Sample records for repair shop dry

  1. Automotive Repair Shops Case Study ME 4171 Automotive Repair Shops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    shops use a wide range of equipment, chemicals, and raw materials. Available services include welding generated through welding? To repair both minor and major auto body damage, hydraulic equipment and hand are recycled with other waste oil generated on site. Question: 2) Do you expect the equipment oil

  2. Incremental temporal reasoning in job shop scheduling repair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Y.

    A working predictive schedule can be useless because of the various external or internal disruptions in a job shop. Total rescheduling may cause problems such as shop floor nervousness. Thus, the job shop scheduling repair ...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile repair shops Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automobile repair shops Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Program Director: Jim Headlee Phone:...

  4. Exposure Evaluation for Benzene, Lead and Noise in Vehicle and Equipment Repair Shops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Lynn C.

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An exposure assessment was performed at the equipment and vehicle maintenance repair shops operating at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site, in Richland, Washington. The maintenance shops repair and maintain vehicles and equipment used in support of the Hanford cleanup mission. There are three general mechanic shops and one auto body repair shop. The mechanics work on heavy equipment used in construction, cranes, commercial motor vehicles, passenger-type vehicles in addition to air compressors, generators, and farm equipment. Services include part fabrication, installation of equipment, repair and maintenance work in the engine compartment, and tire and brake services. Work performed at the auto body shop includes painting and surface preparation which involves applying body filler and sanding. 8-hour time-weighted-average samples were collected for benzene and noise exposure and task-based samples were collected for lead dust work activities involving painted metal surfaces. Benzene samples were obtained using 3Mô 3520 sampling badges and were analyzed for additional volatile organic compounds. These compounds were selected based on material safety data sheet information for the aerosol products used by the mechanics for each day of sampling. The compounds included acetone, ethyl ether, toluene, xylene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone, and trichloroethylene. Laboratory data for benzene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone and trichloroethylene were all below the reporting detection limit. Airborne concentrations for acetone, ethyl ether, toluene and xylene were all less than 10% of their occupational exposure limit. The task-based samples obtained for lead dusts were submitted for a metal scan analysis to identify other metals that might be present. Laboratory results for lead dusts were all below the reporting detection limit and airborne concentration for the other metals observed in the samples were less than 10% of the occupational exposure limit. Noise dosimetry sampling was performed on a random basis and was representative of the different work activities within the four shops. Twenty three percent of the noise samples exceeded the occupational exposure limit of 85 decibels for an 8-hour time-weightedaverage. Work activities where noise levels were higher included use of impact wrenches and grinding wheels.

  5. Millikelvin Lab Machine Shop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Millikelvin Lab OP105­112 Machine Shop OP132 Resistive Magnet Shop CICC Winding Area Transformers This building is home to the Millikelvin lab, the control room, the resistive magnet and machine shops, the CICC@magnet.fsu.edu (850) 644-4378 (850) 644-0534 2 MACHINE SHOP OP132 Vaughan Williams (A114*) williams

  6. An exploration of tourist shopping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Yoon-Jung

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    -demographic variables (age, education and income) on touristsí shopping expenditures. Based on previous research in leisure/tourism and consumer studies on shopping, a conceptual framework of tourist shopping was proposed for this study. For the purpose of this study...

  7. The urban coffee shop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chadios, Konstantinos

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is an investigation of the role of the coffee shop in the urban environment throughout history. Coffee shops spread from the Arab world to Europe and then to the U.S. at the end of the seventeenth century. ...

  8. Machine Shop Safety Tips & Safety Guidelines GENERAL SAFETY TIPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    Machine Shop Safety Tips & Safety Guidelines GENERAL SAFETY TIPS · Safety glasses with side shields distance away from moving machine parts, work pieces, and cutters. · Use hand tools for their designed to oil, clean, adjust, or repair any machine while it is running. Stop the machine and lock the power

  9. APS LOM Shop Usage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies ColoradoTechnical1 NationalC5LOM Shop

  10. Quality electric motor repair: A guidebook for electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schueler, V.; Douglass, J.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidebook provides utilities with a resource for better understanding and developing their roles in relation to electric motor repair shops and the industrial and commercial utility customers that use them. The guidebook includes information and tools that utilities can use to raise the quality of electric motor repair practices in their service territories.

  11. Job-Shop Scheduling in a Body Shop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    ing in a car body production line, where possible colli- sions between industrial robots have to be taken into ac- count. BSSP corresponds to a job-shop problem

  12. Flow shop scheduling with peak power consumption constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Fang

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 29, 2012 ... Flow shop scheduling with peak power consumption constraints ... Keywords: scheduling, flow shop, energy, peak power consumption, integer†...

  13. University of California at Berkeley Shop Safety Policy Biomolecular Nanotechnology Center Machine Shop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    by the manufacturer and within the equipment's Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRTL) listing. ∑ All shop

  14. HEP Division Staff Shop Policy INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    the findings to the Shop Custodian in a written or verbal form. Immediately upon the lockout/tagout of any

  15. Shop Request - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System OutagesNewsMaterialsX-rayOur StaffShop Request

  16. Toolbox Safety Talk Machine Shop Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Toolbox Safety Talk Machine Shop Safety Environmental Health & Safety Facilities Safety & Health to Environmental Health & Safety for recordkeeping. Machine shops are an integral part of the Cornell University be taken seriously. Many of the most frequently cited OSHA safety standards pertain to machine safeguarding

  17. Ted B shop, PGA Derek Sprague, PGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    and Superintendent to review operations/maintenance procedures, Model Golf Shop application. NOON a Evaluation team 451001 Las Vegas, NV 89154-1001 Dear President Smatresk: The Criteria and Standards for Accreditation and procedures ofthe program (policies and procedures for the golf course and golf shop should also be included

  18. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The position is a Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop) located in Kent, Washington, and will be responsible for the safe and efficient operation of a field garage performing...

  19. Cold vacuum drying facility 90% design review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Neill, C.T.

    1997-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains review comment records for the CVDF 90% design review. Spent fuels retrieved from the K Basins will be dried at the CVDF. It has also been recommended that the Multi-Conister Overpacks be welded, inspected, and repaired at the CVD Facility before transport to dry storage.

  20. Biomass Company Sets Up Shop in High School Lab | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biomass Company Sets Up Shop in High School Lab Biomass Company Sets Up Shop in High School Lab March 30, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy...

  1. Quality assurance in small plating shops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNabb, W.J. (Electroless Nickel Plating of Louisiana, Hammond, LA (United States))

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for electroless nickel coatings in oilfield and petrochemical applications is quite high. The greatest obstacle to their use has been a reputation for poor quality due to a lack of quality control in many plating shops. To overcome this, electroless nickel shops should not only have a quality control program in their operation, but must also document its use and success. This article describes how a plating shoe can develop the necessary procedures, manuals, and paperwork trail to offer quality assurance and to satisfy customers.

  2. Flow Shop Scheduling with Peak Power Consumption Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To conduct our experiments, we considered a hypothetical flow shop scheduling ... There are two types of machines with different operations: face milling. 16†...

  3. Hybrid heuristics for the permutation flow shop problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin G. Ravetti

    2006-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 5, 2006 ... Hybrid heuristics for the permutation flow shop problem. Martin G. Ravetti (martin ***at*** dcc.ufmg.br) Fabiola G. Nakamura (fgnaka ***at***†...

  4. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mara, Leo M. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  5. FOR EMERGENCY CABIN REPAIRS REPORT ITFOR EMERGENCY CABIN REPAIRS REPORT IT IMMEDIATELYIMMEDIATELY TO THE MAINTENANCE SHOP OR ONE OFTO THE MAINTENANCE SHOP OR ONE OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    & EMPTY GARBAGE INTO TRASH BINS LOCATED OUTSIDE.LOCATED OUTSIDE. RECYCLE BINS ARE ACROSS FROMRECYCLE BINS IF NOT SURE! NO PETS ARE ALLOWED ON THE STATION!NO PETS ARE ALLOWED ON THE STATION! CAMPFIRES MAY BE BUILT

  6. Tips: Shopping for Lighting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButler Tina Butler Tina-Butler.jpgLighting Tips: Shopping for

  7. ENERGY STAR Back-To-School Shopping Checklist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENERGY STAR¬ģ Back-To-School Shopping Checklist Students can make a difference by shopping "smart" with ENERGY STAR¬ģ . Computing the Savings ENERGY STAR Qualified Computer Equipment Computer Monitor ENERGY up to 90 percent more energy than standard monitors. Printer If every home office were powered

  8. A Cooperative Approach for Job Shop Scheduling under Uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briand, Cyril

    control, consists to use a two-level resolution scheme: an off-line scheduling level builds upA Cooperative Approach for Job Shop Scheduling under Uncertainties C. BRIANDa,1 , S. OURARIb and B on job shop scheduling problems in a cooperative environment. Unlike classical deterministic approaches

  9. Intelligent pothole repair vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minocher Homji, Ruzbeh Adi

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an endeavor to design and construct a prototype of an automated road repair vehicle called the Intelligent Pothole Repair Vehicle (IPRV). The IPRV is capable of automatically detecting and filling potholes on road surfaces...

  10. Laboratory testing of closure cap repair techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persoff, P.; Moridis, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Tuck, D.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landfill design requires a low permeability closure cap as well as a low permeability liner. The Savannah River Site, in South Carolina, has approximately 85 acres of mixed waste landfills covered with compacted kaolin clay. Maintaining low permeability of the clay cap requires both that the permeability of the compacted clay itself remain low and that the integrity of the barrier be maintained. Barrier breaches typically result from penetration by roots or animals, and especially cracks caused by uneven settling or desiccation. In this study, clay layers, 0.81 m in diameter and 7.6 cm thick, were compacted in 7 lysimeters to simulate closure caps. The hydraulic conductivity of each layer was measured, and the compacted clay layers (CCL`s) were cracked by drying. Then various repair techniques were applied and the effectiveness of each repair was assessed by remeasuring the hydraulic conductivity. Finally the repaired CCL was again dried and measured to determine how the repair responded to the conditions that caused the original failure. For a full report of this investigation see Persoff et al. Six repair techniques have been tested, four of which involve the use of injectable barrier liquids colloidal silica (CS) and polysiloxane (PSX) described below: (I) covering the crack with a bentonite geosynthetic clay liner (GCL), (ii) recompaction of new kaolinite at STD+3 moisture content joined to existing kaolinite that had dried and shrunk, (iii) direct injection of colloidal silica to a crack, (iv) injection of colloidal silica (CS) to wells in an overlying sand layer, (v) direct injection of polysiloxane to a crack, and (vi), injection of polysiloxane (PSX) to wells in an overlying soil layer.

  11. Drying Foods at Home Safely Drying Herbs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    jars, freezer bags, and airtight plastic containers. Like other foods dried at home, dried herbs in an airtight container and store in a cool, dry, and dark place. Recommended containers include glass canning

  12. Business expansion and lean transformation for helicopter blade shop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bar, S. Neil (Saumen Neil)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sikorsky Aircraft is undergoing a lean transformation as its helicopter blade line is relocated from Stratford to Site B. Value Stream Mapping is a vital tool to eliminate sources of waste in the existing blade shop and ...

  13. HEART SMART NUTRITION Heart Smart Shopping & Label Reading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesson 3 HEART SMART NUTRITION Heart Smart Shopping & Label Reading What's the first step in fat. Your goal is to eat a diet lower in saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol. The National Heart

  14. Automobile Repair Shop In 1987, the Alaska Health Project has performed an audit of an automobile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Part 268). 2) Disposal in a authorized high-temperature incinerator. 3) Disposal to an authorized assumes incineration is the disposal method. If the waste is disposed of in a landfill or by recycling, costs may be reduced. However, considering the new solvent ban on land disposal incineration

  15. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Bruce; Nancy Porter; George Ritter; Matt Boring; Mark Lozev; Ian Harris; Bill Mohr; Dennis Harwig; Robin Gordon; Chris Neary; Mike Sullivan

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. In lieu of a field installation on an abandoned pipeline, a preliminary nondestructive testing protocol is being developed to determine the success or failure of the fiber-reinforced liner pipeline repairs. Optimization and validation activities for carbon-fiber repair methods are ongoing.

  16. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. The first round of optimization and validation activities for carbon-fiber repairs are complete. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the field trial portion of this program.

  17. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is only marginally effective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressures for larger diameter pipe repaired with a semi-circular patch of carbon fiber-reinforced composite lines were also marginally greater than that of a pipe section with un-repaired simulated damage without a liner. These results indicate that fiber reinforced composite liners have the potential to increase the burst pressure of pipe sections with external damage Carbon fiber based liners are viewed as more promising than glass fiber based liners because of the potential for more closely matching the mechanical properties of steel. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the field trial portion of this program.

  18. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mara, Leo M. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are improvments to a rapid road repair vehicle comprising an improved cleaning device arrangement, two dispensing arrays for filling defects more rapidly and efficiently, an array of pre-heaters to heat the road way surface in order to help the repair material better bond to the repaired surface, a means for detecting, measuring, and computing the number, location and volume of each of the detected surface imperfection, and a computer means schema for controlling the operation of the plurality of vehicle subsystems. The improved vehicle is, therefore, better able to perform its intended function of filling surface imperfections while moving over those surfaces at near normal traffic speeds.

  19. Lean strategies for future body shop development and operation in the automotive industry by Iker Marcaide.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcaide, Iker

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are several body shops which are similar by size of workforce, level of utilization and product complexity but which differ considerably by investment required, shop size, uptime, inventory levels and quality ...

  20. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The two broad categories of deposited weld metal repair and fiber-reinforced composite liner repair technologies were reviewed for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Preliminary test programs were developed for both deposited weld metal repair and for fiber-reinforced composite liner repair. Evaluation trials have been conducted using a modified fiber-reinforced composite liner provided by RolaTube and pipe sections without liners. All pipe section specimens failed in areas of simulated damage. Pipe sections containing fiber-reinforced composite liners failed at pressures marginally greater than the pipe sections without liners. The next step is to evaluate a liner material with a modulus of elasticity approximately 95% of the modulus of elasticity for steel. Preliminary welding parameters were developed for deposited weld metal repair in preparation of the receipt of Pacific Gas & Electric's internal pipeline welding repair system (that was designed specifically for 559 mm (22 in.) diameter pipe) and the receipt of 559 mm (22 in.) pipe sections from Panhandle Eastern. The next steps are to transfer welding parameters to the PG&E system and to pressure test repaired pipe sections to failure. A survey of pipeline operators was conducted to better understand the needs and performance requirements of the natural gas transmission industry regarding internal repair. Completed surveys contained the following principal conclusions: (1) Use of internal weld repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling (HDD) when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) Pipe diameter sizes range from 50.8 mm (2 in.) through 1,219.2 mm (48 in.). The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm to 762 mm (20 in. to 30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. An evaluation of potential repair methods clearly indicates that the project should continue to focus on the development of a repair process involving the use of GMAW welding and on the development of a repair process involving the use of fiber-reinforced composite liners.

  1. Remote Shopping Robot System -Development of a hand mechanism for grasping fresh foods in a supermarket

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohya, Akihisa

    supermarkets, in this research, we propose "remote shopping robot system" as a concrete application efficiency. II. REMOTE SHOPPING ROBOT SYSTEM A. Concept In the case of industrial products, objects haveRemote Shopping Robot System -Development of a hand mechanism for grasping fresh foods

  2. A CONSTANT-INVENTORY TACTICAL PLANNING MODEL FOR A JOB SHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Stephen C.

    A CONSTANT-INVENTORY TACTICAL PLANNING MODEL FOR A JOB SHOP Stephen C. Graves Massachusetts a constant-inventory tactical planning model for a generic manufacturing system, such as a job shop assume that we can regulate the release of work to the shop to maintain the constant-inventory constraint

  3. Instruction Guide Shopping Using the Product Keyword Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheremet, Alexandru

    powerful search engine. Start with by entering an item into the search field and follow the steps outlined the Home/Shop tab at the top to start your search 3. To start searching for an item, enter the item in the search field ­ include specific search terms, such as "latex-free gloves" instead of just "gloves

  4. Visopt ShopFloor System: Integrating Planning into Production Scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartak, Roman

    Visopt ShopFloor System: Integrating Planning into Production Scheduling Roman Bart√°k Charles, the first machine pre-processes the item (3 time units) that is finished in the second machine (additional 3 in parallel and a worker is required (left) or via a serial production when the item is pre- processed

  5. A laboratory experiment from the Little Shop of Physics at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Darel

    1 A laboratory experiment from the Little Shop of Physics at Colorado State University CMMAP Reach a short wavelength. Of course, there's more to the spectrum than this; beyond the red is the longer was brighter, and clearly had more energy, but something about it was lacking. It was Albert Einstein who came

  6. A laboratory experiment from the Little Shop of Physics at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Darel

    1 A laboratory experiment from the Little Shop of Physics at Colorado State University CMMAP Reach of colors from red to violet is the spread of different wavelengths that makes up visible light. Of course different parts of the spectrum: Wavelength and energy. The red end of the rainbow corresponds to long

  7. Electric motor model repair specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These model repair specifications list the minimum requirements for repair and overhaul of polyphase AC squireel cage induction motors. All power ranges, voltages, and speeds of squirrel cage motors are covered.

  8. Window Replacement, Rehabilitation, & Repair Guides - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Window Replacement, Rehabilitation, & Repair Guides - Building America Top Innovation Window Replacement, Rehabilitation, & Repair Guides - Building America Top Innovation Effec...

  9. Action Memorandum for Decommissioning of TAN-607 Hot Shop Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. A. Pinzel

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy is documenting the selection of an alternative for the TAN-607 Hot Shop Area using a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action (NTCRA). The scope of the removal action is limited to TAN-607 Hot Shop Area. An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) has assisted the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office in identifuomg the most effective method for performing the decommissioning of this structure whose mission has ended. TAN-607 Hot Shop Area is located at Test Area North Technical Support Facility within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The selected alternative consists of demolishing the TAN-607 aboveground structures and components, removing belowground noninert components (e.g. wood products), and removing the radiologically contaminated debris that does not meet remedial action objectives (RAOs), as defined in the Record of Decision Amendment for the V-Tanks and Explanation of Significant Differences for the PM-2A Tanks at Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-10.

  10. Record of Decision/Remedial Alternative Selection for the Motor Shops Seepage Basin (716-A)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E.

    1999-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This decision document presents the selected remedial alternative for the Motor Shops Seepage Basin located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina

  11. In-depth survey report: Control technology for small business: Evaluation of a flexible duct ventilation system for radiator repair, at A-1 Radiator, Reno, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheehy, J.W.; Cooper, T.C.; Hall, R.M.; Meier, R.M.

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering control evaluation was conducted at a radiator repair shop which operated at a very high level of production. The shop had the potential for high exposures to lead (7439921) because of the high volume of work, the number of radiator repair stations, and repairs to huge radiators for mining equipment. Local exhaust ventilation which utilized adjustable arm elephant trunk exhaust hoods had been installed 18 months prior to the visit. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the local exhaust ventilation (LEV) system to control lead exposures during work operations. Time weighted average personal exposures for lead were at or below the OSHA permissible exposure level for ten of 15 mechanics during a high level of production. The elephant trunk ventilation system was capable of controlling lead fumes while shop doors were open, except at one tank in a corner. Work practices were found to be a source of excessive lead exposure. Emissions from a worker's own soldering and from soldering activity upwind of the worker were a major source of lead exposure. Collapse of flexible portions of ducts could reduce exhaust volume. Dampers also showed a tendency to close automatically.

  12. Cooling Dry Cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Sandra R.

    2000-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication discusses the effects of heat stress on dairy cows, methods of cooling cows, and research on the effects of cooling cows in the dry period....

  13. Cooking with Dried Potatoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the nutritional value and safe storage of dried potatoes, a commodity food. It also offers food preparation ideas....

  14. Motor Repair Tech Brief

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOE TribaltheMyMinutesDepartmentCharacteristics | Motor Repair

  15. Better approximation guarantees for job-shop scheduling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, L.A.; Paterson, M. [Univ. of Warwick, Conventry (United Kingdom); Srinivasan, A. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore)] [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Job-shop scheduling is a classical NP-hard problem. Shmoys, Stein & Wein presented the first polynomial-time approximation algorithm for this problem that has a good (polylogarithmic) approximation guarantee. We improve the approximation guarantee of their work, and present further improvements for some important NP-hard special cases of this problem (e.g., in the preemptive case where machines can suspend work on operations and later resume). We also present NC algorithms with improved approximation guarantees for some NP-hard special cases.

  16. Industrial motor repair in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schueler, V.; Leistner, P.; Douglass, J.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report characterizes the motor repair industry in the United States; summarizes current motor repair and testing practice; and identifies barriers to energy motor repair practice and recommends strategies for overcoming those barriers.

  17. Waste Minimization Plans and activities in the MFD Plating Shop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W.; Steffani, C.P.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plating Shop (Building 322), provides processes such as electroplating, electroless plating, anodizing, cleaning, etching, electroforming and chemical milling. We in MFD are committed to an active program on waste minimization, and the purpose of this document is to outline the plan of action. Our short range minimization goals are threefold: (1) Reduce our major waste stream by 90%, (2) Minimize discharge of rinse water to sewer system, and (3) Eliminate vapor degreasing in the shop. The intermediate goals consist of characterizing the waste streams and evaluating recovery processes. To do this, we first need to have the distillation unit operational and time to determine its effectiveness. If it proves to be as effective as we anticipate, we will perhaps purchase a second unit. Regardless, the streams that we can identify include: nickel, copper, rinses, acids, alkalies, electropolish and miscellaneous. Our goal is to utilize electrolytic processes to recover metals such as nickel and copper and processes such as ion exchange for some of the other streams. We intend to evaluate the full gamut of recycling processes available for these streams. We anticipate completing this phase of the minimization program by January 1993. The long range goal is zero discharge or since this could prove extremely difficult, development of processes that will allow us to produce a sludge cake that could be handled by our Hazardous Waste Management Group.

  18. Building 9401-2 Plating Shop Surveillance and Maintenance Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a plan for implementing surveillance and maintenance (S and M) activities to ensure that Building 9401-2 Plating Shop is maintained in a cost effective and environmentally secure configuration until subsequent closure during the final disposition phase of decommissioning. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) G430.1A-2, Surveillance and Maintenance During Facility Disposition (1997), was used as guidance in the development of this plan. The S and M Plan incorporates DOE O 430.1A, Life Cycle Asset Management (LCAM) (1998a) direction to provide for conducting surveillance and maintenance activities required to maintain the facility and remaining hazardous and radioactive materials, wastes, and contamination in a stable and known condition pending facility disposition. Recommendations in the S and M plan have been made that may not be requirement-based but would reduce the cost and frequency of surveillance and maintenance activities. During the course of S and M activities, the facility's condition may change so as to present an immediate or developing hazard or unsatisfactory condition. Corrective action should be coordinated with the appropriate support organizations using the requirements and guidance stated in procedure Y10-202, Rev. 1, Integrated Safety Management Program, (Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES), 1998a) implemented at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and the methodology of the Nuclear Operations Conduct of Operations Manual (LMES, 1999) for the Depleted Uranium Operations (DUO) organization. The key S and M objectives applicable to the Plating Shop are to: Ensure adequate containment of remaining residual material in exhaust stacks and outside process piping, stored chemicals awaiting offsite shipment, and items located in the Radioactive Material Area (RMA); Provide access control into the facility and physical safety to S and M personnel; Maintain the facility in a manner that will protect the public, the environment, and the S and M personnel; Provide an S and M plan which identifies and complies with applicable environmental, safety, and health safeguards and security requirements; and Provide a cost effective S and M program for the plating shop, Building 9401-2.

  19. Freeze drying method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coppa, Nicholas V. (Malvern, PA); Stewart, Paul (Youngstown, NY); Renzi, Ernesto (Youngstown, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  20. Freeze drying apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coppa, Nicholas V. (Malvern, PA); Stewart, Paul (Youngstown, NY); Renzi, Ernesto (Youngstown, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  1. Dry Process Electrode Fabrication

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    250m of free standing dry process cathode at thickness >200 m thickness. + Validate cost model by running pilot coating line at >25 mmin. + Deliver 24 cells in A123 SOA EV...

  2. Dry Process Electrode Fabrication

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    free standing dry process cathode that retains 50% capacity at 1C rate. + Validate cost model by running pilot coating line. + Deliver 24 cells in SOA EV cell format....

  3. Dry Process Electrode Fabrication

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    free standing dry process cathode that retains 50% capacity at 1C rate. + Validate cost model by running pilot coating line. + Deliver 24 cells in SOA EV cell format. 3...

  4. TAN Hot Shop and Support Facility Utilization Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picker, B.A.

    2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacts to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex caused by early closure (prior to 2018) and Demolition and Dismantlement (D and D) of the Test Area North (TAN) hot shop and its support facilities are explored in this report. Various possible conditions, such as Standby, Safe Store and Lay-up, that the facility may be placed in prior to eventually being turned over to D and D are addressed. The requirements, impacts, and implications to the facility and to the DOE Complex are discussed for each condition presented in the report. Some details of the report reference the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Spent Nuclear Fuel Life Cycle Baseline Plan, the INEEL 2000 Infrastructure Long Range Plan, and other internal INEEL reports.

  5. TAN HOT SHOP AND SUPPORT FACILITY UTILIZATION STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Ken Crawforth

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacts to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex caused by early closure (prior to 2018) and Demolition and Dismantlement (D&D) of the Test Area North (TAN) hot shop and its support facilities are explored in this report. Various possible conditions, such as Standby, Safe Store and Lay-up, that the facility may be placed in prior to eventually being turned over to D&D are addressed. The requirements, impacts, and implications to the facility and to the DOE Complex are discussed for each condition presented in the report. Some details of the report reference the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Spent Nuclear Fuel Life Cycle Baseline Plan, the INEEL 2000 Infrastructure Long Range Plan, and other internal INEEL reports.

  6. DockingShop: A Tool for Interactive Molecular Docking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ting-Cheng; Max, Nelson L.; Ding, Jinhui; Bethel, E. Wes; Crivelli, Silvia N.

    2005-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Given two independently determined molecular structures, the molecular docking problem predicts the bound association, or best fit between them, while allowing for conformational changes of the individual molecules during construction of a molecular complex. Docking Shop is an integrated environment that permits interactive molecular docking by navigating a ligand or protein to an estimated binding site of a receptor with real-time graphical feedback of scoring factors as visual guides. Our program can be used to create initial configurations for a protein docking prediction process. Its output--the structure of aprotein-ligand or protein-protein complex--may serve as an input for aprotein docking algorithm, or an optimization process. This tool provides molecular graphics interfaces for structure modeling, interactive manipulation, navigation, optimization, and dynamic visualization to aid users steer the prediction process using their biological knowledge.

  7. ACADEMIC MACHINE SHOP SAFETY Procedure: 6.01 Created: 7/2011 Version: 2.0 Revised: 9/30/2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    ACADEMIC MACHINE SHOP SAFETY Procedure: 6.01 Created: 7/2011 Version: 2.0 Revised: 9, staff and visitors working in any Academic Machine Shop. It defines safety guidelines, training in a machine shop. B. Applicability/Scope Applicability: This policy covers users of all Academic Machine Shops

  8. Large steam turbine repair: A survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Findlan, S.J.; Lube, B. (EPRI Nondestructive Evaluation Center, Charlotte, NC (United States))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers a survey taken to document the current state-of-the-art in repairs to large steam turbines. One objective was to provide information to assist utilities in making repair or replacement decisions. The survey revealed that a large number of repairs have been successfully repaired involving both mechanical and welding repair techniques. Repair techniques have been improving in recent years and are being used more frequently. No guidelines or codes exist for the repair of steam turbine components so each repair is primarily controlled by agreement between the utility, contractor and insurer. Types of repairs are reviewed in this report and in addition, the capabilities of various contractors who are currently active in providing repair service. 40 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Inspect and Repair Steam Traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on inspecting and repairing steam traps provide how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  10. Argonne/EPA system captures mercury from air in gold shops |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the mercury vaporizes. The vaporized mercury is directed outside the shop into the open air where it descends onto homes, water and food of the local populations. Image credit:...

  11. New Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    cost for the year, and the color of the light (from warmyellowish, to white to coolblue). Download our placard Lumens: the new way to shop for light to see how to use the...

  12. Bosh repairs No. 3 blast furnace, Edgar Thomson Plant Mon Valley Works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoupis, M.G.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes in detail the steps taken from quenching to dry out of the furnace to repair the bosh area of the No.3 blast furnace. Inspection of the area revealed that there was no brick anywhere in the bosh. Brick in the tuyere breast area had been peeled back to reveal the steel plate, and descaling revealed 14 pipes fully exposed. None were leaking, but one seemed badly deteriorated. Conventional repairs could not take place before the scheduled blow-in. Installation of coolers were instead tried.

  13. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with the Baseline Risk Assessment for the 716-A Motor Shops Seepage Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E.

    1997-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation/Baseline Risk Assessment of the 716-A Motor Shops Seepage Basin.

  14. Drying of fiber webs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, David W. (9253 Glenoaks Blvd., Sun Valley, CA 91352)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and an apparatus for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquified eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciately stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers.

  15. Drying of fiber webs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, D.W.

    1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and an apparatus are disclosed for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquefied eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciatively stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers. 6 figs.

  16. Verification of Motor Repair Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, K.

    Motor testing at Advanced Energy has shown that a motor that has not suffered irreparable damage as a result of failure can be repaired to perform as well as before the failure. But the only way to achieve the performance level of an energy...

  17. Method of drying articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of drying a green particulate article includes the steps of: a. Providing a green article which includes a particulate material and a pore phase material, the pore phase material including a solvent; and b. contacting the green article with a liquid desiccant for a period of time sufficient to remove at least a portion of the solvent from the green article, the pore phase material acting as a semipermeable barrier to allow the solvent to be sorbed into the liquid desiccant, the pore phase material substantially preventing the liquid desiccant from entering the pores.

  18. Method of drying articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janney, M.A.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of drying a green particulate article includes the steps of: (a) Providing a green article which includes a particulate material and a pore phase material, the pore phase material including a solvent; and (b) contacting the green article with a liquid desiccant for a period of time sufficient to remove at least a portion of the solvent from the green article, the pore phase material acting as a semipermeable barrier to allow the solvent to be sorbed into the liquid desiccant, the pore phase material substantially preventing the liquid desiccant from entering the pores. 3 figs.

  19. Dry reforming of hydrocarbon feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Yatish T. [Norfolk State University; Gardner, Todd H. [U.S. DOE

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developments in catalyst technology for the dry reforming of hydrocarbon feedstocks are reviewed for methane, higher hydrocarbons and alcohols. Thermodynamics, mechanisms and the kinetics of dry reforming are also reviewed. The literature on Ni catalysts, bi-metallic Ni catalysts and the role of promoters on Ni catalysts is critically evaluated. The use of noble and transitional metal catalysts for dry reforming is discussed. The application of solid oxide and metal carbide catalysts to dry reforming is also evaluated. Finally, various mechanisms for catalyst deactivation are assessed. This review also examines the various process related issues associated with dry reforming such as its application and heat optimization. Novel approaches such as supercritical dry reforming and microwave assisted dry reforming are briefly expanded upon.

  20. Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy Bohachek; Charles Park; Bruce Wallace; Phil Winston; Steve Marschman

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates existing capabilities at the INL to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for opening and handling full-sized dry storage casks. The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603, Irradiated Spent Fuel Storage Facility, provides the infrastructure to support handling and examining casks and their contents. Based on a reasonable set of assumptions, it is possible to receive, open, inspect, remove samples, close, and reseal large bolted-lid dry storage casks at the INL. The capability can also be used to open and inspect casks that were last examined at the TAN Hot Shop over ten years ago. The Castor V/21 and REA-2023 casks can provide additional confirmatory information regarding the extended performance of low-burnup (<45 GWD/MTU) used nuclear fuel. Once a dry storage cask is opened inside CPP-603, used fuel retrieved from the cask can be packaged in a shipping cask, and sent to a laboratory for testing. Testing at the INLís Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) can occur starting with shipment of samples from CPP-603 over an on-site road, avoiding the need to use public highways. This reduces cost and reduces the risk to the public. The full suite of characterization methods needed to establish the condition of the fuel exists and MFC. Many other testing capabilities also exist at MFC, but when those capabilities are not adequate, samples can be prepared and shipped to other laboratories for testing. This report discusses how the casks would be handled, what work needs to be done to ready the facilities/capabilities, and what the work will cost.

  1. Mathematical optimization of a flexible job shop problem including preventive maintenance and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patriksson, Michael

    1 Mathematical optimization of a flexible job shop problem including preventive maintenance as the scheduling problem includes limited availability of fixtures and preventive maintenance planning periodicity, a number of preventive maintenance activities need to be carried out in some of the resources

  2. Framing the Conversation: The Role of Facebook Conversations in Shopping for Eyeglasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Shaun K.

    Framing the Conversation: The Role of Facebook Conversations in Shopping for Eyeglasses Karim Said Warby Parker's Facebook page and explore the ways customers formulate questions and conversations,000 Facebook posts, consisting of photos, comments, and "likes". Using statistical analyses and qualitative

  3. 241-AZ-101 Waste Tank Color Video Camera System Shop Acceptance Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WERRY, S.M.

    2000-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes shop acceptance test results. The test was performed prior to installation at tank AZ-101. Both the camera system and camera purge system were originally sought and procured as a part of initial waste retrieval project W-151.

  4. Role of DNA repair protein ERCC1 in skin cancer†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Liang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is one of the major repair systems for removal of DNA lesions. The NER pathway has evolved mainly to repair UV-induced DNA damage and is also active against a broad range of endogenously ...

