National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for renewable electricity standards

  1. Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas "super-utility"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: CaseEnergy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case

  2. Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, P.; Logan, J.; Bird, L.; Short, W.

    2009-05-01

    This paper analyzes potential impacts of proposed national renewable electricity standard (RES) legislation. An RES is a mandate requiring certain electricity retailers to provide a minimum share of their electricity sales from qualifying renewable power generation. The analysis focuses on draft bills introduced individually by Senator Jeff Bingaman and Representative Edward Markey, and jointly by Representative Henry Waxman and Markey. The analysis uses NREL's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to evaluate the impacts of the proposed RES requirements on the U.S. energy sector in four scenarios.

  3. A Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Patrick; Logan, Jeffrey; Bird, Lori; Short, Walter

    2009-05-01

    This paper analyzes potential impacts of proposed national renewable electricity standard (RES) legislation. An RES is a mandate requiring certain electricity retailers to provide a minimum share of their electricity sales from qualifying renewable power generation. The analysis focuses on draft bills introduced individually by Senator Jeff Bingaman and Representative Edward Markey, and jointly by Representative Henry Waxman and Markey. The analysis uses NREL's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to evaluate the impacts of the proposed RES requirements on the U.S. energy sector in four scenarios.

  4. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies for Sustainable Energy, LLC. #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable;Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  5. Modeling renewable portfolio standards for the annual energy outlook 1998 - electricity market module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Load and Demand-Side Management (LDSM) Submodule. For the Annual Energy Outlook 1998 (AEO98), the EMM has been modified to represent Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), which are included in many of the Federal and state proposals for deregulating the electric power industry. A RPS specifies that electricity suppliers must produce a minimum level of generation using renewable technologies. Producers with insufficient renewable generating capacity can either build new plants or purchase {open_quotes}credits{close_quotes} from other suppliers with excess renewable generation. The representation of a RPS involves revisions to the ECP, EFD, and the EFP. The ECP projects capacity additions required to meet the minimum renewable generation levels in future years. The EFD determines the sales and purchases of renewable credits for the current year. The EFP incorporates the cost of building capacity and trading credits into the price of electricity.

  6. Evaluating Renewable Portfolio Standards and Carbon Cap Scenarios in the U.S. Electric Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Chapman, C.; Logan, J.; Sumner, J.; Short, W.

    2010-05-01

    This report examines the impact of various renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and cap-and-trade policy options on the U.S. electricity sector, focusing mainly on renewable energy generation. The analysis uses the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model that simulates the least-cost expansion of electricity generation capacity and transmission in the United States to examine the impact of an emissions cap--similar to that proposed in the Waxman-Markey bill (H.R. 2454)--as well as lower and higher cap scenarios. It also examines the effects of combining various RPS targets with the emissions caps. The generation mix, carbon emissions, and electricity price are examined for various policy combinations to simulate the effect of implementing policies simultaneously.

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures PDF Volume 4 PDF #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (2012

  8. Renewable Energy Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: H.B. 40, enacted in June 2015, created Vermont's Renewable Energy Standard and repeals the Sustainably Priced Energy Enterprise Development program's renewable energy goals. The Renewable...

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study End-use Electricity Demand Volume 3 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U Sandor, D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study

  10. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. #12;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  11. Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study Executive Summary NREL is a national laboratory of the U for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF #12;Renewable Electricity Futures. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report

  12. Renewable Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

  13. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  14. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  15. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  16. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-11-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  17. Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas "super-utility"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2010-01-01

    state-based renewable energy policies have significantlyin renewable electricity and energy-efficiency policy.s renewable energy sources and energy efficiency policy

  18. Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas "super-utility"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2010-01-01

    costs: Combining renewable energy and energy efficiency into2009. European Union’s renewable energy sources and energyKansas: A National Renewable Energy Standard Will Benefit

  19. Impacts of a 25% Renewable Electricity Standard as Proposed in the American Clean Energy and Security Act Discussion Draft

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This report responds to requests from Chairman Edward Markey, for an analysis of a 25% federal renewable electricity standard (RES). The RES proposal analyzed in this report is included in the discussion draft of broader legislation, the American Clean Energy and Security Act (ACESA) of 2009, issued on the Energy and Commerce Committee website at the end of March 2009.

  20. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

  1. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.

    2012-10-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

  2. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in an Union of Concerned Scientists webinar on June 12, 2012.

  3. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a Power Systems Engineering Research Center webinar on September 4, 2012.

  4. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a webinar given by the California Energy Commission.

  5. Guide to Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity, Renewable...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity, Renewable Energy Certificates, and On-Site Renewable Generation Guide to Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity, Renewable...

  6. Impacts of a 15% Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    This analysis responds to a request from Senator Jeff Bingaman that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) analyze a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requiring that 15% of U.S. electricity sales be derived from qualifying renewable energy resources.

  7. Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Factual Introduction to Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, R.; Namovicz, C.; Gielecki, M.; Smith, R.

    2008-01-01

    Electric Markets: The Renewables Portfolio Standard. ” TheDuckworth. “Can We Afford a Renewables Portfolio Standard? ”Consensus on National Renewables Policy: The Renewables

  8. State Renewable Electricity Profiles

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    Presents a summary of current and recent historical data for the renewable electric power industry. The data focuses on net summer capacity and net generation for each type of renewable generator, as well as fossil-fired and nuclear power plant types, for the period 2006 through 2010.

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented to the 2012 Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners, during their June, 2012, meeting. The Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners is a regional association within the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).

  10. Distributional and Efficiency Impacts of Clean and Renewable Energy Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distributional and Efficiency Impacts of Clean and Renewable Energy Standards for Electricity on recycled paper #12;Distributional and Efficiency Impacts of Clean and Renewable Energy Standards supply and demand, including renewable energy resources and generating technologies, while representing

  11. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMeo, E.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

  12. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

  13. Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas "super-utility"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2010-01-01

    renewable energy and energy efficiency into a sustainableenergy sources and energy efficiency policy review: Therenewable electricity and energy-efficiency policy. Energy

  14. Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

  15. Distributional and Efficiency Impacts of Clean and Renewable Energy Standards for Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rausch, Sebastian

    2012-07-17

    We examine the efficiency and distributional impacts of greenhouse gas policies directed toward the electricity

  16. Running in place : renewal portfolio standards and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Michael T. (Michael Thomas)

    2008-01-01

    Renewable portfolio standards ("RPS") have spread widely as states have made an effort to promote electricity production from renewable energy sources, granting privileged market access to eligible technologies and resources. ...

  17. The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

    2007-01-01

    Mexico: “…generation of electricity through the use of renewable energyMexico: Legislation passed in March 2007 defines a renewable energyrenewable energy standards or any voluntary clean electricity market or voluntary clean electricity program. ” New Mexico

  18. EPA's Renewable Fuels Standard Web page

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-30

    The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program regulations were developed in collaboration with refiners, renewable fuel producers, and many other stakeholders.

  19. Renewable Electricity Purchases: History and Recent Developments

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of prices of renewable-based electricity that utilities have paid to nonutilities, the primary generators of renewable electricity.

  20. Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status, October 29, 2010 Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status, October 29, 2010...

  1. Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas "super-utility"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2010-01-01

    and lower costs: Combining renewable energy and energydeveloping renewable energy projects under traditional cost-in the levelized cost of renewable energy under the “build”

  2. Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas "super-utility"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2010-01-01

    renewables through power purchase agreements and expenses EElong- term renewable power purchase agreements. Introducingentering into long-term power purchase agreements with

  3. PG&E's Renewable Portfolio Standard & Greenhouse Gas Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electric Transportation Natural Gas Capped at 334 MMT 80 MMT #12;(MMT CO2e Business as Usual ­ 2020 507 Electric and Natural Gas Sectors Energy Efficiency 12 Renewables 11 Other 2 Transportation Low Carbon FuelPG&E's Renewable Portfolio Standard & Greenhouse Gas Compliance Fong Wan Senior Vice President

  4. Renewable Electricity: How Do You Know You Have It?; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    When electricity is generated - either from a renewable or non-renewable power plant - the electrons added to the grid are indistinguishable. So, on what basis can a consumer of electricity claim to be using renewables? In the United States, renewable energy certificates (RECs) were developed as states passed renewable portfolio standards (RPSs) and were requiring fuel mix disclosure labels. RECs are also used in the voluntary market, where customers are buying renewables to meet sustainability goals. The concept of RECs is used most widely in the United States, but international markets also have tradable renewable electricity certificates. This fact sheet reviews how to ensure that RECs are not double-counted, roles of electricity regulators, renewable generators and purchasers. It concludes with a discussion of the international use of RECs.

  5. The renewables portfolio standard in Texas: An early assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H.; Langniss, Ole

    2001-01-01

    J. , 2000. Designing a Renewables Portfolio Standard:Resources. Espey, S. , 2001. Renewables Portfolio Standard:Consensus on National Renewables Policy: The Renewables

  6. Tribal Renewable Energy Foundational Course: Electricity Grid...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electricity Grid Basics Tribal Renewable Energy Foundational Course: Electricity Grid Basics Watch the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy foundational course webinar...

  7. Mohave Electric Cooperative- Renewable Energy Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mohave Electric Cooperative provides incentives for its customers to install renewable energy systems on their homes and businesses. Mohave Electric Cooperative will provide rebates for...

  8. New Study: Renewable Energy for State Renewable Portfolio Standards...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    come from reduced greenhouse gas emissions and 5.2 billion from reductions in other air pollution for state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies operating in 2013. A...

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, Trieu; Hand, Maureen; Baldwin, Sam F.; Wiser , Ryan; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, Paul; Arent, Doug; Porro, Gian; Sandor, Debra; Hostick, Donna J.; Milligan, Michael; DeMeo, Ed; Bazilian, Morgan

    2014-04-14

    This paper highlights the key results from the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study. It is a detailed consideration of renewable electricity in the United States. The paper focuses on technical issues related to the operability of the U. S. electricity grid and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. The results indicate that the future U. S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and the further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway. The central conclusion of the analysis is that renewable electricity generation from technologies that are commercially available today, in combination with a more flexible electric system, is more than adequate to supply 80% of the total U. S. electricity generation in 2050 while meeting electricity demand on an hourly basis in every region of the United States.

  10. Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet),...

  11. Renewable Electricity Generation in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalensee, Richard

    This paper provides an overview of the use of renewable energy sources to generate electricity in the United States and a critical analysis of the federal and state policies that have supported the deployment of renewable ...

  12. Fuel Cells and Renewable Portfolio Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented at the Clean Energy States Alliance and U.S. Department of Energy Webinar: Fuel Cells and Renewable Portfolio Standards, June 9, 2011.

  13. Renewable Electricity Futures: Exploration of Up to 80% Renewable Electricity Penetration in the United States (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; DeMeo, E.; Hostick, D.; Mai, T.; Schlosser, C. A.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  14. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Sandor, D.; Wiser, R.; Schneider, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  15. Investment Model for Renewable Electricity Systems (IMRES): an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    Investment Model for Renewable Electricity Systems (IMRES): an Electricity Generation Capacity Model for Renewable Electricity Systems (IMRES): an Electricity Generation Capacity Expansion, that facilitate renewable integration and reduce the total system cost. 1 Introduction The Investment Model

  16. Lincoln Electric System- Renewable Energy Rebate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Customer-generators may also qualify for an incentive payment based on the amount of electricity generated by the renewable energy system that goes to the electricity grid. For more information o...

  17. Maximising renewable hosting capacity in electricity networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Wei

    2015-06-29

    The electricity network is undergoing significant changes in the transition to a low carbon system. The growth of renewable distributed generation (DG) creates a number of technical and economic challenges in the electricity ...

  18. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Executive Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures) provides an analysis of the grid integration opportunities, challenges, and implications of high levels of renewable electricity generation for the U.S. electric system. The study is not a market or policy assessment. Rather, RE Futures examines renewable energy resources and many technical issues related to the operability of the U.S. electricity grid, and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. RE Futures results indicate that a future U.S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and that further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway.

  19. Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures) provides an analysis of the grid integration opportunities, challenges, and implications of high levels of renewable electricity generation for the U.S. electric system. The study is not a market or policy assessment. Rather, RE Futures examines renewable energy resources and many technical issues related to the operability of the U.S. electricity grid, and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. RE Futures results indicate that a future U.S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and that further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway.

  20. Impacts of a 10% Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This service report addresses the renewable portfolio standard provision of S. 1766. At Senator Murkowski's request it also includes an analysis of the impacts of a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) patterned after the one called for in S. 1766, but where the required share is based on a 20% RPS by 2020 rather than the 10% RPS called for in S. 1766.

  1. Trends in Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    Presents a summary of the nation’s renewable energy consumption in 2010 along with detailed historical data on renewable energy consumption by energy source and end-use sector. Data presented also includes renewable energy consumption for electricity generation and for non-electric use by energy source, and net summer capacity and net generation by energy source and state. The report covers the period from 2006 through 2010.

  2. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    supply-side efficiency technologies or non-renewable energy technologies to meet a portion of their RPS standard, including the electricity and/

  3. Renewable Fuel Standard Potential Economic and Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Fuel Standard Potential Economic and Environmental Effects of U.S. Biofuel Policy Wallace. Burke (Cochair)2--Ecology Wallace E. Tyner (Cochair)2--Energy Economics Virginia H. Dale. Miranowski--Agricultural Economics Aristides Patrinos--Renewable Fuel Production Jerald L. Schnoor3--Water

  4. State Clean Energy Practices: Renewable Portfolio Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurlbut, D.

    2008-07-01

    The State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) project is supported by the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program within the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project seeks to quantify the impacts of existing state policies, and to identify crucial policy attributes and their potential applicability to other states. The goal is to assist states in determining which clean energy policies or policy portfolios will best accomplish their environmental, economic, and security goals. For example, a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) mandates an increase in the use of wind, solar, biomass, and other alternatives to fossil and nuclear electric generation. This paper provides a summary of the policy objectives that commonly drive the establishment of an RPS, the key issues that states have encountered in implementing an RPS, and the strategies that some of the leading states have followed to address implementation challenges. The factors that help an RPS function best generally have been explored in other analyses. This study complements others by comparing empirical outcomes, and identifying the policies that appear to have the greatest impact on results.

  5. Energy for Keeps: Electricity and Renewable Energy Teacher Information...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy for Keeps: Electricity and Renewable Energy Teacher Information Energy for Keeps: Electricity and Renewable Energy Teacher Information Below is information about the student...

  6. Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, have vast potential to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions in the electric sector. Climate change concerns, state initiatives including renewable portfolio standards, and consumer efforts are resulting in increased deployments of both technologies. Both solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind energy have variable and uncertain (sometimes referred to as intermittent) output, which are unlike the dispatchable sources used for the majority of electricity generation in the United States. The variability of these sources has led to concerns regarding the reliability of an electric grid that derives a large fraction of its energy from these sources as well as the cost of reliably integrating large amounts of variable generation into the electric grid. In this report, we explore the role of energy storage in the electricity grid, focusing on the effects of large-scale deployment of variable renewable sources (primarily wind and solar energy).

  7. Review of Draft Regulations Respecting Renewable Energy Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    ERG2006/12 Review of Draft Regulations Respecting Renewable Energy Standards made under Section 5 Regulations Respecting Renewable Energy Standards 1 1. Preliminary observations There is no mention of RPS to Renewable Portfolio Standard, not a Renewable Energy Standard. Given that the term Renewable Portfolio

  8. The renewable electric plant information system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, K.

    1995-12-01

    This report explains the procedures used for creating the Renewable Electric Plant Information System (REPiS) database, describes the database fields, and summarizes the data. The REPiS database contains comprehensive information on grid-connected renewable electric generation plants in the United States. Originally designed in 1987 and updated in 1990, the database includes information through 1994. The report also illustrates ways of using the data for analysis is and describes how researchers validated the data.

  9. Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, Draft White...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, Draft White Paper, September 2007 Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, Draft White Paper, September 2007 The...

  10. Fuel Cells & Renewable Portfolio Standards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cells & Renewable Portfolio Standards Fuel Cells & Renewable Portfolio Standards Presented at the Clean Energy States Alliance and U.S. Department of Energy Webinar: Fuel...

  11. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  12. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1: Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.; Wiser, R.; Sandor, D.; Brinkman, G.; Heath, G.; Denholm, P.; Hostick, D.J.; Darghouth, N.; Schlosser, A.; Strzepek, K.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  13. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1. Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.; Baldwin, S.; DeMeo, E.; Reilly, J. M.; Mai, T.; Arent, D.; Porro, G.; Meshek, M.; Sandor, D.

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  14. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2. Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, Chad; Bain, Richard; Chapman, Jamie; Denholm, Paul; Drury, Easan; Hall, Douglas G.; Lantz, Eric; Margolis, Robert; Thresher, Robert; Sandor, Debra; Bishop, Norman A.; Brown, Stephen R.; Felker, Fort; Fernandez, Steven J.; Goodrich, Alan C.; Hagerman, George; Heath, Garvin; O'Neil, Sean; Paquette, Joshua; Tegen, Suzanne; Young, Katherine

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  15. PSEG Long Island- Renewable Electricity Goal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As a municipal utility, the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) is not obligated to comply with the New York Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). The LIPA Board of Trustees has nevertheless decided...

  16. State Policies Provide Critical Support for Renewable Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01

    renewable electricity generation for the foreseeable future. The extent to which geothermal energy ultimately benefits

  17. State Clean Energy Practices: Renewable Fuel Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, G.; Kreycik, C.

    2008-07-01

    The State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) project is supported by the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program within the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project seeks to quantify the impacts of existing state policies, and to identify crucial policy attributes and their potential applicability to other states. The goal is to assist states in determining which clean energy policies or policy portfolios will best accomplish their environmental, economic, and security goals. For example, renewable fuel standards (RFS) policies are a mechanism for developing a market for renewable fuels in the transportation sector. This flexible market-based policy, when properly executed, can correct for market failures and promote growth of the renewable fuels industry better than a more command-oriented approach. The policy attempts to correct market failures such as embedded fossil fuel infrastructure and culture, risk associated with developing renewable fuels, consumer information gaps, and lack of quantification of the non-economic costs and benefits of both renewable and fossil-based fuels. This report focuses on renewable fuel standards policies, which are being analyzed as part of this project.

  18. Power Systems Engineering Research Center Renewable Electricity Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Veen, Barry D.

    Power Systems Engineering Research Center Renewable Electricity Futures Trieu Mai Electricity of the extent to which renewable energy supply can meet the electricity demands of the contiguous United States renewable electricity generation levels: from 30% up to 90% (focusing on 80%) of all U.S. electricity

  19. Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable...

  20. Renewable Electricity Futures: Operational Analysis of the Western...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of integrating large amounts of renewable electricity generation into the U.S. power system (Mai et al. 2012). RE Futures examined renewable energy resources, technical issues...

  1. Renewable Resources in the U.S. Electricity Supply

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1993-01-01

    Provides an overview of current and long term forecasted uses of renewable resources in the nation's electricity marketplace, the largest domestic application of renewable resources today.

  2. Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and...

  3. Renewable Resource Electricity in the Changing Regulatory Environment

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    This article surveys in the development of renewable resource electricity recent actions and proposals and summarizes their implications for the renewables industry.

  4. Rethinking development assistance for renewable electricity sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozloff, K.L.

    1995-11-01

    According to US DOE projections, the developing world`s demand for electricity will grow by 50% by 2010. While nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide emissions are expected to decline in North America and Europe over the next 25 years, they will more than double in the rest of the world. This article attempts to explore ways in which developing countries can be motivated to develop renewable energy sources to meet their capacity needs. It outlines how multilateral lenders and donor nations can make renewably generated electricity more economically appealing for developing countries. Greater use of renewable technology would allow developing nations to build the capacity they need without endangering human and environmental health. An examination of the history of official development assistance for renewable technologies, however, reveals the necessity of a change in strategy if this shift is to ever take place. Looking at how different renewable electricity technologies - photovoltaics, geothermal, wind, hydropower, and biomass - have been implemented in projects around the world demonstrates the benefits of that change, as well as the price paid by mistakes.

  5. Renewable Electricity: Insights for the Coming Decade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, C.; Pless, J.; Logan, J.; Zhou, E.; Arent, D. J.

    2015-02-01

    A sophisticated set of renewable electricity (RE) generation technologies is now commercially available. Globally, RE captured approximately half of all capacity additions since 2011. The cost of RE is already competitive with fossil fuels in some areas around the world, and prices are anticipated to continue to decline over the next decade. RE options, led by wind and solar, are part of a suite of technologies and business solutions that are transforming electricity sectors around the world. Renewable deployment is expected to continue due to: increasingly competitive economics; favorable environmental characteristics such as low water use, and minimal local air pollution and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; complementary risk profiles when paired with natural gas generators; strong support from stakeholders. Despite this positive outlook for renewables, the collapse in global oil prices since mid-2014 and continued growth in natural gas supply in the United States--due to the development of low-cost shale gas--raise questions about the potential impacts of fossil fuel prices on RE. Today, oil plays a very minor role in the electricity sectors of most countries, so direct impacts on RE are likely to be minimal (except where natural gas prices are indexed on oil). Natural gas and RE generating options appear to be more serious competitors than oil and renewables. Low gas prices raise the hurdle for RE to be cost competitive. Additionally, although RE emits far less GHG than natural gas, both natural gas and RE offer the benefits of reducing carbon relative to coal and oil (see Section 4.1 for more detail on the GHG intensity of electricity technologies). However, many investors and decision makers are becoming aware of the complementary benefits of pairing natural gas and renewables to minimize risk of unstable fuel prices and maintain the reliability of electricity to the grid.

  6. State Policies Provide Critical Support for Renewable Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01

    it can compete against other renewable resource options.Critical Support for Renewable Electricity Galen Barbose,July 15, 2008 Growth in renewable energy in the U.S. over

  7. Procurement Options for New Renewable Electricity Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreycik, C. E.; Couture, T. D.; Cory, K. S.

