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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Renewable Transportation Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Renewable Transportation Fuels Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of...

2

List of Renewable Transportation Fuels Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Fuels Incentives Transportation Fuels Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 30 Renewable Transportation Fuels Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 30) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alternative Energy Bond Fund Program (Illinois) State Grant Program Illinois Commercial Industrial Solar Water Heat Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Photovoltaics Landfill Gas Wind energy Biomass Hydroelectric energy Renewable Transportation Fuels Geothermal Electric No Alternative Fuel Transportation Grant Program (Indiana) State Grant Program Indiana Commercial Nonprofit Local Government Renewable Transportation Fuels Renewable Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cells No Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversion Rebate Program (Arkansas) State Rebate Program Arkansas Transportation Renewable Transportation Fuels No

3

EVermont Renewable Hydrogen Production and Transportation Fueling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A great deal of research funding is being devoted to the use of hydrogen for transportation fuel, particularly in the development of fuel cell vehicles. When this research bears fruit in the form of consumer-ready vehicles, will the fueling infrastructure be ready? Will the required fueling systems work in cold climates as well as they do in warm areas? Will we be sure that production of hydrogen as the energy carrier of choice for our transit system is the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly option? Will consumers understand this fuel and how to handle it? Those are questions addressed by the EVermont Wind to Wheels Hydrogen Project: Sustainable Transportation. The hydrogen fueling infrastructure consists of three primary subcomponents: a hydrogen generator (electrolyzer), a compression and storage system, and a dispenser. The generated fuel is then used to provide transportation as a motor fuel. EVermont Inc., started in 1993 by then governor Howard Dean, is a public-private partnership of entities interested in documenting and advancing the performance of advanced technology vehicles that are sustainable and less burdensome on the environment, especially in areas of cold climates, hilly terrain and with rural settlement patterns. EVermont has developed a demonstration wind powered hydrogen fuel producing filling system that uses electrolysis, compression to 5000 psi and a hydrogen burning vehicle that functions reliably in cold climates. And that fuel is then used to meet transportation needs in a hybrid electric vehicle whose internal combustion engine has been converted to operate on hydrogen Sponsored by the DOE EERE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (HFC&IT) Program, the purpose of the project is to test the viability of sustainably produced hydrogen for use as a transportation fuel in a cold climate with hilly terrain and rural settlement patterns. Specifically, the project addresses the challenge of building a renewable transportation energy capable system. The prime energy for this project comes from an agreement with a wind turbine operator.

Garabedian, Harold T.

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Bioethanol: A Renewable Transportation Fuel from Biomass  

SciTech Connect

Environmentally acceptable scenarios exist in which bioethanol is a major energy carrier for a sustainable transportation sector. Significant progress has been made in developing the new technologies needed but they remain to be proven at the commercial scale.

Riley, C. J.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard RFS Volumes by Year Enlarge illustration The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) is a federal program that requires transportation fuel sold in the U.S. to contain a minimum volume of

6

Renewables for TransportationTransportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal biomass Tank to Wheel Example renewable fuel options: Biofuels biogas Process heat/steam: Solar)) Biofuels, biogas Renewable electricity Renewable H2 sequestration (CCS)) Electricity: solar PV, wind

California at Davis, University of

7

List of Renewable Fuel Vehicles Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicles Incentives Vehicles Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 33 Renewable Fuel Vehicles Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 33) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alternative Fuel Transportation Grant Program (Indiana) State Grant Program Indiana Commercial Nonprofit Local Government Renewable Transportation Fuels Renewable Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cells No Alternative Fuel Vehicle Loan Program (Missouri) State Loan Program Missouri Schools Local Government Renewable Fuel Vehicles Other Alternative Fuel Vehicles Refueling Stations No Alternative Fuel Vehicle Rebate (Colorado) State Rebate Program Colorado Schools Local Government State Government Renewable Fuel Vehicles No Alternative Fuel Vehicle Tax Credit (West Virginia) Personal Tax Credit West Virginia Residential Renewable Fuel Vehicles No

8

Renewable Fuels Module This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuels Module Fuels Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 175 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources: biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind [1]. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve

9

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Assessment to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Assessment The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) prepared a report, Opportunities for DOD Use of Alternative and Renewable Fuels, on the use and potential use of

10

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard At least 2% of all diesel fuel sold in Washington must be biodiesel or renewable diesel. This requirement will increase to 5% 180 days after the

11

Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Standard Schedule Standard Schedule Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule Sector Liquid Transportation Fuels Spatial Resolution National Geographic Scope United States Temporal Resolution Annual The United States Environmental Protection Agency, under the National Renewable Fuel Standard program and as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), periodically revises the volumetric standards for cellulosic biofuel, biomass-based diesel, advanced biofuel, and total renewable fuel that must be used in transportation fuel each year. The table below lists the current RFS2 schedule in billions of gallons: Year Renewable Biofuel Advanced Biofuel Cellulosic Biofuel Biomass-based Diesel Undifferentiated Total 2008 9 9

12

Renewable Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Renewable Fuels Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Renewable Fuels...

13

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Mandate One year after in-state production has reached 350 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol and sustained this volume for three months, all gasoline

14

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Promotion The Texas Bioenergy Policy Council and the Texas Bioenergy Research Committee were established to promote the goal of making biofuels a

15

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard Within six months following the point at which monthly production of denatured ethanol produced in Louisiana equals or exceeds a minimum annualized production volume of 50 million gallons, at least 2% of the

16

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Mandate All gasoline sold in the state must be blended with 10% ethanol (E10). Gasoline with an octane rating of 91 or above is exempt from this mandate,

17

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Promotion Recognizing that biofuels such as ethanol and biodiesel will be an important part of the state's energy economy and advanced research in

18

Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 167 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources: biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind [1]. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the

19

Renewable Fuels Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the Annual Energy Outlook forecasts.

Chris Namovicz

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

20

Property:RenewableFuelStandard/RenewableBiofuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RenewableBiofuel RenewableBiofuel Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "RenewableFuelStandard/RenewableBiofuel" Showing 15 pages using this property. R Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 12.6 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 13.2 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 13.8 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 14.4 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 9 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 10.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 12 +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Alternative Fuel Transportation Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

federal federal register Monday May 17, 1999 Part II Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 10 CFR Part 490 Alternative Fuel Transportation Program; P-series Fuels; Final Rule 26822 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 94 / Monday, May 17, 1999 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 10 CFR Part 490 [Docket No. EE-RM-98-PURE] RIN 1904-AA99 Alternative Fuel Transportation Program; P-Series Fuels AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of final rulemaking. SUMMARY: In response to a petition filed by Pure Energy Corporation, DOE is amending the rules for the statutory program that requires certain alternative fuel providers and State government

22

Renewable Hydrogen Generation and Fueling Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In its efforts to promote hydrogen as an alternative transportation fuel, the New York Power Authority (NYPA) is implementing a renewable hydrogen fueling demonstration project. The project involves hydrogen production by electrolysis using NYPA's large renewable hydropower generating resources. An earlier EPRI report (1014383) provides background and results from a preliminary engineering and feasibility study. This report provides an update on the project and the refueling station bid and procurement p...

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

23

Property:RenewableFuelStandard/Year | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RenewableFuelStandard/Year RenewableFuelStandard/Year Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Date. Pages using the property "RenewableFuelStandard/Year" Showing 15 pages using this property. R Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2022 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2016 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2010 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2017 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2011 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2018 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2012 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2019 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2013 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2020 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2014 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2008 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2021 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2015 +

24

State Clean Energy Practices: Renewable Fuel Standards  

SciTech Connect

The State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) project is supported by the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program within the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project seeks to quantify the impacts of existing state policies, and to identify crucial policy attributes and their potential applicability to other states. The goal is to assist states in determining which clean energy policies or policy portfolios will best accomplish their environmental, economic, and security goals. For example, renewable fuel standards (RFS) policies are a mechanism for developing a market for renewable fuels in the transportation sector. This flexible market-based policy, when properly executed, can correct for market failures and promote growth of the renewable fuels industry better than a more command-oriented approach. The policy attempts to correct market failures such as embedded fossil fuel infrastructure and culture, risk associated with developing renewable fuels, consumer information gaps, and lack of quantification of the non-economic costs and benefits of both renewable and fossil-based fuels. This report focuses on renewable fuel standards policies, which are being analyzed as part of this project.

Mosey, G.; Kreycik, C.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

State Clean Energy Practices: Renewable Fuel Standards  

SciTech Connect

The State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) project is supported by the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program within the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project seeks to quantify the impacts of existing state policies, and to identify crucial policy attributes and their potential applicability to other states. The goal is to assist states in determining which clean energy policies or policy portfolios will best accomplish their environmental, economic, and security goals. For example, renewable fuel standards (RFS) policies are a mechanism for developing a market for renewable fuels in the transportation sector. This flexible market-based policy, when properly executed, can correct for market failures and promote growth of the renewable fuels industry better than a more command-oriented approach. The policy attempts to correct market failures such as embedded fossil fuel infrastructure and culture, risk associated with developing renewable fuels, consumer information gaps, and lack of quantification of the non-economic costs and benefits of both renewable and fossil-based fuels. This report focuses on renewable fuel standards policies, which are being analyzed as part of this project.

Mosey, G.; Kreycik, C.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Calgren Renewable Fuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Fuels LLC Place Newport Beach, California Zip 92660 Product Developer of bio-ethanol plants in US, particularly California. References Calgren Renewable Fuels LLC1...

27

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Promulgation of Renewable Fuel Storage Tank  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Promulgation of Promulgation of Renewable Fuel Storage Tank Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Promulgation of Renewable Fuel Storage Tank Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Promulgation of Renewable Fuel Storage Tank Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Promulgation of Renewable Fuel Storage Tank Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Promulgation of Renewable Fuel Storage Tank Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Promulgation of Renewable Fuel Storage Tank Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Promulgation of Renewable Fuel Storage Tank Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

28

Renewable Fuels Module  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics,...

29

Renewable Fuels Module This  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources: biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics,...

30

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Renewable Identification Numbers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Identification Numbers RIN Format EPA uses the following format to determine RINs for each physical gallon of

31

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Sales Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals The Wisconsin Legislature sets goals for minimum annual renewable fuel

32

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program The national RFS Program was developed to increase the volume of renewable

33

Multi-criteria comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel emission-standards, and fuel carbon tax  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuelcomparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel121, 2011. C. Fischer. Renewable Portfolio Standards: When

Rajagopal, Deepak; Hochman, G.; Zilberman, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Renewable & Alternative Fuels - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Renewable & Alternative Fuels Renewable & Alternative Fuels Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Biomass Geothermal Hydropower Solar Wind Alternative Transportation Fuels All Renewable & Alternative Fuels Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Alternative Fuels Capacity and Generation Consumption Environment Industry Characteristics Prices Production Projections Renewable Energy Type All Reports Don't miss: EIA's Alternative Fuel Vehicle Data. Including two interactive data viewers that provide custom data views of Alternative Fuel Vehicle data for both User & Fuel Data and Supplier Data. EIA's latest Short-Term Energy Outlook for renewables › chart showing U.S. renewable energy supply Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, released monthly.

35

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Retailer Tax Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Retailer Tax Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Retailer Tax Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Retailer Tax Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Retailer Tax Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Retailer Tax Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Retailer Tax Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Retailer Tax Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Retailer Tax Incentive A licensed retail motor fuel dealer may receive a quarterly incentive for

36

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit A tax credit is available for 25% of the cost to install or retrofit

37

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Labeling Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Labeling Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Labeling Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Labeling Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Labeling Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Labeling Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Labeling Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Labeling Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Labeling Requirement Biodiesel and ethanol blend dispensers must be affixed with decals

38

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit

39

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Fuel Definitions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel and Biodiesel and Renewable Fuel Definitions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Fuel Definitions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Fuel Definitions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Fuel Definitions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Fuel Definitions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Fuel Definitions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Fuel Definitions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel and Renewable Fuel Definitions Biodiesel is defined as a renewable, biodegradable, mono alkyl ester

40

Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hawaii has abundant natural energy resources, especially biomass, that could be used to produce alternative fuels for ground transportation and electricity. This report summarizes activities performed during 1988 to June 1991 in the first phase of the Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. The Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program was funded initially by the Energy Division of the State of Hawaii's Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and then by the US Department of Energy. This program was intended to support the transition to an altemative transportation fuel, methanol, by demonstrating the use of methanol fuel and methanol-fueled vehicles, and solving the problems associated with that fuel. Specific objectives include surveying renewable energy resources and ground transportation in Hawaii; installing a model methanol fueling station; demonstrating a methanol-fueled fleet of (spark-ignition engine) vehicles; evaluating modification strategies for methanol-fueled diesel engines and fuel additives; and investigating the transition to methanol fueling. All major objectives of Phase I were met (survey of local renewable resources and ground transportation, installation of methanol refueling station, fleet demonstration, diesel engine modification and additive evaluation, and dissemination of information on alternative fueling), and some specific problems (e.g., relating to methanol fuel contamination during handling and refueling) were identified and solved. Several key issues emerging from Phase I (e.g., methanol corrosion, flame luminosity, and methanol-transition technoeconomics) were recommended as topics for follow-on research in subsequent phases of this program.

Kinoshita, C.M. (ed.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Renewable Fuel Vehicles | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Renewable Fuel Vehicles Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Renewable...

42

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Energy Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Energy Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Energy Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Energy Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Energy Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Energy Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Energy Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Energy Grants The Renewable Energy and Energy-Efficient Technologies Grants Program and Farm to Fuel Grants Program provide matching grants for demonstration,

43

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on AddThis.com...

44

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Provision for Renewable Fuels Investment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Provision for Provision for Renewable Fuels Investment to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Provision for Renewable Fuels Investment on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Provision for Renewable Fuels Investment on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Provision for Renewable Fuels Investment on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Provision for Renewable Fuels Investment on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Provision for Renewable Fuels Investment on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Provision for Renewable Fuels Investment on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Provision for Renewable Fuels Investment To create jobs and improve the state's general infrastructure, the Florida

45

Renewable Fuels Limited RFL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RFL Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Fuels Limited (RFL) Place York, United Kingdom Zip YO19 6ET Sector Biomass Product Supplies various biomass fuels and offers...

46

Missouri Renewable Fuel Standard Brochure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

The Missouri Renewable Fuel Standard The Missouri Renewable Fuel Standard requires ethanol in most gasoline beginning January 1, 2008. ARE YOU READY? TEN THINGS MISSOURI TANK OWNERS AND OPERATORS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT ETHANOL 1. Ethanol is a type of alcohol made usually from corn in Missouri and other states. 2. E10 is a blend of 10% ethanol and 90% unleaded gasoline. E85 is a blend of 75% to 85% fuel ethanol and 25% to 15% unleaded gasoline. Blends between E10 and E85 are not allowed to be sold at retail. 3. Any vehicle or small engine should run fine on E10, but only specially designed vehicles can use E85. 4. You are not required to label your dispensers disclosing the ethanol content if you are selling E10. However, you are required to label your dispensers if you are selling E85.

47

Property:RenewableFuelStandard/Total | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Total Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "RenewableFuelStandard/Total" Showing 15 pages using this property. R Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 13.95 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 26 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15.2 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 28 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 16.55 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 30 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 18.15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 9 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 33 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 20.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 11.1 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 36 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 22.25 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 12.95 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 24 +

48

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report: 2009 Update. REN21 Renewable Energy Policy NetworkRecent Devel- opments in Renewable Technologies: R&Dobjective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

List of Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Incentives | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Incentives Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 192 Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 192) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes AlabamaSAVES Revolving Loan Program (Alabama) State Loan Program Alabama Commercial Industrial Institutional Building Insulation Doors Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls

50

Property:RenewableFuelStandard/UndifferentiatedAdvancedBiofuel | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UndifferentiatedAdvancedBiofuel UndifferentiatedAdvancedBiofuel Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "RenewableFuelStandard/UndifferentiatedAdvancedBiofuel" Showing 14 pages using this property. R Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 0.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 4.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 1.75 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 4.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 4.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 0.1 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 3 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 0.2 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 3.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 0.3 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 4 +

51

EA-1887: Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (DOEEA-1573-S1) EA-1887: Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the...

52

Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of...

53

Renewable Fuels Consulting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consulting Consulting Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Fuels Consulting Place Mason City, Iowa Sector Renewable Energy Product RFC specializes in providing technical solutions to renewable energy production plants. References Renewable Fuels Consulting[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Renewable Fuels Consulting is a company located in Mason City, Iowa . References ↑ "Renewable Fuels Consulting" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Renewable_Fuels_Consulting&oldid=350341" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

54

Consider upgrading pyrolysis oils into renewable fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New research is identifying processing routes to convert cellulosic biomass into transportation fuels

Elliott, Douglas C.; Holmgren, Jennifer; Marinangelli, Richard; nair, Prabhakar; Bain, Richard

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Renewable & Alternative Fuels - Pub - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable & Alternative Fuels Renewable & Alternative Fuels Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Biomass Geothermal Hydropower Solar Wind Alternative Transportation Fuels All Renewable & Alternative Fuels Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Alternative Fuels Capacity and Generation Consumption Environment Industry Characteristics Prices Production Projections Renewable Energy Type All Reports Biofuels Workshops Workshop on Biofuels Projections in the AEO The U.S. Energy Information Administration's Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas, and Biofuels Analysis held a workshop on biofuels projections in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The objective of the workshop was to explore the opportunities and challenges of representing advanced (cellulosic) biofuels in our AEO2013 long term forecast. The workshop focused on the

56

EERE: Sustainable Transportation - Hydrogen and Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy Search Search Search Help | A-Z Subject Index EERE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Sustainable Transportation EERE leads U.S. researchers and other partners in...

57

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

under Low Carbon Fuel Standards? American Economic Journal:the Low Carbon Fuel Standard, Volume I Sta? Report: Initialpolicies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Energy Efficiency and Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Printable Version Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Fuel Cell Technologies...

59

American Renewable Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

American Renewable Fuels American Renewable Fuels Place Dallas, Texas Zip TX 75201 Sector Renewable Energy Product Developer of commercial scale renewable fuels production plants and subsidiary of Australian Renewable Fuels Pty Ltd (ARF). Coordinates 32.778155°, -96.795404° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.778155,"lon":-96.795404,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

60

Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Renewable Fuels &039;Plus&039; Research and Development Fund (Ontario, Canada) Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund (Ontario, Canada)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Biodiesel and Other Renewable Diesel Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Present federal tax incentives apply to certain types of biomass-derived diesel fuels, which in energy policy and tax laws are described either as renewable diesel or biodiesel. To understand the distinctions between these diesel types it is necessary to understand the technologies used to produce them and the properties of the resulting products. This fact sheet contains definitions of renewable and biodiesel and discusses the processes used to convert biomass to diesel fuel and the properties of biodiesel and renewable diesel fuels.

Not Available

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. Phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hawaii has abundant natural energy resources, especially biomass, that could be used to produce alternative fuels for ground transportation and electricity. This report summarizes activities performed during 1988 to June 1991 in the first phase of the Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. The Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program was funded initially by the Energy Division of the State of Hawaii`s Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and then by the US Department of Energy. This program was intended to support the transition to an altemative transportation fuel, methanol, by demonstrating the use of methanol fuel and methanol-fueled vehicles, and solving the problems associated with that fuel. Specific objectives include surveying renewable energy resources and ground transportation in Hawaii; installing a model methanol fueling station; demonstrating a methanol-fueled fleet of (spark-ignition engine) vehicles; evaluating modification strategies for methanol-fueled diesel engines and fuel additives; and investigating the transition to methanol fueling. All major objectives of Phase I were met (survey of local renewable resources and ground transportation, installation of methanol refueling station, fleet demonstration, diesel engine modification and additive evaluation, and dissemination of information on alternative fueling), and some specific problems (e.g., relating to methanol fuel contamination during handling and refueling) were identified and solved. Several key issues emerging from Phase I (e.g., methanol corrosion, flame luminosity, and methanol-transition technoeconomics) were recommended as topics for follow-on research in subsequent phases of this program.

Kinoshita, C.M. [ed.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Crop residues as feedstock for renewable fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrient removal and net costs weigh on decisions to use crop residues as biofuel feedstocks. Crop residues as feedstock for renewable fuels Inform Magazine Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Inform Archives Crop residues as feedstock for rene

64

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Renewable  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on AddThis.com...

65

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Renewable  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on AddThis.com...

66

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Renewable  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on AddThis.com...

67

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Renewable  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on AddThis.com...

68

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Renewable  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on AddThis.com...

69

Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Renewable  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on AddThis.com...

70

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Renewable  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on AddThis.com...

71

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Renewable  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on AddThis.com...

72

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Renewable  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on AddThis.com...

73

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Fuel Cells & Renewable Portfolio Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.....................................................12 SOFC Battery Range Extender Auxiliary Power Unit (SOFC) as Military APU Replacements" (presentation, DOD-DOE Workshop on Fuel Cells in Aviation cell plasma lighting demonstration, a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) battery range extender APU

75

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. The Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to

76

Renewable & Alternative Fuels | U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Unlike fossil fuels, which are exhaustible, renewable energy sources regenerate and can be sustained indefinitely. The five renewable sources used most often are ...

77

Patriot Renewable Fuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Fuels LLC Renewable Fuels LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Patriot Renewable Fuels, LLC Place Geneseo, Illinois Zip 61254 Product An Illinois-based firm developing a 378m-litre (100m-gallon) per year ethanol plant near Annaway, Illinois. Coordinates 42.793381°, -77.81616° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.793381,"lon":-77.81616,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

78

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Energy Property Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Property Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Energy Property Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Energy Property Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Energy Property Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Energy Property Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Energy Property Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Energy Property Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Energy Property Tax Credit Taxpayers who construct, purchase, or lease renewable energy property may

79

Second Generation Renewable Fuels Blue-Green Seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Second Generation Renewable Fuels Blue-Green Seminar at University of Michigan by Michael Ladisch Laboratory of Renewable Resources Engineering Purdue University Potter Engineering Center 500 footprint will require commercialization of industrial processes that transform renewable lignocellulosic

Eustice, Ryan

80

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Definitions,  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel and Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Definitions, Registration, and Labeling Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Definitions, Registration, and Labeling Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Definitions, Registration, and Labeling Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Definitions, Registration, and Labeling Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Definitions, Registration, and Labeling Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Definitions, Registration, and Labeling Requirements on Digg

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel TRANSPORTATION ENERGY alternative fuel, and purified landfill gas could provide a renewable domestic source of it. Landfills from landfills and use it in natural gas applications such as fueling motor vehicles. Project

82

Fuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plants Power Plants Fuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels DOE-DOD Workshop Washington, DC. January 13, 2011 reliable, efficient, ultra-clean FuelCell Energy, Inc. * Premier developer of stationary fuel Premier developer of stationary fuel cell technology - founded in 1969 * Over 50 installations in North America, Europe, and Asia * Industrial, commercial, utility products products * 300 KW to 50 MW and beyond FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. g Product Line Based on Stack Building Block Cell Package and Stack Four-Stack Module DFC3000 Two 4-Stack Modules 2.8 MW Single-Stack Module Single Stack Module DFC1500 One 4-Stack Module 1.4 MW DFC300

83

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogenation-Derived Renewable Diesel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emerging Fuels Emerging Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogenation-Derived Renewable Diesel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogenation-Derived Renewable Diesel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogenation-Derived Renewable Diesel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogenation-Derived Renewable Diesel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogenation-Derived Renewable Diesel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogenation-Derived Renewable Diesel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogenation-Derived Renewable Diesel on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol

84

Fueling America Through Renewable Resources Purdue extension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Streets Coalition www.cts.umn.edu/Education Common job titles: Bike planner Biofuels or low-carbon fuels biofuels for cold climates Evaluate environmental products and processes Maintain infrastructure to reduce Retailer or wholesaler Transportation consulting firm State or federal department of transportation What

85

Solar Power To Help Convert Carbon Dioxide Into Fuel : Renewable Energy News  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Power To Help Convert Carbon Dioxide Into Fuel : Renewable Energy News TUESDAY 25 MAY, 2010 | | Solar Power To Help Convert Carbon Dioxide Into Fuel by Energy Matters Microbiologist Derek Lovley dioxide into transportation fuels, with the help of special micro-organisms and solar power. The team

Lovley, Derek

86

Toward alternative transportation fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At some time in the future the U.S. will make a transition to alternative fuels for transportation. The motivation for this change is the decline in urban air quality and the destruction of the ozone layer. Also, there is a need for energy independence. The lack of consensus on social priorities makes it difficult to compare benefits of different fuels. Fuel suppliers and automobile manufacturers would like to settle on a single alternative fuel. The factors of energy self-sufficiency, economic efficiency, varying anti-pollution needs in different locales, and global warming indicate a need for multiple fuels. It is proposed that instead of a Federal command-and-control type of social regulation for alternative fuels for vehicles, the government should take an incentive-based approach. The main features of this market-oriented proposal would be averaging automobile emission standards, banking automobile emissions reductions, and trading automobile emission rights. Regulation of the fuel industry would allow for variations in the nature and magnitude of the pollution problems in different regions. Different fuels or fuel mixture would need to be supplied for each area. The California Clean Air Resources Board recently adopted a fuel-neutral, market-oriented regulatory program for reducing emissions. This program will show if incentive-based strategies can be extended to the nation as a whole.