  5. Automotive Repair by Number Theory Bart Snapp and Chris Snapp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snapp, Bart

    Automotive Repair by Number Theory Bart Snapp and Chris Snapp While repairing the ignition switch on a 1981 Fiat Spider, we discovered the following connection between number theory and automotive repair

  6. The feasibility of electrophoretic repair of impoundment leaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Ji-Seok

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    finding, repairing and testing the leaks, are tedious, expensive, and dangerous to workers. Electrophoretic repair technique is an innovative, economic, and safe method to repair the leakage of impoundments. A suspension of clay particles is induced...

  7. Repair of overheating linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barkley, Walter; Baldwin, William; Bennett, Gloria; Bitteker, Leo; Borden, Michael; Casados, Jeff; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Gorman, Fred; Johnson, Kenneth; Kurennoy, Sergey; Martinez, Alberto; OíHara, James; Perez, Edward; Roller, Brandon; Rybarcyk, Lawrence; Stark, Peter; Stockton, Jerry

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a proton accelerator that produces high energy particle beams for experiments. These beams include neutrons and protons for diverse uses including radiography, isotope production, small feature study, lattice vibrations and material science. The Drift Tube Linear Accelerator (DTL) is the first portion of a half mile long linear section of accelerator that raises the beam energy from 750 keV to 100 MeV. In its 31st year of operation (2003), the DTL experienced serious issues. The first problem was the inability to maintain resonant frequency at full power. The second problem was increased occurrences of over-temperature failure of cooling hoses. These shortcomings led to an investigation during the 2003 yearly preventative maintenance shutdown that showed evidence of excessive heating: discolored interior tank walls and coper oxide deposition in the cooling circuits. Since overheating was suspected to be caused by compromised heat transfer, improving that was the focus of the repair effort. Investigations revealed copper oxide flow inhibition and iron oxide scale build up. Acid cleaning was implemented with careful attention to protection of the base metal, selection of components to clean and minimization of exposure times. The effort has been very successful in bringing the accelerator through a complete eight month run cycle allowing an incredible array of scientific experiments to be completed this year (2003-2004). This paper will describe the systems, investigation analysis, repair, return to production and conclusion.

  8. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orloff, D.I.; Phelan, P.M.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted on a sheet-fed pilot-scale shoe press to compare impulse drying and double-felted pressing. Both an IPST (Institute of Paper Science and Technology) ceramic coated and Beloit Type A press roll were evaluated for lienrboard sheet structures having a wide range of z-direction permeability. Purpose was to find ways of correcting sheet sticking problems observed in previous pilot-scale shoe press experiments. Results showed that impulse drying was superior to double felted pressing in both press dryness and in important paper physical properties. Impulse drying critical temperature was found to depend on specific surface of the heated layer of the sheet, thermal properties of the press roll surface, and choice of felt. Impulse drying of recycled and two-ply liner was demonstrated for both Southern Pile and Douglas fir-containing furnishes.

  9. INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES REVIEW & EVALUATION OF INTERNAL PIPELINE REPAIR TRIALS REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robin Gordon; Bill Bruce; Ian Harris; Dennis Harwig; George Ritter; Bill Mohr; Matt Boring; Nancy Porter; Mike Sullivan; Chris Neary

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe sections without liners, indicating that this type of liner is generally ineffective at restoring the pressure containing capabilities of pipelines. Failure pressure for pipe repaired with carbon fiber-reinforced composite liner was greater than that of the un-repaired pipe section with damage, indicating that this type of liner is effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe. Pipe repaired with weld deposition failed at pressures lower than that of un-repaired pipe in both the virgin and damaged conditions, indicating that this repair technology is less effective at restoring the pressure containing capability of pipe than a carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair. Physical testing indicates that carbon fiber-reinforced liner repair is the most promising technology evaluated to-date. Development of a comprehensive test plan for this process is recommended for use in the next phase of this project.

  10. Sustaining dry surfaces under water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul R. Jones; Xiuqing Hao; Eduardo R. Cruz-Chu; Konrad Rykaczewski; Krishanu Nandy; Thomas M. Schutzius; Kripa K. Varanasi; Constantine M. Megaridis; Jens H. Walther; Petros Koumoutsakos; Horacio D. Espinosa; Neelesh A. Patankar

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water. In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys - thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical predictions are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations and experiments.

  11. Electric vehicle repairs and modifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buffett, R.K.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This informal report describes the electric vehicle (EV) inspection and the necessary maintenance and repairs required to improve reliable operation of five Volkswagen (VW) Electrotransporter vans and five VW EV buses. The recommendations of TVA, EPRI, GES, Volkswagen, Siemens, and Hoppecke have been carried out in this effort. These modifications were necessary before entering the EPRI/TVA phase II and III continuing program. As new energy storage systems are explored using the VW test-bed vehicles in the battery field testing program, additional modifications may be required. All modifications will be submitted to the vehicle and component manufacturer for general assessment and recommendations. At present three different types of battery systems are being evaluated in six VW vehicles. The two Hoppecke and Exide utilize the modified Hoppecke charging systems. The other batteries being tested require off-board chargers specified by their manufacturer and are separate from the vehicle system.

  12. CATASTROPHIC REPAIR REQUEST CHECKLIST Office of Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    Not Meet Policy Not Sure Equipment may not be covered by a service contract that provides for repair Contacted: ______________ Amount of Annual Service Contract: $ ___________ Meets Policy Info Pending Does

  13. Vehicle Repair Policy Outline the policy regarding vehicle repair on University of Michigan (U-M) vehicles.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    Vehicle Repair Policy Objective Outline the policy regarding vehicle repair on University of Michigan (U-M) vehicles. Policy 1. All vehicle repairs performed on U-M vehicles must be coordinated facility to repair their fleet vehicles. 2. U-M vehicles leased through Fleet Services include routine

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - annular repair strategies Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - lowing a user to create custom repair strategies. ReAssert used a five-step repair process around its... library of repair ... Source: Marinov, Darko - Department of...

  15. Environmental assessment for the Plating Shop Replacement, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existing of Y-12 Plant Plating Shop provides vital support functions for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs operations. In addition to weapon component plating, the facility performs other plating services to support existing operations for the Y-12 Plant, other DOE facilities, and other federal agencies. In addition, the facility would also provide essential deplating services for weapons reclamation and teardown. The existing Y-12 Plant Plating Shop is presently located in a structure which is rapidly deteriorating and obsolete. The existing building structure was originally designed to house a steam plant, not chemical plating operations. As such, vapors from plating operations have deteriorated the structure to a point where a new facility is needed for continued safe operations. The potential environmental impacts of the proposed action was anticipated to be minimal and would affect no environmentally sensitive areas. Some short-term construction- and demolition-related effects would occur in an already highly industrialized setting. These include temporarily disturbing 72,000 square feet of land for the new plating shop and related site preparation activities, constructing a permanent building on part of the area, and using 80 construction personnel over a period of 18 months for site preparation and construction. Demolition effects vary depending on the environmentally suitable option selected, but they could involve as much as 262 cubic yards of concrete rubble and approximately 1600 cubic yards of soil disposed as waste. Either 1600 cubic yards of fresh soil or 1850 yards of clay and fresh soil could be required. Soil erosion would be minimal. Approximately 20 construction personnel would be involved for 12 months in demolition activities.

  16. Selective batch crushing in the coal-preparation shop at OAO NTMK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.A. Berkutov; Yu.V. Stepanov; P.V. Shtark; L.A. Makhortova; N.K. Popova; D.A. Koshkarov; N.V. Tsarev [OAO Nizhnetagil'skii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (NTMK)(Russian Federation)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2004, after reconstruction at OAO Nizhnetagil'skii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (NTMK), blast furnace 6 went into operation for the production of vanadium from hot metal. At the startup of furnace 6, besides optimising its composition; it was decided to restore selective crushing of the coal batch using pneumatic and mechanical separation in the third unit of the coal preparation shop. Additional increase in the mechanical strength of coke by 1.5-2.0% was predicted with a 0.5-1.0% decrease in wear.

  17. Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessel Repair Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuster, George J.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of reactor pressure vessels. This work indicates that the large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the repair ends. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using high sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing, validation by other nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, and complemented by destructive testing.

  18. Emissions control through dry scrubbing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farber, P.S.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concern with operating problems, and the desire for system simplicity, has resulted in the development of dry scrubbing systems for flue gas cleanup, and their acceptance by industry as an alternate to the conventional wet scrubbers. These dry scrubbing systems incorporate two commonly used pieces of equipment; spray dryers, which have been used for many years to manufacture everything from detergents to powdered milk, and a particulates removal device (either a fabric filter or an electrostatic precipitator). The first application of this technology to removal of sulfur oxides from high sulfur coal combustion gases occurred when Argonne National Laboratory installed a system in 1981 as the control device on its main coal-fired boiler. To date, this type of pollution control system has shown itself capable of meeting state emission standards and, in a special test run, of removing over 90% of the sulfur oxides produced from combustion of a coal with over 4% sulfur.

  19. Textile Drying Via Wood Gasification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGowan, T. F.; Jape, A. D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEXTILE DRYING VIA WOOD GASIFICATION Thomas F. ;McGowan, Anthony D. Jape Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, Georgia ABSTRACT This project was carried out to investigate the possibility of using wood gas as a direct replacement... for dryers. In addition to the experimental program described above, the DOE grant covered two other major areas. A survey of the textile industry was made to assess the market for gasification equip ment. The major findings were that a large amount...

  20. Repairable chip bonding/interconnect process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Livermore, CA); Malba, Vincent (Livermore, CA); Riddle, Robert A. (Tracy, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A repairable, chip-to-board interconnect process which addresses cost and testability issues in the multi-chip modules. This process can be carried out using a chip-on-sacrificial-substrate technique, involving laser processing. This process avoids the curing/solvent evolution problems encountered in prior approaches, as well is resolving prior plating problems and the requirements for fillets. For repairable high speed chip-to-board connection, transmission lines can be formed on the sides of the chip from chip bond pads, ending in a gull wing at the bottom of the chip for subsequent solder.

  1. Repairable chip bonding/interconnect process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Contolini, R.J.; Malba, V.; Riddle, R.A.

    1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A repairable, chip-to-board interconnect process which addresses cost and testability issues in the multi-chip modules is disclosed. This process can be carried out using a chip-on-sacrificial-substrate technique, involving laser processing. This process avoids the curing/solvent evolution problems encountered in prior approaches, as well is resolving prior plating problems and the requirements for fillets. For repairable high speed chip-to-board connection, transmission lines can be formed on the sides of the chip from chip bond pads, ending in a gull wing at the bottom of the chip for subsequent solder. 10 figs.

  2. Development of a composite repair system for reinforcing offshore risers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Christopher Richard

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A research program was conducted to investigate the application of composite materials in repairing corroded offshore risers, leading to the development of an optimized repair using a hybrid carbon/E-glass system. The objective of this research...

  3. Phonemic Categorization and Phonotactic Repair as Parallel Sublexical Processes†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishikawa, Kiyoshi

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    categorization and phonotactic repair are sublexical and simultaneous; phonotactic repairs themselves depend on coarticulation cues. Such models can be implemented in two different versions: suprasegmental matching, according to which a speech signal is matched...

  4. Compton Dry-Cask Imaging System

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compton-Dry Cask Imaging Scanner is a system that verifies and documents the presence of spent nuclear fuel rods in dry-cask storage and determines their isotopic composition without moving or opening the cask. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/compton-dry-cask-imaging-system/

  5. Compton Dry-Cask Imaging System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compton-Dry Cask Imaging Scanner is a system that verifies and documents the presence of spent nuclear fuel rods in dry-cask storage and determines their isotopic composition without moving or opening the cask. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/compton-dry-cask-imaging-system/

  6. Window shopping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, D.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author addresses the energy efficiency of windows and describes changes and new products available in this consumer information article. Experiments currently being done by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Bonneville Power Authority and the Washington State Energy Office show that some of these superwindows collect more energy from the sun than they let escape from inside the home. One type of window in current production is the low-E (low-emissivity) and the IGUs (insulated glass units). Low-E techniques include glazing of the glass with various materials including polyester and metallic coatings. Other measures include filling the airspace in double pane windows with argon, aerogel or by creating a vacuum in the airspace. Another factor the author considers is ultraviolet light protection.

  7. Repairable File and Storage Systems A Dissertation Presented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiueh, Tzi-cker

    Repairable File and Storage Systems A Dissertation Presented by Ningning Zhu to The Graduate School of the Dissertation Repairable File and Storage System by Ningning Zhu Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Science Stony stream file/storage system. Repairable file/storage system needs to perform two tasks. First it has

  8. Visualization of Mismatch Repair in Bacterial Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley T.

    We determined the localizations of mismatch repair proteins in living Bacillus subtilis cells. MutS-GFP colocalized with the chromosome in all cells and formed foci in a subset of cells. MutL-GFP formed foci in a subset ...

  9. Method for mask repair using defect compensation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweeney, Donald W. (San Ramon, CA); Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for repair of amplitude and/or phase defects in lithographic masks. The method involves modifying or altering a portion of the absorber pattern on the surface of the mask blank proximate to the mask defect to compensate for the local disturbance (amplitude or phase) of the optical field due to the defect.

  10. EPA Lead Safety for Renovation, Repair and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    than 20 f lead-based paint is dis- e exterior. Window replace- onsidered minor mainte- air. If you're of thousands of dollars in fines and put yourself and your company at risk of po- tential lawsuits. 2. ProtectEPA Lead Safety for Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) Course Certified Renovators Class

  11. Repairing Type Errors in Functional Programs†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAdam, Bruce J

    Type systems for programming languages can be used by compilers to reject programs which are found to be unsound and which may, therefore, fail to execute successfully. When a program is rejected the programmer must repair it so that it can be type...

  12. An emergency response team for membrane repair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchhausen, Tomas

    events, which we focus on here. As discussed later, Ca2+ influx at the site of plasma membrane-fusion events are required to repair a torn plasma membrane, and we propose that this emergency products and the plasma membrane. Reseal or die. Plasma-membrane disruption is a normal event in the life

  13. Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

  14. Dry-cleaning of graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Algara-Siller, Gerardo [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, Group of Electron Microscopy of Materials Science, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Ulm 89081 (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Technical University Ilmenau, Weimarer Strasse 25, Ilmenau 98693 (Germany); Lehtinen, Ossi; Kaiser, Ute, E-mail: ute.kaiser@uni-ulm.de [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, Group of Electron Microscopy of Materials Science, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Ulm 89081 (Germany); Turchanin, Andrey [Faculty of Physics, University of Bielefeld, Universitštsstr. 25, Bielefeld 33615 (Germany)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of the structural and electronic properties of graphene in its pristine state are hindered by hydrocarbon contamination on the surfaces. Also, in many applications, contamination reduces the performance of graphene. Contamination is introduced during sample preparation and is adsorbed also directly from air. Here, we report on the development of a simple dry-cleaning method for producing large atomically clean areas in free-standing graphene. The cleanness of graphene is proven using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron spectroscopy.

  15. Microwave drying of ferric oxide pellets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickles, C.A.; Xia, D.K. [Queens` Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of microwave energy for the drying of ferric oxide pellets has been investigated and evaluated. It is shown that the microwave drying rates are much higher than those observed in the conventional process. Also there is some potential for improved quality of the product. As a stand-alone technology it is unlikely that microwave drying would be economical for pellets due to the low cost of conventional fuels. However, based on an understanding of the drying mechanisms in the conventional process and in the microwave process, it is shown that microwave-assisted drying offers considerable potential. In this hybrid process, the advantages of the two drying techniques are combined to provide an improved drying process.

  16. Dry melting of high albite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anovitz, L.M.: Blencoe, J.G.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of albitic melts are central to thermodynamic models for synthetic and natural granitic liquids. The authors have analyzed published phase-equilibrium and thermodynamic data for the dry fusion of high albite to develop a more accurate equation for the Biggs free energy of this reaction to 30 kbar and 1,400 C. Strict criteria for reaction reversal were sued to evaluate the phase-equilibrium data, and the thermodynamic properties of solid and liquid albite were evaluated using the published uncertainties in the original measurements. Results suggest that neither available phase-equilibrium experiments nor thermodynamic data tightly constrain the location of the reaction. Experimental solidus temperatures at 1 atm range from 1,100 to 1,120 C. High-pressure experiments were not reversed completely and may have been affected by several sources of error, but the apparent inconsistencies among the results of the various experimentalists are eliminated when only half-reversal data are considered. Uncertainties in thermodynamic data yield large variations in permissible reaction slopes. Disparities between experimental and calculated melting curves are, therefore, largely attributable to these difficulties, and there is no fundamental disagreement between the available phase-equilibrium and thermodynamic data for the dry melting of albite. Consequently, complex speciation models for albitic melts, based on the assumption that these discrepancies represent a real characteristic of the system, are unjustified at this time.

  17. Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) for Decommissioning of TAN-607 Hot Shop Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. P. Floerke

    2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Test Area North (TAN) -607, the Technical Support Facility, is located at the north end of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is proposing to decommission the northern section of the TAN-607 facility, hereinafter referred to as TAN-607 Hot Shop Area, under a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) non-time-critical removal action (NTCRA). Despite significant efforts by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) to secure new business, no future mission has been identified for the TAN-607 Hot Shop Area. Its disposition has been agreed to by the Idaho State Historical Preservation Office documented in the Memorandum of Agreement signed October 2005 and it is therefore considered a surplus facility. A key element in DOE's strategy for surplus facilities is decommissioning to the maximum extent possible to ensure risk and building footprint reduction and thereby eliminating operations and maintenance cost. In addition, the DOE's 2006 Strategic Plan is ''complete cleanup of the contaminated nuclear weapons manufacturing and testing sites across the United States. DOE is responsible for the risk reduction and cleanup of the environmental legacy of the Nation's nuclear weapons program, one of the largest, most diverse, and technically complex environmental programs in the world. The Department will successfully achieve this strategic goal by ensuring the safety of the DOE employees and U.S. citizens, acquiring the best resources to complete the complex tasks, and managing projects throughout the United States in the most efficient and effective manner.'' TAN-607 is designated as a historical Signature Property by DOE Headquarters Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and, as such, public participation is required to determine the final disposition of the facility. The decommissioning action will place the TAN-607 Hot Shop Area in a final configuration that will be protective of human health and the environment. Decommissioning the TAN-607 Hot Shop Area is consistent with the joint DOE and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, which establishes the CERCLA NTCRA process as the preferred approach for decommissioning surplus DOE facilities. Under this policy, a NTCRA may be taken when DOE determines that the action will prevent, minimize, stabilize, or eliminate a risk to human health and/or the environment. When DOE determines that a CERCLA NTCRA is necessary, DOE is authorized to evaluate, select, and implement the removal action that DOE determines is most appropriate to address the potential risk posed by the release or threat of release. This action is taken in accordance with applicable authorities and in conjunction with EPA and the State of Idaho pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. In keeping with the joint policy, this engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was developed in accordance with CERCLA as amended by the ''Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986'' and in accordance with the ''National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan.'' This EE/CA is consistent with the remedial action objectives (RAOs) of the Final Record of Decision, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-10 and supports the overall remediation goals established through the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order for Waste Area Group 1. Waste Area Group 1 is located at TAN.

  18. Sampling for Beryllium Surface Contamination using Wet, Dry and Alcohol Wipe Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, Kent

    2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project was conducted at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Kansas City Plant, operated by Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, in conjunction with the Safety Sciences Department of Central Missouri State University, to compare relative removal efficiencies of three wipe sampling techniques currently used at Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling with dry Whatman 42 filter paper, with water-moistened (Ghost Wipe) materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Test plates were prepared using 100 mm X 15 mm Pyrex Petri dishes with interior surfaces spray painted with a bond coat primer. To achieve uniform deposition over the test plate surface, 10 ml aliquots of solution containing 1 beryllium and 0.1 ml of metal working fluid were transferred to the test plates and subsequently evaporated. Metal working fluid was added to simulate the slight oiliness common on surfaces in metal working shops where fugitive oil mist accumulates over time. Sixteen test plates for each wipe method (dry, water, and methanol) were processed and sampled using a modification of wiping patterns recommended by OSHA Method 125G. Laboratory and statistical analysis showed that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed significantly more (about twice as much) beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes (p< 0.001), which removed significantly more (about twice as much) residue as dry wipes (p <0.001). Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced residue removal efficiency.

  19. Land application uses for dry flue gas desulfurization by-products: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, W.; Bigham, J.; Forster, R.; Hitzhusen, F.; Lal, R.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.; Haefner, R.; Rowe, G.

    1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    New flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing technologies create a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction product that contains sulfate and sulfite, and coal fly ash. Generally, dry FGD by-products are treated as solid wastes and disposed in landfills. However, landfill sites are becoming scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. Provided the environmental impacts are socially and scientifically acceptable, beneficial uses via recycling can provide economic benefits to both the producer and the end user of the FGD. A study titled ''Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products'' was initiated in December, 1990 to develop and demonstrate large volume, beneficial uses of FGD by-products. Phase 1 and Phase 2 reports have been published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA. Phase 3 objectives were to demonstrate, using field studies, the beneficial uses of FGD by-products (1) as an amendment material on agricultural lands and on abandoned surface coal mine land, (2) as an engineering material for soil stabilization and raid repair, and (3) to assess the environmental and economic impacts of such beneficial uses. Application of dry FGD by-product to three soils in place of agricultural limestone increased alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and corn (Zea may L.) yields. No detrimental effects on soil and plant quality were observed.

  20. FINAL REPORT: Transformational electrode drying process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claus Daniel, C.; Wixom, M. (A123 Systems, Inc.)

    2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes major findings and outlook from the transformational electrode drying project performance period from January 6, 2012 to August 1, 2012. Electrode drying before cell assembly is an operational bottleneck in battery manufacturing due to long drying times and batch processing. Water taken up during shipment and other manufacturing steps needs to be removed before final battery assembly. Conventional vacuum ovens are limited in drying speed due to a temperature threshold needed to avoid damaging polymer components in the composite electrode. Roll to roll operation and alternative treatments can increase the water desorption and removal rate without overheating and damaging other components in the composite electrode, thus considerably reducing drying time and energy use. The objective of this project was the development of an electrode drying procedure, and the demonstration of processes with no decrease in battery performance. The benchmark for all drying data was an 80įC vacuum furnace treatment with a residence time of 18 Ė 22 hours. This report demonstrates an alternative roll to roll drying process with a 500-fold improvement in drying time down to 2 minutes and consumption of only 30% of the energy compared to vacuum furnace treatment.

  1. Cold vacuum drying system conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, F.W.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the activities involved in the removal of the SNF from the leaking basins and to place it in stable dry storage.

  2. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

  3. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2013,"6301977" ,"Release Date:","124...

  4. Using and Storing Nonfat Dry Milk Nonfat dry milk is convenient to store, easy to use and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a cool, dry place. s Dry milk products are very sensitive to temperature and humidity. The area where your dry milk is stored should be kept as cool as possible. s Dry milk will absorb moisture and odorsUsing and Storing Nonfat Dry Milk Nonfat dry milk is convenient to store, easy to use

  5. RTE.ie News Sport Business Entertainment Television Radio RT Aertel Performing Groups RT Guide About Mobile Edition Fashion Food Motors Jobs Travel Property Shop Weather Live TV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    About Mobile Edition Fashion Food Motors Jobs Travel Property Shop Weather Live TV Search Search Web of the Middle East, particularly the likes of Saudi Arabia, the picture we get in our heads is one

  6. Wall Drying in Hot and Humid Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, K.; Weston, T.; Pascual, X.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drying potential while at the same time providing a high potential for mold growth. To reduce moisture accumulation in wall systems, it is important to design wall systems that not only reduce moisture intrusion, but also allow drying. Yet often a wall...

  7. PREPARATION OF A DRY PRODUCT FROM CONDENSED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PREPARATION OF A DRY PRODUCT FROM CONDENSED MENHADEN SOLUBLES Statistical Supplement WOODS HOI CONDENSED MENHADEN SOLUBLES: STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DATA (Supplement to the Fish and Wildlife Service. Fish and Wildlife Service Research Report k^, Preparation of a Dry Product from Condensed Menhaden

  8. Massachusetts Directory of Sawmills & Dry Kilns 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Massachusetts Directory of Sawmills & Dry Kilns ­ 2003 David T. Damery - University to Sawmill Listings iv Section 1 ­ Sawmill & Dry Kiln Directories Sawmills Operating in Massachusetts 1 of Sawtimber Trees by Diameter, 1972-1998 29 History of Massachusetts Sawmills Listed in Directory 30 Stumpage

  9. Inspection of Used Fuel Dry Storage Casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis C. Kunerth; Tim McJunkin; Mark McKay; Sasan Bakhtiari

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates the storage of used nuclear fuel, which is now and will be increasingly placed in dry storage systems. Since a final disposition pathway is not defined, the fuel is expected to be maintained in dry storage well beyond the time frame originally intended. Due to knowledge gaps regarding the viability of current dry storage systems for long term use, efforts are underway to acquire the technical knowledge and tools required to understand the issues and verify the integrity of the dry storage system components. This report summarizes the initial efforts performed by researchers at Idaho National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory to identify and evaluate approaches to in-situ inspection dry storage casks. This task is complicated by the design of the current storage systems that severely restrict access to the casks.

  10. Motor Repair Tech Brief | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthCommentsAugust 2012 Monthly ProjectEnterprisesRepair Tech Brief Motor

  11. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

  12. Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bramlette, T.T.; Keller, J.O.

    1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat transfer drying apparatus includes an acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber for receiving material to be dried. The chamber includes a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, a material inlet, and a gas outlet which also serves as a dried material and gas outlet. A non-pulsing first heat transfer gas source provides a first drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A valveless, continuous second heat transfer gas source provides a second drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the second heat transfer gas inlet. The second drying gas also generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling with the gases in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber. The second drying gas itself oscillates at an acoustic frequency of approximately 180 Hz due to fluid mechanical motion in the gas. The oscillations of the second heat transfer gas coupled to the first heat transfer gas in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber enhance heat and mass transfer by convection within the chamber. 3 figs.

  13. Proceedings of design, repair, and refurbishment of steam turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warnock, A.S. (Lehigh Univ., PA (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book reports on the proceedings of design, repair and refurbishment of steam engines. Topics covered include: Advisor/Expert Systems for Steam Turbines; Moisture Effects on the Operating and Performance of Steam Turbines; Turbine Steam Path Development; Repair and Refurbishment of the Electric Generator Components; and Advanced Steam Turbine Designs.

  14. Improved Criteria for the Repair of Fabrication Flaws

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Simonen, Fredric A.

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section III of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for nuclear power plant components requires radiographic examinations (RT) of welds and requires repairs for RT indications that exceed code acceptable sizes. This paper describes research that has generated data on welding flaws, which indicated that the largest flaws occur in repaired welds. The fabrication flaws were detected in material removed from cancelled nuclear power plants using high sensitivity Nondestructive Examination (NDE) and validated by complementary NDE and destructive testing. Evidence suggests that repairs are often for small and benign RT indications at locations buried within the vessel or pipe wall. Probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations are described in this paper to predict the increases in vessel and piping failure probabilities caused by the repair-induced flaws. Calculations address failures of embrittled vessel welds for pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transients and piping failures caused by fatigue crack growth. For vessels the small flaws, which are relatively common, can cause brittle fracture, such that the rarely encountered repair flaws of large sizes gave only modestly increased failure probabilities. Calculations for piping show that only relatively large fabrication flaws can cause failures because of the ductile nature of the piping material. The large repair flaws therefore significantly increased the failure probabilities. The paper recommends the use of more discriminating ultrasonic examinations in place of RT examinations along with repair criteria based on a fitness-for-purpose approach that minimize the number of unjustified repairs.

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - anaemia-dna repair connection Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Barclay Morrison and his Neurotrauma and Repair Laboratory... yet unknown, this repair process is aborted. If Morrison can find ... Source: Hone, James - Center for Electron...

  16. Dry cooling: Perspectives on future needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guyer, E.C. (Yankee Scientific, Inc., Ashland, MA (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The factors that can be expected to determine the future role of dry cooling in the United States electric power generation industry are identified and characterized. Focus is primarily on the issues of water availability for the electric power industry and the environmental impacts of evaporative cooling systems. The question of future water availability is addressed in terms of both limitations and opportunities facing the industry. A brief review of the status of dry cooling applications is provided. Included is a summary of an extensive survey of electric utility industry perspectives on the future requirements and role for dry cooling. Some regional assessments of the expected future requirements for this technology are also provided. Conclusions are a qualitative characterization of the expected future role of dry cooling in the electric power industry. 72 refs., 7 figs., 13 tabs.

  17. Dry Cask Storage Study Feb 1989

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report on the use of dry-cask-storage technologies at the sites of civilian nuclear power reactors has been prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE} in response to the requirements of...

  18. High strength air-dried aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coronado, Paul R.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the preparation of high strength air-dried organic aerogels. The method involves the sol-gel polymerization of organic gel precursors, such as resorcinol with formaldehyde (RF) in aqueous solvents with R/C ratios greater than about 1000 and R/F ratios less than about 1:2.1. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be air dried at ambient temperatures and pressures. The method significantly reduces the time and/or energy required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods using either supercritical solvent extraction. The air dried gel exhibits typically less than 5% shrinkage.

  19. Advanced wet-dry cooling tower concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Troxell Kimmel

    The purpose of this years' work has been to test and analyze the new dry cooling tower surface previously developed. The model heat transfer test apparatus built last year has been instrumented for temperature, humidity ...

  20. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irwin, J.J.

    1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This release of the Design Requirements Document is a complete restructuring and rewrite to the document previously prepared and released for project W-441 to record the design basis for the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility.

  1. Dry aging beef for the retail channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Robert David

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Koohmaraie, & Goll, 1995). The Z-line is one myofibrillar structure clearly altered by proteases in the postmortem aging of beef (Goll, Otsuka, Nagainis, Shannon, Sathe, & Muguruma, 1983). However, Z-disk degradation does not occur to any significant... and humidity is said to be dry aged. Practically all beef is vacuumed packaged at the packer level. However, many believe 3 that wet aging does not produce the enhanced palatability characteristics associated with dry aged beef. This process can...

  2. Compression of cooked freeze-dried carrots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macphearson, Bruce Alan

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . Reduction in volume of up to 18-fold can be obtained by com- pressing dehydrated vegetables (Rabman, 1969). During World War II, the United Kingdom produced dehydrated cabbage and carrots in compressed blocks (Gooding and Rolfe, 1967). Fairbrother (1968...-propanol at low concentration by freeze-drying carbohydrate solutions. J. of Food Sci. 37:617. Flosdorf, E. W. 1949. "Freeze-drying, " Reinhold Publishing Co. , New York. Gooding, E. B. B. and Rolfe, E. J. 1957. Some Recent Work on Dehy- dration...

  3. Adsorptive Drying of Organic Liquids- An Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, S.; Humphrey, J. L.; Fair, J. R.

    reactions lowering yields and compro mising product quality. In these several situations where liquids are involved, any of the following means may be used to lower the water content: Inert Gas Purging Liquid Extraction Freeze Drying Pervaporation... Fractional Distillation Adsorption Although fractional distillation and adsorption are almost exclusively used, the others are included to complete the list. Inert Gas Purging This method can be used to dry high boiling liquids such as gear oils...

  4. Amendment 1 - Dry-type power transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Specifies requirements for dry-type power transformers (including auto-transformers) having values of highest voltage for equipment up to and including 36 kV. The following small and special dry-type transformers are not covered by this standard: -instrument transformers (covered by IEC 60185 and 60186); -transformers for static convertors (covered by IEC 60084, 60119 and 60146). Where IEC standards do not exist for other special transformers, this standard may be applicable as a whole or in part.

  5. Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.; Doyle, E.F.; DiBella, F.A.

    1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculates through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried. The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter and recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard. 17 figures.

  6. Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Doyle, Edward F. (Dedham, MA); DiBella, Francis A. (Roslindale, MA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculated through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard.

  7. The SWAP SHOP: A surplus materials exchange network at DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, L.H.; Birch-Kennedy, S.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The diversity and continually changing nature of the research and production programs at the ORR plant sites, as well as the size of the facilities and their physical separation on the ORR, lead to the buildup of surplus equipment and materials from canceled or completed projects, changes in work orders or directives, or over-procurement of particular items or materials. Many times, for lack of a means to find legitimate uses for these excess items, they have been disposed of as wastes or sold as salvage. Recognizing that this situation prevails at most, if not all, government facilities, Congress has enacted legislation encouraging the establishment of waste minimization, pollution prevention, and cost avoidance measures throughout government-owned facilities. In response to this, the Secretary of Energy has instituted a high-priority DOE initiative to develop, promote, and implement waste minimization and pollution prevention at government installations. One result of the increased awareness and emphasis on environmental concerns and improved resource management is the recent grassroots development of a surplus materials exchange network developed and operated on a voluntary basis by Environmental Protection Officers (EPOs) at the Oak Ridge installations. The EPOs are full-time or part-time staff members employed by each division to provide guidance and assistance for achieving compliance with all environmental regulatory requirements and to resolve waste disposal problems. The materials exchange network, called the SWAP SHOP, provides an EPO communications and problem-solving network to help eliminate unnecessary disposal of usable surplus chemicals and equipment at the Oak Ridge plant sites.

  8. Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media Using Gas-phase Tracer Tests. Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media Using Gas-phase Tracer Tests....