    2011-12-01

    State renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies require utilities and load-serving entities (LSEs) to procure renewable energy generation. Utility procurement options may be a function of state policy and regulatory preferences, and in some cases, may be dictated by legislative authority. Utilities and LSEs commonly use competitive solicitations or bilateral contracting to procure renewable energy supply to meet RPS mandates. However, policymakers and regulators in several states are beginning to explore the use of alternatives, namely feed-in tariffs (FITs) and auctions to procure renewable energy supply. This report evaluates four procurement strategies (competitive solicitations, bilateral contracting, FITs, and auctions) against four main criteria: (1) pricing; (2) complexity and efficiency of the procurement process; (3) impacts on developers access to markets; and (4) ability to complement utility decision-making processes. These criteria were chosen because they take into account the perspective of each group of stakeholders: ratepayers, regulators, utilities, investors, and developers.

  8. The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

    2007-01-01

    Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio StandardsGreen Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standardshave adopted mandatory renewables portfolio standards (RPS)

  9. Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) Electrical energy can be generated from renewable resources the potential to meet the worldwide demand of electricity and they contribute to the total generation

  10. RENEWABLE ENERGY ACTION TEAM Milestones to Permit California Renewable Portfolio Standard Energy Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 RENEWABLE ENERGY ACTION TEAM Milestones to Permit California Renewable Portfolio Standard Energy renewable energy resources. In November 2008, the CEC, DFG, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM the Renewable Energy Action Team (REAT) to address permitting issues associated with specific renewable energy

  11. State Policies Provide Critical Support for Renewable Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2008-07-15

    Growth in renewable energy in the U.S. over the past decade has been propelled by a number of forces, including rising fossil fuel prices, environmental concerns, and policy support at the state and federal levels. In this article, we review and discuss what are arguably the two most important types of state policies for supporting electricity generation from geothermal and other forms of renewable energy: renewables portfolio standards and utility integrated resource planning requirements. Within the Western U.S., where the vast majority of the nation's readily-accessible geothermal resource potential resides, these two types of state policies have been critical to the growth of renewable energy, and both promise to continue to play a fundamental role for the foreseeable future. In its essence, a renewables portfolio standard (RPS) requires utilities and other retail electricity suppliers to produce or purchase a minimum quantity or percentage of their generation supply from renewable resources. RPS purchase obligations generally increase over time, and retail suppliers typically must demonstrate compliance on an annual basis. Mandatory RPS policies are backed by various types of compliance enforcement mechanisms, although most states have incorporated some type of cost-containment provision, such as a cost cap or a cap on retail rate impacts, which could conceivably allow utilities to avoid (full) compliance with their RPS target. Currently, 27 states and the District of Columbia have mandatory RPS requirements. Within the eleven states of the contiguous Western U.S., all but three (Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming) now have a mandatory RPS legislation (Utah has a more-voluntary renewable energy goal), covering almost 80% of retail electricity sales in the region. Although many of these state policies have only recently been established, their impact is already evident: almost 1800 MW of new renewable capacity has been installed in Western states following the implementation of RPS policies. To date, wind energy has been the primary beneficiary of state RPS policies, representing approximately 83% of RPS-driven renewable capacity growth in the West through 2007. Geothermal energy occupies a distant second place, providing 7% of RPS-driven new renewable capacity in the West since the late 1990s, though geothermal's contribution on an energy (MWh) basis is higher. Looking to the future, a sizable quantity of renewable capacity beyond pre-RPS levels will be needed to meet state RPS mandates: about 25,000 MW by 2025 within the Western U.S. Geothermal energy is beginning to provide an increasingly significant contribution, as evidenced by the spate of new projects recently announced to meet state RPS requirements. Most of this activity has been driven by the RPS policies in California and Nevada, where the Geothermal Energy Association has identified 47 new geothermal projects, totaling more than 2,100 MW, in various stages of development. Additional geothermal projects in Arizona, New Mexico, Oregon, and Washington are also under development to meet those states RPS requirements. The other major state policy driver for renewable electricity growth, particularly in the West, is integrated resource planning (IRP). IRP was first formalized as a practice in the 1980s, but the practice was suspended in some states as electricity restructuring efforts began. A renewed interest in IRP has emerged in the past several years, however, with several Western states (California, Montana, and New Mexico) reestablishing IRP and others developing new rules to strengthen their existing processes. In its barest form, IRP simply requires that utilities periodically submit long-term resource procurement plans in which they evaluate alternative strategies for meeting their resource needs over the following ten to twenty years. However, many states have developed specific requirements for the IRP process that directly or indirectly support renewable energy. The most general of these is an explicit requirement that utilities evaluate renewables, and that

  12. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Volume 1: Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electrcity Futures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Renewable Electricity Futures Study (RE Futures) is an initial investigation of the extent to which renewable energy supply can meet the electricity demands of the contiguous United States1 over the next several decades. This study includes geographic and electric system operation resolution that is unprecedented for long-term studies of the U.S. electric sector. The analysis examines the implications and challenges of renewable electricity generation levels—from 30% up to 90%, with a focus on 80%, of all U.S. electricity generation from renewable technologies—in 2050. The study focuses on some key technical implications of this environment, exploring whether the U.S. power system can supply electricity to meet customer demand with high levels of renewable electricity, including variable wind and solar generation. The study also begins to address the potential economic, environmental, and social implications of deploying and integrating high levels of renewable electricity in the United States.

  13. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: ANational Laboratory. Renewables Portfolio Standards in theRenewables Portfolio Standards in the United States LBNL-

  14. A SURVEY OF STATE-LEVEL COST ESTIMATES OF RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2014-01-01

    LEVEL COST ESTIMATES OF RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARDS Galenthe incremental cost of renewables portfolio standards (RPS)Washington DC have adopted renewables portfolio standards (

  15. Analysis of a 10% Renewable Portfolio Standard

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    On May 8, 2003, Senator Jeff Bingaman, the Ranking Minority Member of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, requested an analysis of a nationwide Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) program proposed to be amended to energy legislation currently pending before the U.S. Senate. With his request Sen. Bingaman provided specific information on the program to be analyzed. This analysis was prepared in response to his request and projects the impact of the proposed program on energy supply, demand, prices, and emissions. The analysis is based on the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 (AEO2003) projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025, as updated in May 2003.

  16. Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy RFPsLtd RES GroupStandard Schedule

  17. Managing Variable Energy Resources to Increase Renewable Electricity's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Managing Variable Energy Resources to Increase Renewable Electricity's Contribution to the Grid P o Contribution of Renewable Energy to Total Electricity Generation? 15 ManaGInG VaRIablE EnERGy REsouRCEs 16 What to Better Respond to Variability? 19 How Can the Siting of Renewable Energy Projects Be Improved? 20 What

  18. Strategic Use of Electric Vehicle Charging to Reduce Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Use of Electric Vehicle Charging to Reduce Renewable Energy Curtailment on Oahu An analysis of the use of electric vehicle charging to mitigate renewable energy curtailment based on detailed using petroleum is typically used to fill the gap. When the renewable energy supply exceeds that which

  19. Assessment and Methods for Supply-Following Loads in Modern Electricity Grids with Deep Renewables Penetration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taneja, Jayant Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Stanford, and the Renewable Energy Futures project from theNREL RE Futures The Renewable Energy Futures study by theRenewable Energy Laboratory. Renewable Electricity Futures

  20. The effectiveness of the policies on renewable electricity in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Qing S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01

    After the legislation of the Renewable Energy Law, China's government established a series of policies to promote renewable energy source electricity (RES-e) from 2005-2012. The effectiveness of the policies varies depending ...

  1. State Policies Provide Critical Support for Renewable Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01

    types of state policies have been critical to the growth of renewable energy,types of state policies for supporting electricity generation from geothermal and other forms of renewable energy:

  2. Power Transfer Potential to the Southeast in Response to a Renewable Portfolio Standard: Interim Report 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Key, Thomas S [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); Deb, Rajat [LCG Consulting

    2009-05-01

    Electricity consumption in the Southeastern US, not including Florida, is approximately 24% of the total US. The availability of renewable resources for electricity production is relatively small compared to the high consumption. Therefore meeting a national renewable portfolio standard (RPS) is particularly challenging in this region. Neighboring regions, particularly to the west, have significant wind resources and given sufficient long distant transmission these resources could serve energy markets in the SE. This report looks at renewable resource supply relative to demands and the potential for power transfer into the SE. It shows that development of wind resources will depend not only on available transmission capacity but also on electricity supply and demand factors.

  3. A Comparative Study of High Renewables Penetration Electricity Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAuliffe, Jon

    A Comparative Study of High Renewables Penetration Electricity Grids Jay Taneja, Virginia Smith,culler}@cs.berkeley.edu,vsmith@berkeley.edu Catherine Rosenberg Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Waterloo Email: cath@uwaterloo.ca Abstract--Electricity grids are transforming as renewables proliferate, yet operational concerns due

  4. Energy for Keeps: Electricity and Renewable Energy Teacher Informatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy the book covers historical information, the physics involved in electricity generation, information about nonrenewable as well as renewable energy resources, environmental...

  5. Communication and Control of Electric Vehicles Supporting Renewables: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markel, T.; Kuss, M.; Denholm, P.

    2009-08-01

    Discusses the technologies needed, potential scenarios, limitations, and opportunities for using grid-connected renewable energy to fuel the electric vehicles of the future.

  6. Renewable Electricity Grid Integration Roadmap for Mexico: Supplement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FOR LOW EMISSION DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES Renewable Electricity Grid Integration Roadmap for Mexico: Supplement to the IEA Expert Group Report on Recommended Practices for...

  7. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consumption is Growing Electricity generated from sources that are renewable - hydroelectric power, bio-fuels, geothermal, solar, wind, wood, waste - have grown 150% from 1980 to...

  8. Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2014-01-01

    Approval of Its Amended Renewable Energy Plan. June 3, 2013.Light). (2013). 2012 Renewable Energy Standard Complianceuploads/2013/09/PUCO-renewable-energy-standard-study.pdf,

  9. Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2014-01-01

    Documents/201304-IPA-Renewables- Report.pdf. Springfield,and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards: ACommission). (2009). 33% Renewables Portfolio Standard:

  10. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    schemes in the European electricity market. Scheer H. , ThePromoting electricity from renewable energy sources –2001 on the promotion of electricity produced from renewable

  11. Managing Variable Energy Resources to Increase Renewable Electricity's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Better Respond to Variability? 19 How Can the Siting of Renewable Energy Projects Be Improved? 20 WhatManaging Variable Energy Resources to Increase Renewable Electricity's Contribution to the Grid P o accurately assessing and preparing for the operational effects of renewable generation. DEVElopMEnt anD DIss

  12. Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    1991. The Potential for Electricity Efficiency Improvementswww.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html>. FigureA STANDARD METRIC FOR ELECTRICITY SAVINGS Jonathan Koomey*,

  13. Hydrogen Codes and Standards National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Officials Code Administration (BOCA), the International Conference of Building Officials (ICBOHydrogen Codes and Standards James Ohi National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Background The development and promulgation of codes and standards are essential if hydrogen

  14. Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Gas Reductions under Low Carbon Fuel Standards? Americanto Implement the Low Carbon Fuel Standard, Volume I Sta?Paper Series Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel

  15. Clean Energy, Dirty Air: A Policy Coordination Problem between Renewable-Based Electricity Programs and Cap-and-Trade Pollution Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    Clean Energy, Dirty Air: A Policy Coordination Problem between Renewable-Based Electricity Programs of programs--utility-based green electricity programs and state-based renewable portfolio standards--are leading to major expansions in generation of renewable- based electricity. These programs are intended

  16. Property:RenewableFuelStandard/RenewableBiofuel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration Jump to: navigation,PowerAdvancedBiofuel JumpRenewableBiofuel

  17. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program) of the U.S. Department of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy and the Wind & Hydropower Technologies) and the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program) of the U

  18. Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    as buffer for local renewables? Michael Stadler, Gonçaloas buffer for local renewables? *) Michael Stadler Gonçaloowners to integrate renewables and electric vehicles?

  19. Scaling-up Renewable Electricity in BC: Tackling the Institutional and Political Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Scaling-up Renewable Electricity in BC: Tackling the Institutional and Political Challenges Dr.................................................................................................................................... 4 2. Renewable Electricity and Hydropower in BC................................................................................................... 6 3. Institutions and Processes for Renewable Electricity Development

  20. The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heeter, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Can deployment of renewable energy put downward pressure onXcel Energy. (2011). Renewable Energy Standard Rate ImpactPower. (2011). “Renewable Energy Cost Impact Report. ”

  1. Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2014-01-01

    Approval of Its Amended Renewable Energy Plan. June 3, 2013.Benefits of Complying with Renewable Portfolio Standards:The Costs and Benefits of Renewable Resource Procurement in

  2. The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heeter, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    M. (2007). Can deployment of renewable energy put downwardXcel Energy. (2011). Renewable Energy Standard Rate Impact2010. ” Alpena. (2012). “Renewable Energy Annual Report for

  3. Multi-objective regulations on transportation fuels: Comparing renewable fuel mandates and emission standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D; Rajagopal, D; Plevin, R; Hochman, G; Zilberman, D

    2015-01-01

    carbon policies on the renewable fuels standard: economicreport: 2009 update. REN21 Renewable Energy Policy Networktransportation fuels: Comparing renewable fuel mandates and

  4. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    Beyond Traditional Renewable Sources to Include EnergyStandards Are Increasingly Motivating Renewable Energy20 The Use of Renewable Energy Certificates and Certificate

  5. Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    R. and G. Barbose. 2008. Renewables Portfolio Standards inwww.cpuc.ca.gov/PUC/energy/Renewables/index.htm (accessed2008. Deploying Renewables - Principles for Effective

  6. High renewable energy penetrations in the Australian National Electricity Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    Distribution Sector: - DNSPS Electricity flow Multi-region five-minute energy & FCAS markets Intentions, offers by AEMO ­ A multi-region gross wholesale electricity spot market with dynamic intra-regional loss factorsHigh renewable energy penetrations in the Australian National Electricity Market: key challenges

  7. Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation (Report Summary) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

    2010-03-01

    Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, have vast potential to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions in the electric sector. Climate change concerns, state initiatives including renewable portfolio standards, and consumer efforts are resulting in increased deployments of both technologies. Both solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind energy have variable and uncertain (sometimes referred to as "intermittent") output, which are unlike the dispatchable sources used for the majority of electricity generation in the United States. The variability of these sources has led to concerns regarding the reliability of an electric grid that derives a large fraction of its energy from these sources as well as the cost of reliably integrating large amounts of variable generation into the electric grid. In this report, we explore the role of energy storage in the electricity grid, focusing on the effects of large-scale deployment of variable renewable sources (primarily wind and solar energy).

  8. EISA 2007: Focus on Renewable Fuels Standard Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the November 6, 2008 joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Paul Argyropoulos (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Transportation and Air Quality) explained the EISA 2007, Renewable Fuel Standards.

  9. Timing for Startup of the Renewable Fuel Standard

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper responds to whether or not moving the start date of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) from its currently proposed January 2004 to October 2004 would improve the chances of a smooth transition.

  10. Nuclear-renewables energy system for hydrogen and electricity production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haratyk, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    Climate change concerns and expensive oil call for a different mix of energy technologies. Nuclear and renewables attract attention because of their ability to produce electricity while cutting carbon emissions. However ...

  11. Transmission Pricing Issues for Electricity Generation From Renewable Resources

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses how the resolution of transmission pricing issues which have arisen under the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) open access environment may affect the prospects for renewable-based electricity.

  12. Evaluating Policies to Increase Electricity Generation from Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalensee, Richard

    Building on a review of experience in the United States and the European Union, this article advances four main propositions concerning policies aimed at increasing electricity generation from renewable energy. First, who ...

  13. Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Renewable Electricity Sources: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levene, J. I.; Mann, M. K.; Margolis, R.; Milbrandt, A.

    2005-09-01

    To determine the potential for hydrogen production via renewable electricity sources, three aspects of the system are analyzed: a renewable hydrogen resource assessment, a cost analysis of hydrogen production via electrolysis, and the annual energy requirements of producing hydrogen for refueling. The results indicate that ample resources exist to produce transportation fuel from wind and solar power. However, hydrogen prices are highly dependent on electricity prices.

  14. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    renewable energy zone distributed generation Electricenergy resource zone competitive electric service provider PJM Generation

  15. Is it Worth it? A Comparative Analysis of Cost-Benefit Projections for State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Benefit Projections for State Renewables Portfolio Standards2006 Introduction State renewables portfolio standards (RPS)Analysis for Meeting a 20% Renewables Portfolio Standard by

  16. Renewable Portfolio Standard | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, New York: Energy ResourcesProducts LLCProject Jump to:Renewable

  17. Renewable Portfolio Standards Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7, 2015 Thermochem ConversionRenewable Portfolio

  18. Renewable Resource Standard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7, 2015 Thermochem ConversionRenewable PortfolioResource

  19. Renewables Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7, 2015 Thermochem ConversionRenewableDepartment ofLocal

  20. Renewables Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7, 2015 Thermochem ConversionRenewableDepartment

  1. Renewables Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7, 2015 Thermochem ConversionRenewableDepartmentLandfill

  2. Multi-Year Analysis of Renewable Energy Impacts in California: Results from the Renewable Portfolio Standards Integration Cost Analysis; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Shiu, H.; Kirby, B.; Jackson, K.

    2006-08-01

    California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS, Senate Bill 1078) requires the state's investor-owned utilities to obtain 20% of their energy mix from renewable generation sources. To facilitate the imminent increase in the penetration of renewables, the California Energy Commission (CEC), in support of the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC), initiated a study of integration costs in the context of RPS implementation. This effort estimated the impact of renewable generation in the regulation and load-following time scales and calculated the capacity value of renewable energy sources using a reliability model. The analysis team, consisting of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the California Wind Energy Collaborative (CWEC), performed the study in cooperation with the California Independent System Operator (CaISO), the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), and Southern California Edison (SCE). The study was conducted over three phases and was followed by an analysis of a multi-year period. This paper presents results from the multi-year analysis and the Phase III recommendations.

  3. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hein, J.; Schneider, T.; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, P.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  4. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3. End-Use Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, Donna; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hostick, D.; Belzer, D.B.; Hadley, S.W.; Markel, T.; Marnay, C.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems. Operations and Transmission Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, Michael; Ela, Erik; Hein, Jeff; Schneider, Thomas; Brinkman, Gregory; Denholm, Paul

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  7. Renewables Portfolio Standard | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,EnergyEast Jump to: navigation, search Name: Renewables

  8. Renewables Portfolio Standards | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy RFPsLtd RESRenewables Portfolio

  9. Renewables Portfolio Standards | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy RFPsLtd RESRenewables

  10. Power Transfer Potential to the Southeast in Response to a Renewable Portfolio Standard: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Key, Thomas S; Hadley, Stanton W; Deb, Rajat

    2010-02-01

    Electricity consumption in the Southeastern US, including Florida, is approximately 32% of the total US. The availability of renewable resources for electricity production is relatively small compared to the high consumption. Therefore meeting a national renewable portfolio standard (RPS) is particularly challenging in this region. Neighboring regions, particularly to the west, have significant wind resources and given sufficient transmission these resources could serve energy markets in the SE. This report looks at renewable resource supply relative to demands and the potential for power transfer into the SE. We found that significant wind energy transfers, at the level of 30-60 GW, are expected to be economic in case of federal RPC or CO2 policy. Development of wind resources will depend not only on the available transmission capacity and required balancing resources, but also on electricity supply and demand factors.

  11. Envisioning a Renewable Electricity Future for the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This paper presents high renewable electricity penetration scenarios in the United States using detailed capacity expansion modeling that is designed to properly account for the variability and uncertainty of wind and solar resources. The scenarios focus solely on the electricity system, an important sector within the larger energy sector, and demonstrate long-term visions of a U.S. power system where renewable technologies, including biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar, and wind, contribute 80% of 2050 annual electricity, including 49–55% from wind and solar photovoltaic generation. We also present the integration challenges of achieving this high penetration and characterize the options to increase grid flexibility to manage variability.

  12. Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    the potential to meet the worldwide demand of electricity and they contribute to the total generation of providing enough energy to meet the world demand of electricity, the current amount of electricitySupplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources

  13. Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct. 7,DOERTIRegulatory andProjectSales TaxPortfolio Standard

  14. Renewable Electricity Benefits Quantification Methodology: A Request for Technical Assistance from the California Public Utilities Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, G.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2009-07-01

    The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) requested assistance in identifying methodological alternatives for quantifying the benefits of renewable electricity. The context is the CPUC's analysis of a 33% renewable portfolio standard (RPS) in California--one element of California's Climate Change Scoping Plan. The information would be used to support development of an analytic plan to augment the cost analysis of this RPS (which recently was completed). NREL has responded to this request by developing a high-level survey of renewable electricity effects, quantification alternatives, and considerations for selection of analytic methods. This report addresses economic effects and health and environmental effects, and provides an overview of related analytic tools. Economic effects include jobs, earnings, gross state product, and electricity rate and fuel price hedging. Health and environmental effects include air quality and related public-health effects, solid and hazardous wastes, and effects on water resources.

  15. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Powered by Renewable Hydrogen

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently received a Borrego fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) on loan from Kia for display at a variety of summer events. The Borrego is fueled using renewable hydrogen that is produced and dispensed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado. The hydrogen dispensed at the station is produced via renewable electrolysis as part of the wind-to-hydrogen project, which uses wind turbines and photovoltaic arrays to power electrolyzer stacks that split water into hydrogen and oxygen. The FCEV features state-of-the-art technology with zero harmful emissions.

  16. Redding Electric- Renewable Energy Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Earth Advantage Rebate Program was designed to offer rebates to residential and business customers of Redding Electric Utility (REU) for solar PV, solar thermal, and geothermal heat pump...