Sperling, D. (Univ. of California, Davis (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delivering Renewable Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Delivering Renewable Hydrogen: A Focus on Near-Term Applications on AddThis.com...

88

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind1. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy.

89

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Natural Gas Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Natural Gas From Landfill Powers Refuse Vehicles on AddThis.com... April 13, 2013

90

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Landfills Convert Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on AddThis.com... May 25, 2013 Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas

91

Conservation and renewable energy technologies for transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) is charged with long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research and development of promising transportation technologies that are unlikely to be undertaken by the private sector alone. OTT activities are designed to develop an advanced technology base within the US transportation industry for future manufacture of more energy-efficient, fuel-flexible, and environmentally sound transportation systems. OTT operations are focused on three areas: advanced automotive propulsion systems including gas turbines, low heat rejection diesel, and electric vehicle technologies; advanced materials development and tribology research; and research, development, demonstration, test, and evaluation (including field testing in fleet operations) of alternative fuels. Five papers describing the transportation technologies program have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).117 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration,

93

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).112 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration,

94

Fuels processing for transportation fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells primarily use hydrogen as the fuel. This hydrogen must be produced from other fuels such as natural gas or methanol. The fuel processor requirements are affected by the fuel to be converted, the type of fuel cell to be supplied, and the fuel cell application. The conventional fuel processing technology has been reexamined to determine how it must be adapted for use in demanding applications such as transportation. The two major fuel conversion processes are steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming. The former is established practice for stationary applications; the latter offers certain advantages for mobile systems and is presently in various stages of development. This paper discusses these fuel processing technologies and the more recent developments for fuel cell systems used in transportation. The need for new materials in fuels processing, particularly in the area of reforming catalysis and hydrogen purification, is discussed.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Nanostructured Basic Catalysts: Opportunities for Renewable Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This research studied and developed novel basic catalysts for production of renewable chemicals and fuels from biomass. We focused on the development of unique porous structural-base catalysts zeolites. These catalysts were compared to conventional solid base materials for aldol condensation, that were being commercialized for production of fuels from biomass and would be pivotal in future biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals. Specifically, we had studied the aldolpyrolysis over zeolites and the trans-esterification of vegetable oil with methanol over mixed oxide catalysts. Our research has indicated that the base strength of framework nitrogen in nitrogen substituted zeolites (NH-zeolites) is nearly twice as strong as in standard zeolites. Nitrogen substituted catalysts have been synthesized from several zeolites (including FAU, MFI, BEA, and LTL) using NH3 treatment.

Conner, William C; Huber, George; Auerbach, Scott

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

A new generation of renewable fuels is on the horizon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lead inventor of a suite of technologies that can be used to convert triglyceride oils from camelina and other plants into renewable fuels and chemicals discusses two process schemes that are nearing commercialization. A new generation of renewable fue

97

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Just. The welfare economics of a biofuel tax credit and theD. Zilberman. Challenge of biofuel: ?lling the tank withoutsuch as renewable fuel (biofuel) standards (RFS), fuel GHG

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Public Transportation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Public Transportation Vehicle Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Public Transportation Vehicle Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Public Transportation Vehicle Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Public Transportation Vehicle Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Public Transportation Vehicle Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Public Transportation Vehicle Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Public Transportation Vehicle Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

99

EPA finalizes Renewable Fuel Standard for 2013; additional ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... of producing significant volumes of non-ethanol advanced biofuels fuels such as biodiesel, renewable diesel, and biogas; Lacking foresight into EPA's future ...

100

RINs and RVOs are used to implement the Renewable Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

To increase the amount of biofuels in gasoline, the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) administered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was enacted through laws ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council Northwest Power Pool Area This...

102

Light-Powered Microbial Fuel Cell Offering Clean, Renewable ...  

Light-Powered Microbial Fuel Cell Offering Clean, Renewable Hydrogen-Based Alternative Energy Source Inventors: Daniel Noguera, Timothy Donohue, Marc Anderson ...

103

EA-1887: Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

improvements to the Renewable Fuel Heat Plant including construction and operation of a wood chip storage silo and the associated material handling conveyances and utilization of...

104

Template:Set RenewableFuelStandard | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Document Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTemplate:SetRenewableFuelStandard&oldid269035" Category: Articles with...

105

Fuel Cell Power PlantsFuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Safety and Grid Interface Direct Fuel Cell Module: FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct Fuel generation of combined heat andcombined heat and power ­Clean Power with natural gas f lfuel ­Renewable Power with biofuels ·Grid connected power generationgeneration ­High Efficiency Grid support

106

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the shutdown...

107

Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply January 20, 2011 - 3:48pm Addthis Jonathan Silver Jonathan Silver Executive Director of the Loan Programs Office What does this project do? Nearly triples the amount of renewable diesel produced domestically Diversifies the U.S. fuel supply Today, Secretary Chu announced the offer of a conditional commitment for a $241 million loan guarantee to Diamond Green Diesel, LLC., the DOE Loan Program's first conditional commitment for an advanced biofuels plant. The loan guarantee will support the construction of a 137-million gallon per year renewable diesel facility that will produce renewable diesel fuel primarily from animal fats, used cooking oil and other waste grease

108

Renewable Energy: Solar Fuels GRC and GRS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Gordon Research Conference seeks to bring together chemists, physicists, materials scientists and biologists to address perhaps the outstanding technical problem of the 21st Century - the efficient, and ultimately economical, storage of energy from carbon-neutral sources. Such an advance would deliver a renewable, environmentally benign energy source for the future. A great technological challenge facing our global future is energy. The generation of energy, the security of its supply, and the environmental consequences of its use are among the world's foremost geopolitical concerns. Fossil fuels - coal, natural gas, and petroleum - supply approximately 90% of the energy consumed today by industrialized nations. An increase in energy supply is vitally needed to bring electric power to the 25% of the world's population that lacks it, to support the industrialization of developing nations, and to sustain economic growth in developed countries. On the geopolitical front, insuring an adequate energy supply is a major security issue for the world, and its importance will grow in proportion to the singular dependence on oil as a primary energy source. Yet, the current approach to energy supply, that of increased fossil fuel exploration coupled with energy conservation, is not scaleable to meet future demands. Rising living standards of a growing world population will cause global energy consumption to increase significantly. Estimates indicate that energy consumption will increase at least two-fold, from our current burn rate of 12.8 TW to 28 - 35 TW by 2050. - U.N. projections indicate that meeting global energy demand in a sustainable fashion by the year 2050 will require a significant fraction of the energy supply to come carbon free sources to stabilize atmospheric carbon dioxide levels at twice the pre-anthropogenic levels. External factors of economy, environment, and security dictate that this global energy need be met by renewable and sustainable sources from a carbon-neutral source. Sunlight is by far the most abundant global carbon-neutral energy resource. More solar energy strikes the surface of the earth in one hour than is obtained from all of the fossil fuels consumed globally in a year. Sunlight may be used to power the planet. However, it is intermittent, and therefore it must be converted to electricity or stored chemical fuel to be used on a large scale. The 'grand challenge' of using the sun as a future energy source faces daunting challenges - large expanses of fundamental science and technology await discovery. A viable solar energy conversion scheme must result in a 10-50 fold decrease in the cost-to-efficiency ratio for the production of stored fuels, and must be stable and robust for a 20-30 year period. To reduce the cost of installed solar energy conversion systems to $0.20/peak watt of solar radiation, a cost level that would make them economically attractive in today's energy market, will require revolutionary technologies. This GRC seeks to present a forum for the underlying science needed to permit future generations to use the sun as a renewable and sustainable primary energy source. Speakers will discuss recent advances in homoogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis of multi-electron transfer processes of importance to solar fuel production, such as water oxidation and reduction, and carbon dioxide reduction. Speakers will also discuss advances in scaleably manufacturable systems for the capture and conversion of sunlight into electrical charges that can be readily coupled into, and utilized for, fuel production in an integrated system.

Nathan Lewis

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

109

Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels 2009 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels 2009 Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels 2009 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels 2009 Focus Area: Propane Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.eia.gov/renewable/alternative_transport_vehicles/pdf/afv-atf2009.p Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/alternatives-traditional-transportati Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This report provides data on the number of alternative fuel vehicles produced, the number of alternative fuel vehicles in use and the amount of alternative transportation fuels consumed in the United States in 2009. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Alternatives_to_Traditional_Transportation_Fuels_2009&oldid=514311

110

EA-1887: Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (DOE/EA-1573-S1) EA-1887: Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (DOE/EA-1573-S1) Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to make improvements to the Renewable Fuel Heat Plant including construction and operation of a wood chip storage silo and the associated material handling conveyances and utilization of regional wood sources. DOE/EA-1887 supplements a prior EA (DOE/EA-1573, July 2007) and is also referred to as DOE/EA-1573-S1. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download April 9, 2012 EA-1887: Finding of No Significant Impact

111

Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels: An Overview  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Provides background information on alternative transportation fuels and replacement fuels, and furnishes preliminary estimates of the use of these fuels and of alternative fueled vehicles.

Information Center

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

2011 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Key factors driving the short-term outlook. 2011 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook. 2 Disruption of crude oil and liquefied natural gas supply from

113

Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund (Ontario,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Alternative Renewable Fuels &#039;Plus&#039; Research and Development Fund (Ontario, Canada) Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund (Ontario, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial State/Provincial Govt Industrial Local Government Schools Institutional Program Info State Ontario Program Type Grant Program Provider Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs "Exploration of new markets and new uses for bioproducts, alternative renewable fuels and their co-products will contribute to the long term sustainability of Ontario's agri-food, energy and rural sectors. Investment in research will help position Ontario to take advantage of new technologies in these areas. The Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund is a

114

Renewable Fuel Supply Ltd RFSL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply Ltd RFSL Supply Ltd RFSL Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Fuel Supply Ltd (RFSL) Place United Kingdom Zip W1J 5EN Sector Biomass Product UKâ€(tm)s largest supplier of biomass to the UK co-firing power stations. References Renewable Fuel Supply Ltd (RFSL)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Renewable Fuel Supply Ltd (RFSL) is a company located in United Kingdom . References ↑ "[fsl@@Pikefsl@@Renewablefsl@@generationfsl@@sub*-Utilityfsl@@Photovoltanicsfsl@@Fuelfsl@@Wind-Poerfsl@@/ Renewable Fuel Supply Ltd (RFSL)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Renewable_Fuel_Supply_Ltd_RFSL&oldid=350339" Categories:

115

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).109 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

116

List of Renewable Fuels Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 97 Renewable Fuels Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 97) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AlabamaSAVES Revolving Loan Program (Alabama) State Loan Program Alabama Commercial Industrial Institutional Building Insulation Doors Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Steam-system upgrades Water Heaters Windows Biodiesel Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Ethanol Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Photovoltaics Renewable Fuels Solar Water Heat Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Natural Gas Yes Alternative Energy Personal Property Tax Exemption (Michigan) Property Tax Incentive Michigan Commercial

117

Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport Sectors: Policy Drivers and International Trade Aspects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport Sectors: Policy Drivers and International Trade Aspects Agency/Company /Organization: International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry, Transportation Topics: Implementation, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: ictsd.org/downloads/2010/06/synthesis-re-transport-buildings.pdf Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport Sectors: Policy Drivers and International Trade Aspects Screenshot

118

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

renewable fuels module (RFM) consists of five submodules that represent the various types of renewable energy technologies used for grid-connected U.S. electricity supply (Figure 11). Since most renewables (wind, solar, and geothermal) are used to generate electricity, the interaction with the electricity market module (EMM) is important for modeling grid-connected renewable-electric applications. The penetration of grid-connected generation technologies, with the exception of municipal solid waste, is determined by EMM. Hydropower is included in EMM directly. renewable fuels module (RFM) consists of five submodules that represent the various types of renewable energy technologies used for grid-connected U.S. electricity supply (Figure 11). Since most renewables (wind, solar, and geothermal) are used to generate electricity, the interaction with the electricity market module (EMM) is important for modeling grid-connected renewable-electric applications. The penetration of grid-connected generation technologies, with the exception of municipal solid waste, is determined by EMM. Hydropower is included in EMM directly. Figure 11. Renewable Fuels Module Structure Each submodule of RFM is solved independently of the rest. Because variable operation and maintenance costs for renewable technologies are lower than for any other major generating technology and they produce almost no air pollution, all available renewable generating capacity is dispatched first by EMM.

119

Iowa Renewable Fuels Association IRFA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Association IRFA Renewable Fuels Association IRFA Jump to: navigation, search Name Iowa Renewable Fuels Association (IRFA) Place Johnston, Iowa Zip 50131-2948 Sector Renewable Energy Product Fosters the development and growth of renewable fuels industry through education, promotion and infrastructure development in Iowa. Coordinates 33.831879°, -81.800645° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.831879,"lon":-81.800645,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

120

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind1. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost energy storage systems.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Distributed Reforming of Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting using Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reforming of Renewable Reforming of Renewable Liquids via Water Splitting using Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) * U. (Balu) Balachandran, T. H. Lee, C. Y. Park, and S. E. Dorris Energy Systems Division E-mail: balu@anl.gov * Work supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program of DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Presented at the Bio-derived Liquids Working Group (BILIWG) Meeting, Nov. 6, 2007. BILIWG Meeting, Nov. 6, 2007 2 Objective & Rationale Objective: Develop compact dense ceramic membrane reactors that enable the efficient and cost-effective production of hydrogen by reforming renewable liquid fuels using pure oxygen produced by water splitting and transported by an OTM. Rationale: Membrane technology provides the means to attack barriers to the

122

Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment (SFTRA) Draft NUREG-2125 Overview for National Transportation Stakeholders Forum John Cook Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation 1 SFTRA Overview Contents * Project and review teams * Purpose and goals * Basic methodology * Improvements relative to previous studies * Draft NUREG structure and format * Routine shipment analysis and results * Accident condition analysis and results * Findings and conclusions * Schedule 2 SFTRA Research and Review Teams * Sandia National Laboratory Research Team [$1.8M; 9/06-9/12] - Doug Ammerman - principal investigator - Carlos Lopez - thermal - Ruth Weiner - RADTRAN * NRC's SFTRA Technical Review Team - Gordon Bjorkman - structural

123

Spent fuel integrity during transportation  

SciTech Connect

The conditions of recent shipments of light water reactor spent fuel were surveyed. The radioactivity level of cask coolant was examined in an attempt to find the effects of transportation on LWR fuel assemblies. Discussion included potential cladding integrity loss mechanisms, canning requirements, changes of radioactivity levels, and comparison of transportation in wet or dry media. Although integrity loss or degradation has not been identified, radioactivity levels usually increase during transportation, especially for leaking assemblies.

Funk, C.W.; Jacobson, L.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Transportation Clean Transportation Fuel Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean Transportation Fuel Standards The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) administers the Oregon

125

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Transportation Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses

126

Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels Agency/Company /Organization: U.S. Energy Information Administration Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Analysis Tools, Policy Impacts Website: www.eia.gov/renewable/afv/index.cfm This report provides annual data on the number of alternative fuel vehicles produced, the number of alternative fuel vehicles in use, and the amount of alternative transportation fuels consumed in the United States. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Shift - Change to low-carbon modes Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies Learn more about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air

127

Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this mission-oriented research program is the production of renewable hydrogen for fossil fuel processing. This program will build upon promising results that have been obtained in the Chemical Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the utilization of intact microalgae for photosynthetic water splitting. In this process, specially adapted algae are used to perform the light-activated cleavage of water into its elemental constituents, molecular hydrogen and oxygen. The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of their hydrogen-producing capability. These are: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the original development of an evacuated photobiological reactor for real-world engineering applications; (6) the potential for using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. The significance of each of these points in the context of a practical system for hydrogen production is discussed. This program will be enhanced by collaborative research between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and senior faculty members at Duke University, the University of Chicago, and Iowa State University. The special contribution that these organizations and faculty members will make is access to strains and mutants of unicellular algae that will potentially have useful properties for hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting.

Greenbaum, E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Understanding and Informing the Policy Environment: State-Level Renewable Fuels Standards  

SciTech Connect

Renewable fuels standard (RFS) policies are becoming a popular public policy mechanism for developing the market for renewable fuels in the transportation sector. During the past decade, U.S. states and several countries began implementing these more market-based (less command and control) policies to support increased biofuels production and use. This paper presents an overview of current and proposed U.S. state-level policies, as well as selected electric sector policies and international fuel standard policies. Current U.S. state-level renewable fuel policies list drivers including an improved economy and environment, as well as fuel self-sufficiency. Best practices and experience from an evaluation of renewable portfolio standards (RPS) in the United States and international RFS policies can inform U.S. state-level policy by illustrating the importance of policy flexibility, binding targets, effective cost caps, and tradable permits. Understanding and building on the experiences from these previous policies can improve the policy mechanism and further develop a market for renewable fuels to meet the goals of improved economy, environment, and fuel self-sufficiency.

Brown, E.; Cory, K.; Arent, D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Sweet Smell of Renewable Fuel | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Sweet Smell Sweet Smell of Renewable Fuel News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.06.11 Sweet Smell of Renewable Fuel Office of Science researchers borrowed from a fir tree to create a fuel that could leave diesel in the dust. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Tractor trailer driving down road flanked by fields Department of Transportation Commercial trucks in the U.S. burned approximately 22 billion gallons of diesel fuel in 2010. Replacing diesel with a clean, green and renewable biofuel could substantially reduce the industry's carbon footprint.

130

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council NYC-Westchester This dataset comes...

131

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool South This dataset comes from the Energy Information...

132

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council Northeast This dataset comes from...

133

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council Long Island This dataset comes from...

134

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council Upstate New York This dataset comes...

135

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool North This dataset comes from the Energy Information...

136

Renewable Fuels Module, Appendix - Model Performance, Model Documentation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This appendix discusses performance aspects of the Renewable Fuels Module (RFM). It is intended to present the pattern of response of the RFM to typical changes in its major inputs from other NEMS modules.

Perry M. Lindstrom

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Southeast Renewable Fuels LLC SRF | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lauderdale, Florida Zip 33309 Product South Florida-based owner and developer of sweet sorghum-to-ethanol plants. References Southeast Renewable Fuels LLC (SRF)1 LinkedIn...

138

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Delivering Renewable Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Landill Gas to LNG Plant (PDF 432 KB), Steve Eckhardt, Linde Session 3: Hydrogen from Biogas Moderator: Marc Melaina, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Analysis of a Cluster...

139

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuel Petitions to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on AddThis.com... Home About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources Alternative Fuel Petitions Section 301(2) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct 1992) defines

140

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Renewable  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Laws and Incentives for Renewable Fuel Standard / Mandate on AddThis.com...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Transportation Electrification Load Development For a Renewable Future Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Electrification of the transportation sector offers the opportunity to significantly reduce petroleum consumption. The transportation sector accounts for 70% of US petroleum consumption. The transition to electricity as a transportation fuel will create a new load for electricity generation. In support of a recent US Department of Energy funded activity that analyzed a future generation scenario with high renewable energy technology contributions, a set of regional hourly load profiles for electrified vehicles were developed for the 2010 to 2050 timeframe. These load profiles with their underlying assumptions will be presented in this paper. The transportation electrical energy was determined using regional population forecast data, historical vehicle per capita data, and market penetration growth functions to determine the number of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in each analysis region. Two market saturation scenarios of 30% of sales and 50% of sales of PEVs consuming on average {approx}6 kWh per day were considered. Results were generated for 3109 counties and were consolidated to 134 Power Control Areas (PCA) for the use NREL's's regional generation planning analysis tool ReEDS. PEV aggregate load profiles from previous work were combined with vehicle population data to generate hourly loads on a regional basis. A transition from consumer-controlled charging toward utility-controlled charging was assumed such that by 2050 approximately 45% of the transportation energy demands could be delivered across 4 daily time slices under optimal control from the utility perspective. No other literature has addressed the potential flexibility in energy delivery to electric vehicles in connection with a regional power generation study. This electrified transportation analysis resulted in an estimate for both the flexible load and fixed load shapes on a regional basis that may evolve under two PEV market penetration scenarios. EVS25 Copyright.

Markel, Tony; Mai, Trieu; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Transportation System Transportation System Efficiency to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Ridesharing Mass Transit Active Transit Multi-Modal Transportation Telework

143

Transportation fuels from synthetic gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty-five experimental Fischer-Tropsch synthesis runs were made with 14 different catalysts or combinations of catalysts using a Berty reactor system. Two catalysts showed increased selectivity to transportation fuels compared to typical Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. With a catalyst consisting of 5 wt % ruthenium impregnated on a Y zeolite (run number 24), 63 to 70 wt % of the hydrocarbon product was in the gasoline boiling range. Using a 0.5 wt % ruthenium on alumina catalyst (run number 22), 64 to 78 wt % of the hydrocarbon product was in the diesel fuel boiling range. Not enough sample was produced to determine the octane number of the gasoline from run number 24, but it is probably somewhat better than typical Fischer-Tropsch gasoline (approx. 50) and less than unleaded gasoline (approx. 88). The diesel fuel produced in run number 22 consisted of mostly straight chained paraffins and should be an excellent transportation fuel without further refining. The yield of transportation fuels from biomass via gasification and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with the ruthenium catalysts identified in the previous paragraph is somewhat less, on a Btu basis, than methanol (via gasification) and wood oil (PERC and LBL processes) yields from biomass. However, the products of the F-T synthesis are higher quality transportation fuels. The yield of transportation fuels via the F-T synthesis is similar to the yield of gasoline via methanol synthesis and the Mobil MTG process.

Baker, E.G.; Cuello, R.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - NREL to Showcase Renewable Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL to Showcase Renewable Electricity Generation Systems and Advanced NREL to Showcase Renewable Electricity Generation Systems and Advanced Vehicles at Denver Earth Day Fair April 18, 2013 The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will showcase two mobile renewable electricity generation systems and three advanced vehicles-a Toyota Highlander fuel cell electric vehicle, a plug-in Toyota Prius hybrid electric vehicle, and a Mitsubishi i-MiEV electric vehicle-at the Denver Earth Day Fair on April 22. The larger of NREL's two renewable electricity generation systems features a 12 kilowatt biodiesel-powered back-up generator as well as a 1.8 kilowatt photovoltaic array that taps into energy from the sun to produce renewable electricity, which will power the fair. The smaller system includes a 384

145

Intermodal transportation of spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

Concepts for transportation of spent fuel in rail casks from nuclear power plant sites with no rail service are under consideration by the US Department of Energy in the Commercial Spent Fuel Management program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report identifies and evaluates three alternative systems for intermodal transfer of spent fuel: heavy-haul truck to rail, barge to rail, and barge to heavy-haul truck. This report concludes that, with some modifications and provisions for new equipment, existing rail and marine systems can provide a transportation base for the intermodal transfer of spent fuel to federal interim storage facilities. Some needed land transportation support and loading and unloading equipment does not currently exist. There are insufficient shipping casks available at this time, but the industrial capability to meet projected needs appears adequate.