  9. Method and apparatus for drying web

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orloff, David I. (Atlanta, GA); Kloth, Gerald R. (Kennesaw, GA); Rudemiller, Gary R. (Paducah, KY)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method and apparatus for drying a web of paper utilizing impulse drying techniques. In the method of the invention for drying a paper web, the paper web is transported through a pair of rolls wherein at least one of the rolls has been heated to an elevated temperature. The heated roll is provided with a surface having a low thermal diffusivity of less than about 1.times.10.sup.-6 m.sup.2 /s. The surface material of the roll is preferably prepared from a material selected from the group consisting of ceramics, polymers, glass, inorganic plastics, composite materials and cermets. The heated roll may be constructed entirely from the material having a low thermal diffusivity or the roll may be formed from metal, such as steel or aluminum, or other suitable material which is provided with a surface layer of a material having a low thermal diffusivity.

  10. Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bramlette, T. Tazwell (Livermore, CA); Keller, Jay O. (Oakland, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat transfer apparatus includes a first chamber having a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, and an outlet. A first heat transfer gas source provides a first gas flow to the first chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A second gas flow through a second chamber connected to the side of the first chamber, generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling of the first and second gases in the acoustically augmented first chamber. The first chamber may also include a material inlet for receiving material to be dried, in which case the gas outlet serves as a dried material and gas outlet.

  11. Self-protection in dry recycle technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannum, W.H.; Wade, D.; Stanford, G.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the INFCE conclusions, the U.S. undertook development of a new dry fuel cycle. Dry recycle processes have been demonstrated to be feasible. Safeguarding such fuel cycles will be dramatically simpler than the PUREX fuel cycle. At every step of the processes, the materials meet the {open_quotes}spent-fuel standard.{close_quotes} The scale is compatible with collocation of power reactors and their recycle facility, eliminating off-site transportation and storage of plutonium-bearing materials. Material diverted either covertly or overtly would be difficult (relative to material available by other means) to process into weapons feedstock.

  12. Dry etching method for compound semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM); Constantine, Christopher (Safety Harbor, FL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dry etching method. According to the present invention, a gaseous plasma comprising, at least in part, boron trichloride, methane, and hydrogen may be used for dry etching of a compound semiconductor material containing layers including aluminum, or indium, or both. Material layers of a compound semiconductor alloy such as AlGaInP or the like may be anisotropically etched for forming electronic devices including field-effect transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors and for forming photonic devices including vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, edge-emitting lasers, and reflectance modulators.

  13. Dry-Mass Sensing for Microfluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MŁller, T.; White, D. A.; Knowles, T. P. J.

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry-Mass Sensing for Microfluidics T. Mu®ller,1 D. A. White,1 and T. P. J. Knowles1, a) Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW, United Kingdom (Dated: 25 November 2014) We present an approach... for interfacing an electromechanical sensor with a microfluidic device for the accurate quantification of the dry mass of analytes within microchannels. We show that depositing solutes onto the active surface of a quartz crystal microbalance by means of an on...

  14. Annotated Bibliography for Drying Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebecca E. Smith

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Internationally, the nuclear industry is represented by both commercial utilities and research institutions. Over the past two decades many of these entities have had to relocate inventories of spent nuclear fuel from underwater storage to dry storage. These efforts were primarily prompted by two factors: insufficient storage capacity (potentially precipitated by an open-ended nuclear fuel cycle) or deteriorating quality of existing underwater facilities. The intent of developing this bibliography is to assess what issues associated with fuel drying have been identified, to consider where concerns have been satisfactorily addressed, and to recommend where additional research would offer the most value to the commercial industry and the U. S. Department of Energy.

  15. Intermediate hearth repair technique at Thyssen Stahl AG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalski, W.; Bachhofen, H.J.; Ruether, P.; Ballewski, T. [Thyssen Stahl AG, Duisburg (Germany)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Nowadays various techniques for the fastest possible intermediate repair and/or emplacement of refractory materials above the tuyere level allow a significant extension of furnace campaign life. The latter are hence now exclusively determined by the service life of the hearth. The improvement of hearth monitoring and the estimation of residual brick strength of the refractory lining on the basis of temperature measurements in the hearth enable the location of individual zones of premature wear. These measurement methods, which were developed by Thyssen Stahl AG, aid the decision to undertake selective repair of the hearth. Three areas of repair are differentiated: taphole zone; hearth wall, localized; and hearth wall, extensive. This hearth repair method is described in this report using the example of hearth refurbishing blast furnace 8, Hamborn.

  16. Microsoft Word - SPR Emergency Pipeline Repair, 2013-2017 NEPA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Exclusion to be applied: B5.4 Repair or replacement of sections of a crude oil, produced water, brine or geothermal pipeline, if the actions are determined by the Army...

  17. A tissue engineering strategy for integrative cartilage repair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mroszczyk, Keri A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tissue engineering for cartilage repair is a promising approach for improving the healing of articular defects, as biomaterials and growth factors can be supplied directly to a focal lesion. However, integrating neo-tissue ...

  18. Coherent testing and simulation of composite blade repair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNichols, Brian Glenn

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    COHERENT TESTING AND SIMULATION OF COMPOSITE BLADE REPAIR A Thesis by BRIAN GLENN MCNICHOLS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1997 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering COHERENT TESTING AND SIMULATION OF COMPOSITE BLADE REPAIR A Thesis by BRIAN GLENN MCNICHOLS Submitted to Texas A&M University In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  19. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Esherick, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Parmeter, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Rieger, Dennis J. (Tijeras, NM); Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for dry etching of transition metals. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorous-containing .pi.-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the .pi.-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the .pi.-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex.

  20. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Baca, A.G.; Esherick, P.; Parmeter, J.E.; Rieger, D.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for dry etching of transition metals is disclosed. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorus-containing {pi}-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the {pi}-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the {pi}-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/{pi}-acceptor ligand complex.

  1. Hog Fuel Drying Using Vapour Recompression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azarniouch, M. K.; MacEachen, I.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous hog fuel drying pilot plant based on the principle of mixing hog fuel with a hot oil (e.g., crude tall oil) as the heat transfer medium, and recirculating the suspension through a steam heated exchanger was designed, built...

  2. Spent fuel integrity during dry storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinnon, M.A.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on spent fuel integrity is of interest in evaluating the impact of long-term dry storage on the behavior of spent fuel rods. Spent fuel used during cask performance tests at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offers significant opportunities for confirmation of the benign nature of long-term dry storage. The cask performance tests conducted at INEL included visual observation and ultrasonic examination of the condition of cladding, fuel rods, and fuel assembly hardware before dry storage and consolidation of the fuel; and a qualitative determination of the effect of dry storage and fuel consolidation on fission gas release from the spent fuel rods. A variety of cover gases and cask orientations were used during the cask performance tests. Cover gases included vacuum, nitrogen, and helium. The nitrogen and helium backfills were sampled and analyzed to detect leaking spent fuel rods. At the conclusion of each performance test, periodic gas sampling was conducted on each cask as part of a surveillance and monitoring activity. Continued surveillance and monitoring activities are being conducted for intact fuel in a CASTOR V/21 cask and for consolidated fuel in a VSC-17 cask. The results of the gas sampling activities are reported in this paper.

  3. Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

  4. STOP: Always work safely around machines. Prepare for a safe job. A variety of machines are used in many campus shops including

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    STOP: Always work safely around machines. Prepare for a safe job. A variety of machines are used in many campus shops including: · Drill presses · Table saws · Band saws · Grinders · Milling machines AACCCCIIDDEENNTTSS THINK: Machines may present real and significant hazards, such as physical entrapment, severe

  5. MEMBERS ONLY | Join | Renew | Shop | About | Contact Us | Home ASME.ORG > News & Public Policy > Press Releases > Research Begun on New Fuel Cell Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEARCH ASME: MEMBERS ONLY | Join | Renew | Shop | About | Contact Us | Home ASME.ORG > News, the magazine reports on a fuel cell that cleans domestic wastewater while producing electrical energy. This new, takes the high concentration of organic matter found in wastewater and coverts it to energy. "Where

  6. Knowledge Exchange records from 01/04/2013 08/07/2013 CATEGORY 14 -Work shops, exhibitions, demonstrations, and open days presented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowledge Exchange records from 01/04/2013 ­ 08/07/2013 CATEGORY 14 - Work shops, exhibitions; SILVICULTURE; WOODLAND HERITAGE; CHALARA FRAXINEA; 2014-FR-CAT-14 Abstract: Participated at the Woodland: GARDENING FOCUS; 2014-FR-CAT-14 Abstract: Attended by an audience of thousands. Class: No electronic

  7. Non-Linear Drying Diffusion and Viscoelastic Drying Shrinkage Modeling in Hardened Cement Pastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Chin K.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    modeling with an average diffusion coefficient and with determined viscoelastic parameters from creep tests agreed well compared to the shrinkage data from experiments, indicating that drying shrinkage of cement paste may be considered as a poroviscoelastic...

  8. Horizontal modular dry irradiated fuel storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Larry E. (Los Gatos, CA); McInnes, Ian D. (San Jose, CA); Massey, John V. (San Jose, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A horizontal, modular, dry, irradiated fuel storage system (10) includes a thin-walled canister (12) for containing irradiated fuel assemblies (20), which canister (12) can be positioned in a transfer cask (14) and transported in a horizontal manner from a fuel storage pool (18), to an intermediate-term storage facility. The storage system (10) includes a plurality of dry storage modules (26) which accept the canister (12) from the transfer cask (14) and provide for appropriate shielding about the canister (12). Each module (26) also provides for air cooling of the canister (12) to remove the decay heat of the irradiated fuel assemblies (20). The modules (26) can be interlocked so that each module (26) gains additional shielding from the next adjacent module (26). Hydraulic rams (30) are provided for inserting and removing the canisters (12) from the modules (26).

  9. Dry-Mass Sensing for Microfluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MŁller, T; Knowles, T P J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approach for interfacing an electromechanical sensor with a microfluidic device for the accurate quantification of the dry mass of analytes within microchannels. We show that depositing solutes onto the active surface of a quartz crystal microbalance by means of an on-chip microfluidic spray nozzle and subsequent solvent removal provides the basis for the real-time determination of dry solute mass. Moreover, this detection scheme does not suffer from the decrease in the sensor quality factor and the viscous drag present if the measurement is performed in a liquid environment, yet allows solutions to be analysed. We demonstrate the sensitivity and reliability of our approach by controlled deposition of nanogram levels of salt and protein from a micrometer-sized channel.

  10. Polymer nanocomposites for high-temperature composite repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, Xia

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel repair agent for resin-injection repair of advanced high temperature composites was developed and characterized. The repair agent was based on bisphenol E cyanate ester (BECy) and reinforced with alumina nanoparticles. To ensure good dispersion and compatibility with the BECy matrix in nanocomposites, the alumina nanoparticles were functionalized with silanes. The BECy nanocomposites, containing bare and functionalized alumina nanoparticles, were prepared and evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, rheological, and viscoelastic properties. The monomer of BECy has an extremely low viscosity at ambient temperature, which is good for processability. The cured BECy polymer is a highly cross-linked network with excellent thermal mechanical properties, with a high glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) of 270 C and decomposition temperature above 350 C. The incorporation of alumina nanoparticles enhances the mechanical and rheological properties of the BECy nanocomposites. Additionally, the alumina nanoparticles are shown to catalyze the cure of BECy. Characterization of the nanocomposites included dynamic mechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results show that the BECy nanocomposite is a good candidate as repair agent for resin-injection repair applications.

  11. Application of Desiccant Drying in Plastic Molding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, M.; Connors, G.; Moore, D.

    APPLICATION OF DESICCANT DRYING IN PLASTIC MOLDING Michael Brown, P.E. Greg Connors, P.E. Douglas Moore, P.E. Senior Research Engr. Industrial Engr. Senior Research Engr. Ga. Tech Research Inst. Atlanta Gas Light Co. Ga. Tech Research Inst... will condense on refrigerated display doors. In ice rinks, condensation will occur on the ice surface causing it to soften if the humidity too high. In plastic molding, chilled water is provi ed to rapidly cool the finished parts. Cooling incr...

  12. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krahn, D.E.

    1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  13. PULSE DRYING EXPERIMENT AND BURNER CONSTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert States

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Non steady impingement heat transfer is measured. Impingement heating consumes 130 T-BTU/Yr in paper drying, but is only 25% thermally efficient. Pulse impingement is experimentally shown to enhance heat transfer by 2.8, and may deliver thermal efficiencies near 85%. Experimental results uncovered heat transfer deviations from steady theory and from previous investigators, indicating the need for further study and a better theoretical framework. The pulse burner is described, and its roll in pulse impingement is analyzed.

  14. Dry Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. M. Goff; M. F. Simpson

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry (non-aqueous) separations technologies have been used for treatment of used nuclear fuel since the 1960s, and they are still being developed and demonstrated in many countries. Dry technologies offer potential advantages compared to traditional aqueous separations including: compactness, resistance to radiation effects, criticality control benefits, compatibility with advanced fuel types, and ability to produce low purity products. Within the Department of Energyís Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, an electrochemical process employing molten salts is being developed for recycle of fast reactor fuel and treatment of light water reactor oxide fuel to produce a feed for fast reactors. Much of the development of this technology is based on treatment of used Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) fuel, which is metallic. Electrochemical treatment of the EBR-II fuel has been ongoing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility, located at the Materials and Fuel Complex of Idaho National Laboratory since 1996. More than 3.8 metric tons of heavy metal of metallic fast reactor fuel have been treated using this technology. This paper will summarize the status of electrochemical development and demonstration activities with used nuclear fuel, including high-level waste work. A historic perspective on the background of dry processing will also be provided.

  15. Transfer of hot dry rock technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

  16. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended Long Term Storage and Transportation of Used Fuel Rev0 Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for...

  18. Roles of Dry Friction in Fluctuating Motion of Adiabatic Piston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomohiko G. Sano; Hisao Hayakawa

    2014-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The motion of an adiabatic piston under dry friction is investigated to clarify the roles of dry friction in non-equilibrium steady states. We clarify that dry friction can reverse the direction of the piston motion and causes a discontinuity or a cusp-like singularity for velocity distribution functions of the piston. We also show that the heat fluctuation relation is modified under dry friction.

  19. Modeling of Coal Drying before Pyrolysis Damintode Kolani1, a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in the coal without chemical decomposition and pyrolysis converts dry coal into gas and coke [1]. The final1 Modeling of Coal Drying before Pyrolysis Damintode Kolani1, a , Eric Blond1, b , Alain Gasser1 Forbach, France a damintode.kolani@univ-orleans.fr, b eric.blond@univ-orleans.fr Keywords: coal, drying

  20. African dry air outbreaks Chidong Zhang and Jeremy Pennington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chidong

    entrainment. It is conceivable that dry air associated with African dust outbreaks also has substantialAfrican dry air outbreaks Chidong Zhang and Jeremy Pennington Rosenstiel School of Marine; accepted 5 August 2004; published 19 October 2004. [1] Dry air outbreaks from Africa into the tropical

  1. Development of criteria for fatigue repairs in bridge girders damaged by out-of-plane distortion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Scott David

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    repaired and unrepaired cracks along the longitudinal web-to-flange connection of a plate girder subjected to a linear bending stress to determine if repair by drilling holes is really necessary. The results of the finite element analyses...

  2. DRI Renewable Energy Center (REC) (NV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekman, S. Kent; Broch, Broch; Robbins, Curtis; Jacobson, Roger; Turner, Robert

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project was to utilize a flexible, energy-efficient facility, called the DRI Renewable Energy Experimental Facility (REEF) to support various renewable energy research and development (R&D) efforts, along with education and outreach activities. The REEF itself consists of two separate buildings: (1) a 1200-ft2 off-grid capable house and (2) a 600-ft2 workshop/garage to support larger-scale experimental work. Numerous enhancements were made to DRI's existing renewable power generation systems, and several additional components were incorporated to support operation of the REEF House. The power demands of this house are satisfied by integrating and controlling PV arrays, solar thermal systems, wind turbines, an electrolyzer for renewable hydrogen production, a gaseous-fuel internal combustion engine/generator set, and other components. Cooling needs of the REEF House are satisfied by an absorption chiller, driven by solar thermal collectors. The REEF Workshop includes a unique, solar air collector system that is integrated into the roof structure. This system provides space heating inside the Workshop, as well as a hot water supply. The Workshop houses a custom-designed process development unit (PDU) that is used to convert woody biomass into a friable, hydrophobic char that has physical and chemical properties similar to low grade coal. Besides providing sufficient space for operation of this PDU, the REEF Workshop supplies hot water that is used in the biomass treatment process. The DRI-REEF serves as a working laboratory for evaluating and optimizing the performance of renewable energy components within an integrated, residential-like setting. The modular nature of the system allows for exploring alternative configurations and control strategies. This experimental test bed is also highly valuable as an education and outreach tool both in providing an infrastructure for student research projects, and in highlighting renewable energy features to the public.

  3. An experimental investigation of high temperature, high pressure paper drying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Kamal Raoji

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    CONCLUSIONS RECOMMENDATIONS 50 51 REFERENCES APPENDIX A EXPERIMENTAL DATA 52 54 VITA 105 vail LIST OF FIGURES Page Fig. 1 Schematic of test facility 13 Fig. 2 Comparison of Texas A&M drying facility operating ranges to other drying processes... of number of drying passes for drying temperatures of 93, 149, and 204 'C (200, 300, and 400 'F), a contact pressure of 1. 4 MPa (200 psi), a basis weight of 25 g/m' (0. 005 lb/ft'), and contact times between 20 to 180 msec with same side drying...

  4. Project W-441, cold vacuum drying facility design requirements document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Neill, C.T.

    1997-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared and is being released for Project W-441 to record the design basis for the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. This document sets forth the physical design criteria, Codes and Standards, and functional requirements that were used in the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. This document contains section 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements Document. The remaining sections will be issued at a later date. The purpose of the Facility is to dry, weld, and inspect the Multi-Canister Overpacks before transport to dry storage.

  5. Lithographic dry development using optical absorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olynick, Deirdre; Schuck, P. James; Schmidt, Martin

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel approach to dry development of exposed photo resist is described in which a photo resist layer is exposed to a visible light source in order to remove the resist in the areas of exposure. The class of compounds used as the resist material, under the influence of the light source, undergoes a chemical/structural change such that the modified material becomes volatile and is thus removed from the resist surface. The exposure process is carried out for a time sufficient to ablate the exposed resist layer down to the layer below. A group of compounds found to be useful in this process includes aromatic calixarenes.

  6. Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

  7. Dry Process Electrode Fabrication | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent(CRADA andDriving Innovation at theDry Process

  8. Dry lake reveals evidence of Southwestern 'megadroughts'

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct:Directives Templates8.Sifting Slush: Speciation ofDry lake

  9. Development of quick repairing technique for ceramic burner in hot stove of blast furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondo, Atsushi; Doura, Kouji; Nakamura, Hirofumi [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Wakayama (Japan). Wakayama Steel Works

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Refractories of ceramic burner in hot stoves at Wakayama No. 4 blast furnace were damaged. There are only three hot stoves, so repairing must be done in a short. Therefore, a quick repairing technique for ceramic burners has been developed, and two ceramic burners were repaired in just 48 hours.

  10. DNA Repair 8 (2009) 803812 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekelsky, Jeff

    reduced gap repair and loss of the checkpoint response to low-dose irradiation. These findings shed light. Loss of the FHA domain resulted in hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation and defects in gap repair time for repair pro- cesses to act. A given DNA damage response protein may be involved Corresponding

  11. Workshop Proceedings: Life Assessment and Repair of Steam Turbine Casings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the trend toward operating steam turbines far beyond their design lives, utilities need methods for assessing and extending the lives of the turbine casings. Consolidating and publishing industry experience on this subject will help utilities make run/replace decisions, select appropriate repair techniques, implement operational changes, and select new designs to meet future needs.

  12. Corrosion Repair and Corrosion Protection of Reinforced Concrete Structures in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    11/14/2014 1 Corrosion Repair and Corrosion Protection of Reinforced Concrete Structures in Pulp and Paper Mills Vector Construction / Vector Corrosion Technologies www.vectorgroup.com www.vector-corrosion.com Presentation Outline · Introduction · Corrosion of Reinforced Concrete Structures · Protection of Chests

  13. Thermosetting Polymer-Matrix Composites for Strucutral Repair Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Kirby Goertzen

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporate of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

  14. USDA Grants to Help Repair Housing in Rural Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is accepting applications for the Housing Preservation Grant program, which provides funding to repair low-income housing, rental properties, or co-op owned housing. Eligible sponsors include state agencies, local government, Tribes, and nonprofits.

  15. HOW TO REPAIR A SECOND-ORDER SURFACE FOR COMPUTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 HOW TO REPAIR A SECOND-ORDER SURFACE FOR COMPUTER EXPERIMENTS BY KRIGING Astrid JOURDAN and analysis of computer experiments have been widely investigated in the past decade. Two approaches seem describes and compares them briefly in order to present a methodology for computer experiments based

  16. Development/Plasticity/Repair Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grau, James

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Control Metaplasticity the spinal cord can support several forms of plasticity, including response≠outcome (instrumental) learning. This inhibi- tion of plasticity in spinal learning is itself a form of plasticity that requires i

  17. Breakthrough Technologies In Vivo Observation of Cavitation and Embolism Repair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holbrook, N. Michele

    Breakthrough Technologies In Vivo Observation of Cavitation and Embolism Repair Using Magnetic that approximately 10 vessels had cavitated during this time. Leaf water potentials decreased from 1.25 to 2.1 MPa cavitation. Refilling of xylem vessels occurred as soon as the lights were switched off, with the majority

  18. Development/Plasticity/Repair Identification of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Simon

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Identification of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Recycling and Its, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 In the CNS, receptor recycling is critical for synaptic plasticity; however, the recycling of receptors has never been observed at peripheral synapses. Using a novel

  19. Complications of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzen, Barry T. [Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Baptist Health Systems, Department of Interventional Radiology, Florida (United States)], E-mail: barryk@baptisthealth.net; MacLean, Alexandra A. [New York Hospital-Queens, Department of Surgery (United States)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.

  20. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  1. Self drying roofs: What! No dripping!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, A.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Many roofs are replaced because water accumulates in portions of the roofing system.These accumulations can cause dripping, accelerated membrane failure, poor thermal performance, the threat of structural decay, and the depreciation of building assets. Traditionally, the roofing industry has been concerned with controlling the inflow of water into the roof. An example of this strategy would be the development of a more reliable membrane. However, roof membranes inevitably leak. For this reason, the roof design strategy of the future must be concerned with controlling water outflow. The requirements of this type of roof system are described. Under normal operating conditions (no leaks), the total moisture content of a self-drying roof system shall not increase with time and condensation shall not occur under the membrane during winter uptake. Moisture vapor movement by convection must be eliminated and the flow of water by gravity through imperfections in the roof system must be controlled. After a leak has occurred, no condensation on the upper surface of the deck shall be tolerated and the water introduced by the leak must be dissipated to the building interior in a minimum amount of time. Finite difference computer modeling is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the design. The impact of deck and insulation permeance, climate, leaks, and wintertime water uptake are simulated. A database of simulations is qualitatively described; this database will be used in future work to produce a simplified means of assessing the design parameters of a self-drying roof system.

  2. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  3. Economics of dry FGD by sorbent injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naulty, D.J.; Hooper, R.G.; McDowell, D.A.; Scheck, R.W.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The body of information in this paper is directed to engineers involved in desulfurization of boiler flue gas. The problems of wet scrubbing SO/sub 2/ from power plant flue gases have been well documented. The utility industry has been interested in developing new processes that would overcome problems associated with wet slurry systems. While spray dryer technology for FGD may alleviate many of these problems, this concept has problems as well. Dry injection FGD takes the development process one step further to a totally dry system, thus eliminating the difficulties of wet slurry handling. The concept of using the fabric filter as a chemical contactor for the SO/sub 2/ absorption was proposed in the late 1960s by Chaffee and Hill. In the early 1970s, Superior Oil Company, Wheelabrator Frye, Carborundum, and others investigated the use of nahcolite for SO/sub 2/ removal. Nahcolite is a natural occurring sodium bicarbonate found in great quantities in the oil shale regions of Colorado. In general, these developments were found viable in certain circumstances, but commercialization was hampered by the lack of nahcolite suppliers.

  4. Heat Transfer Performance of a Dry and Wet / Dry Advanced Cooling Tower Condenser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fricke, H. D.; Webster, D. J.; McIlroy, K.; Bartz, J. A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    phase change pilot plant (0.6 MWth) located at UCC/Linde. The first unit consisted of integral shaved-fin-extruded aluminum tubing designed for dry operation. Heat transfer and air-side pressure loss characteristics were measured under varying air face...

  5. Project Final Report: Building a Community Infrastructure for Scalable On-Line Performance Analysis Tools around Open|SpeedShop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galarowicz, James

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project we created a community tool infrastructure for program development tools targeting Petascale class machines and beyond. This includes tools for performance analysis, debugging, and correctness tools, as well as tuning and optimization frameworks. The developed infrastructure provides a comprehensive and extensible set of individual tool building components. We started with the basic elements necessary across all tools in such an infrastructure followed by a set of generic core modules that allow a comprehensive performance analysis at scale. Further, we developed a methodology and workflow that allows others to add or replace modules, to integrate parts into their own tools, or to customize existing solutions. In order to form the core modules, we built on the existing Open|SpeedShop infrastructure and decomposed it into individual modules that match the necessary tool components. At the same time, we addressed the challenges found in performance tools for petascale systems in each module. When assembled, this instantiation of community tool infrastructure provides an enhanced version of Open|SpeedShop, which, while completely different in its architecture, provides scalable performance analysis for petascale applications through a familiar interface. This project also built upon and enhances capabilities and reusability of project partner components as specified in the original project proposal. The overall project teamís work over the project funding cycle was focused on several areas of research, which are described in the following sections. The reminder of this report also highlights related work as well as preliminary work that supported the project. In addition to the project partners funded by the Office of Science under this grant, the project team included several collaborators who contribute to the overall design of the envisioned tool infrastructure. In particular, the project team worked closely with the other two DOE NNSA laboratories Los Alamos and Sandia leveraging co-funding for Krell by ASCís Common Computing Environment (CCE) program as laid out in the original proposal. The ASC CCE co-funding, coordinated through LLNL, was for 50% of the total project funding, with the ASC CCE portion of the funding going entirely to Krell, while the ASCR funding itself was split between Krell and the funded partners. This report covers the entire project from both funding sources. Additionally, the team leveraged the expertise of software engineering researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, who specialize in software framework design, in order to achieve a broadly acceptable component framework. The Component Based Tool Framework (CBTF) software has been released to the community. Information related to the project and the released software can be found on the CBTF wiki page at: http://sourceforge.net/p/cbtf/wiki/Home

  6. Mathematical and experimental modelling of heat pump assisted microwave drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiguo Jia (Univ. of Queensland (Australia))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drying is one of the most energy intensive operations in industry and agriculture. In the quest to increase drying efficiency and product quality, new technologies and methods are constantly being sought. Of these technologies, heat pump assisted drying and microwave drying have proved to be the most promising contenders. In order to achieve a better understanding and provide a computer design tool for heat pump assisted convective and microwave drying, both mathematical modelling and experimental investigations of heat pump assisted microwave dryers have been undertaken in this study. A mathematical model has been developed to predict the steady-state performance of a heat pump assisted continuous microwave dryer, with emphasis on the simulation of heat and mass transfer processes in the evaporator and drying chamber. The model is intend to serve as a design tool in the study of heat pump dryers. To achieve the optimum design, the influences of the key design and operating parameters, as well as the comparison of different drying configurations, have been examined. Based on investigation results, several methods have been proposed to improve the performance of heat pump assisted microwave drying, such as the use of a recuperator. To validate the above mathematical model, extensive drying tests using foam rubber as the test material have been conducted on a prototype heat pump assisted microwave dryer. The prototype heat pump input power was 5 kW with a maximum microwave input power of 10 kW. The experimental performance data confirmed the veracity of the simulation model. The experimental results on drying test materials indicate that with careful design heat pump assisted microwave drying is comparable to convective drying in energy consumption while with a much higher drying speed.

  7. Dry lubricant films for aluminum forming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, J.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During metal forming process, lubricants are crucial to prevent direct contact, adhesion, transfer and scuffing of workpiece materials and tools. Boric acid films can be firmly adhered to the clean aluminum surfaces by spraying their methanol solutions and provide extremely low friction coefficient (about 0.04). The cohesion strengths of the bonded films vary with the types of aluminum alloys (6061, 6111 and 5754). The sheet metal forming tests indicate that boric acid films and the combined films of boric acid and mineral oil can create larger strains than the commercial liquid and solid lubricants, showing that they possess excellent lubricities for aluminum forming. SEM analyses indicate that boric acid dry films separate the workpiece and die materials, and prevent their direct contact and preserve their surface qualities. Since boric acid is non-toxic and easily removed by water, it can be expected that boric acid films are environmentally friendly, cost effective and very efficient lubricants for sheet aluminum cold forming.

  8. User data package for implementation of electrolytic recovery technology in Navy electroplating shops. Final report, March 1993-January 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, K.; Koff, J.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In FY94 the Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) completed tests on three electrolytic recovery systems used for the recovery of metals and destruction of cyanide from electroplating wastewaters. Field testing and evaluation was conducted at NSY Norfolk, NAWC Indianapolis, and NADEP Cherry Pt. for five metal recovery applications: silver cyanide, copper cyanide, acid copper, electroless nickel, and tin-lead fluoborate. Advanced design features for metal recovery, including enhanced fluidized circulation, specialized oxidizing anodes, and high porous surface area cathodes were evaluated to optimize performance. NFESC demonstrated that electrolytic recovery systems can be adapted for effective use in the Navy plating operations where production is often sporadic as contrasted to industrial plating processes. The electrolytic recovery units removed metal ions from the rinsewater to below 1 ppm for each application. Electrowinning, as an alternative technology, can reduce industrial waste treatment costs and hazardous sludge generated from conventional treatment This User Data Package (UDP) covers the design, operational and maintenance requirements for these electrolytic systems. This UDP will be applicable to small Navy plating shops where closed-loop waste recycling and point source minimization is necessary for environmental compliance and cost competitiveness.

  9. Combined Haploinsufficiency for ATM and RAD9 as a Factor in Cell Transformation, Apoptosis, and DNA Lesion Repair Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesion Repair Dynamics Lubomir B. Smilenov, Howard B. Lieberman, Stephen A. Mitchell, Ronald A. Baker

  10. aerosol dry deposition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    43 Drying and deposition of poly(ethylene oxide) droplets determined by Pclet number Condensed Matter (arXiv) Summary: We report results of a detailed experimental...

  11. atmospheric dry deposition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water vapor, and we confirm such predictions in a numerical model. There have been a number 38 Dual nitrate isotopes in dry deposition: Utility for partitioning NOx source...

  12. Standard guide for drying behavior of spent nuclear fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This guide is organized to discuss the three major components of significance in the drying behavior of spent nuclear fuel: evaluating the need for drying, drying spent nuclear fuel, and confirmation of adequate dryness. 1.1.1 The guide addresses drying methods and their limitations in drying spent nuclear fuels that have been in storage at water pools. The guide discusses sources and forms of water that remain in SNF, its container, or both, after the drying process and discusses the importance and potential effects they may have on fuel integrity, and container materials. The effects of residual water are discussed mechanistically as a function of the container thermal and radiological environment to provide guidance on situations that may require extraordinary drying methods, specialized handling, or other treatments. 1.1.2 The basic issue in drying is to determine how dry the SNF must be in order to prevent issues with fuel retrievability, container pressurization, or container corrosion. Adequate d...

  13. Gas Composition Transients in the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACKER, M.J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations with plotted results presented as confirmation bases for selected problems involving the prediction of transient gas compositions during Cold Vacuum Drying Operations.

  14. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release...

  15. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

  16. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release...

  17. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

  18. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

  19. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release...

  20. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release...

  1. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

  2. Hydrogen storage materials and method of making by dry homogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, Craig M. (Kailua, HI); Zidan, Ragaiy A. (Honolulu, HI)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry homogenized metal hydrides, in particular aluminum hydride compounds, as a material for reversible hydrogen storage is provided. The reversible hydrogen storage material comprises a dry homogenized material having transition metal catalytic sites on a metal aluminum hydride compound, or mixtures of metal aluminum hydride compounds. A method of making such reversible hydrogen storage materials by dry doping is also provided and comprises the steps of dry homogenizing metal hydrides by mechanical mixing, such as be crushing or ball milling a powder, of a metal aluminum hydride with a transition metal catalyst. In another aspect of the invention, a method of powering a vehicle apparatus with the reversible hydrogen storage material is provided.

  3. air dried soil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    102 Concentration, size distribution, and dry deposition rate of particle-associated metals in the Los Angeles region University of California eScholarship Repository Summary:...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Dry Process Electrode Fabrication

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Navitas Systems at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about dry process electrode...

  5. antarctic dry valley: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UK b Department of Geological Sciences and Institute.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Uranium isotopes; Dry Valleys; Antarctica; Weathering; Lake chemistry 1 isotopes. The supply...

  6. antarctic dry valleys: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UK b Department of Geological Sciences and Institute.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Uranium isotopes; Dry Valleys; Antarctica; Weathering; Lake chemistry 1 isotopes. The supply...

  7. Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straatsma, TP; McCammon, J. A.; Miller, John H.; Smith, Paul E.; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Wong, Chung F.; Zacharias, Martin W.

    2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling project is to enhance our understanding of the mechanism of human polymerase-?, one of the key enzymes in base excision repair (BER) and the cell-signaling enzymes cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. This work used molecular modeling and simulation studies to specifically focus on the ē dynamics of DNA and damaged DNA ē dynamics and energetics of base flipping in DNA ē mechanism and fidelity of nucleotide insertion by BER enzyme human polymerase-? ē mechanism and inhibitor design for cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. Molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure calculations have been performed using the computer resources at the Molecular Science Computing Facility at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.

