2+} content, indicating their aging and maturation. Younger concrete samples and experimental test specimens exhibit the presence of amorphous ASG. The chemistry of ASG from experimental specimens reflects the chemical composition of accelerating solutions. - Research Highlights: {yields} Quantitative analysis of alkali-silica gels {yields} Comparison of ASR in experimental conditions with ASR in bridge structures {yields} Investigation of factors affecting alkali-silica reaction {yields} Investigation of ASR of different types of aggregates.

Sachlova, Sarka, E-mail: lukschova@seznam.cz; Prikryl, Richard; Pertold, Zdenek

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; Idaho Department of Fish and Game, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers efforts to monitor age composition of wild adult spring/summer chinook salmon returning to the Snake River Basin. Accurately determining the ocean age proportions of wild adult spring/summer chinook salmon is important information for monitoring the status and trends of these species. During this report period, project personnel selected the preferred structure for aging, set up a database to track all samples collected, developed procedures and ordered equipment for structure preparation and reading, and aged the adults that were sampled in 1999. Chinook salmon carcasses were sampled from representative spawning areas throughout the Snake River Basin. Ocean age proportions were determined for each 5 centimeter fork length group for wild adult spring/summer chinook salmon returning to the Snake River. These ocean age proportions were applied to the number and estimated length frequency distribution of wild chinook salmon adults passing Lower Granite Dam to estimate the number of adult returns for each ocean age group.

Kiefer, Russell B.; Anderson, Dave; Johnson, June (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - accident reports Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

accident reports Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 U of L Campus AccidentIncident Report Automobile AccidentIncident Page 1 of 2 University of Lethbridge Summary: U of L Campus...

279

Analysis of Coconut-Derived Biodiesel and Conventional Diesel Fuel Samples from the Philippines: Task 2 Final Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Analysis of Coconut-Derived Analysis of Coconut-Derived Biodiesel and Conventional Diesel Fuel Samples from the Philippines Task 2 Final Report T.L. Alleman and R.L. McCormick Milestone Report NREL/MP-540-38643 January 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Analysis of Coconut- Derived Biodiesel and Conventional Diesel Fuel Samples from the Philippines Task 2 Final Report T.L. Alleman and R.L. McCormick Prepared under Task Nos. WF3Y.1000 and FC02.0800 under an agreement between the U.S. Agency for International Development

280

Sample Contract Language for Information Technology Using Energy-Efficient Products  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USING ENERGY- INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USING ENERGY- EFFICIENT PRODUCTS Section C - Performance Work Statement/Descriptions, Specifications The Contractor shall comply with Sections 524 and Sections 525 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007; Section 104 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005; Executive Order 13514, "Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance," dated October 5, 2009; Executive Order 13423, "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," dated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Sample Contract Language for Information Technology Using Energy-Efficient Products  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USING ENERGY- INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY USING ENERGY- EFFICIENT PRODUCTS Section C - Performance Work Statement/Descriptions, Specifications The Contractor shall comply with Sections 524 and Sections 525 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007; Section 104 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005; Executive Order 13514, "Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance," dated October 5, 2009; Executive Order 13423, "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," dated

282

GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-245 Forecasting Productivity in Forest Fire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, efficiency analysis) for economic analysis of the potential hazard posed by forest ecosystems conditionsGENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-245 50 Forecasting Productivity in Forest Fire Suppression Francisco Rodríguez y Silva2 and Armando González-Cabán3 Abstract The abandonment of land, the high energy

Standiford, Richard B.

283

General Technical Report PSW-GTR-243 Effect of Herbicides on Production of Inoculum and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

colonization, it did not have effects of ecological significance on either. 1 A version of this paperGeneral Technical Report PSW-GTR-243 164 Effect of Herbicides on Production of Inoculum and Root at the end of each experiment was analyzed by a general linear model. In preliminary experiments, the effect

Standiford, Richard B.

284

Trace element and REE composition of five samples of the Yucca Mountain calcite-silica deposits. Special report No. 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The attached materials document the results of part of a recent effort of geochemical sampling and analysis at Yucca Mountain and nearby regions. The efforts come as a result of interest in comprehensive analyses of rare earth elements (REE), lanthanum (La) through lutecium (Lu). Several additional, non-REE analyses were obtained as well. Commercially available REE analyses have proved to be insufficiently sensitive for geochemical purposes. Dr. Roman Schmitt at the Radiation Center at Oregon State University in Corvallis was sent five samples as a trial effort. The results are very encouraging. The purpose of compiling Dr. Schmitt`s report and the other materials is to inform the sponsor of his independent observations of these results and other information that sent to him. To provide a more complete appreciation of the utility of REE analyses a copy of Dave Vaniman`s recent article is included in which he notes that REE analyses from Yucca Mountain indicate the occurrence of two distinctly different REE patterns as do several other chemical parameters of the calcite-silica deposits. Our four samples with high equivalent CaCO{sub 3} were collected from sites we believe to be spring deposits. One sample, 24D, is from southern Crater Flat which is acknowledged by U.S.G.S. investigators to be a spring deposit. All four of these samples have REE patterns similar to those from the saturated zone reported by Vaniman.

Livingston, D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Tank 241-BY-104 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank 241-BY-104 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-BY-104 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

286

Tank 241-BY-103 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank 241-BY-103 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-BY-103 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

287

Tank 241-BY-108 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank 241-BY-108 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in ``Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues`` (Osborne and Huckaby 1994). Tank 241-BY-108 was vapor sampled in accordance with ``Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution (Osborne et al., 1994).

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Tank 241-BY-105 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank 241-BY-105 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-BY-105 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Tank 241-BY-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank 241-BY-107 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-BY-107 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Tank 241-BY-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank 241-BY-107 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues{close_quotes}. Tank 241-BY-107 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution{close_quotes}.

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

291

Tank 241-BY-106 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank 241-BY-106 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-BY-106 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

Huckaby, J.L.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) analysis report for solid sample from 219S tank 104  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sample of solids was obtained from tank 104 of 219S via a peristaltic pump equipped with a stainless steel tube and Norprenel tubing (Phthalate free). The sample obtained in a glass jar with Teflon 2 lid, was analyzed for PCBs as Aroclor mixtures. A soxhlet extraction procedure was used to extract the Aroclors from the sample. Analysis was performed using dual column confirmation gas chromatography/electron capture detection (GC/ECD). The extraction method closely follows SW-846 method 3540C and the analysis follows SW-846 method.

Ross, G.A.

1998-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

293

E-Print Network 3.0 - administration reporting period Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Market Studies Collection: Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants 10 UC Davis Academic Personnel Manual Appointment and Promotion Summary: Administrator reports...

294

Solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual bed photosystem. Task 2 report; Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is an investigation into the use of photocatalytic particles in a dual bed configuration, so as to effect the solar-driven decomposition of water to its constituent elements, particularly hydrogen. The system envisioned would consist of two modules, each consisting of a shallow, flat, sealed container, in which micron-sized photocatalytic particles are immobilized. An aqueous solution containing a redox mediator is pumped between the two chambers. Different photoparticles and catalysts are chosen for their respective modules so as to effect oxidative water-splitting in one vessel to evolve oxygen gas, and reductive water-splitting in the other to evolve hydrogen. This is a direct photoconversion scheme that breaks down the energetic requirement for water decomposition into a 2-photon process, and enables separate production of hydrogen and oxygen. Titanium dioxide, TiO{sub 2}, and indium phosphide, InP, were employed as photoparticles in the O{sub 2}- and H{sub 2}-evolving beds, respectively. Platinum catalysts were evaluated to prompt H{sub 2}-evolution. Calculations on the energy band structure of free and immobilized particles provided guidance as to how the microstructure of the particles should be configured. A series of redox mediators, spanning a range of redox potentials, were tested. While many electron donors facilitated H{sub 2}-evolution, only the most oxidizing ones enabled O{sub 2}-evolution. A single redox couple, capable of charge exchange in both modules, is desirable to avoid system design complexity.

Linkous, C.A.; McKaige, G.T.; Slattery, D.K.; Ouellette, A.J.A.; Austin, B.C.N.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

Luxmoore, R.J.

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Annual report of the origin of natural gas liquids production form EIA-64A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The collection of basic, verifiable information on the Nation`s reserves and production of natural gas liquids (NGL) is mandated by the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (FEAA) (Public Law 93-275) and the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91). Gas shrinkage volumes reported on Form EIA-64A by natural gas processing plant operators are used with natural gas data collected on a {open_quotes}wet after lease separation{close_quotes} basis on Form EIA-23, Annual Survey of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves, to estimate {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} natural gas reserves and production volumes regionally and nationally. The shrinkage data are also used, along with the plant liquids production data reported on Form EIA-64A, and lease condensate data reported on Form EIA-23, to estimate regional and national gas liquids reserves and production volumes. This information is the only comprehensive source of credible natural gas liquids data, and is required by DOE to assist in the formulation of national energy policies.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Final Reports on the Top Runner Target Product Standards (Japan) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Final Reports on the Top Runner Target Product Standards (Japan) Final Reports on the Top Runner Target Product Standards (Japan) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Final Reports on the Top Runner Target Product Standards (Japan) Focus Area: Appliances & Equipment Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.eccj.or.jp/top_runner/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/final-reports-top-runner-target-produ Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Industry Codes & Standards Regulations: "Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling,Building Codes" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

298

Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from rubber production and compounding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Facilities engaged in rubber production and compounding may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those who produce rubber in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs were established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste was performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property ,models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Quarterly Report: Microchannel-Assisted Nanomaterial Deposition Technology for Photovoltaic Material Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quarterly report to ITP for Nanomanufacturing program. Report covers FY11 Q2. The primary objective of this project is to develop a nanomanufacturing process which will reduce the manufacturing energy, environmental discharge, and production cost associated with current nano-scale thin-film photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing approaches. The secondary objective is to use a derivative of this nanomanufacturing process to enable greener, more efficient manufacturing of higher efficiency quantum dot-based photovoltaic cells now under development. The work is to develop and demonstrate a scalable (pilot) microreactor-assisted nanomaterial processing platform for the production, purification, functionalization, and solution deposition of nanomaterials for photovoltaic applications. The high level task duration is shown. Phase I consists of a pilot platform for Gen II PV films along with parallel efforts aimed at Gen III PV quantum dot materials. Status of each task is described.

Palo, Daniel R.

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; Idaho Department of Fish and Game, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the following 3 parts of the Project: Part 1--Monitoring age composition of wild adult spring and summer Chinook salmon returning to the Snake River basin in 2003 to predict smolt-to-adult return rates Part 2--Development of a stock-recruitment relationship for Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon to forecast natural smolt production Part 3--Improve the precision of smolt-to-adult survival rate estimates for wild steelhead trout by PIT tagging additional juveniles.

Copeland, Timothy; Johnson, June; Bunn, Paul (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Annual report, March 10, 1993--March 9, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, the investigators review a range of reservoir scenarios in which horizontal wells can be advantageous and discuss some of the modeling problems associated with calculating well connection factors, productivity indices, coning behavior and well two-phase pressure drops. We show illustrative coning calculations and the implications of the well model on distribution of post-breakthrough gas saturations. Such calculations then open up the possibility of determining optimal recompletion strategies and/or additional hydraulic fracturing.

Fayers, F.J.; Aziz, K.; Hewett, T.A.; Arbabi, S.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA Production Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

t.Jt'S~l t.Jt'S~l National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy NNSA ProductiOn Office Post Off1ce Box 2050 Oak Ridge. Tennessee 37831-8009 FEB -7 2013 MEMORANDUMFORKARENBOARDMAN CHAIRPERSON FROM: SUBJECT: REFERENCE: FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAP ABIL KENNETH A. HOAR ASSISTANT MANAGER ENVIRONMENT, SAFET Staffing Plan for the National Nu ear Security Administration Production Office DOE Memorandum, ANNUAL WORKFORCE ANALYSIS AND STAFFING PLAN REPORT FOR CALENDAR YEAR (CY) 2012, Boardman/Agents, dated October 24, 2012 We have completed our analysis of staffing needs per the guidance in the referenced memorandum. Our revised staffing plan for the NNSA Production Office is attached. Should you have any questions, please contact me at (806) 4 77-7158 or Susan Morris at

304

CPSC, EPA, CDC/ATSDR, HUD PRESS STATEMENT ON DRYWALL AIR SAMPLING The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the U.S. Environmental Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, EPA, CDC/ATSDR, HUD PRESS STATEMENT ON DRYWALL AIR SAMPLING The U.S. Consumer Product Safety odors into the air and whether identified substances found in the air pose a safety or health hazard, in support of CPSC, EPA has performed limited air sampling and monitoring in six homes in Florida

305

Letter Report for Analytical Results for Two Concrete and Three Soil Samples Associated with the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute tor Science and Education (ORISE) contract, received two concrete core and three soil samples on August 26, 2013 from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Massachusetts. The samples were received in good condition. The samples were analyzed tor activation and fission products by gamma spectrometry. The sample collection data and identification numbers are tabulated and the gamma spectrometry data are presented. The pertinent procedure reference is included with the data table.

Ivey, Wade

2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

306

Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organization (ANSTO) Interdicted Samples 24-Hour Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Categorization is complete. Samples 11-3-1 (NSR-F-270409-01) and 11-3-2 (NSR-F-270409-02) are depleted uranium powders of moderate purity ({approx}65-80 % U). The uranium feed stocks for 11-3-1 and 11-3-2 have both experienced a neutron flux (as demonstrated by the presence of {sup 232}U). Sample 11-3-3 is indistinguishable from a natural uranium ore concentrate of moderate purity ({approx}70-80% U). Two anomalous objects (11-3-1-4 and 11-3-2-5) were found in the material during aliquoting. These objects might be valuable for route attribution.

Kristo, M J; Hutcheon, I D; Grant, P M; Borg, L E; Sharp, M A; Moody, K J; Conrado, C L; Wooddy, P T

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

307

Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program 1992--1993 report and summary of BSEP data since 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the last one that is currently scheduled in the sequence of reports of new data, and therefore, also includes summary comments referencing important data obtained by BSEP since 1983. These BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the (WIPP) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. A project concern is that enough brine might be present after sealing and closure to generate large quantities of hydrogen gas by corroding the metal in the waste drums and waste inventory. This report describes progress made during the calendar years 1992 and 1993 and focuses on four major areas: (1) monitoring of brine inflow, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled downward from the underground drifts (downholes), upward from the underground drifts (upholes), and from subhorizontal holes from the underground drifts; (2) observations of weeps in the Air Intake Shaft (AIS); (3) further characterization of brine geochemistry; and (4) additional characterization of the hydrologic conditions in the fractured zone beneath the excavations.

Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J. [I. T. Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project Office

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A Novel Geotechnical/Geostatistical Approach for Exploration and Production of Natural Gas from Multiple Geologic Strata: Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses dewatering and production extension test periods, and the demonstration of newly developed technologies for multi-strata gas and water production to enhance commercial applications.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

Report on Testing to Expand the Rotary Mode Core Sampling Operating Envelope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Characterization Equipment Group requested that the Numatec Hanford Corporation--Engineering Testing Laboratory (ETL) perform Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) Operating Envelope (OE) testing. This testing was based upon Witwer 1998a and was performed at different time periods between May and September 1998. The purpose of this testing was to raise the maximum down force limit for rotary mode core sampling as outlined in the current OE. If testing could show that a higher down force could be used while drilling into a concrete/pumice block simulant while still remaining below the 60 C limitation, then the current OE could be revised to include the new, higher, down force limit. Although the Test Plan discussed varying the purge flow rate and rotation rate to find ''optimal'' drilling conditions, the number of drill bits that could be destructively tested was limited. Testing was subsequently limited in scope such that only the down force would be varied while the purge flow rate and rotation rate were kept constant at 30 scfm and 55 rpm respectively. A second objective, which was not part of the original test plan, was added prior to testing. The Bit Improvement testing, mentioned previously, revealed that the drill bits tested in the OE testing were made of a slightly different metal matrix than the ones currently used. The older bits, a Longyear part number 100IVD/5 (/5 bit), had tungsten carbide mixed into the metal matrix that forms the cutting teeth. The currently used bits, Longyear part number 100IVD/8 (/8 bit), instead have tungsten metal in the matrix and no tungsten carbide. Rockwell C hardness testing showed that the /5 bit was significantly harder than the /8 bit, with values of /8 vs. 8, respectively. The change from the /5 bit to the /8 bit was made immediately after the previous OE testing in 1996 because of sparking concerns with the tungsten carbide in the /5 bit. This difference in hardness between the two bit materials was discovered in the Bit Improvement Testing and was expected to affect this OE testing. The second objective, therefore, was to quantify what affect this change in material had and define the OE, based on the current /8 bit design rather than the old /5 bit design.

BOGER, R.M.

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

310

FY 1993 environmental sampling and analysis report for wastewater discharge at McMurdo Station, Antarctica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastewater impact assessment at McMurdo has been or is being conducted by four organizations: Antarctic Support Associates (ASA), which conducts the effluent monitoring; Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, which conducts all of the benthic monitoring and most of the biological monitoring; Montana State University, which conducted water quality and water current measurements; and EG&G Idaho, which conducted water quality and sea ice monitoring. All four programs are interrelated and were needed to determine the impact of the wastewater discharge on the marine environment. This report summarizes the relevant monitoring work being conducted by Antarctic Support Associates, Moss Landing, and Montana State personnel, and specifically documents the results of EG&G Idaho`s efforts.