Elder, H.K.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Elastomer Compatibility Testing of Renewable Diesel Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study, the integrity and performance of six elastomers were tested with ethanol-diesel and biodiesel fuel blends.

Frame, E.; McCormick, R. L.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Bioethanol: Fueling sustainable transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ethanol made from biomass, or bioethanol, can positively impact the national energy security, the economy, and the environment. Producing and using bioethanol can help alleviate some of the negative impacts of the dependence on fossil fuels.

Neufeld, S.

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout Sustainable Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout Sustainable Transportation, May 2013.

149

Clean Energy: Fuel Cells, Batteries, Renewables - Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major areas of rapid advancement include fuel cells, wind, solar, and geothermal ... Hot Section Corrosion Issues in Microturbines Operating on B100 Bio-Diesel.

150

Methods of producing transportation fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing transportation fuel is described herein. The method for producing transportation fuel may include providing formation fluid having a boiling range distribution between -5.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process to a subsurface treatment facility. A liquid stream may be separated from the formation fluid. The separated liquid stream may be hydrotreated and then distilled to produce a distilled stream having a boiling range distribution between 150.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. The distilled liquid stream may be combined with one or more additives to produce transportation fuel.

Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Cherrillo, Ralph Anthony (Houston, TX); Bauldreay, Joanna M. (Chester, GB)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

151

Baylor University - Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Baylor University - Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center Address One Bear Place #97413 Place Waco, Texas Zip 76798 Region Texas Area Coordinates 31.496762°, -97.305664° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.496762,"lon":-97.305664,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

152

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

renewable.gif (4875 bytes) renewable.gif (4875 bytes) The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) consists of five distinct submodules that represent the major renewable energy technologies. Although it is described here, conventional hydroelectric is included in the Electricity Market Module (EMM) and is not part of the RFM. Similarly, ethanol modeling is included in the Petroleum Market Module (PMM). Some renewables, such as municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not require the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using wind, solar, and geothermal energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittence, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

153

Energy Basics: Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not...

154

INL Site Executable Plan for Energy and Transportation Fuels Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that sustainable energy and transportation fuels management will be integrated into DOE operations to meet obligations under Executive Order (EO) 13423 "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," the Instructions for Implementation of EO 13423, as well as Guidance Documents issued in accordance thereto and any modifcations or amendments that may be issued from time to time. In furtherance of this obligation, DOE established strategic performance-based energy and transportation fuels goals and strategies through the Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Initiative, which were incorporated into DOE Order 430.2B "Departmental Energy, Renewable energy, and Transportation Management" and were also identified in DOE Order 450.1A, "Environmental Protection Program." These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of energy and transportation fuels management into site Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

Ernest L. Fossum

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation Efficiency Fund  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fund is a non-lapsing fund managed by the Maine Department of Transportation to increase energy efficiency and reduce reliance on fossil fuels within the state's transportation...

156

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Transportation Plan  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Transportation State Transportation Plan to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Transportation Plan on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Transportation Plan on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Transportation Plan on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Transportation Plan on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Transportation Plan on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Transportation Plan on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type State Transportation Plan The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) must update the California Transportation Plan (Plan) by December 31, 2015, and every five

157

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources,...

158

Transportation fuels from biomass via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing  

SciTech Connect

Biomass is a renewable source of carbon, which could provide a means to reduce the greenhouse gas impact from fossil fuels in the transportation sector. Biomass is the only renewable source of liquid fuels, which could displace petroleum-derived products. Fast pyrolysis is a method of direct thermochemical conversion (non-bioconversion) of biomass to a liquid product. Although the direct conversion product, called bio-oil, is liquid; it is not compatible with the fuel handling systems currently used for transportation. Upgrading the product via catalytic processing with hydrogen gas, hydroprocessing, is a means that has been demonstrated in the laboratory. By this processing the bio-oil can be deoxygenated to hydrocarbons, which can be useful replacements of the hydrocarbon distillates in petroleum. While the fast pyrolysis of biomass is presently commercial, the upgrading of the liquid product by hydroprocessing remains in development, although it is moving out of the laboratory into scaled-up process demonstration systems.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2013-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

159

Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Clean Cities Program fact sheet describes aspects of flexible fuel vehicles such as use of E85, special features, benefits of use, costs, and fueling locations. It discusses performance and lists additional resources.

Not Available

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flexible Fuel vehicles are able to operate using more than one type of fuel. FFVs can be fueled with unleaded gasoline, E85, or any combination of the two. Today more than 7 million vehicles on U.S. highways are flexible fuel vehicles. The fact sheet discusses how E85 affects vehicle performance, the costs and benefits of using E85, and how to find E85 station locations.

Not Available

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Overview of An Analysis Project for Renewable Biogas / Fuel Cell Technologies (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on renewable biogas: as an opportunity for commercialization of fuel cells presented as part of a panel discussion at the 2009 Fuel Cell Seminar, Palm Springs, CA.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A.

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

162

A Biennially Renewable Fuel Resource: Woodchips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent genetic improvements with some tree species has given us hybrids that have disease resistance, rapid growth, and the ability to regenerate from the stump after harvest. Grown intensively these hybrids are capable of producing and storing a usable 250 mBTU per acre per year on a biennial harvest of the total tree. Employing the best of today's silvicultural techniques and boiler equipment each tree can produce a little more than one boiler horsepower per year. Utilizing non-prime lands for the production of 'hybrid poplars' one acre can generate the wood fuel equivalent of 40 barrels of oil ($8/bbl) or 2500 therms of natural gas ($0.13/therm) per year and can be harvested every other year. Beyond the economic and environmental benefits there are additional merits to be realized by growing your own woodfuel. Like money in the bank, fuel may be withdrawn from the forest bank 'as needed' while the reserves accrue growth. The nutrient rich ash 'remains' can be utilized to sustain the yield of an energy plantation. Unlike other alternative sources of energy that are capital intensive, 'growing your own woodfuel' is labor intensive. You can also receive significant forestry tax incentives; and, above all, you can avoid any fuel 'cartel'.

Krantz, B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Market Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States Niven Winchester, Dominic Mc on recycled paper #12;1 Market Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States Niven Winchester Administration (FAA) has a goal that one billion gallons of renewable jet fuel is consumed by the US aviation

164

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) consists of five distinct submodules that represent the major renewable energy technologies. Although it is described here, conventional hydroelectric is included in the Electricity Market Module (EMM) and is not part of the RFM. Similarly, ethanol modeling is included in the Petroleum Market Module (PMM). Some renewables, such as municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not require the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using wind, solar, and geothermal energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

165

Alternatives to traditional transportation fuels: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the first compilation by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of information on alternatives to gasoline and diesel fuel. The purpose of the report is: (1) to provide background information on alternative transportation fuels and replacement fuels compared with gasoline and diesel fuel, and (2) to furnish preliminary estimates of alternative transportation fuels and alternative fueled vehicles as required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), Title V, Section 503, ``Replacement Fuel Demand Estimates and Supply Information.`` Specifically, Section 503 requires the EIA to report annually on: (1) the number and type of alternative fueled vehicles in existence the previous year and expected to be in use the following year, (2) the geographic distribution of these vehicles, (3) the amounts and types of replacement fuels consumed, and (4) the greenhouse gas emissions likely to result from replacement fuel use. Alternative fueled vehicles are defined in this report as motorized vehicles licensed for on-road use, which may consume alternative transportation fuels. (Alternative fueled vehicles may use either an alternative transportation fuel or a replacement fuel.) The intended audience for the first section of this report includes the Secretary of Energy, the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the automobile manufacturing industry, the transportation fuel manufacturing and distribution industries, and the general public. The second section is designed primarily for persons desiring a more technical explanation of and background for the issues surrounding alternative transportation fuels.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Clean Cities fact sheet describing aspects of flexible fuel vehicles such as use of E85, special features, benefits of use, costs, and fueling locations. It includes discussion on performance and how to identify these vehicles as well as listing additional resources.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Transportation of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. industrys limited efforts at licensing transportation packages characterized as high-capacity, or containing high-burnup (>45 GWd/MTU) commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), or both, have not been successful considering existing spent-fuel inventories that will have to be eventually transported. A holistic framework is proposed for resolving several CSNF transportation issues. The framework considers transportation risks, spent-fuel and cask-design features, and defense-in-depth in context of pre...

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

168

Transportation Energy Futures: Project Overview and Findings (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation currently accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum use and 33% of the Transportation currently accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum use and 33% of the nation's total carbon emissions. Energy-efficient transportation strategies and renewable fuels have the potential to simultaneously reduce petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examines how a combination of multiple strategies could achieve deep reductions in petroleum use and GHG emissions. The project's primary objective is to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an emphasis on underexplored opportunities related to energy efficiency

169

Transportation Services Fueling Operation Transportation Services has installed a software system that will facilitate fueling of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Services Fueling Operation Transportation Services has installed a software system into this system. All University vehicles that wish to fuel at UH M noa Transportation Services will be required the application below and submit your application to Transportation Services before attempting to fuel your

170

Jet Fuel from Microalgal Lipids; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probably our most pressing energy need is Probably our most pressing energy need is to develop domestic, renewable substitutes for imported transportation fuel. Ethanol made from starch or sugar such as corn grain already displaces about 2% of gasoline and making it from cellulosic biomass will allow much greater displacement. Biodiesel made from oil crops such as soybeans can displace some of our diesel use. Unfortunately, neither of these biofuels can help supply jet fuel, for which energy density and low-temperature fuel properties are critical. Ethanol is not dense enough having only about half the energy per volume of jet fuel. Biodiesel has about 80% the energy density of kerosene, but can solidify at the low temperatures of high altitude flight. In

171

Lessons Learned from Alternative Transportation Fuels: Modeling Transition Dynamics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Lessons Learned from Lessons Learned from Alternative Transportation Fuels: Modeling Transition Dynamics C. Welch Technical Report NREL/TP-540-39446 February 2006 Lessons Learned from Alternative Transportation Fuels: Modeling Transition Dynamics C. Welch Prepared under Task Nos. HS04.2000 and HS06.1002 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-39446 February 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

172

Center for Renewable Energy and Alternative Transportation Technologies (CREATT)  

SciTech Connect

The Center for Renewable Energy and Alternative Transportation Technologies (CREATT) was established to advance the state of the art in knowledge and education on critical technologies that support a renewable energy future. Our research and education efforts have focused on alternative energy systems, energy storage systems, and research on battery and hybrid energy storage systems.This report details the Center's progress in the following specific areas: Development of a battery laboratory; Development of a demonstration system for compressed air energy storage; Development of electric propulsion test systems; Battery storage systems; Thermal management of battery packs; and Construction of a micro-grid to support real-world performance monitoring of a renewable energy system.

Mackin, Thomas

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

173

Center for Renewable Energy and Alternative Transportation Technologies (CREATT)  

SciTech Connect

The Center for Renewable Energy and Alternative Transportation Technologies (CREATT) was established to advance the state of the art in knowledge and education on critical technologies that support a renewable energy future. Our research and education efforts have focused on alternative energy systems, energy storage systems, and research on battery and hybrid energy storage systems.This report details the Center's progress in the following specific areas: Development of a battery laboratory; Development of a demonstration system for compressed air energy storage; Development of electric propulsion test systems; Battery storage systems; Thermal management of battery packs; and Construction of a micro-grid to support real-world performance monitoring of a renewable energy system.

Mackin, Thomas

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

Opportunities for the Use of Renewable Energy in Road Transport | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Opportunities for the Use of Renewable Energy in Road Transport Opportunities for the Use of Renewable Energy in Road Transport Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Opportunities for the Use of Renewable Energy in Road Transport Agency/Company /Organization: Renewable Energy Technology Deployment Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Transportation Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: www.iea-retd.org/files/RETRANS_PolicyMakersReport_final.pdf Opportunities for the Use of Renewable Energy in Road Transport Screenshot References: Opportunities for the Use of Renewable Energy in Road Transport[1] "This report discusses the current state of the art of the use of options for using renewable energies in road transport, and explores possible

175

Is Methanol the Transportation Fuel of the Future?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Comparative Analysis of Future Transportation Fuels," UCB-Press plc THE TRANSPORTATION FUTURE? FUEL OF THE DANIELPurdue University, "Transportation Energy Futures; Paths of

Sperling, Daniel; DeLuchi, Mark A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuelsl Module Renewable Fuelsl Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Renewable Fuels Module Figure 11. Renewable Fuels Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Renewable Fuels Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The renewable fuels module (RFM) represents renewable energy resoures and large–scale technologies used for grid-connected U.S. electricity supply (Figure 11). Since most renewables (biomass, conventional hydroelectricity, geothermal, landfill gas, solar photovoltaics, solar thermal, and wind) are used to generate electricity, the RFM primarily interacts with the electricity market module (EMM). New renewable energy generating capacity is either model–determined or

177

Powering Cell Phones with Fuel Cells Running on Renewable Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major goals of this project were to increase lifetime, increase energy density, and reduce material costs. The combination of identifying corrosion resistant materials and changing catalysts increased lifetimes. Work to increase the energy density included increasing the concentration of the formic acid fuel from 12M (ca. 50 wt%) to 22M (ca. 85 wt%) and decreasing the amount of fuel crossing over. The largest expense of the device is the cathode catalyst. At the beginning of the project Pt loading was over 8 mg/cm2 on our cathodes. Through optimization work we managed to bring down the cathode loading to approximately half of what we started with.

Dr. Ruiming Zhang

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Methods of making transportation fuel  

SciTech Connect

A method for producing alkylated hydrocarbons is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce at least a second gas stream including hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3. The first gas stream and the second gas stream are introduced into an alkylation unit to produce alkylated hydrocarbons. At least a portion of the olefins in the first gas stream enhance alkylation. The alkylated hydrocarbons may be blended with one or more components to produce transportation fuel.

Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Muylle, Michel Serge Marie (Houston, TX); Mandema, Remco Hugo (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

Energy Basics: Propane as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Propane Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Vehicles Propane as a Transportation Fuel Photo of a man standing next to a propane fuel pump with a tank in the background....

180

Energy Basics: Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Propane Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Vehicles Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy Basics: Propane as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Propane as a Transportation Fuel Photo of a man standing next to a propane fuel pump with a tank in the background. Propane, also known as liquefied petroleum...

182

EA-1573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the 573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site, Golden, CO EA-1573-S1: Proposed Renewable Fuel Heat Plant Improvements at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site, Golden, CO DOE's Golden Field Office has prepared a draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) for proposed improvements to the Renewable Fuel Heat Plant (RFHP) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain site. The SEA analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed improvements tot he RFHP consisting of construction and operation of an onsite woodchip fuel storage silo and an expansion of woodchip fuel sources to a regional scale.

183

Direct Conversion of Biomass into Transportation Fuels  

Direct Conversion of Biomass into Transportation Fuels . Return to Marketing Summary. Skip footer navigation to end of page. Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S ...

184

Energy Basics: Electricity as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Electricity as a Transportation Fuel Electricity used to power vehicles is generally provided by the electricity grid and stored in the vehicle's batteries....

185

Energy Basics: Electricity as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Propane Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Vehicles Electricity as a Transportation Fuel Electricity used to power vehicles is generally provided by the electricity grid and...

186

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels standard requires 36 billion gallons of renewable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels standard requires 36 billion gallons of renewable fuels be used annually by 2022, which allows continued

187

Integrated transport and renewable energy systems B. V. Mathiesen*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the implementation of transport technologies, though, the various technologies ­ such as bioethanol, battery electric. Improved energy conversion technologies with high temperature fuel cells such as SOFCs (Solid oxide fuel,78 - bioethanol 0,00 0,00 0,00 21,27 - electricity 0,00 0,00 0,00 3,16 3,16 Railroad 3,82 -6 3,60 10 3,23 5,61 5

188

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Power Pool Area Northwest Power Pool Area Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 118, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. This dataset contains data for the northwest power pool area of the U.S. Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Northwest Power Pool Area Renewable Energy Generation WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Northwest Power Pool Area - Reference (xls, 119.3 KiB)

189

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Island Long Island Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 104, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Long Island Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Long Island- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

190

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 108, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Reliability First Corporation Renewable Energy Generation West Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / West- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

191

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockies Rockies Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 119, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. The dataset contains data for the Rockies region of WECC. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Rockies WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Rockies- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB)

192

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California California Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 117, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO California EIA Renewable Energy Generation Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / California (xls, 119.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

193

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upstate New York Upstate New York Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 105, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Upstate New York Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Upstate New York- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

194

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delta Delta Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 109, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Delta EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Delta- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

195

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Virginia-Carolina Virginia-Carolina Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 113, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Carolina EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Virginia Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

196

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeastern Southeastern Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 111, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Southeastern Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Southeastern- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

197

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East East Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 106, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released July 25th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO East EIA Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / East- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

198

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southwest Southwest Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 116, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Southwest Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Southwest (xls, 119.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

199

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan Michigan Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 107, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Michigan Reliability First Corporation Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / Michigan- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

200

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen August 19, 2013 - 5:45pm Addthis Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not widely used today as a transportation fuel, government and industry research and development are working toward the goal of clean, economical, and safe hydrogen production and hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles. Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the universe. However, it is rarely found alone in nature. Hydrogen is locked up in enormous quantities in water (H2O), hydrocarbons (such as methane, CH4), and other organic matter. Efficiently producing hydrogen from these compounds is one of the challenges of using hydrogen as a fuel. Currently,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen August 19, 2013 - 5:45pm Addthis Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not widely used today as a transportation fuel, government and industry research and development are working toward the goal of clean, economical, and safe hydrogen production and hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles. Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the universe. However, it is rarely found alone in nature. Hydrogen is locked up in enormous quantities in water (H2O), hydrocarbons (such as methane, CH4), and other organic matter. Efficiently producing hydrogen from these compounds is one of the challenges of using hydrogen as a fuel. Currently,

202

Sustainable Transportation, Continuum Magazine, Fall 2013 / Issue 5 (Book), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

L L L 2 0 1 3 / I S S U E 5 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL.GOV/CONTINUUM S U S T A I N A B L E T R A N S P O R T A T I O N 2 Continuum DAN SAYS TRANSFORMING TRANSPORTATION This issue of Continuum focuses on our contributions toward creating a sustainable transportation system-from developing more efficient electric and hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles to inventing technologies and processes for producing biofuel alternatives to gasoline, diesel, and even jet fuel. In some ways, the challenges we face in transforming our nation's vehicle

203

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pittsburgh Livery Company Transports  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Pittsburgh Livery Pittsburgh Livery Company Transports Customers in Alternative Fuel Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pittsburgh Livery Company Transports Customers in Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pittsburgh Livery Company Transports Customers in Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pittsburgh Livery Company Transports Customers in Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pittsburgh Livery Company Transports Customers in Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pittsburgh Livery Company Transports Customers in Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pittsburgh

204

Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

205

Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.  

SciTech Connect

At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

Wang, M. Q.

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

206

Alternatives to traditional transportation fuels 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interest in alternative transportation fuels (ATF`s) has increased in recent years due to the drives for cleaner air and less dependence upon foreign oil. This report, Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels 1996, provides information on ATFs, as well as the vehicles that consume them.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Florida Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Reliability Florida Reliability Coordinating Council Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 99, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released July 20th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Florida Fuel Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Florida Reliability Coordinating Council- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

208

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NYC-Westchester NYC-Westchester Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 103, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Westchester Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

209

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 101, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel midwest Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council / West- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

210

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Texas Regional Entity |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas Regional Entity Texas Regional Entity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 98, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Texas Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Texas Regional Entity- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

211

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East East Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 100, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel midwest Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council / East- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

212

Converting syncrudes to transportation fuels: Appendix 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Syncrudes derived from oil shale and those produced in direct coal liquefaction processes can be converted to transportation fuels using modern commercial hydroprocessing technology. Upgrading routes typically consist of hydrogen addition and removal of heteroatom and inorganic impurities. This paper reviews refining routes and discusses the properties of finished transportation fuel products (gasoline, jet fuel, diesel) produced from syncrudes. Fuels produced from bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, and lignite are contrasted with those produced from oil shale and petroleum. Transportation fuels from shale oil resemble those from waxy petroleum crudes. Upgraded products from liquids made in H-Coal, EDS, and SRC-II direct coal liquefaction processes are low in paraffin content and consist mainly of cyclic hydrocarbons. As a result, the latter have some unusual and desirable properties for transportation fuels. 14 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

Sullivan, R.F.; O'Rear, D.J.; Frumkin, H.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Transportation implications of a closed fuel cycle.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transportation for each step of a closed fuel cycle is analyzed in consideration of the availability of appropriate transportation infrastructure. The United States has both experience and certified casks for transportation that may be required by this cycle, except for the transport of fresh and used MOX fuel and fresh and used Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) fuel. Packaging that had been used for other fuel with somewhat similar characteristics may be appropriate for these fuels, but would be inefficient. Therefore, the required neutron and gamma shielding, heat dissipation, and criticality were calculated for MOX and ABR fresh and spent fuel. Criticality would not be an issue, but the packaging design would need to balance neutron shielding and regulatory heat dissipation requirements.

Bullard, Tim (University of Nevada - Reno); Bays, Samuel (Idaho National Laboratory); Dennis, Matthew L.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Dixon, Brent (Idaho National Laboratory); Greiner, Miles (University of Nevada - Reno)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Impacts of Renewable Fuel and Electricity Standards on State Economies (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

This poster, submitted for the CU Energy Initiative/NREL Symposium on October 3, discusses the impacts of renewable fuel and electricity standards on state economies.

Brown, E.; Cory, K.; Brown, J.; Bird, L.; Sweezey, B.

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

215

Impacts of renewable fuel regulation and production on agriculture, energy, and welfare.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this dissertation is to study the impact of U.S. federal renewable fuel regulations on energy and agriculture commodity markets and welfare. We (more)

Mcphail, Lihong Lu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Impact of Renewable Fuels Standard/MTBE Provisions of S. 517 Requested by Sens. Daschle & Murkowski  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Additional analysis of the impact of the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban provisions of S. 517.

Information Center

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Impact of Renewable Fuels Standard/MTBE Provisions of S.1766  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SR/OIAF/2002-06 Release date: March 2002 This report analyzes the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS)/methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) provisions of S. 1766.

218

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the more-polluting fossil fuels being consumed abroaddomestic fuel consumers and fossil fuel suppliers. Numericalequivalent quantity of fossil fuel but may replace more or

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Solid fuel applications to transportation engines  

SciTech Connect

The utilization of solid fuels as alternatives to liquid fuels for future transportation engines is reviewed. Alternative liquid fuels will not be addressed nor will petroleum/solid fuel blends except for the case of diesel engines. With respect to diesel engines, coal/oil mixtures will be addressed because of the high interest in this specific application as a result of the large number of diesel engines currently in transportation use. Final assessments refer to solid fuels only for diesel engines. The technical assessments of solid fuels utilization for transportation engines is summarized: solid fuel combustion in transportation engines is in a non-developed state; highway transportation is not amenable to solid fuels utilization due to severe environmental, packaging, control, and disposal problems; diesel and open-cycle gas turbines do not appear worthy of further development, although coal/oil mixtures for slow speed diesels may offer some promise as a transition technology; closed-cycle gas turbines show some promise for solid fuels utilization for limited applications as does the Stirling engine for use of cleaner solid fuels; Rankine cycle engines show good potential for limited applications, such as for locomotives and ships; and any development program will require large resources and sophisticated equipment in order to advance the state-of-the-art.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Renewable and Natural Gas Electricity Contracts: Afor Fuel Price Risk: Using Forward Natural Gas PricesInstead of Gas Price Forecasts to Compare Renewable to Gas-

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Sustainable Transportation (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment SFTRA Overview Contents Project and review teams Purpose and goals Basic methodology...

223

Electricity as a Transportation Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity as a Transportation Fuel Electricity as a Transportation Fuel August 19, 2013 - 5:44pm Addthis Electricity used to power vehicles is generally provided by the...