  8. Providing protection: Agencies receive funding to repair, upgrade dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 26 Providing protection Agencies receive funding to repair, upgrade dams along with local partners, can apply for grant funds, he said. Construction of the dams began through four federal authorizations... totaling about $11 million. Of the 343 dams currently classified as high hazard, Scattered across Texas are almost 2,000 nondescript, earthen dams built on private land to protect property, roads, and bridges from flood damages. Some of these dams...

  9. SPEAK4IT: MULTIMODAL INTERACTION IN THE WILD MICHAEL JOHNSTON AND PATRICK EHLEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    to specifying queries by voice (e.g., "bike repair shops near the Golden Gate Bridge") users can combine speech

  10. Speak4it: Multimodal Interaction for Local Search Patrick Ehlen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    . In addition to specifying queries by voice (e.g., "bike repair shops near the golden gate bridge") users can

  11. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program Annual Report Fiscal Year 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dash, Zora V.; Murphy, Hugh D.; Smith, Morton C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complete list of HDR objectives is provided in Reference 10, and is tabulated below in Tables 1 and 2 for the reader's convenience. The primary, level 1, objective for HDR is ''to improve the technology to the point where electricity could be produced commercially from a substantial number of known HDR resource sites in a cost range of 5 to 8 cents/kWh by 1997''. A critically important milestone in attaining this cost target is the level II objective: ''Evaluate the performance of the Fenton Hill Phase II reservoir''. To appreciate the significance of this objective, a brief background is helpful. During the past 14 years the US DOE has invested $123 million to develop the technology required to make Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy commercially useful. The Governments of Japan and the Federal Republic of Germany have contributed an additional $32 million to the US program. The initial objectives of the program were met by the successful development and long-term operation of a heat-extraction loop in hydraulically-fractured hot dry rock. This Phase I reservoir produced pressurized hot water at temperatures and flow rates suitable for many commercial uses such as space heating and food processing. It operated for more than a year with no major problems or detectable environmental effect. With this accomplished and the technical feasibility of HDR energy systems demonstrated, the program undertook the more difficult task of developing a larger, deeper, hotter reservoir, called ''Phase II'', capable of supporting pilot-plant-scale operation of a commercial electricity-generating power plant. As described earlier in ''History of Research'', such a system was created and operated successfully in a preliminary 30-day flow test. However, to justify capital investment in HDR geothermal technology, industry now requires assurance that the reservoir can be operated for a long time without major problems or a significant decrease in the rate and quality of energy production. Industrial advisors to the HDR Program have concluded that, while a longer testing period would certainly be desirable, a successful and well-documented flow test of this high-temperature, Phase II reservoir lasting at least one year should convince industry that HDR geothermal energy merits their investment in its commercial development. This test is called the Long Term Flow Test (LTFT), and its completion will be a major milestone in attaining the Level 1 objective. However, before the LTFT could be initiated, well EE-2 had to be repaired, as also briefly described in the ''History of Research''. During this repair operation, superb progress was made toward satisfying the next most critically important Level II objective: Improve the Performance of HDR Drilling and Completion Technology. During the repair of EE-2, Los Alamos sidetracked by drilling out of the damaged well at 2.96 km (9700 ft), and then completed drilling a new-wellbore (EE-2A) to a total depth of 3.78 km (12,360 ft). As a consequence of this drilling experience, Los Alamos believes that if the original wells were redrilled today their combined cost would be only $8 million rather than the $18.8 million actually spent (a 60% cost saving). Further details, particularly of the completion of the well, can be found in the major section, ACCOMPLISHMENTS, but it can be seen that the second, Level II objective is already nearing attainment.

  12. DRY TRANSFER FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.S. Tang

    2004-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Dry Transfer Facility No.1 (DTF-1) performing operations to receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, and ship out loaded waste packages and empty casks. Doses received by workers due to maintenance operations are also included in this revision. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation from normal operation, excluding the remediation area of the building. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the DTF-1 and to provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering of the Design and Engineering Organization and are intended solely for the use of the Design and Engineering Organization in its work regarding facility operation. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering.

  13. Corrosion assessment of dry fuel storage containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, C.E.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural stability as a function of expected corrosion degradation of 75 dry fuel storage containers located in the 200 Area Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds was evaluated. These containers include 22 concrete burial containers, 13 55-gal (208-l) drums, and 40 Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) transport/storage casks. All containers are buried beneath at least 48 in. of soil and a heavy plastic tarp with the exception of 35 of the EBR-II casks which are exposed to atmosphere. A literature review revealed that little general corrosion is expected and pitting corrosion of the carbon steel used as the exterior shell for all containers (with the exception of the concrete containers) will occur at a maximum rate of 3.5 mil/yr. Penetration from pitting of the exterior shell of the 208-l drums and EBR-II casks is calculated to occur after 18 and 71 years of burial, respectively. The internal construction beneath the shell would be expected to preclude containment breach, however, for the drums and casks. The estimates for structural failure of the external shells, large-scale shell deterioration due to corrosion, are considerably longer, 39 and 150 years respectively for the drums and casks. The concrete burial containers are expected to withstand a service life of 50 years.

  14. Simple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, Emily M.

    '' and spatial variations of gaseous dry N deposition (i.e., nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ammonia (NH3)), thoughSimple approaches for measuring dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition to watersheds Heather E. Golden the effects of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on surface water quality requires accurate accounts

  15. Horizontal Air Flow Drying Foods at Home Safely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horizontal Air Flow Drying Foods at Home Safely Choosing a Food Dehydrator Drying is one. The thermostat should go up to 160 degrees F. The unit should have a fan or blower for air circulation. Mesh purposes. Types of Dehydrators There are two main types of dehydrators: those with vertical air flow

  16. Solvent Selection Use dry ice/isopropanol for cooling baths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Hue Sun

    Solvent Selection Use dry ice/isopropanol for cooling baths Reaches essentially the same temperature as dry ice/acetone (-77¬įC vs. -78¬įC), but the lower volatility of isopropanol minimizes vapor a closed-loop cooling system for condensers Closed-loop cooling systems eliminate wastewater and accidental

  17. Dry friction avalanches: Experiment and theory Sergey V. Buldyrev,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buldyrev, Sergey

    Dry friction avalanches: Experiment and theory Sergey V. Buldyrev,1 John Ferrante,2 and Fredy R and theoretical models are presented supporting the conjecture that dry friction stick-slip is described by self the variation of the friction force as a function of time. We study nominally flat surfaces of matching aluminum

  18. Safe Handling of Dry Ice During a Power Outage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dry ice in a well-insulated container. If transporting it inside a car for more than 15 minutes, make. Burn treatment Treat dry ice burns the same as heat burns. See a doctor if skin blisters. Disposal are open to all with- out regard to race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability

  19. Biomass Logistics and Particle Technology Group Purdue Improved Drying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    to maintain quality of grain in storage. n Farmers primarily depended on open air solar drying after logistics Grain & pest management Pre-Harvest losses from: Insect, molds and birds Harvesting & handling of PICS, technology Open Air Solar Drying of Maize in Ejura Market, Ashanti Region, Ghana #12;4 Chronology

  20. Moisture Distribution and Flow During Drying of Wood and Fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zink-Sharp, Audrey; Hanna, Robert B.

    2001-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    New understanding, theories, and techniques for moisture flow and distribution were developed in this research on wood and wood fiber. Improved understanding of the mechanisms of flake drying has been provided. Observations of flake drying and drying rate curves revealed that rate of moisture loss consisted of two falling rate periods and no constant rate drying period was observed. Convective heat transfer controls the first period, and bound water diffusion controls the second period. Influence of lower drying temperatures on bending properties of wood flakes was investigated. Drying temperature was found to have a significant influence on bending stiffness and strength. A worksheet for calculation of the energy required to dry a single strandboard flake was developed but has not been tested in an industrial setting yet. A more complete understanding of anisotropic transverse shrinkage of wood is proposed based on test results and statistical analysis. A simplified mod el of a wood cell's cross-section was drawn for calculating differential transverse shrinkage. The model utilizes cell wall thickness and microfibrillar packing density and orientation. In spite of some phenomena of cell wall structure not yet understood completely, the results might explain anisotropic transverse shrinkage to a major extent. Boundary layer theory was found useful for evaluating external moisture resistance during drying. Simulated moisture gradients were quire comparable to the actual gradients in dried wood. A mathematical procedure for determining diffusion and surface emission coefficients was also developed. Thermal conductivity models of wood derived from its anatomical structure were created and tested against experimental values. Model estimations provide insights into changes in heat transfer parameters during drying. Two new techniques for measuring moisture gradients created in wood during drying were developed. A new technique that utilizes optical properties of cobalt chloride was developed for nondestructive determination of surface moisture content. Fundamental new understanding of drying characteristics in wood and fiber has been provided that can be used by researchers to improve drying of wood and fiber. The three techniques for measuring moisture content and gradients provided in this study are efficient, practical, and economical - easy to apply by industry and researchers. An energy consumption worksheet is provided as a first step toward reducing energy consumed during drying of lumber and strandboard flakes. However, it will need additional verification and testing.

  1. Structural Sensitivity of Dry Storage Canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Karri, Naveen K.; Adkins, Harold E.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This LS-DYNA modeling study evaluated a generic used nuclear fuel vertical dry storage cask system under tip-over, handling drop, and seismic load cases to determine the sensitivity of the canister containment boundary to these loads. The goal was to quantify the expected failure margins to gain insight into what material changes over the extended long-term storage lifetime could have the most influence on the security of the containment boundary. It was determined that the tip-over case offers a strong challenge to the containment boundary, and identifies one significant material knowledge gap, the behavior of welded stainless steel joints under high-strain-rate conditions. High strain rates are expected to increase the materialís effective yield strength and ultimate strength, and may decrease its ductility. Determining and accounting for this behavior could potentially reverse the model prediction of a containment boundary failure at the canister lid weld. It must be emphasized that this predicted containment failure is an artifact of the generic system modeled. Vendor specific designs analyze for cask tip-over and these analyses are reviewed and approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Another location of sensitivity of the containment boundary is the weld between the base plate and the canister shell. Peak stresses at this location predict plastic strains through the whole thickness of the welded material. This makes the base plate weld an important location for material study. This location is also susceptible to high strain rates, and accurately accounting for the material behavior under these conditions could have a significant effect on the predicted performance of the containment boundary. The handling drop case was largely benign to the containment boundary, with just localized plastic strains predicted on the outer surfaces of wall sections. It would take unusual changes in the handling drop scenario to harm the containment boundary, such as raising the drop height or changing the impact angle. The seismic load case was derived from the August 23, 2011 earthquake that affected the North Anna power station. The source of the data was a monitoring station near Charlottesville, Virginia, so the ground motion is not an exact match. Stresses on the containment boundary were so low, even from a fatigue standpoint, that the seismic load case is generally not a concern. Based on this study, it is recommended that high strain rate testing of welded stainless steel test samples be pursued to define the currently unknown material behavior. Additional modeling is recommended to evaluate specific dry storage cask system designs subjected to tip-over loads using a high level of model detail. Additional modeling of the canister interior components (basket, fuel assemblies, etc.) is also recommended, to evaluate the feasibility of fuel retrievability after a tip-over incident. Finally, additional modeling to determine how much degradation a system could undergo and still maintain the integrity of the confinement barrier should be performed.

  2. Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel Celland Contractors | Department of EnergyAllEnergy Dry

  3. Brain necrosis after fractionated radiation therapy: Is the halftime for repair longer than we thought?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, Edward T. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To derive a radiobiological model that enables the estimation of brain necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy rates for a variety of fractionation schemes, and to compare repair effects between brain and spinal cord. Methods: Sigmoidal dose response relationships for brain radiation necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy are derived from clinical data using nonlinear regression. Three different repair models are considered and the repair halftimes are included as regression parameters. Results: For radiation necrosis, a repair halftime of 38.1 (range 6.9-76) h is found with monoexponential repair, while for spinal cord myelopathy, a repair halftime of 4.1 (range 0-8) h is found. The best-fit alpha beta ratio is 0.96 (range 0.24-1.73)Conclusions: A radiobiological model that includes repair corrections can describe the clinical data for a variety of fraction sizes, fractionation schedules, and total doses. Modeling suggests a relatively long repair halftime for brain necrosis. This study suggests that the repair halftime for late radiation effects in the brain may be longer than is currently thought. If confirmed in future studies, this may lead to a re-evaluation of radiation fractionation schedules for some CNS diseases, particularly for those diseases where fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy is used.

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - activation repairs endothelial Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aorta of the normal rabbit exhibits focal sites Summary: to repair this injury. Because fluid mechanical forces regulate such fundamental endothelial processes... PF. Shear...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - auto body repair Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repair Your source ... Source: Braun, Paul - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Collection: Materials Science 3 A Case...

  6. Development of Baseline Monthly Utility Models, Stabilization of Data Logging Environment and Development of Metering Plan and Shopping List for Fort Hood, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saman, N. F.; Reddy, T. A.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensors) at *ue west substation, and the installation of the ESL's Monitor software for use by the Energy Office at the base. The objective of Task C is to provide a metering plan and shopping list of necessary data points to provide CERL with energy... and EModel, and it was found that EModel gave more accurate modeling results than PRISM, and therefore EModel was used in the analysis. For Task B, a weather station that includes temperature, humidity and solar sensors was installed at the west substation...

  7. Energy-efficient regenerative liquid desiccant drying process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ko, Suk M. (Huntsville, AL); Grodzka, Philomena G. (Huntsville, AL); McCormick, Paul O. (Athens, AL)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the use of desiccants in conjunction with an open oop drying cycle and a closed loop drying cycle to reclaim the energy expended in vaporizing moisture in harvested crops. In the closed loop cycle, the drying air is brought into contact with a desiccant after it exits the crop drying bin. Water vapor in the moist air is absorbed by the desiccant, thus reducing the relative humidity of the air. The air is then heated by the used desiccant and returned to the crop bin. During the open loop drying cycle the used desiccant is heated (either fossil or solar energy heat sources may be used) and regenerated at high temperature, driving water vapor from the desiccant. This water vapor is condensed and used to preheat the dilute (wet) desiccant before heat is added from the external source (fossil or solar). The latent heat of vaporization of the moisture removed from the desiccant is reclaimed in this manner. The sensible heat of the regenerated desiccant is utilized in the open loop drying cycle. Also, closed cycle operation implies that no net energy is expended in heating drying air.

  8. Kinetics of the clay roofing tile convection drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, S. (Univ. of Osijek (Croatia). Faculty of Food Technology); Skansi, D. (Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology); Sokele, M. (Croatian Post and Telecommunications, Zagreb (Croatia). Telecommunications Center)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetics of the convection drying process of flat tile has been investigated experimentally in an industrial tunnel dryer. Several velocities of wet tile movement through the dryer were tested to obtain maximum allowable drying rate curve. As there are various models to describe the kinetics of convection drying, finding a model that would fairly well approximate the kinetics of the whole drying process was part of the research. Especially the polynomial and exponential models were tested. It was found that exponential model of the type: B(t) = (a[minus]B[sub e])[center dot]EXP([minus]bt[sup 2])+B[sub e], ([minus]dB(t)/dt) = 2bt(B(t)[minus]B[sub e]) significantly correlates the kinetics of the whole tile drying process. Applying the maximum allowable drying rate curve obtained for flat tile in the first period of drying, a grapho-analytic model for the optimal conducting of the process has been developed.

  9. Repair welding of fusion reactor components. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, B.A.; Wang, C.A.

    1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The exposure of metallic materials, such as structural components of the first wall and blanket of a fusion reactor, to neutron irradiation will induce changes in both the material composition and microstructure. Along with these changes can come a corresponding deterioration in mechanical properties resulting in premature failure. It is, therefore, essential to expect that the repair and replacement of the degraded components will be necessary. Such repairs may require the joining of irradiated materials through the use of fusion welding processes. The present ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) conceptual design is anticipated to have about 5 km of longitudinal welds and ten thousand pipe butt welds in the blanket structure. A recent study by Buende et al. predict that a failure is most likely to occur in a weld. The study is based on data from other large structures, particularly nuclear reactors. The data used also appear to be consistent with the operating experience of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This reactor has a fuel pin area comparable with the area of the ITER first wall and has experienced one unanticipated fuel pin failure after two years of operation. The repair of irradiated structures using fusion welding will be difficult due to the entrapped helium. Due to its extremely low solubility in metals, helium will diffuse and agglomerate to form helium bubbles after being trapped at point defects, dislocations, and grain boundaries. Welding of neutron-irradiated type 304 stainless steels has been reported with varying degree of heat-affected zone cracking (HAZ). The objectives of this study were to determine the threshold helium concentrations required to cause HAZ cracking and to investigate techniques that might be used to eliminate the HAZ cracking in welding of helium-containing materials.

  10. Blade reliability collaborative : collection of defect, damage and repair data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashwill, Thomas D.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) was started by the Wind Energy Technologies Department of Sandia National Laboratories and DOE in 2010 with the goal of gaining insight into planned and unplanned O&M issues associated with wind turbine blades. A significant part of BRC is the Blade Defect, Damage and Repair Survey task, which will gather data from blade manufacturers, service companies, operators and prior studies to determine details about the largest sources of blade unreliability. This report summarizes the initial findings from this work.

  11. Anionic Salt Programs for Close-Up Dry Cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Sandra R.

    1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    .5 to 1.8 percent of dry mat- ter (dietary supplementation between 150 and 200 grams calcium per day). 4 Set dietary phosphorus at about 0.4 percent (dietary sup- ply between 35 and 50 grams of phosphorus per day). n Monitor the urine pH of close-up dry... that contrib- ute both anions and cations to the balance. They do not affect DCAD. Although dietary DCAD is relatively easy to cal- culate, monitoring urine pH of close-up dry cows is a more accurate way to determine the diet?s impact on an animal?s acid...

  12. Technical and economical considerations of new DRI melting process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Shuzo; Tokuda, Koji; Sammt, F.; Gray, R.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The new DRI melting process can effectively and economically produce high quality molten iron. This process utilizes hot charging of DRI directly from a reduction furnace into a dedicated new melting furnace. The molten iron from this DRI premelter can be charged into a steelmaking furnace, such as an electric arc furnace (EAF), where the molten iron, together with other iron sources, can be processed to produce steel. Alternatively the molten iron can be pigged or granulated for off-site merchant sales. Comprehensive research and development of the new process has been conducted including operational process simulation, melting tests using FASTMET DRI, slag technology development, and refractory corrosion testing. This paper describes the process concept, its operational characteristics and further applications of the process.

  13. Drilling Complete on Australian Hot Dry Rock Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first commercial attempt to create a commercial geothermal power plant using hot dry rock technology reached a crucial milestone on January 22, when a production well successfully reached its target depth.

  14. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Diesel Generator Fire Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SINGH, G.

    2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Fire Protection and Detection System installed by Project W-441 (Cold Vacuum Drying Facility and Diesel Generator Building) functions as required by project specifications.

  15. Reservoir Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System, Fenton Hill, New Mexico- Tracer Test Results Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  16. Drying studies for corroded DOE aluminum plate fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lords, R.E.; Windes, W.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Crepeau, J.C.; Sidwell, R.W. [Idaho Univ., Idaho Falls, ID (United States) Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) currently stores a wide variety of spent nuclear fuel. The fuel was originally intended to be stored underwater for a short period of thermal cooling, then removed and reprocessed. However, it has been stored underwater for much longer thank originally anticipated. During this time dust and airborne desert soil have entered the oldest INEL pool, accumulating on the fuel. Also, the aluminum fuel cladding has corroded compromising the exposed surfaces of the fuel. Plans are now underway to move some the the more vulnerable aluminum plate type fuels into dry storage in an existing vented and filtered fuel storage facility. In preparation for dry storage of the fuel a drying and canning station is being built at the INEL. The two primary objectives of this facility are to determine the influence of corrosion products on the drying process and to establish temperature distribution inside the canister during heating.

  17. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:22:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NA1160SNY2"...

  18. Sandis irradiator for dried sewage solids. Final safety analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, M.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses of the hazards associated with the operation of the Sandia irradiator for dried sewage solids, as well as methods and design considerations to minimize these hazards, are presented in accordance with DOE directives.

  19. Evaluation of mixing characteristics of corn dry masa flours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobeira Massu, Rodrigo

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixing characteristics of commercial and reformulated corn dry masa flours (DMF) were evaluated using a mixograph and a farinograph. The objectives were to evaluate the potential use of the mixograph and farinograph to study DMF mixing and hydration...

  20. High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fuel (SNF) for many decades will have a near-term and potentially significant impact on nuclear plant licensing and operations. While dry storage of lower burnup SNF less than...

  1. Loading guide for dry-type power transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applicable to naturally cooled dry-type power transformers complying with IEC 60726. Permits the calculation of, and indicates the permissible loading under certain defined conditions in terms of rated current.

  2. Disneylandís Dry Cleaning Gets an Energy Efficient Upgrade

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As the provider of laundry and dry cleaning services for Disneyland Resortís costumes and hospitality supply items, L&N Costume and Linen Service knows a little something about both quantity and quality.

  3. Insights into the historical construction of species-rich Mesoamerican seasonally dry tropical forests: the diversification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Mark

    Insights into the historical construction of species-rich Mesoamerican seasonally dry tropical, Mesoamerica, niche conservatism, seasonally dry tropical forests. Summary ∑ Mesoamerican arid biomes epitomize the vast species richness of Meso- american seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTFs), and to evaluate

  4. OXIDATION OF DRY HYDROCARBONS AT HIGH-POWER DENSITY ANODES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.Krist; O. Spaldon-Stewart; R. Remick

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work builds upon discoveries by the University of Pennsylvania and others pertaining to the oxidation of dry hydrocarbon fuels in high temperature solid oxide fuel cells. The work reported here was restricted primarily to dry methane and confirms that YSZ-based cells, having ceria in the anode as a catalyst and copper in the anode as a current collector, can operate on dry methane for extended periods. Thirty-three lab-scale cells of various designs were fabricated and operated under a variety of conditions. The longest-lived cell gave stable performance on dry methane at 800 C for over 305 hours. Only slight carbon deposition was noted at the completion of the test. A corresponding nickel/YSZ-based anode would have lasted for less than an hour under these test conditions (which included open circuit potential measurements) before carbon fouling essentially destroyed the cell. The best performing cell achieved 112 mW/cm{sub 2} on dry methane at 800 C. Several problems were encountered with carbon fouling and declining open circuit voltages in many of the test cells after switching from operation on hydrogen to dry methane. Although not rigorously confirmed by experimentation, the results suggested that air infiltration through less than perfect perimeter seals or pinholes in the electrolytes, or both gave rise to conditions that caused the carbon fouling and OCV decline. Small amounts of air reacting with methane in a partial oxidation reaction could produce carbon monoxide that, in turn, would deposit the carbon. If this mechanism is confirmed, it implies that near perfect hardware is required for extended operation. Some evidence was also found for the formation of electrical shorts, probably from carbon deposits bridging the electrolyte. Work with odorized methane and with methane containing 100-ppm hydrogen sulfide confirmed that copper is stable at 800 C in dry hydrocarbon fuels in the presence of sulfur. In a number of cases, but not exclusively, the performance life on dry methane with sulfur compounds was much longer than with dry methane alone. The effect of sulfur compounds in these cases appeared to correlate with inhibition of carbon deposition. Mixed results were obtained for the effect of the sulfur compounds on power density. Progress also was made in understanding the mechanisms involved in direct utilization of dry natural gas. Evidence was developed for three possible mechanisms for dry methane utilization in addition to the usually cited mechanism--direct oxidation of methane by oxygen anions. Further work is required at a fundamental level before the knowledge gained here can be translated into higher levels of performance.

  5. GEOLOGY O F THE NORTHERN PCIRT O F DRY MOUNTAXN,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    GEOLOGY O F THE NORTHERN PCIRT O F DRY MOUNTAXN, SOUTHERN UASCSTCH H Q - W T A X H E i i - UT&H #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY RESEARCH STUDIES Geology Seri,es Vol. 3 No. 2 April, 1956 GEOLOGY OF THE NORTHERN Department of Gedogy Provo, Utah #12;GEOLOGY OF THE NORTHERN PART OF DRY MOUNTAIN, SOUTHERN WASATCH M O U N

  6. Identification and Dissection of a Complex DNA Repair Sensitivity Phenotype in Baker's Yeast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruglyak, Leonid

    Identification and Dissection of a Complex DNA Repair Sensitivity Phenotype in Baker's Yeast Ann-assisted bulk segregant analysis, we identified one other locus, MKT1, and a QTL on Chromosome VII that also) Identification and Dissection of a Complex DNA Repair Sensitivity Phenotype in Baker's Yeast. PLoS Genet 4(7): e

  7. Lazy Means Smart: Reducing Repair Bandwidth Costs in Erasure-coded Distributed Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvisi, Lorenzo

    - ditional bandwidth savings. 1. INTRODUCTION Erasure coding schemes, e.g. Reed-Solomon (RS) codes on the example of Reed-Solomon codes, and then explain the repair bandwidth problem. In an RS(n,k) stor- age scheme. 4. EVALUATION METHODOLOGY Evaluating the efficacy of lazy recovery in reducing repair bandwidth

  8. A Centralized, TreeBased Approach to Network Repair Service for Multicast Streaming Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxemchuk, Nicholas F.

    transmission, and can forward (via unicast) packets to other repair servers that did not receive the packets via the original transmission. After a fixed delay on the order of several seconds, a repair server with a transmission that is delayed by a few seconds relative to the original multicast session. However, this delayed

  9. 4 CONCRETE REPAIR BULLETIN MAY/JUNE2001 Laser Profilometry for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maerz, Norbert H.

    4 CONCRETE REPAIR BULLETIN MAY/JUNE2001 Laser Profilometry for Concrete Substrate Characterization and resins are non- corrosive, they are ideally suited for the repair and retrofitting of concrete bridges highly upon the quality of the bond between the concrete and the laminate. Experience has shown that when

  10. Optimizing Repair Programs for Consistent Query Answering Monica Caniupan and Leopoldo Bertossi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertossi, Leopoldo

    , a logic programming system that implements the stable models semantics, in particular. We also analyze be restored minimally by inserting Q(a) or elim- inating S(a). The repair program contains the following 1Optimizing Repair Programs for Consistent Query Answering Monica Caniupan and Leopoldo Bertossi

  11. Rotating equipment shop testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godse, A.G. (Kuwait National Petroleum Co., Shuaiba (KW))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Poor performance of machinery after commissioning at first draws comments on whether the purchase specification was in order, whether there were any lapses in stage inspection or whether the performance test procedure was inadequate. Attempts are initiated to find out whether there were any deviations in operating conditions from the purchase specifications, inadvertent lapses in operation or any mistakes by the maintenance Dept. It will be of some interest to mention here a difference between operating companies who have taken over existing plants and engineering consulting companies who have engineered and constructed the plants. The specialist rotating machinery group of engineering consultant companies have a good understanding of what can be achieved at the manufacturer's test facility due to repeated dealings with manufacturers. However, operating company understanding varies from one organization to the next. This article gives an overview of rotating machinery with respect to test objectives and field problems.

  12. TRANSPORT...18 SHOPPING...22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    of renewable energy sources, paying attention to the environmental impact of our activities, and setting after the golden days of economic growth, without regard for ecological consequences. Yet I am pleased are having both close to home, and upon some of the most vulnerable members of society across the world

  13. Injection repair of carbon fiber/bismaleimide composite panels with bisphenol E cyanate ester resin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thunga, Mahendra [Ames Laboratory; Bauer, Amy [Iowa State University; Obusek, Kristine [Fleet Readiness Center East; Meilunas, Ray [Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division; Akinc, Mufit [Ames Laboratory; Kessler, Michael R [Ames Laboratory

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resin injection of bisphenol E cyanate ester, a low viscosity resin that cures into a high temperature thermoset polymer, is investigated as a reliable repair method to restore strength and stiffness in delaminated carbon fiber/bismaleimide composites used in aircraft panels. The influence of temperature on the viscosity of the uncured resin was measured to optimize the injection conditions for high resin infiltration into the delaminations. The repair efficiency of the resin was evaluated by varying the panel thickness and the method by which the delamination damage was created in the composite specimens. Ultrasonic scanning (C-scan), flash thermography images, and cross-section analysis of repaired panels revealed excellent resin infiltration into the damaged region. Evaluation of mechanical repair efficiency using both bending stiffness and in-plain compressive strength of the composite panels as the repair metrics showed values exceeding 100%.

  14. Repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA base damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Dobson, P.P.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The repair of DNA damage produced by /sup 137/Cs gamma irradiation was measured with a preparation from Micrococcus luteus containing DNA damage-specific endonucleases in combination with alkaline elution. The frequency of these endonuclease sensitive sites (ESS) was determined after 54 or 110 Gy of oxic irradiation in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts from complementation groups A, C, D, and G. Repair was rapid in all cell strains with greater than 50% repair after 1.5 h of repair incubation. At later repair times, 12-17 h, more ESS remained in XP than in normal cells. The frequency of excess ESS in XP cells was approximately 0.04 per 10(9) Da of DNA per Gy which was equivalent to 10% of the initial ESS produced. The removal of ESS was comparable in XP cells with normal radiosensitivity and XP3BR cells which have been reported to be moderately radiosensitive.

  15. Experience in the repair of steam generator auxiliary feedwater nozzle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, K.K.N. [Consumers Power Co., Jackson, MI (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The auxiliary feedwater nozzle is quite often subjected to more thermal stress cycles and other loading mechanisms during their service life than the material was designed and fabricated for at the nozzle of the earlier steam generators in many nuclear plants. During plant operation, the auxiliary feedwater nozzle outlet is exposed to the hot steam from the generator side, while the auxiliary feedwater piping which contains subcooled water from the inlet often induces water hammer as a result of the steam-water mixing phenomena. The thermal cycles and the steam bubble collapse at the nozzle may cause cracking in the nozzle liner and interior surface of the nozzle, and subsequently results in structural damage to the steam generator. This presentation is intended to share the lessons learned from the evaluation of the nozzle condition and the subsequent modification and repair made to the auxiliary feedwater nozzle at the Palisades Nuclear Plant. Other nuclear plant owners may benefit from this experience.

  16. Method of tissue repair using a composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchens, Stacy A; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R; O'Neill, Hugh M

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  17. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C. [Guy's and St. Thomas' Foundation Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom); Sabharwal, T. [Guy's and St. Thomas' Foundation Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom); Carrell, T. W. G. [Guy's and St. Thomas' Foundation Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Vascular Surgery (United Kingdom); Reidy, J. F. [Guy's and St. Thomas' Foundation Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom)], E-mail: John.Reidy@gstt.nhs.uk

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis.

  18. Intracellular Water Exchange for Measuring the Dry Mass, Water Mass and Changes in Chemical Composition of Living Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cermak, Nathan

    We present a method for direct non-optical quantification of dry mass, dry density and water mass of single living cells in suspension. Dry mass and dry density are obtained simultaneously by measuring a cellís buoyant ...

  19. Water quality investigation of Kingston Fossil Plant dry ash stacking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohac, C.E.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing to a dry ash disposal systems at Kingston Fossil Plant (KFP) raises several water quality issues. The first is that removing the fly ash from the ash pond could alter the characteristics of the ash pond discharge to the river. The second concerns proper disposal of the runoff and possibly leachate from the dry ash stack. The third is that dry ash stacking might change the potential for groundwater contamination at the KFP. This report addresses each of these issues. The effects on the ash pond and its discharge are described first. The report is intended to provide reference material to TVA staff in preparation of environmental review documents for new ash disposal areas at Kingston. Although the investigation was directed toward analysis of dry stacking, considerations for other disposal options are also discussed. This report was reviewed in draft form under the title Assessment of Kingston Fossil Plant Dry Ash Stacking on the Ash Pond and Groundwater Quality.'' 11 refs., 3 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. Development and validation of bonded composite doubler repairs for commercial aircraft.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A typical aircraft can experience over 2,000 fatigue cycles (cabin pressurizations) and even greater flight hours in a single year. An unavoidable by-product of aircraft use is that crack, impact, and corrosion flaws develop throughout the aircraft's skin and substructure elements. Economic barriers to the purchase of new aircraft have placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair methods. The use of bonded composite doublers offers the airframe manufacturers and aircraft maintenance facilities a cost effective method to safely extend the lives of their aircraft. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is now possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance Center at Sandia National Labs (AANC), Boeing, and Federal Express completed a pilot program to validate and introduce composite doubler repair technology to the U.S. commercial aircraft industry. This project focused on repair of DC-10 fuselage structure and its primary goal was to demonstrate routine use of this repair technology using niche applications that streamline the design-to-installation process. As composite doubler repairs gradually appear in the commercial aircraft arena, successful flight operation data is being accumulated. These commercial aircraft repairs are not only demonstrating the engineering and economic advantages of composite doubler technology but they are also establishing the ability of commercial maintenance depots to safely adopt this repair technique. This report presents the array of engineering activities that were completed in order to make this technology available for widespread commercial aircraft use. Focused laboratory testing was conducted to compliment the field data and to address specific issues regarding damage tolerance and flaw growth in composite doubler repairs. Fatigue and strength tests were performed on a simulated wing repair using a substandard design and a flawed installation. In addition, the new Sol-Gel surface preparation technique was evaluated. Fatigue coupon tests produced Sol-Gel results that could be compared with a large performance database from conventional, riveted repairs. It was demonstrated that not only can composite doublers perform well in severe off-design conditions (low doubler stiffness and presence of defects in doubler installation) but that the Sol-Gel surface preparation technique is easier and quicker to carry out while still producing optimum bonding properties. Nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods were developed so that the potential for disbond and delamination growth could be monitored and crack growth mitigation could be quantified. The NDI methods were validated using full-scale test articles and the FedEx aircraft installations. It was demonstrated that specialized NDI techniques can detect flaws in composite doubler installations before they reach critical size. Probability of Detection studies were integrated into the FedEx training in order to quantify the ability of aircraft maintenance depots to properly monitor these repairs. In addition, Boeing Structural Repair and Nondestructive Testing Manuals were modified to include composite doubler repair and inspection procedures. This report presents the results from the FedEx Pilot Program that involved installation and surveillance of numerous repairs on operating aircraft. Results from critical NDI evaluations are reported in light of damage tolerance assessments for bonded composite doublers. This work has produced significant interest from airlines and aircraft manufacturers. The successful Pilot Program produced flight performance history to establish the durability of bonded composite patches as a permanent repair on commercial aircraft structures. This report discusses both the laboratory data and Pilot Program results from repair installations on operating aircraft to introduce composite doubler repairs into mainstream commercial aircraft use.