  17. Abstract--The substitution of non-renewable energy by renewable energy as electricity supply is an emerging trend for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Lei

    Abstract-- The substitution of non-renewable energy by renewable energy as electricity supply]. The transition from traditional energy to renewable energy has now become a real demand for sustainability pack. The electrical grid servers as back-up supplier in case energy stored in the battery is used up

  18. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    M. Fripp. 2004. Putting Renewables to Work: How Many Jobsand S. Hempling. 2001. The Renewables Portfolio Standard: AEvaluating Experience with Renewables Portfolio Standards in

  19. NREL: Energy Analysis - Renewable Electricity Futures Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on771/6/14Recent PublicationsNicholas DiOrio PhotoSchwabeRanRenewable

  20. The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heeter, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Company of New Mexico Renewable Energy Portfolio ProcurementCompany of New Mexico Renewable Energy Portfolio ProcurementMexico’s RPS requires that IOUs have 15% of retail electricity sales from renewable energy

  1. Denton Municipal Electric- Standard Offer Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Within the GreenSense program, Denton Municipal Electric's Standard Offer Program provides rebates to large commercial and industrial customers for lighting retrofits, HVAC upgrades and motor...

  2. Multi-objective regulations on transportation fuels: Comparing renewable fuel mandates and emission standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D; Plevin, R; Hochman, G; Zilberman, D

    2015-01-01

    update. REN21 Renewable Energy Policy Network and Worldwatchconclusion Policies such as renewable energy mandates arerenewable fuels standard: economic and greenhouse gas implications. Energy Policy

  3. Understanding and Informing the Policy Environment: State-Level Renewable Fuels Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.; Cory, K.; Arent, D.

    2007-01-01

    Renewable fuels standard (RFS) policies are becoming a popular public policy mechanism for developing the market for renewable fuels in the transportation sector. During the past decade, U.S. states and several countries began implementing these more market-based (less command and control) policies to support increased biofuels production and use. This paper presents an overview of current and proposed U.S. state-level policies, as well as selected electric sector policies and international fuel standard policies. Current U.S. state-level renewable fuel policies list drivers including an improved economy and environment, as well as fuel self-sufficiency. Best practices and experience from an evaluation of renewable portfolio standards (RPS) in the United States and international RFS policies can inform U.S. state-level policy by illustrating the importance of policy flexibility, binding targets, effective cost caps, and tradable permits. Understanding and building on the experiences from these previous policies can improve the policy mechanism and further develop a market for renewable fuels to meet the goals of improved economy, environment, and fuel self-sufficiency.

  4. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    Renewable Energy Capacity Additions in RPS States, By Technology Typetheir own renewable energy standards. Various other types oftypes of compliance enforcement mechanisms, and many – but not all – such policies include the trading of renewable energy

  5. Evaluating a Proposed 20% National Renewable Portfolio Standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, Jeffrey; Sullivan, Patrick; Short, Walter; Bird, Lori; James, Ted L.; Shah, Monisha R.

    2009-02-01

    This paper provides a preliminary analysis of the impacts of a proposed 20% national renewable portfolio standard (RPS) by 2021, which has been advanced in the U.S. Congress by Senator Jeff Bingaman of New Mexico. The paper was prepared before the America Recovery and Reinvestment Act was signed into law by President Barack Obama on February 17, 2009, and thus does not consider important changes in renewable energy (RE) policy that need to be addressed in follow-on analysis. We use NREL's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to evaluate the impacts of the RPS requirements on the energy sector and consider design issues associated with renewable energy certificate (REC) trading markets.

  6. Electrical Energy Storage for Renewable Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helms, C. R.; Cho, K. J.; Ferraris, John; Balkus, Ken; Chabal, Yves; Gnade, Bruce; Rotea, Mario; Vasselli, John

    2012-08-31

    This program focused on development of the fundamental understanding necessary to significantly improve advanced battery and ultra-capacitor materials and systems to achieve significantly higher power and energy density on the one hand, and significantly lower cost on the other. This program spanned all the way from atomic-level theory, to new nanomaterials syntheses and characterization, to system modeling and bench-scale technology demonstration. Significant accomplishments are detailed in each section. Those particularly noteworthy include: • Transition metal silicate cathodes with 2x higher storage capacity than commercial cobalt oxide cathodes were demonstrated. • MnO? nanowires, which are a promising replacement for RuO?, were synthesized • PAN-based carbon nanofibers were prepared and characterized with an energy density 30-times higher than current ultracapacitors on the market and comparable to lead-acid batteries • An optimization-based control strategy for real-time power management of battery storage in wind farms was developed and demonstrated. • PVDF films were developed with breakdown strengths of > 600MVm?¹, a maximum energy density of approximately 15 Jcm?³, and an average dielectric constant of 9.8 (±1.2). Capacitors made from these films can support a 10-year lifetime operating at an electric field of 200 MV m?¹. This program not only delivered significant advancements in fundamental understanding and new materials and technology, it also showcased the power of the cross-functional, multi-disciplinary teams at UT Dallas and UT Tyler for such work. These teams are continuing this work with other sources of funding from both industry and government.

  7. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    cost disadvantage compared to electricity generated from fossil or nuclear fuels 2 . A significant switch to a renewable energy

  8. Analysis of a 10% Renewable Portfolio Standard, Supplement to

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    On June 10, 2003, Senator Pete Domenici, Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, requested additional analysis of a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), expected to be proposed as an amendment to energy legislation currently pending before the U.S. Senate. This request asked the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide additional results from two previously released EIA analyses of the proposed legislation, and to conduct further analyses with modified assumptions.

  9. "Do costs fall faster than revenues? Dynamics of renewables entry into electricity markets"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TSE-591 "Do costs fall faster than revenues? Dynamics of renewables entry into electricity markets of renewables entry into electricity markets Richard J. Green Thomas-Olivier Léautier June 26, 2015 Abstract In many countries, entry of renewable electricity producers has been supported by subsidies and financed

  10. ENERGY SERIES "New findings on variable renewable energy and the electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Keren

    SEMINAR: ENERGY SERIES "New findings on variable renewable energy and the electricity grid" Jay Apt Renewable Energy and the Electricity Grid". Professor Apt received an A.B. in physics from Harvard College the market share of variable renewable electric power generation in the United States from the present 4

  11. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    hedge value of renewable energy and the benefits of reducedhedge value of renewable energy and the benefits of reducedRenewable Energy Standard: Economic and Employment Benefits.

  12. Is it Worth it? A Comparative Analysis of Cost-Benefit Projections for State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-01-01

    hedge value of renewable energy and the benefits of reducedthe public benefits of renewable energy, including theRenewable Energy Standard: Economic and Employment Benefits

  13. Multi-criteria comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel emission-standards, and fuel carbon tax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak; Hochman, G.; Zilberman, D.

    2012-01-01

    comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuelcomparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel121, 2011. C. Fischer. Renewable Portfolio Standards: When

  14. Barriers to CHP with Renewable Portfolio Standards, Draft White Paper, September 2007

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A draft white paper discussing the barriers to combine heat and power (CHP) with renewable portfolio standards

  15. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume includes chapters discussing biopower, geothermal, hydropower, ocean, solar, wind, and storage technologies. Each chapter includes a resource availability estimate, technology cost and performance characterization, discussions of output characteristics and grid service possibilities, large-scale production and deployment issues, and barriers to high penetration along with possible responses to them. Only technologies that are currently commercially available—biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar PV, CSP, and wind-powered systems—are included in the modeling analysis. Some of these renewable technologies—such as run-of-river hydropower, onshore wind, hydrothermal geothermal, dedicated and co-fired-with-coal biomass—are relatively mature and well-characterized. Other renewable technologies—such as fixed-bottom offshore wind, solar PV, and solar CSP—are at earlier stages of deployment with greater potential for future technology advancements over the next 40 years.

  16. Modelling renewable electric resources: A case study of wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernow, S.; Biewald, B.; Hall, J.; Singh, D.

    1994-07-01

    The central issue facing renewables in the integrated resource planning process is the appropriate assessment of the value of renewables to utility systems. This includes their impact on both energy and capacity costs (avoided costs), and on emissions and environmental impacts, taking account of the reliability, system characteristics, interactions (in dispatch), seasonality, and other characteristics and costs of the technologies. These are system-specific considerations whose relationships may have some generic implications. In this report, we focus on the reliability contribution of wind electric generating systems, measured as the amount of fossil capacity they can displace while meeting the system reliability criterion. We examine this issue for a case study system at different wind characteristics and penetration, for different years, with different system characteristics, and with different modelling techniques. In an accompanying analysis we also examine the economics of wind electric generation, as well as its emissions and social costs, for the case study system. This report was undertaken for the {open_quotes}Innovative IRP{close_quotes} program of the U.S. Department of Energy, and is based on work by both Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) and Tellus Institute, including America`s Energy Choices and the UCS Midwest Renewables Project.

  17. Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity in the United States through 2015: Projecting from 2009 through 2015 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Hurlbut, D.; Donohoo, P.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.

    2010-06-01

    This report examines the balance between the demand and supply of new renewable electricity in the United States on a regional basis through 2015. It expands on a 2007 NREL study that assessed the supply and demand balance on a national basis. As with the earlier study, this analysis relies on estimates of renewable energy supplies compared to demand for renewable energy generation needed to meet existing state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies in 28 states, as well as demand by consumers who voluntarily purchase renewable energy. However, it does not address demand by utilities that may procure cost-effective renewables through an integrated resource planning process or otherwise.

  18. Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Holt, Edward

    2010-10-01

    Among the available options for encouraging the increased deployment of renewable electricity, renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have become increasingly popular. The RPS is a relatively new policy mechanism, however, and experience with its use is only beginning to emerge. One key concern that has been voiced is whether RPS policies will offer adequate support to a wide range of renewable energy technologies and applications or whether, alternatively, RPS programs will favor a small number of the currently least-cost forms of renewable energy. This report documents the design of and early experience with state-level RPS programs in the United States that have been specifically tailored to encourage a wider diversity of renewable energy technologies, and solar energy in particular. As shown here, state-level RPS programs specifically designed to support solar have already proven to be an important, albeit somewhat modest, driver for solar energy deployment, and those impacts are projected to continue to build in the coming years. State experience in supporting solar energy with RPS programs is mixed, however, and full compliance with existing requirements has not been achieved. The comparative experiences described herein highlight the opportunities and challenges of applying an RPS to specifically support solar energy, as well as the importance of policy design details to ensuring that program goals are achieved.

  19. Analysis of a 10% Renewable Portfolio Standard, Addendum

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    On May 8, 2003, Senator Jeff Bingaman, the Ranking Minority Member of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, requested an analysis of a nationwide Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) program proposed to be amended to energy legislation currently pending before the U.S. Senate. With his request Sen. Bingaman provided specific information on the program to be analyzed. This analysis was prepared in response to his request and projects the impact of the proposed program on energy supply, demand, prices, and emissions. The analysis is based on the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 (AEO2003) projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2025, as updated in May 2003.

  20. Template:Set RenewableFuelStandard | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation JumpSet RenewableFuelStandard Jump to: navigation,

  1. The Importance of High Temporal Resolution in Modeling Renewable Energy Penetration Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolosi, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Impact of a 15-Percent Renewable Portfolio Standard, EnergyAlternatives for Competitive Renewable Energy Zones inU.S. Electric Supply, National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  2. Guide to purchasing green power. Renewable electricity, renewable energy certificates and on-site renewable generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-09-30

    The Guide to Purchasing Green Power is intended for organizations that are considering the merits of buying green power as well as those that have decided to buy it and want help doing so. The Guide was written for a broad audience, including businesses, government agencies, universities, and all organizations wanting to diversify their energy supply and to reduce the environmental impact of their electricity use.The Guide provides an overview of green power markets and describes the necessary steps to buying green power. This section summarizes the Guide to help readers find the information they need.

  3. Comparing the Risk Profiles of Renewable and Natural Gas Electricity Contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Comparing the Risk Profiles of Renewable and Natural Gas Electricity Contracts: A Summary Public Utilities Commission DWR California Department of Water Resources EEI Edison Electric Institute EOB California Electricity Oversight Board FERC Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ISO California

  4. Neutron Electric Dipole Moments from Beyond the Standard Model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutron Electric Dipole Moments from Beyond the Standard Model Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron Electric Dipole Moments from Beyond the Standard Model...

  5. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This volume details the end-use electricity demand and efficiency assumptions. The projection of electricity demand is an important consideration in determining the extent to which a predominantly renewable electricity future is feasible. Any scenario regarding future electricity use must consider many factors, including technological, sociological, demographic, political, and economic changes (e.g., the introduction of new energy-using devices; gains in energy efficiency and process improvements; changes in energy prices, income, and user behavior; population growth; and the potential for carbon mitigation).

  6. Achieving 30% Renewable Electricity Use by 2025 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| DepartmentAL/FAL 99-01 More5,Achieving 30% Renewable Electricity Use by

  7. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    New Hampshire’s RPS, enacted in May 2007, establishes a renewables target for all of the state’s electricity

  8. Evaluating Interventions in the U.S. Electricity System: Assessments of Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, and Small-Scale Cogeneration from electricity generation. Renewable energy, energy efficiency, and energy, where performance is measured relative to three objectives: energy production

  9. Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

    2013-03-20

    Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

  10. Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

    2013-06-07

    Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

  11. Electricity for Millions: Developing Renewable Energy in China (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-04-01

    This two page fact sheet describes NREL's work developing renewable energy in China. Renewable focus areas include rural energy development, wind energy development, geothermal energy development, renewable energy business development and policy and planning.

  12. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Bird, Lori; Churchill, Susannah; Deyette, Jeff; Holt, Ed

    2008-04-09

    Renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have proliferated at the state level in the United States since the late 1990s. In combination with Federal tax incentives, state RPS requirements have emerged as one of the most important drivers of renewable energy capacity additions. The focus of most RPS activity in the U.S. has been within the states. Nonetheless, the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate have, at different times, each passed versions of a Federal RPS; a Federal RPS, however, has not yet been signed into law. The design of an RPS can and does vary, but at its heart an RPS simply requires retail electricity suppliers (also called load-serving entities, or LSEs) to procure a certain minimum quantity of eligible renewable energy. An RPS establishes numeric targets for renewable energy supply, applies those targets to retail electricity suppliers, and seeks to encourage competition among renewable developers to meet the targets in a least-cost fashion. RPS purchase obligations generally increase over time, and retail suppliers typically must demonstrate compliance on an annual basis. Mandatory RPS policies are backed by various types of compliance enforcement mechanisms, and many--but not all--such policies include the trading of renewable energy certificates (RECs). Renewables portfolio standards are a relatively recent addition to the renewable energy policy landscape, and these policies continue to evolve. Keeping up with the design, early experience, and projected impacts of these programs is a challenge. This report seeks to fill this need by providing basic, factual information on RPS policies in the United States. It focuses on state-level initiatives, though a later section briefly discusses Federal developments as well. The report does not cover municipal-level renewable energy goals, unless required by state law. Similarly, this report focuses on mandatory state RPS requirements, though it also touches on non-binding renewable energy goals, especially when those goals are developed by state law or regulation. This report is the first of what is envisioned to be an ongoing series; as such, it concentrates on key recent developments, while also providing basic information on historical RPS experience and design. The report begins with an overview of state RPS policies: where they have been developed, when, and with what design features. Though most RPS programs are still in their infancy, the report summarizes the early impacts of these policies on renewable energy development, and provides a forecast of possible future impacts. It then turns to the implications of the growing trend towards solar and/or distributed generation set-asides within state RPS programs. Next, the report highlights state RPS compliance levels, enforcement actions, and cost impacts, as well as key developments in REC markets. Finally, the report provides a brief overview of Federal RPS proposals.

  13. Solar Renewable Energy Certificates (SREC-II)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Massachusetts' renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requires each regulated electricity supplier/provider serving retail customers in the state* to include in the electricity it sells 15% qualifying...

  14. Impact of Renewable Fuels Standard/MTBE Provisions of S. 517 Requested by Sens. Daschle & Murkowski

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    Additional analysis of the impact of the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban provisions of S. 517.

  15. The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heeter, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    addition of renewable and alternative energy resources. TheCompany to Update its Alternative Energy Rider. ” Delaware2011 Annual Report Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards

  16. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C.

    1994-06-01

    Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

  17. Integrating CO? storage with geothermal resources for dispatchable renewable electricity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buscheck, Thomas A.; Bielicki, Jeffrey M.; Chen, Mingjie; Sun, Yunwei; Hao, Yue; Edmunds, Thomas A.; Saar, Martin O.; Randolph, Jimmy B.

    2014-12-31

    We present an approach that uses the huge fluid and thermal storage capacity of the subsurface, together with geologic CO? storage, to harvest, store, and dispatch energy from subsurface (geothermal) and surface (solar, nuclear, fossil) thermal resources, as well as energy from electrical grids. Captured CO? is injected into saline aquifers to store pressure, generate artesian flow of brine, and provide an additional working fluid for efficient heat extraction and power conversion. Concentric rings of injection and production wells are used to create a hydraulic divide to store pressure, CO?, and thermal energy. Such storage can take excess power frommore »the grid and excess/waste thermal energy, and dispatch that energy when it is demanded, enabling increased penetration of variable renewables. Stored CO? functions as a cushion gas to provide enormous pressure-storage capacity and displaces large quantities of brine, which can be desalinated and/or treated for a variety of beneficial uses.« less

  18. Integrating CO? storage with geothermal resources for dispatchable renewable electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buscheck, Thomas A.; Bielicki, Jeffrey M.; Chen, Mingjie; Sun, Yunwei; Hao, Yue; Edmunds, Thomas A.; Saar, Martin O.; Randolph, Jimmy B.

    2014-12-31

    We present an approach that uses the huge fluid and thermal storage capacity of the subsurface, together with geologic CO? storage, to harvest, store, and dispatch energy from subsurface (geothermal) and surface (solar, nuclear, fossil) thermal resources, as well as energy from electrical grids. Captured CO? is injected into saline aquifers to store pressure, generate artesian flow of brine, and provide an additional working fluid for efficient heat extraction and power conversion. Concentric rings of injection and production wells are used to create a hydraulic divide to store pressure, CO?, and thermal energy. Such storage can take excess power from the grid and excess/waste thermal energy, and dispatch that energy when it is demanded, enabling increased penetration of variable renewables. Stored CO? functions as a cushion gas to provide enormous pressure-storage capacity and displaces large quantities of brine, which can be desalinated and/or treated for a variety of beneficial uses.

  19. Risk implications of the deployment of renewables for investments in electricity generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sisternes, Fernando J. de (Fernando José de Sisternes Jiménez)

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores the potential risk implications that a large penetration of intermittent renewable electricity generation -such as wind and solar power- may have on the future electricity generation technology mix, ...

  20. Integration of renewable energy into the transport and electricity sectors through V2G

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Integration of renewable energy into the transport and electricity sectors through V2G Henrik Lund Renewable energy Wind powerQ1 a b s t r a c t Large-scale sustainable energy systems will be necessary replace oil in the transportation sector, and (2) since today's inexpensive and abundant renewable energy

  1. Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System Mark, alternative energy system to convert the circular motion of ocean waves as they propagate through the sea and feasible alternative, renewable, electrical energy producing subsea system. Index Terms--ocean energy, wave

  2. Impact of Renewable Fuels Standard/MTBE Provisions of S. 1766

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This service report addresses the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS)/methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) provisions of S. 1766. The 'S. 1766' Case reflects provisions of S. 1766 including a renewable fuels standard (RFS) reaching five billion gallons by 2012, a complete phase-out of MTBE within four years, and the option for states to waive the oxygen requirement for reformulated gasoline (RFG).

  3. COMMISSION GUIDEBOOK RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's Renewables Portfolio Standard (RPS), which has a goal of obtaining 33 percent of the state's electricity ................................................................................................... 6 C. Consumer Education Program

  4. Integrating High Levels of Renewables into the Lanai Electric Grid

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses an assessment of the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy sources on the island of Lanai with a stated goal of reaching 100% renewable...

  5. Electric Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. electric vehicle and infrastructure projects.

  6. Liquid Fuel From Renewable Electricity and Bacteria: Electro-Autotrophic Synthesis of Higher Alcohols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: UCLA is utilizing renewable electricity to power direct liquid fuel production in genetically engineered Ralstonia eutropha bacteria. UCLA is using renewable electricity to convert carbon dioxide into formic acid, a liquid soluble compound that delivers both carbon and energy to the bacteria. The bacteria are genetically engineered to convert the formic acid into liquid fuel—in this case alcohols such as butanol. The electricity required for the process can be generated from sunlight, wind, or other renewable energy sources. In fact, UCLA’s electricity-to-fuel system could be a more efficient way to utilize these renewable energy sources considering the energy density of liquid fuel is much higher than the energy density of other renewable energy storage options, such as batteries.

  7. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Washington voters passed Initiative 937 in 2006, creating a renewable energy standard and an energy efficiency resource standard for the state's electric utilities. Initiative 937, enacted as th...

  8. Beginning of Construction for Purposes of the Renewable Electricity Production Tax Credit and Energy Investment Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beginning of Construction for Purposes of the Renewable Electricity Production Tax Credit and Energy Investment Tax Credit

  9. Recharging U.S. Energy Policy: Advocating for a National Renewable Portfolio Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunt, Robin J.

    2007-01-01

    on shifts in the electricity market. Id. at § 25.173(h), (standards require an electricity market to include a minimumin a restructured Electricity Market, 15 L. POL'Y F. 187,

  10. California's Renewable Portfolio Standard Northwest Power and Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contracts 30,000 40,000 GWh Solar Thermal 20,000 G Wind 0 10,000 Biopower Geotherma l Small Hydro 0 2003 target for 33% of energy to be from eligible renewable energy resources Large hydro and rooftop solar for mid-size and small projects ReMAT, successor to Feed-In Tariff (0-3 MW) Renewable Auction Mechanism

  11. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This volume focuses on the role of variable renewable generation in creating challenges to the planning and operations of power systems and the expansion of transmission to deliver electricity from remote resources to load centers. The technical and institutional changes to power systems that respond to these challenges are, in many cases, underway, driven by the economic benefits of adopting more modern communication, information, and computation technologies that offer significant operational cost savings and improved asset utilization. While this volume provides background information and numerous references, the reader is referred to the literature for more complete tutorials.