224

Alternatives to traditional transportation fuels 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, gasoline and diesel fuel have accounted for about 80 percent of total transportation fuel and nearly all of the fuel used in on-road vehicles. Growing concerns about the environmental effects of fossil fuel use and the Nation`s high level of dependence on foreign oil are providing impetus for the development of replacements or alternatives for these traditional transportation fuels. (The Energy Policy Act of 1992 definitions of {open_quotes}replacement{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}alternative{close_quotes} fuels are presented in the following box.) The Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) and the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) are significant legislative forces behind the growth of replacement fuel use. Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels 1993 provides the number of on-road alternative fueled vehicles in use in the United States, alternative and replacement fuel consumption, and information on greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the production, delivery, and use of replacement fuels for 1992, 1993, and 1995.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

SEU43 fuel bundle shielding analysis during spent fuel transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic task accomplished by the shielding calculations in a nuclear safety analysis consist in radiation doses calculation, in order to prevent any risks both for personnel protection and impact on the environment during the spent fuel manipulation, transport and storage. The paper investigates the effects induced by fuel bundle geometry modifications on the CANDU SEU spent fuel shielding analysis during transport. For this study, different CANDU-SEU43 fuel bundle projects, developed in INR Pitesti, have been considered. The spent fuel characteristics will be obtained by means of ORIGEN-S code. In order to estimate the corresponding radiation doses for different measuring points the Monte Carlo MORSE-SGC code will be used. Both codes are included in ORNL's SCALE 5 programs package. A comparison between the considered SEU43 fuel bundle projects will be also provided, with CANDU standard fuel bundle taken as reference. (authors)

Margeanu, C. A.; Ilie, P.; Olteanu, G. [Inst. for Nuclear Research Pitesti, No. 1 Campului Street, Mioveni 115400, Arges County (Romania)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity August 19, 2013 - 5:44pm Addthis Electricity used to power vehicles is generally provided by the electricity grid and stored in the vehicle's batteries. Fuel cells are being explored as a way to use electricity generated on board the vehicle to power electric motors. Unlike batteries, fuel cells convert chemical energy from hydrogen into electricity. Vehicles that run on electricity have no tailpipe emissions. Emissions that can be attributed to electric vehicles are generated in the electricity production process at the power plant. Home recharging of electric vehicles is as simple as plugging them into an electric outlet. Electricity fueling costs for electric vehicles are

227

Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation: An Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent nuclear fuel comprises a fraction of the hazardous materials packages shipped annually in the United States. In fact, at the present time, fewer than 100 packages of spent nuclear fuel are shipped annually. At the onset of spent fuel shipments to the proposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada, repository, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) expects to ship 400 - 500 spent fuel transport casks per year over the life of the facility. This study summarizes work on transportation cask design and testing, regulato...

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

228

Fuel cell system for transportation applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A propulsion system is described for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell and receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and uses water and air for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor. 3 figures.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

229

Fuel cell system for transportation applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A propulsion system for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and water and air and for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel with water and air in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor.

Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Ahmed, Shabbir (Evanston, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Myles, Kevin M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Improved fuel cell system for transportation applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a propulsion system for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and water and air and for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel with water and air in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, M.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Climate policy and the airline industry : emissions trading and renewable jet fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I assess the impact of the current EU Emissions Trading Scheme and a hypothetical renewable jet fuel mandate on US airlines. I find that both the EU Scheme up until 2020 and a renewable jet fuel mandate of ...

McConnachie, D. (Dominic Alistair)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 112, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords undefined Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Central- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

233

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gateway Gateway Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 110, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Gateway Reliability First Corporation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011:Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Gateway- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

234

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast Northeast Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 102, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Northeast Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Northeast- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

235

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Modeling Transport Modeling Working Group to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on AddThis.com... Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Accomplishments Organization Chart & Contacts Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation

236

RECENT TRENDS IN EMERGING TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abundance of energy can be improved both by developing new sources of fuel and by improving efficiency of energy utilization, although we really need to pursue both paths to improve energy accessibility in the future. Currently, 2.7 billion people or 38% of the world s population do not have access to modern cooking fuel and depend on wood or dung and 1.4 billion people or 20% do not have access to electricity. It is estimated that correcting these deficiencies will require an investment of $36 billion dollars annually through 2030. In growing economies, energy use and economic growth are strongly linked, but energy use generally grows at a lower rate due to increased access to modern fuels and adaptation of modern, more efficient technology. Reducing environmental impacts of increased energy consumption such as global warming or regional emissions will require improved technology, renewable fuels, and CO2 reuse or sequestration. The increase in energy utilization will probably result in increased transportation fuel diversity as fuels are shaped by availability of local resources, world trade, and governmental, environmental, and economic policies. The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the recently emerging trends, but not to suggest winners. This paper will focus on liquid transportation fuels, which provide the highest energy density and best match with existing vehicles and infrastructure. Data is taken from a variety of US, European, and other sources without an attempt to normalize or combine the various data sources. Liquid transportation fuels can be derived from conventional hydrocarbon resources (crude oil), unconventional hydrocarbon resources (oil sands or oil shale), and biological feedstocks through a variety of biochemical or thermo chemical processes, or by converting natural gas or coal to liquids.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Orleans Provides Green Transportation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Orleans Provides Orleans Provides Green Transportation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Orleans Provides Green Transportation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Orleans Provides Green Transportation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Orleans Provides Green Transportation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Orleans Provides Green Transportation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Orleans Provides Green Transportation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Orleans Provides Green Transportation on AddThis.com... March 19, 2011 New Orleans Provides Green Transportation D iscover how New Orleans provides green transportation with electric street

238

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Advanced Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion The California Alternative Energy and Advanced Transportation Financing

239

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biobased Biobased Transportation Research Funding to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biobased Transportation Research Funding The Surface Transportation Research, Development, and Deployment (STRDD)

240

Progress in fuel cells for transportation applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current and projected states of development of fuel cells are described in terms of availability, performance, and cost. The applicability of various fuel cell types to the transportation application is discussed, and projections of power densities, weights, and volumes of fuel cell systems are made into the early 1990s. Research currently being done to advance fuel cells for vehicular application is described. A summary of near-term design parameters for a fuel cell transit line is given, including bus performance requirements, fuel cell power plant configuration, and battery peaking requirements. The objective of this paper is to determine a fuel cell technology suitable for near-term use as a vehicular power plant. The emphasis of the study is on indirect methanol fuel cell systems.

Murray, H.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Alternatives to traditional transportation fuels 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides information on transportation fuels other than gasoline and diesel, and the vehicles that use these fuels. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) provides this information to support the U.S. Department of Energy`s reporting obligations under Section 503 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT). The principal information contained in this report includes historical and year-ahead estimates of the following: (1) the number and type of alterative-fueled vehicles (AFV`s) in use; (2) the consumption of alternative transportation fuels and {open_quotes}replacement fuels{close_quotes}; and (3) the number and type of alterative-fueled vehicles made available in the current and following years. In addition, the report contains some material on special topics. The appendices include a discussion of the methodology used to develop the estimates (Appendix A), a map defining geographic regions used, and a list of AFV suppliers.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Liquid Transportation Fuels from Coal and Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid Transportation Fuels from Coal and Biomass Technological Status, Costs, and Environmental Katzer #12;CHARGE TO THE ALTF PANEL · Evaluate technologies for converting biomass and coal to liquid for liquid fuels produced from coal or biomass. · Evaluate environmental, economic, policy, and social

243

Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

as a Transportation Fuel Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel August 19, 2013 - 5:45pm Addthis Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from...

244

Propane as a Transportation Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

as a Transportation Fuel Propane as a Transportation Fuel July 30, 2013 - 4:31pm Addthis Photo of a man standing next to a propane fuel pump with a tank in the background. Propane,...

245

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Local and Public Transportation Fleet  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Local and Public Local and Public Transportation Fleet Alternative Fuel Study to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Local and Public Transportation Fleet Alternative Fuel Study on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Local and Public Transportation Fleet Alternative Fuel Study on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Local and Public Transportation Fleet Alternative Fuel Study on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Local and Public Transportation Fleet Alternative Fuel Study on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Local and Public Transportation Fleet Alternative Fuel Study on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Local and Public Transportation Fleet Alternative Fuel Study on AddThis.com...

246

Liquid Fuel From Renewable Electricity and Bacteria: Electro-Autotrophic Synthesis of Higher Alcohols  

SciTech Connect

Electrofuels Project: UCLA is utilizing renewable electricity to power direct liquid fuel production in genetically engineered Ralstonia eutropha bacteria. UCLA is using renewable electricity to convert carbon dioxide into formic acid, a liquid soluble compound that delivers both carbon and energy to the bacteria. The bacteriaare genetically engineered to convert the formic acid into liquid fuelin this case alcohols such as butanol. The electricity required for the process can be generated from sunlight, wind, or other renewable energy sources. In fact, UCLAs electricity-to-fuel system could be a more efficient way to utilize these renewable energy sources considering the energy density of liquid fuel is much higher than the energy density of other renewable energy storage options, such as batteries.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind.112 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost energy storage systems.

248

Heated transportable fuel cell cartridges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell stack protective system is made where a plurality of fuel cells, each containing liquid electrolyte subject to crystallization, is enclosed by a containing vessel, and where at least one electric heater is placed in the containing vessel and is capable of preventing electrolyte crystallization.

Lance, Joseph R. (N. Huntingdon, PA); Spurrier, Francis R. (Whitehall, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Transportation Electrification Load Development For A Renewable Future Analysis: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transition to electricity as a transportation fuel will create a new load for electricity generation. A set of regional hourly load profiles for electrified vehicles was developed for the 2010 to 2050 timeframe. The transportation electrical energy was determined using regional population forecast data, historical vehicle per capita data, and market penetration growth functions to determine the number of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in each analysis region. Market saturation scenarios of 30% and 50% of sales of PEVs consuming on average approx. 6 kWh per day were considered. PEV aggregate load profiles from previous work were combined with vehicle population data to generate hourly loads on a regional basis. A transition from consumer-controlled charging toward utility-controlled charging was assumed such that by 2050 approximately 45% of the transportation energy demands could be delivered across four daily time slices under optimal control from the utility?s perspective. This electrified transportation analysis resulted in an estimate for both the flexible load and fixed load shapes on a regional basis that may evolve under two PEV market penetration scenarios.

Markel, T.; Mai, T.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Soybean-Derived Biodiesel and Renewable Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study, we used Argonne National Laboratory's Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model to assess the life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts of four soybean-derived fuels: biodiesel fuel produced via transesterification, two renewable diesel fuels (I and II) produced from different hydrogenation processes, and renewable gasoline produced from catalytic cracking. Five approaches were employed to allocate the coproducts: a displacement approach; two allocation approaches, one based on the energy value and the other based on the market value; and two hybrid approaches that integrated the displacement and allocation methods. The relative rankings of soybean-based fuels in terms of energy and environmental impacts were different under the different approaches, and the reasons were analyzed. Results from the five allocation approaches showed that although the production and combustion of soybean-based fuels might increase total energy use, they could have significant benefits in reducing fossil energy use (>52%), petroleum use (>88%), and GHG emissions (>57%) relative to petroleum fuels. This study emphasized the importance of the methods used to deal with coproduct issues and provided a comprehensive solution for conducting a life-cycle assessment of fuel pathways with multiple coproducts.

Huo, H.; Wang, M.; Bloyd, C.; Putsche, V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) - 2002 EIA Models Directory  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The RFM consists of five analytical submodules that represent major renewable energy resources landfill gas, wind energy, solar, biomass, and ...

252

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Energy Plan Transportation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Agency Energy State Agency Energy Plan Transportation Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Energy Plan Transportation Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Energy Plan Transportation Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Energy Plan Transportation Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Energy Plan Transportation Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Energy Plan Transportation Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Energy Plan Transportation Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

253

Renewable utility-scale electricity production differs by fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy.

254

RINs and RVOs are used to implement the Renewable Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ...

255

U.S. ethanol production and the Renewable Fuel Standard ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ...

256

Driving it home: choosing the right path for fueling North America's transportation future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

North America faces an energy crossroads. With the world fast approaching the end of cheap, plentiful conventional oil, we must choose between developing ever-dirtier sources of fossil fuels -- at great cost to our health and environment -- or setting a course for a more sustainable energy future of clean, renewable fuels. This report explores the full scale of the damage done by attempts to extract oil from liquid coal, oil shale, and tar sands; examines the risks for investors of gambling on these dirty fuel sources; and lays out solutions for guiding us toward a cleaner fuel future. Table of contents: Executive Summary; Chapter 1: Transportation Fuel at a Crossroads; Chapter 2: Canadian Tar Sands: Scraping the Bottom of the Barrel in Endangered Forests; Chapter 3: Oil Shale Extraction: Drilling Through the American West; Chapter 4: Liquid Coal: A 'Clean Fuel' Mirage; Chapter 5: The Investment Landscape: Dirty Fuels Are Risky Business; Chapter 6: The Clean Path for Transportation and Conclusion.

Ann Bordetsky; Susan Casey-Lefkowitz; Deron Lovaas; Elizabeth Martin-Perera; Melanie Nakagawa; Bob Randall; Dan Woynillowicz

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transportation and Stationary Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop On October 27, 2008, more than 55 participants from industry, state and federal government, utilities, national laboratories, and other groups met to discuss the topic of integrating stationary fuel cell combined heat and power (CHP) systems and hydrogen production infrastructure for vehicles. The workshop was co-hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Fuel Cell Council, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and was held in conjunction with the Fuel Cell Seminar in Phoenix, Arizona. Plenary presentations provided an overview of the integration concept and perspective on the opportunity from federal, state and industry organizations. Workshop participants met in breakout sessions to consider the potential to leverage early hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure requirements by co-producing hydrogen in stationary fuel cell CHP applications at select facilities (e.g., military bases, postal facilities, airports, hospitals, etc.). The efficiency, reliability, and emissions benefits of these CHP systems have the potential to offset the up-front capital costs and financial risks associated with producing hydrogen for early vehicle markets.

258

Fuel cell assembly with electrolyte transport  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell assembly wherein electrolyte for filling the fuel cell matrix is carried via a transport system comprising a first passage means for conveying electrolyte through a first plate and communicating with a groove in a second plate at a first point, the first and second plates together sandwiching the matrix, and second passage means acting to carry electrolyte exclusively through the second plate and communicating with the groove at a second point exclusive of the first point.

Chi, Chang V. (Brookfield, CT)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Analysis of Fuel Ethanol Transportation Activity and Potential Distribution Constraints  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an analysis of fuel ethanol transportation activity and potential distribution constraints if the total 36 billion gallons of renewable fuel use by 2022 is mandated by EPA under the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. Ethanol transport by domestic truck, marine, and rail distribution systems from ethanol refineries to blending terminals is estimated using Oak Ridge National Laboratory s (ORNL s) North American Infrastructure Network Model. Most supply and demand data provided by EPA were geo-coded and using available commercial sources the transportation infrastructure network was updated. The percentage increases in ton-mile movements by rail, waterways, and highways in 2022 are estimated to be 2.8%, 0.6%, and 0.13%, respectively, compared to the corresponding 2005 total domestic flows by various modes. Overall, a significantly higher level of future ethanol demand would have minimal impacts on transportation infrastructure. However, there will be spatial impacts and a significant level of investment required because of a considerable increase in rail traffic from refineries to ethanol distribution terminals.

Das, Sujit [ORNL; Peterson, Bruce E [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

On the Path to Low Cost Renewable Fuels, an Important Breakthrough |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On the Path to Low Cost Renewable Fuels, an Important Breakthrough On the Path to Low Cost Renewable Fuels, an Important Breakthrough On the Path to Low Cost Renewable Fuels, an Important Breakthrough April 18, 2013 - 4:10pm Addthis NREL Scientist Bryon Donohoe looks at different views of ultra structures of pre-treated biomass materials in the Cellular Visualization room of the Biomass Surface Characterization Lab. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL. NREL Scientist Bryon Donohoe looks at different views of ultra structures of pre-treated biomass materials in the Cellular Visualization room of the Biomass Surface Characterization Lab. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL. A researcher examines a strain of the fermentation microorganism Zymomonas mobilis on a culture plate. NREL has genetically engineered and patented its own strains of Zymomonas mobilis to more effectively ferment the multiple sugars found in biomass as part of the cellulosic ethanol-to-renewable fuel conversion process. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Market Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has a goal that one billion gallons of renewable jet fuel is consumed by the US aviation industry each year from 2018. We examine the cost to US airlines of meeting this goal ...

Winchester, N.

262

What Has the Federal Renewable Fuels Standard Accomplished - A National Perspective (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides an overview of the nation's biofuels industry accomplishments and a perspective on the challenges and implications of reaching goals set in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

Schwab, A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

A techno-economic and environmental assessment of hydroprocessed renewable distillate fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a model to quantify the economic costs and environmental impacts of producing fuels from hydroprocessed renewable oils (HRO) process. Aspen Plus was used to model bio-refinery operations and supporting ...

Pearlson, Matthew Noah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

What Has the Federal Renewable Fuels Standard Accomplished - A National Perspective (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides an overview of the nation's biofuels industry accomplishments and a perspective on the challenges and implications of reaching goals set in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

Schwab, A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Few transportation fuels surpass the energy densities of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy density and the cost, weight, and size of onboard energy storage are important characteristics of fuels for transportation. Fuels that require ...

266

Fuels Performance Group: Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems  

SciTech Connect

Describes R&D and analysis in advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum-based transportation fuels done by NREL's Fuels Performance Group.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Fuels Performance Group: Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Describes R&D and analysis in advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum-based transportation fuels done by NREL's Fuels Performance Group.

Not Available

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Reports Increase in Durability and Reliability for Current Generation Fuel Cell Buses (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

869 * November 2010 869 * November 2010 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Reports Increase in Durability and Reliability for Current Generation Fuel Cell Buses NREL Team: Hydrogen Technology Validation, Leslie Eudy Accomplishment: NREL recently reported an increase in durability and reliability for fuel cell systems demonstrated in transit service (first reported in July 2010). Context: The transit industry provides an excellent test-bed for developing and optimizing advanced transportation technologies, such as fuel cells. In coordination with the Federal Transit Administration, the Department of Energy (DOE) funds the evaluation of fuel cell buses (FCBs) in real-world service. Under this funding, NREL has collected and analyzed data on nine early generation FCBs operated by four transit agencies in the United States.

269

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - NREL to Showcase Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version NREL to Showcase Renewable Electricity Generation Systems and Advanced Vehicles at Denver Earth Day Fair April 18,...

270

Renewable utility-scale electricity production differs by fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... For non-hydro renewables, the 2011 generation share ranges from less than 1% in Alaska, Ohio, Alabama, and Kentucky, ...

271

Renewable wood fuel: Fuel feed system for a pulverized coal boiler. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates a pilot test program conducted by New York State Gas & Electric Corporation to evaluate the feasibility of co-firing a pulverized coal plant with renewable wood fuels. The goal was to establish that such a co-firing system can reduce air emissions while maintaining good operational procedures and cost controls. The test fuel feed system employed at Greenidge Station`s Boiler 6 was shown to be effective in feeding wood products. Emission results were promising and an economic analysis indicates that it will be beneficial to pursue further refinements to the equipment and systems. The report recommends further evaluation of the generation and emission impacts using woods of varied moisture contents and at varied Btu input rates to determine if a drying system would be a cost-effective option.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Techno-Economic Analysis of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Transportation Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Transportation Fuels Mark M. Wright, Justinus A. Satrio, and Robert C. Brown Iowa State University Daren E. Daugaard ConocoPhillips Company David D. Hsu National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-46586 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Techno-Economic Analysis of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Transportation Fuels Mark M. Wright, Justinus A. Satrio, and Robert C. Brown Iowa State University

273

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of current and near-future transportation fuel production inof current and future transportation fuel production in theof existing and near-future transportation fuel production

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Renewable & Alternative Fuels - Analysis & Projections - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (formerly shown in Table 5) was obtained from the Alternative Fuels Data Center (http://www.eere.energy.gov/afdc/fuels/stations_counts.html). ...

275

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Fuel Cell Water Transport Mechanism  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Transport Mechanism Project Summary Full Title: Neutron Imaging Study of the Water Transport Mechanism in a Working Fuel Cell Project ID: 183 Principal Investigator: Muhammad...

276

Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation fuel. About one third of the natural gas used in the United States goes to residential and commercial uses, one third to industrial uses, and one third to electric power production.

277

Fuel Chemistry Preprints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Papers are presented under the following symposia titles: advances in fuel cell research; biorefineries - renewable fuels and chemicals; chemistry of fuels and emerging fuel technologies; fuel processing for hydrogen production; membranes for energy and fuel applications; new progress in C1 chemistry; research challenges for the hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage; SciMix fuel chemistry; and ultraclean transportation fuels.

NONE

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

278

Fuel Cell System for Transportation -- 2005 Cost Estimate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Independent review report of the methodology used by TIAX to estimate the cost of producing PEM fuel cells using 2005 cell stack technology. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Manager asked the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to commission an independent review of the 2005 TIAX cost analysis for fuel cell production. The NREL Systems Integrator is responsible for conducting independent reviews of progress toward meeting the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) technical targets. An important technical target of the Program is the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell cost in terms of dollars per kilowatt ($/kW). The Program's Multi-Year Program Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan established $125/kW as the 2005 technical target. Over the last several years, the Program has contracted with TIAX, LLC (TIAX) to produce estimates of the high volume cost of PEM fuel cell production for transportation use. Since no manufacturer is yet producing PEM fuel cells in the quantities needed for an initial hydrogen-based transportation economy, these estimates are necessary for DOE to gauge progress toward meeting its targets. For a PEM fuel cell system configuration developed by Argonne National Laboratory, TIAX estimated the total cost to be $108/kW, based on assumptions of 500,000 units per year produced with 2005 cell stack technology, vertical integration of cell stack manufacturing, and balance-of-plant (BOP) components purchased from a supplier network. Furthermore, TIAX conducted a Monte Carlo analysis by varying ten key parameters over a wide range of values and estimated with 98% certainty that the mean PEM fuel cell system cost would be below DOE's 2005 target of $125/kW. NREL commissioned DJW TECHNOLOGY, LLC to form an Independent Review Team (the Team) of industry fuel cell experts and to evaluate the cost estimation process and the results reported by TIAX. The results of this independent review will permit NREL and DOE to better understand the credibility of the TIAX cost estimation process and to implement changes in future cost analyses, if necessary. The Team found the methodology used by TIAX to estimate the cost of producing PEM fuel cells to be reasonable and, using 2005 cell stack technology and assuming production of 500,000 units per year, to have calculated a credible cost of $108/kW.