  1. Fabrication Flaw Density and Distribution In Repairs to Reactor Pressure Vessel and Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GJ Schuster, FA Simonen, SR Doctor

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a generalized fabrication flaw distribution for the population of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and for piping welds in U.S. operating reactors. The purpose of the generalized flaw distribution is to predict component-specific flaw densities. The estimates of fabrication flaws are intended for use in fracture mechanics structural integrity assessments. Structural integrity assessments, such as estimating the frequency of loss-of-coolant accidents, are performed by computer codes that require, as input, accurate estimates of flaw densities. Welds from four different reactor pressure vessels and a collection of archived pipes have been studied to develop empirical estimates of fabrication flaw densities. This report describes the fabrication flaw distribution and characterization in the repair weld metal of vessels and piping. This work indicates that large flaws occur in these repairs. These results show that repair flaws are complex in composition and sometimes include cracks on the ends of the repair cavities. Parametric analysis using an exponential fit is performed on the data. The relevance of construction records is established for describing fabrication processes and product forms. An analysis of these records shows there was a significant change in repair frequency over the years when these components were fabricated. A description of repair flaw morphology is provided with a discussion of fracture mechanics significance. Fabrication flaws in repairs are characterized using optimized-access, high-sensitivity nondestructive ultrasonic testing. Flaw characterizations are then validated by other nondestructive evaluation techniques and complemented by destructive testing.

  2. Standard review plan for dry cask storage systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Review Plan (SRP) For Dry Cask Storage Systems provides guidance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff in the Spent Fuel Project Office for performing safety reviews of dry cask storage systems. The SRP is intended to ensure the quality and uniformity of the staff reviews, present a basis for the review scope, and clarification of the regulatory requirements. Part 72, Subpart B generally specifies the information needed in a license application for the independent storage of spent nuclear fuel and high level radioactive waste. Regulatory Guide 3.61 {open_quotes}Standard Format and Content for a Topical Safety Analysis Report for a Spent Fuel Dry Storage Cask{close_quotes} contains an outline of the specific information required by the staff. The SRP is divided into 14 sections which reflect the standard application format. Regulatory requirements, staff positions, industry codes and standards, acceptance criteria, and other information are discussed.

  3. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998) and, the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1997, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 3a. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence, and has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  4. Characterization and air drying of chunkwood and chips

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturos, J.B.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chunkwood was found to be composed of a few large particles and many small particles with the large particles constituting almost half the total weight. More than 75% of the chunk weight was composed of particles weighing more than 100 grams (ovendry), while 85% of the chip weight was composed of particles weighing 3 grams or less. Energy densities ranged from 89,675 Btu/ft/sup 3/ for green aspen chips to 162,520 Btu/ft/sup 3/ for dried sugar maple chunks. Chunks and chips were air-dried from July through October in eight covered cribs. For both species tested, the chunks dried faster than the chips to about 20% moisture content.

  5. Alternative barrier layers for surface covers in dry climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stormont, J.C.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface covers are one of the most widespread remediation and waste management options in all climates. Barrier layers to limit percolation through cover systems are principal features of engineered, multi-component cover designs. Conventional barrier layer components developed for humid climates have limitations in dry climates. One alternative barrier layer is a capillary barrier, which consists of a fine-over-coarse soil arrangement. The capacity of capillary barrier to laterally divert downward moving water is the key to their success. Another alternative is a dry barrier, in which atmospheric air is circulated through a coarse layer within the cover to remove water vapor. Incorporating a coarse layer which stores water for subsequent removal by air flow reduces the requirements for the air flow velocity and increases the applicability of the dry barrier.

  6. Linear Extrusion 400 Tons/Day Dry Solids Pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Sprouse; David Matthews

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept that uses rocket engine experience to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to current state-of-the-art systems. The PWR gasifier concept uses a compact and highly efficient (>50%) dry solids pump that has excellent availability (>99.5%). PWR is currently developing this dry solids pump under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement. The conceptual design on two dry solids pumps were completed under this agreement and one pump concept was selected for preliminary design. A preliminary design review (PDR) of the selected pump was presented on September 20, 2007 to PWR management and numerous technical specialists. Feedback from the PDR review team has been factored into the design and a Delta-PDR was held on April 9, 2008.

  7. Enhancing fire safety at Hydro plants with dry transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemen, D.M. (Harza Engineering Company, Chicago, IL (United States))

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydroelectric plant owners and engineers can use dry-type transformers to reduce fire hazards in auxiliary power systems. The decision to replace a liquid-immersed transformer with a dry-type product has a price: higher unit cost and a need to be more vigilant in detailing transformer specifications. But, whether the change affects only one failed transformer or is part of a plant rehabilitation project, the benefits in safety can be worth it. Voltages on hydroelectric plant auxiliary power systems can range from a 20 kV medium-voltage system to the normal 480-208/120 V low-voltage system. Dry transformers typically are used in such systems to reduce the fire hazard present with liquid-filled transformers. For a hydro plant owner or engineer seeking alternatives to liquid-filled transformers, there are two main kinds of dry-type transformers to consider: vacuum pressure impregnated (VPI) and cast coil epoxy resin. VPI transformers normally are manufactured in sizes up to 6,000 kVA with primary voltage ratings up to 20 kV. Cast coil transformers can be made in sizes from 75 to 10,000 kVA, with primary voltage ratings up to 34,500 V. Although the same transformer theory applies to dry transformers as to liquid-filled units, the cooling medium, air, required different temperature rise ratings, dielectric tests, and construction techniques to ensure reliability. Consequently, the factory and field tests for dry units are established by a separate set of American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) standards. Cast coil transformers have several important advantages over VPI units.

  8. DNA Repair Alterations in Children With Pediatric Malignancies: Novel Opportunities to Identify Patients at Risk for High-Grade Toxicities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruebe, Claudia E., E-mail: claudia.ruebe@uks.e [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Fricke, Andreas; Schneider, Ruth; Simon, Karin; Kuehne, Martin; Fleckenstein, Jochen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Graeber, Stefan [Institute of Medical Biometrics, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Graf, Norbert [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Ruebe, Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a pilot study, the phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}H2AX) foci approach for identifying patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: The DSB repair capacity of children with solid cancers was analyzed compared with that of age-matched control children and correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses (n = 47). Double-strand break repair was investigated by counting {gamma}H2AX foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after irradiation of blood samples. Results: Whereas all healthy control children exhibited proficient DSB repair, 3 children with tumors revealed clearly impaired DSB repair capacities, and 2 of these repair-deficient children developed life-threatening or even lethal normal-tissue toxicities. The underlying mutations affecting regulatory factors involved in DNA repair pathways were identified. Moreover, significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity were observed between children with tumors and control children, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DSB repair function. Conclusions: Double-strand break repair alteration in children may predispose to cancer formation and may affect children's susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. Phosphorylated H2AX analysis of blood samples allows one to detect DSB repair deficiencies and thus enables identification of children at risk for high-grade toxicities.

  9. Saving for dry days: Aquifer storage and recovery may help

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 2 Saving for dry days Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 3 Aquifer storage and recovery may help With reoccurring droughts and growing population, Texas will always be looking for better ways to save or use water. Some water... suppliers in Texas are turning to aquifer storage and recovery. During the dry summer of 2008, the San Antonio Water System (SAWS) had enough assets in its ?bank? (of water) to make with- drawals to meet the needs of its customers. The water bank...

  10. Missouri Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998 10,643NorwayBase4802009 2010YearSame Month126 117 94 90 82 73DryDry

  11. Photocatalytic properties of titania pillared clays by different drying methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Z.; Zhu, H.Y.; Lu, G.Q.; Greenfield, P.F. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photocatalysts based on titania pillared clays (TiO{sub 2} PILCs) have been prepared through a sol-gel method. Different drying methods, air drying (AD), air drying after ethanol extraction (EAD), and supercritical drying (SCD) have been employed and found to have significant effects on the photocatalytic efficiency of the resultant catalysts for the oxidation of phenol in water. Titania pillared clay (TiO{sub 2} PILC) obtained by SCD has the highest external and micropore surface area, largest amount and smallest crystallite size of anatase, and exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity. Furthermore, silica titania pillared clay (SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC) after SCD, titania coated TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) and SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) were synthesized to study the key factors controlling the photocatalytic activity. It is concluded that the dispersion of nanometer-sized anatase on the surface of the PILC particles and the suspensibility of the particles are the most important factors for high photocatalytic efficiency.

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER Twin-Screw Extrusion Processing of Distillers Dried

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Physical properties . Protein . Twin-screw extruder Introduction As a consequence of changes in energyORIGINAL PAPER Twin-Screw Extrusion Processing of Distillers Dried Grains with Solubles (DDGS. Twin- screw extrusion studies were performed to investigate the production of nutritionally balanced

  13. Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, B.H.

    1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Fire Hazard Analysis assesses the risk from fire within individual fire areas in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility at the Hanford Site in relation to existing or proposed fire protection features to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE Order 5480.7A Fire Protection are met.

  14. Sediment transport by dry ravel Emmanuel J. Gabet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabet, Emmanuel "Manny"

    Sediment transport by dry ravel Emmanuel J. Gabet Department of Geological Sciences, University, bouncing, and sliding of individual particles down a slope and is a dominant hillslope sediment transport of sediment wedges that have accumulated behind vegetation. On a daily basis, particles may be mobilized

  15. Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Quang A. (Chesterfield, MO); Keller, Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

    2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

  16. Radiation budget changes with dry forest clearing in temperate Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Radiation budget changes with dry forest clearing in temperate Argentina J A V I E R H O U S P A N, Argentina, Catedra de Climatologia Agricola, Facultad de Ciencias Agropecuarias, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, Oro Verde, Argentina Abstract Land cover changes may affect climate and the energy balance

  17. EFFECT OF DRYING CONDITIONS OF DEHYDRATED LUCERNE ON GROWTH PERFORMANCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EFFECT OF DRYING CONDITIONS OF DEHYDRATED LUCERNE ON GROWTH PERFORMANCES OF RABBITS RECEIVING DIETS CONTAINING LUCERNE F. LEBAS, J. DOLZ Annie ESPAIGNET* Marie-Oaude COUSIN e G. SARDI Station de Recherches sur * Station expérimentale de l'I. T. C. F., 91920 Boigneville In 1972, 18 different adjustments of the lucerne

  18. Seismic Behavior of Spent Fuel Dry Cask Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaukat, Syed K. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States); Luk, Vincent K. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800. Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0744 (United States)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting a research program to investigate technical issues concerning the dry cask storage systems of spent nuclear fuel by conducting confirmatory research for establishing criteria and review guidelines for the seismic behavior of these systems. The program focuses on developing 3-D finite element analysis models that address the dynamic coupling of a module/cask, a flexible concrete pad, and an underlying soil/rock foundation, in particular, the soil-structure-interaction. Parametric analyses of the coupled models are performed to include variations in module/cask geometry, site seismicity, underlying soil properties, and cask/pad interface friction. The analyses performed include: 1) a rectangular dry cask module typical of Transnuclear West design at a site in Western USA where high seismicity is expected; 2) a cylindrical dry cask typical of Holtec design at a site in Eastern USA where low seismicity is expected; and 3) a cylindrical dry cask typical of Holtec design at a site in Western USA with medium high seismicity. The paper includes assumptions made in seismic analyses performed, results, and conclusions. (authors)

  19. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Stack Air Sampling System Qualification Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2001-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents tests that were conducted to verify that the air monitoring system for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility ventilation exhaust stack meets the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of the air sampling probe, sample transport, and stack flow measurement accuracy.

  20. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Electrical System Design Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRISBIN, S.A.

    1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a technical explanation of the design and operation of the electrical system for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. This document identifies the requirements, and the basis for the requirements and details on how the requirements have been implemented in the design and construction of the facility. This document also provides general guidance for the surveillance, testing, and maintenance of this system.

  1. Evaluation of the Technical Basis for Extended Dry Storage and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- Executive Summary U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board December 2010 #12;U.S.U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Authors This report was prepared for the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board.NWTRB.GOV ii #12;Extended Dry Storage and Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical

  2. Hottest spot temperatures in ventilated dry type transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, L.W. (General Electric Co., Rome, GA (United States))

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hottest spot temperature allowance to be used for the different insulation system temperature classes is a major unknown facing IEEE Working Groups developing standards and loading guides for ventilated dry type transformers. In 1944, the hottest spot temperature allowance for ventilated dry type transformers was established as 30 C for 80 C average winding temperature rise. Since 1944, insulation temperature classes have increased to 220 C but IEEE standards continue to use a constant 30 C hottest spot temperature allowance. IEC standards use a variable hottest spot temperature allowance from 5 to 30 C. Six full size test windings were manufactured with imbedded thermocouples and 133 test runs performed to obtain temperature rise data. The test data indicated that the hottest spot temperature allowance used in IEEE standards for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA is too low. This is due to the large thermal gradient from the bottom to the top of the windings caused by natural convection air flow through the cooling ducts. A constant ratio of hottest spot winding temperature rise to average winding temperature rise should be used in product standards for all insulation temperature classes. A ratio of 1.5 is suggested for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA. This would increase the hottest spot temperature allowance from 30 C to 60 C and decrease the permissible average winding temperature rise from 150 C to 120 C for the 220 C insulation temperature class.

  3. Power transformers - Part 11: Dry-type transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applies to dry-type power transformers (including auto-transformers) having values of highest voltage for equipment up to and including 36 kV and at least one winding operating at greater than 1,1 kV. Applies to all construction technologies.

  4. Community-Minded Interns at Savannah River Site Help Area Residents in Need with Home Repairs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. Ė More than two dozen college interns who worked at the Savannah River Site (SRS) this summer joined other volunteers and headed into area neighborhoods to help people in need with home repairs.

  5. Use of CFRP Overlays to Repair Fatigue Damage in Steel Bridge Girders and Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gangel, Regan Elisabeth

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue damage in steel girder bridges built prior to the mid-1980s is common due to distortion-induced fatigue. Different repair techniques have been developed and implemented to retrofit bridges of this era with existing fatigue damage...

  6. USE OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS TO REPAIR STEEL STRUCTURES VULNERABLE TO FATIGUE DAMAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alemdar, Fatih

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates mainly two different topics related to the use of CFRP's for strengthening and repair of steel bridges: the use of CFRP's to prevent damage in fatigue vulnerable welded connections prior to fatigue-crack initiation...

  7. Consistency Management with Repair Actions Christian Nentwich, Wolfgang Emmerich and Anthony Finkelstein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Hoek, André

    Consistency Management with Repair Actions Christian Nentwich, Wolfgang Emmerich and Anthony Finkelstein Department of Computer Science University College London Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK {c.nentwich,w.emmerich

  8. Project: UAF Utilities Waste Line Repairs Ch6 to Ch13 Project No: 2013101 UTWH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Project: UAF Utilities Waste Line Repairs Ch6 to Ch13 Project No: 2013101 UTWH Subject: Project Schedule Project Duration: May 27 to August 10, 2014 The sewer line will be constructed in phases

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - aortic repair pushing Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for: aortic repair pushing Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Mechanobiology of the Aortic Heart Valve Jonathan T. Butcher1 Summary: ;13:798-803 18. Deck JD, Thubrikar MJ, Schneider...

  10. Using 3D Painting to Build and Repair Parts | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spray as an alternate way to repair or coat parts involved in oil and gas drilling and turbo machinery. Cold spray's future benefits include extended product lifespan and reduced...

  11. GENETIC AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND TOLERANCE PATHWAYS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation can damage cellular components, including DNA. Organisms have developed a panoply of means of dealing with DNA damage. Some repair paths have rather narrow substrate specificity (e.g. photolyases), which act on specific pyrimidine photoproducts in a specific type (e.g., DNA) and conformation (double-stranded B conformation) of nucleic acid. Others, for example, nucleotide excision repair, deal with larger classes of damages, in this case bulky adducts in DNA. A detailed discussion of DNA repair mechanisms is beyond the scope of this article, but one can be found in the excellent book of Friedberg et al. [1] for further detail. However, some DNA damages and paths for repair of those damages important for photobiology will be outlined below as a basis for the specific examples of genetic and molecular analysis that will be presented below.

  12. Review of Maintenance and Repair Times for Components in Technological Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of some unique component repair time data and it also presents citations of more extensive reports where lists of repair times can be found. This collection of information should support analysts who seek to quantify maintainability and availability of high technology and nuclear energy production systems. While there are newer sources of repair time information, most, if not all, of the newer sources are proprietary and cannot be shared. This report offers data that, while older, is openly accessible and can serve as reasonable estimates of repair times, at least for initial studies. Some times were found for maintenance times in radiation environments, and some guidance for multiplicative factors to use to account for work in contamination areas.

  13. Tiny Terminators: New Micro-Robots Assemble, Repair Themselves and Are Surprisingly Strong

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tiny robots that can assemble and repair themselves? Watch a video of Argonne National Laboratory's micro-robots that easily perform tasks that can challenge other robots, including moving objects that are larger than themselves.

  14. RESTORING A DAMAGED 16-YEAR -OLD INSULATING POLYMER CONCRETE DIKE OVERLAY: REPAIR MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program was to design and formulate organic polymer-based material systems suitable for repairing and restoring the overlay panels of insulating lightweight polymer concrete (ILPC) from the concrete floor and slope wall of a dike at KeySpan liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, NY, just over sixteen years ago. It also included undertaking a small-scale field demonstration to ensure that the commercial repairing technologies were applicable to the designed and formulated materials.

  15. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in the Presence of a Kidney Transplant: Therapeutic Considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karkos, Christos D., E-mail: ckarkos@hotmail.com; McMahon, Greg [Leicester Royal Infirmary, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (United Kingdom); Fishwick, Guy [Leicester Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Lambert, Kelly; Bagga, Ajay; McCarthy, Mark J. [Leicester Royal Infirmary, Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (United Kingdom)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in the presence of a kidney transplant can be extremely challenging, as it carries significant risks of renal ischemia. Endovascular repair is an attractive option, as it can be performed with little or no impairment of renal arterial flow. We describe the endovascular management of a recurrent AAA in a patient with a functioning renal transplant using a custom-made aorto-uni-iliac device. We discuss the planning and the potential problems of the technique.

  16. Laser engineered net shaping (LENS) for the repair and modification of NWC metal components.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, Clinton J.; Smugeresky, John E. (Sandia National Labs, Livermore,CA); Gill, David Dennis

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser Engineered Net Shaping{trademark} (LENS{reg_sign}) is a layer additive manufacturing process that creates fully dense metal components using a laser, metal powder, and a computer solid model. This process has previously been utilized in research settings to create metal components and new material alloys. The ''Qualification of LENS for the Repair and Modification of Metal NWC Components'' project team has completed a Technology Investment project to investigate the use of LENS for repair of high rigor components. The team submitted components from four NWC sites for repair or modification using the LENS process. These components were then evaluated for their compatibility to high rigor weapons applications. The repairs included hole filling, replacement of weld lips, addition of step joints, and repair of surface flaws and gouges. The parts were evaluated for mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, weldability, and hydrogen compatibility. This document is a record of the LENS processing of each of these component types and includes process parameters, build strategies, and lessons learned. Through this project, the LENS process was shown to successfully repair or modify metal NWC components.

  17. Remote Welding, NDE and Repair of DOE Standardized Canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric Larsen; Art Watkins; Timothy R. McJunkin; Dave Pace; Rodney Bitsoi

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) to manage DOEís spent nuclear fuel (SNF). One of the NSNFPís tasks is to prepare spent nuclear fuel for storage, transportation, and disposal at the national repository. As part of this effort, the NSNFP developed a standardized canister for interim storage and transportation of SNF. These canisters will be built and sealed to American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section III, Division 3 requirements. Packaging SNF usually is a three-step process: canister loading, closure welding, and closure weld verification. After loading SNF into the canisters, the canisters must be seal welded and the welds verified using a combination of visual, surface eddy current, and ultrasonic inspection or examination techniques. If unacceptable defects in the weld are detected, the defective sections of weld must be removed, re-welded, and re-inspected. Due to the high contamination and/or radiation fields involved with this process, all of these functions must be performed remotely in a hot cell. The prototype apparatus to perform these functions is a floor-mounted carousel that encircles the loaded canister; three stations perform the functions of welding, inspecting, and repairing the seal welds. A welding operator monitors and controls these functions remotely via a workstation located outside the hot cell. The discussion describes the hardware and software that have been developed and the results of testing that has been done to date.

  18. In situ repair of a failed compression fitting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolbert, R.R.; Jandrasits, W.G.

    1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the in situ repair of a failed compression fitting is provided. Initially, a portion of a guide tube is inserted coaxially in the bore of the compression fitting and locked therein. A close fit dethreading device is then coaxially mounted on the guide tube to cut the threads from the fitting. Thereafter, the dethreading device and guide tube are removed and a new fitting is inserted onto the dethreaded fitting with the body of the new fitting overlaying the dethreaded portion. Finally, the main body of the new fitting is welded to the main body of the old fitting whereby a new threaded portion of the replacement fitting is precisely coaxial with the old threaded portion. If needed, a bushing is located on the dethreaded portion which is sized to fit snugly between the dethreaded portion and the new fitting. Preferably, the dethreading device includes a cutting tool which is moved incrementally in a radial direction whereby the threads are cut from the threaded portion of the failed fitting in increments.

  19. In situ repair of a failed compression fitting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolbert, Ronald R. (McKees Rocks, PA); Jandrasits, Walter G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the in situ repair of a failed compression fitg is provided. Initially, a portion of a guide tube is inserted coaxially in the bore of the compression fitting and locked therein. A close fit dethreading device is then coaxially mounted on the guide tube to cut the threads from the fitting. Thereafter, the dethreading device and guide tube are removed and a new fitting is inserted onto the dethreaded fitting with the body of the new fitting overlaying the dethreaded portion. Finally, the main body of the new fitting is welded to the main body of the old fitting whereby a new threaded portion of the replacement fitting is precisely coaxial with the old threaded portion. If needed, a bushing is located on the dethreaded portion which is sized to fit snugly between the dethreaded portion and the new fitting. Preferably, the dethreading device includes a cutting tool which is moved incrementally in a radial direction whereby the threads are cut from the threaded portion of the failed fitting in increments.

  20. Dry Storage of Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel - 13321

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.M.; Dunsmuir, M.D.; Leduc, D.R.; Severynse, T.F.; Sindelar, R.L. [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States); Moore, E.N. [Moore Nuclear Energy, LLC (United States)] [Moore Nuclear Energy, LLC (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent fuel from domestic and foreign research reactors is received and stored at the Savannah River Site's L Area Material Storage (L Basin) Facility. This DOE-owned fuel consists primarily of highly enriched uranium in metal, oxide or silicide form with aluminum cladding. Upon receipt, the fuel is unloaded and transferred to basin storage awaiting final disposition. Disposition alternatives include processing via the site's H Canyon facility for uranium recovery, or packaging and shipment of the spent fuel to a waste repository. A program has been developed to provide a phased approach for dry storage of the L Basin fuel. The initial phase of the dry storage program will demonstrate loading, drying, and storage of fuel in twelve instrumented canisters to assess fuel performance. After closure, the loaded canisters are transferred to pad-mounted concrete overpacks, similar to those used for dry storage of commercial fuel. Unlike commercial spent fuel, however, the DOE fuel has high enrichment, very low to high burnup, and low decay heat. The aluminum cladding presents unique challenges due to the presence of an oxide layer that forms on the cladding surface, and corrosion degradation resulting from prolonged wet storage. The removal of free and bound water is essential to the prevention of fuel corrosion and radiolytic generation of hydrogen. The demonstration will validate models predicting pressure, temperature, gas generation, and corrosion performance, provide an engineering scale demonstration of fuel handling, drying, leak testing, and canister backfill operations, and establish 'road-ready' storage of fuel that is suitable for offsite repository shipment or retrievable for onsite processing. Implementation of the Phase I demonstration can be completed within three years. Phases II and III, leading to the de-inventory of L Basin, would require an additional 750 canisters and 6-12 years to complete. Transfer of the fuel from basin storage to dry storage requires integration with current facility operations, and selection of equipment that will allow safe operation within the constraints of existing facility conditions. Examples of such constraints that are evaluated and addressed by the dry storage program include limited basin depth, varying fuel lengths up to 4 m, (13 ft), fissile loading limits, canister closure design, post-load drying and closure of the canisters, instrument selection and installation, and movement of the canisters to storage casks. The initial pilot phase restricts the fuels to shorter length fuels that can be loaded to the canister directly underwater; subsequent phases will require use of a shielded transfer system. Removal of the canister from the basin, followed by drying, inerting, closure of the canister, and transfer of the canister to the storage cask are completed with remotely operated equipment and appropriate shielding to reduce personnel radiation exposure. (authors)

  1. INTERNAL REPAIR OF GAS PIPLINES SURVEY OF OPERATOR EXPERIENCE AND INDUSTRY NEEDS REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian D. Harris

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A repair method that can be applied from the inside of a gas transmission pipeline (i.e., a trenchless repair) is an attractive alternative to conventional repair methods since the need to excavate the pipeline is precluded. This is particularly true for pipelines in environmentally sensitive and highly populated areas. The objectives of the project are to evaluate, develop, demonstrate, and validate internal repair methods for pipelines; develop a functional specification for an internal pipeline repair system; and prepare a recommended practice for internal repair of pipelines. The purpose of this survey is to better understand the needs and performance requirements of the natural gas transmission industry regarding internal repair. A total of fifty-six surveys were sent to pipeline operators. A total of twenty completed surveys were returned, representing a 36% response rate, which is considered very good given the fact that tailored surveys are known in the marketing industry to seldom attract more than a 10% response rate. The twenty survey responses produced the following principal conclusions: (1) Use of internal weld repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water (e.g., lakes and swamps) in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. All these areas tend to be very difficult and very costly if, and where, conventional excavated repairs may be currently used. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling (HDD) when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem in a water/river crossing. (3) The typical travel distances required can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). In concept, these groups require pig-based systems; despooled umbilical systems could be considered for the first two groups. For the last group a self-propelled system with an onboard self-contained power and welding system is required. (4) Pipe size range requirements range from 50.8 mm (2 in.) through 1,219.2 mm (48 in.) in diameter. The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm to 762 mm (20 in. to 30 in.) diameter, with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) diameter pipe.

  2. Development of bonded composite doublers for the repair of oil recovery equipment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, David W.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An unavoidable by-product of a metallic structure's use is the appearance of crack and corrosion flaws. Economic barriers to the replacement of these structures have created an aging infrastructure and placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair methods. In the past decade, an advanced composite repair technology has made great strides in commercial aviation use. Extensive testing and analysis, through joint programs between the Sandia Labs FAA Airworthiness Assurance Center and the aviation industry, have proven that composite materials can be used to repair damaged aluminum structure. Successful pilot programs have produced flight performance history to establish the durability of bonded composite patches as a permanent repair on commercial aircraft structures. With this foundation in place, this effort is adapting bonded composite repair technology to civil structures. The use of bonded composite doublers has the potential to correct the difficulties associated with current repair techniques and the ability to be applied where there are no rehabilitation options. It promises to be cost-effective with minimal disruption to the users of the structure. This report concludes a study into the application of composite patches on thick steel structures typically used in mining operations. Extreme fatigue, temperature, erosive, and corrosive environments induce an array of equipment damage. The current weld repair techniques for these structures provide a fatigue life that is inferior to that of the original plate. Subsequent cracking must be revisited on a regular basis. The use of composite doublers, which do not have brittle fracture problems such as those inherent in welds, can help extend the structure's fatigue life and reduce the equipment downtime. Two of the main issues for adapting aircraft composite repairs to civil applications are developing an installation technique for carbon steel and accommodating large repairs on extremely thick structures. This study developed and proved an optimum field installation process using specific mechanical and chemical surface preparation techniques coupled with unique, in-situ heating methods. In addition, a comprehensive performance assessment of composite doubler repairs was completed to establish the viability of this technology for large, steel structures. The factors influencing the durability of composite patches in severe field environments were evaluated along with related laminate design issues.

  3. Dry Transfer Facility #1 - Ventilation Confinement Zoning Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.D. Draper

    2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to establish the preliminary Ventilation Confinement Zone (VCZ) for the Dry Transfer Facility (DTF). The results of this document is used to determine the air quantities for each VCZ that will eventually be reflected in the development of the Ventilation Flow Diagrams. The calculations contained in this document were developed by D and E/Mechanical-HVAC and are intended solely for the use of the D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department in its work regarding the HVAC system for the Dry Transfer Facility. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department should be consulted before use of the calculation for purposes other than those stated herein or used by individuals other than authorized personnel in D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department.

  4. Dry soldering with hot filament produced atomic hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.K.G.; Jellison, J.L.; Staley, D.J.

    1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is disclosed for chemically transforming metal surface oxides to metal that is especially, but not exclusively, suitable for preparing metal surfaces for dry soldering and solder reflow processes. The system employs one or more hot, refractory metal filaments, grids or surfaces to thermally dissociate molecular species in a low pressure of working gas such as a hydrogen-containing gas to produce reactive species in a reactive plasma that can chemically reduce metal oxides and form volatile compounds that are removed in the working gas flow. Dry soldering and solder reflow processes are especially applicable to the manufacture of printed circuit boards, semiconductor chip lead attachment and packaging multichip modules. The system can be retrofitted onto existing metal treatment ovens, furnaces, welding systems and wave soldering system designs. 1 fig.

  5. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted between January 1, 2006, and March 31, 2006, on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal combustion flue gas. An integrated system composed of a downflow co-current contact absorber and two hollow screw conveyors (regenerator and cooler) was assembled, instrumented, debugged, and calibrated. A new batch of supported sorbent containing 15% sodium carbonate was prepared and subjected to surface area and compact bulk density determination.

  6. Drum drying of black liquor using superheated steam impinging jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiravi, A.H.; Mujumdar, A.S.; Kubes, G.J. [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel drum dryer for black liquor utilizing multiple impinging jets of superheated steam was designed and built to evaluate the performance characteristics and effects of various operating parameters thereon. Appropriate ranges of parameters such as steam jet temperature and velocity were examined experimentally to quantify the optimal operating conditions for the formation of black liquor film on the drum surface as well as the drying kinetics.

  7. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Hazards Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CROWE, R.D.

    2000-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Hazard Analysis to support the CVDF Final Safety Analysis Report and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports,'' and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, ''Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.''

  8. Independent Panel Evaluation of Dry Sludge PISA Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.F.

    1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Dr. Kirk Yeager and Mr. Marvin Banks from Energetic Material Research and Technology Center (EMRTC) evaluated the Savannah River Site (SRS) efforts in the Dry Sludge program. They evaluated four program areas: energetic material formation, stability, initiation, and propagation. The panel evaluation included a site visit (July 13, 1999 and July 14, 1999) as well as a review of various reports and presentations by researchers involved in the program.

  9. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Electrical System Design Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SINGH, G.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This system design description (SDD) provides a technical explanation of the design and operation of the electrical system for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). This SDD also identifies the requirements, and the basis for the requirements and details on how the requirements have been implemented in the design and construction of the facility. This SDD also provides general guidance for the surveillance, testing, and maintenance of this system.

  10. 7-forming, superconducting filaments through bicomponent dry spinning

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuominen, Olli P. (Ogden, UT); Morgan, Carol W. (Asheville, NC); Burlone, Dominick A. (Asheville, NC); Blankenship, Keith V. (Asheville, NC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fibers which contain potentially superconducting material are dry spun by the steps of preparing a suspension of potentially superconducting powder in a thickened solvent; preparing a solution of fiber-forming polymer; supplying the suspension and the solution to a spinning apparatus; in the spinning apparatus, arranging the solution and the suspension in a bicomponent arrangement; extruding the arranged solution and suspension from a spinneret as a bicomponent filament; and removing the solvent from the filament.

  11. Process and apparatus for indirect-fired heating and drying

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbasi, Hamid Ali; Chudnovsky, Yaroslav

    2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for heating flat or curved surfaces comprising injecting fuel and oxidant along the length, width or longitudinal side of a combustion space formed between two flat or curved plates, transferring heat from the combustion products via convection and radiation to the surface being heated on to the material being dried/heated, and recirculating at least 20% of the combustion products to the root of the flame.

  12. Inclined fluidized bed system for drying fine coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Merriam, Norman W. (Laramie, WY); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY)

    1992-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal is processed in an inclined fluidized bed dryer operated in a plug-flow manner with zonal temperature and composition control, and an inert fluidizing gas, such as carbon dioxide or combustion gas. Recycled carbon dioxide, which is used for drying, pyrolysis, quenching, and cooling, is produced by partial decarboxylation of the coal. The coal is heated sufficiently to mobilize coal tar by further pyrolysis, which seals micropores upon quenching. Further cooling with carbon dioxide enhances stabilization.