Crockett, A.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek in Association with Restoration Efforts, US Geological Survey Report, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was designed to document existing habitat conditions and fish populations within the Rattlesnake Creek watershed (White Salmon River subbasin, Washington) before major habitat restoration activities are implemented and prior to the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead above Condit Dam. Returning adult salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead O. mykiss have not had access to Rattlesnake Creek since 1913. An assessment of resident trout populations should serve as a good surrogate for evaluation of factors that would limit salmon and steelhead production in the watershed. Personnel from United States Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) attended to three main objectives of the Rattlesnake Creek project. The first objective was to characterize stream and riparian habitat conditions. This effort included measures of water quality, water quantity, stream habitat, and riparian conditions. The second objective was to determine the status of fish populations in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage. To accomplish this, we derived estimates of salmonid population abundance, determined fish species composition, assessed distribution and life history attributes, obtained tissue samples for genetic analysis, and assessed fish diseases in the watershed. The third objective was to use the collected habitat and fisheries information to help identify and prioritize areas in need of restoration. As this report covers the fourth year of a five-year study, it is largely restricted to describing our efforts and findings for the first two objectives.

Allen, M. Brady; Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Increasing the productivity of short-rotation Populus plantations. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report represents the culmination of eight years of biological research devoted to increasing the productivity of short rotation plantations of Populus trichocarpa and Populus hybrids in the Pacific Northwest. Studies provide an understanding of tree growth, stand development and biomass yield at various spacings, and how patterns differ by Populus clone in monoclonal and polyclonal plantings. Also included is some information about factors related to wind damage in Populus plantings, use of leaf size as a predictor of growth potential, and approaches for estimating tree and stand biomass and biomass growth. Seven research papers are included which provide detailed methods, results, and interpretations on these topics.

DeBell, D.S.; Harrington, C.A.; Clendenen, G.W.; Radwan, M.A.; Zasada, J.C. [Forest Service, Olympia, WA (United States). Pacific Northwest Research Station

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Laboratory analysis of soil hydraulic properties of TA-49 soil samples. Volume I: Report summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hydrologic Testing Laboratory at Daniel B. Stephens & Associates, Inc. (DBS&A) has completed laboratory tests on TA-49 soil samples as specified by Mr. Daniel A. James and summarized in Table 1. Tables 2 through 12 give the results of the specified analyses. Raw laboratory data and graphical plots of data (where appropriate) are contained in Appendices A through K. Appendix L lists the methods used in these analyses. A detailed description of each method is available upon request. Thermal properties were calculated using methods reviewed by Campbell and covered in more detail in Appendix K. Typically, soil thermal conductivities are determined using empirical fitting parameters (five in this case), Some assumptions are also made in the equations used to reduce the raw data. In addition to the requested thermal property measurements, calculated values are also presented as the best available internal check on data quality. For both thermal conductivities and specific heats, calculated and measured values are consistent and the functions often cross. Interestingly, measured thermal conductivities tend to be higher than calculated thermal conductivities around typically encountered in situ moisture contents ({plus_minus}5 percent). While we do not venture an explanation of the difference, sensitivity testing of any problem requiring nonisothermal modeling across this range is in order.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Green IS for GHG Emission Reporting on Product-Level? An Action Design Research Project in the Meat Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emission reporting gained importance in the last years, due to societal and governmental pressure. However, this task is highly complex, especially in interdependent batch production processes and ...

Hendrik Hilpert; Christoph Beckers

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

DOE oil shale reference sample bank: Quarterly report, July-September 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Oil Shale Program was restructured in FY84 to implement a 5-year period of basic and applied research in the study of the phenomena involved in oil shale pyrolysis/retorting. The program calls for the study of two reference shales per year for a period of 5 years. Consequently, the program calls for the identification, acquisition, processing, characterization, storage, disbursement, and record keeping for ten reference shales in a period of 5 years. Two FY86 and one FY87 reference shales have been acquired, processed and stored under inert gas. The Eastern shale, designated E86, was obtained from the Clegg Creek Member of the New Albany Shale at a quarry near Louisville, Kentucky in the first quarter of FY86. The FY86 Western Shale was obtained from the Exxon Colony Mine, located near Parachute, Colorado, during the first quarter of FY86. The FY87 Western Shale was obtained from the Tipton Member of the Green River Formation near Rock Springs, Wyoming during the fourth quarter of FY87. Partial distributions of the FY86 shale have been made to DOE and non-DOE contractors. Complete descriptions of the FY87 Western reference shale locale, shale processing procedures and analytical characterization are provided in this report. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Owen, L.B.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, February 1995--April 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period February 1, 1995, through April 30, 1995, for Phase II of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program by Solar Turbines Incorporated under DOE contract No. DE-AC21-93MC30246. The objective of Phase II of the ATS Program is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000. A secondary objective is to begin early development of technologies critical to the success of ATS. Tasks 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 7 of Phase II have been completed in prior quarters. Their results have been discussed in the applicable quarterly reports and in their respective topical reports. With the exception of Task 7, final editions of these topical reports have been submitted to the DOE. This quarterly report, then, addresses only Task 4 and the nine subtasks included in Task 8, {open_quotes}Design and Test of Critical Components.{close_quotes} These nine subtasks address six ATS technologies as follows: (1) Catalytic Combustion - Subtasks 8.2 and 8.5, (2) Recuperator - Subtasks 8.1 and 8.7, (3) Autothermal Fuel Reformer - Subtask 8.3, (4) High Temperature Turbine Disc - Subtask 8.4, (5) Advanced Control System (MMI) - Subtask 8.6, and (6) Ceramic Materials - Subtasks 8.8 and 8.9. Major technological achievements from Task 8 efforts during the quarter are as follows: (1) The subscale catalytic combustion rig in Subtask 8.2 is operating consistently at 3 ppmv of NO{sub x} over a range of ATS operating conditions. (2) The spray cast process used to produce the rim section of the high temperature turbine disc of Subtask 8.4 offers additional and unplanned spin-off opportunities for low cost manufacture of certain gas turbine parts.

Karstensen, K.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Production and screening of carbon products precursors from coal: Carbon products consortium. Quarterly technical progress report and key personnel staffing report, No. 1, February 15, 1995--March 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) is a university, industry, national laboratory cooperative research, development and commercialization partnership focused on the use of coal-derived precursors for a wide range of carbon products. The CPC program has evolved over five years through the combined efforts of academic, congressional, industrial, and government agency participation and support. The PETC funded WVU portion of the CPC involves both administration and research. During the preceding quarter, the Project Management Plan specified in Task 1 of the Workplan has been initiated and a draft will be submitted to the DOE COR. A CPC Participants Agreement has been approved and signed by the university and industrial participants. The WVU carbon products group has added three additional technicians to help initiate the project. Several new reactor systems have been obtained for the solvent extraction lab. Due to WVU`s experience and background in solvent extraction of coal, the WVU portion of the project will be in operation very soon. Several small samples (one ounce or less) of coal extracts will be provided to UCAR for initial screening.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Tank 241-ER-311, grab samples, ER311-98-1, ER311-98-2, ER311-98-3 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final report for catch tank 241-ER-311 grab samples. Three grab samples ER311-98-1, ER311-98-2 and ER311-98-3 were taken from East riser of tank 241-ER-311 on August 4, 1998 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on August 4, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1998)and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Mulkey and Miller, 1997). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report (Table 1). No notification limits were exceeded.

FULLER, R.K.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

319

Tank 241-AN-101, grab samples, 1AN-98-1, 1AN-98-2 and 1AN-98-3 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final report for tank 241-AN-101 grab samples. Three grab samples 1AN-98-1, 1AN-98-2 and 1AN-98-3 were taken from riser 16 of tank 241-AN-101 on April 8, 1998 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on April 9, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the ''Compatability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan'' (TSAP) and the ''Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatability Program'' (DQO). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report. No notification limits were exceeded.

FULLER, R.K.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

320

Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production is obtained from proved reserves but the determinants of the scale of production in the industry and country components of the world total are many and complex with some unique to the individual com...

D. C. Ion

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Arun Madan MVSystems, Incorporated (MVS) 500 Corporate Circle, Suite L Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 271-9907 Email: ArunMadan@aol.com or amadan@mvsystemsinc.com DOE Managers HQ: Eric Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-07GO17105, A00 Subcontractor: University of Hawaii at Manoa (UH), Honolulu, HI Project Start Date: September 1, 2007 Project End Date: December 31, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Work closely with the DOE Working Group on * Photoelectrochemical (PEC) Hydrogen Production for optimizing PEC materials and devices. Develop new PEC film materials compatible with high- *

322

Resource Analysis for Hydrogen Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Marc W. Melaina (Primary Contact), Michael Penev and Donna Heimiller National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3836 Email: Marc.Melaina@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2009 Project End Date: September 28, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Understand the hydrogen production requirements for a * future demand scenario Estimate low-carbon energy resources required to meet * the future scenario demand Compare resource requirements to current consumption * and projected future consumption Determine resource availability geographically and on a *

323

Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Annual report, August 1994--July 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the tasks completed under this project during the period from August 1, 1994 through July 31, 1994. The objective of the study is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost-competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000. The tasks completed include a market study for the advanced turbine system; definition of an optimized recuperated gas turbine as the prime mover meeting the requirements of the market study and whose characteristics were, in turn, used for forecasting the total advanced turbine system (ATS) future demand; development of a program plan for bringing the ATS to a state of readiness for field test; and demonstration of the primary surface recuperator ability to provide the high thermal effectiveness and low pressure loss required to support the proposed ATS cycle.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Technical support for the Ohio Coal Technology Program. Volume 1, Baseline of knowledge concerning by-product characteristics: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LRl and comprises two volumes. Volume I presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume II consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1989-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

325

Utilization of low NO{sub x} coal combustion by-products. Quarterly report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is studying a beneficiation process to make power plant fly ash a more useful by-product. The tasks include: (1) Laboratory characterization: Sample collection; Material characterization; and Lab testing of ash processing operations; (2) Pilot plant testing of the separation of carbon from fly ash; (3) Product testing: Concrete testing and Plastic fillers; and (4) Market and economic analysis. Appendices present information on material characterization, laboratory testing of a flotation process, pilot runs, and concrete testing results.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Tank 241-AP-106, Grab samples, 6AP-98-1, 6AP-98-2 and 6AP-98-3 Analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final report for tank 241-AP-106 grab samples. Three grab samples 6AP-98-1, 6AP-98-2 and 6AP-98-3 were taken from riser 1 of tank 241-AP-106 on May 28, 1998 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on May 28, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the ''Compatability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan'' (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1998) and the ''Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatability Program (DQO). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report. No notification limits were exceeded. The request for sample analysis received for AP-106 indicated that the samples were polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) suspects. The results of this analysis indicated that no PCBs were present at the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) regulated limit of 50 ppm. The results and raw data for the PCB analysis are included in this document.

FULLER, R.K.

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

327

Tank 241-AP-107, grab samples, 7AP-99-1, 7AP-99-3 and 7AP-99-4 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-AP-107 (AP-107) grab samples taken in May 1999 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank AP-107 samples were performed as directed in Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal year 1999. Any deviations from the instructions provided in the tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAP) were discussed in this narrative. Interim data were provided earlier to River Protection Project (RPP) personnel, however, the data presented here represent the official results. No notification limits were exceeded.

BELL, K.E.

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

328

Report Sample 5  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Prepared for: Prepared by: Prepared for: Prepared by: U.S. Department of Energy AECOM Minneapolis Project Number 60140143 June 2010 Environment Final Environmental Assessment and Notice of Wetland Involvement Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi i BlueFire DOE Final EA 6-4-10.docx Contents Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................................... 1 Acronyms, Abbreviations, and Terms ............................................................................................................ 3 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................. 1-1

329

Report Sample 1  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

resources - Researchers develop resource information for solar, wind, 652 biomass, and geothermal energy applications. 653 * Renewable thermal technologies - These technologies...

330

Report Sample 1  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Endangered Species Act Correspondence with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Department of Energy Golden Field Office 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 May 21, 2014...

331

Report Sample 1  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

appears that the subsurface water is closer to the surface 2997 in these patches. One patch is located on a southern-facing slope near the eastern property boundary; 2998 the...

332

Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. These residues are composed largely of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. Since the residues are used as an integral component of the cement and not just as additives to concrete, larger amounts of the residues can be utilized. The process uses submerged combustion to melt blends of coal combustion residues with lime, clay, and/or sand. The submerged combustion melter utilizes natural gas-oxidant firing directly into a molten bath to provide efficient melting of mineral-like materials. Use of this melter for cement production has many advantages over rotary kilns including very little, if any, grinding of the feed material, very low emissions, and compact size. During the first year of the program, samples of coal combustion residues were blended and mixed, as needed; with lime, clay, and/or sand to adjust the composition. Six mixtures, three with fly ash and three with bottom ash, were melted in a laboratory-scale furnace. The resultant products were used in mortar cubes and bars which were subjected to ASTM standard tests of cementitious properties. In the hydraulic activity test, mortar cubes were found to have a strength comparable to standard mortar cements. In the compressive strength test, mortar cubes were found to have strengths that exceeded ASTM blended cement performance specifications. In the ASR expansion test, mortar bars were subjected to alkali-silica reaction-induced expansion, which is a problem for siliceous aggregate-based concretes that are exposed to moisture. The mortar bars made with the products inhibited 85 to 97% of this expansion. These results show that residue-based products have an excellent potential as ASR-preventing additions in concretes.

Wagner, J.C.; Bhatty, J.L.; Mishulovich, A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Advanced turbine systems program -- Conceptual design and product development. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report presents the accomplishments on Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS). The ATS is an advanced, natural gas fired gas turbine system that will represent a major advance on currently available industrial gas turbines in the size range of 1--20 MW. This report covers a market-driven development. The Market Survey reported in Section 5 identified the customer`s performance needs. This market survey used analyses performed by Solar turbine Incorporated backed up by the analyses done by two consultants, Research Decision Consultants (RDC) and Onsite Energy Corporation (Onsite). This back-up was important because it is the belief of all parties that growth of the ATS will depend both on continued participation in Solar`s traditional oil and gas market but to a major extent on a new market. This new market is distributed electrical power generation. Difficult decisions have had to be made to meet the different demands of the two markets. Available resources, reasonable development schedules, avoidance of schedule or technology failures, probable acceptance by the marketplace, plus product cost, performance and environmental friendliness are a few of the complex factors influencing the selection of the Gas Fired Advanced Turbine System described in Section 3. Section 4 entitled ``Conversion to Coal`` was a task which addresses the possibility of a future interruption to an economic supply of natural gas. System definition and analysis is covered in Section 6. Two major objectives were met by this work. The first was identification of those critical technologies that can support overall attainment of the program goals. Separate technology or component programs were begun to identify and parameterize these technologies and are described in Section 7. The second objective was to prepare parametric analyses to assess performance sensitivity to operating variables and to select design approaches to meet the overall program goals.

NONE

1996-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

334

DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF UNDERBALANCED DRILLING PRODUCTS. Final Report, Oct 1995 - July 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underbalanced drilling is experiencing growth at a rate that rivals that of horizontal drilling in the mid-1980s and coiled-tubing drilling in the 1990s. Problems remain, however, for applying underbalanced drilling in a wider range of geological settings and drilling environments. This report addresses developments under this DOE project to develop products aimed at overcoming these problems. During Phase I of the DOE project, market analyses showed that up to 12,000 wells per year (i.e., 30% of all wells) will be drilled underbalanced in the U.S.A. within the next ten years. A user-friendly foam fluid hydraulics model (FOAM) was developed for a PC Windows environment during Phase I. FOAM predicts circulating pressures and flow characteristics of foam fluids used in underbalanced drilling operations. FOAM is based on the best available mathematical models, and was validated through comparison to existing models, laboratory test data and field data. This model does not handle two-phase flow or air and mist drilling where the foam quality is above 0.97. This FOAM model was greatly expanded during Phase II including adding an improved foam rheological model and a ''matching'' feature that allows the model to be field calibrated. During Phase I, a lightweight drilling fluid was developed that uses hollow glass spheres (HGS) to reduce the density of the mud to less than that of water. HGS fluids have several advantages over aerated fluids, including they are incompressible, they reduce corrosion and vibration problems, they allow the use of mud-pulse MWD tools, and they eliminate high compressor and nitrogen costs. Phase II tests showed that HGS significantly reduce formation damage with water-based drilling and completion fluids and thereby potentially can increase oil and gas production in wells drilled with water-based fluids. Extensive rheological testing was conducted with HGS drilling and completion fluids during Phase II. These tests showed that the HGS fluids act similarly to conventional fluids and that they have potential application in many areas, including underbalanced drilling, completions, and riserless drilling. Early field tests under this project are encouraging. These led to limited tests by industry (which are also described). Further field tests and cost analyses are needed to demonstrate the viability of HGS fluids in different applications. Once their effectiveness is demonstrated, they should find widespread application and should significantly reduce drilling costs and increase oil and gas production rates. A number of important oilfield applications for HGS outside of Underbalanced Drilling were identified. One of these--Dual Gradient Drilling (DGD) for deepwater exploration and development--is very promising. Investigative work on DGD under the project is reported, along with definition of a large joint-industry project resulting from the work. Other innovative products/applications are highlighted in the report including the use of HGS as a cement additive.