  12. Defining a Standard Metric for Electricity Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Marilyn; Akbari, Hashem; Blumstein, Carl; Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard; Calwell, Chris; Carter, Sheryl; Cavanagh, Ralph; Chang, Audrey; Claridge, David; Craig, Paul; Diamond, Rick; Eto, Joseph H.; Fulkerson, William; Gadgil, Ashok; Geller, Howard; Goldemberg, Jose; Goldman, Chuck; Goldstein, David B.; Greenberg, Steve; Hafemeister, David; Harris, Jeff; Harvey, Hal; Heitz, Eric; Hirst, Eric; Hummel, Holmes; Kammen, Dan; Kelly, Henry; Laitner, Skip; Levine, Mark; Lovins, Amory; Masters, Gil; McMahon, James E.; Meier, Alan; Messenger, Michael; Millhone, John; Mills, Evan; Nadel, Steve; Nordman, Bruce; Price, Lynn; Romm, Joe; Ross, Marc; Rufo, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant; Schipper, Lee; Schneider, Stephen H; Sweeney, James L; Verdict, Malcolm; Vorsatz, Diana; Wang, Devra; Weinberg, Carl; Wilk, Richard; Wilson, John; Worrell, Ernst

    2009-03-01

    The growing investment by governments and electric utilities in energy efficiency programs highlights the need for simple tools to help assess and explain the size of the potential resource. One technique that is commonly used in this effort is to characterize electricity savings in terms of avoided power plants, because it is easier for people to visualize a power plant than it is to understand an abstraction such as billions of kilowatt-hours. Unfortunately, there is no standardization around the characteristics of such power plants. In this letter we define parameters for a standard avoided power plant that have physical meaning and intuitive plausibility, for use in back-of-the-envelope calculations. For the prototypical plant this article settles on a 500 MW existing coal plant operating at a 70percent capacity factor with 7percent T&D losses. Displacing such a plant for one year would save 3 billion kW h per year at the meter and reduce emissions by 3 million metric tons of CO2 per year. The proposed name for this metric is the Rosenfeld, in keeping with the tradition among scientists of naming units in honor of the person most responsible for the discovery and widespread adoption of the underlying scientific principle in question--Dr. Arthur H. Rosenfeld.

  13. Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Barbose, G.; Bird, L.; Weaver, S.; Flores-Espino, F.; Kuskova-Burns, K.; Wiser, R.

    2014-05-01

    Most renewable portfolio standards (RPS) have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS costs and benefits is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. This study provides an overview of methods used to estimate RPS compliance costs and benefits, based on available data and estimates issued by utilities and regulators. Over the 2010-2012 period, average incremental RPS compliance costs in the United States were equivalent to 0.8% of retail electricity rates, although substantial variation exists around this average, both from year-to-year and across states. The methods used by utilities and regulators to estimate incremental compliance costs vary considerably from state to state and a number of states are currently engaged in processes to refine and standardize their approaches to RPS cost calculation. The report finds that state assessments of RPS benefits have most commonly attempted to quantitatively assess avoided emissions and human health benefits, economic development impacts, and wholesale electricity price savings. Compared to the summary of RPS costs, the summary of RPS benefits is more limited, as relatively few states have undertaken detailed benefits estimates, and then only for a few types of potential policy impacts. In some cases, the same impacts may be captured in the assessment of incremental costs. For these reasons, and because methodologies and level of rigor vary widely, direct comparisons between the estimates of benefits and costs are challenging.

  14. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    hedge value of renewable energy and the benefits of reducedRenewable Energy Standard: Economic and Employment Benefits.risk-mitigation benefits of renewable energy are sizable.

  15. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards: AM. Fripp. 2004. Putting Renewables to Work: How Many JobsLos Angeles Can Reach 20% Renewables Without Raising Rates.

  16. Integrating High Levels of Renewables in to the Lanai Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroposki, B.; Burman, K.; Keller, J.; Kandt, A.; Glassmire, J.; Lilienthal, P.

    2012-06-01

    The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is working with a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratory (Sandia) to assess the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy sources on the island of Lanai with a stated goal of reaching 100% renewable energy. NREL and Sandia partnered with Castle & Cooke, Maui Electric Company (MECO), and SRA International to perform the assessment.

  17. Collaboration on Renewable Energy Standards, Testing, and Certification under the U.S. China Renewable Energy Partnership: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, W.; Kurtz, S.; Lin, W.

    2012-06-01

    During November 2009, the U.S. China Renewable Energy Partnership agreement was authorized in Beijing by Presidents Obama and Hu from the U.S. and China. One of the principle tasks under this new program is the collaboration of the U.S. and China on the topic of renewable energy standards, testing, and certification with an initial focus on solar PV and wind topics. This paper will describe and discuss the activities which have taken place under the bilateral collaboration to date.

  18. Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona)- Renewable Energy Purchase Rate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Farmers Electric Cooperative offers a production incentive to members that install qualifying wind and solar electricity generating systems. Qualifying grid-tied solar and wind energy systems are...

  19. Economic analysis of using excess renewable electricity to displace heating fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    -penetration renewable electricity systems, it is less expensive to install higher capacity of renewables and to allow cases, a natural gas fired boiler (NGB) was modeled to be installed in the building for back-up heat for human related activities (the solar radiation alone on the earth's surface is more than three orders

  20. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electricity generated from sources that are renewable – hydroelectric power, bio-fuels, geothermal, solar, wind, wood, waste – have grown 150% from 1980 to 2011 (latest year available). Of the...

  1. Renewable Electricity Use by the U.S. Information and Communication...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    generating non-grid connected electricity from small-scale landfill gas and solar photovoltaic (PV) renewable projects (CDP 2014f). 17 This report is available at no cost...

  2. Combining a Renewable Portfolio Standard with a Cap-and-Trade Policy: A General Equilibrium Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Jennifer

    Many efforts to address greenhouse gas emissions combine a cap-and-trade system with other measures such as a renewable portfolio standard. In this paper we use a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model, the MIT Emissions ...

  3. What Has the Federal Renewable Fuels Standard Accomplished - A National Perspective (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwab, A.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the nation's biofuels industry accomplishments and a perspective on the challenges and implications of reaching goals set in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

  4. Review of Transportation Issues & Comparison of Infrastructure Costs for a Renewable Fuels Standard

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyzes the inter-regional transportation issues and associated costs for increased distribution of renewable fuels with the assumption that ethanol will be used to meet the standards.

  5. The Potential Economic Impacts of a Renewable Portfolio Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    , and economic development. The RPS has emerged as one of the most popular and cost-effective mechanisms. Comparison of Coal, Wind and PV (in Person-Years per $1 Million in Cost over 10 Years Including Capital, hydropower, and biomass) according to a specified schedule. Many states are prioritizing renewable energy

  6. Renewable Electricity Use by the U.S. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John; Bird, Lori; Heeter, Jenny; Gorham, Bethany

    2015-07-20

    The information and communication technology (ICT) sector continues to witness rapid growth and uptake of ICT equipment and services at both the national and global levels. The electricity consumption associated with this expansion is substantial, although recent adoptions of cloudcomputing services, co-location data centers, and other less energy-intensive equipment and operations have likely reduced the rate of growth in this sector. This paper is intended to aggregate existing ICT industry data and research to provide an initial look at electricity use, current and future renewable electricity acquisition, as well as serve as a benchmark for future growth and trends in ICT industry renewable electricity consumption.

  7. Toward Standards for Dynamics in Electric Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conducting research on challenges facing the electric power industry and educating the next generation in complex electric power systems; and to, eventually utilize these for proposing principles for standardsToward Standards for Dynamics in Electric Energy Systems Future Grid Initiative White Paper Power

  8. Control Strategies for Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Using Renewables...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    demand charges for residential and commercial customers. The use of renewables (e.g., solar) and local storage (e.g., battery bank) can mitigate loads caused by EVSE on the...

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures:  Operational Analysis of the Western Interconnection at Very High Renewable Penetrations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of this work was to perform a detailed, sub-hourly analysis of very high penetration scenarios for a single interconnection (the Western Interconnection). The scenarios analyzed for this study included a variety of generation infrastructure buildouts and power system operational assumptions, with three different portfolios of renewable generators. The High scenario had approximately 82% renewable generation after curtailment, which included 41% of its generation coming from variable generation (VG) sources like wind and solar photovoltaics (PV). The remaining renewable generation came from hydropower, geothermal, and concentrating solar power (CSP). The Higher Baseload scenario adds CSP and geothermal to the High scenario to make 88% renewable generation. This study also included a Higher VG scenario with added wind and solar PV generation to get to 86% renewable generation. Both Higher scenarios added the same amount of possible generation, but the Higher VG scenario showed more curtailment from the incremental generation, leading to lower penetration levels after curtailment. The primary conclusion of this study is that sub-hourly operation of the grid is possible with renewable generation levels between 80% and 90%. Dynamic studies will need to be done to understand any impacts on reliability during contingencies and transient events.

  10. Renewable Power Options for Electrical Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, K.; Keller, J.; Kroposki, B.; Lilienthal, P.; Slaughter, R.; Glassmire, J.

    2011-11-01

    The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is working with a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy in Hawaii. This part of the HCEI project focuses on working with Kaua'i Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) to understand how to integrate higher levels of renewable energy into the electric power system of the island of Kaua'i. NREL partnered with KIUC to perform an economic and technical analysis and discussed how to model PV inverters in the electrical grid.

  11. Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, New York: Energy ResourcesProducts LLCProjectMaze -Renewables

  12. Renewable Fuel Standards Program Update | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct. 7,DOERTIRegulatoryResidential SavingsEnergyofRenewable

  13. Renewables Portfolio Standards: What Are We Learning? | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudgetFinancialReliabilityEnergyRenewable Jet Fuel

  14. The Easy Way to Use Renewables: Buy Clean Electricity | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    electric utility, just like I am. These wind rates were lower than the coalnuclear electricity rates offered by my utility for both summer and winter through May 31, 2010....

  15. Intelligence in Electricity Networks for Embedding Renewables and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    their loads due to highly-inefficient transmission. Furthermore, multiple electric lines were needed for each. At the same time, introducing more combined heat and power generation (CHP) couples electricity production. Tesla's `new system' made it possible to transmit electrical power over long dis- tances and to use one

  16. Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid System Economic Basis for Electricity, Fuel, and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Forsberg; Steven Aumeier

    2014-04-01

    Concerns about climate change and altering the ocean chemistry are likely to limit the use of fossil fuels. That implies a transition to a low-carbon nuclear-renewable electricity grid. Historically variable electricity demand was met using fossil plants with low capital costs, high operating costs, and substantial greenhouse gas emissions. However, the most easily scalable very-low-emissions generating options, nuclear and non-dispatchable renewables (solar and wind), are capital-intensive technologies with low operating costs that should operate at full capacities to minimize costs. No combination of fully-utilized nuclear and renewables can meet the variable electricity demand. This implies large quantities of expensive excess generating capacity much of the time. In a free market this results in near-zero electricity prices at times of high nuclear renewables output and low electricity demand with electricity revenue collapse. Capital deployment efficiency—the economic benefit derived from energy systems capital investment at a societal level—strongly favors high utilization of these capital-intensive systems, especially if low-carbon nuclear renewables are to replace fossil fuels. Hybrid energy systems are one option for better utilization of these systems that consumes excess energy at times of low prices to make some useful product.The economic basis for development of hybrid energy systems is described for a low-carbon nuclear renewable world where much of the time there are massivequantities of excess energy available from the electric sector.Examples include (1) high-temperature electrolysis to generate hydrogen for non-fossil liquid fuels, direct use as a transport fuel, metal reduction, etc. and (2) biorefineries.Nuclear energy with its concentrated constant heat output may become the enabling technology for economically-viable low-carbon electricity grids because hybrid nuclear systems may provide an economic way to produce dispatachable variable electricity with economic base-load operation of the reactor.

  17. The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

    2007-01-01

    Renewable Energy Certificates and Air Emissions Benefits:risk mitigation benefits of renewable energy are achievedenvironmental benefits from renewable energy in general

  18. The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

    2007-01-01

    between renewable energy and environmental policy, we look3) state policies on whether renewable energy or RECs sold3. State policies on whether renewable energy or RECs sold

  19. The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

    2007-01-01

    Holt. 2004. “Design Guide for Renewable Energy Certificate2005. “Emerging Markets for Renewable Energy Certificates:Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory. http://

  20. The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

    2007-01-01

    renewable energy systems…will reduce environmental costs infor renewable energy and RECs and determining their cost andthe cost of providing total renewable energy to its retail

  1. The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

    2007-01-01

    Design Guide for Renewable Energy Certificate Tracking2005. “Emerging Markets for Renewable Energy Certificates:Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory. http://

  2. Neutron Electric Dipole Moments from Beyond the Standard Model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electric Dipole Moments from Beyond the Standard Model Physics Bhattacharya, Tanmoy Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cirigliano, Vincenzo Los...

  3. Integration of renewable energy into the transport and electricity sectors through V2G

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Integration of renewable energy into the transport and electricity sectors through V2G Henrik Lund, DE 19716, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 18 March 2008 Accepted 2 June 2008 Keywords: V2G Vehicle to grid Energy system analysis Sustainable energy systems Electric vehicle EV

  4. Producing methane from electrical current generated using renewable energy sources using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Producing methane from electrical current generated using renewable energy sources using electrical current 5 Liu et al. (2004) Environ. Sci. Technol. #12;6 Getting energy from food (biomass) C6H12O methanogenic microorganisms Bruce E. Logan Penn State University Engineering Energy & Environmental Institute

  5. Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    and feasible alternative, renewable, electrical energy producing subsea system. Index Terms--ocean energy, wave energy, wave energy converter, WEC, electrical energy, alternative energy, hydrokinetic energy on the coasts of the United States the harvesting ocean wave energy is ideal. It is projected that wave energy

  6. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    wholesale electricity price projections as a model output.in natural gas prices projections over the past severalprojections of renewable technology cost, fossil fuel price

  7. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    detailed wholesale electricity price projections as a modelelectricity bills, and renewable energy certificate (REC) prices. Developing a consistent set of metrics for comparing cost projections

  8. EEE598 Renewable Electric Energy Systems Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    in the utilization of renewable resources, especially wind and solar. EEE 598 is an advanced course on power Harmonic analysis, power quality and filter design Current injection control at unity power factor and implementation in simulation tools 2. Power converters and control for wind generators Overview of wind turbine

  9. Cumberland Valley Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cumberland Valley Electric offers a number of programs to promote energy conservation. This program offers rebates for air source heat pumps, building insulation (including windows and doors), and...

  10. RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portfolio Standard (RPS), which has a goal of obtaining 20 percent of the state's electricity from renewable................................................................................................. 13H7 C. CONSUMER EDUCATION PROGRAM

  11. Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2012-11-01

    Currently, 29 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico have instituted a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). An RPS sets a minimum threshold for how much renewable energy must be generated in a given year. Each state policy is unique, varying in percentage targets, timetables, and eligible resources. This paper examines state experience with implementing renewable portfolio standards that include energy efficiency, thermal resources, and non-renewable energy and explores compliance experience, costs, and how states evaluate, measure, and verify energy efficiency and convert thermal energy. It aims to gain insights from the experience of states for possible federal clean energy policy as well as to share experience and lessons for state RPS implementation.

  12. Intelligence in Electricity Networks for Embedding Renewables and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    . At the same time, introducing more combined heat and power generation (CHP) couples electricity production power systems of in- dustrialized economies have become one of the most complex systems created to heat demand patterns. Secondly, the location of electricity generation relative to the load centers

  13. ReEDS Modeling of the President's 2020 U.S. Renewable Electricity Generation Goal (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinaman, O.; Mai, T.; Lantz, E.; Gelman, R.; Porro, G.

    2014-05-01

    President Obama announced in 2012 an Administration Goal for the United States to double aggregate renewable electricity generation from wind, solar, and geothermal sources by 2020. This analysis, using the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, explores a full range of future renewable deployment scenarios out to 2020 to assess progress and outlook toward this goal. Under all modeled conditions, consisting of 21 scenarios, the Administration Goal is met before 2020, and as early as 2015.

  14. Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

    2012-12-01

    Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

  15. Estimating the Value of Utility-Scale Solar Technologies in California Under a 40% Renewable Portfolio Standard (Report Summary) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgenson, J.; Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2014-06-01

    Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) is a unique source of solar energy in that its output can be shifted over time. The ability of CSP-TES to be a flexible source of generation may be particularly valuable in regions with high overall penetration of solar energy, such as the state of California. California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) requires the state to increase generation from eligible renewable energy resources to reach 33% of retail electricity sales by 2020. Beyond 2020, California targets a further reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. To help reach this goal, current California governor Jerry Brown has stated that a higher 40% RPS might be reachable in the near term. The levelized cost of energy is generally emphasized when assessing the economic viability of renewable energy systems implemented to achieve the RPS. However, the operational and capacity benefits of such systems are often ignored, which can lead to incorrect economic comparisons between CSP-TES and variable renewable generation technologies such as solar photovoltaics (PV). Here we evaluate a 40% RPS scenario in a California grid model with PV or CSP-TES providing the last 1% of RPS energy. We compare the technical and economic implications of integrating either solar technology under several sensitivities, finding that the ability to displace new conventional thermal generation capacity may be the largest source of value of CSP-TES compared to PV at high solar penetrations.

  16. Estimating the Value of Utility-Scale Solar Technologies in California Under a 40% Renewable Portfolio Standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgenson, J.; Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2014-05-01

    Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) is a unique source of solar energy in that its output can be shifted over time. The ability of CSP-TES to be a flexible source of generation may be particularly valuable in regions with high overall penetration of solar energy, such as the state of California. California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) requires the state to increase generation from eligible renewable energy resources to reach 33% of retail electricity sales by 2020. Beyond 2020, California targets a further reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. To help reach this goal, current California governor Jerry Brown has stated that a higher 40% RPS might be reachable in the near term. The levelized cost of energy is generally emphasized when assessing the economic viability of renewable energy systems implemented to achieve the RPS. However, the operational and capacity benefits of such systems are often ignored, which can lead to incorrect economic comparisons between CSP-TES and variable renewable generation technologies such as solar photovoltaics (PV). Here we evaluate a 40% RPS scenario in a California grid model with PV or CSP-TES providing the last 1% of RPS energy. We compare the technical and economic implications of integrating either solar technology under several sensitivities, finding that the ability to displace new conventional thermal generation capacity may be the largest source of value of CSP-TES compared to PV at high solar penetrations.

  17. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power transmission systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Dykas, W.P.; Kirby, B.J.; Purucker, S.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lawler, J.S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Renewable energy technologies such as photovoltaics, solar thermal power plants, and wind turbines are nonconventional, environmentally attractive sources of energy that can be considered for electric power generation. Many of the areas with abundant renewable energy resources (very sunny or windy areas) are far removed from major load centers. Although electrical power can be transmitted over long distances of many hundreds of miles through high-voltage transmission lines, power transmission systems often operate near their limits with little excess capacity for new generation sources. This study assesses the available capacity of transmission systems in designated abundant renewable energy resource regions and identifies the requirements for high-capacity plant integration in selected cases. In general, about 50 MW of power from renewable sources can be integrated into existing transmission systems to supply local loads without transmission upgrades beyond the construction of a substation to connect to the grid. Except in the Southwest, significant investment to strengthen transmission systems will be required to support the development of high-capacity renewable sources of 1000 MW or greater in areas remote from major load centers. Cost estimates for new transmission facilities to integrate and dispatch some of these high-capacity renewable sources ranged from several million dollars to approximately one billion dollars, with the latter figure an increase in total investment of 35%, assuming that the renewable source is the only user of the transmission facility.

  18. City of Columbia - Renewable Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging station inWin"nearAaron

  19. Renewable Electricity in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand Cubic Feet)6984 For Renewable

  20. Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewable Energy RFPsLtd RES Group Jump|Technologies,

  1. Achieving 30% Renewable Electricity Use by 2025 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDIT REPORT:Federal Employee Fatality atRenewable Energy

  2. Decision-Making for High Renewable Electricity Futures in the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This short Report Review highlights aspects of policy, regulation, finance, markets and operations that can help enable high penetration renewable energy electricity generation futures. It uses analytical results from the NREL Renewable Electricity Futures (REF) Study as a basis for discussion. As technical issues have been shown not to be key impediments for this pathway at the hourly level for the bulk system, we focus on other aspects of public and private decision-making. We conclude by describing how the REF might inform future research and development by the scientific community.

  3. Environmental Standard Review Plan for the review of license renewal applications for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, J.; Kim, T.J.; Reynolds, S.

    1991-08-01

    The Environmental Standard Review Plan for the Review of License Applications for Nuclear Power Plants (ESRP-LR) is to be used by the NRC staff when performing environmental reviews of applications for the renewal of power reactor licenses. The use of the ESRP-LR provides a framework for the staff to determine whether or not environmental issues important to license renewal have been identified and the impacts evaluated and provides acceptance standards to help the reviewers comply with the National Environmental Policy Act.

  4. Development of renewable energy Challenges for the electrical grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    (U 20 kV) · Grids initially constructed and operated to distribute electricity · New Role technology cost reduction #12;Challenges for the grids 4. Grid Codes · Grid Codes: Regulation for production challenges ­ New capacities & grid connection : RES grid connection schemes (S3RENR) ­ RES and distribution

  5. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Evaluation; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, Jennifer; Sprik, Sam; Ainscough, Chris; Saur, Genevieve

    2015-06-10

    This presentation provides a summary of NREL's FY15 fuel cell electric vehicle evaluation project activities and accomplishments. It was presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2015 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting on June 10, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia.