Wheeler, D.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

abroad while greater quantity of crude oil will be consumedoil (oilsands) and biofuel respectively. p denotes the fuel price, q the quantity,

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Electricity Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity August 19, 2013 - 5:44pm Addthis Electricity used to power vehicles is generally provided by the electricity grid and stored in the vehicle's batteries. Fuel cells are being explored as a way to use electricity generated on board the vehicle to power electric motors. Unlike batteries, fuel cells convert chemical energy from hydrogen into electricity. Vehicles that run on electricity have no tailpipe emissions. Emissions that can be attributed to electric vehicles are generated in the electricity production process at the power plant. Home recharging of electric vehicles is as simple as plugging them into an electric outlet. Electricity fueling costs for electric vehicles are reasonable compared to gasoline, especially if consumers take advantage of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Transportation Fuel Basics - Propane | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Propane Propane Transportation Fuel Basics - Propane July 30, 2013 - 4:31pm Addthis Photo of a man standing next to a propane fuel pump with a tank in the background. Propane, also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or LP-gas), or autogas in Europe, is a high-energy alternative fuel. It has been used for decades to fuel light-duty and heavy-duty propane vehicles. Propane is a three-carbon alkane gas (C3H8). Stored under pressure inside a tank, propane turns into a colorless, odorless liquid. As pressure is released, the liquid propane vaporizes and turns into gas that is used for combustion. An odorant, ethyl mercaptan, is added for leak detection. Propane has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic and presents no threat to soil,

282

Alternative Fuels Data Center: SmartWay Transport Partnership  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

SmartWay Transport SmartWay Transport Partnership to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: SmartWay Transport Partnership on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: SmartWay Transport Partnership on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: SmartWay Transport Partnership on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: SmartWay Transport Partnership on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: SmartWay Transport Partnership on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: SmartWay Transport Partnership on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type SmartWay Transport Partnership The SmartWay Transport Partnership is a voluntary partnership between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the domestic freight

283

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Multi-Modal Multi-Modal Transportation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Ridesharing Mass Transit Active Transit Multi-Modal Transportation Telework Multi-Modal Transportation Using multiple modes of transportation is the best approach for some

284

Bio Diesel Oil of Mustard: Small Diesel a Renewable Alternative Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper represents the mustard oil is a kind of renewable energy and alternative fuel of the future. In order to cope with the current situation of load shedding, and reduce dependence on imported fuels, the Bangladesh government to encourage the ... Keywords: Calorific Value, Ester Exchange Reaction, Keywords: Biodiesel, Mustard Oil, Pyrolysis, Viscosity

Liu Hongcong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Integration and Dynamics of a Renewable Regenerative Hydrogen Fuel Cell System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integration and Dynamics of a Renewable Regenerative Hydrogen Fuel Cell System by Alvin Peter Cell System by Alvin Peter Bergen B.A.Sc., University of Victoria, 1994 M.Sc., University of University, hydrogen and electricity storage, and fuel cells. A special design feature of this test bed is the ability

Victoria, University of

286

Hydrogen fuel dispensing station for transportation vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technical and economic assessment is being conducted of a hydrogen fuel dispensing station to develop an understanding of the infrastructure requirements for supplying hydrogen fuel for mobile applications. The study includes a process design of a conceptual small-scale, stand-alone, grassroots fuel dispensing facility (similar to the present-day gasoline stations) producing hydrogen by steam reforming of natural gas. Other hydrogen production processes (such as partial oxidation of hydrocarbons and water electrolysis) were reviewed to determine their suitability for manufacturing the hydrogen. The study includes an assessment of the environmental and other regulatory permitting requirements likely to be imposed on a hydrogen fuel dispensing station for transportation vehicles. The assessment concludes that a dispensing station designed to produce 0.75 million standard cubic feet of fuel grade (99.99%+ purity) hydrogen will meet the fuel needs of 300 light-duty vehicles per day. Preliminary economics place the total capital investment (in 1994 US dollars) for the dispensing station at $4.5 million and the annual operating costs at around $1 million. A discounted cash-flow analysis indicates that the fuel hydrogen product price (excluding taxes) to range between $1.37 to $2.31 per pound of hydrogen, depending upon the natural gas price, the plant financing scenario, and the rate of return on equity capital. A report on the assessment is due in June 1995. This paper presents a summary of the current status of the assessment.

Singh, S.P.N.; Richmond, A.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Review of Transportation Issues and Comparison of Infrastructure ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Infrastructure Costs Associated with Renewable Fuels The DAI study estimates the infrastructure investment costs and the transportation costs

288

Recent Developments on the Production of Transportation Fuels via Catalytic Conversion of Microalgae: Experiments and Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Due to continuing high demand, depletion of non-renewable resources and increasing concerns about climate change, the use of fossil fuel-derived transportation fuels faces relentless challenges both from a world markets and an environmental perspective. The production of renewable transportation fuel from microalgae continues to attract much attention because of its potential for fast growth rates, high oil content, ability to grow in unconventional scenarios, and inherent carbon neutrality. Moreover, the use of microalgae would minimize food versus fuel concerns associated with several biomass strategies, as microalgae do not compete with food crops in the food chain. This paper reviews the progress of recent research on the production of transportation fuels via homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversions of microalgae. This review also describes the development of tools that may allow for a more fundamental understanding of catalyst selection and conversion processes using computational modelling. The catalytic conversion reaction pathways that have been investigated are fully discussed based on both experimental and theoretical approaches. Finally, this work makes several projections for the potential of various thermocatalytic pathways to produce alternative transportation fuels from algae, and identifies key areas where the authors feel that computational modelling should be directed to elucidate key information to optimize the process.

Shi, Fan; Wang, Ping; Duan, Yuhua; Link, Dirk; Morreale, Bryan

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hydrogen-fueled polymer electrolyte fuel cell systems for transportation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) system that is fueled directly by hydrogen has been evaluated for transportation vehicles. The performance was simulated using a systems analysis code and a vehicle analysis code. The results indicate that, at the design point for a 50-kW PEFC system, the system efficiency is above 50%. The efficiency improves at partial load and approaches 60% at 40% load, as the fuel cell operating point moves to lower current densities on the voltage-current characteristic curve. At much lower loads, the system efficiency drops because of the deterioration in the performance of the compressor, expander, and, eventually, the fuel cell. The results also indicate that the PEFC system can start rapidly from ambient temperatures. Depending on the specific weight of the fuel cell (1.6 kg/kW in this case), the system takes up to 180s to reach its design operating conditions. The PEFC system has been evaluated for three mid-size vehicles: the 1995 Chrysler Sedan, the near-term Ford AIV (Aluminum Intensive Vehicle) Sable, and the future P2000 vehicle. The results show that the PEFC system can meet the demands of the Federal Urban Driving Schedule and the Highway driving cycles, for both warm and cold start-up conditions. The results also indicate that the P2000 vehicle can meet the fuel economy goal of 80 miles per gallon of gasoline (equivalent).

Ahluwalia, R.; Doss, E.D.; Kumar, R.

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

290

Renewable & Alternative Fuels - Analysis & Projections - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency. ... Biomass; Geothermal; Hydropower; Solar ...

291

EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets: Frequently Asked Questions (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This brochure provides answers to frequently asked questions about the EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program's State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Veolia Transportation Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to Propane to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to Propane on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to Propane on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to Propane on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to Propane on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to Propane on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to Propane on AddThis.com... Aug. 17, 2013 Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to Propane

293

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) FY 2005 Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

residues, forest thinnings, energy crops, etc.). Expanding the biomass feedstocks is critical to developing a renewable alternative transportation fuel. The standard outdoor...

294

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. Golove (2003). Accounting for Fuel Price Risk: UsingForward Natural Gas Prices Insteadof Gas Price Forecasts to Compare Renewable to Gas-Fired

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

APEC-Alternative Transport Fuels: Implementation Guidelines | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

APEC-Alternative Transport Fuels: Implementation Guidelines APEC-Alternative Transport Fuels: Implementation Guidelines Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: APEC-Alternative Transport Fuels: Implementation Guidelines Agency/Company /Organization: Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.egnret.ewg.apec.org/news/Alternative%20Transport%20Fuels%20Final%2 Cost: Free Language: English References: APEC-Alternative Transport Fuels: Implementation Guidelines[1] "Worldwide, there are at least 35 million vehicles already operating on some form of alternative transport fuel and many millions more that are fuelled by blends with conventional gasoline and diesel or powered by electricity. Many alternative fuel programs are being, or have been,

296

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If di?erence in oil transportation cost to US and to otherrelate the world oil price to the marginal cost of each typerelate the world oil price to the marginal cost of CCO and

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Transports Students in Hybrid  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Michigan Transports Michigan Transports Students in Hybrid Electric School Buses to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Transports Students in Hybrid Electric School Buses on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Transports Students in Hybrid Electric School Buses on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Transports Students in Hybrid Electric School Buses on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Transports Students in Hybrid Electric School Buses on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Transports Students in Hybrid Electric School Buses on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Transports Students in Hybrid Electric School Buses on AddThis.com...

298

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Truck Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on AddThis.com... Dec. 31, 2009 Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree F ollow the Capitol Christmas Tree from Arizona to Washington, D.C., aboard

299

EPA issues proposed rule for the 2014 Renewable Fuel Standard ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, ... power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand ... What is shale gas and why is it ...

300

GREET 1.0 -- Transportation fuel cycles model: Methodology and use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel-cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, Co, NOx, SOx, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydropower, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

Wang, M.Q.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Report NREL/TP-6A50-56324 December 2012 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors April Lee, Owen Zinaman, and Jeffrey Logan National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.jisea.org Technical Report NREL/TP-6A50-56324 December 2012 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors April Lee, Owen Zinaman, and Jeffrey Logan

302

2011 RENEWABLE ENERGY: SOLAR FUELS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conference will present and discuss current science that underlies solar fuels production, and will focus on direct production pathways for production. Thus, recent advances in design and understanding of molecular systems and materials for light capture and conversion of relevance for solar fuels will be discussed. An important set of topics will be homogeneous, heterogeneous and biological catalysts for the multi-electron processes of water oxidation, hydrogen production and carbon dioxide reduction to useful fuels. Also, progress towards integrated and scalable systems will be presented. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program.

Joseph Hupp

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

303

Polymer electrolyte fuel cells for transportation applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) as a primary power source in electric vehicles has received incrming attention during the last few years. This increased attention has been fueled by a combination of significant technical advances in this field and by the initiation of some projects for the demonstration of a complete, PEFC-based power system in a bus or in a passenger car. Such demonstration pretieds reflect an increased faith of industry in the potential of this technology for transportation applications, or, at least, in the need for a detailed evaluation of this potential Nevertheless, large scale transportation applications of PEFCs requim a continued concerted effort of research on catalysis, materials and components, combined with the engineering efforts addressing the complete power system. This is required to achieve cost effective, highly performing PEFC stack and power system. We describe in this contribution some recent results of work performed within the Core Research PEFC Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, which has addressed transportation applications of PEFCs.

Springer, T.E.; Wilson, M.S.; Garzon, F.H.; Zawodzinski, T.A.; Gottesfeld, S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Polymer electrolyte fuel cells for transportation applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) as a primary power source in electric vehicles has received incrming attention during the last few years. This increased attention has been fueled by a combination of significant technical advances in this field and by the initiation of some projects for the demonstration of a complete, PEFC-based power system in a bus or in a passenger car. Such demonstration pretieds reflect an increased faith of industry in the potential of this technology for transportation applications, or, at least, in the need for a detailed evaluation of this potential Nevertheless, large scale transportation applications of PEFCs requim a continued concerted effort of research on catalysis, materials and components, combined with the engineering efforts addressing the complete power system. This is required to achieve cost effective, highly performing PEFC stack and power system. We describe in this contribution some recent results of work performed within the Core Research PEFC Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, which has addressed transportation applications of PEFCs.

Springer, T.E.; Wilson, M.S.; Garzon, F.H.; Zawodzinski, T.A.; Gottesfeld, S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Renewable & Alternative Fuels - User - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vehicle Type 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011; Automobiles (Compact) Total Vehicles: Total Fuel Consumed: 8,953 681 14,208 1,015 20,965 ...

306

Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors  

SciTech Connect

Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

GREET 1.5 - transportation fuel-cycle model - Vol. 1 : methodology, development, use, and results.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the development and use of the most recent version (Version 1.5) of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel-cycle emissions and energy associated with various transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter with diameters of 10 micrometers or less, and sulfur oxides) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates total energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption when various transportation fuels are used. The GREET model includes the following cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, conventional diesel, reformulated diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, Fischer-Tropsch diesel, dimethyl ether, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydropower, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; soybeans to biodiesel; flared gas to methanol, dimethyl ether, and Fischer-Tropsch diesel; and landfill gases to methanol. This report also presents the results of the analysis of fuel-cycle energy use and emissions associated with alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies to be applied to passenger cars and light-duty trucks.

Wang, M. Q.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

308

The Investment Plan for the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Investment Plan The Investment Plan for the The Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program Webcast for the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Forum January 14, 2009 Peter F. Ward California Energy Commission C A L I F O R N I A E N E R G Y C O M M I S S I O N Program Purpose and Objectives - AB 118 Program Purpose: "develop and deploy innovative technologies that transform California's fuel and vehicle types to help attain the state's climate change policies" - Creating a Framework for Sustainability: "establish sustainability goals to ensure that alternative and renewable fuel and vehicle development projects, on a full fuel- cycle assessment basis, will not adversely impact natural resources, especially state and federal lands"

309

Session 5: Renewable Energy in the Transportation and Power SectorsŽ  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5: "Renewable Energy in the Transportation and Power 5: "Renewable Energy in the Transportation and Power Sectors" Mr. Michael Schaal: Well, let's get started and we'll have people come in as we move along. Welcome to the session which addresses the topic of renewable energy and the transportation and power sectors, a topic that is very much on the minds of the public at large, policymakers who are pondering the cost benefits and preferred outcomes of a variety of current and potential future laws and regulations, and also researchers who are busily involved with pushing the state-of-the-art in a number of key technology areas and also technology developer who are weighing the risks and benefits of pursuing different business plans in this evolving market, and environmentalists who are

310

Figure 6. Transportation energy consumption by fuel, 1990-2040 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 6. Transportation energy consumption by fuel, 1990-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Motor Gasoline, no E85 Pipeline Other E85 Jet Fuel

311

Model documentation Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analaytical approach and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the 1996 Annual Energy Outlook forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Alternative and Renewable fuels and Vehicle Technology Program Subject Area: Biofuels production Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative and Renewable fuels and Vehicle Technology Program Subject Area: Biofuels production: Commercial Facilities · Applicant's Legal Name: Yokayo Biofuels, Inc. · Name of project: A Catalyst for Success · Project Description: Yokayo Biofuels, an industry veteran with over 10 years experience

313

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Documents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cycle Technologies » Nuclear Fuels Storage & Fuel Cycle Technologies » Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project » Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Documents Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Documents September 30, 2013 Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites In January 2013, the Department of Energy issued the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste. Among the elements contained in this strategy is an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites. February 22, 2013 Public Preferences Related to Consent-Based Siting of Radioactive Waste Management Facilities for Storage and Disposal This report provides findings from a set of social science studies

314

Integrated Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal ...  

ORNL 2011-G00239/jcn UUT-B ID 201102603 09.2011 Integrated Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Canister System Technology Summary

315

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

against * steady state and transient operational cell data. Complete fuel cell water transport model improvements * and code package development to include two phase flow....

316

Neutron Imaging Study of the Water Transport in Operating Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Durability (B) Cost (C) Performance This project is conducting fundamental studies of water transport in the fuel cell. Insights gained from these studies will be applied toward...

317

The outlook for transportation fuel markets this summer ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The price forecast for transportation fuels is highly uncertain, in large part due to the uncertainty in the outlook for crude oil prices.

318

National Renewable Energy Laboratory DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cold start analysis: 2001 ­ Fuel cell hybrid electric vehicles: 1999 (in collaboration with VATech) ­ H funding from the DOE Hydrogen Program (now HFCIT), with some funding coming from PBA and OFCVT #12;History analysis, electric grid/hydrogen interaction ­ Johanna Ivy: Electrolysis, H2A, programming ­ Maggie Mann

319

Energy Basics: Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation...

320

Stationary and Portable Fuel Cell Systems Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Stationary and Portable Fuel Cell Systems Codes and Standards Citations This document lists codes and standards typically used for Stationary and Portable Fuel Cell Systems projects. To determine which codes and standards apply to a specific project, you need to identify the codes and standards currently in effect within the jurisdiction where the project will be located. Some jurisdictions also have unique applicable ordinances or regulations. Learn about codes and standards basics at www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/codes_standards_basics.html. Find Stationary and Portable Fuel Cell Systems codes and standards in these categories:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply s  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities of waste from fossil fuel extraction and combustion. As that day draws nearer, policymakers will have no realistic alternative but to turn to sources of power that today make up a viable but small part of America's energy picture. And they will be forced to embrace energy efficiencies - those that are within our reach today, and those that will be developed tomorrow. Precisely when they come lo grips with that reality - this year, 10 years from now, or 20 years from now - will determine bow smooth the transition will be for consumers and industry alike.

322

NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind to Hydrogen Project: Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation NREL Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Todd Ramsden, Kevin Harrison, Darlene Steward November 16, 2009 NREL/PR-560-47432 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL Wind2H2 RD&D Project * The National Renewable Energy Laboratory in partnership with Xcel Energy and DOE has designed, operates, and continues to perform testing on the wind-to-hydrogen (Wind2H2) project at the National Wind Technology Center in Boulder * The Wind2H2 project integrates wind turbines, PV arrays and electrolyzers to produce from renewable energy

323

Model documentation renewable fuels module of the National Energy Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the 1995 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO95) forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. The RFM consists of six analytical submodules that represent each of the major renewable energy resources--wood, municipal solid waste (MSW), solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy, and alcohol fuels. The RFM also reads in hydroelectric facility capacities and capacity factors from a data file for use by the NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM). The purpose of the RFM is to define the technological, cost and resource size characteristics of renewable energy technologies. These characteristics are used to compute a levelized cost to be competed against other similarly derived costs from other energy sources and technologies. The competition of these energy sources over the NEMS time horizon determines the market penetration of these renewable energy technologies. The characteristics include available energy capacity, capital costs, fixed operating costs, variable operating costs, capacity factor, heat rate, construction lead time, and fuel product price.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Ris Energy Report 5 New and emerging technologies for renewable energy 51 in the transport sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the prominent exception of biomass, renewable energy resources--solar, wind, ocean, hydro--and nu- clear power density, though, batteries are still at least an order of magnitude below hydrocarbons and advanced hydro the direct loading and unloading of electricity. Road transport Car manufacturers all over the world

325

PROGRAM OPPORTUNITY NOTICE Renewable Natural Gas Transportation Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Questions (by 5:00 p.m.)* January 3, 2013 Pre-Application Workshop* January 3, 2013 Anticipated Distribution of Questions/Answers and PON Addenda (if any) January 11, 2013 Deadline to Submit Applications (by 3:00 p.m.)* February 1, 2013 Anticipated Notice of Proposed Award Posting Date March 2013 Anticipated Commission

326

Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical Gap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analyses Analyses Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical Gap Analyses The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology, has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development activities related to storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The mission of the UFDC is to identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The Storage and Transportation activities within the UFDC are being developed to address issues regarding the extended storage of UNF and its subsequent

327

INL Site FY 2010 Executable Plan for Energy and Transportation Fuels Management with the FY 2009 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that sustainable energy and transportation fuels management will be integrated into DOE operations to meet obligations under Executive Order (EO) 13423 "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," the Instructions for Implementation of EO 13423, as well as Guidance Documents issued in accordance thereto and any modifcations or amendments that may be issued from time to time. In furtherance of this obligation, DOE established strategic performance-based energy and transportation fuels goals and strategies through the Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Initiative, which were incorporated into DOE Order 430.2B "Departmental Energy, Renewable energy, and Transportation Management" and were also identified in DOE Order 450.1A, "Environmental Protection Program." These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of energy and transportation fuels management into site Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

Ernest L. Fossum

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: Success Story (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This success story highlights the EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program's series of workshops that bring fleets regulated under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) together with Clean Cities stakeholders and fuel providers to form and strengthen regional partnerships and initiate projects that will deploy more alternative fuel infrastructure.

Not Available

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Dieseland Specifications. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviewstheir Reduction Approaches. Renewable and Sustainable Energy

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid hydrogen-carbon (H{sub 2}CAR) process for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels is proposed wherein biomass is the carbon source and hydrogen is supplied from carbon-free energy. To implement this concept, a process has been designed to co-feed a biomass gasifier with H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} recycled from the H{sub 2}-CO to liquid conversion reactor. Modeling of this biomass to liquids process has identified several major advantages of the H{sub 2}CAR process. The land area needed to grow the biomass is CAR process shows the potential to supply the entire United States transportation sector from that quantity of biomass. The synthesized liquid provides H{sub 2} storage in an open loop system. Reduction to practice of the H{sub 2}CAR route has the potential to provide the transportation sector for the foreseeable future, using the existing infrastructure. The rationale of using H{sub 2} in the H{sub 2}CAR process is explained by the significantly higher annualized average solar energy conversion efficiency for hydrogen generation versus that for biomass growth. For coal to liquids, the advantage of H{sub 2}CAR is that there is no additional CO{sub 2} release to the atmosphere due to the replacement of petroleum with coal, thus eliminating the need to sequester CO{sub 2}.

Agrawal, R.; Singh, N.R.; Ribeiro, F.H.; Delgass, W.N. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Chemical Engineering and Energy Center at Discovery Park

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

331

Model documentation: Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it related to the production of the 1994 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO94) forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. This documentation report serves two purposes. First, it is a reference document for model analysts, model users, and the public interested in the construction and application of the RFM. Second, it meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. The RFM consists of six analytical submodules that represent each of the major renewable energy resources -- wood, municipal solid waste (MSW), solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy, and alcohol fuels. Of these six, four are documented in the following chapters: municipal solid waste, wind, solar and biofuels. Geothermal and wood are not currently working components of NEMS. The purpose of the RFM is to define the technological and cost characteristics of renewable energy technologies, and to pass these characteristics to other NEMS modules for the determination of mid-term forecasted renewable energy demand.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the shutdown Connecticut Yankee site. The ISFSI includes 40 multi-purpose canisters, within vertical concrete storage casks, containing 1019 used nuclear fuel assemblies [412.3 metric ton heavy metal (MTHM)] and 3 canisters of greater-than-class-C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste. Photo courtesy of Connecticut Yankee (http://www.connyankee.com/html/fuel_storage.html). Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the shutdown Connecticut Yankee site. The ISFSI includes 40 multi-purpose canisters, within vertical concrete storage casks, containing 1019 used nuclear fuel

333

2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report, June 2011, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT JUNE 2011 i Authors This report was a collaborative effort by staff of the Breakthrough Technologies Institute, Inc., in Washington, DC. Acknowledgement The authors relied upon the hard work and valuable contributions of many men and women in government and in the fuel cell industry. The authors especially wish to thank Sunita Satyapal, Nancy Garland and the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program for their support and guidance in the preparation of this report. The authors also wish to thank Lisa Callaghan- Jerram of Pike Research and Rachel Gelman of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the many others who made this report possible. ii Contents List of Figures ............................................................................................................................................... iv

334

EERE SBIR Case Study: Improving Hybrid Poplars as a Renewable Source of Ethanol Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GreenWood Resources to advance GreenWood Resources to advance scientific understanding of the ways chemical traits are inherited in hybrid poplars and the extent of variations in characteristics such as lignin content and forms of lignin-enabling the best traits to be developed and significantly advancing the potential of hybrid poplars to provide a substantial, renewable source of ethanol fuel. GreenWood Resources (Portland,

335

Fuel cells for transportation program: FY1997 national laboratory annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cells for Transportation Program is structured to effectively implement the research and development (R and D) required for highly efficient, low or zero emission fuel cell power systems to be a viable replacement for the internal combustion engine in automobiles. The Program is part of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), a government-industry initiative aimed at development of an 80 mile-per-gallon vehicle. This Annual Report summarizes the technical accomplishments of the laboratories during 1997. Participants include: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). During 1997, the laboratory R and D included one project on solid oxide fuel cells; this project has since been terminated to focus Department resources on PEM fuel cells. The technical component of this report is divided into five key areas: fuel cell stack research and development; fuel processing; fuel cell modeling, testing, and evaluation; direct methanol PEM fuel cells; and solid oxide fuel cells.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Tuning the transport properties of layer-by-layer thin films for fuel cell applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing global focus on alternative energy sources has led to a renewed interest in fuel cells. For low power, portable applications, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are the most promising type of fuel cell. DMFCs ...

Ashcraft, James Nathan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Statement by U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on EPA's Renewable Fuel Standard Waiver Announcement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON -- The following is a statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman in response to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) announcement on the Renewable Fuel Standard...