William C. Maurer; William J. McDonald; Thomas E. Williams; John H. Cohen

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Idaho Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation : Annual Progress Report February 1, 2007 - January 31, 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Populations of anadromous salmonids in the Snake River basin declined precipitously following the construction of hydroelectric dams in the Snake and Columbia rivers. Raymond (1988) documented a decrease in survival of emigrating steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha from the Snake River following the construction of dams on the lower Snake River during the late 1960s and early 1970s. Although Raymond documented some improvements in survival through the early 1980s, anadromous populations remained depressed and declined even further during the 1990s (Petrosky et al. 2001; Good et al. 2005). The effect was disastrous for all anadromous salmonid species in the Snake River basin. Coho salmon O. kisutch were extirpated from the Snake River by 1986. Sockeye salmon O. nerka almost disappeared from the system and were declared under extreme risk of extinction by authority of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1991. Chinook salmon were classified as threatened with extinction in 1992. Steelhead trout were also classified as threatened in 1997. Federal management agencies in the basin are required to mitigate for hydroelectric impacts and provide for recovery of all ESA-listed populations. In addition, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has the long-term goal of preserving naturally reproducing salmon and steelhead populations and recovering them to levels that will provide a sustainable harvest (IDFG 2007). Management to achieve these goals requires an understanding of how salmonid populations function (McElhany et al. 2000) as well as regular status assessments. Key demographic parameters, such as population density, age composition, recruits per spawner, and survival rates must be estimated annually to make such assessments. These data will guide efforts to meet mitigation and recovery goals. The Idaho Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (INPMEP) was developed to provide this information to managers. The Snake River stocks of steelhead and spring/summer Chinook salmon still have significant natural reproduction and thus are the focal species for this project's investigations. The overall goal is to monitor the abundance, productivity, distribution, and stock-specific life history characteristics of naturally produced steelhead trout and Chinook salmon in Idaho (IDFG 2007). We have grouped project tasks into three objectives, as defined in our latest project proposal and most recent statement of work. The purpose of each objective involves enumerating or describing individuals within the various life stages of Snake River anadromous salmonids. By understanding the transitions between life stages and associated controlling factors, we hope to achieve a mechanistic understanding of stock-specific population dynamics. This understanding will improve mitigation and recovery efforts. Objective 1. Measure 2007 adult escapement and describe the age structure of the spawning run of naturally produced spring/summer Chinook salmon passing Lower Granite Dam. Objective 2. Monitor the juvenile production of Chinook salmon and steelhead trout for the major population groups (MPGs) within the Clearwater and Salmon subbasins. Objective 3. Evaluate life cycle survival and the freshwater productivity/production of Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon. There are two components: update/refine a stock-recruit model and estimate aggregate smolt-to-adult survival. In this annual progress report, we present technical results for work done during 2007. Part 2 contains detailed results of INPMEP aging research and estimation of smolt-to-adult return rates for wild and naturally produced Chinook salmon (Objectives 1 and 3). Part 3 is a report on the ongoing development of a stock-recruit model for the freshwater phase of spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River basin (Objective 3). Part 4 is a summary of the parr density data (Objective 2) collected in 2007 using the new site selection procedure. Data are maintained in computer databases housed at the IDFG Nampa Fisheries Research off

Copeland, Timothy; Johnson, June; Putnam, Scott

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

342

Microsoft Word - 911106_0 End-ProductsReport_final_rel.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 Revision 0 Preconceptual Engineering Services For The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) With Hydrogen Production NGNP End-Products Study Prepared by General Atomics For the...

343

Moored instrument for time series studies of primary production and other microbial rate processes. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to build and test a Time Series Submersible Incubation Device (TS-SID) capable of the autonomous in situ measurement of phytoplankton production and other rate processes for a period of up at least three months. The instrument is conceptually based on a recently constructed Submersible Incubation Device (SID). The TS-SID is to possess the ability to periodically incubate samples in the presence of an appropriate tracer, and to store 94 chemically fixed subsamples for later analysis. The TS-SID has been designed to accurately simulate the natural environment, and to avoid trace metal contamination and physical damage to cells. Devices for biofouling control of internal and external surfaces are to be incorporated into the instrument. After the time series capabilities of the instrument have been successfully evaluated by medium-term coastal time series studies (up to one month), longer-term coastal time series studies (2-3 months) will be conducted to evaluate the biofouling prevention measures that have been used with the instrument.

Taylor, C.D.; Doherty, K.W.

1993-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

344

Characterization of the geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils on the Savannah River Site: Field sampling activities. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are 36,000 acres of wetlands on the Savannah River Site (SRS) and an additional 5,000 acres of floodplain. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste sites at SRS have shown that some wetlands have been contaminated with pollutants resulting from SRS operations. In general, releases of contaminants to wetland areas have been indirect. These releases may have originated at disposal lagoons or waste facilities located in the vicinity of the wetland areas. Transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, soil erosion, sediment transport, and groundwater seepage into downgradient wetland areas are responsible for the indirect discharges to the wetland areas. The SRS determined that a database of background geochemical and physical properties for wetland soils on the SRS was needed to facilitate future remedial investigations, human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, and feasibility studies for the wetland areas. These data are needed for comparison to contaminant data collected from wetland soils that have been affected by contamination from SRS operations. This report describes the efforts associated with the collection of soil cores, preparation of a lithologic log for each core, and the processing and packaging of individual soil samples for shipment to analytical laboratory facilities.

Dixon, K.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

346

Washability of trace elements in product coals from Illinois mines. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existing trace element washability data on Illinois coals are based on float-sink methods, and these data are not applicable to modern froth flotation or column flotation processes. Particularly, there is a lack of washability data on samples from modern preparation plants, as well as other product (as-shipped) coals. The goal of this project is to provide the needed trace element washability data on as-shipped coals that were collected during 1992--1993 from Illinois mines. The results generated by this project will promote Illinois coals for such prospective new markets as feed materials for advanced gasification processes, for synthetic organic chemicals, and to meet new environmental requirements for their use in utility steam generation. During the first quarter, each of 34 project samples were ground to about {approximately}100 mesh size and cleaned by use of a special froth flotation technique (release analysis). The flotation products were analyzed for ash, moisture, and heating value (BTU). The data were then used to construct a series of different-washability curves. For example, these curves can show variation in BTU or combustible recovery as a function of the amount of ash or S rejected, or as a function of the weight of the flotation products. From the relationship between %cumulative BTU and %cumulative weight, nine composite samples each having 80% of the total BTU were prepared from the individual flotation products and submitted for trace element analysis.

Demir, I.; Ruch, R.R.; Harvey, R.D.; Steele, J.D. [Illinois Dept. of Energy and Natural Resources, Springfield, IL (United States). Geological Survey

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy?s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to li

Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

[National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research] quarterly technical report, July 1--September 30, 1991. Volume 2, Energy production research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report is submitted in two volumes, Volume I representing the work accomplished under Fuels Research and Volume II the work for Energy Production Research during the period July 1--Sept. 30, 1991. Topics covered include: chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience technology, resource assessment technology, microbial technology, environmental technology.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Site characterization summary report for dry weather surface water sampling upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes activities associated with conducting dry weather surface water sampling of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This activity is a portion of the work to be performed at UEFPC Operable Unit (OU) 1 [now known as the UEFPC Characterization Area (CA)], as described in the RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak- Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and in the Response to Comments and Recommendations on RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Volume 1, Operable Unit 1. Because these documents contained sensitive information, they were labeled as unclassified controlled nuclear information and as such are not readily available for public review. To address this issue the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published an unclassified, nonsensitive version of the initial plan, text and appendixes, of this Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) Plan in early 1994. These documents describe a program for collecting four rounds of wet weather and dry weather surface water samples and one round of sediment samples from UEFPC. They provide the strategy for the overall sample collection program including dry weather sampling, wet weather sampling, and sediment sampling. Figure 1.1 is a schematic flowchart of the overall sampling strategy and other associated activities. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) was prepared to specifically address four rounds of dry weather surface water sampling and one round of sediment sampling. For a variety of reasons, sediment sampling has not been conducted and has been deferred to the UEFPC CA Remedial Investigation (RI), as has wet weather sampling.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-100 Raman Lidar Profiles Best Estimate Value-Added Product Technical Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 Raman Lidar Profiles Best Estimate Value-Added Product Technical Report R Newsom January 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

351

DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-005.1 ARM Value-Added Product (VAP) Monthly Status Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 ARM Value-Added Product (VAP) Monthly Status Report ARM Translator Team J. Comstock C. Flynn M. Jensen C. Long D. Turner S. Xie March 13, 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

352

Coeur d'Alene Tribal Production Facility, Volume III of III, 2002-2003 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendices covers the following reports: (1) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1993-94 annual report; (2) Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, Supplementation Feasibility Report on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1998 technical report; and (3) Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation, 1998 annual report.

Anders, Paul

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Independent Oversight Activity Report, National Nuclear Security Administration Production Office- March 10-14, 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Contractor Transition Activities for the National Nuclear Security Administration Production Office [IAR-NPO-2014-03-10

354

DOE Oil Shale Reference Sample Bank. Quarterly reports, October-December 1985; January-March 1986. [Samples from eastern and western USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two FY-86 reference shales have been acquired, processed and stored under inert gas. The Eastern shale, designated E86, was obtained from the Clegg Creek Member of the New Albany Shale at a quarry near Louisville, Kentucky in the first quarter of FY86. The western shale was obtained from the Exxon Colony Mine, located near Parachute, Colorado, during the second quarter of FY 86. Partial distributions of both shales have been made to DOE contractors. Complete descriptions of the reference shale locales, shale processing procedures and analytical characterization are provided in the following sections of this report. 26 tabs.

Owen, L.B.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

THE `TEST STATISTICS REPORT' provides a synopsis of the test attributes and some important statistics. A sample is shown here to the right.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;THE `TEST STATISTICS REPORT' provides a synopsis of the test attributes and some important statistics. A sample is shown here to the right. The Test reliability indicators are measures of how well: Are formulae for testing reliability as a measure of internal consistency. Higher values indicate a stronger

Kambhampati, Patanjali

356

Consumer purchasing behaviour towards fish and seafood products: patterns and insights from a sample of international studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present systematic review was performed to assess consumer purchasing behaviour towards fish and seafood products in the wide context of developed countries. Web of Science, Scopus, ScienceDirect and Google Scholar engines were used to search the existing literature and a total of 49 studies were identified for inclusion. These studies investigated consumer purchasing behaviour towards a variety of fish and seafood products, in different countries and by means different methodological approaches. In particular, the review identifies and discusses the main drivers and barriers of fish consumption as well as consumers' preferences about the most relevant attributes of fish and seafood products providing useful insights for both practitioners and policy makers. Finally, main gaps of the existing literature and possible trajectories for future research are also discussed.

Domenico Carlucci; Giuseppe Nocella; Biagia De Devitiis; Rosaria Viscecchia; Francesco Bimbo; Gianluca Nardone

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Reports  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Reports Reports . . . . , Book -1. Service Open File Information for Project Rulison, Production Testing Phase, . , August 28,1970 : . "; DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. DESCRIPTION O F PU1:T41C I-l!lkI,T;-1 SE1:VICh: 0P:SN F I L E INPOPt4ATION i[ ' 7 S&u-~%uestcrn E a d i o l o g i c a l H e a l t h 1,aboratol-p r? U. S. Depaieraent o f I l e a l t h ,. E d u c a t i o n aud Welfa,re i i I t - - . L-J~ub-l-ic H e a l t h ' ~ c r v i c e : Y T h i s s u r v e i l l a ~ l c e p e r f o r m e d u n d e r r e , a Memorandum o f ~ n d e k s t a n d i n ~ (No. SF 5 1 & L A U. S . . A t o m i c E n e r g y Commission i hk, ! i ilYo.,jh,asic g r o u p s o f i n f o r m a t i o n a r e p l a c e d i n t h e P u b l i c H e a l t h i k e l ~ e r v i k e , \ ~ o u t h w e s t c r n R a t i i o l o g i c a l H

358

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Fourth Quarter 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the end of 1983, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 305, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,389 MW. Of these totals, 202 projects, capable of producing 566 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 101 contracts with a potential of 1,408 MW. In total, 106 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,479 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 29 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 402 MW to 444 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 84 MW to 89 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 3 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 28, with a generating capability of 618 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 14 wind farm projects, totaling 365 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 8 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 59 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 146 MW, as well as 72 projects under active discussion for 169 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 185 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of December 31, 1983.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Letter Report for Analytical Results for five Swipe Samples from the Northern Biomedical Research Facility, Muskegon Michigan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, received five swipe samples on December 10, 2013 from the Northern Biomedical Research Facility in Norton Shores, Michigan. The samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14 according to the NRC Form 303 supplied with the samples. The sample identification numbers are presented in Table 1 and the tritium and carbon-14 results are provided in Table 2. The pertinent procedure references are included with the data tables.

Ivey, Wade

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

360

ARTIFACT FORMATION DURING NEUTRALIZATION OF TANK 50 SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Degradation products have been identified in the extracts of Tank 50 samples analyzed by semivolatile organic compound analysis (SVOA) using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These materials, identified as short chain alkyl alcohols, were formed by acidification during sample preparation. A number of questions were raised about the formation of these and other materials reported in Tank 50 surface samples, and this report serves to address these questions.

Crump, S.; Young, J.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Airfoil sampling of a pulsed Laval beam with tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry: Application to low--temperature kinetics and product detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron photoionization quadrupole mass spectrometry is constructed to study low-temperature radicalneutralchemical reactions of importance for modeling the atmosphere of Titan and the outer planets. A design for the sampling geometry of a pulsed Laval nozzle expansion has beendeveloped that operates successfully for the determination of rate coefficients by time-resolved mass spectrometry. The new concept employs airfoil sampling of the collimated expansion withexcellent sampling throughput. Time-resolved profiles of the high Mach number gas flow obtained by photoionization signals show that perturbation of the collimated expansion by theairfoil is negligible. The reaction of C2H with C2H2 is studied at 70 K as a proof-of-principle result for both low-temperature rate coefficient measurements and product identification basedon the photoionization spectrum of the reaction product versus VUV photon energy. This approach can be used to provide new insights into reaction mechanisms occurring at kinetic ratesclose to the collision-determined limit.

Soorkia, Satchin; Liu, Chen-Lin; Savee, John D.; Ferrell, Sarah J.; Leone, Stephen R.; Wilson, Kevin R.

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

362

Unattended Environmental Sampling and Laser-based Enrichment Assay for Detection of Undeclared HEU Production in Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power is enjoying rapid growth as government energy policies and public demand shift toward carbon neutral energy production. Accompanying the growth in nuclear power is the requirement for increased nuclear fuel production, including a significant expansion in uranium enrichment capacity. Essential to the success of the nuclear energy renaissance is the development and implementation of sustainable, proliferation-resistant nuclear power generation. Unauthorized production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) remains the primary proliferation concern for modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). While to date there has been no indication of declared, safeguarded GCEPs producing HEU, the massive separative work unit (SWU) processing power of modern GCEPs presents a significant latent risk of nuclear breakout and suggests the need for more timely detection of potential facility misuse. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an unattended safeguards instrument, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely HEU detection within a GCEP. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulates, followed by laser spectroscopy to characterize the uranium enrichment level. We demonstrate enrichment assay, with relative isotope abundance uncertainty <5%, on individual micron-sized particles that are trace components within a mixture background particles

Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission. Second Quarter 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the end of the Second Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 334, with total estimated nominal capacity of 2,876 MW. Of these totals, 232 projects, capable of producing 678 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration projects had signed 80 contracts with a potential of 1,161 MW. Thirty-three contracts had been signed for solid waste/biomass projects for a total of 298 MW. In total, 118 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with cogeneration, solid waste, and biomass projects capable of producing 1,545 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 46 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 688 MW to 770 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 119 MW to 139 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. Two geothermal projects were under active discussion for a total of 2 MW. There were 8 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 4 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 34, with a generating capability of 1,042 MW, Also, discussions were being conducted with 23 wind farm projects, totaling 597 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 7 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 71 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 151 MW, as well as 76 projects under active discussion for 505 MW. In addition, there were 18 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 193 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. Appendix A displays in tabular form the status reports of the projects as of June 30, 1984.

None

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

The role of emerging energy-efficient technology in promoting workplace productivity and health: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this particular Indoor Health and Productivity (IHP) project is to improve the communication of research findings in the indoor health and productivity area to scientists and building professionals (e.g. architects and engineers) and, thus, to help stimulate implementation of existing knowledge.

Kumar, Satish; Fisk, William J.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

SUMMARY REPORT FOR THE ANALYSIS OF THE SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7) DWPF POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLE FOR CANISTER S03472  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to comply with the Waste Acceptance Specifications in Sludge Batch 6 (Macrobatch 7), Savannah River National Laboratory personnel performed characterization analyses on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) pour stream glass sample collected while filling canister S03472. This report summarizes results of the characterization, which indicate that the DWPF produced glass that is significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment glass. Results and further details are documented in 'Analysis of DWPF Sludge Batch 6 (Macrobatch 7) Pour Stream Glass Samples,' SRNL-STI-2011-00555.

Johnson, F.

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

366

Analysis of Coconut-Derived Biodiesel and Conventional Diesel Fuel Samples from the Philippines: Task 2 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL tested Philippines coconut biodiesel samples of neat and blended fuels. Results show that the current fuel quality standards were met with very few exceptions. Additional testing is recommended.