  6. The value of electricity storage under large-scale penetration of renewable energy : a hybrid modeling approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Octaviano Villasana, Claudia Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Due to the physics of electricity, and the current high costs of storage technologies, electricity generation and demand need to be instantaneously balanced at all times. The large-scale deployment of intermittent renewables ...

  7. International Standards Development for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy - Final Report on Technical Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Neil E.; Busch, Jason; Kimball, Richard

    2011-10-29

    This report summarizes the progress toward development of International Standards for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy, as funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 114. The project has three main objectives: 1. Provide funding to support participation of key U.S. industry technical experts in 6 (originally 4) international working groups and/or project teams (the primary standards-making committees) and to attend technical meetings to ensure greater U.S. involvement in the development of these standards. 2. Provide a report to DOE and industry stakeholders summarizing the IEC standards development process for marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, new international standards and their justifications, and provide standards guidance to industry members. 3. Provide a semi-annual (web-based) newsletter to the marine renewable energy community. The newsletter will educate industry members and stakeholders about the processes, progress, and needs of the US efforts to support the international standards development effort. The newsletter is available at www.TC114.us

  8. Abstract--The penetration of plug-in electric vehicles and renewable distributed generation is expected to increase over the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perreault, Dave

    1 Abstract--The penetration of plug-in electric vehicles and renewable distributed generation, power grids I. INTRODUCTION ROWING concern for climate change and energy security has renewed interest legislative effort to mandate, or incentivize, large scale integration of renewable energy resources

  9. IEEE 1547 and 2030 Standards for Distributed Energy Resources Interconnection and Interoperability with the Electricity Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basso, T.

    2014-12-01

    Public-private partnerships have been a mainstay of the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (DOE/NREL) approach to research and development. These partnerships also include technology development that enables grid modernization and distributed energy resources (DER) advancement, especially renewable energy systems integration with the grid. Through DOE/NREL and industry support of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) standards development, the IEEE 1547 series of standards has helped shape the way utilities and other businesses have worked together to realize increasing amounts of DER interconnected with the distribution grid. And more recently, the IEEE 2030 series of standards is helping to further realize greater implementation of communications and information technologies that provide interoperability solutions for enhanced integration of DER and loads with the grid. For these standards development partnerships, for approximately $1 of federal funding, industry partnering has contributed $5. In this report, the status update is presented for the American National Standards IEEE 1547 and IEEE 2030 series of standards. A short synopsis of the history of the 1547 standards is first presented, then the current status and future direction of the ongoing standards development activities are discussed.

  10. Implications of High Renewable Electricity Penetration in the U.S. for Water Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Land-Use, and Materials Supply

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recent work found that renewable energy could supply 80% of electricity demand in the contiguous United States in 2050 at the hourly level. This paper explores some of the implications of achieving such high levels of renewable electricity for supply chains and the environment in scenarios with renewable supply up to such levels. Transitioning to high renewable electricity supply would lead to significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and water use, with only modest land-use implications. While renewable energy expansion implies moderate growth of the renewable electricity supply chains, no insurmountable long-term constraints to renewable electricity technology manufacturing capacity or materials supply are identified.

  11. The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

    2007-01-01

    s rules state: “Renewable Energy Trading Program Emissionsin a renewable energy trading program shall have exclusiverenewable energy and RECs in emissions trading markets. For

  12. The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

    2007-01-01

    market of potential significance to renewable energy ispotential application of tracking systems is to verify marketing claims for voluntary renewable energy

  13. Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix K RENEWABLE RESOURCE CONFIRMATION AGENDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , or additional projects undertaken to support demand for "green" power or to achieve research and developmentK-1 Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix K APPENDIX K RENEWABLE in Chapter 1 of Volume II of the 1991 Power Plan. In general, the Council has avoided advocating new policies

  14. Evaluating Interventions in the U.S. Electricity System: Assessments of Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on to explore regional variations in the performance of wind turbines and solar panels of an additional wind turbine or solar panel in the U.S. electricity system. I find of Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, and Small-Scale Cogeneration

  15. Optimal utilisation of renewable electricity generation Location: School of Mathematics, University of Leeds, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    . The increase of random fluctuations in the generation of electricity when more wind and solar installations, wind and solar generation fluctuates depending on meteorological conditions. This new source to limited capacity, hydro-pump plants are currently employed. With the growing penetration of renewable

  16. Evaluating Policies to Increase the Generation of Electricity from Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalensee, Richard

    Focusing on the U.S. and the E.U., this essay seeks to advance four main propositions. First, the incidence of the short-run costs of programs to subsidize the generation of electricity from renewable sources varies with ...

  17. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Renewable Electricity Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Renewable Electricity Futures Trieu Berlin, Germany December 46, 2012 NREL/PR6A2057018 Renewable Electricity Futures Study (2012). Hand, M is a low carbon, low air pollutant, low fuel use, low water use, domestic, and sustainable electricity

  18. Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto Electric Coop, Inc JumpElko, Nevada:Geothermal Power LLC Jump

  19. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors and Walk...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Motors and Walk-in Coolers and Freezers to Save on Energy Bills and Reduce Carbon Pollution New Energy Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors and Walk-in Coolers and Freezers...

  20. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    or clean energy policies, unless RPS-specific costs areCost Impacts of a Vermont Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard Economics of a Washington Energy Portfolio Standard: Effects on Ratepayers The Washington Clean Energy

  1. Variable Renewable Generation can Provide Balancing Control to the Electric Power System (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-09-01

    As wind and solar plants become more common in the electric power system, they may be called on to provide grid support services to help maintain system reliability. For example, through the use of inertial response, primary frequency response, and automatic generation control (also called secondary frequency response), wind power can provide assistance in balancing the generation and load on the system. These active power (i.e., real power) control services have the potential to assist the electric power system in times of disturbances and during normal conditions while also potentially providing economic value to consumers and variable renewable generation owners. This one-page, two-sided fact sheet discusses the grid-friendly support and benefits renewables can provide to the electric power system.

  2. Next Generation of Renewable Electricity Policy: How Rapid Change is Breaking Down Conventional Policy Categories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couture, T. D.; Jacobs, D.; Rickerson, W.; Healey, V.

    2015-02-01

    A number of policies have been used historically in order to stimulate the growth of the renewable electricity sector. This paper examines four of these policy instruments: competitive tendering, sometimes called renewable electricity auctions, feed-in tariffs, net metering and net billing, and tradable renewable energy certificates. In recent years, however, a number of changes to both market circumstances and to policy priorities have resulted in numerous policy innovations, including the emergence of policy hybrids. With no common language for these evolving policy mechanisms, policymakers have generally continued to use the same traditional policy labels, occasionally generating confusion as many of these new policies no longer look, or act, like their traditional predecessors. In reviewing these changes, this paper makes two separate but related claims: first, policy labels themselves are breaking down and evolving. As a result, policy comparisons that rely on the conventional labels may no longer be appropriate, or advisable. Second, as policymakers continue to adapt, we are in effect witnessing the emergence of the next generation of renewable electricity policies, a change that could have significant impacts on investment, as well as on market growth in both developed and developing countries.

  3. Solar Renewable Energy Certificates (SRECs) Registration Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Jersey’s Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) includes a carve-out for solar, requiring the each electricity Load Serving Entities (LSEs) to provide at least 4.1% of the electricity through in...

  4. Renewables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout UsRegionalScientificRenewables Sign In About |

  5. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.; Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Arent, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Many countries -- reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems -- are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This study documents the diverse approaches to effective integration of variable renewable energy among six countries -- Australia (South Australia), Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Spain, and the United States (Western region-Colorado and Texas)-- and summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. Each country has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. The ability to maintain a broad ecosystem perspective, to organize and make available the wealth of experiences, and to ensure a clear path from analysis to enactment should be the primary focus going forward.

  6. Renewable Electric Plant Information System user interface manual: Paradox 7 Runtime for Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    The Renewable Electric Plant Information System (REPiS) is a comprehensive database with detailed information on grid-connected renewable electric plants in the US. The current version, REPiS3 beta, was developed in Paradox for Windows. The user interface (UI) was developed to facilitate easy access to information in the database, without the need to have, or know how to use, Paradox for Windows. The UI is designed to provide quick responses to commonly requested sorts of the database. A quick perusal of this manual will familiarize one with the functions of the UI and will make use of the system easier. There are six parts to this manual: (1) Quick Start: Instructions for Users Familiar with Database Applications; (2) Getting Started: The Installation Process; (3) Choosing the Appropriate Report; (4) Using the User Interface; (5) Troubleshooting; (6) Appendices A and B.

  7. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Reinhard; Meyer, Niels I.; Held, Anne; Finon, Dominique; Lorenzoni, Arturo; Wiser, Ryan; Nishio, Ken-ichiro

    2007-06-01

    The promotion of electricity generated from Renewable Energy Sources (RES) has recently gained high priority in the energy policy strategies of many countries in response to concerns about global climate change, energy security and other reasons. This chapter compares and contrasts the experience of a number of countries in Europe, states in the US as well as Japan in promoting RES, identifying what appear to be the most successful policy measures. Clearly, a wide range of policy instruments have been tried and are in place in different parts of the world to promote renewable energy technologies. The design and performance of these schemes varies from place to place, requiring further research to determine their effectiveness in delivering the desired results. The main conclusions that can be drawn from the present analysis are: (1) Generally speaking, promotional schemes that are properly designed within a stable framework and offer long-term investment continuity produce better results. Credibility and continuity reduce risks thus leading to lower profit requirements by investors. (2) Despite their significant growth in absolute terms in a number of key markets, the near-term prognosis for renewables is one of modest success if measured in terms of the percentage of the total energy provided by renewables on a world-wide basis. This is a significant challenge, suggesting that renewables have to grow at an even faster pace if we expect them to contribute on a significant scale to the world's energy mix.

  8. Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas 'Super-Utility' Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL...

  9. Integrating renewable energy technologies in the electric supply industry: A risk management approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoff, T.E. [Pacific Energy Group, Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Regulatory and technical forces are causing electric utilities to move from a natural monopoly to a more competitive environment. Associated with this movement is an increasing concern about how to manage the risks associated with the electric supply business. One approach to managing risks is to purchase financial instruments such as options and futures contracts. Another approach is to own physical assets that have low risk attributes or characteristics. This research evaluates how investments in renewable energy technologies can mitigate risks in the electric supply industry. It identifies risks that are known to be of concern to utilities and other power producers. These risks include uncertainty in fuel prices, demand, environmental regulations, capital cost, supply, and market structure. The research then determines how investments in renewables can mitigate these risks. Methods are developed to calculate the value of renewables in terms of their attributes of fuel costs, environmental costs, lead-time, modularity, availability, initial capital costs, and investment reversibility. Examples illustrate how to apply the methods.

  10. Recharging U.S. Energy Policy: Advocating for a National Renewable Portfolio Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunt, Robin J.

    2007-01-01

    look into renewable energy credit trading programs, a keywill include a renewable energy credit trading mechanism tothrough renewable energy credit trading systems, to meet

  11. Recharging U.S. Energy Policy: Advocating for a National Renewable Portfolio Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunt, Robin J.

    2007-01-01

    trading market would benefit renewable energy producers inThe Economic Benefits of Renewable Energy Sept. 1997. thebenefits, do- mestically-generated renewable energy adds

  12. A SURVEY OF STATE-LEVEL COST ESTIMATES OF RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2014-01-01

    Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar TechnologiesRPS costs, per unit of renewable energy generation, rangedFlores-Espino National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013

  13. Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    wind power development." Renewable Energy. 33(8): 1854–1867.support mechanisms for renewable energy technologies usingdistributions. ” Renewable Energy. 35(6): Ferrey, S. 2006. “

  14. Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Factual Introduction to Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, R.; Namovicz, C.; Gielecki, M.; Smith, R.

    2008-01-01

    Charles Goldman. “Renewable Energy Policy and Electricityrelative to other renewable energy policy mechanisms) inor design of the policy; renewable energy targets and

  15. Recharging U.S. Energy Policy: Advocating for a National Renewable Portfolio Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunt, Robin J.

    2007-01-01

    in a national renewable energy policy. A. Australia'sEnergy Agency, Global Renewable Energy Policies and Measuresare listed. The Renewable Energy Policy Network states that

  16. Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    legality of state renewable energy policies, see Ferrey (in-state renewable generation? ” Energy Policy. 38: 1140-the development of renewable energy. ” Energy Policy. 31(8):

  17. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    addition to the renewable energy policy landscape, and thesenew addition to the renewable energy policy landscape, withimpacts of these policies on renewable energy development,

  18. Recharging U.S. Energy Policy: Advocating for a National Renewable Portfolio Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunt, Robin J.

    2007-01-01

    that directly compares renewable energy costs to traditionalif the marginal cost of renewable energy exceeded 1.5 centsthe marginal cost of renewable energy. 49. Rader, supra note

  19. Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Factual Introduction to Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, R.; Namovicz, C.; Gielecki, M.; Smith, R.

    2008-01-01

    bulk non-hydro renewable energy capacity installations,3. Cumulative Non-Hydro Renewable Energy Capacity in thethe percentage of non-hydro renewable energy generation

  20. Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    and Renewable Energy (Solar Energy Technologies Program) andand Renewable Energy (Solar Energy Technologies Program) andand Renewable Energy (Solar Energy Technologies Program) and

  1. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    primarily supported by solar renewable energy credits. Note:Wind, Solar, Methane None Non-Binding Renewable Energy Goalsfor solar, but also for other favored renewable resource

  2. Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar Energy TechnologiesEfficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar Energy TechnologiesEfficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar Energy Technologies

  3. The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2013-01-01

    ABORATORY The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energyemployer. THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF INCREASED RENEWABLE ENERGY

  4. Power politics : renewable energy policy change in US states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Leah C

    2015-01-01

    Addressing climate change requires societies to transition towards renewable energy resources. In the United States, most states have passed renewables portfolio standards (RPS), creating goals for electricity's share of ...

  5. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    ignore the potential impact of renewable energy in reducingpotential strategies for using transmission to encourage local ownership of renewable energy

  6. Recharging U.S. Energy Policy: Advocating for a National Renewable Portfolio Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunt, Robin J.

    2007-01-01

    incentives in place, non-hydro power renewables will ac-Including traditional hydro- power, renewable fuels provide

  7. Connecting Colorado's Renewable Resources to the Markets in a Cabon-Constrained Electricity Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-12-31

    The benchmark goal that drives the report is to achieve a 20 percent reduction in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in Colorado's electricity sector below 2005 levels by 2020. We refer to this as the '20 x 20 goal.' In discussing how to meet this goal, the report concentrates particularly on the role of utility-scale renewable energy and high-voltage transmission. An underlying recognition is that any proposed actions must not interfere with electric system reliability and should minimize financial impacts on customers and utilities. The report also describes the goals of Colorado's New Energy Economy5 - identified here, in summary, as the integration of energy, environment, and economic policies that leads to an increased quality of life in Colorado. We recognize that a wide array of options are under constant consideration by professionals in the electric industry, and the regulatory community. Many options are under discussion on this topic, and the costs and benefits of the options are inherently difficult to quantify. Accordingly, this report should not be viewed as a blueprint with specific recommendations for the timing, siting, and sizing of generating plants and high-voltage transmission lines. We convened the project with the goal of supplying information inputs for consideration by the state's electric utilities, legislators, regulators, and others as we work creatively to shape our electricity sector in a carbon-constrained world. The report addresses various issues that were raised in the Connecting Colorado's Renewable Resources to the Markets report, also known as the SB07-91 Report. That report was produced by the Senate Bill 2007-91 Renewable Resource Generation Development Areas Task Force and presented to the Colorado General Assembly in 2007. The SB07-91 Report provided the Governor, the General Assembly, and the people of Colorado with an assessment of the capability of Colorado's utility-scale renewable resources to contribute electric power in the state from 10 Colorado generation development areas (GDAs) that have the capacity for more than 96,000 megawatts (MW) of wind generation and 26,000 MW of solar generation. The SB07-91 Report recognized that only a small fraction of these large capacity opportunities are destined to be developed. As a rough comparison, 13,964 MW of installed nameplate capacity was available in Colorado in 2008. The legislature did not direct the SB07-91 task force to examine several issues that are addressed in the REDI report. These issues include topics such as transmission, regulation, wildlife, land use, permitting, electricity demand, and the roles that different combinations of supply-side resources, demand-side resources, and transmission can play to meet a CO{sub 2} emissions reduction goal. This report, which expands upon research from a wide array of sources, serves as a sequel to the SB07-91 Report. Reports and research on renewable energy and transmission abound. This report builds on the work of many, including professionals who have dedicated their careers to these topics. A bibliography of information resources is provided, along with many citations to the work of others. The REDI Project was designed to present baseline information regarding the current status of Colorado's generation and transmission infrastructure. The report discusses proposals to expand the infrastructure, and identifies opportunities to make further improvements in the state's regulatory and policy environment. The report offers a variety of options for consideration as Colorado seeks pathways to meet the 20 x 20 goal. The primary goal of the report is to foster broader discussion regarding how the 20 x 20 goal interacts with electric resource portfolio choices, particularly the expansion of utility-scale renewable energy and the high-voltage transmission infrastructure. The report also is intended to serve as a resource when identifying opportunities stemming from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

  8. Neutron Electric Dipole Moment from Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanmoy Bhattacharya; Vincenzo Cirigliano; Rajan Gupta

    2012-12-20

    We discuss the phenomenology of neutron Electric Dipole Moment from the Standard Model and beyond, and identify the matrix elements most necessary to connect the current and forthcoming experiments with phenomenology. We then describe lattice techniques for calculating these matrix elements

  9. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience, Summary for Policymakers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.; Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Arent, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Many countries -- reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems -- are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This document summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. There is no one-size-fits-all approach; each country studied has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. This study also emphatically underscores the value of countries sharing their experiences. The more diverse and robust the experience base from which a country can draw, the more likely that it will be able to implement an appropriate, optimized, and system-wide approach.

  10. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets. Best Practices from International Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, Jaquelin; Bird, Lori; Heeter, Jenny; Arent, Douglas J.

    2012-04-30

    Many countries—reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems—are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This document summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. There is no one-size-fits-all approach; each country studied has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. This study also emphatically underscores the value of countries sharing their experiences. The more diverse and robust the experience base from which a country can draw, the more likely that it will be able to implement an appropriate, optimized, and system-wide approach.

  11. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets. Best Practices from International Experience, Summary for Policymakers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, Jaquelin; Bird, Lori; Heeter, Jenny; Arent, Douglas J.

    2012-04-30

    Many countries - reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems - are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This document summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. There is no one-size-fits-all approach; each country studied has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. This study also emphatically underscores the value of countries sharing their experiences. The more diverse and robust the experience base from which a country can draw, the more likely that it will be able to implement an appropriate, optimized, and system-wide approach.

  12. Beyond Renewable Portfolio Standards: An Assessment of Regional Supply and Demand Conditions Affecting the Future of Renewable Energy in the West; Report and Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurlbut, D. J.; McLaren, J.; Gelman, R.

    2013-08-01

    This study assesses the outlook for utility-scale renewable energy development in the West once states have met their renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements. In the West, the last state RPS culminates in 2025, so the analysis uses 2025 as a transition point on the timeline of RE development. Most western states appear to be on track to meet their final requirements, relying primarily on renewable resources located relatively close to the customers being served. What happens next depends on several factors including trends in the supply and price of natural gas, greenhouse gas and other environmental regulations, consumer preferences, technological breakthroughs, and future public policies and regulations. Changes in any one of these factors could make future renewable energy options more or less attractive.

  13. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    and J. Hamrin. 2005. “Renewable Energy Policies and Marketsexperience with renewable energy obligation supportM. (2001): REBUS: Renewable Energy Burden Sharing (Main

  14. Biomass power and state renewable energy policies under electric industry restructuring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Kevin; Wiser, Ryan

    2000-01-01

    POWER AND STATE RENEWABLE ENERGY POLICIES UNDER ELECTRICPROVISIONS IN STATE RENEWABLE ENERGY POLICIES Of the 17that have adopted renewable energy policy measures as part

  15. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    and J. Hamrin. 2005. “Renewable Energy Policies and Marketspromoting the development of renewable energy". In: Energyand optimisation of renewable support schemes in the

  16. The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2013-01-01

    San Francisco, CA, 2010 (6) National Renewable EnergyLaboratory (NREL), Renewable Resource Data Center, Website:Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on

  17. The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2013-01-01

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar Energy TechnologiesEfficiency and Renewable Energy, Solar Technologies ProgramSOLAR 2012 Conference Proceedings, for the World Renewable

  18. Control Strategies for Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Using Renewables and Local Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castello, Charles C; LaClair, Tim J; Maxey, L Curt

    2014-01-01

    The increase of electric vehicle (EV) and plug-in hybrid-electric vehicle (PHEV) adoption creates a need for more EV supply equipment (EVSE) infrastructure (i.e., EV chargers). The impact of EVSE installations could be significant due to limitations in the electric grid and potential demand charges for residential and commercial customers. The use of renewables (e.g., solar) and local storage (e.g., battery bank) can mitigate loads caused by EVSE on the electric grid. This would eliminate costly upgrades needed by utilities and decrease demand charges for consumers. This paper aims to explore control systems that mitigate the impact of EVSE on the electric grid using solar energy and battery banks. Three control systems are investigated and compared in this study. The first control system discharges the battery bank at a constant rate during specific times of the day based on historical data. The second discharges the battery bank based on the number of EVs charging (linear) and the amount of solar energy being generated. The third discharges the battery bank based on a sigmoid function (non-linear) in response to the number of EVs charging, and also takes into consideration the amount of renewables being generated. The first and second control systems recharge the battery bank at night when demand charges are lowest. The third recharges the battery bank at night and during times of the day when there is an excess of solar. Experiments are conducted using data from a private site that has 25 solar-assisted charging stations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN and 4 at a public site in Nashville, TN. Results indicate the third control system having better performance, negating up to 71% of EVSE load, compared with the second control system (up to 61%) and the first control system (up to 58%).