338

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel Price Risk: Using Forward Natural Gas Prices Insteadof Gas Price Forecasts to Compare Renewable to Gas-FiredWhich way the natural gas price: an attempt to predict the

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

List of Other Alternative Fuel Vehicles Incentives | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Vehicles Incentives Fuel Vehicles Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 8 Other Alternative Fuel Vehicles Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 8) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alternative Fuel Vehicle Loan Program (Missouri) State Loan Program Missouri Schools Local Government Renewable Fuel Vehicles Other Alternative Fuel Vehicles Refueling Stations No Alternative Fuels Incentive Grant Fund (AFIG) (Pennsylvania) State Grant Program Pennsylvania Commercial Industrial Residential General Public/Consumer Nonprofit Schools Local Government Renewable Transportation Fuels Renewable Fuel Vehicles Other Alternative Fuel Vehicles Refueling Stations Ethanol Methanol Biodiesel No Alternative Vehicle Conversion Credits - Corporate (Louisiana) Corporate Tax Credit Louisiana Commercial Renewable Fuel Vehicles

340

Development and use of the GREET model to estimate fuel-cycle energy use and emissions of various transportation technologies and fuels  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel- cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydrogen, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

Wang, M.Q.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Arrival condition of spent fuel after storage, handling, and transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study conducted to determine the probable arrival condition of spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel after handling and interim storage in spent fuel storage pools and subsequent handling and accident-free transport operations under normal or slightly abnormal conditions. The objective of this study was to provide information on the expected condition of spent LWR fuel upon arrival at interim storage or fuel reprocessing facilities or at disposal facilities if the fuel is declared a waste. Results of a literature survey and data evaluation effort are discussed. Preliminary threshold limits for storing, handling, and transporting unconsolidated spent LWR fuel are presented. The difficulty in trying to anticipate the amount of corrosion products (crud) that may be on spent fuel in future shipments is also discussed, and potential areas for future work are listed. 95 references, 3 figures, 17 tables.

Bailey, W.J.; Pankaskie, P.J.; Langstaff, D.C.; Gilbert, E.R.; Rising, K.H.; Schreiber, R.E.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Liquid-fueled SOFC power sources for transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Traditionally, fuel cells have been developed for space or stationary terrestrial applications. As the first commercial 200-kW systems were being introduced by ONSI and Fuji Electric, the potentially much larger, but also more challenging, application in transportation was beginning to be addressed. As a result, fuel cell-powered buses have been designed and built, and R&D programs for fuel cell-powered passenger cars have been initiated. The engineering challenge of eventually replacing the internal combustion engine in buses, trucks, and passenger cars with fuel cell systems is to achieve much higher power densities and much lower costs than obtainable in systems designed for stationary applications. At present, the leading fuel cell candidate for transportation applications is, without question, the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Offering ambient temperature start-up and the potential for a relatively high power density, the polymer technology has attracted the interest of automotive manufacturers worldwide. But the difficulties of fuel handling for the PEFC have led to a growing interest in exploring the prospects for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) operating on liquid fuels for transportation applications. Solid oxide fuel cells are much more compatible with liquid fuels (methanol or other hydrocarbons) and are potentially capable of power densities high enough for vehicular use. Two SOFC options for such use are discussed in this report.

Myles, K.M.; Doshi, R.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Spent Fuel Transportation Package Performance Study - Experimental Design Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous studies of spent nuclear fuel transportation accident risks have been performed since the late seventies that considered shipping container design and performance. Based in part on these studies, NRC has concluded that the level of protection provided by spent nuclear fuel transportation package designs under accident conditions is adequate. [1] Furthermore, actual spent nuclear fuel transport experience showcase a safety record that is exceptional and unparalleled when compared to other hazardous materials transportation shipments. There has never been a known or suspected release of the radioactive contents from an NRC-certified spent nuclear fuel cask as a result of a transportation accident. In 1999 the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated a study, the Package Performance Study, to demonstrate the performance of spent fuel and spent fuel packages during severe transportation accidents. NRC is not studying or testing its current regulations, a s the rigorous regulatory accident conditions specified in 10 CFR Part 71 are adequate to ensure safe packaging and use. As part of this study, NRC currently plans on using detailed modeling followed by experimental testing to increase public confidence in the safety of spent nuclear fuel shipments. One of the aspects of this confirmatory research study is the commitment to solicit and consider public comment during the scoping phase and experimental design planning phase of this research.

Snyder, A. M.; Murphy, A. J.; Sprung, J. L.; Ammerman, D. J.; Lopez, C.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

344

Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation: September 30, 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subcontract Report Subcontract Report Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell NREL/SR-560-39104 Systems for Transportation December 2005 September 30, 2005 E.J. Carlson, P. Kopf, J. Sinha, S. Sriramulu, and Y. Yang TIAX LLC Cambridge, Massachusetts NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation September 30, 2005 E.J. Carlson, P. Kopf, J. Sinha, S. Sriramulu, and Y. Yang TIAX LLC Cambridge, Massachusetts NREL Technical Monitor: K. Wipke Prepared under Subcontract No. KACX-5-44452-01 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-560-39104 December 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy

345

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

346

Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Energy Energy Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 1999 FY 1999 FY 1999 FY 1999 Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Progress Report for Advanced Automotive Fuels Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Transportation Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies

347

Lessons Learned from the Alternative Fuels Experience and How They Apply to the Development of a Hydrogen-Fueled Transportation System  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Lessons Learned from the Lessons Learned from the Alternative Fuels Experience and How They Apply to the Development of a Hydrogen- Fueled Transportation System M. Melendez, K. Theis, and C. Johnson Technical Report NREL/TP-560-40753 August 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Technical Report NREL/TP-560-40753 August 2007 Lessons Learned from the Alternative Fuels Experience and How They Apply to the Development of a Hydrogen-

348

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature MarketProjected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUELS Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 2013 Prepared by NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Golden, Colorado 80401-3305 managed by Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DC-A36-08GO28308 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

349

The Future of Low Carbon Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" Nuclear" Oil resources" Unconventional:" oil shale liquid, " oil sands" Coal resources" Transport! Elec

Kammen, Daniel M.

350

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transportation and Stationary...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HOME ABOUT PROGRAM AREAS INFORMATION RESOURCES FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES TECHNOLOGIES MARKET TRANSFORMATION NEWS EVENTS EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Information...

351

Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas July 30, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation fuel. About one third of the natural gas used in the United States goes to residential and commercial uses, one third to industrial uses, and one third to electric power production. Natural gas has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic, non-corrosive, and non-carcinogenic. It presents no threat to soil, surface water, or groundwater. Natural gas is a mixture of hydrocarbons, predominantly methane (CH4). As delivered through the nation's pipeline system, it also contains

352

Energy Basics: Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Propane Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Vehicles Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is...

353

Technology assessment of alternative transportation fuels. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief summary is presented of major accomplishments in a research program on the impact of synthetic fuels, electric vehicles, and railroad electification on energy consumption by the US transportation sector. (LCL)

Not Available

1978-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

354

Transportation capabilities study of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates current capabilities for transporting spent nuclear fuel owned by the US Department of Energy. Currently licensed irradiated fuel shipping packages that have the potential for shipping the spent nuclear fuel are identified and then matched against the various spent nuclear fuel types. Also included are the results of a limited investigation into other certified packages and new packages currently under development. This study is intended to support top-level planning for the disposition of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel inventory.

Clark, G.L.; Johnson, R.A.; Smith, R.W. [Packaging Technology, Inc., Tacoma, WA (United States); Abbott, D.G.; Tyacke, M.J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Modeling Working Group Transport Modeling Working Group The Transport Modeling Working Group meets twice per year to exchange information, create synergies, share experimental and computational results, and collaboratively develop methodologies for and understanding of transport phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks. Its members include principle investigators and supporting personnel from transport-related projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Learn more about DOE research activities can be found in the Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. Description Technical Targets Meetings Contacts Description Fuel cell operation relies on effective mass transport of species through individual components and across the interfaces between components. Among these species are hydrogen, oxygen, water, protons, and electrons. Transport behavior is a function of operating conditions and component properties such as microstructure and surface properties. Understanding and optimizing the controlling transport phenomena are critical to the efficient and cost-effective operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. A better understanding of mass transport in the fuel cell, especially of water, has the potential to lead to improved designs and more efficient systems.

356

Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Powered by a Renewable U.S. Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clean Cities fact sheet describing aspects of flexible fuel vehicles such as use of E85, special features, benefits of use, costs, and fueling locations. It includes discussion on performance and how to identify these vehicles as well as listing additional resources.

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice, Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

an FFV? an FFV? An FFV, as its name implies, has the flex- ibility of running on more than one type of fuel. FFVs can be fueled with unleaded gasoline, E85, or any combination of the two. Like conventional gasoline vehicles, FFVs have a single fuel tank, fuel system, and engine. And they are available in a wide range of models such as sedans, pickups, and minivans. Light-duty FFVs are designed to operate with at least 15% gasoline in the fuel, mainly to ensure they start in cold weather. FFVs are equipped with modified components designed specifically to be compatible with ethanol's chemical properties. In the illustration on the back, the main modifications for FFVs are

358

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / South  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South South Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 115, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation South Southwest Power Pool Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / South- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

359

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / North  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North North Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 114, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA North Renewable Energy Generation Southwest Power Pool Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / North- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

360

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 120, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States- Reference Case (xls, 119.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Analysis of near-term spent fuel transportation hardware requirements and transportation costs  

SciTech Connect

A computer model was developed to quantify the transportation hardware requirements and transportation costs associated with shipping spent fuel in the commercial nucler fuel cycle in the near future. Results from this study indicate that alternative spent fuel shipping systems (consolidated or disassembled fuel elements and new casks designed for older fuel) will significantly reduce the transportation hardware requirements and costs for shipping spent fuel in the commercial nuclear fuel cycle, if there is no significant change in their operating/handling characteristics. It was also found that a more modest cost reduction results from increasing the fraction of spent fuel shipped by truck from 25% to 50%. Larger transportation cost reductions could be realized with further increases in the truck shipping fraction. Using the given set of assumptions, it was found that the existing spent fuel cask fleet size is generally adequate to perform the needed transportation services until a fuel reprocessing plant (FRP) begins to receive fuel (assumed in 1987). Once the FRP opens, up to 7 additional truck systems and 16 additional rail systems are required at the reference truck shipping fraction of 25%. For the 50% truck shipping fraction, 17 additional truck systems and 9 additional rail systems are required. If consolidated fuel only is shipped (25% by truck), 5 additional rail casks are required and the current truck cask fleet is more than adequate until at least 1995. Changes in assumptions could affect the results. Transportation costs for a federal interim storage program could total about $25M if the FRP begins receiving fuel in 1987 or about $95M if the FRP is delayed until 1989. This is due to an increased utilization of federal interim storage facility from 350 MTU for the reference scenario to about 750 MTU if reprocessing is delayed by two years.

Daling, P.M.; Engel, R.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Integrated Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation, and ...  

Researchers at ORNL have developed an integrated system that reduces the total life-cycle cost of used fuel storage while improving overall safety. This multicanister ...

363

NREL: Technology Deployment - Fuels, Vehicles, and Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in-depth information about biodiesel, electricity, ethanol, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane, as well as the vehicles that use these fuels and the infrastructure used to deliver...

364

Spent fuel transportation in the United States: commercial spent fuel shipments through December 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to provide updated transportation information on light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel in the United States. Historical data are presented on the quantities of spent fuel shipped from individual reactors on an annual basis and their shipping destinations. Specifically, a tabulation is provided for each present-fuel shipment that lists utility and plant of origin, destination and number of spent-fuel assemblies shipped. For all annual shipping campaigns between 1980 and 1984, the actual numbers of spent-fuel shipments are defined. The shipments are tabulated by year, and the mode of shipment and the casks utilized in shipment are included. The data consist of the current spent-fuel inventories at each of the operating reactors as of December 31, 1984. This report presents historical data on all commercial spent-fuel transportation shipments have occurred in the United States through December 31, 1984.

Not Available

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

World Biofuels Production Potential Understanding the Challenges to Meeting the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates the worldwide potential to produce biofuels including biofuels for export. It was undertaken to improve our understanding of the potential for imported biofuels to satisfy the requirements of Title II of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) in the coming decades. Many other countries biofuels production and policies are expanding as rapidly as ours. Therefore, we modeled a detailed and up-to-date representation of the amount of biofuel feedstocks that are being and can be grown, current and future biofuels production capacity, and other factors relevant to the economic competitiveness of worldwide biofuels production, use, and trade. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) identified and prepared feedstock data for countries that were likely to be significant exporters of biofuels to the U.S. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) calculated conversion costs by conducting material flow analyses and technology assessments on biofuels technologies. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) integrated the country specific feedstock estimates and conversion costs into the global Energy Technology Perspectives (ETP) MARKAL (MARKet ALlocation) model. The model uses least-cost optimization to project the future state of the global energy system in five year increments. World biofuels production was assessed over the 2010 to 2030 timeframe using scenarios covering a range U.S. policies (tax credits, tariffs, and regulations), as well as oil prices, feedstock availability, and a global CO{sub 2} price. All scenarios include the full implementation of existing U.S. and selected other countries biofuels policies (Table 4). For the U.S., the most important policy is the EISA Title II Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). It progressively increases the required volumes of renewable fuel used in motor vehicles (Appendix B). The RFS requires 36 billion (B) gallons (gal) per year of renewable fuels by 2022. Within the mandate, amounts of advanced biofuels, including biomass-based diesel and cellulosic biofuels, are required beginning in 2009. Imported renewable fuels are also eligible for the RFS. Another key U.S. policy is the $1.01 per gal tax credit for producers of cellulosic biofuels enacted as part of the 2008 Farm Bill. This credit, along with the DOE's research, development and demonstration (RD&D) programs, are assumed to enable the rapid expansion of U.S. and global cellulosic biofuels production needed for the U.S. to approach the 2022 RFS goal. While the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has yet to issue RFS rules to determine which fuels would meet the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction and land use restrictions specified in EISA, we assume that cellulosic ethanol, biomass-to-liquid fuels (BTL), sugar-derived ethanol, and fatty acid methyl ester biodiesel would all meet the EISA advanced biofuel requirements. We also assume that enough U.S. corn ethanol would meet EISA's biofuel requirements or otherwise be grandfathered under EISA to reach 15 B gal per year.

Sastri, B.; Lee, A.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation. Multi-fuel reformers: Phase 1 -- Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE has established the goal, through the Fuel Cells in Transportation Program, of fostering the rapid development and commercialization of fuel cells as economic competitors for the internal combustion engine. Central to this goal is a safe feasible means of supplying hydrogen of the required purity to the vehicular fuel cell system. Two basic strategies are being considered: (1) on-board fuel processing whereby alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol or natural gas stored on the vehicle undergo reformation and subsequent processing to produce hydrogen, and (2) on-board storage of pure hydrogen provided by stationary fuel processing plants. This report analyzes fuel processor technologies, types of fuel and fuel cell options for on-board reformation. As the Phase 1 of a multi-phased program to develop a prototype multi-fuel reformer system for a fuel cell powered vehicle, the objective of this program was to evaluate the feasibility of a multi-fuel reformer concept and to select a reforming technology for further development in the Phase 2 program, with the ultimate goal of integration with a DOE-designated fuel cell and vehicle configuration. The basic reformer processes examined in this study included catalytic steam reforming (SR), non-catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and catalytic partial oxidation (also known as Autothermal Reforming, or ATR). Fuels under consideration in this study included methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. A systematic evaluation of reforming technologies, fuels, and transportation fuel cell applications was conducted for the purpose of selecting a suitable multi-fuel processor for further development and demonstration in a transportation application.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Compositional and Agronomic Evaluation of Sorghum Biomass as a Potential Feedstock for Renewable Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One goal of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee was to replace 30% of current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. This will take mixtures of various feedstocks; an annual biomass feedstock such as sorghum will play an important role in meeting this goal. Commercial forage sorghum samples collected from field trials grown in Bushland, TX in 2007 were evaluated for both agronomic and compositional traits. Biomass compositional analysis of the samples was performed at the National Renewable Energy Lab in Golden, CO following NREL Laboratory Analytical Procedures. Depending on the specific cultivar, several additional years of yield data for this location were considered in establishing agronomic potential. Results confirm that sorghum forages can produce high biomass yields over multiple years and varied growing conditions. In addition, the composition of sorghum shows significant variation, as would be expected for most crops. Using theoretical estimates for ethanol production, the sorghum commercial forages examined in this study could produce an average of 6147 L ha{sup -1} of renewable fuels. Given its genetic variability, a known genomic sequence, a robust seed industry, and biomass composition, sorghum will be an important annual feedstock to meet the alternative fuel production goals legislated by the US Energy Security Act of 2007.

Dahlberg, J.; Wolfrum, E.; Bean, B.; Rooney, W. L.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Demonstration of a transportable storage system for spent nuclear fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the joint demonstration project between the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the use of a transportable storage system for the long-term storage and subsequent transport of spent nuclear fuel. SMUD's Rancho Seco nuclear generating station was shut down permanently in June 1989. After the shutdown, SMUD began planning the decommissioning process, including the disposition of the spent nuclear fuel. Concurrently, Congress had directed the Secretary of Energy to develop a plan for the use of dual-purpose casks. Licensing and demonstrating a dual-purpose cask, or transportable storage system, would be a step toward achieving Congress's goal of demonstrating a technology that can be used to minimize the handling of spent nuclear fuel from the time the fuel is permanently removed from the reactor through to its ultimate disposal at a DOE facility. For SMUD, using a transportable storage system at the Rancho Seco Independent Spent-Fuel Storage Installation supports the goal of abandoning Rancho Seco's spent-fuel pool as decommissioning proceeds.

Shetler, J.R.; Miller, K.R.; Jones, R.E. (Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Herald, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Rail transportation of coal-water slurry fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of the anticipated near-term appearance of commercial coal-water slurry (CWS) fuels, least-cost modes of their transportation should be considered now. Unlike dilute pipeline transport slurries (typically 50 percent solids) a CWS fuel is a stable, highly-loaded (typically 70 percent or more solids) with vastly different rheological properties. The high solids loading and stabilization against settling produce effective viscosities one or more orders of magnitude greater than those of dilute slurries. Pipeline transportation of such fuels for more than a few miles thus becomes economically unattractive. In the future, further physical refinement or slight dilution of CWS fuels may permit long-range transmission by slurry pipeline once they become available. In the meantime, distribution of these fuels to serve widely dispersed industrial users will be accomplished by barge or rail. In the latter case the high flow-friction characteristics will preclude use of the unit ''Tank Train'' system designed for loading and unloading via a single connection at high rates of flow. This limitation does not rule out assembly of unit trains of individually-loaded tank cars if desired. The optimum location of CWS fuel plants relative to mine-mouth coal preparation plants and/or pipeline terminals will require modeling of multi-mode transportation networks in order to determine the least-cost combination for serving the needs of industrial as well as utility CWS users.

Green, L.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Application of fuel cells to highway and nonhighway transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transportation is the nation's largest single energy user and accounts for approximately 50% of our current petroleum consumption. This fact not only defines the urgency of the problem, it also delineates the magnitude of the infrastructure already in place and the built-in inertia of the system. Major changes in our modes of transportation will not take place instantly, as we might wish, but will certainly require years and, perhaps, decades of steady evolution and technological development. Fuel cells are a promising alternate power source for transportation applications for a number of reasons. Modeling studies have indicated the potential for providing highway vehicles with performance and range comparable to those provided by internal combustion engines. Fuel cells are efficient and therefore reduce energy consumption. They are nonpolluting in terms of both air and noise pollution - highly desirable features for urban applications. In addition, they can operate on nonpetroleum fuels such as hydrogen or hydrogen in combined form, for example, methanol or ammonia, thereby reducing the nation's petroleum dependency. The investigation of the application of fuel cells to the highway transportation described began in 1977. Recently, the scope was broadened to include a determination of the feasibility of using fuel cells in nonhighway transportation, i.e., rail and marine.

Huff, J.R.; McCormich, J.B.; Lynn, D.K.; Bobbett, R.E.; Dooley, G.R.; Derouin, C.R.; Murray, H.S.; Srinivasan, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Application of fuel cells to highway and nonhighway transportation  

SciTech Connect

Transportation is the nation's largest single energy user and accounts for approximately 50% of our current petroleum consumption. This fact not only defines the urgency of the problem, it also delineates the magnitude of the infrastructure already in place and the built-in inertia of the system. Major changes in our modes of transportation will not take place instantly, as we might wish, but will certainly require years and, perhaps, decades of steady evolution and technological development. Fuel cells are a promising alternate power source for transportation applications for a number of reasons. Modeling studies have indicated the potential for providing highway vehicles with performance and range comparable to those provided by internal combustion engines. Fuel cells are efficient and therefore reduce energy consumption. They are nonpolluting in terms of both air and noise pollution - highly desirable features for urban applications. In addition, they can operate on nonpetroleum fuels such as hydrogen or hydrogen in combined form, for example, methanol or ammonia, thereby reducing the nation's petroleum dependency. The investigation of the application of fuel cells to the highway transportation described began in 1977. Recently, the scope was broadened to include a determination of the feasibility of using fuel cells in nonhighway transportation, i.e., rail and marine.

Huff, J.R.; McCormich, J.B.; Lynn, D.K.; Bobbett, R.E.; Dooley, G.R.; Derouin, C.R.; Murray, H.S.; Srinivasan, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nations around the world pursue a variety of sustainable nations around the world pursue a variety of sustainable transportation solutions, the hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) presents a promising opportunity for American consumers and automakers. FCEVs are important to our nation's future because they can: * Play an important role in our portfolio of sustainable transportation options * Provide a cost-competitive, appealing alternative for drivers * Reduce dependence on imported oil and diversify energy sources for transportation * Enable global economic leadership and job growth. Offering a Sustainable Transportation Option Americans have tremendous freedom to travel wherever and whenever they want. Ninety percent of travel in the United States is achieved by automobiles that refuel quickly

373

ULTRACLEAN FUELS PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FOR THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: ADVANCES TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

SciTech Connect

Ultraclean fuels production has become increasingly important as a method to help decrease emissions and allow the introduction of alternative feed stocks for transportation fuels. Established methods, such as Fischer-Tropsch, have seen a resurgence of interest as natural gas prices drop and existing petroleum resources require more intensive clean-up and purification to meet stringent environmental standards. This review covers some of the advances in deep desulfurization, synthesis gas conversion into fuels and feed stocks that were presented at the 245th American Chemical Society Spring Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA in the Division of Energy and Fuels symposium on "Ultraclean Fuels Production and Utilization".

Fox, E.

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

374

Spent Fuel Transportation Applications: Longitudinal Tearing Resulting from Transportation Accidents--A Probabilistic Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a probabilistic treatment of longitudinal tearing of spent fuel rods subjected to dynamic forces that could result from hypothetical spent fuel transportation accidents. Longitudinal tearing represents the failure configuration with the highest potential for occurring during transport because of the effects of radial hydrides on cladding resistance to fracture. Accurate assessment of this failure mode constitutes an important part of a general failure analysis methodology to quantify...

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

375

Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project: 22 April 2004--31 August 2005  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Subcontract Report Strategy for the Integration of NREL/SR-540-38720� Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into September 2005 � the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle � Fueling Infrastructure of the � Interstate Clean Transportation � Corridor Project � April 22, 2004 - August 31, 2005 Gladstein, Neandross & Associates � Santa Monica, California � NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation

376

Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, carbon-rich fossil fuels, primarily oil, coal, and natural gas, provide 85% of the energy consumed in the U.S. As world demand increases, oil reserves may become rapidly depleted. Fossil fuel use increases CO{sub 2} emissions and raises the risk of global warming. The high energy content of liquid hydrocarbon fuels makes them the preferred energy source for all modes of transportation. In the U.S. alone, transportation consumes >13.8 million barrels of oil per day and generates 0.5 gigatons of carbon per year. This release of greenhouse gases has spurred research into alternative, nonfossil energy sources. Among the options (nuclear, concentrated solar thermal, geothermal, hydroelectric, wind, solar, and biomass), only biomass has the potential to provide a high-energy-content transportation fuel. Biomass is a renewable resource that can be converted into carbon-neutral transporation fuels. Currently, biofuels such as ethanol are produced largely from grains, but there is a large, untapped resource (estimated at more than a billion tons per year) of plant biomass that could be utilized as a renewable, domestic source of liquid fuels. Well-established processes convert the starch content of the grain into sugars that can be fermented to ethanol. The energy efficiency of starch-based biofuels is however not optimal, while plant cell walls (lignocellulose) represent a huge untapped source of energy. Plant-derived biomass contains cellulose, which is more difficult to convert to sugars; hemicellulose, which contains a diversity of carbohydrates that have to be efficiently degraded by microorganisms to fuels; and lignin, which is recalcitrant to degradation and prevents cost-effective fermentation. The development of cost-effective and energy-efficient processes to transform lignocellulosic biomass into fuels is hampered by significant roadblocks, including the lack of specifically developed energy crops, the difficulty in separating biomass components, low activity of enzymes used to deconstruct biomass, and the inhibitory effect of fuels and processing byproducts on organisms responsible for producing fuels from biomass monomers. The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Research Center that will address these roadblocks in biofuels production. JBEI draws on the expertise and capabilities of three national laboratories (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)), two leading U.S. universities (University of California campuses at Berkeley (UCB) and Davis (UCD)), and a foundation (Carnegie Institute for Science, Stanford) to develop the scientific and technological base needed to convert the energy stored in lignocellulose into transportation fuels and commodity chemicals. Established scientists from the participating organizations are leading teams of researchers to solve the key scientific problems and develop the tools and infrastructure that will enable other researchers and companies to rapidly develop new biofuels and scale production to meet U.S. transportation needs and to develop and rapidly transition new technologies to the commercial sector. JBEI's biomass-to-biofuels research approach is based in three interrelated scientific divisions and a technologies division. The Feedstocks Division will develop improved plant energy crops to serve as the raw materials for biofuels. The Deconstruction Division will investigate the conversion of this lignocellulosic plant material to sugar and aromatics. The Fuels Synthesis Division will create microbes that can efficiently convert sugar and aromatics into ethanol and other biofuels. JBEI's cross-cutting Technologies Division will develop and optimize a set of enabling technologies including high-throughput, chipbased, and omics platforms; tools for synthetic biology; multi-scale imaging facilities; and integrated data analysis to support and integrate JBEI's scientific program.