Alleman, T. L.; McCormick, R. L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Wind Energy Production and Manufacturing...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Technologies Market Report, technical and design innovation allowing for larger wind turbines with longer, lighter blades has steadily improved wind turbine performance and has...

368

Energy Dept. Reports: U.S. Fuel Cell Market Production and Deployment Continues Strong Growth  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Department released three new reports showcasing strong growth across the U.S. fuel cell and hydrogen technologies market.

369

Scaleable production and separation of fermentation-derived acetic acid. Final CRADA report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Half of U.S. acetic acid production is used in manufacturing vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) and is economical only in very large production plants. Nearly 80% of the VAM is produced by methanol carbonylation, which requires high temperatures and exotic construction materials and is energy intensive. Fermentation-derived acetic acid production allows for small-scale production at low temperatures, significantly reducing the energy requirement of the process. The goal of the project is to develop a scaleable production and separation process for fermentation-derived acetic acid. Synthesis gas (syngas) will be fermented to acetic acid, and the fermentation broth will be continuously neutralized with ammonia. The acetic acid product will be recovered from the ammonium acid broth using vapor-based membrane separation technology. The process is summarized in Figure 1. The two technical challenges to success are selecting and developing (1) microbial strains that efficiently ferment syngas to acetic acid in high salt environments and (2) membranes that efficiently separate ammonia from the acetic acid/water mixture and are stable at high enough temperature to facilitate high thermal cracking of the ammonium acetate salt. Fermentation - Microbial strains were procured from a variety of public culture collections (Table 1). Strains were incubated and grown in the presence of the ammonium acetate product and the fastest growing cultures were selected and incubated at higher product concentrations. An example of the performance of a selected culture is shown in Figure 2. Separations - Several membranes were considered. Testing was performed on a new product line produced by Sulzer Chemtech (Germany). These are tubular ceramic membranes with weak acid functionality (see Figure 3). The following results were observed: (1) The membranes were relatively fragile in a laboratory setting; (2) Thermally stable {at} 130 C in hot organic acids; (3) Acetic acid rejection > 99%; and (4) Moderate ammonia flux. The advantages of producing acetic acid by fermentation include its appropriateness for small-scale production, lower cost feedstocks, low energy membrane-based purification, and lower temperature and pressure requirements. Potential energy savings of using fermentation are estimated to be approximately 14 trillion Btu by 2020 from a reduction in natural gas use. Decreased transportation needs with regional plants will eliminate approximately 200 million gallons of diesel consumption, for combined savings of 45 trillion Btu. If the fermentation process captures new acetic acid production, savings could include an additional 5 trillion Btu from production and 7 trillion Btu from transportation energy.

Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

370

Evaluation of a Low-Cost Salmon Production Facility; 1988 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fiscal year 1988 study sponsored by the Bonneville Power Administration evaluates an existing, small-scale salmon production facility operated and maintained by the Clatsop County Economic Development Committee's Fisheries Project.

Hill, James M.; Olson, Todd

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Selective Gaseous Extraction: Research, Development and Training for Isotope Production, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General Atomics and the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) completed research and development of selective gaseous extraction of fission products from irradiated fuel, which included training and education of MURR students. The process used porous fuel and after irradiation flowed product gases through the fuel to selectively removed desired fission products with the primary goal of demonstrating the removal of rhodium 105. High removal rates for the ruthenium/rhodium (Ru/Rh), tellurium/iodine (Te/I) and molybdenum/technetium (Mo/Tc) series were demonstrated. The success of this research provides for the reuse of the target for further production, significantly reducing the production of actinide wastes relative to processes that dissolve the target. This effort was conducted under DOE funding (DE-SC0007772). General Atomics objective of the project was to conduct R&D on alternative methods to produce a number of radioactive isotopes currently needed for medical and industry applications to include rhodium-105 and other useful isotopes. Selective gaseous extraction was shown to be effective at removing radioisotopes of the ruthenium/rhodium, tellurium/iodine and molybdenum/technetium decay chains while having trace to no quantities of other fission products or actinides. This adds a new, credible method to the area of certain commercial isotope production beyond current techniques, while providing significant potential reduction of process wastes. Waste reduction, along with reduced processing time/cost provides for superior economic feasibility which may allow domestic production under full cost recovery practices. This provides the potential for improved access to domestically produced isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment at reduced cost, providing for the public good.

Bertch, Timothy C, [General Atomics

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Final Report for grant entitled "Production of Astatine-211 for U.S. Investigators"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alpha-particle emitting radionuclides hold great promise in the therapy of cancer, but few alpha-emitters are available to investigators to evaluate. Of the alpha-emitters that have properties amenable for use in humans, 211At is of particular interest as it does not have alpha-emitting daughter radionuclides. Thus, there is a high interest in having a source of 211At for sale to investigators in the US. Production of 211At is accomplished on a cyclotron using an alpha-particle beam irradiation of bismuth metal. Unfortunately, there are few cyclotrons available that can produce an alpha particle beam for that production. The University of Washington has a cyclotron, one of three in the U.S., that is currently producing 211At. In the proposed studies, the things necessary for production and shipment of 211At to other investigators will be put into place at UW. Of major importance is the efficient production and isolation of 211At in a form that can be readily used by other investigators. In the studies, production of 211At on the UW cyclotron will be optimized by determining the best beam energy and the highest beam current to maximize 211At production. As it would be very difficult for most investigators to isolate the 211At from the irradiated target, the 211At-isolation process will be optimized and automated to more safely and efficiently obtain the 211At for shipment. Additional tasks to make the 211At available for distribution include obtaining appropriate shipping vials and containers, putting into place the requisite standard operating procedures for Radiation Safety compliance at the levels of 211At activity to be produced / shipped, and working with the Department of Energy, Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program, to take orders, make shipments and be reimbursed for costs of production and shipment.

Wilbur, Daniel Scott

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

373

Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly progress report, December 1, 1995--February 29, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the overall program status of the General Electric Advanced Gas Turbine Development program, and reports progress on three main task areas. The program is focused on two specific products: (1) a 70-MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology, utilizing a new air cooling methodology; and (2) a 200-MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy-duty machine, utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. The emphasis for the industrial system is placed on cycle design and low emission combustion. For the utility system, the focus is on developing a technology base for advanced turbine cooling while achieving low emission combustion. The three tasks included in this progress report are on: conversion to a coal-fueled advanced turbine system, integrated program plan, and design and test of critical components. 13 figs., 1 tab.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Columbia Basin fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Contribution of Rogue stock fall chinook released in the lower Columbia River occurred primarily in Oregon ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean, and Columbia Basin fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook released by CEDC contributed to similar ocean fisheries, but had much higher catch in Columbia Basin gillnet fisheries than the same stocks released in the Willamette Basin. Up-river stocks of spring chinook contributed almost exclusively to Columbia Basin fisheries. The up-river stocks of Columbia River summer steelhead contributed almost exclusively to the Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho ocean fisheries from Washington to California were closed or very limited from 1994 through 1998 (1991 through 1995 broods). This has resulted in a lower percent of catch in Washington, Oregon and California ocean fisheries, and a higher percent of catch in Alaska and British Columbia ocean and Columbia Basin freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released by ODFW below Bonneville Dam were caught mainly in Oregon and Washington ocean, Columbia Gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released in the Klaskanine River and Youngs Bay area had similar ocean catch distributions, but a much higher percent catch in gillnet fisheries than the other coho releases. Ocean catch distribution of coho stocks released above Bonneville Dam was similar to the other coho groups. However, they had a higher percent catch in gillnet fisheries above Bonneville Dam than coho released below the dam. Survival rates of salmon and steelhead are influenced, not only by factors in the hatchery (disease, density, diet, size and time of release) but also by environmental factors in the river and ocean. These environmental factors are influenced by large scale oceanic and weather patterns such as El Nino. Changes in rearing conditions in the hatchery do impact survival, however, these can be offset by impacts caused by environmental factors. Coho salmon released in the Columbia River generally experience better survival rates when released later in the spring. However, for the 1990 brood year June releases of Columbia River coho had much lower survival than May releases, for all ODFW hatcheries. In general survival of ODFW Columbia River hatchery coho has declined to low levels in recent years. Results from evaluation of photonic marking as a tool to mass mark juvenile salmonids were mixed (Appendix B). Logistical and safety concerns were documented. The mark was not retained through to adult return as no photonic marks were detected in any of the Sandy hatchery jack or adult coho recoveries. Data from coded-wire tag recoveries indicated there should have been approximately 6 jack and 318 adult coho recovered with photonic marks. Photonic marks were retained for the 5 months from marking to release. Photonic marking did not appear to effect in-hatchery survival or hatchery return rate. Because of the above results evaluation of photonic marking was discontinued in favor of evaluation of Visual Implant Elastomer tagging. Results in 1998 with Sandy hatchery coho demonstrated a marking rate of 17,000 fish per day for VIE tagging (Appendix C). Mark retention at releases was 98% for VIE tags. Although, this included re-marking 22% of the fish during the coded-wire tagging process (4 months after the VIE marks were applied).

Lewis, Mark A.; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William M.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Columbia Basin fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Contribution of Rogue stock fall chinook released in the lower Columbia River occurred primarily in Oregon ocean commercial, Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean, and Columbia Basin non-gillnet fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook released by CEDC contributed to similar ocean fisheries, but had much higher catch in Columbia Basin gillnet fisheries than the same stocks released in the Willamette Basin. Up-river stocks of spring chinook contributed almost exclusively to Columbia Basin fisheries. The up-river stocks of Columbia River summer steelhead contributed almost exclusively to the Columbia Basin gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho ocean fisheries from Washington to California were closed or very limited from 1994 through 1999 (1991 through 1996 broods). This has resulted in a lower percent of catch in Washington, Oregon and California ocean fisheries, and a higher percent of catch in Alaska and British Columbia ocean and Columbia Basin freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released by ODFW below Bonneville Dam were caught mainly in Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia ocean, Columbia Gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released in the Klaskanine River and Youngs Bay area had similar ocean catch distributions, but a much higher percent catch in gillnet fisheries than the other coho releases. Ocean catch distribution of coho stocks released above Bonneville Dam was similar to the other coho groups. However, they had a higher percent catch in gillnet fisheries above Bonneville Dam than coho released below the dam. Survival rates of salmon and steelhead are influenced, not only by factors in the hatchery (disease, density, diet, size and time of release) but also by environmental factors in the river and ocean. These environmental factors are influenced by large scale oceanic and weather patterns such as El Nino. Changes in rearing conditions in the hatchery do impact survival, however, these can be offset by impacts caused by environmental factors. Coho salmon released in the Columbia River generally experience better survival rates when released later in the spring. However, for the 1990 brood year June releases of Columbia River coho had much lower survival than May releases, for all ODFW hatcheries. In general survival of ODFW Columbia River hatchery coho has declined to low levels in recent years. Preliminary results from the evaluation of Visual Implant Elastomer (VIE) tagging showed an improvement in tagging rate and pre-release tag retention from the first (1998) to second (1999) year of tagging. For fish tagged in 1999 pre-release VIE tag retention was 99.4%. The first adult hatchery returns of VIE tagged coho for this study will be in 2000. Of 17 jacks recovered at Sandy hatchery in 1999 12 (70.6%) had retained there VIE tag.

Lewis, Mark A.; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William M.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Research and development for the declassification productivity initiative. Quarterly report, January 1997--August 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The highlight for the first quarter was the presentation of research progress and findings at the DPI Symposium on March 5, 1997. Since that presentation, additional progress was slowed down due to the decreased budget funding for year two, and consequently, the decrease in time-effort of the principal investigators. This report summarizes the progress in each of the topical areas to date. A research article has been prepared for publication for the Optical Character Recognition project; two progress reports are included for the Logical Analysis project; and two progress reports for the Knowledge Representation project. Research activities for the Tipster Technology project will resume this fall.

Bessonet, C.G. de

1997-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Relationship Between Pain and Mood: Does Mood Predict Reports of Aches and Pains in a Healthy Sample?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current study examined the predictive relationship between positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA) and reports of general aches and pains. Because little is known about the relationship between emotion arousal levels ...

Clausius, Rebecca

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Establishment of a Graduate Certificate Program in Biobased Industrial Products Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A certificate of graduate studies in Biobased Industrial Products is to be established at Kansas State University (KSU) along with the development of a similar program at Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, KS. At KSU, the program of study will be coordinated through the steering committee of the Agricultural Products Utilization Forum (APUF); the certificate of graduate studies will be awarded through the Graduate School of Kansas State University. This certificate will establish an interdisciplinary program of study that will: (1) ensure participating students receive a broad education in several disciplines related to Biobased Industrial Products, (2) provide a documented course of study for students preferring a freestanding certificate program, and (3) provide a paradigm shift in student awareness away from petroleum-based feedstocks to the utilization of renewable resources for fuels and chemical feedstocks. The academic program described herein will accomplish this goal by: (1) providing exposure to several academic disciplines key to Biobased Industrial Products; (2) improving university/industry collaboration through an external advisory board, distance learning opportunities, and student internships; (3) expanding the disciplines represented on the students' supervisory committee; (4) establishing a seminar series on Biobased Industrial Products that draws upon expert speakers representing several disciplines; and (5) increasing collaboration between disciplines. Numerous research programs emphasizing Biobased Industrial Products currently exist at KSU and PSU. The certificate of graduate studies, the emphasis on interdisciplinary collaboration within the students? thesis research, the proposed seminar series, and formation of an industrial advisory board will: (1) provide an interdisciplinary academic experience that spans several departments, four colleges, four research centers, and two universities; (2) tangibly promote collaboration between KSU and PSU; (3) catalyze involvement of plant geneticists with researchers active in the development and utilization of biobased industrial products; and, (4) promote university/industry collaboration.

John R. Schlup

2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

379

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 10. Jet fuels production by-products, utility, and sulfur-emissions control integration study. Interim report, 1 May 1988-1 April 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1986, the Fuels Branch of the Aero Propulsion Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, began an investigation of the potential of jet-fuel production from the liquid by-product streams produced by the gasification of lignite at the Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota. Funding has been provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to administer the experimental portion of this effort. This document reports the results of the effort by Burns and Roe Services Corporation/Science Applications International Corporation (BRSC/SAIC) to evaluate the impact of integrating Jet Fuel and/or Chemical Production Facilities with the Great Plains Gasification Plant.

Rossi, R.J.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Industrial market assessment of the products of mild gasification: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to determine the best available conditions, in terms of market volumes and prices, for the products from a mild gasification facility. A process feasibility study will then have to determine the cost of building and operating a facility to make those products. The study is presented as a summary of the options available to a coal producer for creating added product value. For this reason, three specific coal mines owned by AMAX Inc. were chosen, and the options were analyzed from the viewpoint of increasing the total revenue derived from those coals. No specific mild gasification, or mild devolatilization technology was assumed during the assessment. The analysis considers only product prices, volumes, and specifications. It does not assign any intangible value or national benefit to substituting coal for oil or to producing a cleaner fuel. Although it would be desirable to conceive of a product slate which would be immune from energy price fluctuations, such a goal is probably unattainable and no particular emphasis was placed on it. 76 figs., 75 tabs.

Sinor, J.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Cotton production and water quality: Economic and environmental effects of pollution prevention. Agricultural economic report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cotton production, compared with other crops, is less likely to cause erosion-induced water-quality problems because cotton acreage is not the major source of erosion in most regions. For cotton production, the most widespread potential damages to water quality are nitrates from fertilizer polluting ground water and pesticides contaminating surface water. This damage could be reduced by restricting chemical and fertilizer use on all cotton production, but doing so could reduce cotton yields and raise cotton prices. The same level of water-quality improvement could be achieved at less cost by targeting the chemical use or erosion restrictions only to cotton farms with the most vulnerable soils. Data come from a 1989 USDA survey of cotton producers.

Crutchfield, S.R.; Ribaudo, M.O.; Hansen, L.T.; Quiroga, R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

ARM Climate Research Facility Spectral Surface Albedo Value-Added Product (VAP) Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the input requirements, output data products, and methodology for the Spectral Surface Albedo (SURFSPECALB) value-added product (VAP). The SURFSPECALB VAP produces a best-estimate near-continuous high spectral resolution albedo data product using measurements from multifilter radiometers (MFRs). The VAP first identifies best estimates for the MFR downwelling and upwelling shortwave irradiance values, and then calculates narrowband spectral albedo from these best-estimate irradiance values. The methodology for finding the best-estimate values is based on a simple process of screening suspect data and backfilling screened and missing data with estimated values when possible. The resulting best-estimate MFR narrowband spectral albedos are used to determine a daily surface type (snow, 100% vegetation, partial vegetation, or 0% vegetation). For non-snow surfaces, a piecewise continuous function is used to estimate a high spectral resolution albedo at 1 min temporal and 10 cm-1 spectral resolution.