  19. Production Tax Credit for Renewable Electricity Generation (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    In the late 1970s and early 1980s, environmental and energy security concerns were addressed at the federal level by several key pieces of energy legislation. Among them, the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), P.L. 95-617, required regulated power utilities to purchase alternative electricity generation from qualified generating facilities, including small-scale renewable generators; and the Investment Tax Credit (ITC), P.L. 95-618, part of the Energy Tax Act of 1978, provided a 10% federal tax credit on new investment in capital-intensive wind and solar generation technologies.

  20. c " .RENEWABLE ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    c " .RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD ELIGIBILITY GUIDEBOOK, Manager Technology Market Development Office Timothy N. Tutt, Technical Director Renewable Energy Program #12;The Energy Commission established the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) proceeding on March 5

  1. Features of a fully renewable US electricity system: Optimized mixes of wind and solar PV and transmission grid extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    . To quantify general features of such a weather dependent electricity supply in the contiguous US, windFeatures of a fully renewable US electricity system: Optimized mixes of wind and solar PV and transmission grid extensions Sarah Becker a, b, * , Bethany A. Frew b , Gorm B. Andresen d, b , Timo Zeyer c

  2. EC417 --Electric Energy, Adapting to Renewable Resources Brief History of Power Systems (the great AC-DC battle)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (generation, transmission, distribution -- electric motors and other loads) · Power Plants with emphasis to the introduction of renewables (Photovoltaics, wind, etc.) · Development of the "Smart Grid" · Electric Vehicles - An Introduction (Third Edition) , CRC Press, 2012 Grading Policy: Midterm 30% Final 45% Homework / Short Papers 20

  3. Recharging U.S. Energy Policy: Advocating for a National Renewable Portfolio Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunt, Robin J.

    2007-01-01

    excitement to the future of renewable energies. Australia'sinto the future, creates reliable renewable energy mandatesRenewable energy and the policies that support it are invest- ments in the future

  4. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    above-market renewable energy contract costs would be paidjust the least-cost renewable energy options. Alternatively,above-market cost of renewable energy, (b) that the short-

  5. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    and solar data for all years were from Larry Sherwood (Interstate Renewable Energyand solar data for all years come from Larry Sherwood (Interstate Renewable Energysupported by solar renewable energy credits. Note: Data are

  6. The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heeter, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    renewable energy to conventional alternatives will depend on futurefuture scenarios, the availability of renewable energy taxrenewable energy generation (IPA 2013). New York. NYSERDA has examined historical and future

  7. Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    than other types of renewable energy. Among the six statestypes of solar applications and project sizes. Solar is somewhat unique among renewable energy

  8. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    in electricity sector generation costs. In addition, the5/MWh change in levelized generation costs. We find that thethe cost and potential of renewable generation technologies

  9. Roadmap for Testing and Validation of Electric Vehicle Communication Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Richard M.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Gowri, Krishnan

    2012-07-12

    Vehicle to grid communication standards are critical to the charge management and interoperability among plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), charging stations and utility providers. The Society of Automobile Engineers (SAE), International Organization for Standardization (ISO), International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the ZigBee Alliance are developing requirements for communication messages and protocols. While interoperability standards development has been in progress for more than two years, no definitive guidelines are available for the automobile manufacturers, charging station manufacturers or utility backhaul network systems. At present, there is a wide range of proprietary communication options developed and supported in the industry. Recent work by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in collaboration with SAE and automobile manufacturers, has identified performance requirements and developed a test plan based on possible communication pathways using power line communication (PLC). Though the communication pathways and power line communication technology options are identified, much work needs to be done in developing application software and testing of communication modules before these can be deployed in production vehicles. This paper presents a roadmap and results from testing power line communication modules developed to meet the requirements of SAE J2847/1 standard.

  10. The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heeter, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    renewable resources will not reflect the cost of network transmission investments needed to deliver power to

  11. The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, Jenny; Barbose, Galen; Bird, Lori; Weaver, Samantha; Flores, Francisco; Kuskova-Burns, Ksenia; Wiser, Ryan

    2014-03-12

    More than half of U.S. states have renewable portfolio standards (RPS) in place and have collectively deployed approximately 46,000 MW of new renewable energy capacity through year-end 2012. Most of these policies have five or more years of implementation experience, enabling an assessment of their costs and benefits. Understanding RPS benefits and costs is essential for policymakers evaluating existing RPS policies, assessing the need for modifications, and considering new policies. A key aspect of this study is the comprehensive review of existing RPS cost and benefit estimates, in addition to an examination of the variety of methods used to calculate such estimates. Based on available data and estimates reported by utilities and regulators, this study summarizes RPS costs to date. The study considers how those costs may evolve going forward, given scheduled increases in RPS targets and cost containment mechanisms incorporated into existing policies. The report also summarizes RPS benefits estimates, based on published studies for individual states, and discusses key methodological considerations.

  12. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix F: Model Conservation Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .................................................................................................................. 2 Utility Conservation Programs for New Residential Buildings buildings, the standard for utility residential conservation programs, the standard for all new commercial......................................................................................................................................... 1 New Site Built Electrically Heated Residential Buildings and New Electrically Heated Manufactured

  13. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    J. Hamrin. 2005. “Renewable Energy Policies and Markets inKomor Paul: Renewable Energy Policy, Diebold Institute forN.I. (2004a): “Renewable energy policy in Denmark”, Energy

  14. The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2013-01-01

    the costs of renewable energy procurement, the costs of theRE is the total costs of renewable energy procurement, r resThough the total costs of renewable energy procurement ( C

  15. Electric Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    This chart shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for electric.

  16. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Fast Charge Station Operational Analysis with Integrated Renewables: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, M.; Markel, T.

    2012-08-01

    The growing, though still nascent, plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) market currently operates primarily via level 1 and level 2 charging in the United States. Fast chargers are still a rarity, but offer a confidence boost to oppose 'range anxiety' in consumers making the transition from conventional vehicles to PEVs. Because relatively no real-world usage of fast chargers at scale exists yet, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed a simulation to help assess fast charging needs based on real-world travel data. This study documents the data, methods, and results of the simulation run for multiple scenarios, varying fleet sizes, and the number of charger ports. The grid impact of this usage is further quantified to assess the opportunity for integration of renewables; specifically, a high frequency of fast charging is found to be in demand during the late afternoons and evenings coinciding with grid peak periods. Proper integration of a solar array and stationary battery thus helps ease the load and reduces the need for new generator construction to meet the demand of a future PEV market.

  17. Power flow tracing in a simplified highly renewable European electricity network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tranberg, Bo; Rodriguez, Rolando A; Andresen, Gorm B; Schäfer, Mirko; Greiner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing transmission capacity needs in a future energy system raise the question how associated costs should be allocated to the users of a strengthened power grid. In contrast to straightforward oversimplified methods, a flow tracing based approach provides a fair and consistent nodal usage and thus cost assignment of transmission investments. This technique follows the power flow through the network and assigns the link capacity usage to the respective sources or sinks using a diffusion-like process, thus taking into account the underlying network structure and injection pattern. As a showcase, we apply power flow tracing to a simplified model of the European electricity grid with a high share of renewable wind and solar power generation, based on long-term weather and load data with an hourly temporal resolution.

  18. UPDATING THE NRC STANDARD REVIEW PLAN - CHAPTER 8 - ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN,K.

    2007-06-24

    The Standard Review Plan (SRP) (Reference 2), provides guidance to the regulatory staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on performing their safety reviews of applications to construct or operate nuclear power plants, and applications to approve standard designs and sites for nuclear power plants. Chapter 8 of the SRP provides guidance related to the review of station electrical distribution systems described by the applicant in its Design Control Document (DCD) or Safety Analysis Report (SAR). As part of the 2006-2007 SAR update, all sections in this Chapter (8.1, 8.2, 8.3.1, 8.3.2, Appendix 8A, and Appendix 8B) were revised to incorporate new analyses, design approaches, and the lessons learned from the review of the AP 1000 design certification and to assure consistency with the draft Regulatory Guide DG-1145, ''Combined License Applications for Nuclear Power Plants (LWR Edition)''.

  19. Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    for wind and other renewable energy technologies, or for “energy market value than wind and other solar technologies.energy additions, wind has thus far consistently been the dominant renewable technology

  20. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    than 1% is small hydro and ocean energy, demonstrating a8,900 MW of new non-hydro renewable energy capacity that hasFigure 6. Non-Hydro Renewable Energy Capacity Additions in

  1. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    World Energy Outlook 2006, Paris International Energy Agency (2006b): Renewables Information 2006. With 2005 data.

  2. A Survey of State-Level Cost and Benefit Estimates of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report surveys and summarizes existing state-level RPS cost and benefit estimates and examines the various methods used to calculate such estimates. The report relies largely upon data or results reported directly by electric utilities and state regulators. As such, the estimated costs and benefits itemized in this document do not result from the application of a standardized approach or the use of a consistent set of underlying assumptions. Because the reported values may differ from those derived through a more consistent analytical treatment, we do not provide an aggregate national estimate of RPS costs and benefits, nor do we attempt to quantify net RPS benefits at national or state levels.

  3. World Biofuels Production Potential Understanding the Challenges to Meeting the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sastri, B.; Lee, A.

    2008-09-15

    This study by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates the worldwide potential to produce biofuels including biofuels for export. It was undertaken to improve our understanding of the potential for imported biofuels to satisfy the requirements of Title II of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) in the coming decades. Many other countries biofuels production and policies are expanding as rapidly as ours. Therefore, we modeled a detailed and up-to-date representation of the amount of biofuel feedstocks that are being and can be grown, current and future biofuels production capacity, and other factors relevant to the economic competitiveness of worldwide biofuels production, use, and trade. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) identified and prepared feedstock data for countries that were likely to be significant exporters of biofuels to the U.S. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) calculated conversion costs by conducting material flow analyses and technology assessments on biofuels technologies. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) integrated the country specific feedstock estimates and conversion costs into the global Energy Technology Perspectives (ETP) MARKAL (MARKet ALlocation) model. The model uses least-cost optimization to project the future state of the global energy system in five year increments. World biofuels production was assessed over the 2010 to 2030 timeframe using scenarios covering a range U.S. policies (tax credits, tariffs, and regulations), as well as oil prices, feedstock availability, and a global CO{sub 2} price. All scenarios include the full implementation of existing U.S. and selected other countries biofuels policies (Table 4). For the U.S., the most important policy is the EISA Title II Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). It progressively increases the required volumes of renewable fuel used in motor vehicles (Appendix B). The RFS requires 36 billion (B) gallons (gal) per year of renewable fuels by 2022. Within the mandate, amounts of advanced biofuels, including biomass-based diesel and cellulosic biofuels, are required beginning in 2009. Imported renewable fuels are also eligible for the RFS. Another key U.S. policy is the $1.01 per gal tax credit for producers of cellulosic biofuels enacted as part of the 2008 Farm Bill. This credit, along with the DOE's research, development and demonstration (RD&D) programs, are assumed to enable the rapid expansion of U.S. and global cellulosic biofuels production needed for the U.S. to approach the 2022 RFS goal. While the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has yet to issue RFS rules to determine which fuels would meet the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction and land use restrictions specified in EISA, we assume that cellulosic ethanol, biomass-to-liquid fuels (BTL), sugar-derived ethanol, and fatty acid methyl ester biodiesel would all meet the EISA advanced biofuel requirements. We also assume that enough U.S. corn ethanol would meet EISA's biofuel requirements or otherwise be grandfathered under EISA to reach 15 B gal per year.

  4. Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Factual Introduction to Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, R.; Namovicz, C.; Gielecki, M.; Smith, R.

    2008-01-01

    on average retail electricity rates in most instances.Lab sample forecast retail electricity rate increases of no5. Projected RPS Electricity Rate Impacts by Cost Study The

  5. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    in RPS design The electricity rate increases associated withon average retail electricity rates so far. Translatingdecline. Estimated Electricity Rate Impact in 2007 (%)

  6. Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    on solar energy deployment and retail electricity rates, (c)for solar energy projects in restructured electricitySolar Energy Technologies Program) and the Office of Electricity

  7. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    photovoltaics and 65 MW of solar-thermal electric capacity,known installations of solar thermal electric facilities.known installations of solar thermal electric facilities. We

  8. EC417: Electric Energy Systems: Adapting to Renewable Resources Description: This course will present a detailed perspective of electric power systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    calculations 6. Analysis and Design of Transformers 7. Introduction to Power Electronics and AC/DC and DC and "blackouts" (especially those related to the introduction of renewables (Photovoltaics, wind, etc.) 10. Power will present a detailed perspective of electric power systems from generation, transmission, and storage

  9. Customer-Economics of Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Impact of High Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings with Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential photovoltaic (PV) systems in the US are often compensated at the customer's underlying retail electricity rate through net metering. There is growing interest in understanding how potential changes in rates may impact the value of bill savings from PV. This article uses a production cost and capacity expansion model to project California hourly wholesale electricity market prices under a reference scenario and a 33% renewables scenario. Second, based on the wholesale electricity market prices generated by the model, the article develops retail rates (i.e., flat, time-of-use, and real-time pricing) for each future scenario based on standard retail rate design principles. Finally, based on these retail rates, the bill savings from PV are estimated for 226 California residential customers under two types of net metering, for each scenario. The article finds that high renewable penetrations can drive substantial changes in residential retail rates and that these changes, together with variations in retail rate structures and PV compensation mechanisms, interact to place substantial uncertainty on the future value of bill savings from residential PV.

  10. State Renewable Energy Requirements and Goals: Update Through 2003 (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    As of the end of 2003, 15 states had legislated programs to encourage the development of renewable energy for electricity generation. Of the 17 programs (two states have multiple programs), 9 are renewable portfolio standards (RPS), 4 are renewable energy mandates, and 4 are renewable energy goals.

  11. Renewable energy technology characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    1997-12-01

    The Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describe the technical and economic status of the major emerging renewable energy options for electricity supply.

  12. Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Hitt (Solar Alliance), Charlie Kubert (Clean Energy Group),Alliance. Acknowledgements This work was supported by: the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar

  13. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    less than 1% is small hydro and ocean energy, demonstratingexcept that certain small-hydro facilities owned by Oregon8% geothermal, and 4% small hydro. Renewables Portfolio

  14. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    renewable energy fund created “green power partnership” that offers guaranteed REC purchase or option contracts of up to 10 years Central

  15. Multi-objective regulations on transportation fuels: Comparing renewable fuel mandates and emission standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, D; Rajagopal, D; Plevin, R; Hochman, G; Zilberman, D

    2015-01-01

    2010. Measuring energy security: can the United StatesCBO, 2010. Energy Independence and Security Act of 2010: Achange Transportation Energy security Renewable energy

  16. Renewable Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Science & Innovation Energy Sources Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Watch as these fourth grade students go from learning about electricity to making their own electricity...

  17. ReEDS Modeling of the President’s 2020 U.S. Renewable Electricity Generation Goal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The primary objective of the analysis is to project future contributions from wind, solar, and geothermal technologies to the U.S. electricity generation mix in the 2020 time period. While this exercise is motivated by an interest in assessing the feasibility of achieving the Obama's Administration's goal of doubling renewable generation during that timeframe, the analysis only evaluates one interpretation of the goal and does not comprehensively evaluate others. The report introduction provides further background for this motivation. The analysis presented in this report was requested by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in the U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. California's future `Smart Grid' system will integrate solar, wind, and other renewable electricity generation with energy storage to meet our electricity demands and to support electric transportation. The Sustainable Integrated Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    California's future `Smart Grid' system will integrate solar, wind, and other renewable electricity. The Sustainable Integrated Grid Initiative at UCR combines these elements so that researchers, utility personnel and wind are intermittent in nature and may not be available when needed. Electrical energy stored

  19. The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2013-01-01

    1) Borenstein, S. , Electricity Rate Structures and thes underlying retail electricity rate through net metering.turn impact retail electricity rates, particularly as retail

  20. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    in the European electricity market. Scheer H. , The solarin the internal electricity market. European Commission [liberalisation of electricity markets across Europe and

  1. Hedging Quantity Risks with Standard Power Options in a Competitive Wholesale Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedging Quantity Risks with Standard Power Options in a Competitive Wholesale Electricity Market, GA, 30332-0205 USA March 3, 2005 Abstract This paper addresses quantity risk in the electricity of a load serving entity, which provides electricity service at a regulated price in electricity markets

  2. Hedging Quantity Risks with Standard Power Options in a Competitive Wholesale Electricity Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    Hedging Quantity Risks with Standard Power Options in a Competitive Wholesale Electricity MarketScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). Abstract: This paper addresses quantity risk in the electricity market-serving entity, which provides electricity service at a regulated price in electricity markets with price

  3. To be included in this de"nition, the organic matter must be derived from a renewable source of biomass such as sustained yield forestry or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Jaccard). Energy Policy 29 (2001) 263}277 The renewable portfolio standard: design considerations sources are sometimes subsidized, their full pollution costs are ignored, and renewables involve newer), and the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS). The RPS requires a minimum share of electricity from renewable energy

  4. Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2014-01-01

    estimates of health and emission reduction benefits, economic development benefits, and wholesale electricity market price

  5. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Renewable Energy Funds Rebates FIT/premium Quota obligationof these programs involves rebates and production incentivesthrough capital cost rebates – denominated in $ per Watt –

  6. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    generators, e.g. roof PV, small wind, and small hydro. Thefulfillment) Small and large hydro, wind, biomass No smallinvolved technologies small hydro****, wind, all renewables,

  7. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Wind, Biomass, Small hydro, for Energy and Competitiveness”half of the non-hydro renewable energy capacity additionsshore wind 50€, hydro: 50€, solar energy: 150€, biomass: 20

  8. Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    state renewable generation? ” Energy Policy. 38: 1140-1149.Sweden 2003–2008. ” Energy Policy. 38(3): 1255-1271. Butler,US energy markets. ” Energy Policy. 35: 809-814. Kildegaard.

  9. Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    except that certain small-hydro facilities owned by OregonMSW, and less than 1% is small hydro and ocean energy,8% geothermal, and 4% small hydro. Renewables Portfolio

  10. The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heeter, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Mexico Public Regulatory Commission; Will Lent and Rick Umoff, Solarsolar renewable additions caused revenue At the opposite end are Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico,Mexico, where rules specify that cost cap calculations shall not include annualization. upfront solar

  11. The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels on Electricity Bill Savings From Residential Photovoltaic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2014-01-01

    ABORATORY The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energyemployer. The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy

  12. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    for the potential demand for renewable energy from otherthe potential value of renewable energy in reducing certainfor the potential demand for renewable energy from other

  13. Is it Worth it? A Comparative Analysis of Cost-Benefit Projections for State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-01-01

    for the potential demand for renewable energy from otherpotential secondary impacts of increased renewable energyPotential Cost Impacts of a Vermont Renewable Energy

  14. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    13. Washington, D.C. : Renewable Energy Policy Project. (Commissioners. Renewable Energy Policy Project (REPP). 2001.energy/clean_energy_policies/the-colorado-renewable-energy-

  15. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    45 7.3 Renewable Energy Costand future renewable energy costs, while less volatile thanResource Data Renewable Energy Cost Characterization

  16. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    projections of renewable technology cost, fossil fuel priceboth renewable technology costs and avoided fuel costs. Theof future renewable technology cost and performance would

  17. Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua’i: Economics and Performance Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is working with a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy in Hawaii.

  18. The path to clean energy: direct coupling of nuclear and renewable technologies for thermal and electrical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; Boardman, Richard; Ruth, Mark

    2015-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the need to transform the energy infrastructure of the U.S. and elsewhere to systems that can significantly reduce environmental impacts in an efficient and economically viable manner while utilizing both clean energy generation sources and hydrocarbon resources. Thus, DOE is supporting research and development that could lead to more efficient utilization of clean nuclear and renewable energy generation sources. A concept being advanced by the DOE Offices of Nuclear Energy (NE) and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is tighter coupling of nuclear and renewable energy sources in a manner that better optimizes energy use for the combined electricity, industrial manufacturing, and the transportation sectors. This integration concept has been referred to as a “hybrid system” that is capable of providing energy (thermal or electrical) where it is needed, when it is needed. For the purposes of this work, the hybrid system would integrate two or more energy resources to generate two or more products, one of which must be an energy commodity, such as electricity or transportation fuel. This definition requires coupling of subsystems ‘‘behind’’ the electrical transmission bus, where energy flows are dynamically apportioned as necessary to meet demand and the system has a single connection to the grid that provides dispatchable electricity as required while capital intensive generation assets operate at full capacity. Development of integrated energy systems for an “energy park” must carefully consider the intended location and the associated regional resources, traditional industrial processes, energy delivery infrastructure, and markets to identify viable region-specific system configurations. This paper will provide an overview of the current status of regional hybrid energy system design, development and application of dynamic analysis tools to assess technical and economic performance, and roadmap development to identify and prioritize component, subsystem and system testing that will lead to prototype demonstration.

  19. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    fluctuations. Electricity generation [TWh/year] EU-25 USA4 . Electricity generation [TWh/year] Japan EU-25 USA EU-25USA Japan Wind Waste Solar Biomass Geothermal Figure 2 Historical pattern of electricity

  20. The RenewElec Project: Variable Renewable Energy and the Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apt, Jay

    2014-02-14

    Variable energy resources, such as wind power, now produce about 4% of U.S. electricity. They can play a significantly expanded role if the U.S. adopts a systems approach that considers affordability, security and reliability. Reaching a 20-30% renewable portfolio standard goal is possible, but not without changes in the management and regulation of the power system, including accurately assessing and preparing for the operational effects of renewable generation. The RenewElec project will help the nation make the transition to the use of significant amounts of electric generation from variable and intermittent sources of renewable power.