Blanch, Harvey; Adams, Paul; Andrews-Cramer, Katherine; Frommer, Wolf; Simmons, Blake; Keasling, Jay

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

377

Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical Gap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis Analysis Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical Gap Analysis While both wet and dry storage have been shown to be safe options for storing used nuclear fuel (UNF), the focus of the program is on dry storage of commercial UNF at reactor or centralized locations. This report focuses on the knowledge gaps concerning extended storage identified in numerous domestic and international investigations and provides the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign"s (UFDC) gap description, any alternate gap descriptions, the rankings by the various organizations, evaluation of the priority assignment, and UFDC-recommended action based on the comparison. Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical Gap Analysis More Documents & Publications

378

Railroad transportation of spent nuclear fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a detailed analysis of rail operations that are important for assessing the risk of transporting high-level nuclear waste. The major emphasis of the discussion is towards ''general freight'' shipments of radioactive material. The purpose of this document is to provide a basis for selecting models and parameters that are appropriate for assessing the risk of rail transportation of nuclear waste.

Wooden, D.G.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Water transport properties of fuel cell ionomers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We will report transport parameters measured for several available perfluorosulfonate membranes. The water sorption characteristics, diffusion coefficient of water, electroosmotic drag, and conductivity will be compared for these materials. The intrinsic properties of the membranes will be the basis of our comparison. An objective look at transport parameters should enable us to compare membranes without the skewing effects of extensive features such as membrane thickness. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Springer, T.E.; Davey, J.; Valerio, J.; Gottesfeld, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Reimagining liquid transportation fuels : sunshine to petrol.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two of the most daunting problems facing humankind in the twenty-first century are energy security and climate change. This report summarizes work accomplished towards addressing these problems through the execution of a Grand Challenge LDRD project (FY09-11). The vision of Sunshine to Petrol is captured in one deceptively simple chemical equation: Solar Energy + xCO{sub 2} + (x+1)H{sub 2}O {yields} C{sub x}H{sub 2x+2}(liquid fuel) + (1.5x+.5)O{sub 2} Practical implementation of this equation may seem far-fetched, since it effectively describes the use of solar energy to reverse combustion. However, it is also representative of the photosynthetic processes responsible for much of life on earth and, as such, summarizes the biomass approach to fuels production. It is our contention that an alternative approach, one that is not limited by efficiency of photosynthesis and more directly leads to a liquid fuel, is desirable. The development of a process that efficiently, cost effectively, and sustainably reenergizes thermodynamically spent feedstocks to create reactive fuel intermediates would be an unparalleled achievement and is the key challenge that must be surmounted to solve the intertwined problems of accelerating energy demand and climate change. We proposed that the direct thermochemical conversion of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O to CO and H{sub 2}, which are the universal building blocks for synthetic fuels, serve as the basis for this revolutionary process. To realize this concept, we addressed complex chemical, materials science, and engineering problems associated with thermochemical heat engines and the crucial metal-oxide working-materials deployed therein. By project's end, we had demonstrated solar-driven conversion of CO{sub 2} to CO, a key energetic synthetic fuel intermediate, at 1.7% efficiency.

Johnson, Terry Alan (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; McDaniel, Anthony H. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Dedrick, Daniel E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stechel, Ellen Beth; Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Miller, James Edward; Allendorf, Mark D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ambrosini, Andrea; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Chen, Ken Shuang; Ermanoski, Ivan; Kellog, Gary L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sustainable Transportation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sustainable Transportation Sustainable Transportation Sustainable Transportation Bioenergy Read more Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Read more Vehicles Read more The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) leads U.S. researchers and other partners in making transportation cleaner and more efficient through solutions that put electric drive vehicles on the road and replace oil with clean domestic fuels. Through our Vehicle, Bioenergy, and Fuel Cell Technologies Offices, EERE advances the development of next-generation technologies to improve plug-in electric and other alternative-fuel vehicles, advanced combustion engine and vehicle efficiency, and produce low-carbon domestic transportation fuels. SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION Vehicles Bioenergy Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Vehicles Bioenergy

382

Solar Energy for Transportation Fuel (LBNL Science at the Theater)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nate Lewis' talk looks at the challenge of capturing solar energy and storing it as an affordable transportation fuel all on a scale necessary to reduce global warming. Overcoming this challenge will require developing new materials that can use abundant and inexpensive elements rather than costly and rare materials. He discusses the promise of new materials in the development of carbon-free alternatives to fossil fuel.

Lewis, Nate

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

383

PEM fuel cells for transportation and stationary power generation applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe recent activities at LANL devoted to polymer electrolyte fuel cells in the contexts of stationary power generation and transportation applications. A low cost/high performance hydrogen or reformate/air stack technology is being developed based on ultralow Pt loadings and on non-machined, inexpensive elements for flow-fields and bipolar plates. On board methanol reforming is compared to the option of direct methanol fuel cells because of recent significant power density increases demonstrated in the latter.

Cleghorn, S.J.; Ren, X.; Springer, T.E.; Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Gottesfeld, S.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2004 Annual Progress Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New York State Hi-Way Initiative, Richard Bourgeois, GE Global Research (PDF 223 KB) Vermont Renewable Hydrogen Production and Transportation Fueling System (New Project), Chris...

385

More Than 1,000 Fuel Cell Units Deployed Through DOE ARRA Funding (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

359 * July 2012 359 * July 2012 More Than 1,000 Fuel Cell Units Deployed Through DOE ARRA Funding Team: Jennifer Kurtz, Keith Wipke, Sam Sprik, Todd Ramsden, Chris Ainscough Accomplishment: Early market end users are operating 1,111 fuel cell units at 301 sites in 20 states funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program and with analysis by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Context: The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funded the deployment of approximately 1,000 fuel cell systems in key early markets to accelerate the commercialization and deployment of fuel cells and fuel cell manufacturing, installation, maintenance, and support services. In support of the ARRA fuel cell deployment objectives, NREL analyzes and

386

Biofacts: Fueling a stronger economy. Renewable fuel solutions for petroleum refineries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Biofuels Program is investigating processes to condition synthesis gas (syngas) produced from the gasification of biomass, coke, waste oils, and other inexpensive feedstocks and low-cost by-products. Syngas technologies offer refiners economical, flexible solutions to the challenges presented by today`s market forces and regulatory environment, such as: increasingly stringent environmental regulations that dictate the composition of petroleum products; increasingly sour crudes; increased coke production and hydrogen use resulting from heavier crude; increased disposal cost for coke and residuals oils; and decreasing hydrogen supply resulting from decreased catalytic reforming severity--a necessity to comply with requirements for reduced aromatic content. Most importantly, refiners can use the DOE syngas processes to upgrade refinery residuals and coke, which minimizes environmental problems and maximizes profitability. DOE`s solution also offers refiners the flexibility to economically supplement petroleum feedstocks with a wide variety of locally available renewable feedstocks that can be fed into the gasifier--feedstocks such as energy crops, municipal solid wastes, many industrial wastes, and agricultural by-products.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Algae as a Feedstock for Transportation Fuels. The Future of Biofuels?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Events in world energy markets over the past several years have prompted many new technical developments as well as political support for alternative transportation fuels, especially those that are renewable. We have seen dramatic rises in the demand for and production of fuel ethanol from sugar cane and corn and biodiesel from vegetable oils. The quantities of these fuels being used continue to rise dramatically, and their use is helping to create a political climate for doing even more. But, the quantities are still far too small to stem the tide of rising crude prices worldwide. In fact, the use of some traditional crops (corn, sugar, soy, etc.) in making fuels instead of food is apparently beginning to impact the cost of food worldwide. Thus, there is considerable interest in developing alternative biofuel feedstocks for use in making fuels -- feedstocks that are not used in the food industries. Of course, we know that there is a lot of work in developing cellulosic-based ethanol that would be made from woody biomass. Process development is the critical path for this option, and the breakthrough in reducing the cost of the process has been elusive thus far. Making biodiesel from vegetable oils is a well-developed and inexpensive process, but to date there have been few reasonable alternatives for making biodiesel, although advanced processes such as gasification of biomass remain an option.

McGill, Ralph [Sentech, Inc., Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Consulting, Knoxville, TN (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Baseline descriptions for LWR spent fuel storage, handling, and transportation  

SciTech Connect

Baseline descriptions for the storage, handling, and transportation of reactor spent fuel are provided. The storage modes described include light water reactor (LWR) pools, away-from-reactor basins, dry surface storage, reprocessing-facility interim storage pools, and deep geologic storage. Land and water transportation are also discussed. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy/Office of Safeguards and Security as part of the Sandia Laboratories Fixed Facility Physical Protection Program. 45 figs, 4 tables.

Moyer, J.W.; Sonnier, C.S.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportationfrom alternative fuels for motor vehicles and electricity-Environmental Externalities of Motor-Vehicle Use in the U.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportationfrom alternative fuels for motor vehicles and electricity-Environmental Externalities of Motor-Vehicle Use in the U.

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

HYDROGEN COMMERCIALIZATION: TRANSPORTATION FUEL FOR THE 21ST CENTURY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1999, SunLine Transit Agency has worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) to develop and test hydrogen infrastructure, fuel cell buses, a heavy-duty fuel cell truck, a fuel cell neighborhood electric vehicle, fuel cell golf carts and internal combustion engine buses operating on a mixture of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG). SunLine has cultivated a rich history of testing and demonstrating equipment for leading industry manufacturers in a pre-commercial environment. Visitors to SunLine's "Clean Fuels Mall" from around the world have included government delegations and agencies, international journalists and media, industry leaders and experts and environmental and educational groups.

APOLONIO DEL TORO

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

392

Lessons Learned from the Alternative Fuels Experience and How They Apply to the Development of a Hydrogen-Fueled Transportation System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report describes efforts to deploy alternative transportation fuels and how those experiences might apply to a hydrogen-fueled transportation system.

Melendez, M.; Theis, K.; Johnson, C.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

A smooth transition to hydrogen transportation fuel  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this work is to examine viable near-term infrastructure options for a transition to hydrogen fueled vehicles and to suggest profitable directions for technology development. The authors have focused in particular on the contrasting options of decentralized production using the existing energy distribution network, and centralized production of hydrogen with a large-scale infrastructure. Delivered costs have been estimated using best available industry cost and deliberately conservative economic assumptions. The sensitivities of these costs have then been examined for three small-scale scenarios: (1) electrolysis at the home for one car, and production at the small station scale (300 cars/day), (2) conventional alkaline electrolysis and (3) steam reforming of natural gas. All scenarios assume fueling a 300 mile range vehicle with 3.75 kg. They conclude that a transition appears plausible, using existing energy distribution systems, with home electrolysis providing fuel costing 7.5 to 10.5{cents}/mile, station electrolysis 4.7 to 7.1{cents}/mile, and steam reforming 3.7 to 4.7{cents}/mile. The average car today costs about 6{cents}/mile to fuel. Furthermore, analysis of liquid hydrogen delivered locally by truck from central processing plants can also be competitive at costs as low as 4{cents}/mile. These delivered costs are equal to $30 to $70 per GJ, LHV. Preliminary analysis indicates that electricity transmission costs favor this method of distributing energy, until very large (10 GW) hydrogen pipelines are installed. This indicates that significant hydrogen pipeline distribution will be established only when significant markets have developed.

Berry, G.D.; Smith, J.R.; Schock, R.N.

1995-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

Model documentation renewable fuels module of the National Energy Modeling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the 1997 Annual Energy Outlook forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs. and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. This documentation report serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document for model analysts, model users, and the public interested in the construction and application of the RFM. Second, it meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. Finally, such documentation facilitates continuity in EIA model development by providing information sufficient to perform model enhancements and data updates as part of EIA`s ongoing mission to provide analytical and forecasting information systems.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Appendix model performance - model documentation renewable fuels module of the National Energy Modeling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This appendix discusses performance aspects of the Renewable Fuels Module (RFM). It is intended to present the pattern of response of the RFM to typical changes in its major inputs from other NEMS modules. The overall approach of this document, with the particular statistics presented, is designed to be comparable with similar analyses conducted for all of the modules of NEMS. While not always applicable, the overall approach has been to produce analyses and statistics that are as comparable as possible with model developer`s reports for other NEMS modules. Those areas where the analysis is somewhat limited or constrained are discussed. Because the RFM consists of independent submodules, this appendix is broken down by submodule.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Model documentation, Renewable Fuels Module of the National Energy Modeling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and design of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) as it relates to the production of the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98) forecasts. The report catalogues and describes modeling assumptions, computational methodologies, data inputs, and parameter estimation techniques. A number of offline analyses used in lieu of RFM modeling components are also described. For AEO98, the RFM was modified in three principal ways, introducing capital cost elasticities of supply for new renewable energy technologies, modifying biomass supply curves, and revising assumptions for use of landfill gas from municipal solid waste (MSW). In addition, the RFM was modified in general to accommodate projections beyond 2015 through 2020. Two supply elasticities were introduced, the first reflecting short-term (annual) cost increases from manufacturing, siting, and installation bottlenecks incurred under conditions of rapid growth, and the second reflecting longer term natural resource, transmission and distribution upgrade, and market limitations increasing costs as more and more of the overall resource is used. Biomass supply curves were also modified, basing forest products supplies on production rather than on inventory, and expanding energy crop estimates to include states west of the Mississippi River using information developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Finally, for MSW, several assumptions for the use of landfill gas were revised and extended.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Off-Highway Transportation-Related Fuel Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transportation sector includes many subcategories--for example, on-highway, off-highway, and non-highway. Use of fuel for off-highway purposes is not well documented, nor is the number of off-highway vehicles. The number of and fuel usage for on-highway and aviation, marine, and rail categories are much better documented than for off-highway land-based use. Several sources document off-highway fuel use under specific conditions--such as use by application (e.g., recreation) or by fuel type (e.g., gasoline). There is, however, no single source that documents the total fuel used off-highway and the number of vehicles that use the fuel. This report estimates the fuel usage and number of vehicles/equipment for the off-highway category. No new data have been collected nor new models developed to estimate the off-highway data--this study is limited in scope to using data that already exist. In this report, unless they are being quoted from a source that uses different terminology, the terms are used as listed below. (1) ''On-highway/on-road'' includes land-based transport used on the highway system or other paved roadways. (2) ''Off-highway/off-road'' includes land-based transport not using the highway system or other paved roadways. (3) ''Non-highway/non-road'' includes other modes not traveling on highways such as aviation, marine, and rail. It should be noted that the term ''transportation'' as used in this study is not typical. Generally, ''transportation'' is understood to mean the movement of people or goods from one point to another. Some of the off-highway equipment included in this study doesn't transport either people or goods, but it has utility in movement (e.g., a forklift or a lawn mower). Along these lines, a chain saw also has utility in movement, but it cannot transport itself (i.e., it must be carried) because it does not have wheels. Therefore, to estimate the transportation-related fuel used off-highway, transportation equipment is defined to include all devices that have wheels, can move or be moved from one point to another, and use fuel. An attempt has been made to exclude off-highway engines that do not meet all three of these criteria (e.g., chain saws and generators). The following approach was used to determine the current off-highway fuel use. First, a literature review was conducted to ensure that all sources with appropriate information would be considered. Secondly, the fuel use data available from each source were compiled and compared in so far as possible. Comparable data sets (i.e., same fuel type; same application) were evaluated. Finally, appropriate data sets were combined to provide a final tally.

Davis, S.C.

2004-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

398

Cathode porous transport irreversibility model for PEM fuel cell design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence is studied of slip-irreversibility at the interface between the gas diffusion layer, also referred to here as the porous transport layer, and the catalyst layer of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). A two-dimensional cathode ... Keywords: catalyst layer, exergy, gas diffusion layer, slip flow irreversibility

E. O. B. Ogedengbe; M. A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Criticality Risks During Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a best-estimate probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) to quantify the frequency of criticality accidents during railroad transportation of spent nuclear fuel casks. The assessment is of sufficient detail to enable full scrutiny of the model logic and the basis for each quantitative parameter contributing to criticality accident scenario frequencies.

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

400

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS -POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS - POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS Senior scientist - "Towards Hydrogen Society" ·biomass resources - potentials, limits ·biomass carbon cycle ·biomass for hydrogen - as compared to other H2- sources and to other biomass paths #12;BIOMASS - THE CARBON CYCLE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

2007 Renewable Energy: Solar Fuels Gordon Research Conference - January 21-26  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Gordon Research Conference seeks to brings together chemists, physicists, materials scientists and biologists to address perhaps the outstanding technical problem of the 21st Century - the efficient, and ultimately economical, storage of energy from carbon-neutral sources. Such an advance would deliver a renewable, environmentally benign energy source for the future. A great technological challenge facing our global future is energy. The generation of energy, the security of its supply, and the environmental consequences of its use are among the world's foremost geopolitical concerns. Fossil fuels - coal, natural gas, and petroleum - supply approximately 90% of the energy consumed today by industrialized nations. An increase in energy supply is vitally needed to bring electric power to the 25% of the world's population that lacks it, to support the industrialization of developing nations, and to sustain economic growth in developed countries. On the geopolitical front, insuring an adequate energy supply is a major security issue for the world, and its importance will grow in proportion to the singular dependence on oil as a primary energy source. Yet, the current approach to energy supply, that of increased fossil fuel exploration coupled with energy conservation, is not scaleable to meet future demands. Rising living standards of a growing world population will cause global energy consumption to increase significantly. Estimates indicate that energy consumption will increase at least two-fold, from our current burn rate of 12.8 TW to 28 - 35 TW by 2050. - U.N. projections indicate that meeting global energy demand in a sustainable fashion by the year 2050 will require a significant fraction of the energy supply to come carbon free sources to stabilize atmospheric carbon dioxide levels at twice the pre-anthropogenic levels. External factors of economy, environment, and security dictate that this global energy need be met by renewable and sustainable sources from a carbon-neutral source. Sunlight is by far the most abundant global carbon-neutral energy resource. More solar energy strikes the surface of the earth in one hour than is obtained from all of the fossil fuels consumed globally in a year. Sunlight may be used to power the planet. However, it is intermittent, and therefore it must be converted to electricity or stored chemical fuel to be used on a large scale. The ''grand challenge'' of using the sun as a future energy source faces daunting challenges - large expanses of fundamental science and technology await discovery. A viable solar energy conversion scheme must result in a 10-50 fold decrease in the cost-to-efficiency ratio for the production of stored fuels, and must be stable and robust for a 20-30 year period. To reduce the cost of installed solar energy conversion systems to $0.20/peak watt of solar radiation, a cost level that would make them economically attractive in today's energy market, will require revolutionary technologies. This GRC seeks to present a forum for the underlying science needed to permit future generations to use the sun as a renewable and sustainable primary energy source.

Daniel G. Nocera

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Transportation and Air Quality Transportation Energy Policy Analysis Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Appliance Energy...

403

Methanol production from biomass and natural gas as transportation fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two processes are examined for production of methanol. They are assessed against the essential requirements of a future alternative fuel for road transport: that it (1) is producible in amounts comparable to the 19 EJ of motor fuel annually consumed in the US, (2) minimizes emissions of criteria pollutants, (3) reduces greenhouse gas emissions from production and use, (4) is cost-competitive with petroleum fuel, and (5) is compatible with the emerging vehicle technologies, especially those powdered by fuel cells. The methanol yield, production cost, and potential for reduction of overall fuel-cycle CO{sub 2} emissions were evaluated and compared to those of reformulated gasoline. The results show that a process utilizing natural gas and biomass as cofeedstocks can meet the five requirements more effectively than individual processes utilizing those feedstocks separately. When end-use efficiencies are accounted for, the cost per vehicle mile traveled would be less than that of gasoline used in current vehicles. CO{sub 2} emissions from the vehicle fleet would be reduced 66% by methanol used in fuel cell vehicles and 8--36% in flexible-fuel or dedicated-methanol vehicles during the transition period. Methanol produced from natural gas and biomass, together in one process, and used in fuel cell vehicles would leverage petroleum displacement by a factor of about 5 and achieve twice the overall CO{sub 2} emission reduction obtainable from the use of biomass alone.

Borgwardt, R.H. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). National Risk Management Research Lab.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Fuel Cell Demonstration Project - 200 kW - Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Power Plant Located at the National Transportation Research Center: FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researches and develops distributed generation technology for the Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Distributed Energy Program. This report describes installation and operation of one such distributed generation system, a United Technology Corporation fuel cell located at the National Transportation Research Center in Knoxville, Tennessee. Data collected from June 2003 to June of 2004, provides valuable insight regarding fuel cell-grid compatibility and the cost-benefit of the fuel cell operation. The NTRC fuel cell included a high-heat recovery option so that use of thermal energy improves project economics and improves system efficiency to 59% year round. During the year the fuel cell supplied a total of 834MWh to the NTRC and provided 300MBtu of hot water. Installation of the NTRC fuel cell was funded by the Distributed Energy Program with partial funding from the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buy Down Program, administered by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. On-going operational expenses are funded by ORNL's utility budget and are paid from operational cost savings. Technical information and the benefit-cost of the fuel cell are both evaluated in this report and sister reports.

Berry, JB

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

405

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout … Sustainable Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dr. Kathleen Hogan, Deputy Assistant Secretary Dr. Kathleen Hogan, Deputy Assistant Secretary May 2, 2013 Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout - Sustainable Transportation 2 EERE's National Mission To create American leadership in the global transition to a clean energy economy 1) High-Impact Research, Development, and Demonstration to Make Clean Energy as Affordable and Convenient as Traditional Forms of Energy 2) Breaking Down Barriers to Market Entry 3 Why Clean Energy Matters To America * Winning the most important global economic development race of the 21 st century * Creating jobs through American innovation * Enhancing energy security by reducing our dependence on foreign oil and gas * Saving money by cutting energy costs for American

406

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System Discussion Fuel Cell Tech Team FreedomCar Detroit. MI October 20, 2004 TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge, Massachusetts 02140-2390 Ref D0006 SFAA No. DE-SCO2- 98EE50526 Topic 1 Subtopic 1C Agenda EC_2004 10 20 FC Tech Team Presentation 1 1 Project Overview 2 Compressed Hydrogen Storage Cost 3 2004 System Cost Update 4 Appendix Project Overview Approach EC_2004 10 20 FC Tech Team Presentation 2 In our final year of the project, we assessed the cost of compressed hydrogen storage and updated the overall system cost projection. Task 1: PEMFC System Technology Synopsis Task 2: Develop Cost Model and Baseline Estimates Task 3: Identify Opportunities for System Cost Reduction Tasks 4, 5, 6 & 7: Annual Updates

407

Beyond Diesel - Renewable Diesel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CTTS fact sheet describing NREL's new Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Research Laboratory, which will be used to facilitate increased renewable diesel use in heavy-duty vehicles.