McFarlane, S; Gaustad, K; Long, C; Mlawer, E

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Report for Development of a Census Array and Evaluation of the Array to Detect Biothreat Agents and Environmental Samples for DHS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to provide DHS a comprehensive evaluation of the current genomic technologies including genotyping, Taqman PCR, multiple locus variable tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing in the analysis of biothreat agents from complex environmental samples. This report focuses on the design, testing and results of samples on the Census Array. We designed a Census/Detection Array to detect all sequenced viruses (including phage), bacteria (eubacteria), and plasmids. Family-specific probes were selected for all sequenced viral and bacterial complete genomes, segments, and plasmids. Probes were designed to tolerate some sequence variation to enable detection of divergent species with homology to sequenced organisms, and to be unique relative to the human genome. A combination of 'detection' probes with high levels of conservation within a family plus 'census' probes targeting strain/isolate specific regions enabled detection and taxonomic classification from the level of family down to the strain. The array has wider coverage of bacterial and viral targets based on more recent sequence data and more probes per target than other microbial detection/discovery arrays in the literature. We tested the array with purified bacterial and viral DNA/RNA samples, artificial mixes of known bacterial/viral samples, spiked DNA against complex background including BW aerosol samples and soil samples, and environmental samples to evaluate the array's sensitivity and forensic capability. The data were analyzed using our novel maximum likelihood software. For most of the organisms tested, we have achieved at least species level discrimination.

Jaing, C; Jackson, P

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

384

Sample Proficiency Test exercise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

2006-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

385

Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report- NNSA Production Office- 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In preparation for the upcoming Chief for Defense Nuclear Safety (CDNS) review, a self-assessment of NNSA Production Office (NPO) oversight of the B&W Pantex Plant and the Y-12 National Security Complex was completed from October 2013 January 2014. The scope included all available CDNS Criteria, Review, and Approach Documents (CRADS) identified as of September 2013.

386

Quantitation of microbial products and their effectiveness in enhanced oil recovery. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three-dimensional, three-phase, multiple-component numerical simulator was developed to investigate transport and growth of microorganisms in porous media and the impacts of microbial activities on oil recovery. The microbial activities modeled in this study included: (1) growth, retention, chemotaxis, and end product inhibition of growth, (2) the formation of metabolic products, and (3) the consumption of nutrients. Major mechanisms for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) processes were modeled as follows: (1) improvement in sweep efficiency of a displacement process due to in situ plugging of highly-permeable production zones by cell mass or due to improved mobility control achieved by increasing the viscosity of the displacing fluid with a biopolymer, and (2) solubilization and mobilization of residual oil in porous media due to the reduction of the interfacial tension between oleic and aqueous phases by the production of a biosurfactant. The numerical solutions for mathematical models involved two steps. The distributions of pressure and phase saturations were solved from continuity equations and Darcy flow velocities for the aqueous phase were computed. This was followed by the solution of convection-dispersion equations for individual components. Numerical solutions from the proposed model were compared to results obtained from analytical equations, commercial simulators, and laboratory experiments. The comparison indicated that the model accurately quantified microbial transport and metabolism in porous media, and predicted additional crude oil recovery due to microbial processes. 50 refs., 41 figs., 26 tabs.

Zhang, X.; Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Product formulations using recycled tire crumb rubber. Final report/project accomplishments summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to combine crumb rubber and synthetic fiber obtained from scrap tires with thermoplastic polymers and convert these materials into commercially useful, high-value products. A specific goal was to use these materials for roofing, while remaining cognizance of other potential applications.

Lula, J.W.; Bohnert, G.W.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Subcontracted R and D final report: analysis of samples obtained from GKT gasification test of Kentucky coal. Nonproprietary version  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory test program was performed to obtain detailed compositional data on the Gesellshaft fuer Kohle-Technologie (GKT) gasifier feed and effluent streams. GKT performed pilot gasification tests with Kentucky No. 9 coal and collected various samples which were analyzed by GKT and the Radian Corporation, Austin, Texas. The coal chosen had good liquefaction characteristics and a high gasification reactivity. No organic priority pollutants or PAH compounds were detected in the wash water, and solid waste leachates were within RCRA metals limits.

Raman, S.V.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Environmental Sampling FY01 Annual Report - Understanding the Movement of Mercury in the Environmental Surrounding the INEEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental fate and transport of the toxic air pollutant mercury (Hg) is currently a high-priority regional concern for the INEEL, and national and global concern for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). At the INEELs Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), significant quantities (est. 40 kg/year) of Hg may have been released over 37 years of Environmental Managements (EM) High-Level Waste (HLW) treatment operations. The EPA is very concerned about the continued global buildup of Hg in the atmosphere and aquatic ecosystems, and has recently invested heavily in Hg research to better understand its complex environmental cycling.1,2 The Environmental Sampling work began in FY99 as a joint INEEL/U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) field research effort to (a) better understand the fate and potential impacts of Hg emissions from the INEELs HLW treatment operations (operational component) and (b) contribute at a national level to the scientific understanding of local, regional, and global Hg fate and transport (research component). The USGS contributed snow sampling support in the field (Water Resources Division, Salt Lake City) and laboratory analysis of all samples (Wisconsin District Mercury Research Laboratory).

Abbott, Michael Lehman

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, August--October 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the tasks completed for the advanced turbine systems program. The topics of the report include last row turbine blade development, single crystal blade casting development, ceramic materials development, combustion cylinder flow mapping, shroud film cooling, directional solidified valve development, shrouded blade cooling, closed-loop steam cooling, active tip clearance control, flow visualization tests, combustion noise investigation, TBC field testing, catalytic combustion development, optical diagnostics probe development, serpentine channel cooling tests, brush seal development, high efficiency compressor design, advanced air sealing development, advanced coating development, single crystal blade development, Ni-based disc forging development, and steam cooling effects on materials.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Health and Productivity of the U.S. Department of Energy (FINAL REPORT) - Prepared by the University of Maryland with the Integrated Benefits Institute  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Health and Productivity of the Health and Productivity of the U.S. Department of Energy FINAL REPORT Prepared by the University of Maryland with the Integrated Benefits Institute 2012 FINAL REPORT 2 Executive Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been concerned about employees' health and well-being for several years, especially as they relate to workplace productivity and safety. Additionally, the DOE's reliance on an aging workforce makes it even more critical for the Department to ensure that its programs and policies support employees, regardless of their age, to perform their jobs safely, while maintaining productivity, overall health, and well-

392

How to effectively recover free product at leaking underground storage tank sites. A guide for state regulators. Final report, January-October 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the report is to provide guidance that will help state and local regulators to review free product recovery plans or that portion of a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) that proposes free product recovery technologies. The report focuses on appropriate technology use, taking into consideration site-specific conditions. It addresses the following three basic questions when reviewing a free product recovery plan: (1) is free product recovery necessary; (2) has an appropriate method been proposed for free product recovery; and (3) does the free product recovery plan provide a technically sound approach to remediating the site. The text focuses on scientific and engineering-related considerations for evaluating alternative technologies for the recovery of free product.

Faust, C.R.; Montroy, M.P.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Annual report, August 1994--July 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive gas turbine systems for base-load application in utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. This report discusses the major accomplishments achieved during the second year of the ATS Phase 2 program, particularly the design and test of critical components.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Annual report, March 10, 1996--March 9, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following tasks: advanced modeling of horizontal wells; heterogeneous effects of reservoirs; development of improved methods for calculating multi-phase pressure drops within the wellbore; pseudo-functions; development of multi-well models;testing of HW models with field examples; enhanced oil recovery applications; and application studies and their optimization.

Aziz, K.; Hewett, T.A.; Arbabi, S.; Smith, M.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Digestion Experiments with Oat By-Products and Other Feeds : Report No. 7.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION GRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS B. BIZZELL, President --- Y -- BULLETIN NO. 315 February, 1924 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY DIGESTION EXPERIMENTS WITH OAT BY- PRODUCTS AND OTHER FEEDS -- -- - B... Breeding G. R. WARREN, B. S., Swine Husbandman MAIN STATION FARM: R. M. SHERWOOD, B. S., Poultry HUS- D. T. KILLOUGH, B. S., Superinte. bandman J. J. HUNT, Wool Grader FEED CONTROL SERVICE: K. YOUNGBLOOD, M. S.. Ph. D., ENTOMOLOGY: F. D. FULLER, M. S...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1924-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Final Technical Report Microwave Assisted Electrolyte Cell for Primary Aluminum Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research addresses the high priority research need for developing inert anode and wetted cathode technology, as defined in the Aluminum Industry Technology Roadmap and Inert Anode Roadmap, with the performance targets: a) significantly reducing the energy intensity of aluminum production, b) ultimately eliminating anode-related CO2 emissions, and c) reducing aluminum production costs. This research intended to develop a new electrometallurgical extraction technology by introducing microwave irradiation into the current electrolytic cells for primary aluminum production. This technology aimed at accelerating the alumina electrolysis reduction rate and lowering the aluminum production temperature, coupled with the uses of nickel based superalloy inert anode, nickel based superalloy wetted cathode, and modified salt electrolyte. Michigan Technological University, collaborating with Cober Electronic and Century Aluminum, conducted bench-scale research for evaluation of this technology. This research included three sub-topics: a) fluoride microwave absorption; b) microwave assisted electrolytic cell design and fabrication; and c) aluminum electrowinning tests using the microwave assisted electrolytic cell. This research concludes that the typically used fluoride compound for aluminum electrowinning is not a good microwave absorbing material at room temperature. However, it becomes an excellent microwave absorbing material above 550C. The electrowinning tests did not show benefit to introduce microwave irradiation into the electrolytic cell. The experiments revealed that the nickel-based superalloy is not suitable for use as a cathode material; although it wets with molten aluminum, it causes severe reaction with molten aluminum. In the anode experiments, the chosen superalloy did not meet corrosion resistance requirements. A nicked based alloy without iron content could be further investigated.

Xiaodi Huang; J.Y. Hwang

2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

397

Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Annual report, March 10, 1995--March 9, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE approval for the annual renewal of the research grant to the Stanford Project on the Productivity and Injectivity of Horizontal Wells was received in early March 1995. Project goals include the advanced modeling of horizontal wells; investigation and incorporation of the effects of reservoir heterogeneities; development of improved methods of calculating multi-phase pressure drops within wellbores; development of multi-well models; testing of horizontal well models with field examples; EOR applications; and application studies and their optimization.

Aziz, K.; Hewett, T.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A study of over production and enhanced secretion of enzymes. Quarterly report 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current project is concerned with the over-production and enhanced secretion of PPO, cellulase and lignin peroxidase. The project is divided into two segments: over-production of lignocellulolytic enzymes by genetic engineering methodologies and hyper-production and enhanced secretion of these enzymes by biochemical/electron microscopical techniques. The former approach employs recombinant DNA procedures, ligation of appropriate nuclease generated DNA fragments into a vector and the subsequent transformation of Escherichia coli to yield E. coli harboring a C. versicolor DNA insert. The biochemistry/electron microscopical method involves substrate induction and the time-dependent addition of respiration and PPO inhibitors to elevate C.versicolor`s ability to synthesize and secrete lignocellulosic enzymes. In this connection, cell fractionation/kinetic analysis, TEM immunoelectron microscopic localization and TEM substrate localization of PPO are being employed to assess the route of secretion. Both approaches will culminate in the batch culture of either E. coli or C. versicolor, in a fermentor with the subsequent development of rapid isolation and purification procedures to yield elevated quantities of pure lignocellulosic enzymes. During the past year, research effort were directed toward determining the route of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) secretion by the wood-decay fungus, Coriolus versicolor. In addition, research activities were continued to over-produce and to purify PPO as well as define the time-dependent intra- and extra-cellular appearances of C. versicolor ligninases and cellulases.

Dashek, W.V.

1992-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

399

Ethanol production for automotive fuel usage. Final technical report, July 1979-August 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production of ethanol from potatoes, sugar beets, and wheat using geothermal resources in the Raft River area of Idaho was evaluated. The south-central region of Idaho produces approximately 18 million bushels of wheat, 1.3 million tons of sugar beets, and 27 million cwt potatoes annually. A 20-million-gallon-per-year ethanol facility has been selected as the largest scale plant that can be supported with the current agricultural resources. The conceptual plant was designed to operate on each of these three feedstocks for a portion of the year, but could operate year-round on any of them. The processing facility uses conventional alcohol technology and uses geothermal energy for all process heating. There are three feedstock preparation sections, although the liquefaction and saccharification steps for potatoes and wheat involve common equipment. The fermentation, distillation, and by-product handling sections are common to all three feedstocks. Maximum geothermal fluid requirements are approximately 6000 gpm. It is anticipated that this flow will be supplied by nine production wells located on private and BLM lands in the Raft River KGRA. The geothermal fluid will be flashed from 280/sup 0/F in three stages to supply process steam at 250/sup 0/F, 225/sup 0/F, and 205/sup 0/F for various process needs. Steam condensate plus liquid remaining after the third flash will be returned to receiving strata through six injection wells.

Stenzel, R.A.; Yu, J.; Lindemuth, T.E.; Soo-Hoo, R.; May, S.C.; Yim, Y.J.; Houle, E.H.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Advanced turbine systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, September 1 - November 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx, and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system: the turbine inlet temperature must increase, although this will lead to increased NOx emission. Improved coating and materials along with creative combustor design can result in solutions. The program is focused on two specific products: a 70 MW class industrial gas turbine based on GE90 core technology utilizing an innovative air cooling methodology, and a 200 MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy duty machines utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. This report reports on tasks 3-8 for the industrial ATS and the utility ATS. Some impingement heat transfer results are given.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reports Reports About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network Requirements Reviews Reports Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Reports ESnet publishes reports from science network Program Requirements Reviews on a regular basis. View the most recent of these below. Sort by: Date | Author | Type 2012 Eli Dart, Brian Tierney, Editors, "Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements Workshop, November 2012 - Final Report"", November 29, 2012, LBNL LBNL-6395E

402

Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of 333 stream sections were sampled in 1994 to monitor in chinook salmon and steelhead trout parr populations in Idaho. Percent carry capacity and density estimates were summarized by different classes of fish: wild A-run steelhead trout, wild B-run steelhead trout, natural A-run steelhead trout, natural B-run steelhead trout, wild spring and summer chinook salmon. These data were also summarized by cells and subbasins as defined in Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s 1992-1996 Anadromous Fish Management Plan.

Hall-Griswold, Judy A.; Leitzinger, Eric J.; Petrosky, C.E. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Molten carbonate fuel cell product design and improvement. Quarterly report, January 1--March 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective is to establish by 1998 the commercial readiness of MW- class IMHEX{reg_sign} MCFC power plants for distributed generation, cogeneration, and compressor station applications. This will require an advanced IMHEX{reg_sign} technology base, lower-cost manufacturing processes, verified balance-of-plant components, proven packaging and assembly approaches, demonstrated prototype power plants, finalized manufacturing and market distribution plans, and a committed commercialization team. Various tasks are reported on.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Development of technology in the production of fertilizers in ammoniation-granulation plants. Progress report No. 12, September 1980. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work conducted to demonstrate procedures and equipment to conserve about 83% of fuel oil used for drying and generating steam in the ammoniation-granulation plants is reported. The general mechanism of granulation is examined. Conventional ammoniation-granulation plants are described and the new pipe-cross reactor system is described and schematics of their design are presented. Results of some demonstration tests reveal that an average of 785,000 Btu's per ton of production is eliminated with the installation of the TVA pipe-cross reactor process. It also reduces atmospheric emissions. Data on investment cost and payback period of the installation of a pipe-cross reactor in an existing TVA granulation fertilizer plant are presented.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Benefits analysis for the production of fuels and chemicals using solar thermal energy. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous possibilities exist for using high temperature solar thermal energy in the production of various chemicals and fuels (Sun Fuels). Research and development activities have focused on the use of feedstocks such as coal and biomass to provide synthesis gas, hydrogen, and a variety of other end-products. A Decision Analysis technique geared to the analysis of Sun Fuels options was developed. Conventional scoring methods were combined with multi-attribute utility analysis in a new approach called the Multi-Attribute Preference Scoring (MAPS) system. MAPS calls for the designation of major categories of attributes which describe critical elements of concern for the processes being examined. The six major categories include: Process Demonstration; Full-Scale Process, Feedstock; End-Product Market; National/Social Considerations; and Economics. MAPS calls for each attribute to be weighted on a simple scale for all of the candidate processes. Next, a weight is assigned to each attribute, thus creating a multiplier to be used with each individual value to derive a comparative weighting. Last, each of the categories of attributes themselves are weighted, thus creating another multiplier, for use in developing an overall score. With sufficient information and industry input, each process can be ultimately compared using a single figure of merit. After careful examination of available information, it was decided that only six of the 20 candidate processes were adequately described to allow a complete MAPS analysis which would allow direct comparisons for illustrative purposes. These six processes include three synthesis gas processes, two hydrogen and one ammonia. The remaining fourteen processes were subjected to only a partial MAPS assessment.

None

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Activation Products from Copper and Steel Samples Exposed to Showers Produced by 8 GeV Protons Lost in the Fermilab Main Injector Collimation System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In conjunction with efforts to predict residual radiation levels in the Fermilab Main Injector, measurements of residual radiation were correlated with the time history of losses. Detailed examination suggested that the list of radioactive isotopes used for fitting was incomplete. We will report on activation studies of magnet steel and copper samples which we irradiated adjacent to the Fermilab Main Injector collimation system. Our results identified several additional radioactive isotopes of interest. The MARS15 studies using a simplified model are compared with measurements. The long half-life isotopes will grow in importance as operation stretches to a second decade and as loss rates rise. These studies allow us to predict limits on these concerns.