  1. The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2013-01-01

    pricing, high solar penetrations in the market could lead tosolar power (CSP), and wind penetrations in the electricity market.in wholesale market electricity prices. Under high solar

  2. Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    N ATIONAL L ABORATORY Smart buildings with electric vehicleopportunity employer. Smart buildings with electric vehicleand integrated in smart buildings Is it that simple or does

  3. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Electricity generation [GWh/year] Wind onshore BiogasElectricity generation [GWh/year] Wind onshore Hydro small-scale Solid biomass PV Hydro large-scale Biogas

  4. The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heeter, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Company to Update its Alternative Energy Rider. ” Delaware2011 Annual Report Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards2012 Annual Report Alternative Energy Portfolio Standards

  5. Impact of the renewable oxygenate standard for reformulated gasoline on ethanol demand, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stork, K.C.; Singh, M.K.

    1995-04-01

    To assure a place for renewable oxygenates in the national reformulated gasoline (RFG) program, the US Environmental Protection Agency has promulgated the renewable oxygenate standard (ROS) for RFG. It is assumed that ethanol derived from corn will be the only broadly available renewable oxygenate during Phase I of the RFG program. This report analyzes the impact that the ROS could have on the supply of ethanol, its transported volume, and its displacement from existing markets. It also considers the energy and crude oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that could result from the production and use of various RFGs that could meet the ROS requirements. The report concludes that on the basis of current and projected near-term ethanol capacity, if ethanol is the only available renewable oxygenate used to meet the requirements of the ROS, diversion of ethanol from existing use as a fuel is likely to be necessary. Year-round use of ethanol and ETBE would eliminate the need for diversion by reducing winter demand for ethanol. On an RFG-program-wide basis, using ethanol and ETBE to satisfy the ROS can be expected to slightly reduce fossil energy use, increase crude oil use, and have essentially no effect on GHG emissions or total energy use relative to using RFG oxygenated only with MTBE.

  6. Submitted to Renewable Energy, 5 December 2009 The technical potential for off-peak electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    -peak electricity to serve as backup in wind-electric thermal storage systems Larry Hughes Energy Research Group thermal storage systems Larry Hughes Energy Research Group Electrical and Computer Engineering, Dalhousie the introduction of energy policies that focus on the reduction of greenhouse gases in electrical generation

  7. Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (Spanish Version); Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    This is a Spanish-language brochure about hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles, which use electricity as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. These vehicles can be divided into three categories: hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), all-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, they have great potential to cut U.S. petroleum use and vehicle emissions.

  8. Integration of Electric Energy Storage into Power Systems with Renewable Energy Resources 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yixing 1985-

    2012-10-26

    This dissertation investigates the distribution and transmission systems reliability and economic impact of energy storage and renewable energy integration. The reliability and economy evaluation framework is presented. Novel operation strategies...

  9. Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    allows generation data from all solar energy systems to beanalysis of data compiled by the Solar Energy Industriesdata are available), 68% of the aggregate solar/DG set-aside compliance obligation was achieved through the purchase of qualifying renewable energy

  10. The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels on Electricity Bill Savings From Residential Photovoltaic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim

    2014-01-01

    Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels onof Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar EnergyImpact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels on

  11. An Interview with Professor Alexandra von Meier on an Efficient Electric Grid: Improving Visibility and Integrating Renewable Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhary, Harshika; Gill, Manraj; McGuinness, Philippa; Miller, Daniel; Patel, Saavan

    2015-01-01

    improving the integration of renewable energy sources intothe incorporation of renewable energy into the pre-existingpretty unique. It spans renewable energy, energy efficiency,

  12. Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    an expectation that solar electricity costs will decline,and tracking of solar RECs (SRECs), and cost containment andand tracking of solar RECs (SRECs), and cost containment and

  13. National Template: Hydrogen Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This graphic template shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for hydrogen.

  14. The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heeter, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    facility in Hawaii. It supplies almost 10% of KIUC’s daytimeKIUC pays 20 ¢/kWh for solar power. In 2008, the HawaiiHawaii Electric Light Maui Division Maui Electric Company Lanai Division Molokai Division Source: HECO 2012 Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC)

  15. Analysis of the Behavior of Electric Vehicle Charging Stations with Renewable Generations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Vincent

    -Alexander University Erlangen-Nurnberg, Erlangen, Germany Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University to attract more EVs. Therefore, an EVCS is likely to set its electricity price by taking into account for charging EVs is to charge EVs when the price of electricity is low, e.g., at night time [3]. In [2

  16. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Electric Motors and Walk...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Climate Action Plan, which called for efficiency standards that cut carbon pollution and save money by saving energy, the Energy Department today announced two new energy...

  17. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    of Renewable Energy Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.4the model, where renewable energy supply is replaced by itsPhil Kaminsky. Renewable energy supply for electric vehicle

  18. The Costs and Benefits of Compliance with Renewable Portfolio Standards: Reviewing Experience to Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heeter, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    in wholesale electricity prices. Estimates of benefitsprice estimates have been derived through modeling of the electricityelectricity prices, for example, so if wholesale prices are used in cost calculations, then those estimates

  19. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Renewable Electricity Generation Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout - Renewable Electricity Generation Office of Energy Efficiency and...

  20. Green Power Renewable Electricity, Renewable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Makers ....................................................................................................................... 14 Gathering Energy Data

  1. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    renewable energy deployment, are likely of far more importance than the typetypes of renewable generation, e.g. PV technology or renewable energyrenewable energy supply and demand, a task that can be greatly complicated by differences in the types

  2. ANSI Electric Vehicle Standards Roadmap v2.0 | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roadmap v2.0 ANSI Electric Vehicle Standards Roadmap v2.0 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

  3. The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2013-01-01

    displaces higher marginal cost generation. The high periodrates Utility-owned generation Costs to run and maintainrenewable electricity generation costs. This proportion is

  4. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    generating electricity from RES is wind energy, followed byto a rapid growth of wind energy. The development in Japanof hydro, some biomass and wind energy plants at favourable

  5. Assessment and Methods for Supply-Following Loads in Modern Electricity Grids with Deep Renewables Penetration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taneja, Jayant Kumar

    2013-01-01

    45] Der Spiegel. Germany’s Energy Poverty: How ElectricityGermany – Monthly proportion of annual energy contributionsources. EEX - Germany The European Energy Exchange (EEX)

  6. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Renewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program) ofEnergy and the Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program OfficeRenewable Energy (Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program) of

  7. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    resource types and generation costs are estimated externallystudy reports cost and renewable generation results for thestudy reports cost and renewable generation results for the

  8. Is it Worth it? A Comparative Analysis of Cost-Benefit Projections for State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-01-01

    well as the cost of integrating renewable energy into largerto renewable energy in many states, but these costs arerenewable energy credits (RECs) have led to unexpected cost

  9. Electricity Capacity Expansion Modeling, Analysis, and Visualization. A Summary of High-Renewable Modeling Experience for China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, Nate; Zhou, Ella; Getman, Dan; Arent, Douglas J.

    2015-10-01

    Mathematical and computational models are widely used for the analysis and design of both physical and financial systems. Modeling the electric grid is of particular importance to China for three reasons. First, power-sector assets are expensive and long-lived, and they are critical to any country's development. China's electric load, transmission, and other energy-related infrastructure are expected to continue to grow rapidly; therefore it is crucial to understand and help plan for the future in which those assets will operate (NDRC ERI 2015). Second, China has dramatically increased its deployment of renewable energy (RE), and is likely to continue further accelerating such deployment over the coming decades. Careful planning and assessment of the various aspects (technical, economic, social, and political) of integrating a large amount of renewables on the grid is required. Third, companies need the tools to develop a strategy for their own involvement in the power market China is now developing, and to enable a possible transition to an efficient and high RE future.

  10. The RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState of Pennsylvania U.S.The6,Category 2 Nuclear

  11. Recharging U.S. Energy Policy: Advocating for a National Renewable Portfolio Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunt, Robin J.

    2007-01-01

    Neff, Review of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Aug 2, 2005),standard (RPS) in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. I advocateId. RECHARGING U.S. ENERGY POLICY plans. 130 The Amendment

  12. Renewable Energy Financing: The Role of Policy and Economics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cory, K.

    2008-03-27

    Renewable portfolio standards (RPS) have rapidly developed momentum in certain sections of the United States and throughout the world, primarily in response to climate and energy security concerns. This presentation at the RPS Symposium, sponsored by the Electric Utility Consultants Inc., will discuss renewable energy financing and the economics of such policies.

  13. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    price forecasts. Again, assuming that renewable energy continues to offset natural gas, rather than coal,

  14. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    certification procedure for wind turbines as early as 1978electricity from onshore wind turbines between 2003 and 2005from abroad, may own wind turbines in Denmark. At the end of

  15. El Paso Electric Company- Small and Medium System Renewable Energy Certificate Purchase Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Only systems connected to the utility's grid and net-metered are eligible. RECs will be measured by a separate REC meter and purchased by El Paso Electric on a monthly basis. For contracts signed...

  16. Neutron Electric Dipole Moment from Beyond the Standard Model (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switch for| SciTech Connect Neutron Electric Dipole Moment

  17. Neutron Electric Dipole Moment from Beyond the Standard Model (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switch for| SciTech Connect Neutron Electric Dipole

  18. Neutron Electric Dipole Moments from Beyond the Standard Model Physics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switch for| SciTech Connect Neutron Electric

  19. Electrical Systems And Safety Oversight Functional Area Qualification Standard

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofApril 25,EVtheEnergyPreparedElectricalNOT0-2007

  20. Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,2060 0 1 0 0 0a.inElectricity

  1. Electric Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlenderBusiness Case for E85CaliforniaCleanUNITED

  2. Electric Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlenderBusiness Case for E85CaliforniaCleanUNITEDNREL is a

  3. The Renewable Energy Footprint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outka, Uma

    2011-01-01

    With the shift toward renewable energy comes the potential for staggering land impacts – many millions of acres may be consumed to meet demand for electricity and fuel over the next 20 years. To conservationists’ dismay, the more renewable energy we...

  4. Renewable Energy Growth Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2014, Act H 7727 created the Renewable Energy Growth (REG) program with the goal to promote installation of grid connected renewable energy within the load zones of electric distribution...

  5. Evolution of Wholesale Electricity Market Design with Increasing Levels of Renewable Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Bloom, A.; Botterud, A.; Townsend, A.; Levin, T.

    2014-09-01

    Variable generation such as wind and photovoltaic solar power has increased substantially in recent years. Variable generation has unique characteristics compared to the traditional technologies that supply energy in the wholesale electricity markets. These characteristics create unique challenges in planning and operating the power system, and they can also influence the performance and outcomes from electricity markets. This report focuses on two particular issues related to market design: revenue sufficiency for long-term reliability and incentivizing flexibility in short-term operations. The report provides an overview of current design and some designs that have been proposed by industry or researchers.

  6. Development and utilization of new and renewable energy with Stirling engine system for electricity in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, W.; Abenavoli, R.I.; Carlini, M.

    1996-12-31

    China is the largest developing country in the world. Self-supporting and self-sustaining energy supply is the only solution for development. Recently, fast economic development exposed gradually increasing pressure of energy demand and environment concern. In order to increase the production of electricity of China, the Stirling engine system should be developed. This paper provides an investigation of energy production and consumption in China. The main features of the energy consumption and the development objectives of China`s electric power industry are also described. The necessity and possibility of development of Stirling engine system is discussed.

  7. Transmission grid extensions during the build-up of a fully renewable pan-European electricity supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Sarah; Andresen, Gorm B; Schramm, Stefan; Greiner, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Spatio-temporal generation patterns for wind and solar photovoltaic power in Europe are used to investigate the future rise in transmission needs with an increasing penetration of these variable renewable energy sources (VRES) on the pan-European electricity system. VRES growth predictions according to the official National Renewable Energy Action Plans of the EU countries are used and extrapolated logistically up to a fully VRES-supplied power system. We find that keeping today's international net transfer capacities (NTCs) fixed over the next forty years reduces the final need for backup energy by 13% when compared to the situation with no NTCs. An overall doubling of today's NTCs will lead to a 26% reduction, and an overall quadrupling to a 33% reduction. The remaining need for backup energy is due to correlations in the generation patterns, and cannot be further reduced by transmission. The main investments in transmission lines are due during the ramp-up of VRES from 15% (as planned for 2020) to 80%. Add...

  8. Model-Predictive Cascade Mitigation in Electric Power Systems With Storage and Renewables-Part I: Theory and Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almassalkhi, MR; Hiskens, IA

    2015-01-01

    A novel model predictive control (MPC) scheme is developed for mitigating the effects of severe line-overload disturbances in electrical power systems. A piece-wise linear convex approximation of line losses is employed to model the effect of transmission line power flow on conductor temperatures. Control is achieved through a receding-horizon model predictive control (MPC) strategy which alleviates line temperature overloads and thereby prevents the propagation of outages. The MPC strategy adjusts line flows by rescheduling generation, energy storage and controllable load, while taking into account ramp-rate limits and network limitations. In Part II of this paper, the MPC strategy is illustrated through simulation of the IEEE RTS-96 network, augmented to incorporate energy storage and renewable generation.

  9. Effect of real-time electricity pricing on renewable generators and system emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connolly, Jeremiah P. (Jeremiah Peter)

    2008-01-01

    Real-time retail pricing (RTP) of electricity, in which the retail price is allowed to vary with very little time delay in response to changes in the marginal cost of generation, offers expected short-run and long-run ...

  10. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    Many countries--reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems--are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy (RE) on the grid. Australia (South Australia), Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Spain, and the United States (Colorado and Texas), for example, have effectively integrated variable RE utilizing diverse approaches. Analysis of the results from these case studies reveals a wide range of mechanisms that can be used to accommodate high penetrations of variable RE (e.g., from new market designs to centralized planning). Nevertheless, the myriad approaches collectively suggest that governments can best enable variable RE grid integration by implementing best practices in five areas of intervention: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations.

  11. A status report on the design and implementation of state renewable portfolio standards and system benefits charge policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Kevin; Wiser, Ryan

    2000-01-01

    Mexico SBC includes $4 million annually for renewable energy; andrenewable energy technologies. Unlike other states, the New Mexico

  12. 2014 Renewable Energy Data Book

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Renewable Energy Data Book for 2014 provides facts and figures on energy and electricity use, renewable electricity in the United States, global renewable energy development, wind power, solar power, geothermal power, biopower, hydropower, marine and hydrokinetic power, hydrogen, renewable fuels, and clean energy investment.

  13. 2014 Renewable Energy Data Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beiter, Philipp

    2015-11-01

    The Renewable Energy Data Book for 2014 provides facts and figures on energy and electricity use, renewable electricity in the United States, global renewable energy development, wind power, solar power, geothermal power, biopower, hydropower, marine and hydrokinetic power, hydrogen, renewable fuels, and clean energy investment.

  14. 2014 Renewable Energy Data Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beiter, Philipp

    2015-11-15

    The Renewable Energy Data Book for 2014 provides facts and figures on energy and electricity use, renewable electricity in the United States, global renewable energy development, wind power, solar power, geothermal power, biopower, hydropower, marine and hydrokinetic power, hydrogen, renewable fuels, and clean energy investment.

  15. Emissions from Medium-Duty Conventional and Diesel-Electric Hybrid Vehicles; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragatz, A.; Duran, A.; Thornton, M.; Walkowicz, K.

    2014-04-02

    This presentation discusses the results of emissions testing for medium-duty conventional and diesel-electric hybrid vehicles. Testing was based on a field evaluation approach that utilized the Fleet DNA drive cycle database and NREL’s Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory chassis dynamometer. Vehicles tested included parcel delivery (Class 6 step vans), beverage delivery (Class 8 tractors), and parcel delivery (Class 7 box trucks) vehicles, all with intended service class medium/heavy heavy-duty diesel (MHDD).
    Results for fuel economy and tailpipe NOx emissions included: diesel hybrid electric vehicles showed an average fuel economy advantage on identified test cycles: Class 6 Step Vans: 26%; Class 7 Box Trucks: 24.7%; Class 8 Tractors: 17.3%. Vehicle miles traveled is an important factor in determining total petroleum and CO2 displacement. Higher NOx emissions were observed over some test cycles: highly drive cycle dependent; engine-out differences may result from different engine operating point; and selective catalyst reduction temperature may play a role, but does not explain the whole story.

  16. Features of a fully renewable US electricity system: Optimized mixes of wind and solar PV and transmission grid extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Sarah; Andresen, Gorm B; Zeyer, Timo; Schramm, Stefan; Greiner, Martin; Jacobson, Mark Z

    2014-01-01

    Wind and solar PV generation data for the entire contiguous US are calculated, on the basis of 32 years of weather data with temporal resolution of one hour and spatial resolution of 40x40km$^2$, assuming site-suitability-based as well as stochastic wind and solar PV capacity distributions throughout the country. These data are used to investigate a fully renewable electricity system, resting primarily upon wind and solar PV power. We find that the seasonal optimal mix of wind and solar PV comes at around 80% solar PV share, owing to the US summer load peak. By picking this mix, long-term storage requirements can be more than halved compared to a wind only mix. The daily optimal mix lies at about 80% wind share due to the nightly gap in solar PV production. Picking this mix instead of solar only reduces backup energy needs by about 50%. Furthermore, we calculate shifts in FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission)-level LCOE (Levelized Costs Of Electricity) for wind and solar PV due to their differing resour...

  17. Abstract of Doctoral Dissertation in "Engineering and Public Policy, EPP" Integrating Variable Renewables into the Electric Grid: An Evaluation of Challenges and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    ~$15/tonne CO2 to the cost of abatement for solar thermal power, $25 for wind, and $33-$40 for PV. In this thesis I quantify the cost of variability of different renewable energy technologies and then explore energy into the electricity grid. Cost of Variability I calculate the cost of variability of solar

  18. Is it Worth it? A Comparative Analysis of Cost-Benefit Projections for State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-01-01

    project base-case retail electricity rate increases of lessimpacts on retail electricity rates, the wide range of2. Projected RPS Electricity Rate Impacts by Cost Study Wind

  19. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    on Average Retail Electricity Rates.. 14Projected RPS Electricity Rate Impacts by RPS CostRPS Targets and Retail Electricity Rate Impacts 16 Typical

  20. An International Survey of Electric Storage Tank Water Heater Efficiency and Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Alissa; Lutz, James; McNeil, Michael A.; Covary, Theo

    2013-11-13

    Water heating is a main consumer of energy in households, especially in temperate and cold climates. In South Africa, where hot water is typically provided by electric resistance storage tank water heaters (geysers), water heating energy consumption exceeds cooking, refrigeration, and lighting to be the most consumptive single electric appliance in the home. A recent analysis for the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) performed by the authors estimated that standing losses from electric geysers contributed over 1,000 kWh to the annual electricity bill for South African households that used them. In order to reduce this burden, the South African government is currently pursuing a programme of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labelling (EES&L) for electric appliances, including geysers. In addition, Eskom has a history of promoting heat pump water heaters (HPWH) through incentive programs, which can further reduce energy consumption. This paper provides a survey of international electric storage water heater test procedures and efficiency metrics which can serve as a reference for comparison with proposed geyser standards and ratings in South Africa. Additionally it provides a sample of efficiency technologies employed to improve the efficiency of electric storage water heaters, and outlines programs to promote adoption of improved efficiency. Finally, it surveys current programs used to promote HPWH and considers the potential for this technology to address peak demand more effectively than reduction of standby losses alone

  1. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Integration with Renewables | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1,an R7-CompatiblePlaying Around with LightingIn Electric

  2. Standard Scenarios Annual Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is conducting a study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy DOE, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), that aims to document and implement an annual process designed to identify a realistic and timely set of input assumptions (e.g., technology cost and performance, fuel costs), and a diverse set of potential futures (standard scenarios), initially for electric sector analysis.

  3. Impact of Generator Flexibility on Electric System Costs and Integration of Renewable Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flexibility of traditional generators plays an important role in accommodating the increased variability and uncertainty of wind and solar on the electric power system. Increased flexibility can be achieved with changes to operational practices or upgrades to existing generation. One challenge is in understanding the value of increasing flexibility, and how this value may change given higher levels of variable generation. This study uses a commercial production cost model to measure the impact of generator flexibility on the integration of wind and solar generators. We use a system that is based on two balancing areas in the Western United States with a range of wind and solar penetrations between 15% and 60%, where instantaneous penetration of wind and solar is limited to 80%.

  4. Impact of Generator Flexibility on Electric System Costs and Integration of Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palchak, D.; Denholm, P.

    2014-07-01

    Flexibility of traditional generators plays an important role in accommodating the increased variability and uncertainty of wind and solar on the electric power system. Increased flexibility can be achieved with changes to operational practices or upgrades to existing generation. One challenge is in understanding the value of increasing flexibility, and how this value may change given higher levels of variable generation. This study uses a commercial production cost model to measure the impact of generator flexibility on the integration of wind and solar generators. We use a system that is based on two balancing areas in the Western United States with a range of wind and solar penetrations between 15% and 60%, where instantaneous penetration of wind and solar is limited to 80%.

  5. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 14: Regional Adequacy Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) to assess the adequacy of the North American bulk power supply. In 2005, the Council and the Bonneville Power Administration created the Northwest Resource Adequacy Forum to aid the Council in developingSixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 14: Regional Adequacy Standards

  6. An Interview with Professor Alexandra von Meier on an Efficient Electric Grid: Improving Visibility and Integrating Renewable Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhary, Harshika; Gill, Manraj; McGuinness, Philippa; Miller, Daniel; Patel, Saavan

    2015-01-01

    and future power distribution grids, micro-synchrophasor technology and the challenges with optimizing the incorporation of renewable energy

  7. Renewable energy and telecommunications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable energy and telecommunications Case study: Energy Systems Week When AK Erlang first used fossil fuels and switch to renewable energy sources. But the unlikely convergence of the two fields lay to be able to deal with. "If we integrate renewable energies, such as wind power, in the electricity grid

  8. Implementation Scenarios for Electric Vehicle Roadway Wireless Power Transfer; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meintz, A.; Markel, T.; Burton, E.; Wang, L.; Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.