Not Available

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Water consumption footprint and land requirements of alternative diesel and jet fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Renewable Fuels Standard 2 (RFS2) is an important component of alternative transportation fuels policy in the United States (US). By mandating the production of alternative fuels, RFS2 attempts to address a number of ...

Staples, Mark Douglas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Hydrogen as a near-term transportation fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The health costs associated with urban air pollution are a growing problem faced by all societies. Automobiles burning gasoline and diesel contribute a great deal to this problem. The cost to the United States of imported oil is more than US$50 billion annually. Economic alternatives are being actively sought. Hydrogen fuel, used in an internal combustion engine optimized for maximum efficiency and as part of a hybrid-electric vehicle, will give excellent performance and range (>480 km) with emissions well below the ultra-low emission vehicle standards being required in California. These vehicles can also be manufactured without excessive cost. Hydrogen-fueled engines have demonstrated indicated efficiencies of more than 50% under lean operation. Combining engine and other component efficiencies, the overall vehicle efficiency should be about 40%, compared with 13% for a conventional vehicle in the urban driving cycle. The optimized engine-generator unit is the mechanical equivalent of the fuel cell but at a cost competitive with today`s engines. The increased efficiency of hybrid-electric vehicles now makes hydrogen fuel competitive with today`s conventional vehicles. Conservative analysis of the infrastructure options to support a transition to a hydrogen-fueled light-duty fleet indicates that hydrogen may be utilized at a total cost comparable to what US vehicle operators pay today. Both on-site production by electrolysis or reforming of natural gas and liquid hydrogen distribution offer the possibility of a smooth transition by taking advantage of existing low-cost, large-scale energy infrastructures. Eventually, renewable sources of electricity and scalable methods of making hydrogen will have lower costs than today. With a hybrid-electric propulsion system, the infrastructure to supply hydrogen and the vehicles to use it can be developed today and thus can be in place when fuel cells become economical for vehicle use.

Schock, R.N.; Berry, G.D.; Smith, J.R.; Rambach, G.D.

1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

410

Coal transportation risks for fuel switching decisions  

SciTech Connect

Coal switching costs are generally expected to be the single largest cost factor associated with switching coals to low-sulfur sources. This report analyzes the principal issues and risks involved in moving Powder River Basin coal to eastern destinations and in moving increased amounts of Central Appalachian low-sulfur coal along the Ohio River. The railroad infrastructure for Powder River Basin coal is essentially optimized for current levels of traffic, yet estimated shipments will expand by 100 million tons over the next ten years. A critical issue is the magnitude and timing of investments in the railroad system required to maintain quality of service. Costs for rail and barge transport are comparable at present, yet they have different abilities to handle increased traffic. Negotiated rates will not be uniform and will change with the dynamics of investments and the clarification of utility compliance plans. Coal traffic patterns on inland waterways will change in order to handle barge movements for both Powder River Basin and Central Appalachian low-sulfur coals. Docks serving Central Appalachian coal fields have ample capacity, but originations will take place increasingly far from the rivers. Potential bottlenecks at specific locks and dams along the Ohio River have been identified. With the barge industry coming out of a slump, future barge rates will depend critically on the Corps of Engineers' schedule to upgrade key facilities. 30 figs., 14 tabs.

Toth, S. (Fieldston Co., Inc., Washington, DC (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Fossil fuels -- future fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas July 30, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation fuel. About one third of the natural gas used in the United States goes to residential and commercial uses, one third to industrial uses, and one third to electric power production. Natural gas has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic, non-corrosive, and non-carcinogenic. It presents no threat to soil, surface water, or groundwater. Natural gas is a mixture of hydrocarbons, predominantly methane (CH4). As delivered through the nation's pipeline system, it also contains hydrocarbons such as ethane and propane and other gases such as nitrogen,

413

Assessment of Co-Production of Transportation Fuels and Electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an update of EPRI TR-1004066 ("Assessment of Technical Innovations for the Co-Production of Transportation Fuels and Electricity", August 2001). The need for this update became evident as a result of technology, economic and market developments over the past five years. A key driver has been the escalation of natural gas prices, which results in increased competitiveness of coal-fired plant options.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

414

Criticality Risks During Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a best-estimate probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) to quantify the frequency of criticality accidents during railroad transportation of spent nuclear fuel casks. The assessment is of sufficient detail to enable full scrutiny of the model logic and the basis for each quantitative parameter contributing to criticality accident scenario frequencies. The report takes into account the results of a 2007 peer review of the initial version of this probabilistic risk assessment, which was pu...

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

415

National Program Plan Fuel Cells in Transportation. Executive Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells are being developed for application in the transportation sector because they will convert hydrogen to electric power at high efficiencies with virtually no detrimental environmental impact. To realize these energy, environmental, and economic benefits, developers of FCVs need to (1) reduce the size and weight of current designs, (2) develop fuel cell propulsion systems with rapid start-up and greater load-following capability, (3) reduce system cost and/or improve performance, and (4) utilize alternative fuels to a large extent. This Plan addresses the FCV-related requirements of the Energy Act, describing a development program for light- and heavy-duty propulsion systems, a basic R&D program on fuel cell technology that is separate from, but feeds into, the system development activities, and supporting analyses. Implementation of the Program Plan by means of industry/government alliances will accelerate the commercialization of FCVs. In the long term, the successful deployment of large numbers of FCVs promises to eliminate the transportation sector as a major contributor to the nation`s environmental problems.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Potential transportation and stationary applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) as a primary power source in electric vehicles has received increasing attention during the last few years. This increased attention is the result of a combination of significant technical advances in this fuel cell technology and the initiation of some projects for the demonstration of a complete, PEFC-based power system a bus or in a passenger car. Such demonstration projects reflect an increase in industry`s faith in the potential of this technology for transportation applications, or, at least, in the need for a detailed evaluation of this potential. Nevertheless, large scale transportation applications of PEFCs require a continued concerted effort of research on catalysis, materials and components, combined with the engineering efforts addressing the complete power system. This is required to achieve a cost effective, highly performing PEFC stack and power system. A related set of technical and cost challenges arises in the context of potential applications of PEFCs for stationary power applications, although there are clearly some differences in their nature, particularly, to do with the different types of fuels to be employed for each of these applications. We describe in this contribution some recent results of work performed by the Core Research PEFC Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, which has addressed materials, components and single cell testing of PEFCS. Also included are some recent observations and some insights regarding the potential of this fuel cell technology for stationary Power generation.

Gottesfeld, S.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Potential transportation and stationary applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) as a primary power source in electric vehicles has received increasing attention during the last few years. This increased attention is the result of a combination of significant technical advances in this fuel cell technology and the initiation of some projects for the demonstration of a complete, PEFC-based power system a bus or in a passenger car. Such demonstration projects reflect an increase in industry's faith in the potential of this technology for transportation applications, or, at least, in the need for a detailed evaluation of this potential. Nevertheless, large scale transportation applications of PEFCs require a continued concerted effort of research on catalysis, materials and components, combined with the engineering efforts addressing the complete power system. This is required to achieve a cost effective, highly performing PEFC stack and power system. A related set of technical and cost challenges arises in the context of potential applications of PEFCs for stationary power applications, although there are clearly some differences in their nature, particularly, to do with the different types of fuels to be employed for each of these applications. We describe in this contribution some recent results of work performed by the Core Research PEFC Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, which has addressed materials, components and single cell testing of PEFCS. Also included are some recent observations and some insights regarding the potential of this fuel cell technology for stationary Power generation.

Gottesfeld, S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Salt transport extraction of transuranium elements from lwr fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl.sub.2 and a Cu--Mg alloy containing not less than about 25% by weight Mg at a temperature in the range of from about 750.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C. to precipitate uranium metal and some of the noble metal fission products leaving the Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and some of the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl.sub.2 having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO.sub.2. The Ca metal and CaCl.sub.2 is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with a transport salt including Mg Cl.sub.2 to transfer Mg values from the transport salt to the Cu--Mg alloy while transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product metals transfer from the Cu--Mg alloy to the transport salt. Then the transport salt is mixed with a Mg--Zn alloy to transfer Mg values from the alloy to the transport salt while the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product values dissolved in the salt are reduced and transferred to the Mg--Zn alloy.

Pierce, R. Dean (Naperville, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Salt transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl[sub 2] and a Cu--Mg alloy containing not less than about 25% by weight Mg at a temperature in the range of from about 750 C to about 850 C to precipitate uranium metal and some of the noble metal fission products leaving the Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and some of the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl[sub 2] having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO[sub 2]. The Ca metal and CaCl[sub 2] is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with a transport salt including MgCl[sub 2] to transfer Mg values from the transport salt to the Cu--Mg alloy while transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product metals transfer from the Cu--Mg alloy to the transport salt. Then the transport salt is mixed with a Mg--Zn alloy to transfer Mg values from the alloy to the transport salt while the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product values dissolved in the salt are reduced and transferred to the Mg--Zn alloy. 2 figs.

Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Miller, W.E.

1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

420

Salt transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report discusses a process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl{sub 2} and a Cu-Mg alloy containing not less than about 25% by weight Mg at a temperature in the range of from about 750{degrees}C to about 850{degrees}C to precipitate uranium metal and some of the noble metal fission products leaving the Cu-Mg alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and some of the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl{sub 2} having Cao and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO{sub 2}. The Ca metal and CaCl{sub 2} is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The Cu-Mg alloy having transuranium metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with a transport salt including Mg C1{sub 2} to transfer Mg values from the transport salt to the Cu-Mg alloy .hile transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product metals transfer from the Cu-Mg alloy to the transport salt. Then the transport salt is mixed with a Mg-Zn alloy to transfer Mg values from the alloy to the transport salt while the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product values dissolved in the salt are reduced and transferred to the Mg-Zn alloy.

Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Miller, W.E.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fuel Cycle Technologies Near Term Planning for Storage and Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuels Storage Fuels Storage and Transportation Planning Project (NFST) Program Status Jeff Williams Project Director National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Buffalo, New York May 2013 2  "With the appropriate authorizations from Congress, the Administration currently plans to implement a program over the next 10 years that:  Sites, designs and licenses, constructs and begins operations of a pilot interim storage facility by 2021 with an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shut-down reactor sites;  Advances toward the siting and licensing of a larger interim storage facility to be available by 2025 that will have sufficient capacity to provide flexibility in the waste management system and allows for acceptance of enough used

422

Local Option - Building Permit Fee Waivers for Renewable Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

permit fees. Class I renewable energy projects include energy derived from solar power, wind power, fuel cells (using renewable or non-renewable fuels), methane gas from...

423

Fuel Cell Backup Power Geographical Visualization Map (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6740 * December 2012 6740 * December 2012 Fuel Cell Backup Power Geographical Visualization Map Team: Genevieve Saur, Jennifer Kurtz, Sam Sprik, Todd Ramsden Accomplishment: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a time-lapse geographical visualization map of early market use of fuel cells for telecommunications backup power. This map synthesizes data being analyzed by NREL's Technology Validation team for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program with DOE's publically available annual summaries of electric disturbance events. 1 Context: Correlating fuel cell operation with grid outages enhances knowledge of backup system requirements and backup power operation strategies that may advance how systems are designed and how best to utilize their capabilities. NREL's

424

Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

xTL Fuels to someone xTL Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels xTL Fuels Synthetic liquid transportation fuels, collectively known as xTL fuels, are produced through specialized conversion processes. These production methods, including the Fischer-Tropsch process, produce fuels from carbon-based feedstocks, such as biomass, coal, or natural gas, and can

425

Advanced fuel cells for transportation applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Research and Development (R and D) contract was directed at developing an advanced technology compressor/expander for supplying compressed air to Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells in transportation applications. The objective of this project was to develop a low-cost high-efficiency long-life lubrication-free integrated compressor/expander utilizing scroll technology. The goal of this compressor/expander was to be capable of providing compressed air over the flow and pressure ranges required for the operation of 50 kW PEM fuel cells in transportation applications. The desired ranges of flow, pressure, and other performance parameters were outlined in a set of guidelines provided by DOE. The project consisted of the design, fabrication, and test of a prototype compressor/expander module. The scroll CEM development program summarized in this report has been very successful, demonstrating that scroll technology is a leading candidate for automotive fuel cell compressor/expanders. The objectives of the program are: develop an integrated scroll CEM; demonstrate efficiency and capacity goals; demonstrate manufacturability and cost goals; and evaluate operating envelope. In summary, while the scroll CEM program did not demonstrate a level of performance as high as the DOE guidelines in all cases, it did meet the overriding objectives of the program. A fully-integrated, low-cost CEM was developed that demonstrated high efficiency and reliable operation throughout the test program. 26 figs., 13 tabs.

NONE

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

426

Fuel Cycle Technologies Near Term Planning for Storage and Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Section 180(c) of the Nuclear of Section 180(c) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended National Transportation Stakeholder's Forum Buffalo, NY May 15, 2013 Section 180(c) Mandate "The Secretary shall provide technical assistance and funds to States for training for public safety officials of appropriate units of local government and Indian tribes through whose jurisdiction the Secretary plans to transport spent nuclear fuel or high-level radioactive waste [to an NWPA-authorized facility]. * The training shall cover procedures for safe routine transportation of these materials and procedures for dealing with emergency response situations. * Covers all modes of transport 2 Section 180(c) - Background  DOE nearly implemented Section 180(c) in the mid-

427

NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation about NREL's Wind to Hydrogen Project and producing renewable hydrogen for both energy storage and transporation, including the challenges, sustainable pathways, and analysis results.

Ramsden, T.; Harrison, K.; Steward, D.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

428

Combustion chemistry and an evolving transportation fuel environment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The world currently faces tremendous energy challenges stemming from the need to curb potentially catastrophic anthropogenic climate change. In addition, many nations, including the United States, recognize increasing political and economic risks associated with dependence on uncertain and limited energy sources. For these and other reasons the chemical composition of transportation fuels is changing, both through introduction of nontraditional fossil sources, such as oil sands-derived fuels in the US stream, and through broader exploration of biofuels. At the same time the need for clean and efficient combustion is leading engine research towards advanced low-temperature combustion strategies that are increasingly sensitive to this changing fuel chemistry, particularly in the areas of pollutant formation and autoignition. I will highlight the new demands that advanced engine technologies and evolving fuel composition place on investigations of fundamental reaction chemistry. I will focus on recent progress in measuring product formation in elementary reactions by tunable synchrotron photoionization, on the elucidation of pressure-dependent effects in the reactions of alkyl and substituted alkyl radicals with O{sub 2}, and on new combined efforts in fundamental combustion chemistry and engine performance studies of novel potential biofuels.

Taatjes, Craig A. (Org. 8353, Combustion Chemistry Department)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

First Renewables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

development projects, ranging from wind to biomass using a variety of renewable fuel sources. Absorbed into EPR in 2002. References First Renewables1 LinkedIn Connections...

430

Converting Green River shale oil to transportation fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Shale oils contain significant quantities of nitrogen, oxygen, and heavy metals. Removing these contaminants is a major consideration in the catalytic conversion of shale oil to transportation fuels. Hydrotreating can remove substantially all of these elements, while coking only removes most of the heavy metals. Pilot plant data for three processing schemes were generated during the course of this study: hydrotreating followed by hydrocracking, hydrotreating followed by fluid catalytic cracking, and delayed coking followed by hydrotreating. Yields and product inspections are presented for these three cases.

Sullivan, R.F.; Stangeland, B.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Methanol as an alternative transportation fuel in the U.S.  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Methanol as an alternative transportation fuel in the US: Methanol as an alternative transportation fuel in the US: Options for sustainable and/or energy-secure transportation L. Bromberg and W.K. Cheng Prepared by the Sloan Automotive Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge MA 02139 September 27, 2010 Finalized November 2, 2010 Revised November 28, 2010 Final report UT-Battelle Subcontract Number:4000096701 1 Abstract Methanol has been promoted as an alternative transportation fuel from time to time over the past forty years. In spite of significant efforts to realize the vision of methanol as a practical transportation fuel in the US, such as the California methanol fueling corridor of the 1990s, it did not succeed on a large scale. This white paper covers all important aspects of methanol as a transportation fuel.

432

Review of the Research Strategy for Biomass-Derived Transportation Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The report is a review of the R and D strategy for the production of transportation fuel from biomass. Its focus is on ethanol and biodiesel. Its review includes the DG's Office of Fuels Program Development Program.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

433

Basic Research Needs for Clean and Efficient Combustion of 21st Century Transportation Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To identify basic research needs and opportunities underlying utilization of evolving transportation fuels, with a focus on new or emerging science challenges that have the potential for significant long-term impact on fuel efficiency and emissions.

McIlroy, A.; McRae, G.; Sick, V.; Siebers, D. L.; Westbrook, C. K.; Smith, P. J.; Taatjes, C.; Trouve, A.; Wagner, A. F.; Rohlfing, E.; Manley, D.; Tully, F.; Hilderbrandt, R.; Green, W.; Marceau, D.; O'Neal, J.; Lyday, M.; Cebulski, F.; Garcia, T. R.; Strong, D.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Fuels generated from renewable energy: a possible solution for large scale energy storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-powered engines. Fig. 1 shows its ability to restore the lubricity of sulfur-free (Fischer-Tropsch) diesel fuel-boron additive concentration in 0 ppm sulfur diesel Fischer-Tropsch fuel with Argonne's boron additives at different concentrations Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel fuel Number 2 diesel fuel sulfur(500ppm) 0

Franssen, Michael

435

Solid oxide fuel cells for transportation: A clean, efficient alternative for propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells show great promise for providing clean and efficient transportation power. Of the fuel cell propulsion systems under investigation, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is particularly attractive for heavy duty transportation applications that have a relatively long duty cycle, such as locomotives, trucks, and barges. Advantages of the SOFC include a simple, compact system configuration; inherent fuel flexibility for hydrocarbon and alternative fuels; and minimal water management. The specific advantages of the SOFC for powering a railroad locomotive are examined. Feasibility, practicality, and safety concerns regarding SOFCs in transportation applications are discussed, as am the major R D issues.

Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Solid oxide fuel cells for transportation: A clean, efficient alternative for propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells show great promise for providing clean and efficient transportation power. Of the fuel cell propulsion systems under investigation, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is particularly attractive for heavy duty transportation applications that have a relatively long duty cycle, such as locomotives, trucks, and barges. Advantages of the SOFC include a simple, compact system configuration; inherent fuel flexibility for hydrocarbon and alternative fuels; and minimal water management. The specific advantages of the SOFC for powering a railroad locomotive are examined. Feasibility, practicality, and safety concerns regarding SOFCs in transportation applications are discussed, as am the major R&D issues.

Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Cellulosic biomass could help meet Californias transportation fuel needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: TheTransportation fuels ac- Bioenergy crop Plant cells countfor Bioproducts and Bioenergy, Washington State University.

Wyman, Charles E.; Yang, Bin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel: Benefits, Challenges, and Implementation (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation for the Clean Cities Website highlighting the benefits, challenges, and implementation considerations when utilizing natural gas as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation report  

SciTech Connect

This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste issues. In addition, this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages sew be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste transportation report  

SciTech Connect

This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste issues. In addition, this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages will be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable transportation fuels" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Spent Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Report  

SciTech Connect

This publication is intended to provide its readers with an introduction to the issues surrounding the subject of transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, especially as those issues impact the southern region of the United States. It was originally issued by SSEB in July 1987 as the Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Primer, a document patterned on work performed by the Western Interstate Energy Board and designed as a ``comprehensive overview of the issues.`` This work differs from that earlier effort in that it is designed for the educated layman with little or no background in nuclear waste Issues. In addition. this document is not a comprehensive examination of nuclear waste issues but should instead serve as a general introduction to the subject. Owing to changes in the nuclear waste management system, program activities by the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies and developing technologies, much of this information is dated quickly. While this report uses the most recent data available, readers should keep in mind that some of the material is subject to rapid change. SSEB plans periodic updates in the future to account for changes in the program. Replacement pages will be supplied to all parties in receipt of this publication provided they remain on the SSEB mailing list.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The Value of Renewable Energy as a Hedge Against Fuel Price Risk: Analytic Contributions from Economic and Finance Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

different renewable energy potential and cost assumptions.and negative impacts and costs of renewable energy on otherany incremental cost of renewable energy (relative to

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

The Value of Renewable Energy as a Hedge Against Fuel Price Risk: Analytic Contributions from Economic and Finance Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can Deployment of Renewable Energy Put Downward Pressure onDeployment of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency. LBNL-Efficiency and Renewable Energy Practices and Policies.

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

The Value of Renewable Energy as a Hedge Against Fuel Price Risk: Analytic Contributions from Economic and Finance Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deployment of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency. LBNL-Can Deployment of Renewable Energy Put Downward Pressure onEfficiency and Renewable Energy Practices and Policies.

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gas-fired and renewable generation Mark Bolinger and Ryannatural gas prices, renewable energy resources which bygas-fired generation, renewable generation, such as wind or

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

The Value of Renewable Energy as a Hedge Against Fuel Price Risk: Analytic Contributions from Economic and Finance Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of a 10-Percent Renewable Portfolio Standard. SR/Impacts of a 15-Percent Renewable Portfolio Standard. SR/through Increased Deployment of Renewable Energy and Energy

Bolinger, Mark A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meier AKMeier@lbl.gov (510) 486-4740 Links Transportation and Air Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

448

Analytical performance of direct-hydrogen-fueled polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems for transportation applications.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of a stand-alone polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) system directly fueled by hydrogen has been evaluated for transportation vehicles. The study was carried out using a systems analysis code and a vehicle analysis code. The systems code includes models for the various PEFC components and is applicable for steady-state and transient situations. At the design point the system efficiency is above 50% for a 50-kW system. The efficiency improves under partial load and approaches 60% at 40% load, as the fuel cell operating point moves to lower current densities on the V-I polarization curve. At much lower loads, the system efficiency drops because of the deterioration in the performance of the compressor, expander, and eventually the fuel cell. The system performance suffers at lower temperatures, as the V-I characteristic curve for the fuel cell shifts downward because of the increased ohmic losses. The results of the transient analysis indicate that the hydrogen-fueled PEFC system can start rather rapidly, within seconds from ambient conditions. However, the warm-up time constant to reach the design operating temperatures is about 180 s. It is important during this period for the coolant to bypass the system radiator until the coolant temperature approaches the design temperature for the fuel cell. The systems analysis code has been applied to two mid-size vehicles: the near-term Ford AIV Sable and the future P2000 vehicle. The results of this study show that the PEFC system in these vehicles can respond well to the demands of the FUDS and Highway driving cycles, with both warm and cold starting conditions. The results also show that the fuel-cell AIV Sable vehicle has impressive gains in fuel economy over that of the internal combustion engine vehicle. However, this vehicle will not be able to meet the PNGV goal of 80 mpg. On the other hand, the P2000 vehicle approaches this goal with variable efficiency of the compressor and expander. It is expected to exceed that goal by a big margin, if the efficiency of the compressor and expander can be maintained constant (at 0.8) over the power range of the fuel cell system.

Doss, E. D.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

449

Alternative fuel transit buses: Interim results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Vehicle Evaluation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transit bus program is designed to provide a comprehensive study of the alternative fuels currently used by the transit bus industry. The study focuses on the reliability, fuel economy, operating costs, and emissions of vehicles running on the various fuels and alternative fuel engines. The alternative fuels being tested are methanol, ethanol, biodiesel and natural gas. The alternative fuel buses in this program use the most common alternative fuel engines from the heavy-duty engine manufacturers. Data are collected in four categories: Bus and route descriptions; Bus operating data; Emissions data; and, Capital costs. The goal is to collect 18 months of data on each test bus. This report summarizes the interim results from the project to date. The report addresses performance and reliability, fuel economy, costs, and emissions of the busses in the program.

Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K.J.; Chandler, K.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z