Brown, Bruce C; Pronskikh, Vitaly S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes - annual report for FY 2010.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation without using an external power supply or circuitry. This project grew from an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen production by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen using OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, Y.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J. (Energy Systems)

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

408

Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes - annual report for FY 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that, without using an external power supply or circuitry, can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation. This project grew from an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen production by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen by means of OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, Y.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J.; Energy Systems

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

409

Concentrating-collector mass-production feasibility. Volume I. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Performance Prototype Trough (PPT) Concentrating Collector consists of four 80-foot modules in a 320-foot row. The collector was analyzed, including cost estimates and manufacturing processes to produce collectors in volumes from 100 to 100,000 modules per year. The four different reflector concepts considered were the sandwich reflector structure, sheet metal reflector structure, molded reflector structure, and glass laminate structure. The sheet metal and glass laminate structures are emphasized with their related structure concepts. A preliminary manufacturing plan is offered that includes: documentation of the manufacturing process with production flow diagrams; labor and material costs at various production levels; machinery and equipment requirements including preliminary design specifications; and capital investment costs for a new plant. Of five reflector designs considered, the two judged best and considered at length are thin annealed glass and steel laminate on steel frame panel and thermally sagged glass. Also discussed are market considerations, costing and selling price estimates, design cost analysis and make/buy analysis. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

410

Analysis of Historic Data for Juvenile and Adult Salmonid Production. Phase 1, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Survival of hatchery reared Columbia River chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) salmon from release to return is highly variable and thought to be related to river flow during juvenile outmigration in the spring. The purpose of this project is to examine the relationship between survival of coded-wire-tagged (CWT) Columbia River salmonids and in-river flow and other freshwater factors. This report covers Phase 1, in which two methods to estimate survival were developed and evaluated, and criteria for data selection were established.

Hilborn, Ray; Pascual, Miguel; Donnelly, Robert; Coronado-Hernadez, Claribel

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Quarterly report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of research activities have been carried out in the last three months. A list outlining these efforts is presented below followed by brief description of each activity in the subsequent sections of this report: (1) The available analytical solutions in the literature for steady state critical rates of horizontal wells are examined. Application of these methods to a cresting example show significant uncertainties in prediction of critical rates. (2) Sensitivity computations have been run for evaluating the effects of shale distribution on the performance of horizontal wells in heterogeneous reservoirs. (3) A number of single phase (water and oil) and two-phase (water and air) experiments have been completed in the Marathon Wellbore Model and the collected data are being analyzed. (4) A presentation of our project was given in the International Technology Forum DEA-44/67 on Horizontal, Slimhole, and Coiled Tubing, held by Maurer. (5) Our draft review report entitled ``Opportunities for Horizontal Wells and Problems in Predicting Their Performance`` has been completed.

Fayers, F.J.; Aziz, K.; Hewett, T.A.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Commercial production of ethanol in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commercial feasibility of producing between 76 and 189 million liters (20 to 50 million gallons) of ethanol annually in the San Luis Valley, Colorado using geothermal energy as the primary heat source was assessed. The San Luis Valley is located in south-central Colorado. The valley is a high basin situated approximately 2316 meters (7600 feet) above sea level which contains numerous warm water wells and springs. A known geothermal resource area (IGRA) is located in the east-central area of the valley. The main industry in the valley is agriculture, while the main industry in the surrounding mountains is lumber. Both of these industries can provide feedstocks for the production of ethanol.

Hewlett, E.M.; Erickson, M.V.; Ferguson, C.D.; Boswell, B.S.; Walter, K.M.; Hart, M.L.; Sherwood, P.B.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Coal gasification power generation, and product market study. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Western Research Institute (WRI) project was part of a WRI Energy Resource Utilization Program to stimulate pilot-scale improved technologies projects to add value to coal resources in the Rocky Mountain region. The intent of this program is to assess the application potential of emerging technologies to western resources. The focus of this project is on a coal resource near the Wyoming/Colorado border, in Colorado. Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company operates a coal mine in Jackson County, Colorado. The coal produces 10,500 Btu/lb and has very low sulfur and ash contents. Kerr Coal Company is seeking advanced technology for alternate uses for this coal. This project was to have included a significant cost-share from the Kerr Coal Company ownership for a market survey of potential products and technical alternatives to be studied in the Rocky Mountain Region. The Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company and WRI originally proposed this work on a cost reimbursable basis. The total cost of the project was priced at $117,035. The Kerr Coal Company had scheduled at least $60,000.00 to be spent on market research for the project that never developed because of product market changes for the company. WRI and Kerr explored potential markets and new technologies for this resource. The first phase of this project as a preliminary study had studied fuel and nonfuel technical alternatives. Through related projects conducted at WRI, resource utilization was studied to find high-value materials that can be targeted for fuel and nonfuel use and eventually include other low-sulfur coals in the Rocky Mountain region. The six-month project work was spread over about a three-year period to observe, measure, and confirm over time-any trends in technology development that would lead to economic benefits in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming from coal gasification and power generation.

Sheesley, D.; King, S.B.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Neither Pinnacle Technologies, Inc. nor any person acting on behalf of Pinnacle: * Makes any warranty or representation, express or implied, with respect to the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of the information contained in this report, or that the use of any apparatus, method or process disclosed in this report may not infringe privately owned rights; or * Assumes any liability with respect to the use of, or for damages resulting from the use of, any information, apparatus, method or process disclosed in this report Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions DE-FC26-02NT41663 Final Report for National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, WV Project No.: USDE-0511 Report Date: December 2005 By:

415

Audit Report - Department of Energy's Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program's Fiscal Year 2010 Balance Sheet Audit, OAS-FS-13-09  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Audits and Inspections Audits and Inspections Audit Report Department of Energy's Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program's Fiscal Year 2010 Balance Sheet Audit OAS-FS-13-09 January 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF SCIENCE FROM: Daniel M. Weeber Assistant Inspector General for Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION Production for Research and Applications Program's Fiscal Year 2010 Balance Sheet Audit The attached report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants' audit of the Department of Energy's Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program's (Isotope Program) and 2009. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) engaged the independent public accounting firm of

416

Novel Approaches to the Production of Higher Alcohols From Synthesis Gas. Quarterly report, January 1 - March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effort during this quarter was devoted to three areas: 1) analyzing the data from earlier runs with ?zinc chromite? catalyst and three different slurry liquids: decahydronaphthalene (Decalin, DHN), tetrahydronaphthalene (tetralin, THN) and tetrahydroquinoline (THQ); 2) analyzing newly-obtained data from earlier thermal stability tests on DHN and THN, and 3) carrying out a thermal stability test on THQ. Both the activity and selectivity of ?zinc chromite? catalyst depended on the slurry liquid that was used. The catalyst activity for methanol synthesis was in the order: THQ > DHN > THN. Despite the basic nature of THQ, it exhibited the highest dimethyl ether (DME) production rates of the three liquids. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) analyses of samples of THN and DHN were taken at the end of standard thermal stability tests at 375C. With both liquids, the only measurable compositional change was a minor amount of isomerization. Analysis of a sample of THN after a thermal stability test at 425C showed a small reduction in molecular weight, and a significant amount of opening of the naphthenic ring. Preliminary data from the tehrmal stability test of THQ showed that this molecule is more stable than DHN, but less stable than THN.

George W. Roberts

1997-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

417

Revised Master Plan for the Hood River Production Program, Technical Report 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hood River Production Program (HRPP) is a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded program initiated as a mitigation measure for Columbia River hydrosystem effects on anadromous fish. The HRPP began in the early 1990s with the release of spring Chinook and winter steelhead smolts into the basin. Prior to implementation, co-managers, including the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drafted the Hood River Production Master Plan (O'Toole and ODFW 1991a; O'Toole and ODFW 1991b) and the Pelton Ladder Master Plan (Smith and CTWSR 1991). Both documents were completed in 1991 and subsequently approved by the Council in 1992 and authorized through a BPA-led Environmental Impact Statement in 1996. In 2003, a 10-year programmatic review was conducted for BPA-funded programs in the Hood River (Underwood et al. 2003). The primary objective of the HRPP Review (Review) was to determine if program goals were being met, and if modifications to program activities would be necessary in order to meet or revise program goals. In 2003, an agreement was signed between PacifiCorp and resource managers to remove the Powerdale Dam (RM 10) and associated adult trapping facility by 2010. The HRPP program has been dependant on the adult trap to collect broodstock for the hatchery programs; therefore, upon the dam's removal, some sort of replacement for the trap would be needed to continue the HRPP. At the same time the Hood River Subbasin Plan (Coccoli 2004) was being written and prompted the co-managers to considered future direction of the program. This included revising the numerical adult fish objectives based on the assimilated data and output from several models run on the Hood River system. In response to the Review as well as the Subbasin Plan, and intensive monitoring and evaluation of the current program, the HRPP co-managers determined the spring Chinook program was not achieving the HRPP's defined smolt-to-adult (SAR) survival rate guidelines. The observed low SAR was due to precocity, straying, and incidence of BKD in the spring Chinook program; which ultimately led to the program's inability to achieve the subbasin's overly optimistic biological fish objectives. The summer steelhead hatchery program was not providing the fishery or population benefits anticipated and will be discontinued. The winter steelhead program was performing as planned and no changes are foreseen. This updated Master Plan addresses the several proposed changes to the existing HRPP, which are described.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

418

Annual Report: 2010-2011 Storm Season Sampling For NON-DRY DOCK STORMWATER MONITORING FOR PUGET SOUND NAVAL SHIPYARD, BREMERTON, WA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This interim report summarizes the stormwater monitoring conducted for non-dry dock outfalls in both the confined industrial area and the residential areas of Naval Base Kitsap within the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (referred to as the Shipyard). This includes the collection, analyses, and descriptive statistics for stormwater sampling conducted from November 2010 through April 2011. Seven stormwater basins within the Shipyard were sampled during at least three storm events to characterize non-dry dock stormwater discharges at selected stormwater drains located within the facility. This serves as the Phase I component of the project and Phase II is planned for the 2011-2012 storm season. These data will assist the Navy, USEPA, Ecology and other stakeholders in understanding the nature and condition of stormwater discharges from the Shipyard and inform the permitting process for new outfall discharges. The data from Phase I was compiled with current stormwater data available from the Shipyard, Sinclair/Dyes Inlet watershed, and Puget Sound in order to support technical investigations for the Draft NPDES permit. The permit would require storm event sampling at selected stormwater drains located within the Shipyard. However, the data must be considered on multiple scales to truly understand potential impairments to beneficial uses within Sinclair and Dyes Inlets.

Brandenberger, Jill M.; Metallo, David; Johnston, Robert K.; Gebhardt, Christine; Hsu, Larry

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Final report for tank 241-AN-102, grab samples 2AN-95-1 through 2AN-95-6 and 102-AN-1 through 102-AN-4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ten grab samples (2AN-95-1, 2, 3, 4A, 5A; 102-AN-1, 2, 3(A), 3(B), and 4) and one field blank (2AN-95-6) were taken from tank 241-AN-102. In support of the safety screening program, total organic carbon and cyanide were performed as secondary analyses because the differential scanning calorimetry results exceeded the notification limit. These were compared to safety screening limits at a confidence level of 95%. Waste compatibility analyses were performed on the 3 supernate samples and the field blank from the latest sampling event. Results presented in the 45 day and in this report show that the waste in Tank 241-AN-1D2 has energetics greater than 480 J/g (dry) and total organic carbon > 3 wt%; however, with a moisture content > 17 wt%, the tank may be considered ``conditionally`` safe in accordance with the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue.

Esch, R.A.

1996-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

420

Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Pt. I: General Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating proposed and existing habitat improvement projects for rainbow-steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, hereafter called steelhead, and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha, hereafter called chinook, in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages for the past seven years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. This evaluation project is also funded under the same authority (Fish and Wildlife Program, Northwest Power Planning Council). A mitigation record is being developed using increased carrying capacity and/or survival as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on completion or maturation of the project and presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed status of upriver anadromous stocks has precluded measuring full benefits of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit is credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration.

Rich, Bruce A.; Scully, Richard J.; Petrosky, Charles Edward

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reported sample production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Idaho Habitat and Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating proposed and existing habitat improvement projects for rainbow-steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha in the Clearwater River and Salmon River drainages on a large scale for the past 8 years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. A mitigation record is being developed using increased carrying capacity and/or survival as the best measures of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on completion or maturation of the project and presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed status of upriver anadromous stocks has precluded measuring full benefits of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit is credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration.

Rich, Bruce A.; Petrosky, Charles E. (idaho Department of Fish and Game, Fisheries Research Section, Boise, ID)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Progress report on the accelerator production of tritium materials irradiation program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project is developing an accelerator and a spoliation neutron source capable of producing tritium through neutron capture on He-3. A high atomic weight target is used to produce neutrons that are then multiplied and moderated in a blanket prior to capture. Materials used in the target and blanket region of an APT facility will be subjected to several different and mixed particle radiation environments; high energy protons (1-2 GeV), protons in the 20 MeV range, high energy neutrons, and low energy neutrons, depending on position in the target and blanket. Flux levels exceed 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2}s in some areas. The APT project is sponsoring an irradiation damage effects program that will generate the first data-base for materials exposed to high energy particles typical of spallation neutron sources. The program includes a number of candidate materials in small specimen and model component form and uses the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the 800 MeV, Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator.

Maloy, S.A.; Sommer, W.F.; Brown, R.D.; Roberts, J.E. [and others

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Development of an inert ceramic anode to reduce energy consumption in magnesium production. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop a dimensionally stable ceramic anode for production of magnesium metal in electrolytic cells, replacing the graphite anodes currently used by The Dow Chemical Company magnesium business. The work is based on compositional and design technology for a ceramic anode developed in the former Central Research Inorganic Laboratory. The approach selected is to use a ceramic semiconductor tube as the material to interface with the bath and gaseous atmosphere in the cell. The testing goal was to demonstrate six anodes surviving a 30 day test lifetime with acceptable wear rates and electrical performance in a laboratory scale magnesium cell test. State of the art slip casting techniques were used and advanced in the pursuit of a virtually flaw free ceramic anode shell. Novel core materials were also invented to allow for the complete, crack free fabrication of the laboratory scale anode. Two successive anodes were tested and exceeded the 30 day cell lifetime goal with excellent wear characteristics. More aggressive testing of the ceramic anode revealed that the anode had a rather narrow operating region.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Utilization of agricultural wastes for production of ethanol. Progress report, October 1979-May 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project proposes to develop methods to utilize agricultural wastes, especially cottonseed hulls and peanut shells to produce ethanol. Initial steps will involve development of methods to break down cellulose to a usable form of substrates for chemical or biological digestion. The process of ethanol production will consist of (a) preparatory step to separate fibrous (cellulose) and non-fibrous (non-cellulosic compounds). The non-cellulosic residues which may include grains, fats or other substrates for alcoholic fermentation. The fibrous residues will be first pre-treated to digest cellulose with acid, alkali, and sulfur dioxide gas or other solvents. (b) The altered cellulose will be digested by suitable micro-organisms and cellulose enzymes before alcoholic fermentation. The digester and fermentative unit will be specially designed to develop a prototype for pilot plant for a continuous process. The first phase of the project will be devoted toward screening of a suitable method for cellulose modification, separation of fibrous and non-fibrous residues, the micro-organism and enzyme preparations. Work is in progress on: the effects of various microorganisms on the degree of saccharification; the effects of higher concentrations of acids, alkali, and EDTA on efficiency of microbial degradation; and the effects of chemicals on enzymatic digestion.

Singh, B.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Final LDRD report : metal oxide films, nanostructures, and heterostructures for solar hydrogen production.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The distinction between electricity and fuel use in analyses of global power consumption statistics highlights the critical importance of establishing efficient synthesis techniques for solar fuels-those chemicals whose bond energies are obtained through conversion processes driven by solar energy. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) processes show potential for the production of solar fuels because of their demonstrated versatility in facilitating optoelectronic and chemical conversion processes. Tandem PEC-photovoltaic modular configurations for the generation of hydrogen from water and sunlight (solar water splitting) provide an opportunity to develop a low-cost and efficient energy conversion scheme. The critical component in devices of this type is the PEC photoelectrode, which must be optically absorptive, chemically stable, and possess the required electronic band alignment with the electrochemical scale for its charge carriers to have sufficient potential to drive the hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions. After many decades of investigation, the primary technological obstacle remains the development of photoelectrode structures capable of efficient conversion of light with visible frequencies, which is abundant in the solar spectrum. Metal oxides represent one of the few material classes that can be made photoactive and remain stable to perform the required functions.

Kronawitter, Coleman X. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Mao, Samuel S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Habitat Quality and Anadromous Fish Production on the Warm Springs Reservation. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The number of anadromous fish returning to the Columbia River and its tributaries has declined sharply in recent years. Changes in their freshwater, estuarine, and ocean environments and harvest have all contributed to declining runs of anadromous fish. Restoration of aquatic resources is of paramount importance to the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs (CTWS) Reservation of Oregon. Watersheds on the Warm Springs Reservation provide spawning and rearing habitat for several indigenous species of resident and anadromous fish. These streams are the only ones in the Deschutes River basin that still sustain runs of wild spring chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus, tshawytscha. Historically, reservation streams supplied over 169 km of anadromous fish habitat. Because of changes in flows, there are now only 128 km of habitat that can be used on the reservation. In 1981, the CTWS began a long-range, 3-phase study of existing and potential fish resources on the reservation. The project, consistent with the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program, was designed to increase the natural production of anadromous salmonids on the reservation.