  13. Dry flue gas desulfurization process for various coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widico, M.J.; Dhargalkar, P.H.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes have been widely used since the early 1970's for control of sulfur dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants. First generation FGD systems employ ''wet processes'' whereby the flue gas is contacted with a solution or slurry of an alkali reagent. Most of these installations use either lime or limestone. Calcium-based wet systems have, in general, satisfied SO/sub 2/ removal requirements; however, reliability of the early systems was affected by some operational problems. Additionally, sludge dewatering and disposal equipment results in overall system complexity. A dry FGD process which minimizes these problems was developed in late 1970's. It incorporates a spray drying concept for removal of SO/sub 2/ by reaction with lime slurry or soda ash solution. The spray dryer absorber is followed by an electrostatic precipitator or a fabric filter where particulates are collected. The waste product, which is a mixture of FGD reaction products, unreacted reagent and fly ash, is dry thus eliminating the need for dewatering equipment.

  14. Safe Advantage on Dry Interim Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanato, L.S. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em S.Paulo, Brazilian Navy Technological Center, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims to present the advantages of dry cask storage in comparison with the wet storage (cooling water pools) for SNF. When the nuclear fuel is removed from the core reactor, it is moved to a storage unit and it wait for a final destination. Generally, the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) remains inside water pools within the reactors facility for the radioactive activity decay. After some period of time in pools, SNF can be sent to a definitive deposition in a geological repository and handled as radioactive waste or to reprocessing facilities, or still, wait for a future solution. Meanwhile, SNF remains stored for a period of time in dry or wet facilities, depending on the method adopted by the nuclear power plant or other plans of the country. Interim storage, up to 20 years ago, was exclusively wet and if the nuclear facility had to be decommissioned another storage solution had to be found. At the present time, after a preliminary cooling of the SNF elements inside the water pool, the elements can be stored in dry facilities. This kind of storage does not need complex radiation monitoring and it is safer then wet one. Casks, either concrete or metallic, are safer, especially on occurrence of earthquakes, like that occurred at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant, in Japan on July 16, 2007. (authors)

  15. Predicting hottest spot temperatures in ventilated dry type transformer windings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, L.W. (General Electric Co., Rome, GA (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test data indicates that hottest spot allowances used in IEEE standards for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA are too low. A mathematical model to predict hottest spot temperature rises in ventilated dry type transformers was developed. Data from six layer type test windings and a 2500 kva prototype was used to refine the model. A correlation for the local heat transfer coefficient in the cooling ducts was developed. The model was used to study the effect of various parameters on the ratio of hottest spot to average winding temperature rise. The number of conductor layers, insulation thickness, and conductor strand size were found to have only a minor effect on the ratio. Winding height was found to be the main parameter influencing the ratio of hottest spot to average winding temperature rise. The study based on the mathematical model confirmed previous conclusions based on test data that the hottest spot allowances used in IEEE standards for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA should be revised.

  16. The effect of drying treatment on the n-alkane analysis M Olivn, K Osoro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    38 and lucerne hay samples (n = 33) were prepared for the alkane analysis by two procedures : freeze-dried faeces and herbage (lucerne hay) samples. Therefore oven-drying would not affect on the estimation

  17. The effect of drying on the heating value of biomass fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Pablo Gregorio

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been some speculation as to whether or not biomass fuels (such as feedlot manure) may lose volatile matter during the drying process. Since current standards state that heating value analysis may be performed before or after drying...

  18. Extending dry storage of spent LWR fuel for 100 years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einziger, R. E.

    1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of delays in closing the back end of the fuel cycle in the U.S., there is a need to extend dry inert storage of spent fuel beyond its originally anticipated 20-year duration. Many of the methodologies developed to support initial licensing for 20-year storage should be able to support the longer storage periods envisioned. This paper evaluates the applicability of existing information and methodologies to support dry storage up to 100 years. The thrust of the analysis is the potential behavior of the spent fuel. In the USA, the criteria for dry storage of LWR spent fuel are delineated in 10 CFR 72 [1]. The criteria fall into four general categories: maintain subcriticality, prevent the release of radioactive material above acceptable limits, ensure that radiation rates and doses do not exceed acceptable levels, and maintain retrievability of the stored radioactive material. These criteria need to be considered for normal, off-normal, and postulated accident conditions. The initial safety analysis report submitted for licensing evaluated the fuel's ability to meet the requirements for 20 years. It is not the intent to repeat these calculations, but to look at expected behavior over the additional 80 years, during which the temperatures and radiation fields are lower. During the first 20 years, the properties of the components may change because of elevated temperatures, presence of moisture, effects of radiation, etc. During normal storage in an inert atmosphere, there is potential for the cladding mechanical properties to change due to annealing or interaction with cask materials. The emissivity of the cladding could also change due to storage conditions. If there is air leakage into the cask, additional degradation could occur through oxidation in breached rods, which could lead to additional fission gas release and enlargement of cladding breaches. Air in-leakage could also affect cover gas conductivity, cladding oxidation, emissivity changes, and excessive creep and mechanical property changes. Postulated accident scenarios would be the same for 20-year or 100-year storage, because they are mostly governed by operational or outside events, and not by the cask or fuel. Analyses of accident scenarios during extended dry storage could be impacted by fuel and cask changes that would result from the extended period of storage. Overall, the results of this work indicate that, based on fuel behavior, spent fuel at burnups below {approximately}45 GWd/MTU can be dry stored for 100 years. Long-term storage of higher burnup fuel or fuels with newer cladding will require the determination of temperature limits based on evaluation of stress-driven degradation mechanisms of the cladding.

  19. Implementing Strategies for Drying and Pressing Wood Without Emissions Controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sujit Banerjee; Terrance Conners

    2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Drying and pressing wood for the manufacture of lumber, particleboard, oriented strand board (OSB), veneer and medium density fiberboard (MDF) release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. These emissions require control equipment that are capital-intensive and consume significant quantities of natural gas and electricity. The objective of our work was to understand the mechanisms through which volatile organic compounds are generated and released and to develop simple control strategies. Of the several strategies developed, two have been implemented for OSB manufacture over the course of this study. First, it was found that increasing final wood moisture by about 2-4 percentage points reduced the dryer emissions of hazardous air pollutants by over 70%. As wood dries, the escaping water evaporatively cools the wood. This cooling tapers off wood when the wood is nearly dry and the wood temperature rises. Thermal breakdown of the wood tissue occurs and VOCs are released. Raising the final wood moisture by only a few percentage points minimizes the temperature rise and reduces emissions. Evaporative cooling also impacts has implications for VOC release from wood fines. Flaking wood for OSB manufacture inevitable generates fines. Fines dry out rapidly because of their high surface area and evaporative cooling is lost more rapidly than for flakes. As a result, fines emit a disproportionate quantity of VOCs. Fines can be reduced in two ways: through screening of the green furnish and through reducing their generation during flaking. The second approach is preferable because it also increased wood yield. A procedure to do this by matching the sharpness angle of the flaker knife to the ambient temperature was also developed. Other findings of practical interests are as follows: Dielectric heating of wood under low-headspace conditions removes terpenes and other extractives from softwood; The monoterpene content in trees depend upon temperature and seasonal effects; Method 25A emissions from lumber drying can be modeled from a knowledge of the airflow through the kiln; A heat transfer model shows that VOCs released during hot-pressing mainly originate from the surface of the board; and Boiler ash can be used to adsorb formaldehyde from air streams.

  20. IN-PORE TENSILE STRESS BY DRYING-INDUCED CAPILLARY BRIDGES INSIDE POROUS MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    such systems are the building stones when extracted from natural quarries, and exposed to drying-wetting cycles

  1. Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets David Jon by raindrop impacts. We use high-speed imaging of drop impacts on dry sand to describe the drop (2007), Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets, J

  2. Sludge drying reed beds: a full and pilot-scales study for activated sludge treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    Sludge drying reed beds: a full and pilot-scales study for activated sludge treatment S. Troesch.troesch@cemagref.fr, dirk.esser@sint.fr Abstract Sludge drying reed beds have been used for dewatering and mineralization of sludge since the beginning of the 90's, but their insufficient performances in terms of Dry Matter [DM

  3. Effect of air-drying of Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. leaves on intake and digestion by sheep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    Effect of air-drying of Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. leaves on intake and digestion by sheep H Abdouli-dried. The aim of the present study was to compare fresh to air-dried leaves for their intake, digestibility to the diets for the first 15 days and intake, digestibility and rumen fermentation parameters were measured

  4. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G), Volume 1 Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site were usually shallow excavations approximately 3 to 4 meters in depth. Operations at the pits consisted of collecting waste on a continuous basis and burning on a monthly basis. The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631- 6G (BRP6G) was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal of paper, lumber, cans and empty galvanized steel drums. The unit may have received other materials such as plastics, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, or drummed solvents. The BRP6G was operated from 1951 until 1955. After disposal activities ceased, the area was covered with soil. Hazardous substances, if present, may have migrated into the surrounding soil and/or groundwater. Because of this possibility, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated the BRP6G as a Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) subject to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process.

  5. Automatic coke oven heating control system at Burns Harbor for normal and repair operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battle, E.T.; Chen, K.L. [Bethlehem Steel Corp., Burns Harbor, IN (United States); [Bethlehem Steel Corp., PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An automatic heating control system for coke oven batteries was developed in 1985 for the Burns Harbor No. 1 battery and reported in the 1989 Ironmaking Conference Proceedings. The original system was designed to maintain a target coke temperature at a given production level under normal operating conditions. Since 1989, enhancements have been made to this control system so that it can also control the battery heating when the battery is under repair. The new control system has improved heating control capability because it adjusts the heat input to the battery in response to anticipated changes in the production schedule. During a recent repair of this 82 oven battery, the pushing schedule changed from 102 ovens/day to 88 ovens/day, then back to 102 ovens/day, then to 107 ovens/day. During this repair, the control system was able to maintain the coke temperature average standard deviation at 44 F, with a maximum 75 F.

  6. Evaluation of bisphenol E cyanate ester for the resin-injection repair of advanced composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilber Yaote Lio

    2009-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is a compilation of a general introduction and literature review that ties together the subsequent chapters which consist of two journal articles that have yet to be submitted for publication. The overall topic relates to the evaluation and application of a new class of cyanate ester resin with unique properties that lend it applicable to use as a resin for injection repair of high glass transition temperature polymer matrix composites. The first article (Chapter 2) details the evaluation and optimization of adhesive properties of this cyanate ester and alumina nanocomposites under different conditions. The second article (Chapter 3) describes the development and evaluation of an injection repair system for repairing delaminations in polymer matrix composites.

  7. A survey of repair practices for nuclear power plant containment metallic pressure boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oland, C.B.; Naus, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide assistance in their assessment of the effects of potential degradation on the structural integrity and leaktightness of metal containment vessels and steel liners of concrete containments in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to identify repair practices for restoring metallic containment pressure boundary components that have been damaged or degraded in service. This report presents issues associated with inservice condition assessments and continued service evaluations and identifies the rules and requirements for the repair and replacement of nonconforming containment pressure boundary components by welding or metal removal. Discussion topics include base and welding materials, welding procedure and performance qualifications, inspection techniques, testing methods, acceptance criteria, and documentation requirements necessary for making acceptable repairs and replacements so that the plant can be returned to a safe operating condition.

  8. Demonstrating the Safety of Long-Term Dry Storage - 13468

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCullum, Rod [Nuclear Energy Institute, 1201 F St. NW, Washington, DC, 20004 (United States)] [Nuclear Energy Institute, 1201 F St. NW, Washington, DC, 20004 (United States); Brookmire, Tom [Dominion Energy, 5000 Dominion Boulevard Glen Allen, VA 23060 (United States)] [Dominion Energy, 5000 Dominion Boulevard Glen Allen, VA 23060 (United States); Kessler, John [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 West W.T. Harris Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 West W.T. Harris Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States); Leblang, Suzanne [Entergy, 1340 Echelon Parkway, Jackson, MS 39211 (United States)] [Entergy, 1340 Echelon Parkway, Jackson, MS 39211 (United States); Levin, Adam [Exelon, 4300 Winfield Road, Warrenville, IL 60555 (United States)] [Exelon, 4300 Winfield Road, Warrenville, IL 60555 (United States); Martin, Zita [Tennessee Valley Authority, 1101 Market Street, Chattanooga, TN 37402 (United States)] [Tennessee Valley Authority, 1101 Market Street, Chattanooga, TN 37402 (United States); Nesbit, Steve [Duke Energy, 550 South Tryon Street, Charlotte, NC 28202 (United States)] [Duke Energy, 550 South Tryon Street, Charlotte, NC 28202 (United States); Nichol, Marc [Nuclear Energy Institute, 1201 F St. NW Washington DC, 2004 (United States)] [Nuclear Energy Institute, 1201 F St. NW Washington DC, 2004 (United States); Pickens, Terry [Xcel Energy, 414 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55401 (United States)] [Xcel Energy, 414 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55401 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial nuclear plants in the United States were originally designed with the expectation that used nuclear fuel would be moved directly from the reactor pools and transported off site for either reprocessing or direct geologic disposal. However, Federal programs intended to meet this expectation were never able to develop the capability to remove used fuel from reactor sites - and these programs remain stalled to this day. Therefore, in the 1980's, with reactor pools reaching capacity limits, industry began developing dry cask storage technology to provide for additional on-site storage. Use of this technology has expanded significantly since then, and has today become a standard part of plant operations at most US nuclear sites. As this expansion was underway, Federal programs remained stalled, and it became evident that dry cask systems would be in use longer than originally envisioned. In response to this challenge, a strong technical basis supporting the long term dry storage safety has been developed. However, this is not a static situation. The technical basis must be able to address future challenges. Industry is responding to one such challenge - the increasing prevalence of high burnup (HBU) used fuel and the need to provide long term storage assurance for these fuels equivalent to that which has existed for lower burnup fuels over the past 25 years. This response includes a confirmatory demonstration program designed to address the aging characteristics of HBU fuel and set a precedent for a learning approach to aging management that will have broad applicability across the used fuel storage landscape. (authors)

  9. Assessment of an active dry barrier for a landfill cover system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stormont, J.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ankeny, M.D.; Burkhard, M.E.; Tansey, M.K.; Kelsey, J.A. [Stephens (Daniel B.) and Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dry barrier is a layer of geologic material that is dried by air flow. An active dry barrier system can be designed, installed, and operated as part of a landfill cover system. An active system uses blowers and fans to move air through a high-permeability layer within the cover system. Depending principally on the air-flow rate, it is possible for a dry barrier to remove enough water to substantially reduce the likelihood of water percolating through the cover system. If a material with a relatively great storage capacity, such as processed tuff, is used as the coarse layer, then the efficiency of the dry barrier will be increased.

  10. Drying by Cavitation and Poroelastic Relaxations in Porous Media with Macroscopic Pores Connected by Nanoscale Throats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Vincent; David A. Sessoms; Erik J. Huber; Jules Guioth; Abraham D. Stroock

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the drying dynamics of porous media with two pore diameters separated by several orders of magnitude. Nanometer-sized pores at the edge of our samples prevent air entry, while drying proceeds by heterogeneous nucleation of vapor bubbles (cavitation) in the liquid in micrometer-sized voids within the sample. We show that the dynamics of cavitation and drying are set by the interplay of the deterministic poroelastic mass transport in the porous medium and the stochastic nucleation process. Spatio-temporal patterns emerge in this unusual reaction-diffusion system, with temporal oscillations in the drying rate and variable roughness of the drying front.

  11. Dry, reconstituted, and early harvested sorghum grain for finishing cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrett, Ned Albert

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    upon a number of, factors such as diameter& length and revolving speed of the auger. A steady flow of dry grain and water must be maintained into the mixing auger in order to obtain proper and uniform water application. For a given installation... commenced. Reconstituting was accomplish . d by making use of a 70-foot auger conveyor, nine inches in diameter (Figure li. Water was added by metering into a one inch line located above the auger. Grain flow rate was regulated by use of a variable...

  12. Mathematical modeling of impingement drying of corn tortillas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, Louise Marie

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drying process should balance the beneficial effects, such as extended shelf life and desirable textural changes, with unfavorable effects, such as nutrient loss and decrease in digestibility (Barbosa-Canovas and Vega-Mercado, 1996). 2. 3 Methods... to 39'C (Barbosa-Canovas and Vega-Mercado, 1996). This method is used in processing citrus juices, apple flakes and other heat-sensitive products (Sokhansanj and Jayas, 19877. ~Fd ~ 1 1 1 lf1 d fh 1d~'i g. Th f p d fl *?p d to reduced pressure below...

  13. Cold Vacuum Drying facility HVAC system design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SINGH, G.

    2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This System Design Description (SDD) addresses the HVAC system for the CVDF. The CVDF HVAC system consists of five subsystems: (1) Administration building HVAC system; (2) Process bay recirculation HVAC system; (3) Process bay local exhaust HVAC and process vent system; (4) Process general supply/exhaust HVAC system; and (5) Reference air system. The HVAC and reference air systems interface with the following systems: the fire protection control system, Monitoring and Control System (MCS), electrical power distribution system (including standby power), compressed air system, Chilled Water (CHW) system, drainage system, and other Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) control systems not addressed in this SDD.

  14. Electrical conductivity of dispersions: from dry foams to dilute suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Feitosa; S. Marze; A. Saint-Jalmes; D. J. Durian

    2005-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new data for the electrical conductivity of foams in which the liquid fraction ranges from two to eighty percent. We compare with a comprehensive collection of prior data, and we model all results with simple empirical formul\\ae. We achieve a unified description that applies equally to dry foams and emulsions, where the droplets are highly compressed, as well as to dilute suspensions of spherical particles, where the particle separation is large. In the former limit, Lemlich's result is recovered; in the latter limit, Maxwell's result is recovered.

  15. Dried Citrus Pulp in Beef Cattle Fattening Rations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, J. M. (John McKInley)

    1942-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    occurred in the milk during the feeding trials in question. They also observed that Florida dairymen have fed a considerable quantity of fresh citrus pulp to dairy cows and heifers and that the fermenting product tended to impart a slight flavor...- T 1 I I TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR College Station, Texas BULLETIS NO. 613 JULY 1949 DRIED CITRUS PULP IN BEEF CATTLE FATTENING RATIONS J. H. JONES, R. A. HALL E. 31. NEAL, J. H. JONES Division of Range...

  16. Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Dry

  17. Alaska--Onshore Natural Gas Dry Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion CubicCubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar119,0392008 2009Dry

  18. Lower 48 States Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289886,084Dry18,749 21,459

  19. Missouri Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year JanThousand Cubic0 0 0 2011 2012Dry

  20. Texas State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear JanSeparation, Proved1 4.70 1967-2010Cubic Feet) Dry Natural

  1. Probability analysis of dry-day sequences in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milne, Robert James

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0. d 0. 5 0. 4 0. 3 0. 2 0. 1 0 20 40 d0 80 100 120 140 140 180 200 220 240 240 280 300 320 340 340 JULIAN DATE Fig, 7. Three-cycle maximum and minimum probabilities for Brownsville, Texas. 1. 0 m I a O 0. 9 0. 8 0. 7 0. d 0. 8 0...PROBABILITY ANALYSIS OF DRY-DAY SEQUENCES IN TEXAS A I'hesis by ROBERT SAMES MILNE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE DECEMBER 1971 Major...

  2. Nevada Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30 2013 Macroeconomic team:6-2015 Illinois NA NA,0,DecadeYearDry Natural Gas

  3. Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Dry Natural

  4. Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Dry

  5. Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia DrySales

  6. West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)perAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Dry Natural Gas

  7. West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)perAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Dry Natural

  8. West Virginia Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)perAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Dry

  9. Missouri Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30 2013 Macroeconomic team: Kay6 KentuckyYear Jan Feb Mar Apr(DollarsDry

  10. Nevada Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year Jan Feb MarthroughYear Jan Feb MarDry Natural Gas Production

  11. Nevada Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) in KansasYear Jan Feb MarYear Janfrom YemenDry

  12. A laboratory study of the activities of dried rumen microorganisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbers, Leniel Henry

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 01736 gm. /ml. By all of the criteria used, (except the digestion of carboxyzethyl cellulose) the activities of dried rumen preparations were very much lover than those of fresh rumen liquid in the "artificial rumen". This may be attributed to nne... have little or no ~ ~ act1vity vith respect to cellulose digestion, non-protein nitrogen utilisation, or vitamin synthesis. The failure of the bacteria to be reactivated may bs due to one or more of the following possible causes& (s) the bacteria...

  13. EVALUATION OF A UAV COMPOSITE WING SPAR REPAIR USING AN EMBEDDED OPTICAL FIBER RAYLEIGH BACK-SCATTERING DISTRIBUTED STRAIN SENSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EVALUATION OF A UAV COMPOSITE WING SPAR REPAIR USING AN EMBEDDED OPTICAL FIBER RAYLEIGH BACK Branch, Tel-Aviv Israel ikressel@iai.co.il ABSTRACT A representing damaged UAV wing spar cap was repaired requirements for UAVs, where the substantiation of structural bonded joint can be based on: "repeatable

  14. The Role of Nucleotide Excision Repair in Restoring Replication Following UV-Induced Damage in Escherichia coli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courcelle, Justin

    The Role of Nucleotide Excision Repair in Restoring Replication Following UV-Induced Damage DNA synthesis in the absence of nucleotide excision repair does not promote cell survivalA mutants....................... 26 Following low doses of UV irradiation cells lacking nucleotide excision

  15. Hot repair of ceramic burner on hot blast stoves at USS/Kobe`s {number_sign}3 blast furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernarding, T.F.; Chemorov, M.; Shimono, S.; Phillips, G.R.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During the 1992 reline of the No. 3 blast furnace, three new stoves were constructed. The design of the stoves, equipped with internal ceramic burners, was for providing a hot blast temperature of 2,000 F at a wind rate of 140,000 SCFM. After 3 years the performance had deteriorated so the burners were cleaned. When a second cleaning did not improve the performance of No. 3 blast furnace, it was decided to repair the refractory while still hot. The paper describes the hot repair procedures, taking a stove off for repairs, maintenance heat up during repairs, two stove operation, stove commissioning, repair of a ceramic burner, and wet gas prevention.

  16. Operation of dry-cleaned and agglomerated precompaction system (DAPS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Shigemi; Okanishi, Kazuya; Kikuchi, Akio; Yamamura, Yuichi

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to reduce the manufacturing cost of coke, it is necessary to reduce mainly (1) the material cost and (2) operating cost. Both of these costs can be reduced by lowering the moisture of charging coal. Because dust generation increases with decreasing moisture of charging coal, however, the lower limit of charging coal moisture in the existing coke-oven equipment was about 5%, which yielded good results in coal moisture control (CMC) equipment. Nippon Steel has furthered the development of techniques for lowering the moisture of charging coal as far as possible in the existing coke ovens and has recently succeeded in developing a dry-cleaned and agglomerated precompaction system (DAPS) and incorporating this system in commercial production equipment. In this system, a coal preparation process is undertaken that involves separating coal fines, which cause dust generation, from dried charging coal and agglomerating them. The equipment incorporating this system was installed in the No. 3 and No. 4 coke batteries at Oita Works and brought into full-scale operation in September 1992. The equipment has since been operating smoothly.

  17. Dry oxidation and fracture of LWR spent fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahn, T.M.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the characteristics of oxidation and fracture of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel in dry air. It also discusses their effects on radionuclide releases in the anticipated high-level waste repository environment. A sphere model may describe diffusion-limited formation of lower oxides, such as U{sub 4}O{sub 9}, in the oxidation of the spent fuel (SF) matrix. Detrimental higher oxides, such as U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, may not form at temperatures below a threshold temperature. The nucleation process suggests that a threshold temperature exists. The calculated results regarding fracture properties of the SF matrix agree with experimental observations. Oxidation and fracture of Zircaloy may not be significant under anticipated conditions. Under saturated or unsaturated aqueous conditions, oxidation of the SF matrix is believed to increase the releases of Pu-(239+240), Am-(241+243), C-14, Tc-99, I-129, and Cs-135. Under dry conditions, I-129 releases are likely to be small, unlike C-14, in lower oxides; Cl-36, Tc-99, I-129, and Cs-135 may be released fast in higher oxides. 79 refs.

  18. Human factors engineering report for the cold vacuum drying facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IMKER, F.W.

    1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present the results and findings of the final Human Factors Engineering (HFE) technical analysis and evaluation of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). Ergonomics issues are also addressed in this report, as appropriate. This report follows up and completes the preliminary work accomplished and reported by the Preliminary HFE Analysis report (SNF-2825, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Human Factors Engineering Analysis: Results and Findings). This analysis avoids redundancy of effort except for ensuring that previously recommended HFE design changes have not affected other parts of the system. Changes in one part of the system may affect other parts of the system where those changes were not applied. The final HFE analysis and evaluation of the CVDF human-machine interactions (HMI) was expanded to include: the physical work environment, human-computer interface (HCI) including workstation and software, operator tasks, tools, maintainability, communications, staffing, training, and the overall ability of humans to accomplish their responsibilities, as appropriate. Key focal areas for this report are the process bay operations, process water conditioning (PWC) skid, tank room, and Central Control Room operations. These key areas contain the system safety-class components and are the foundation for the human factors design basis of the CVDF.

  19. Dry compliant seal for phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Granata, Jr., Samuel J. (South Greensburg, PA); Woodle, Boyd M. (N. Huntingdon Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dry compliant overlapping seal for a phosphoric acid fuel cell preformed f non-compliant Teflon to make an anode seal frame that encircles an anode assembly, a cathode seal frame that encircles a cathode assembly and a compliant seal frame made of expanded Teflon, generally encircling a matrix assembly. Each frame has a thickness selected to accommodate various tolerances of the fuel cell elements and are either bonded to one of the other frames or to a bipolar or end plate. One of the non-compliant frames is wider than the other frames forming an overlap of the matrix over the wider seal frame, which cooperates with electrolyte permeating the matrix to form a wet seal within the fuel cell that prevents process gases from intermixing at the periphery of the fuel cell and a dry seal surrounding the cell to keep electrolyte from the periphery thereof. The frames may be made in one piece, in L-shaped portions or in strips and have an outer perimeter which registers with the outer perimeter of bipolar or end plates to form surfaces upon which flanges of pan shaped, gas manifolds can be sealed.

  20. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  1. Latest advances in steam turbine design, blading, repairs, condition assessment, and condenser interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, D.M. (Turbine Consultants, Inc., Milwaukee, WI (US))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains papers presented at a conference on power generation. Topics covered include: a life extension approach for steam turbine blading in Electricite de France fossil plants, and on site 430 MW high pressure reheat turbine shell cracking and distortion repairs.

  2. Repair and Replacement projects help FM to honor its commitment to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulliver, Robert

    of the University. Services provided fall into three major categories: preventive maintenance, routine repairs friendly power. Energy Management is continually recognized for the superior maintenance. · Maintenance (www.facm.umn. edu/services/maintenance.html) Maintenance Operations preserves the physical assets

  3. Home Maintenance and Repair Owning a home is a major responsibility.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    maintenance is conducted. Regular, preventive maintenance can pay off in peace of mind, utility cost savings, routine maintenance helps to prolong the life of the home and may prevent the need for major repairs of Benjamin Franklin, "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." Regular, routine maintenance enhances

  4. Investigation of Corrosion Damage and Repair System in a Concrete Jetty Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mobasher, Barzin

    Investigation of Corrosion Damage and Repair System in a Concrete Jetty Structure Farid Moradi of the deterioration was reinforcement corrosion, which initiated within few years after the completion of the jetty structure. The structure underwent major corrosion rehabilitation after 7 years of service. Despite the use

  5. Development/Plasticity/Repair A Structural MRI Study of Human Brain Development from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Development/Plasticity/Repair A Structural MRI Study of Human Brain Development from Birth to 2 Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7510 Brain development in the first 2 years after birth and schizophrenia. Knowledge regarding this period is currently quite limited. We studied structural brain

  6. Evaluation of temporary non-code repairs in safety class 3 piping systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godha, P.C.; Kupinski, M.; Azevedo, N.F. [Northeast Utilities System, Hartford, CT (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temporary non-ASME Code repairs in safety class 3 pipe and piping components are permissible during plant operation in accordance with Nuclear Regulatory Commission Generic Letter 90-05. However, regulatory acceptance of such repairs requires the licensee to undertake several timely actions. Consistent with the requirements of GL 90-05, this paper presents an overview of the detailed evaluation and relief request process. The technical criteria encompasses both ductile and brittle piping materials. It also lists appropriate evaluation methods that a utility engineer can select to perform a structural integrity assessment for design basis loading conditions to support the use of temporary non-Code repair for degraded piping components. Most use of temporary non-code repairs at a nuclear generating station is in the service water system which is an essential safety related system providing the ultimate heat sink for various plant systems. Depending on the plant siting, the service water system may use fresh water or salt water as the cooling medium. Various degradation mechanisms including general corrosion, erosion/corrosion, pitting, microbiological corrosion, galvanic corrosion, under-deposit corrosion or a combination thereof continually challenge the pressure boundary structural integrity. A good source for description of corrosion degradation in cooling water systems is provided in a cited reference.

  7. Overview of NCHRP Design Guideline for EPS-Block Geofoam in Slope Stabilization and Repair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, John S.

    1 Overview of NCHRP Design Guideline for EPS-Block Geofoam in Slope Stabilization and Repair David in Construction Applications (EPS 2011 Norway) June 6-8, 2011 #12;2 ABSTRACT This paper presents an overview of the design guideline for the use of expanded polystyrene (EPS)-block geofoam for slope stabilization

  8. Efficacy of Low Level Laser Therapy After Hand Flexor Tendon Repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayad, K. E.; Abd El Mejeed, S. F. [Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University (Egypt); El Gohary, H. M.; Abd Elrahman, M.; Bekheet, A. B. [Al Sahel Teaching Hospital, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Flexor tendon injury is a common problem requiring suturing repair followed by early postoperative mobilization. Muscle atrophy, joint stiffness, osteoarthritis, infection, skin necrosis, ulceration of joint cartilage and tendocutaneous adhesion are familiar complications produced by prolonged immobilization of surgically repaired tendon ruptures. The purpose of this study was to clarify the importance of low level laser therapy after hand flexor tendon repair in zone II. Thirty patients aging between 20 and 40 years were divided into two groups. Patients in group A (n = 15) received a conventional therapeutic exercise program while patients in group B (n = 15) received low level laser therapy combined with the same therapeutic exercise program. The results showed a statistically significant increase in total active motion of the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints as well as maximum hand grip strength at three weeks and three months postoperative, but improvement was more significant in group B. It was concluded that the combination of low level laser therapy and early therapeutic exercises was more effective than therapeutic exercises alone in improving total active motion of proximal and distal interphalangeal joints and hand grip strength after hand flexor tendon repair.

  9. Multilayer sulfur-resistant composite metal membranes and methods of making and repairing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Way, J. Douglas; Hatlevik, Oyvind

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to thin, hydrogen-permeable, sulfur-resistant membranes formed from multi-layers of palladium or palladium-alloy coatings on porous, ceramic or metal supports, methods of making these membranes, methods of repairing layers of these membranes and devices that incorporate these membranes.

  10. Provably Repairing the ISO/IEC 9798 Standard for Entity Authentication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basin, David

    , or authentication of transmitted data [27,33]. The ISO (International Organization for Standardization) and IECProvably Repairing the ISO/IEC 9798 Standard for Entity Authentication David Basin, Cas Cremers the family of entity authentication protocols defined by the ISO/IEC 9798 standard and find numerous

  11. Provably Repairing the ISO/IEC 9798 Standard for Entity Authentication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basin, David

    (International Organization for Standardization) and IEC (Interna- tional Electrotechnical Commission) jointlyProvably Repairing the ISO/IEC 9798 Standard for Entity Authentication David Basin, Cas Cremers the family of entity authentication proto- cols defined by the ISO/IEC 9798 standard and find numerous

  12. Self-repairing Self-assembled Structures Daniel Arbuckle and Aristides A. G. Requicha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    1 Self-repairing Self-assembled Structures Daniel Arbuckle and Aristides A. G. Requicha Department.arbuckle@usc.edu, requicha@usc.edu Abstract-- This paper introduces a method by which structures can be self-assembled from by a process analogous to mitosis. I. INTRODUCTION Self-assembly agents have the potential to become an im

  13. Development/Plasticity/Repair Dendritic Spine Dynamics Regulate the Long-Term Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Rossum, Mark

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Dendritic Spine Dynamics Regulate the Long-Term Stability of Synaptic Plasticity Cian O'Donnell,1,2 Matthew F. Nolan,3 and Mark C. W. van Rossum1 1Institute for Adaptive of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9XD, United Kingdom Long-term synaptic plasticity requires postsynaptic influx

  14. Development/Plasticity/Repair A Refractory Period for Rejuvenating GABAergic Synaptic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    Development/Plasticity/Repair A Refractory Period for Rejuvenating GABAergic Synaptic Transmission and Ocular Dominance Plasticity with Dark Exposure Shiyong Huang,1* Yu Gu,2* Elizabeth M. Quinlan,2 Dark exposure initiated in adulthood reactivates robust ocular dominance plasticity in the visual

  15. Development/Plasticity/Repair Simultaneous NMDA-Dependent Long-Term Potentiation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segal, Menahem

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Simultaneous NMDA-Dependent Long-Term Potentiation of EPSCs and Long activity-dependent long-term plasticity of neuronal networks is the interplay between excitatory, whereas a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor was ineffec- tive. Finally, network-induced plasticity

  16. Inspection, Assessment, and Repair of Grouted Ducts in Post-tensioned Bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Seok Been

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    and mitigation methods of voided ducts in PT structures. Although controversy exists on how to best protect PT tendons from corrosion, filling these voids with grout may be one option. An optimized grouting procedure for repairing these voids is needed how best...