    2015-06-05

    Analysis has been performed on the Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC) warehouse of collected GPS second-by-second driving profile data of vehicles in the Atlanta, Chicago, Fresno, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Sacramento, and San Francisco Consolidated Statistical Areas (CSAs) to understand in-motion wireless power transfer introduction scenarios. In this work it has been shown that electrification of 1% of road miles could reduce fuel use by 25% for Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) in these CSAs. This analysis of strategically located infrastructure offers a promising approach to reduced fuel consumption; however, even the most promising 1% of road miles determined by these seven analysis scenarios still represent an impressive 2,700 miles of roadway to electrify. Therefore to mitigate the infrastructure capital costs, integration of the grid-tied power electronics in the Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) system at the DC-link to photovoltaic and/or battery storage is suggested. The integration of these resources would allow for the hardware to provide additional revenue through grid services at times of low traffic volumes and conversely at time of high traffic volumes these resources could reduce the peak demand that the WPT system would otherwise add to the grid.

  9. Effective Renewable Energy Policy: Leave It to the States?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weissman, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Berkeley Effective Renewable Energy Policy: Leave It to therealities related to renewable energy policy suggest thatof a new energy policy—using renewable electric generation

  10. Smoothing the Eects of Renewable Generation on the Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naud, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    to Grid by Paul Naud Renewable electrical power sourcessystem based on various renewable energy resources. InCRUZ Smoothing the Effects of Renewable Generation on the

  11. Managing R&D Risk in Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rausser, Gordon C.; Papineau, Maya

    2008-01-01

    from 2007. Table 6: Renewable Energy Costs, Transportationmegajoules. Table 7: Renewable Energy Costs, Electricity ($/1: DOE Renewable Energy Milestones cellulosic ethanol cost

  12. Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? An Exploration of Policy Options and Practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-01-01

    evidence of compliance with renewables portfolio standards (states that have adopted a renewables portfolio standard (D.C. now have mandatory renewables portfolio standard (RPS)

  13. 2014 Renewable Energy Markets (REM) Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renewable Energy Markets (REM) is the clean energy industry's most important annual event focused on the states, businesses, organizations, and households that choose clean, renewable electricity...

  14. Identifying Renewable Energy Projects for Federal Agencies |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    projects that can help federal agencies meet their 30% renewable electricity by 2025 target. This research is summarized on this page. Renewable Energy Markets The size of the...

  15. 2015 Standard Scenarios Annual Report: U.S. Electric Sector Scenario Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Patrick; Cole, Wesley; Blair, Nate; Lantz, Eric; Krishnan, Venkat; Mai, Trieu; Mulcahy, David; Porro, Gian

    2015-07-16

    This report is one of several products resulting from an initial effort to provide a consistent set of technology cost and performance data and to define a conceptual and consistent scenario framework that can be used in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s (NREL’s) future analyses. The long-term objective of this effort is to identify a range of possible futures of the U.S. electricity sector in which to consider specific energy system issues through (1) defining a set of prospective scenarios that bound ranges of key technology, market, and policy assumptions and (2) assessing these scenarios in NREL’s market models to understand the range of resulting outcomes, including energy technology deployment and production, energy prices, and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.

  16. A Critical Analysis of the Viability and Impacts of Solar Energy Carve-Outs in Renewable Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Aaron D.

    2010-12-17

    Numerous states have implemented legislation to advance the use of specific renewable energy resources, most notably solar. However, solar energy is accompanied by several deficiencies – including high costs, limited ...

  17. Multi-criteria comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel emission-standards, and fuel carbon tax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak; Hochman, G.; Zilberman, D.

    2012-01-01

    is only one type of fossil fuel and one alternative fuel andGHG emissions and reducing fossil fuel use, and ?nd biofuelin GHG intensity of both fossil fuels and renewable fuels,

  18. 2010 Renewable Energy Data Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelman, Rachel

    2011-10-01

    This Renewable Energy Data Book for 2010 provides facts and figures on energy in general, renewable electricity in the United States, global renewable energy development, wind power, solar energy, geothermal power, biopower, hydropower, advanced waterpower, hydrogen, renewable fuels, and clean energy investments.

  19. 2008 Renewable Energy Data Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-07-01

    This Renewable Energy Data Book for 2008 provides facts and figures on energy in general, renewable electricity in the United States, global renewable energy development, wind power, solar energy, geothermal power, biopower, hydropower, advanced water power, hydrogen, renewable fuels, and clean energy investments.

  20. 2009 Renewable Energy Data Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelman, Rachel

    2010-08-01

    This Renewable Energy Data Book for 2009 provides facts and figures on energy in general, renewable electricity in the United States, global renewable energy development, wind power, solar energy, geothermal power, biopower, hydropower, advanced waterpower, hydrogen, renewable fuels, and clean energy investments.

  1. 2008 Renewable Energy Data Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelman, Rachel

    2009-07-01

    This Renewable Energy Data Book for 2008 provides facts and figures on energy in general, renewable electricity in the United States, global renewable energy development, wind power, solar energy, geothermal power, biopower, hydropower, advanced waterpower, hydrogen, renewable fuels, and clean energy investments.

  2. 2011 Renewable Energy Data Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Gelman

    2013-02-01

    This Renewable Energy Data Book for 2011 provides facts and figures on energy in general, renewable electricity in the United States, global renewable energy development, wind power, solar energy, geothermal power, biopower, hydropower, advanced water power, hydrogen, renewable fuels, and clean energy investments.

  3. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Energy Laboratory. Renewable Energy Policy Project (REPP).13. Washington, D.C. : Renewable Energy Policy Project. (clean_energy_policies/increase-the-texas- renewable-energy-

  4. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    and future renewable energy costs, while less volatile thandifference between renewable energy costs and the cost ofto be the least-cost renewable energy source and, as noted

  5. Renewable Electricity Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProject Developsfor UCNIEnvironmentalAHRIRemote Duct Sealing in ResidentialNREL

  6. Effective Renewable Energy Policy: Leave It to the States?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weissman, Steven

    2011-01-01

    megawatts of installed renewable energy capacity in thePortfolio Standards,” Renewable Energy Law Blog (Apr. 30,as well as small renewable energy power facilities (no

  7. Effective Renewable Energy Policy: Leave It to the States?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weissman, Steven

    2011-01-01

    megawatts of installed renewable energy capacity in theCatlin, “Commerce Clause Challenge to Renewable PortfolioStandards,” Renewable Energy Law Blog (Apr. 30, 2010),

  8. Battery storage for supplementing renewable energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The battery storage for renewable energy systems section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes structures and models to support the technical and economic status of emerging renewable energy options for electricity supply.

  9. Distributed Generation and Renewable Energy in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distributed Generation and Renewable Energy in the Electric Cooperative Sector Ed Torrero generation (non-renewable) $6.4M CRN dollars over 10 years Renewable energy $1.6M CRN dollars over 10

  10. Electric Vehicle Communication Standards Testing and Validation Phase I: SAE J2847/1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Richard M.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Gowri, Krishnan

    2011-09-21

    Executive Summary Vehicle to grid communication standards are critical to the charge management and interoperability among vehicles, charging stations and utility providers. Several standards initiatives by the Society of Automobile Engineers (SAE), International Standards Organization and International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC), and ZigBee / HomePlug Alliance are developing requirements for communication messages and protocols. While the standard development is in progress for more than two years, no definitive guidelines are available for the automobile manufacturers, charging station manufacturers and utility backhaul network systems. At present, there is a wide range of proprietary communication options developed and supported in the industry. Recent work by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaboration with SAE and automobile manufacturers has identified performance requirements and test plan based on possible communication pathways using power line communication over the control pilot and mains. Though the communication pathways and power line communication technology options are identified, much work needs to be done in developing application software and testing of communication modules before these can be deployed in production vehicles. This report presents a test plan and results from initial testing of two power line communication modules developed to meet the requirements of SAE J2847/1 standard.

  11. Is it Worth it? A Comparative Analysis of Cost-Benefit Projections for State Renewables Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-01-01

    electricity and natural gas prices. Over half of the studiesfactors, such as the natural gas price forecast and thecapital costs and natural gas prices. Since wind is expected

  12. Multi-criteria comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel emission-standards, and fuel carbon tax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak; Hochman, G.; Zilberman, D.

    2012-01-01

    order for the low carbon fuel standard, 2012. URL http://mediated e?ects of low carbon fuel policies. AgBioForum, 15(Gas Reductions under Low Carbon Fuel Standards? American

  13. Evaluation of Public Service Electric & Gas Company`s standard offer program, Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.A.; Kito, M.S.; Moezzi, M.M.

    1995-07-01

    In May 1993, Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G), the largest investor-owned utility in New Jersey, initiated the Standard Offer program, an innovative approach to acquiring demand-side management (DSM) resources. In this program, PSE&G offers longterm contracts with standard terms and conditions to project sponsors, either customers or third-party energy service companies (ESCOs), on a first-come, first-serve basis to fill a resource block. The design includes posted, time-differentiated prices which are paid for energy savings that will be verified over the contract term (5, 10, or 15 years) based on a statewide measurement and verification (M&V) protocol. The design of the Standard Offer differs significantly from DSM bidding programs in several respects. The eligibility requirements and posted prices allow ESCOs and other energy service providers to market and develop projects among customers with few constraints on acceptable end use efficiency technologies. In contrast, in DSM bidding, ESCOs typically submit bids without final commitments from customers and the utility selects a limited number of winning bidders who often agree to deliver a pre-specified mix of savings from various end uses in targeted markets. The major objectives of the LBNL evaluation were to assess market response and customer satisfaction; analyze program costs and cost-effectiveness; review and evaluate the utility`s administration and delivery of the program; examine the role of PSE&G`s energy services subsidiary (PSCRC) in the program and the effect of its involvement on the development of the energy services industry in New Jersey; and discuss the potential applicability of the Standard Offer concept given current trends in the electricity industry (i.e., increasing competition and the prospect of industry restructuring).

  14. Financing investments in renewable energy: The role of policy design and restructuring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Pickle, S.

    1997-03-01

    The costs of electric power projects utilizing renewable energy technologies are highly sensitive to financing terms. Consequently, as the electricity industry is restructured and new renewables policies are created, it is important for policymakers to consider the impacts of renewables policy design on project financing. This report describes the power plant financing process and provides insights to policymakers on the important nexus between renewables policy design and finance. A cash-flow model is used to estimate the impact of various financing variables on renewable energy costs. Past and current renewable energy policies are then evaluated to demonstrate the influence of policy design on the financing process and on financing costs. The possible impacts of electricity restructuring on power plant financing are discussed and key design issues are identified for three specific renewable energy programs being considered in the restructuring process: (1) surcharge-funded policies; (2) renewables portfolio standards; and (3) green marketing programs. Finally, several policies that are intended to directly reduce financing costs and barriers are analyzed. The authors find that one of the key reasons that renewables policies are not more effective is that project development and financing processes are frequently ignored or misunderstood when designing and implementing renewable energy incentives. A policy that is carefully designed can reduce renewable energy costs dramatically by providing revenue certainty that will, in turn, reduce financing risk premiums.

  15. Renewable Energy in Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    This report examines the opportunities, challenges, and costs associated with renewable energy implementation in Alaska and provides strategies that position Alaska's accumulating knowledge in renewable energy development for export to the rapidly growing energy/electric markets of the developing world.

  16. Renewable Energy Annual

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    Presents five chapters covering various aspects of the renewable energy marketplace, along with detailed data tables and graphics. Particular focus is given to renewable energy trends in consumption and electricity; manufacturing activities of solar thermal collectors, solar photovoltaic cells/modules, and geothermal heat pumps; and green pricing and net metering programs. The Department of Energy provides detailed offshore

  17. COMMISSION GUIDEBOOK RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), which has a goal of obtaining 33 percent of the state's electricity from renewable resources by 2020 ................................................................................................. 10 C. Consumer Education Program

  18. RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM OVERALL PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's electricity from renewable resources by the year 2010. These Guidelines assist interested applicants..................................................................................................7 C. CONSUMER EDUCATION PROGRAM

  19. Renewable Energy Economic Potential

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, is defined in this report as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity.

  20. Abstract-The Chilean electricity regulation introduced in 2008 an obligation to contract 10% of renewable energy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    of that obligation into the market, revises renewable projects that have been submitted for environmental assessment countries with those of Latin America or Africa. The two latter do not yet satisfy the energy needs of much sources connected to the grid, such as geothermal, wind, solar, biomass, tidal, cogeneration, and hydro

  1. BATTERY STORAGE CONTROL FOR STEADYING RENEWABLE POWER GENERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by storing excess power to a battery during excess generation, and then releasing the energy when power generation diminishes. Among other considera- tions, we would like to release and store energy at a bounded States have adopted renewable portfolio standards, which require a certain percentage of electric energy

  2. State Renewable Energy Requirements and Goals: Status Through 2003

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    This report was assembled by the Energy Information Administration from a number of sources and in a series of steps, beginning with a review of state renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and other program summaries available on web sites, followed by a review of state laws and regulations, and then further clarified by direct contact with State public utility commissions, electric utilities, and others.

  3. Renewable Electricity Grid Integration Roadmap for Mexico. Supplement to the IEA Expert Group Report on Recommended Practices for Wind Integration Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, Brian; Cochran, Jaquelin; Watson, Andrea; Katz, Jessica; Bracho, Ricardo

    2015-08-19

    As a recognized leader in efforts to mitigate global climate change, the Government of Mexico (GOM) works proactively to reduce emissions, demonstrating strong political will and capacity to comprehensively address climate change. Since 2010, the U.S. government (USG) has supported these efforts by partnering with Mexico under the Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) program. Through the program, the USG has partnered with Mexico’s Ministry of Energy (SENER), as well as other government agencies, to support GOM in reaching its clean energy and climate change goals. Specifically, the EC-LEDS program is supporting GOM’s clean energy goal of generating 35% of its electricity from renewable energy (RE) by 2024. EC-LEDS, through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the U.S Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), has been collaborating with SENER and GOM interagency working group—the Consejo Consultivo para las Energías Renovables (Consultative Council on Renewable Energy)—to create a grid integration roadmap for variable RE. 1 A key objective in creating a grid integration roadmap is assessing likely impacts of wind and solar energy on the power system and modifying planning and operations accordingly. This paper applies best practices in conducting a grid integration study to the Mexican context.

  4. Missing Money--Will the Current Electricity Market Structure Support High (~50%) Wind/Solar?; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, Michael

    2015-05-15

    This presentation summarizes the missing money problem and whether the current electricity market structure will support high penetration levels of wind and solar.

  5. Electric Vehicle Communications Standards Testing and Validation - Phase II: SAE J2931/1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Richard M.; Gowri, Krishnan

    2013-01-15

    Vehicle to grid communication standards enable interoperability among vehicles, charging stations and utility providers and provide the capability to implement charge management. Several standards initiatives by the Society of Automobile Engineers (SAE), International Standards Organization and International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC), and ZigBee/HomePlug Alliance are developing requirements for communication messages and protocols. Recent work by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaboration with SAE and automobile manufacturers has identified vehicle to grid communication performance requirements and developed a test plan as part of SAE J2931/1 committee work. This laboratory test plan was approved by the SAE J2931/1 committee and included test configurations, test methods, and performance requirements to verify reliability, robustness, repeatability, maximum communication distance, and authentication features of power line carrier (PLC) communication modules at the internet protocol layer level. The goal of the testing effort was to select a communication technology that would enable automobile manufacturers to begin the development and implementation process. The EPRI/Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) testing teams divided the testing so that results for each test could be presented by two teams, performing the tests independently. The PNNL team performed narrowband PLC testing including the Texas Instruments (TI) Concerto, Ariane Controls AC-CPM1, and the MAXIM Tahoe 2 evaluation boards. The scope of testing was limited to measuring the vendor systems communication performance between Electric Vehicle Support Equipment (EVSE) and plug-in electric vehicles (PEV). The testing scope did not address PEV’s CAN bus to PLC or PLC to EVSE (Wi-Fi, cellular, PLC Mains, etc.) communication integration. In particular, no evaluation was performed to delineate the effort needed to translate the IPv6/SEP2.0 messages to PEV’s CAN bus. The J2931/1 laboratory test results were presented to the SAE membership on March 20-22, 2012. The SAE committee decided to select HomePlug GreenPHY (HPGP) as the communication technology to use between the PEV and EVSE. No technology completely met all performance requirements. Both the MAXIM Tahoe 2 and TI Concerto met the 100Kbps throughput requirement, are estimated to meet the latency measurement performance, and met the control pilot impairment requirements. But HPGP demonstrated the potential to provide a data throughput rate of 10x of the requirement and either met or showed the potential to meet the other requirements with further development.

  6. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of State Renewables Portfolio Standards in the United States: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    would stimulate wind technology cost reductions on theprojections of renewable technology costs, fossil fuel priceavailability. Renewable technology cost: Reflects changes to

  7. Challenges in Integrating Renewable Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    costs and improving energy efficiencies of the various types of renewable resources, such as wind, solar reliability and econ- omy. The challenges of integrating high penetrations of renewable energy technologiesChallenges in Integrating Renewable Technologies into an Electric Power System White Paper Power

  8. State Renewable Energy Requirements and Goals: Update through 2008 (Update) (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    State renewable portfolio standards (RPS) programs continue to play an important role in Annual Energy Outlook 2009, growing in number while existing programs are modified with more stringent targets. In total, 28 states and the District of Columbia now have mandatory RPS programs, and at least 4 other states have voluntary renewable energy programs. In the absence of a federal renewable electricity standard, each state determines its own levels of generation, eligible technologies, and noncompliance penalties. The growth in state renewable energy requirements has led to an expansion of renewable energy credit (REC) markets, which vary from state to state. Credit prices depend on the state renewable requirements and how easily they can be met.

  9. >.........standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the multimedia research and product development industry Planned Accomplishments MPEG Standards: ·Establishing 2D. ......... IETF standard protocols Collaborators / Customers Standards Groups: MPEG, SMPTE NIST Collaborators: ATP Other Collaborators: Academic

  10. Development of an electrical impedance computed tomographic two-phase flows analyzer. Annual technical report for program renewal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, O.C.

    1993-05-01

    This progress report details the theoretical development, numerical results, experimental design (mechanical), experimental design (electronic), and experimental results for the research program for the development of an electrical impedance computed tomographic two-phase flow analyzer.

  11. Features of a fully renewable US electricity system: Optimized mixes of wind and solar PV and transmission grid extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    in FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission)-level LCOE (Levelized Costs Of Electricity) for wind and solar PV due to differing weather conditions. Regional LCOE vary by up to 29%, and LCOE-optimal mixes

  12. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Consumers (Spanish Version); Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    This is a Spanish-language handbook designed to answer a consumer's basic questions, as well as point them to additional information they need, to make the best decision about whether an electric-drive vehicle is right for them.

  13. Sustainable Development of Renewable Energy Mini-grids for Energy Access: A Framework for Policy Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmukh, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    electricity supply,” Renewable and Sustainable EnergyGanapathy, “Decetralized Renewable Energy (DRE) Micro-gridsextension, off-grid and renewable energy sources,” in World

  14. Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

    2006-01-01

    1: U.S. and International Renewable Hydrogen Demonstrationfueling station powered by renewable electricity. The systemand Natural Gas, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, U.S.

  15. 2012 Renewable Energy Data Book

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The annual report is an important assessment of U.S. energy statistics for 2012, including renewable electricity, worldwide renewable energy development, clean energy investments, and data on specific technologies. The 2012 Renewable Energy Data Book is filled with information-packed charts and graphics, which allows users, from analysts to policymakers, to quickly understand and summarize trends in renewable energy -- both on a U.S. and global scale.

  16. 2010 Renewable Energy Data Book

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The annual report is an important assessment of U.S. energy statistics for 2010, including renewable electricity, worldwide renewable energy development, clean energy investments, and data on specific technologies. The 2010 Renewable Energy Data Book is filled with information-packed charts and graphics, which allows users, from analysts to policymakers, to quickly understand and summarize trends in renewable energy -- both on a U.S. and global scale.

  17. 2011 Renewable Energy Data Book

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The annual report is an important assessment of U.S. energy statistics for 2011, including renewable electricity, worldwide renewable energy development, clean energy investments, and data on specific technologies. The 2011 Renewable Energy Data Book is filled with information-packed charts and graphics, which allows users, from analysts to policymakers, to quickly understand and summarize trends in renewable energy -- both on a U.S. and global scale.

  18. 2013 Renewable Energy Data Book

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The annual report is an important assessment of U.S. energy statistics for 2013, including renewable electricity, worldwide renewable energy development, clean energy investments, and data on specific technologies. The 2013 Renewable Energy Data Book is filled with information-packed charts and graphics, which allows users, from analysts to policymakers, to quickly understand and summarize trends in renewable energy -- both on a U.S. and global scale.

  19. Renewables and air quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wooley, D.R.

    2000-08-01

    The US heavy reliance on fossil fuels is a central obstacle to improving air quality and preventing catastrophic climate change. To solve this problem will require a combination of financial incentives and market rules that strongly encourage development of renewable energy resources to meet electric power demand. One promising policy option is to allow renewable energy resources to directly participate in air pollution emission trading mechanisms. Currently, the clean air benefits of renewable energy generally go unrecognized by regulators, under-appreciated by consumers and uncompensated by markets. Renewable energy is a key clean air alternative to conventional electricity generation, and the development of renewables could be stimulated by changes to the Clean Air Act's emissions trading programs. As Congress revisits clean air issues over the next several years, renewable energy representatives could push for statutory changes that reward the renewable energy industry for the air quality benefits it provides. By also becoming involved in key US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state rule-making cases, the renewables industry could influence the structure of emissions trading programs and strengthen one of the most persuasive arguments for wind, solar and biomass energy development.

  20. The Value of Renewable Energy as a Hedge Against Fuel Price Risk: Analytic Contributions from Economic and Finance Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of a 10-Percent Renewable Portfolio Standard. SR/Impacts of a 15-Percent Renewable Portfolio Standard. SR/through Increased Deployment of Renewable Energy and Energy