Fritsch, Mark A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

PILOT PLANT STUDIES OF THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL. REPORT OF WORK PROGRESS, JAN. 31, 1977  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioconversion Of Cellulose And Production Of Ethanol CharlesBIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL under

Wilke, C.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Final report on LDRD project : biodiesel production from vegetable oils using slit-channel reactors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents work done for a late-start LDRD project, which was carried out during the last quarter of FY07. The objective of this project was to experimentally explore the feasibility of converting vegetable (e.g., soybean) oils to biodiesel by employing slit-channel reactors and solid catalysts. We first designed and fabricated several slit-channel reactors with varying channel depths, and employed them to investigate the improved performance of slit-channel reactors over traditional batch reactors using a NaOH liquid catalyst. We then evaluated the effectiveness of several solid catalysts, including CaO, ZnO, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, calcium gluconate, and heteropolyacid or HPA (Cs{sub 2.5}H{sub 0.5}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}), for catalyzing the soybean oil-to-biodiesel transesterification reaction. We found that the slit-channel reactor performance improves as channel depth decreases, as expected; and the conversion efficiency of a slit-channel reactor is significantly higher when its channel is very shallow. We further confirmed CaO as having the highest catalytic activity among the solid catalysts tested, and we demonstrated for the first time calcium gluconate as a promising solid catalyst for converting soybean oil to biodiesel, based on our preliminary batch-mode conversion experiments.

Kalu, E. Eric (FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL); Chen, Ken Shuang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Western states enhanced oil shale recovery program: Shale oil production facilities conceptual design studies report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report analyzes the economics of producing syncrude from oil shale combining underground and surface processing using Occidental's Modified-In-Situ (MIS) technology and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Hot Recycled Solids (HRS) retort. These retorts form the basic technology employed for oil extraction from oil shale in this study. Results are presented for both Commercial and Pre-commercial programs. Also analyzed are Pre-commercialization cost of Demonstration and Pilot programs which will confirm the HRS and MIS concepts and their mechanical designs. These programs will provide experience with the circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor (CFBC), the MIS retort, the HRS retort and establish environmental control parameters. Four cases are considered: commercial size plant, demonstration size plant, demonstration size plant minimum CFBC, and a pilot size plant. Budget cost estimates and schedules are determined. Process flow schemes and basic heat and material balances are determined for the HRS system. Results consist of summaries of major equipment sizes, capital cost estimates, operating cost estimates and economic analyses. 35 figs., 35 tabs.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Summary Report: Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined Fission Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glass-ceramic waste form development began in FY 2010 examining two combined waste stream options: (1) alkaline earth (CS) + lanthanide (Ln), and (2) + transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by the uranium extraction (UREX+) separations process. Glass-ceramics were successfully developed for both options however; Option 2 was selected over Option 1, at the conclusion of 2010, because Option 2 immobilized all three waste streams with only a minimal decrease in waste loading. During the first year, a series of three glass (Option 2) were fabricated that varied waste loading-WL (42, 45, and 50 mass%) at fixed molar ratios of CaO/MoO{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/alkali both at 1.75. These glass-ceramics were slow cooled and characterized in terms of phase assemblage and preliminary irradiation stability. This fiscal year, further characterization was performed on the FY 2010 Option 2 glass-ceramics in terms of: static leach testing, phase analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and irradiation stability (electron and ion). Also, a new series of glass-ceramics were developed for Option 2 that varied the additives: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0-6 mass%), molar ratio of CaO/MoO{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/alkali (1.75 to 2.25) and waste loading (50, 55, and 60 mass%). Lastly, phase pure powellite and oxyapatite were synthesized for irradiation studies. Results of this fiscal year studies showed compositional flexibility, chemical stability, and radiation stability in the current glass-ceramic system. First, the phase assemblages and microstructure of all of the FY 2010 and 2011 glass-ceramics are very similar once subjected to the slow cool heat treatment. The phases identified in these glass-ceramics were oxyapatite, powellite, cerianite, and ln-borosilicate. This shows that variations in waste loading or additives can be accommodated without drastically changing the phase assemblage of the waste form, thus making the processing and performance characteristics of the waste form more predictable/flexible. However, in the future, the glass phase still needs to be accurately characterized to determine the effects of waste loading and additives on the glass structure. Initial investigations show a borosilicate glass phase rich in silica. Second, the normalized concentrations of elements leached from the waste form during static leach testing were all below 0.6 g/L after 28d at 90 C, by the Product Consistency Test (PCT), method B. These normalized concentrations are on par with durable waste glasses such as the Low-Activity Reference Material (LRM) glass. The release rates for the crystalline phases (oxyapatite and powellite) appear to be lower (more durable) than the glass phase based on the relatively low release rates of Mo, Ca, and Ln found in the crystalline phases compared to Na and B that are mainly observed in the glass phase. However, further static leach testing on individual crystalline phases is needed to confirm this statement. Third, Ion irradiation and In situ TEM observations suggest that these crystalline phases (such as oxyapatite, ln-borosilicate, and powellite) in silicate based glass ceramic waste forms exhibit stability to 1000 years at anticipated doses (2 x 10{sup 10}-2 x 10{sup 11} Gy). This is adequate for the short lived isotopes in the waste, which lead to a maximum cumulative dose of {approx}7 x 10{sup 9} Gy, reached after {approx}100 yrs, beyond which the dose contributions are negligible. The cumulate dose calculations are based on a glass-ceramic at WL = 50 mass%, where the fuel has a burn-up of 51GWd/MTIHM, immobilized after 5 yr decay from reactor discharge.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Riley, Brian J.; Turo, Laura A.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna

2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

431

Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes. Annual report for FY 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that, without using an external power supply or circuitry, can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation. This project grew out of an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions [1]. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen to be produced by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting [1, 2]. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen by means of OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

Balachandran, U.; Chen, L.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J.; Song, S. J.; Energy Systems

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

432

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission First Quarter 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the end of the First Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 322, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,643 MW. Of these totals, 215 projects, capable of producing 640 MW, are operational. A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 110 contracts with a potential of 1,467 MW. In total, 114 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,508 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 35 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 425 MW to 467 MW, and 11 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 94 MW to 114 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 5 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 32, with a generating capability of 848 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 18 wind farm projects, totaling 490 MW. There were 101 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 6 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 64 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 148 MW, as well as 75 projects under active discussion for 316 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 187 MW, that Pg and E was planning to construct.

None

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Middlesex Sampling Plant environmental report for calendar year 1992, 239 Mountain Avenue, Middlesex, New Jersey. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the environmental surveillance program at the Middlesex Sampling Plant (MSP) and provides the results for 1992. The site, in the Borough of Middlesex, New Jersey, is a fenced area and includes four buildings and two storage piles that contain 50,800 m{sup 3} of radioactive and mixed hazardous waste. More than 70 percent of the MSP site is paved with asphalt. The MSP facility was established in 1943 by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) to sample, store, and/or ship uranium, thorium, and beryllium ores. In 1955 the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), successor to MED, terminated the operation and later used the site for storage and limited sampling of thorium residues. In 1967 AEC activities ceased, onsite structures were decontaminated, and the site was certified for unrestricted use under criteria applicable at that time. In 1980 the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a multiphase remedial action project to clean up several vicinity properties onto which contamination from the plant had migrated. Material from these properties was consolidated into the storage piles onsite. Environmental surveillance of MSP began in 1980 when Congress added the site to DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. The environmental surveillance program at MSP includes sampling networks for radon and thoron in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, radium-228, thorium-230, thorium-232, and total uranium in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, chemical analyses are performed to detect metals and organic compounds in surface water and groundwater and metals in sediments. This program assists in fulfilling th DOE policy of measuring and monitoring effluents from DOE activities and calculating hypothetical doses.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Second Quarter 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Second Quarter of 1983, the number of signed contracts and committed projects rose from 223 to 240, with a total estimated nominal capacity of these projects of 1,449 MW. Of this nominal capacity, about 361 MW is operational, and the balance is under contract for development. A map indicating the location of currently operating facilities is provided as Figure A. Of the 240 signed contracts and committed projects, 75 were cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects with a potential of 740 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 32 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 858 MW to 921 MW, and 10 solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 113 MW to 121 MW. Two contracts have been signed with geothermal projects, capable of producing 83 MW. There are 6 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 36 MW, as well as another solar project under active discussion for 30 MW. Wind farm projects under contract number 19, with a generating capability of 471 MW. Also, discussions are being conducted with 12 wind farm projects, totaling 273 to 278 MW. There are 89 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of almost 1 MW, as well as 10 other projects under active discussion. There are 47 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 110 MW, as well as 65 projects under active discussion for 175 MW. In addition, there are 30 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 291 MW, that PG and E is constructing or planning to construct. Table A displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of June 30, 1983.

None

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

(Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 240  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

million tons. The 49 million tons probably includes crude clay production tonnages which contain E Recycling: Insignificant. Import Sources (2000-03): Brazil, 68%; Mexico, 9%; United Kingdom, 8 probably includes crude clay production which contains significant water content. Compensating

436

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., California using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. This is the third quarterly technical progress report for the project. Significant technical achievements accomplished include the drilling of four horizontal wells (two producers and two steam injectors) utilizing a new and lower cost drilling program, the drilling of five observation wells to monitor the horizontal steamflood pilot, the installation of a subsurface harbor channel crossing for delivering steam to an island location, and a geochemical study of the scale minerals being created in the wellbore. Cyclic steam injection into the two horizontal injection wells began in mid-December 1995 utilizing the new 2400 ft steam line under the Cerritos channel and the wells will be placed on production in May. Cyclic steam injection into the two horizontal producers will start in May. Work on the basic reservoir engineering is expected to be completed in March 1996. The deterministic geologic model was improved to add eight layers to the previous ten.

Hara, S.

1996-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

437

Final Report on the Development of an Improved Cloud Microphysical Product for Model and Remote Sensing Evaluation using RACORO Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We proposed to analyze data collected during the Routine Aerial Facilities (AAF) Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) in order to develop an integrated product of cloud microphysical properties (number concentration of drops in different size bins, total liquid drop concentration integrated over all bin sizes, liquid water content LWC, extinction of liquid clouds bw, effective radius of water drops re, and radar reflectivity factor) that could be used to evaluate large-eddy simulations (LES), general circulation models (GCMs) and ground-based remote sensing retrievals, and to develop cloud parameterizations with the end goal of improving the modeling of cloud processes and properties and their impact on atmospheric radiation. We have completed the development of this microphysical database and have submitted it to ARM for consideration of its inclusion on the ARM database as a PI product. This report describes the development of this database, and also describes research that has been conducted on cloud-aerosol interactions using the data obtained during RACORO. A list of conference proceedings and publications is also included.

McFarquhar, Greg

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

438

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

Chugh, Y.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

For Researchers For Researchers What You Need to Know and Do The Tech Transfer Process Business Development Services Berkeley Lab LaunchPad Funding - Innovation Grants Forms and Policies Conflict of Interest Outside Employment Export Control Record of Invention Software Disclosure and Abstract See Also FAQs for Researchers Entrepreneurial Resources Webcast: Transferring Technology to the Marketplace Pre-Publication Review Report Invention/Software The next step is for Lab researchers to report the invention or software to the Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Management Department. The invention report is not a patent application and in and of itself secures no intellectual property rights. It is used by the Lab to make a decision as to whether to proceed with a patent application.

440

REPORT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REPORT REPORT of the INFRASTRUCTURE TASK FORCE of the DOE NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE January 16, 2003 2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY On October 1, 2002 the DOE Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee was asked to provide specific, focused updates to its Nuclear Science and Technology Infrastructure Roadmap and review the specific issues at the DOE key nuclear energy research and development (R&D) laboratories. This activity was assigned to a five-member Infrastructure Task Force (ITF). After receiving extensive written materials from DOE, the Idaho Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W), on November 6-8, 2002 the ITF visited the Idaho site and received briefings and tours of the INEEL and ANL-W facilities. INEEL and

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441

Evaluation of Wet Chemical ICP-AES Elemental Analysis Methods usingSimulated Hanford Waste Samples-Phase I Interim Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wet chemistry digestion method development for providing process control elemental analyses of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Melter Feed Preparation Vessel (MFPV) samples is divided into two phases: Phase I consists of: (1) optimizing digestion methods as a precursor to elemental analyses by ICP-AES techniques; (2) selecting methods with the desired analytical reliability and speed to support the nine-hour or less turnaround time requirement of the WTP; and (3) providing baseline comparison to the laser ablation (LA) sample introduction technique for ICP-AES elemental analyses that is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Phase II consists of: (1) Time-and-Motion study of the selected methods from Phase I with actual Hanford waste or waste simulants in shielded cell facilities to ensure that the methods can be performed remotely and maintain the desired characteristics; and (2) digestion of glass samples prepared from actual Hanford Waste tank sludge for providing comparative results to the LA Phase II study. Based on the Phase I testing discussed in this report, a tandem digestion approach consisting of sodium peroxide fusion digestions carried out in nickel crucibles and warm mixed-acid digestions carried out in plastic bottles has been selected for Time-and-Motion study in Phase II. SRNL experience with performing this analytical approach in laboratory hoods indicates that well-trained cell operator teams will be able to perform the tandem digestions in five hours or less. The selected approach will produce two sets of solutions for analysis by ICP-AES techniques. Four hours would then be allocated for performing the ICP-AES analyses and reporting results to meet the nine-hour or less turnaround time requirement. The tandem digestion approach will need to be performed in two separate shielded analytical cells by two separate cell operator teams in order to achieve the nine-hour or less turnaround time. Because of the simplicity of the warm mixed-acid method, a well-trained cell operator team may in time be able to perform both sets of digestions. However, having separate shielded cells for each of the methods is prudent to avoid overcrowding problems that would impede a minimal turnaround time.

Coleman, Charles J.; Edwards, Thomas B.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

Tank 241U102 Grab Samples 2U-99-1 and 2U-99-2 and 2U-99-3 Analytical Results for the Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final report for tank 241-U-102 grab samples. Five grab samples were collected from riser 13 on May 26, 1999 and received by the 222-S laboratory on May 26 and May 27, 1999. Samples 2U-99-3 and 2U-99-4 were submitted to the Process Chemistry Laboratory for special studies. Samples 2U-99-1, 2U-99-2 and 2U-99-5 were submitted to the laboratory for analyses. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal year 1999 (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1999) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Fowler 1995, Mulkey and Miller 1998). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report. None of the subsamples submitted for differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), total organic carbon (TOC) and plutonium 239 (Pu239) analyses exceeded the notification limits as stated in TSAP.

STEEN, F.H.

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

443

Multidimensional gas chromatography of oxidative degradation products in algae-derived fuel oil samples using narrow heartcuts and rapid cycle times  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To characterize a fuel's thermal and storage stability an understanding of the process of oxidation and oxidation pathways is essential. Oxidation pathways commence with hydroperoxides which quickly decompose to form a range of alcohols, acids and other oxygen-containing species. In the presence of significant levels of hydrocarbon-based matrix, analysis of these heteroatomic species is difficult. Applying multidimensional gas chromatography with very narrow heart-cut windows (0.20min) minimizes the number of compounds transferred to the second dimension (2D) column during each heart-cut. Successive heart-cuts every 2.00min are taken throughout the analytical run, since each heart-cut has a maximum retention on 2D of <2.00min on the fast elution 2D column. Subsequent analyses involve incrementing or offsetting the heart-cut windows by 0.20min, so after 10 analyses, a complete coverage of the sample components can be obtained. On the polar 1D and non-polar 2D phase column arrangement, non-polar matrix compounds elute last on the 2D column, and this determines the largest 2tR; i.e. 2tRreported here, good correlation of MS data (with average MS library similarity data) for acids (903), alcohols (909), ketones (941) and aldehydes (938) in the sample is obtained. The method requires ten sequential runs, and this can be accomplished automatically once the events table is set up. However if fewer target compounds are to be transferred, a reduced number of sequential runs can be implemented.

Blagoj Mitrevski; Rene L. Webster; Paul Rawson; David J. Evans; Hyung-Kyoon Choi; Philip J. Marriott

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Quarterly Technical Progress Report *** SAMPLE *...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the lower graph. It was discovered after the field test that the 50 m fiber optic patch cable that had been used to connect the downhole cable at the well head to the readout...

445

Home Energy Score Sample Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Home Energy Score is a national rating system developed by the U.S. Department of Energy. The Score reflects the energy efficiency of a home based on the homes structure and heating, cooling, and hot water systems. The Home Facts provide details about the current structure and systems. Recommendations show how to improve the energy efficiency of the home to achieve a higher score and save money.