  17. Repairing and maintaining a public bicycle system: the case of Vlib' in Paris1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Repairing and maintaining a public bicycle system: the case of Vélib' in Paris1 . Martin Tironi Phd. Valued for their 'planet friendly' character, public bicycle systems have become the hallmark for cities to the worldwide spread of public bicycle schemes (PBS). They now exist in more than 110 cities around the world

  18. Development/Plasticity/Repair Identification of Modulators of Hair Cell Regeneration in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Edwin

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Identification of Modulators of Hair Cell Regeneration compounds that modulate hair cell regeneration in zebrafish. Of the 1680 compounds evaluated, we identified,aresyntheticglucocorticoidsthatpotentiatedhaircellnumbersduringregenerationandalsoinducedhair cell addition in the absence of damage. BrdU analysis confirmed that the extra hair cells arose from

  19. Development/Plasticity/Repair Hair Cell Replacement in Adult Mouse Utricles after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Edwin

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Hair Cell Replacement in Adult Mouse Utricles after Targeted Ablation of Hair Cells with Diphtheria Toxin Justin S. Golub,1 Ling Tong,1 Tot B. Ngyuen,1 Cliff R. Hume,1 Richard developed a transgenic mouse to permit conditional and selective ablation of hair cells in the adult mouse

  20. Removal of impurities from dry scrubbed fluoride enriched alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuh, L. [ABB Corporate Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wedde, G. [ABB Environmental, Oslo (Norway)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pot-gas from an aluminum electrolytic cell is cleaned by a dry scrubbing process using fresh alumina as a scrubbing agent. This alumina is enriched with fluorides and trace impurities in a closed loop system with the pots. The only significant removal of the impurities is due to metal tapping. An improved technique has been developed that is more effective than earlier stripper systems. The impurity-rich fine fraction (< 10 {micro}m) of the enriched alumina is partly attached to the coarser alumina. That attachment has to be broken. Selective impact milling under special moderate conditions and air classifying have shown to be a cost effective process for the removal of impurities. For iron (Fe) and phosphorus (P) about 30--70% can be removed by the separation of 0.5--1% of the alumina. Full scale tests have successfully confirmed these results.

  1. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrobalance studies of calcination and carbonation of sodium bicarbonate materials were conducted at Louisiana State University. Calcination in an inert atmosphere was rapid and complete at 120 C. Carbonation was temperature dependent, and both the initial rate and the extent of reaction were found to decrease as temperature was increased between 60 and 80 C. A fluidization test apparatus was constructed at RTI and two sodium bicarbonate materials were fluidized in dry nitrogen at 22 C. The bed was completely fluidized at between 9 and 11 in. of water pressure drop. Kinetic rate expression derivations and thermodynamic calculations were conducted at RTI. Based on literature data, a simple reaction rate expression, which is zero order in carbon dioxide and water, was found to provide the best fit against reciprocal temperature. Simulations based on process thermodynamics suggested that approximately 26 percent of the carbon dioxide in flue gas could be recovered using waste heat available at 240 C.

  2. On the chemical composition of Titan's dry lakebed evaporites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordier, Daniel; Ferreira, Abel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titan, the main satellite of Saturn, has an active cycle of methane in its troposphere. Among other evidence for a mechanism of evaporation at work on the ground, dry lakebeds have been discovered. Recent Cassini infrared observations of these empty lakes have revealed a surface composition poor in water ice compared to that of the surrounding terrains --- suggesting the existence of organic evaporites deposits. The chemical composition of these possible evaporites is unknown. In this paper, we study evaporite composition using a model that treats both organic solids dissolution and solvent evaporation. Our results suggest the possibility of large abundances of butane and acetylene in the lake evaporites. However, due to uncertainties of the employed theory, these determinations have to be confirmed by laboratory experiments.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that includes a co-current downflow reactor system for adsorption of CO{sub 2} and a steam-heated, hollow-screw conveyor system for regeneration of the sorbent and release of a concentrated CO{sub 2} gas stream. An economic analysis of this process (based on the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory's [DOE/NETL's] 'Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines') was carried out. RTI's economic analyses indicate that installation of the Dry Carbonate Process in a 500 MW{sub e} (nominal) power plant could achieve 90% CO{sub 2} removal with an incremental capital cost of about $69 million and an increase in the cost of electricity (COE) of about 1.95 cents per kWh. This represents an increase of roughly 35.4% in the estimated COE - which compares very favorable versus MEA's COE increase of 58%. Both the incremental capital cost and the incremental COE were projected to be less than the comparable costs for an equally efficient CO{sub 2} removal system based on monoethanolamine (MEA).

  4. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box Raghubir P. Gupta

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted between July 1, 2006 and September 30, 2006 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal combustion flue gas. Modifications to the integrated absorber/ sorbent regenerator/ sorbent cooler system were made to improve sorbent flow consistency and measurement reliability. Operation of the screw conveyor regenerator to achieve a sorbent temperature of at least 120 C at the regenerator outlet is necessary for satisfactory carbon dioxide capture efficiencies in succeeding absorption cycles. Carbon dioxide capture economics in new power plants can be improved by incorporating increased capacity boilers, efficient flue gas desulfurization systems and provisions for withdrawal of sorbent regeneration steam in the design.

  5. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)); Haefner, R. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.)

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  6. RELEASE OF DRIED RADIOACTIVE WASTE MATERIALS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOZLOWSKI, S.D.

    2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support RPP-23429, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (PDSA) and RPP-23479, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Facility. The main document describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative accidents involving the release of dried radioactive waste materials from the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) and to the associated represented hazardous conditions. Appendices D through F provide the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative dried waste release accident and associated represented hazardous conditions for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Packaging Unit (WPU). The risk binning process uses an evaluation of the frequency and consequence of a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition to determine the need for safety structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls. A representative accident or a represented hazardous condition is assigned to a risk bin based on the potential radiological and toxicological consequences to the public and the collocated worker. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers because credible hazardous conditions with the potential for significant facility worker consequences are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls regardless of their estimated frequency. The controls for protection of the facility workers are described in RPP-23429 and RPP-23479. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, as described below.

  7. A study of the trophodynamic relationships among zooplankton groups in the Gulf of Mexico utilizing biomass determined by dry weight and ash-free dry weight analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwok, Alan Yautak

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF THE TROPHODYNAMIC RELATIONSHIPS AMONG ZOOPLANKTON GROUPS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO UTILIZING BIOMASS DETERMINED BY DRY WEIGHT AND ASH-FREE DRY WEIGHT ANALYSES A Thesis by ALAN YAUTAK KWOK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A... WEIGHT AND ASH-FREE DRY WEIGHT ANALYSES A Thesis by ALAN YAUTAK KWOK Approved as to style and content by: '7 (Chairman of Committee) )l&z J( ii (Member) ember) (Head of Department) May 1980 ABSTRACT A Study of the Trophodynamic Relat1onships...

  8. Data on production and use of DRI: World and U. S. [Direct Reduced Iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, H.B.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will present data on the production and use direct-reduced iron (DRI) worldwide, focusing primarily on its use in the United States. The author is indebted to the Midrex Corporation for the data on world production of DRI. The U.S. data is his own and he will explain later how it was collected. He uses the term DRI to include all forms of direct-reduced iron, whether briquettes, pellets or lump.

  9. Physical stability of spray dried solid dispersions of amorphous tolfenamic acid and polyvinylpyrolidone K30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thybo, Pia

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL STABILITY OF SPRAY DRIED SOLID DISPERSIONS OF AMORPHOUS TOLFENAMIC ACID AND POLYVINYLPYRROLIDONE K-30 Pia Thybo The Danish University of Pharmaceutical Sciences Copenhagen, Denmark GPEN October 2006 Side 2 Pia Thybo The Danish University... Spray Drying -Continued ?Ability to handle solutions, suspensions, emulsions, pastes or melts ?Ability to handle materials under cGMP and aseptic drying conditions ?Ability to handle hazardous substances i.e. flammable solvents, dust explosion hazards...

  10. MSC Monthly Performance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efficiency. The shop, designated 254E, has improved transformer testing, repair and maintenance capabilities. Currently, MSA is preparing to dispose of approximately 70...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - approved land disposal Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Department of Mathematics, University of Western Ontario Collection: Mathematics 3 Automobile Repair Shop In 1987, the Alaska Health Project has performed an audit of an...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - annual waste minimization Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 3 Automobile Repair Shop In 1987, the Alaska Health Project has performed an audit of an...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative disposal methods Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Bioresources Engineering, University of Delaware Collection: Renewable Energy 2 Automobile Repair Shop In 1987, the Alaska Health Project has performed an audit of an...

  14. Factors affecting the quality of freeze-dried and compressed spinach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisakowsky, Eugene Edward

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    critical to the preparation of freeze-dried and compressed spinach. REVIEW OF LITERATURE Freeze-Drying Freeze-drying, also designated as sublimation drying or lyphilization, is the removal of water as a vapor from a frozen substance under vaccuum... on the quality of 27 diff- erent raw materials. According to Winton (1935) the average chemical composition of spinach is as follows: water, 91. 3X; protein, 2. 1%; fat, 0. 35; nitrogen free extract, 3. 2/; fiber, 1. 9%; and ash, 2. 15. Giese (1930) found...

  15. Fractionation studies on the unidentified growth factor(s) in distillers dried solubles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dannenburg, Warren Nathaniel

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This was called "methyl aloohol soluble fraction of distillers dried solublesi The residue wss air drie4 and labeled "aetna 1 alcohol insoluble fraotion of distillers drie4 solubles". $. r fo m at nt ist e i o ubl s Five hundred gm of distillexs dried... fraction ox Ms- tillers Cried solubles (pH 1)"L "water soluole fr~ction of distillers dried solubles (PH '/)"L ~ "water soluble fxaction of dis~illers dried solubles (pH 11)". ur h r Pra tionatio f th Sate 8 lub e }raut of 9 still rs ed Soluo es a...

  16. Instrumented, Shielded Test Canister System for Evaluation of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Dry Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the development of an instrumented, shielded test canister system to store and monitor aluminum-based spent nuclear duel under dry storage conditions.

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - acrylate-acrylic acid dry Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Mechanics of Contact and Lubrication, MTM G230 Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Summary: and toothpaste were changed. Afterwards samples are dried...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - amazon dry-season climate Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dry- season drought. Journal of Geophysical Research... amplify the effects of global climate change on the region. And just like the Arctic, the Amazon... modellers fear that...

  19. Dose Rates for Various Loading Patterns of Spent Fuel Assemblies in a Dry Cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenquin, Urban P. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shielding calculations were performed to assess the impact of loading various combinations of spent fuel on dose rates and fuel temperature in a dry storage cask.

  20. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

  1. Bibliography of the geological and geophysical aspects of hot dry rock geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.; Sayer, S.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first issue of an annual compilation of references that are useful to the exploration, understanding and development of the hot dry rock geothermal resource.

  2. Mathematical model of steam drying of wood chips and other hygroscopic porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fyhr, C.; Rasmuson, A. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering Design] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering Design

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model is presented that is focused on the drying kinetics of single wood chips as a function of time and external conditions, such as temperature, pressure and velocity of the superheated steam. A multiphase and 2-D approach was used to model the coupled transport of water, vapor, air and heat in anisotropic hygroscopic porous media. The model was verified by drying experiments where measurements of the average moisture content, center temperature and pressure in a single wood chip could be performed simultaneously. A comparison between the calculations and the measurements showed that the drying behavior was well predicted. The drying can be divided into three stages: a heat-up period when condensation on the surface initially increases the moisture content; a period of constant drying rate when the external heat transfer controls the drying rate; and a period of decreasing drying rate when the drying is controlled by internal mass transfer. Many interesting features of the drying could be assigned to the strong anisotropicity of wood, which makes a 2-D model necessary.

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial dry diet Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shrimp... assimilation of diets sim- (3)AF (F') (U'IOO). F' 1F -- ratio of organic weight to dry weight of food... CarbohydratesDiet ----- ---- - - - - ... Source:...

  4. The Impacts of Dry-Storage Canister Designs on Spent Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Canister Designs on Spent Nuclear Fuel Handling, Storage, Transportation, and Disposal in the U.S. The Impacts of Dry-Storage Canister Designs on Spent Nuclear Fuel...

  5. Shopping is Work: An Institutional Ethnography of Grocery Shopping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Shelley L.

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    worked full-time, three worked part-time, four identified as stay-home moms, and two were retired. Eight informants (forty percent of the total) had household incomes below $45,000, two informants (ten percent) had incomes above $100... deficiencies (Mayo 1993). The grocery store developed as people started moving outside urban cores and as smaller towns were able to receive a steady supply of goods (Mayo 1993). The independent mom-and-pop store, the quintessential food retail outlet prior...

  6. Optimization Online - Job-Shop Scheduling in a Body Shop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachim Schauer

    2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 24, 2011 ... This problem arises from the industrial application of welding in a car body production line, where possible collisions between industrial robots†...

  7. A novel role for the transcriptional modulator NusA in DNA repair/damage tolerance pathways in Escherichia coli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Susan E., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All organisms must contend with the consequences of DNA damage, induced by a variety of both endogenous and exogenous sources. Mechanisms of DNA repair and DNA damage tolerance are crucial for cellular survival after DNA ...

  8. UCSC EMPLOYEE HOUSING APARTMENTS APPLICATION Rental rates include: rent, refuse collection, common area utilities, groundskeeping services, and repairs and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    area utilities, groundskeeping services, and repairs and maintenance of the Laureate Court complex. Tenants pay for their own utilities (i.e., electricity, gas, water, telephone and cable services). A $750

  9. Colorado State University Industrial Assessment Center Report CO0564 1 AR No. 1 -Repair Compressed Air Leaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado State University Industrial Assessment Center Report CO0564 1 AR No. 1 - Repair Compressed was then divided by 0.25 hours to convert the energy consumption into kW, so the #12;Colorado State University

  10. Weld Repair of a Stamped Pressure Vessel in a Radiologically Controlled Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannell, Gary L. [Fluor Enterprises, Inc.; Huth, Ralph J. [CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company; Hallum, Randall T. [Fluor Government Group

    2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2012 an ASME B&PVC Section VIII stamped pressure vessel located at the DOE Hanford Site Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) developed a through-wall leak. The vessel, a steam/brine heat exchanger, operated in a radiologically controlled zone (by the CH2MHill PRC or CHPRC), had been in service for approximately 17 years. The heat exchanger is part of a single train evaporator process and its failure caused the entire system to be shut down, significantly impacting facility operations. This paper describes the activities associated with failure characterization, technical decision making/planning for repair by welding, logistical challenges associated with performing work in a radiologically controlled zone, performing the repair, and administrative considerations related to ASME code requirements.

  11. Subterranean barriers, methods, and apparatuses for forming, inspecting, selectively heating, and repairing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A. (Shelley, ID); Sloan, Paul A. (Rigby, ID); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Walsh, Stephanie (Idaho Falls, ID); Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho, ID)

    2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

  12. Template strand scrunching during DNA gap repair synthesis by human polymerase [lamda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; Bebenek, Katarzyna; Larrea, Andres A.; Havener, Jody M.; Perera, Lalith; Krahn, Joseph M.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Ramsden, Dale A.; Kunkel, Thomas A.; (NIH); (UNC)

    2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Family X polymerases such as DNA polymerase {lambda}(Pol {lambda}) are well suited for filling short gaps during DNA repair because they simultaneously bind both the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of short gaps. DNA binding and gap filling are well characterized for 1-nucleotide (nt) gaps, but the location of yet-to-be-copied template nucleotides in longer gaps is unknown. Here we present crystal structures revealing that, when bound to a 2-nt gap, Pol {lambda} scrunches the template strand and binds the additional uncopied template base in an extrahelical position within a binding pocket that comprises three conserved amino acids. Replacing these amino acids with alanine results in less processive gap filling and less efficient NHEJ when 2-nt gaps are involved. Thus, akin to scrunching by RNA polymerase during transcription initiation, scrunching occurs during gap filling DNA synthesis associated with DNA repair.

  13. Nondestructive evaluation and characterization of damage and repair to continuous-fiber ceramic composite panels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, J. G.; Petrak, D. R.; Pillai, T. A. K.; Deemer, C.; Ellingson, W. A.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites are currently being developed for a variety of high-temperature applications. Because of the high costs of making these components, minor damage incurred during manufacturing or operation must be rewired in order to extend the life of the components. In this study, five ceramic-grade Nicalon{trademark} fiber/SiNC-matrix composite panels were intentionally damaged with a pendulum-type impactor during an impact test. The damaged panels were then repaired at Dow Corning Corporation. Three nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods were used to study the characteristics of the panels after the damage and again after the panels were repaired. The NDE methods were X-ray radiography, infrared thermal imaging, and air-coupled ultrasound. The results showed that the impact test induced various types of damage in the panels. The NDE data that were obtained by the three NDE methods were correlated with each other.

  14. Oven rack having integral lubricious, dry porcelain surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrose, Jeffrey A; Mackiewicz-Ludtka, Gail; Sikka, Vinod K; Qu, Jun

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A lubricious glass-coated metal cooking article capable of withstanding repeated heating and cooling between room temperature and at least 500.degree. F. without chipping or cracking the glass coating, wherein the glass coating includes about 0.1 to about 20% by weight of a homogeneously distributed dry refractory lubricant material having a particle size less than about 200 .mu.m. The lubricant material is selected from the group consisting of carbon; graphite; boron nitride; cubic boron nitride; molybdenum (FV) sulfide; molybdenum sulfide; molybdenum (IV) selenide; molybdenum selenide, tungsten (IV) sulfide; tungsten disulfide; tungsten sulfide; silicon nitride (Si.sub.3N.sub.4); TiN; TiC; TiCN; TiO.sub.2; TiAlN; CrN; SiC; diamond-like carbon; tungsten carbide (WC); zirconium oxide (ZrO.sub.2); zirconium oxide and 0.1 to 40 weight % aluminum oxide; alumina-zirconia; antimony; antimony oxide; antimony trioxide; and mixtures thereof.

  15. Chilled water coil freeze protection via internal drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaRocca, D.V. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States). Building Services and Operations Dept.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Winter lay-up for chilled water coils has been a problem for as long as there has been air conditioning. A frozen coil may be so seriously damaged that it must be replaced. Also, as the coil thaws, significant flooding of adjacent areas may result. Over the years, various methods of freeze protection have been used. These methods include using a glycol solution to lower the freezing point, blowing the coil clear with compressed air, or installing coils that incorporate freeze plugs in the coil design. Each of these methods has one or more significant drawbacks. A new approach, nicknamed ``The LaRocca Solution`` is a simple procedure. Air is blown continuously through the coils to ensure that they become completely dry and remain so. Instead of using a separate blower or air compressor to blow out the water, the supply fan itself is used. On most medium- and high-pressure HVAC systems, the static pressure produced by the supply fan is sufficient to overcome the internal resistance of the coil tubes. One simply configures the chilled water piping in a manner that permits the coils to be drained by gravity and then purged by the discharge of the fan. The fan does all the work.

  16. Atmospheric particulate emissions from dry abrasive blasting using coal slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaskar Kura; Kalpalatha Kambham; Sivaramakrishnan Sangameswaran; Sandhya Potana [University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal slag is one of the widely used abrasives in dry abrasive blasting. Atmospheric emissions from this process include particulate matter (PM) and heavy metals, such as chromium, lead, manganese, nickel. Quantities and characteristics of PM emissions depend on abrasive characteristics and process parameters. Emission factors are key inputs to estimate emissions. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of blast pressure, abrasive feed rate, and initial surface contamination on total PM (TPM) emission factors for coal slag. Rusted and painted mild steel surfaces were used as base plates. Blasting was carried out in an enclosed chamber, and PM was collected from an exhaust duct using U.S. Environment Protection Agency source sampling methods for stationary sources. Results showed that there is significant effect of blast pressure, feed rate, and surface contamination on TPM emissions. Mathematical equations were developed to estimate emission factors in terms of mass of emissions per unit mass of abrasive used, as well as mass of emissions per unit of surface area cleaned. These equations will help industries in estimating PM emissions based on blast pressure and abrasive feed rate. In addition, emissions can be reduced by choosing optimum operating conditions. 40 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Prospects for hot dry rock in the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, M.E.; Murphy, H.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy program is a renewable energy program that can contribute significantly to the nation's balanced and diversified energy mix. The program was reviewed five times in the past three years. Three of these reviews were done by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and a fourth was conducted by the National Research Council at the request of DOE. In addition, HDR was evaluated in the Energy Research Advisory Board's Solid Earth Sciences Report. Recent economic studies for HDR have been performed by Bechtel National, Inc., the Electric Power Research Institute, and the United Kingdom. These studies are reviewed in light of recent progress at Fenton Hill in reducing drilling costs, and mapping and in identifying drilling targets. All of the attention focused on HDR has resulted in evaluating the way in which HDR fits within the nation's energy mix and in estimating when HDR will contribute to energy security. To establish a framework for evaluating the future of HDR, the status and progress of HDR are reviewed and the remaining Fenton Hill program is outlined. Recommendations are also made for follow-on activities that will lead to achieving full development of HDR technologies in the appropriate time frame.

  18. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box; Andreas Weber; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted between October 1, 2005, and December 31, 2005, on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from flue gas from coal combustion. A field test was conducted to examine the extent to which RTI's supported sorbent can be regenerated in a heated, hollow screw conveyor. This field test was conducted at the facilities of a screw conveyor manufacturer. The sorbent was essentially completely regenerated during this test, as confirmed by thermal desorption and mass spectroscopy analysis of the regenerated sorbent. Little or no sorbent attrition was observed during 24 passes through the heated screw conveyor system. Three downflow contactor absorption tests were conducted using calcined sodium bicarbonate as the absorbent. Maximum carbon dioxide removals of 57 and 91% from simulated flue gas were observed at near ambient temperatures with water-saturated gas. These tests demonstrated that calcined sodium carbonate is not as effective at removing CO{sub 2} as are supported sorbents containing 10 to 15% sodium carbonate. Delivery of the hollow screw conveyor for the laboratory-scale sorbent regeneration system was delayed; however, construction of other components of this system continued during the quarter.

  19. WIPP Remote Handled Waste Facility: Performance Dry Run Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrington, T. P.; Britain, R. M.; Cassingham, S. T.

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Handled (RH) TRU Waste Handling Facility at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was recently upgraded and modified in preparation for handling and disposal of RH Transuranic (TRU) waste. This modification will allow processing of RH-TRU waste arriving at the WIPP site in two different types of shielded road casks, the RH-TRU 72B and the CNS 10-160B. Washington TRU Solutions (WTS), the WIPP Management and Operation Contractor (MOC), conducted a performance dry run (PDR), beginning August 19, 2002 and successfully completed it on August 24, 2002. The PDR demonstrated that the RHTRU waste handling system works as designed and demonstrated the handling process for each cask, including underground disposal. The purpose of the PDR was to develop and implement a plan that would define in general terms how the WIPP RH-TRU waste handling process would be conducted and evaluated. The PDR demonstrated WIPP operations and support activities required to dispose of RH-TRU waste in the WIPP underground.

  20. USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Harun Bilirgen; Hugo Caram

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. low rank coals contain relatively large amounts of moisture, with the moisture content of subbituminous coals typically ranging from 15 to 30 percent and that for lignites from 25 and 40 percent. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit, for it can result in fuel handling problems and it affects heat rate, stack emissions and maintenance costs. Theoretical analyses and coal test burns performed at a lignite fired power plant show that by reducing the fuel moisture, it is possible to improve boiler performance and unit heat rate, reduce emissions and reduce water consumption by the evaporative cooling tower. The economic viability of the approach and the actual impact of the drying system on water consumption, unit heat rate and stack emissions will depend critically on the design and operating conditions of the drying system. The present project evaluated the low temperature drying of high moisture coals using power plant waste heat to provide the energy required for drying. Coal drying studies were performed in a laboratory scale fluidized bed dryer to gather data and develop models on drying kinetics. In addition, analyses were carried out to determine the relative costs and performance impacts (in terms of heat rate, cooling tower water consumption and emissions) of drying along with the development of optimized drying system designs and recommended operating conditions.

  1. HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT OF PCE EMISSIONS FROM DRY CLEANING ACTIVITIES IN FRANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT OF PCE EMISSIONS FROM DRY CLEANING ACTIVITIES IN FRANCE L DELERY1 Verneuil-en-halatte-F ABSTRACT Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) is a solvent used mostly in the dry health effects caused by chronic inhalation exposure of PCE. PCE is suspected to be probably carcinogenic

  2. Effects of grazing intensity on soil carbon stocks following deforestation of a Hawaiian dry tropical forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmore, Andrew J.

    Effects of grazing intensity on soil carbon stocks following deforestation of a Hawaiian dry carbon (SOC) along gradients of grazing intensity and elevation in pastures converted from dry tropical of forest-to-pasture conversion on soil carbon (C) stocks depend on a combination of climatic and management

  3. SOLAR UPGRADE OF METHANE USING DRY REFORMING IN DIRECT CONTACT BUBBLE REACTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    process of a solar reformer of dry methane reforming was proposed to operate in a temperature range of 600SOLAR UPGRADE OF METHANE USING DRY REFORMING IN DIRECT CONTACT BUBBLE REACTOR Khalid Al-Ali 1 including lower melting point, thermal and chemical stability, acting simultaneously as heat transport

  4. EFFECT OF MECHANICAL CONDITIONING ON THIN-LAYER DRYING OF ENERGY SORGHUM (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; Kevin L. Kenney

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic energy varieties of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench show promise as a bioenergy feedstock, however, high moisture content at the time of harvest results in unacceptable levels of degradation when stored in aerobic conditions. To safely store sorghum biomass for extended periods in baled format, the material must be dried to inhibit microbial growth. One possible solution is allowing the material to dry under natural in-field conditions. This study examines the differences in thin-layer drying rates of intact and conditioned sorghum under laboratory-controlled temperatures and relative humidity levels (20 degrees C and 30 degrees C from 40% to 85% relative humidity), and models experimental data using the Pageís Modified equation. The results demonstrate that conditioning drastically accelerates drying times. Relative humidity had a large impact on the time required to reach a safe storage moisture content for intact material (approximately 200 hours at 30 degrees C and 40% relative humidity and 400 hours at 30 degrees C and 70% relative humidity), but little to no impact on the thin-layer drying times of conditioned material (approximately 50 hours for all humidity levels < 70% at 30 degrees C). The drying equation parameters were influenced by temperature, relative humidity, initial moisture content, and material damage, allowing drying curves to be empirically predicted. The results of this study provide valuable information applicable to the agricultural community and to future research on drying simulation and management of energy sorghum.

  5. Surface Analysis of Silica Gel Particles after Mechanical Dry Coating with Magnesium Stearate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Surface Analysis of Silica Gel Particles after Mechanical Dry Coating with Magnesium Stearate particles (d50 = 55 ¬Ķm) by coating with different mass ratios of magnesium stearate - MgSt2 (d50 = 4.6 ¬Ķm Group). Keywords: AFM phase imaging, adhesion force, dry coating, silica, magnesium stearate. 1

  6. Climatology of katabatic winds in the McMurdo dry valleys, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    Climatology of katabatic winds in the McMurdo dry valleys, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica of katabatic winds largely controls winter (June to August) temperatures, increasing 1¬įC per 1% increase of katabatic winds in the McMurdo dry valleys, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D

  7. Digestive efficiency and dry-matter digestibility in Steller sea lions fed herring, pollock, squid, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Digestive efficiency and dry-matter digestibility in Steller sea lions fed herring, pollock, squid, and salmon D.A.S. Rosen and A.W. Trites Abstract: Dry-matter digestibility and energy digestive efficiency-matter digestibility (DMD) and digestive efficiency (DE) were measured using the energy and manganese concentration

  8. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ZOOPLANKTON DISPLACEMENT VOLUME, WET WEIGHT, DRY WEIGHT, AND CARBONI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the regression line for log transformed values for carbon vs. dry weight and wet weight vs. displacement volumeRELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ZOOPLANKTON DISPLACEMENT VOLUME, WET WEIGHT, DRY WEIGHT, AND CARBONI PETER H are identical. We have employed this type of analysis in determinations on samples from diverse sea areas

  9. "You Can Do It" Basic Home Repair Using Hand and Power Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 "You Can Do It" Basic Home Repair Using Hand and Power Tools by Janie L. Harris Extension Housing guard housing. Place the tool rest 1/8 inch from the wheel on bench-mounted units. Before starting://www.cdc.gov/nasd/docs/ University of Denver, Risk Management http://www.du.edu/risk/Tool_Safety.html #12;2 "You Can Do It" Basic

  10. REPAIR OF A DAMAGED PART ON HYDRAULIC TRACT KAPLAN TURBINE WITH "LIQUID METAL"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuad ?atovi?; Prof Emeritus; Edin Děiho Msc; Mostar Bih; Mustafa äehi?; Hydroelectric Power Plant Neretva; Jablanica Bih

    During 2011 on unit no.2 reparation work was carried out aimed at fault removal on Kaplan turbine impeller, while extending the lifespan of the entire installed equipment. The overhaul included all vital parts, replacement of all gasket compresses, machine processing to achieve the required tolerances, NDT equipment control according to "Quality Control Plan", repairing equipment, etc. This paper describes the recovery of defects on the blades of the guide vanes using epoxy masses.

  11. Endovascular Repair of a Pseudoaneurysm of the Abdominal Aorta Secondary to Translumbar Aortography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mir, Naheed; Nunzio, Mario De; Pollock, John G [Derbyshire Royal Infirmary, Department of Clinical Radiology (United Kingdom)], E-mail: JG.Pollock@derbyhospitals.nhs.uk

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an incidental finding of a pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta on a computed tomography (CT) renal angiogram during investigation of chronic renal failure in a 73-year-old man. The patient had undergone a translumbar aortogram 20 years previously. An increase in the size of the aneurysm by 7 mm over 6 months prompted treatment and the aneurysm underwent successful endovascular repair with a custom-made stent-graft.

  12. SHOPPING GENIE Ethernet cables must

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    ) to rent a unit for academic year. 2. Purchase both items Maximum size allowed for refrig- erators is 4 e d i t : PLEASE NOTE: ITEMS SUCH AS FANS, IRONS, IRONING BOARDS, & MATTRESS TOPPERS ARE USEFUL, toasters, toaster ovens, hot pots, heating coils, George For- man Grill¬ģ. In general anything

  13. Development Shop | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOfficeNERSC Helps Develop Next-GenEMSL Research

  14. ,"Texas - RRC District 8 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPrice SoldDryDryDryDryDryDry Natural Gas

  15. ,"Texas - RRC District 8A Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPrice SoldDryDryDryDryDryDryADry Natural Gas

  16. Hot dry rock geothermal energy. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This second EPRI workshop on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy, held in May 1994, focused on the status of worldwide HDR research and development and used that status review as the starting point for discussions of what could and should be done next: by U.S. federal government, by U.S. industry, by U.S. state governments, and by international organizations or through international agreements. The papers presented and the discussion that took place indicate that there is a community of researchers and industrial partners that could join forces, with government support, to begin a new effort on hot dry rock geothermal development. This new heat mining effort would start with site selection and confirmatory studies, done concurrently. The confirmatory studies would test past evaluations against the most current results (from the U.S. site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, and from the two sites in Japan, the one in Russia, and the two in western Europe) and the best models of relevant physical and economic aspects. Site selection would be done in the light of the confirmatory studies and would be influenced by the need to find a site where success is probable and which is representative enough of other sites so that its success would imply good prospects for success at numerous other sites. The test of success would be circulation between a pair of wells, or more wells, in a way that confirmed, with the help of flow modeling, that a multi-well system would yield temperatures, flows and lifetimes that support economically feasible power generation. The flow modeling would have to have previously achieved its own confirmation from relevant data taken from both heat mining and conventional hydrothermal geothermal experience. There may be very relevant experience from the enhancement of ''hot wet rock'' sites, i.e., sites where hydrothermal reservoirs lack, or have come to lack, enough natural water or steam and are helped by water injected cold and produced hot. The new site would have to be selected in parallel with the confirmatory studies because it would have to be modeled as part of the studies and because its similarity to other candidate sites must be known well enough to assure that results at the selected site are relevant to many others. Also, the industry partners in the joint effort at the new site must be part of the confirmatory studies, because they must be convinced of the economic feasibility. This meeting may have brought together the core of people who can make such a joint effort take place. EPRI sponsored the organization of this meeting in order to provide utilities with an update on the prospects for power generation via heat mining. Although the emerging rules for electric utilities competing in power generation make it very unlikely that the rate-payers of any one utility (or small group of utilities) can pay the differential to support this new heat mining research and development effort, the community represented at this meeting may be able to make the case for national or international support of a new heat mining effort, based on the potential size and economics of this resource as a benefit for the nation as a whole and as a contribution to reduced emissions of fossil CO{sub 2} worldwide.

  17. The UK geothermal hot dry rock R&D programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, Paul; Stedman, Ann; Symons, Geoff

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UK hot dry rock research and development programme is funded by the Department of Energy and aims to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial exploitation of HDR in the UK. The philosophy of the UK programme has been to proceed to a full-scale prototype HDR power station via a number of stages: Phase 1--Experiments at shallow depth (300 m) to assess the feasibility of enhancing the permeability of the rock. Phase 2--Studies at intermediate depth (2500 m) to determine the feasibility of creating a viable HDR subsurface heat exchanger. Phase 3--Establishment of an HDR prototype at commercial depth. The programme has run over a 15 year period, and has been formally reviewed at stages throughout its progress. The 1987 review towards the end of Phase 2 identified a number of technical objectives for continuing research and proposed that the initial design stage of the deep HDR prototype should start. Phase 3A is now complete. It addressed: the feasibility of creating an underground HDR heat exchanger suitable for commercial operation; techniques for improving hydraulic performance and correcting short circuits in HDR systems; modeling of the performance, resource size and economic aspects of HDR systems. The work has been conducted by a number of contractors, including Cambome School of Mines, Sunderland and Sheffield City Polytechnics and RTZ Consultants Limited. This paper focuses upon the experimental work at Rosemanowes in Cornwall and the recently completed conceptual design of a prototype HDR power station. The economics of HDR-generated electricity are also discussed and the conclusions of a 1990 program review are presented. Details of the HDR program to 1994, as announced by the UK Department of Energy in February 1991, are included.

  18. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Green; Thomas Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul Box; Weijiong Li; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2005 and June 30, 2005 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas from coal combustion and synthesis gas from coal gasification. Supported sodium carbonate sorbents removed up to 76% of the carbon dioxide from simulated flue gas in a downflow cocurrent flow reactor system, with an approximate 15 second gas-solid contact time. This reaction proceeds at temperatures as low as 25 C. Lithium silicate sorbents remove carbon dioxide from high temperature simulated flue gas and simulated synthesis gas. Both sorbent types can be thermally regenerated and reused. The lithium silicate sorbent was tested in a thermogravimetric analyzer and in a 1-in quartz reactor at atmospheric pressure; tests were also conducted at elevated pressure in a 2-in diameter high temperature high pressure reactor system. The lithium sorbent reacts rapidly with carbon dioxide in flue gas at 350-500 C to absorb about 10% of the sorbent weight, then continues to react at a lower rate. The sorbent can be essentially completely regenerated at temperatures above 600 C and reused. In atmospheric pressure tests with synthesis gas of 10% initial carbon dioxide content, the sorbent removed over 90% of the carbon dioxide. An economic analysis of a downflow absorption process for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas with a supported sodium carbonate sorbent suggests that a 90% efficient carbon dioxide capture system installed at a 500 MW{sub e} generating plant would have an incremental capital cost of $35 million ($91/kWe, assuming 20 percent for contingencies) and an operating cost of $0.0046/kWh. Assuming capital costs of $1,000/kW for a 500 MWe plant the capital cost of the down flow absorption process represents a less than 10% increase, thus meeting DOE goals as set forth in its Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan.

  19. LENS repair and modification of metal NW components:materials and applications guide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smugeresky, John E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Gill, David Dennis; Oberhaus, Jason (BWXT Y-12); Adams, Thad (Savannah River National Laboratory); VanCamp, Chad (Kansas City Plant)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser Engineered Net Shaping{trademark} (LENS{reg_sign}) is a unique, layer additive, metal manufacturing technique that offers the ability to create fully dense metal features and components directly from a computer solid model. LENS offers opportunities to repair and modify components by adding features to existing geometry, refilling holes, repairing weld lips, and many other potential applications. The material deposited has good mechanical properties with strengths typically slightly higher that wrought material due to grain refinement from a quickly cooling weld pool. The result is a material with properties similar to cold worked material, but without the loss in ductility traditionally seen with such treatments. Furthermore, 304L LENS material exhibits good corrosion resistance and hydrogen compatibility. This report gives a background of the LENS process including materials analysis addressing the requirements of a number of different applications. Suggestions are given to aid both the product engineer and the process engineer in the successful utilization of LENS for their applications. The results of testing on interface strength, machinability, weldability, corrosion resistance, geometric effects, heat treatment, and repair strategy testing are all included. Finally, the qualification of the LENS process is briefly discussed to give the user confidence in selecting LENS as the process of choice for high rigor applications. The testing showed LENS components to have capability in repair/modification applications requiring complex castings (W80-3 D-Bottle bracket), thin wall parts requiring metal to be rebuilt onto the part (W87 Firing Set Housing and Y-12 Test Rings), the filling of counterbores for use in reservoir reclamation welding (SRNL hydrogen compatibility study) and the repair of surface defects on pressure vessels (SRNL gas bottle repair). The material is machinable, as testing has shown that LENS deposited material machines similar to that of welded metal. Tool wear is slightly higher in LENS material than in wrought material, but not so much that one would be concerned with increased tooling cost. The LENS process achieved process qualification for the AY1E0125 D-Bottle Bracket from the W80-3 LEP program, and in the effort, also underwent testing in weapons environments. These tests included structural dynamic response testing and drop testing. The LENS deposited parts were compared in these tests with conventionally machined parts and showed equivalency to such an extent that the parts were accepted for use in parallel path subsystem-level weapon environment testing. The evaluation of LENS has shown that the process can be a viable option when either complete metal parts are needed or existing metal parts require modification or repair. The LENS Qualification Technology Investment team successfully investigated new applications for the LENS process and showed that it has great applicability across the Nuclear Weapons Complex as well as in other high rigor applications.

  20. Design of a dry sump lubrication system for a Hondaģ CBR 600 F4i engine for Formula SAE applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farkhondeh, Ehsan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dry sump lubrication system for a Formula SAE race car was designed and manufactured in order to gain the various advantages this type of system affords. A dry sump system stores oil in an external tank and pumps it ...

  1. Doping suppression and mobility enhancement of graphene transistors fabricated using an adhesion promoting dry transfer process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheol Shin, Woo; Hun Mun, Jeong; Yong Kim, Taek; Choi, Sung-Yool; Jin Cho, Byung, E-mail: bjcho@kaist.edu, E-mail: tskim1@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graphene Research Center, KAIST, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Taeshik; Kim, Taek-Soo, E-mail: bjcho@kaist.edu, E-mail: tskim1@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graphene Research Center, KAIST, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graphene Research Center, KAIST, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the facile dry transfer of graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition on copper film to a functional device substrate. High quality uniform dry transfer of graphene to oxidized silicon substrate was achieved by exploiting the beneficial features of a poly(4-vinylphenol) adhesive layer involving a strong adhesion energy to graphene and negligible influence on the electronic and structural properties of graphene. The graphene field effect transistors (FETs) fabricated using the dry transfer process exhibit excellent electrical performance in terms of high FET mobility and low intrinsic doping level, which proves the feasibility of our approach in graphene-based nanoelectronics.

  2. Final Report - Membranes and MEA's for Dry, Hot Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamrock, Steven J.

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this program was to develop a new Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) which can operate under hotter, dryer conditions than the state of the art membranes today and integrate it into a Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA). These MEA's should meet the performance and durability requirements outlined in the solicitation, operating under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20√?¬?√?¬ļC to 120√?¬?√?¬ļC, to meet 2010 DOE technical targets for membranes. This membrane should operate under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20√?¬?√?¬ļC to 120√?¬?√?¬ļC in order to meet DOE HFCIT 2010 commercialization targets for automotive fuel cells. Membranes developed in this program may also have improved durability and performance characteristics making them useful in stationary fuel cell applications. The new membranes, and the MEA√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?s comprising them, should be manufacturable at high volumes and at costs which can meet industry and DOE targets. This work included: A) Studies to better understand factors controlling proton transport within the electrolyte membrane, mechanisms of polymer degradation (in situ and ex situ) and membrane durability in an MEA; B) Development of new polymers with increased proton conductivity over the range of temperatures from -20√?¬?√?¬ļC to 120√?¬?√?¬ļC and at lower levels of humidification and with improved chemical and mechanical stability; C) Development of new membrane additives for increased durability and conductivity under these dry conditions; D) Integration of these new materials into membranes and membranes into MEA√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?s, including catalyst and gas diffusion layer selection and integration; E) Verification that these materials can be made using processes which are scalable to commercial volumes using cost effective methods; F) MEA testing in single cells using realistic automotive testing protocols. This project addresses technical barriers A (Durability) and C (Performance) from the Fuel Cells section of the 2005 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year R&D Plan. In the course of this four-year program we developed a new PEM with improved proton conductivity, chemical stability and mechanical stability. We incorporated this new membrane into MEAs and evaluated performance and durability.

  3. Adapting Dry Cask Storage for Aging at a Geologic Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Sanders; D. Kimball

    2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Aging System is a crucial part of operations at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository in the United States. Incoming commercial SNF that does not meet thermal limits for emplacement will be aged on outdoor pads. U.S. Department of Energy SNF will also be managed using the Aging System. Proposed site-specific designs for the Aging System are closely based upon designs for existing dry cask storage (DCS) systems. This paper evaluates the applicability of existing DCS systems for use in the SNF Aging System at Yucca Mountain. The most important difference between existing DCS facilities and the Yucca Mountain facility is the required capacity. Existing DCS facilities typically have less than 50 casks. The current design for the aging pad at Yucca Mountain calls for a capacity of over 2,000 casks (20,000 MTHM) [1]. This unprecedented number of casks poses some unique problems. The response of DCS systems to off-normal and accident conditions needs to be re-evaluated for multiple storage casks. Dose calculations become more complicated, since doses from multiple or very long arrays of casks can dramatically increase the total boundary dose. For occupational doses, the geometry of the cask arrays and the order of loading casks must be carefully considered in order to meet ALARA goals during cask retrieval. Due to the large area of the aging pad, skyshine must also be included when calculating public and worker doses. The expected length of aging will also necessitate some design adjustments. Under 10 CFR 72.236, DCS systems are initially certified for a period of 20 years [2]. Although the Yucca Mountain facility is not intended to be a storage facility under 10 CFR 72, the operational life of the SNF Aging System is 50 years [1]. Any cask system selected for use in aging will have to be qualified to this design lifetime. These considerations are examined, and a summary is provided of the adaptations that must be made in order to use DCS technologies successfully at a geologic repository.

  4. Proposal for the award of a blanket contract for the supply of cast-resin dry-type power transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a blanket contract for the supply of cast-resin dry-type power transformers

  5. Proposal to negotiate two contracts, without competitive tendering, for the supply and the repair of compressors for the LHC 18 kW helium refrigeration plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal to negotiate two contracts, without competitive tendering, for the supply and the repair of compressors for the LHC 18 kW helium refrigeration plants

  6. Development and validation of nondestructive inspection techniques for composite doubler repairs on commercial aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single boron-epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. In order for the use of composite doublers to achieve widespread use in the civil aviation industry, it is imperative that methods be developed which can quickly and reliably assess the integrity of the doubler. In this study, a specific composite application was chosen on an L-1011 aircraft in order to focus the tasks on application and operation issues. Primary among inspection requirements for these doublers is the identification of disbonds, between the composite laminate and aluminum parent material, and delaminations in the composite laminate. Surveillance of cracks or corrosion in the parent aluminum material beneath the doubler is also a concern. No single nondestructive inspection (NDI) method can inspect for every flaw type, therefore it is important to be aware of available NDI techniques and to properly address their capabilities and limitations. A series of NDI tests were conducted on laboratory test structures and on full-scale aircraft fuselage sections. Specific challenges, unique to bonded composite doubler applications, were highlighted. An array of conventional and advanced NDI techniques were evaluated. Flaw detection sensitivity studies were conducted on applicable eddy current, ultrasonic, X-ray and thermography based devices. The application of these NDI techniques to composite doublers and the results from test specimens, which were loaded to provide a changing flaw profile, are presented in this report. It was found that a team of these techniques can identify flaws in composite doubler installations well before they reach critical size.

  7. The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zusman, Eric

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow Riverof the severity of water shortages in the riverís basin. Ina median level of runoff water shortages in the basin would

  8. Operations to be Performed in the Waste Package Dry Remediation Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman E. Cole; Randy K. Elwood

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes planned and proposed operations for remediating damaged and/or out-of-compliance waste packages, casks, DPCs, overpacks, and containers at the Yucca Mountain Dry Transfer Facility.

  9. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  10. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems I. Fluid...

  11. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems II....

  12. Spray drying and attrition behavior of iron catalysts for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carreto Vazquez, Victor Hugo

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating attrition resistant iron catalysts prepared by spray drying technique. These catalysts are intended for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor...

  13. Effect of residual stress on the life prediction of dry storage canisters for used nuclear fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Bradley P. (Bradley Patrick)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Used nuclear fuel dry storage canisters will likely be tasked with holding used nuclear fuel for a period longer than originally intended. Originally designed for 20 years, the storage time will likely approach 100 years. ...

  14. Regulators Experiences in Licensing and Inspection of Dry Cask Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baggett, S.; Brach, E.W. [Spent Fuel Project Office, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the combination of a rigorous licensing and inspection program, ensures the safety and security of dry cask storage. NRC authorizes the storage of spent fuel at an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) under two licensing options: site-specific licensing and general licensing. In July 1986, the NRC issued the first site-specific license to the Surry Nuclear Power Plant in Virginia authorizing the interim storage of spent fuel in a dry storage cask configuration. Today, there are over 30 ISFSIs currently licensed by the NRC with over 700 loaded dry casks. Current projections identify over 50 ISFSIs by the year 2010. No releases of spent fuel dry storage cask contents or other significant safety problems from the storage systems in use today have been reported. This paper discusses the NRC licensing and inspection experiences. (authors)

  15. Control on (234 U) in lake water: A study in the Dry Valleys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    .V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Uranium isotopes; Dry Valleys; Antarctica; Weathering; Lake chemistry 1 isotopes. The supply of 234 U is therefore limited by decay of 238 U, suggesting that the two uranium

  16. Evaluation of Corrosion of Aluminum Based Reactor Fuel Cladding Materials During Dry Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peacock, H.B. Jr.

    1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an evaluation of the corrosion behavior of aluminum cladding alloys and aluminum-uranium alloys at conditions relevant to dry storage. The details of the corrosion program are described and the results to date are discussed.

  17. Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facilities Process Water Handling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KESSLER, S.F.

    2000-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified.

  18. SETTING IN STONE: A CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY OF THE DRY STANE SYKES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zaoyang

    of the new rural economy. Even so, the artistry and the industry necessary to build a dry stone dyke are less be influential in refining methodological approach and narrative style. Ultimately, the project will produce

  19. Endovascular Stent-Graft Repair as a Late Secondary Procedure After Previous Aortic Grafts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsagas, Miltiadis I. [School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Department of Surgery - Vascular Surgery Unit (Greece)], E-mail: mimats@cc.uoi.gr; Anagnostopoulos, Constantine E. [School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Greece); Papakostas, John C. [School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Department of Surgery - Vascular Surgery Unit (Greece); DeRose, Joseph J. [St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital, Columbia University, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery (United States); Siminelakis, Stavros [School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Greece); Katsouras, Christos S. [School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Department of Cardiology (Greece); Toumpoulis, Ioannis K.; Drossos, George E. [School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Greece); Michalis, Lampros K. [School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Department of Cardiology (Greece)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thoracic and abdominal aortic endovascular procedures as alternatives to aortic reoperations were studied in three different cases. An anastomotic aneurysm after previous thoracic aortic graft for coarctation, a second-stage elephant trunk repair (descending thoracic aortic aneurysm), and a secondary aneurysm proximal to a previous abdominal aortic graft were successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafts. During the follow-up period no lethal events or major aortic or graft-related complications were observed, except a type II endoleak in the anastomotic aortic aneurysm case. An endovascular stent-graft can be safely deployed into a previously implanted vascular graft, avoiding repeat surgery.

  20. The effects of plasticization and storage on quality of freeze-dried and compressed carrot bars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greaves, Donald William

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of this study were: To evaluate the effects of selected plasticizing methods on quality of stored freeze-dried compressed carrot cubes. To evaluate the effects of storage temperature on quality of freeze-dried compressed carrot cubes. To subjectively... carrots. than for those which had not been compressed before storage. Retention was much lower for compressed carrots packed in air compared to those packed in an inert gas or in vacuum (Hendel, 1973). Subjective Analysis Although taste panel...

  1. Cold vacuum drying proof of performance (first article testing) test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCCRACKEN, K.J.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents and details the test results of the first of a kind process referred to as Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD). The test results are compiled from several months of testing of the first process equipment skid and ancillary components to de-water and dry Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCO) filled with Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). The tests results provide design verifications, equipment validations, model validation data, and establish process parameters.

  2. Drying: a comparison of radial jet reattachment and standard in-line jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habetz, Darren Keith

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    line of the nozzle but is shown in two dimensions as seen in the flow visualization. The flow rate of water corresponds to an exit velocity in air of approximately 75 meters per second, using Reynolds number similarity. The reattachment ring.... In this research endeavor, RJR nozzles have been compared to the drying industry's common method of air impingement drying, namely, standard In-Line Jets (ILJ), for several different combinations of flow and geometrical parameters. This gives evidence...

  3. Dried Citrus Peel and Pulp as a Feed for Lactating Cows.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copeland, O. C. (Orlin Cephas); Shepardson, C. N. (Charles Noah)

    1944-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATTnw A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas I DRIED CITRUS PEEL AND PuLP As r FEED FOR LACTATING COWS 0. C. COPELAND AND C. N. SHEPARDSON Division of Dairy Husbandry AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL... COLLEGE OF TE GIBB GILCHRIST, President [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Dried citrus peel and pulp proved a satisfactory car- bonaceous feed for milk cows when used as fifty per cent of the concentrate mixture. In five separate experiments, citrus...

  4. Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally evaporated solvent vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britten, Jerald A. (Oakley, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The process passively introduces by natural evaporation and diffusion of minute amounts of alcohol (or other suitable material) vapor in the immediate vicinity of a continuously refreshed meniscus of deionized water or another aqueous-based, nonsurfactant rinsing agent. Used in conjunction with cleaning, developing or wet etching application, rinsing coupled with Marangoni drying provides a single-step process for 1) cleaning, developing or etching, 2) rinsing, and 3) drying objects such as flat substrates or coatings on flat substrates without necessarily using heat, forced air flow, contact wiping, centrifugation or large amounts of flammable solvents. This process is useful in one-step cleaning and drying of large flat optical substrates, one-step developing/rinsing and drying or etching/rinsing/drying of large flat patterned substrates and flat panel displays during lithographic processing, and room-temperature rinsing/drying of other large parts, sheets or continuous rolls of material.

  5. Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally evaporated solvent vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britten, J.A.

    1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The process passively introduces by natural evaporation and diffusion of minute amounts of alcohol (or other suitable material) vapor in the immediate vicinity of a continuously refreshed meniscus of deionized water or another aqueous-based, nonsurfactant rinsing agent. Used in conjunction with cleaning, developing or wet etching application, rinsing coupled with Marangoni drying provides a single-step process for (1) cleaning, developing or etching, (2) rinsing, and (3) drying objects such as flat substrates or coatings on flat substrates without necessarily using heat, forced air flow, contact wiping, centrifugation or large amounts of flammable solvents. This process is useful in one-step cleaning and drying of large flat optical substrates, one-step developing/rinsing and drying or etching/rinsing/drying of large flat patterned substrates and flat panel displays during lithographic processing, and room-temperature rinsing/drying of other large parts, sheets or continuous rolls of material. 5 figs.

  6. The Evolution of Dry Spent Fuel Storage in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGough, M.S. [Duratek Inc., 695 Bamesley Lane, Alpharetta, GA 30022 (United States); Bland, D.W. [TriVis, Inc., 1001 Yeager Parkway, Pelham, AL 35124 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the evolution of Dry Spent Fuel storage technology and application in the United States. Dating back to the legislation signed by Jimmy Carter on April 7, 1977, to outlaw spent fuel reprocessing, the nations spent fuel pools are gradually becoming filled to capacity. This has necessitated the development of new technologies to store spent fuel in dry casks, predominantly at nuclear power plant sites, awaiting the availability of the federal repository at Yucca Mountain. Site-specific conditions and changes in types of fuel being discharged from reactors have driven a constant evolution of technologies to support this critical need. This paper provides an overview of those changes, which have influenced the evolution of dry storage technology. Focus is provided more towards current technology and cask loading practices, as opposed to those technologies, which are no longer in heavy use. Detailed pictorial material is presented showing the loading sequences of various systems in current use. This paper provides a critical primer on Dry Spent Fuel Storage technology. It provides anyone who is new to dry storage, or who is contemplating initiating dry storage at a nuclear plant site, with useful background and history upon which to build programmatic decisions. (authors)

  7. Foreign experience on effects of extended dry storage on the integrity of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of foreign experience in dry storage of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors that was carried out for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report reviews the mechanisms for degradation of spent fuel cladding and fuel materials in dry storage, identifies the status and plans of world-wide experience and applications, and documents the available information on the expected long-term integrity of the dry-stored spent fuel from actual foreign experience. Countries covered in this survey are: Argentina, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany (before reunification with the former East Germany), former German Democratic Republic (former East Germany), France, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the former USSR (most of these former Republics are now in the Commonwealth of Independent States [CIS]). Industrial dry storage of Magnox fuels started in 1972 in the United Kingdom; Canada began industrial dry storage of CANDU fuels in 1980. The technology for safe storage is generally considered to be developed for time periods of 30 to 100 years for LWR fuel in inert gas and for some fuels in oxidizing gases at low temperatures. Because it will probably be decades before countries will have a repository for spent fuels and high-level wastes, the plans for expanded use of dry storage have increased significantly in recent years and are expected to continue to increase in the near future.

  8. Foreign experience on effects of extended dry storage on the integrity of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of foreign experience in dry storage of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors that was carried out for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report reviews the mechanisms for degradation of spent fuel cladding and fuel materials in dry storage, identifies the status and plans of world-wide experience and applications, and documents the available information on the expected long-term integrity of the dry-stored spent fuel from actual foreign experience. Countries covered in this survey are: Argentina, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany (before reunification with the former East Germany), former German Democratic Republic (former East Germany), France, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the former USSR (most of these former Republics are now in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)). Industrial dry storage of Magnox fuels started in 1972 in the United Kingdom; Canada began industrial dry storage of CANDU fuels in 1980. The technology for safe storage is generally considered to be developed for time periods of 30 to 100 years for LWR fuel in inert gas and for some fuels in oxidizing gases at low temperatures. Because it will probably be decades before countries will have a repository for spent fuels and high-level wastes, the plans for expanded use of dry storage have increased significantly in recent years and are expected to continue to increase in the near future.

  9. Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 9: Builders Challenge Guide to 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Bartlett, Rosemarie; Love, Pat M.

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This best practices guide is the ninth in a series of guides for builders produced by the U.S. Department of Energyís Building America Program. This guide book is a resource to help builders design and construct homes that are among the most energy-efficient available, while addressing issues such as building durability, indoor air quality, and occupant health, safety, and comfort. With the measures described in this guide, builders in the hot-dry and mixed-dry climates can achieve homes that have whole house energy savings of 40% over the Building America benchmark (a home built to mid-1990s building practices roughly equivalent to the 1993 Model Energy Code) with no added overall costs for consumers. These best practices are based on the results of research and demonstration projects conducted by Building Americaís research teams. The guide includes information for managers, designers, marketers, site supervisors, and subcontractors, as well as case studies of builders who are successfully building homes that cut energy use by 40% in the hot-dry and mixed-dry climates.

  10. ,"Texas - RRC District 7C Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale ProvedTexas"Brunei (Dollars per ThousandPrice SoldDryDryDryDryDry Natural Gas

  11. Dry Kraft Pulping at Ambient Pressure for Cost Effective Energy Saving and Pollution Deduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yulin Deng; Art Ragauskas

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Sponsored by the DOE Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge program, our research team at the Georgia Institute of Technology conducted laboratory studies and confirmed the concept of making wood pulp using a dry pulping technology. This technology is a new process different from any prior pulping technology used in Kraft and CTMP pulping. Three different kinds of dry pulping methods were investigated. (a) Dry Pulping at Atmospheric Pressure: The first one is to dry and bake the pretreated woodchips in a conventional oven at atmospheric pressure without the use of a catalyst. (b) Dry Pulping at Reduced Pressure: The second method is to dry the pretreated woodchips first in a vacuum oven in the presence of anthraquinone (AQ) as a pulping catalyst, followed by baking at elevated temperature. (c) Liquid Free Chemical Pulping, LFCP. The third method is to first remove the free water of pretreated woodchips, followed by dry pulping using a conventional Kraft pulping digester with AQ and triton as additives. Method one: Experimental results indicated that Dry Pulping at Atmospheric Pressure could produce pulp with higher brightness and lower bulk than conventional Kraft pulp. However, tensile strength of the acquired pulp is much lower than traditional Kraft pulp, and their Kappa number and energy consumption are higher than conventional Kraft pulp. By fully analyzing the results, we concluded that wood fibers might be damaged during the drying process at elevated temperature. The main reason for wood fiber damage is that a long drying time was used during evaporation of water from the woodchips. This resulted in an un-uniform reaction condition on the woodchips: the outside layer of the woodchips was over reacted while inside the woodchips did not reacted at all. To solve this problem, dry pulping at reduced pressure was investigated. Method two: To achieve uniform reaction throughout the entire reaction system, the water inside the pretreated woodchips was evaporated first under vacuum condition at low temperature. Then, the dry woodchips were baked at high temperature (120-130 C) at atmospheric pressure. The qualities of the pulp made with this method were improved compared to that made with method one. The pulp shows higher brightness and lower bulk than Kraft pulping. The tensile strength is significantly higher than the pulp made from the first method. Although the pulp is stronger than that of TMP pulp, it is still lower than conventional Kraft fiber. Method Three: The third dry method was done in a Kraft pulping digester at elevated pressure but without free liquid in the digester. With this method, pulp that has almost the same qualities as conventional Kraft pulp could be produced. The screen yield, Kappa number, fiber brightness, pulp strength and pulp bulk are almost identical to the conventional Kraft pulp. The key advantages of this dry pulping method include ca. 55 % of cooking energy saved during the pulping process, as high as 50 wt% of NaOH saving as well as 3 wt% of Na2S saving comparing to Kraft one. By analyzing fiber properties, yields, chemical and energy consumptions, we concluded that the dry pulping method based on Liquid Free Chemical Pulping, LFCP, could be very attractive for the pulp and paper industry. More fundamental studies and scale up trials are needed to fully commercialize the technology. We expect to conduct pilot trials between 12 to 24 months of period if the DOE or industry can provide continual research funding. Based on the technology we demonstrated in this report, several pilot trial facilities in the United States will be available after small modifications. For example, the Herty Foundation in Savannah, Georgia is one of these potential locations. DOE funding for continuous study and final lead to commercialization of the technique is important.

  12. Steam turbine maintenance and repair technology: Reducing planned-outage costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, H.P.; McClintock, M. (General Physics Corp., Columbia, MD (USA)); Lamping, G. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (USA))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The North American Electric Reliability Council (NAERC) reported that the average loss of equivalent availability per outage for a major fossil turbine overhaul is 323,000 MW-HR. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Generation and Storage Division, is in the first phase of a major research project to reduce the duration and/or frequency of steam turbine maintenance outages. This project consists of an assessment of the current state-of-the-art turbine maintenance and repair techniques and technologies. It is based on a review of current turbine maintenance practices of the US, European, Japanese, and Australian utility industries. Emphasized are maintenance and repair activities that have the most significant impact on outage duration or frequency. Twenty-six key turbine maintenance activities and the current best techniques were identified for use by utility maintenance personnel. Overall outage durations could be reduced if the duration of these activities were shortened or if they were performed more effectively. Recommended projects for development of advanced steam turbine maintenance technology were identified. 29 refs., 46 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. Dofasco`s No. 4 blast furnace hearth breakout, repair and rescue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donaldson, R.J.; Fischer, A.J.; Sharp, R.M.; Stothart, D.W. [Dofasco Inc., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On May 5, 1994, after producing 9.5 million metric tons of iron, Dofasco`s No. 4 Blast Furnace experienced a hearth breakout 250 millimeters below the west taphole. The hot metal spill caused a fire resulting in severe damage and 33 days of lost production. During a 26-day period, electrical wiring, water drainage systems and both tapholes were repaired. Recovery from an unprepared furnace stop of this length, with the deadman depleted is difficult. To aid with the rescue Hoogovens-designed oxygen/fuel lances were commissioned. The furnace recovery began with a lance in each taphole and all tuyeres plugged. Six days after startup the furnace was casting into torpedo cars, and after nine days operation had returned to normal. This incident prompted Dofasco to expand the hearth monitoring system to detect and prevent similar occurrences. During the repair, 203 new thermocouples were installed in the hearth, concentrating on the tapholes and elephant foot areas. These thermocouples were installed at various depths and locations to allow heat flux calculations. This hearth monitoring system has already identified other problem areas and provided valuable information about hearth drainage patterns. This information has allowed them to develop control strategies to manage localized problem areas.

  14. Percutaneous Stent-Graft Repair of a Mycotic Pulmonary Artery Pseudoaneurysm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou Meichun; Liang Hueilung, E-mail: hlliang@isca.vghks.gov.tw; Pan Huayban; Yang Chienfang [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology (China)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ruptured mycotic pulmonary pseudoaneurysm is a lethal complication. Emergent surgical repair is usually recommended, but still associated with a high mortality rate. We present a patient in whom mycotic pulmonary pseudoaneurysm was a complication after surgical lobectomy 2 weeks earlier. This patient had suffered from repeated massive hemoptysis. After emergent surgical repair of the ruptured pulmonary artery stump, another episode of massive hemorrhage occurred. The pulmonary arteriogram revealed a segmental stenosis and a large, wide-necked, lobulated pseudoaneurysm at the left proximal pulmonary artery. We deployed a balloon-expandable stent-graft (48 mm in length mounted on a 12 mm x 40 mm angioplasty balloon) across the stenotic segment and the neck of the pulmonary pseudoaneurysm. Hemostasis was achieved immediately and, under a 4-week antibiotic treatment, patient was transferred to a local hospital for medical care. This case report demonstrates the benefit of minimally invasive endovascular therapy in a critically ill patient. A literature review of the etiology and management of mycotic pulmonary pseudoaneurysm is included.

  15. Operational results of shaft repair by installing stave type cooler at Kimitsu Nos. 3 and 4 blast furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oda, Hiroshi; Amano, Shigeru; Sakamoto, Aiichiro; Anzai, Osamu [Nippon Steel Corp., Kimitsu, Chiba (Japan). Kimitsu Works; Nakagome, Michiru; Kuze, Toshisuke [Nippon Steel Corp., Futtsu, Chiba (Japan); Imuta, Akira [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Plant and Machinery Div.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Nos. 3 and 4 blast furnaces in Nippon Steel Corporation Kimitsu Works were both initially fitted with cooling plate systems. With the aging of each furnace, the damage to their respective inner-shaft profiles had become serious. Thus, in order to prevent operational change and prolong the furnace life, the inner-shaft profile of each furnace was repaired by replacing the former cooling plate system with the stave type cooler during the two-week-shutdowns. With this repair, stability of burden descent and gas flow near the wall part of the furnace have been achieved. Thus the prolongation of the furnace life is naturally expected.

  16. Detection and Repair of Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Double Strand Breaks: New Developments in Nonhomologous End Joining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chen [Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Oncology, and Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada)] [Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Oncology, and Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada); Lees-Miller, Susan P., E-mail: leesmill@ucalgary.ca [Departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Oncology, and Southern Alberta Cancer Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA damage can occur as a result of endogenous metabolic reactions and replication stress or from exogenous sources such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy. DNA double strand breaks are the most cytotoxic form of DNA damage, and defects in their repair can result in genome instability, a hallmark of cancer. The major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DSBs in human cells is nonhomologous end joining. Here we review recent advances on the mechanism of nonhomologous end joining, as well as new findings on its component proteins and regulation.

  17. Subj: Educational and General (E&G) Facility Support Provide an overview of Facility Operations, Maintenance, Repair and Renovation and Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    support, and, preventive and unscheduled maintenance of all building systems, with the exception of BAS Operations, Maintenance, Repair and Renovation and Space Management Procedures and Practices. KEY DEFINITIONS chambers, fume hoods, fixed seating, etc. are normally considered part of the building. Maintenance, repair

  18. [Studies of the repair of radiation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila]. Annual progress report, February 1, 1993--November 1, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawley, R.S.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on two repair deficient mutations in Drosophila melanogaster, namely mei-9, mei-41. In addition, the authors propose to extend this study to include the mus-312 mutation. They expect these studies to provide substantial insights into both the molecular mechanisms of DNA repair in Drosophila and the role these genes play in normal biological processes.

  19. Inhibition of X-ray-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair in aerobic plateau-phase Chinese hamster cells by misonidazole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer misonidazole (MISO) and the hydrophilic analog SR-2508 on the repair of X-ray-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) was studied in plateau-phase Chinese Hamster ovary (HA-1) cells. It was found that although MISO does not radiosensitize aerobic cells, it inhibits the repair of PLD. However, under hypoxic conditions, MISO has no effect on PLD repair. The major portion of the inhibition of PLD repair in aerobic cells requires the presence of MISO only during irradiation; little or no additional inhibition occurs when MISO is present during the postirradiation repair period. Also, treatment of aerobic cells with 5 mM MISO for either 5 or 30 min prior to irradiation is equally inhibitory. This suggests that the presence of MISO in some way modifies the initial lesion under aerobic conditions since it does not increase cell killing as determined by immediate plating but inhibits subsequent repair. The inhibition is concentration dependent; 0.5 mM MISO inhibits PLD repair by one-half while 5-10 mM totally inhibits the repair measured 6 hr postirradiation. This phenomenon suggests that radiosensitization of tissue in vivo by MISO and other 2-nitroimidazoles may not be unequivocal proof of the presence of hypoxic cells.

  20. Kevin P. Boggs || Office of Technology Transfer || 901.678.1712 || kpboggs@memphis.edu Novel Material Improves and Streamlines Repair of Peripheral Nerves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Dipankar

    . A significant alternative to suturing peripheral nerve injuries, an aerogel-based implant uniquely destination. "It is my opinion that the development of the multidimensional aerogel based nerve repair device boards, an aerogel-based peripheral nerve repair approach applies the functionality of a circuit board