446

Screening study for waste biomass to ethanol production facility using the Amoco process in New York State. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the economic feasibility of locating biomass-to-ethanol waste conversion facilities in New York State. Part 1 of the study evaluates 74 potential sites in New York City and identifies two preferred sites on Staten, the Proctor Gamble and the Arthur Kill sites, for further consideration. Part 2 evaluates upstate New York and determines that four regions surrounding the urban centers of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse provide suitable areas from which to select specific sites for further consideration. A separate Appendix provides supplemental material supporting the evaluations. A conceptual design and economic viability evaluation were developed for a minimum-size facility capable of processing 500 tons per day (tpd) of biomass consisting of wood or paper, or a combination of the two for upstate regions. The facility would use Amoco`s biomass conversion technology and produce 49,000 gallons per day of ethanol and approximately 300 tpd of lignin solid by-product. For New York City, a 1,000-tpd processing facility was also evaluated to examine effects of economies of scale. The reports evaluate the feasibility of building a biomass conversion facility in terms of city and state economic, environmental, and community factors. Given the data obtained to date, including changing costs for feedstock and ethanol, the project is marginally attractive. A facility should be as large as possible and located in a New York State Economic Development Zone to take advantage of economic incentives. The facility should have on-site oxidation capabilities, which will make it more financially viable given the high cost of energy. 26 figs., 121 tabs.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Analytical Data Report for Sediment Samples Collected From 200 BP 5 OU, C5860 (299-E29-545) K-Well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an analytical data report for sediments received fro BP 5 K Well. This report is prepared for CHPRC

Lindberg, Michael J.

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

448

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 4. U.S. uranium mills by owner, location, capacity, and operating status at end of the year, 2008-2012 Mill Owner Mill Name County, State (existing and planned locations) Milling Capacity (short tons of ore per day) Operating Status at End of the Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Cotter Corporation Canon City Mill Fremont, Colorado 0 Standby Standby Standby Reclamation Demolished Denison White Mesa LLC White Mesa Mill San Juan, Utah 2,000 Operating Operating Operating Operating Operating Energy Fuels Resources Corporation Piñon Ridge Mill Montrose, Colorado 500 Developing Developing Developing Permitted And Licensed Partially Permitted And Licensed Kennecott Uranium Company/Wyoming Coal Resource Company Sweetwater Uranium Project Sweetwater, Wyoming 3,000 Standby Standby Standby Standby Standby

449

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 W W W W W W W W W W W Total Mill Feed W W W W W W W W W W W Uranium Concentrate Produced at U.S. Mills (thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W W Uranium Concentrate...

450

Drilling Productivity Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

procedure is used within the DPR model for those DPR model linkages shown by the green arrows in Figure 3. The LOESS procedure gives the analyst a heuristic tool for...

451

Waste tank vapor project: Vapor characterization of Tank 241-C-103: Data report for OVS samples collected from Sample Job 7b, Parts I and II, received 5/18/94 and 5/24/94  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On 5/18/94, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) delivered samples to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) that were collected from waste Tank 241-C-103 on 5/16/94. These samples were from Sample Job (SJ) 7b, Part 1. On 5/24/94, WHC delivered samples to PNL that were collected from waste Tank 241-C-103 on 5/18/94. These samples were from SJ7b, Part 2. A summary of data derived from the sampling of waste Tank 241-C-103 for gravimetric (H{sub 2}O) and normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH) concentrations are shown for SJ7b. Gravimetric analysis was performed on the samples within 24 hours of receipt by PNL. The NPH concentration of 10 samples collected for Part 1 was slightly higher than the average concentration for 15 samples collected in Part 2, 812 ({+-} 133) mg/m{sup 3} and 659 ({+-} 88) mg/m{sup 3}, respectively. The higher concentrations measured in Part 1 samples may be because the samples in Part 1 were collected at a single level, 0.79 meters above the air-liquid interface. Part 2 samples were collected at three different tank levels, 0.79, 2.92, and 5.05 m above the air-liquid interface. In Part 2, the average NPH concentrations for 5 samples collected at each of three levels was similar: 697 (60) mg/m{sup 3} at the low level, 631 (51) mg/m{sup 3} at the mid level, and 651 (134) mg/m{sup 3} at the high level. It is important to note that the measured tridecane to dodecane concentration remained constant in all samples collected in Parts 1 and 2. That ratio is 1.2 {+-} 0.05. This consistent ratio indicates that there were no random analytical biases towards either compound.

Clauss, T.R.; Edwards, J.A.; Fruchter, J.S.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 4. GPGP jet-fuels production program-feed analyses compilation and review. Interim report, October 1987-January 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1986, the Fuels Branch of the Aero Propulsion Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, began an investigation of the potential of jet-fuel production from the liquid by-product streams produced by the gasification of lignite at the Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota. Funding was provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to administer the experimental portion of this effort. This document reports the results of the effort by Burns and Roe Services Corporation/Science Applications International Corporation (BRSC/SAIC) to compile and review physical and chemical characterization data for the GPGP by-product liquids. This report describes the relative reliability of the various characterization data and indicates where specific limitations exist.

Rossi, R.J.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by- products in underground mines: Phase 1, Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetics study which is investigating hydration reactions of the ADM by-product (Subtask 2.2) was continued this quarter. This study further aided in gaining information on mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions during hydration of the ADM materials. The information is of importance for a comprehensive understanding of the factors that control strength and long-term stability during aging of FGD materials. The decision was made by Addington, Inc., DOE, and the University of Kentucky that the originally selected mine site for the emplacement demonstration must be changed, mainly for safety reasons. Mine selection will be a priority for the next quarter (Jul--Sep, 1995). Another activity during this reporting period was related to Subtask 4.3, the selection and testing of the transport system for the FGD material. A laboratory-scale pneumatic emplacement test unit (ETU) for dry FGD materials was built at the CAER to generate data so that a final selection of the field demonstration technology can be made. A dry pneumatic system was chosen for laboratory testing because the equipment and expertise available at the CAER matched this sort of technology best. While the design of the laboratory system was based on shotcrete technology, the physical properties of the emplaced FGD material is expected to be similar for other transport techniques, either pneumatic or hydraulic. In other words, the selection of a dry pneumatic transport system for laboratory testing does not necessarily imply that a scaled-up version will be used for the field demonstration. The ETU is a convenient means of producing samples for subsequent chemical and physical testing by a representative emplacement technology. Ultimately, the field demonstration technology will be chosen based on the laboratory data and the suitability of locally available equipment.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen, and Oxygen Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project is a collaboration between the Sinskey laboratory at MIT and the Worden laboratory at Michigan State University. The goal of the project is to produce Isobutanol (IBT), a branched-chain alcohol that can serve as a drop-in transportation fuel, through the engineered microbial biosynthesis of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen, and Oxygen using a novel bioreactor. This final technical report presents the findings of both the biological engineering work at MIT that extended the native branched-chain amino acid pathway of the wild type Ralstonia eutropha H16 to perform this biosynthesis, as well as the unique design, modeling, and construction of a bioreactor for incompatible gasses at Michigan State that enabled the operational testing of the complete system. This 105 page technical report summarizing the three years of research includes 72 figures and 11 tables of findings. Ralstonia eutropha (also known as Cupriavidus necator) is a Gram-negative, facultatively chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. It has been the principle organism used for the study of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) polymer biosynthesis. The wild-type Ralstonia eutropha H16 produces PHB as an intracellular carbon storage material while under nutrient stress in the presence of excess carbon. Under this stress, it can accumulate approximately 80 % of its cell dry weight (CDW) as this intracellular polymer. With the restoration of the required nutrients, the cells are then able to catabolize this polymer. If extracted from the cell, this PHB polymer can be processed into biodegradable and biocompatible plastics, however for this research, it is the efficient metabolic pathway channeling the captured carbon that is of interest. R. eutropha is further unique in that it contains two carbon-fixation CalvinBensonBassham cycle operons, two oxygen-tolerant hydrogenases, and several formate dehydrogenases. It has also been much studied for its ability in the presence of oxygen, to fix carbon dioxide into complex cellular molecules using the energy from hydrogen. In this research project, engineered strains of R. eutropha redirected the excess carbon from PHB storage into the production of isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol (branched-chain higher alcohols). These branched-chain higher alcohols can be used directly as substitutes for fossil-based fuels and are seen as alternative biofuels to ethanol and biodiesel. Importantly, these alcohols have approximately 98 % of the energy content of gasoline, 17 % higher than the current gasoline additive ethanol, without impacting corn market production for feed or food. Unlike ethanol, these branched-chain alcohols have low vapor pressure, hygroscopicity, and water solubility, which make them readily compatible with the existing pipelines, gasoline pumps, and engines in our transportation infrastructure. While the use of alternative energies from solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric has spread for stationary power applications, these energy sources cannot be effectively or efficiently employed in current or future transportation systems. With the ongoing concerns of fossil fuel availability and price stability over the long term, alternative biofuels like branched-chain higher alcohols hold promise as a suitable transportation fuel in the future. We showed in our research that various mutant strains of R. eutropha with isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase activity, in combination with the overexpression of plasmid-borne, native branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis pathway genes and the overexpression of heterologous ketoisovalerate decarboxylase gene, would produce isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol when initiated during nitrogen or phosphorus limitation. Early on, we isolated one mutant R. eutropha strain which produced over 180 mg/L branched-chain alcohols in flask culture while being more tolerant of isobutanol toxicity. After the targeted elimination of genes encoding several potential carbon sinks (ilvE, bkdAB, and aceE), the production titer of the improved to 270 mg/L isobutanol and 40 mg/L 3-methyl-1-butanol.

Sinskey, Anthony J. [MIT] [MIT; Worden, Robert Mark [Michigan State University MSU] [Michigan State University MSU; Brigham, Christopher [MIT] [MIT; Lu, Jingnan [MIT] [MIT; Quimby, John Westlake [MIT] [MIT; Gai, Claudia [MIT] [MIT; Speth, Daan [MIT] [MIT; Elliott, Sean [Boston University] [Boston University; Fei, John Qiang [MIT] [MIT; Bernardi, Amanda [MIT] [MIT; Li, Sophia [MIT] [MIT; Grunwald, Stephan [MIT] [MIT; Grousseau, Estelle [MIT] [MIT; Maiti, Soumen [MSU] [MSU; Liu, Chole [MSU] [MSU

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

455

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) joint development of SNL`s sample tracking, analysis and reporting (STAR) information system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive environmental sample management program allocates much of its resources to collecting, managing, and manipulating information. A computerized system that collects information at the field sampling point, tracks the sample to analytical labs and loads electronic data deliverables from these labs, while maintaining chain of custody and data integrity, is efficient and cost effective for providing consistent and accurate, legally defensible sample data. In June 1993, a team was formed to gather Sample Management Office requirements and begin development of a sample tracking system. This paper is an overview of experiences encountered when Sandia transferred and implemented sample software from the Waste Area Group (WAG6) at ORNL.

Fish, J.; Campbell, D.; Jenkins, B. [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Cross-sample invariance of the structure of self-reported distress and difficulty in assertiveness: Experiences with the scale for interpersonal behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent surveys of psychometric studies with respect to the construct and/or factorial validity of self-report assertion measures (e.g. Beck and Heimberg, 1983) point to the paucity of systematic research addressing such issues. To date no attempts have been made to examine the cross-sample generalisability of dimensions of assertion by means of objective techniques of factorial invariance (i.e. hypothesis-testing variations of principal factor or principal components analysis). Employing such a technique in the present study, distress and performance factors identified previously in a phobic population (N = 703) with a Dutch measure of assertion (Scale for Interpersonal Behaviour) the factors being: (I) DISPLAY OF NEGATIVE FEELINGS, (II) EXPRESSION of and DEALING with PERSONAL LIMITATIONS, (III) INITIATING ASSERTIVENESS and (IV) POSITIVE ASSERTION were shown to be replicable in a new phobic sample (N = 119) and invariant across three distinct samples, namely psychiatric outpatients (N = 253), (non-patient) students (N = 412) and (non-student) normals (N = 250). Additional reliability and validity data supported the utility of a fifth overall measure within the Scale, which was termed GENERAL ASSERTIVENESS. These data also underline the contention of Futch et al. (1982) that it would be unwise to take any demonstrated multidimensionality of an assertion construct as evidence in the context of the trait-state issue (e.g. Eisler et al., 1975). However, the exclusive use of an overall assertion scale of a purportedly multidimensional measure is likely to invalidate research findings (including clinical research) since it masks relevant component information. To counteract this problem it is proposed that either the subscales should be used on their own or that the subscales and the overall scale should be used together. It is further concluded that (1) in developing and using an assertion measure a multidimensional approach should be taken, there being at least four distress and four performance factors to be taken account of; (2) of these four factors, that of Positive Assertion in particular should be considered more thoroughly in adequately defining and operationalising the assertion construct.

Willem A. Arrindell; Jan van der Ende

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Production of Short-Rotation Woody Crops Grown with a Range of Nutrient and Water Availability: Establishment Report and First-Year Responses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coleman, M.D., et. al. 2003. Production of Short-Rotation Woody Crops Grown with a Range of Nutrient and Water Availability: Establishment Report and First-Year Responses. Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 26 pp. Abstract: Many researchers have studied the productivity potential of intensively managed forest plantations. However, we need to learn more about the effects of fundamental growth processes on forest productivity; especially the influence of aboveground and belowground resource acquisition and allocation. This report presents installation, establishment, and first-year results of four tree species (two cottonwood clones, sycamore, sweetgum, and loblolly pine) grown with fertilizer and irrigation treatments. At this early stage of development, irrigation and fertilization were additive only in cottonwood clone ST66 and sweetgum. Leaf area development was directly related to stem growth, but root production was not always consistent with shoot responses, suggesting that allocation of resources varies among treatments. We will evaluate the consequences of these early responses on resource availability in subsequent growing seasons. This information will be used to: (1) optimize fiber and bioenergy production; (2) understand carbon sequestration; and (3) develop innovative applications such as phytoremediation; municipal, industrial, and agricultural wastes management; and protection of soil, air, and water resources.

D.R. Coyle; J. Blake; K. Britton; M.; Buford; R.G. Campbell; J. Cox; B. Cregg; D. Daniels; ,; M. Jacobson; K. Johnsen; T. McDonald; K. McLeod; E.; Nelson; D. Robison; R. Rummer; F. Sanchez; J.; Stanturf; B. Stokes; C. Trettin; J. Tuskan; L. Wright; ,; S. Wullschleger

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. This is the sixth quarterly technical progress report for the project. Through September 1996, the project continues to make good progress but is slightly behind schedule. Estimated costs are on budget for the work performed to date. Technical achievements accomplished during the quarter include placing the first two horizontal wells on production following cyclic steam stimulation, completing several draft technical reports and preparing presentations on the deterministic geologic model, steam channel crossing and horizontal well drilling for technical transfer. Cyclic steam injection into the first two horizontal wells was completed in June 1996 and initial oil production from the project began the same month. Work has commenced on the stochastic geologic and reservoir simulation models. High temperature core work and reservoir tracer work will commence in the First Quarter 1997.

Hara, S. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

US/FRG umbrella agreement for cooperation in GCR Development. Fuel, fission products, and graphite subprogram. Quarterly status report, July 1, 1982-September 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the status of the cooperative work being performed in the Fuel, Fission Product, and Graphite Subprogram under the HTR-Implementing Agreement of the United States/Federal Republic of Germany Umbrella Agreement for Cooperation in GCR Development. The status is described relative to the commitments in the Subprogram Plan for Fuel, Fission Products, and Graphite, Revision 5, April 1982. The work described was performed during the period July 1, 1982 through September 30, 1982 in the HTGR Base Technology Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the HTGR Fuel and Plant Technology Programs at General Atomic Company (GA), and the Project HTR-Brennstoffkreislauf of the Entwicklungsgemeinschaft HTR at KFA Julich, HRB Mannheim, HOBEG Hanau, and SIGRI Meitingen. The requirement for and format of this quarterly status report are specified in the HTR Implementing Agreement procedures for cooperation. Responsibility for preparation of the quarterly report alternates between GA and KFA.

Turner, R.F.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Production of Seamless Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities from Ultra-fine Grained Niobium, Phase II Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The positron and electron linacs of the International Linear Collider (ILC) will require over 14,000, nine-cell, one meter length, superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities [ILC Reference Design Report, 2007]. Manufacturing on this scale will benefit from more efficient fabrication methods. The current methods of fabricating SRF cavities involve deep drawing of the halves of each of the elliptical cells and joining them by high-vacuum, electron beam welding, with at least 19 circumferential welds per cavity. The welding is costly and has undesirable effects on the cavity surfaces, including grain-scale surface roughening at the weld seams. Hydroforming of seamless tubes avoids welding, but hydroforming of coarse-grained seamless tubes results in strain-induced surface roughening. Surface roughness limits accelerating fields, because asperities prematurely exceed the critical magnetic field and become normal conducting. This project explored the technical and economic feasibility of an improved processing method for seamless tubes for hydroforming. Severe deformation of bulk material was first used to produce a fine structure, followed by extrusion and flow-forming methods of tube making. Extrusion of the randomly oriented, fine-grained bulk material proceeded under largely steady-state conditions, and resulted in a uniform structure, which was found to be finer and more crystallographically random than standard (high purity) RRR niobium sheet metal. A 165 mm diameter billet of RRR grade niobium was processed into five, 150 mm I.D. tubes, each over 1.8 m in length, to meet the dimensions used by the DESY ILC hydroforming machine. Mechanical properties met specifications. Costs of prototype tube production were approximately twice the price of RRR niobium sheet, and are expected to be comparable with economies of scale. Hydroforming and superconducting testing will be pursued in subsequent collaborations with DESY and Fermilab. SRF Cavities are used to construct particle accelerators for high-energy physics research, as well as for lower energy particle accelerators, and Free Electron Lasers. These machines have applications in the fields of basic science, industrial processing, medical diagnostics, pharmaceutical research and weapons systems. The scientific community and the general public will benefit from the implementation of this technology since lower production costs will increase the availability of SRF particle accelerators.

Roy Crooks, Ph.D., P.E.

2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

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