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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Trends in Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents a summary of the nation’s renewable energy consumption in 2010 along with detailed historical data on renewable energy consumption by energy source and end-use sector. Data presented also includes renewable energy consumption for electricity generation and for non-electric use by energy source, and net summer capacity and net generation by energy source and state. The report covers the period from 2006 through 2010.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Renewable Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation by Energy Use Electricity Generation by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion btu) for electricity generation in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial and electric power) and by energy source (e.g. biomass, geothermal, etc.) This data was compiled and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass Commercial Electric Power Electricity Generation geothermal Industrial PV Renewable Energy Consumption solar wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.Consumption.for_.Elec_.Gen_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 19.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

3

Electricity consumption from renewable and non-renewable sources and economic growth: Evidence from Latin American countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study explores the effect of renewable and non-renewable electricity consumption on economic growth in 18 Latin American countries. To achieve the goal of this study a panel Gross Domestic Product (GDP) model was constructed taking the period 1980–2010 into account. From the Pedroni cointegration test results it was found that renewable electricity consumption, non-renewable electricity consumption, labor, gross fixed capital formation, and total trade are cointegrated. Moreover, the panel Dynamic Ordinary Least Squares (DOLS) test results revealed that all above the mentioned variables have a long run positive effect on GDP growth in the investigated countries. The Vector Error-Correction (VEC) Granger causality model results revealed the existence of feedback causality between the variables. The results of the study indicated that renewable electricity consumption is more significant than non-renewable electricity consumption in promoting economic growth in the investigated countries in the long run and the short run. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended that the investigated countries should increase their investment on renewable energy projects to increase the role of electricity consumption from renewable sources. In addition, it is essential that these countries should reduce their non-renewable electricity consumption by increasing their energy efficiency and implementing energy saving projects. By applying these recommendations, these countries would be able to mitigate global warming and reduce their dependency on fossil fuel to increase their energy security.

Usama Al-mulali; Hassan Gholipour Fereidouni; Janice Y.M. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The effect of electricity consumption from renewable sources on countries? economic growth levels: Evidence from advanced, emerging and developing economies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper uses a sample of 36 countries for the time period 1990–2011 in order to examine the relationship between countries? electricity consumption from renewable sources and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) levels. Several nonparametric techniques are applied to investigate the effect of electricity consumption from several renewable sources including wind, geothermal, solar, biomass and waste on countries? GDP levels. When investigating the whole sample ignoring countries? economic development status, the results reveal an increasing relationship up to a certain GDP level, which after that point the effect of electricity consumption on GDP stabilises. However when analyzing separately the ‘Emerging Markets and Developing Economies’, and, the ‘Advanced-Developed Economies’, the results change significantly. For the case of Emerging Market and Developing Economies the relationship appears to be highly nonlinear (an M-shape form) indicating that on those countries the levels of electricity consumption from renewable sources will not result on higher GDP levels. In contrast for the case of the advanced economies the results reveal an increasing nonlinear relationship indicating that higher electricity consumption levels from renewable sources results to higher GDP levels. This finding is mainly attributed to the fact that in the advanced-developed economies more terawatts from renewable sources are generated and consumed compared to the emerging market and developing economies, which traditionally their economies rely on non-renewable sources for power generation and consumption.

George E. Halkos; Nickolaos G. Tzeremes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Renewable Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA renewable electricity Renewable Energy Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 8.5 KiB) text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 8.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

6

Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Electricity generated from sources that are renewable – hydroelectric power, bio-fuels, geothermal, solar, wind, wood, waste – have grown 150% from 1980 to 2011 (latest year available). Of the...

7

renewable electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electricity electricity Dataset Summary Description Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA renewable electricity Renewable Energy Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 8.5 KiB) text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 8.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

8

Renewable Electricity Futures Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Electricity Futures Study End-use Electricity Demand Volume 3 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3;Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U Sandor, D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study

9

Demand side management of industrial electricity consumption: Promoting the use of renewable energy through real-time pricing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As the installed capacity of wind generation in Ireland continues to increase towards an overall goal of 40% of electricity from renewable sources by 2020, it is inevitable that the frequency of wind curtailment occurrences will increase. Using this otherwise discarded energy by strategically increasing demand at times that would otherwise require curtailment has the potential to reduce the installed capacity of wind required to meet the national 2020 target. Considering two industrial electricity consumers, this study analyses the potential for the implementation of price based demand response by an industrial consumer to increase their proportional use of wind generated electricity by shifting their demand towards times of low prices. Results indicate that while curtailing during peak price times has little or no benefit in terms of wind energy consumption, demand shifting towards low price times is likely to increase a consumer’s consumption of wind generation by approximately 5.8% for every 10% saved on the consumer’s average unit price of electricity.

Paddy Finn; Colin Fitzpatrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Green Power Renewable Electricity, Renewable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Air (6202J) EPA430-K-04-015 www.epa.gov/greenpower March 2010 ISBN: 1-56973-577-8 #12;Guide................................................................................................9 Renewable Electricity Products ..................................................18 Developing Criteria for Screening Suppliers and Products

11

Electricity Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Consumption Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates (million kWh) National Petroleum Council Assumption: The definition of electricity con- sumption and sales used in the NPC 1999 study is the equivalent ofwhat EIA calls "sales by utilities" plus "retail wheeling by power marketers." This A nn u al Gro wth total could also be called "sales through the distribution grid," 2o 99 99 to Sales by Utilities -012% #N/A Two other categories of electricity consumption tracked by EIA cover on site Retail Wheeling Sales by generation for host use. The first, "nonutility onsite direct use," covers the Power Marketen 212.25% #N/A traditional generation/cogeneration facilities owned by industrial or large All Sales Through Distribution

12

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Hand, M. M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Guide to Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity, Renewable...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity, Renewable Energy Certificates, and On-Site Renewable Generation Guide to Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity, Renewable...

17

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

Hand, M.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a Power Systems Engineering Research Center webinar on September 4, 2012.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in an Union of Concerned Scientists webinar on June 12, 2012.

Hand, M.; Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a webinar given by the California Energy Commission.

Hand, M. M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Renewable Electricity Working Group Presentation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Renewable Electricity Working Group Chris Namovicz, Renewable Electricity Analysis Team July 9, 2013 Agenda * Review status of AEO 2013 * Discuss new model updates and development...

23

State Renewable Electricity Profiles  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents a summary of current and recent historical data for the renewable electric power industry. The data focuses on net summer capacity and net generation for each type of renewable generator, as well as fossil-fired and nuclear power plant types, for the period 2006 through 2010.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented to the 2012 Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners, during their June, 2012, meeting. The Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners is a regional association within the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).

Hand, M. M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

DeMeo, E.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Imagine a day, you drove your car without spilling a dime from your pocket? A day, you pay just a dollar bill for your monthly electrical energy consumption? Yes, this is what renewable energy resources does! We  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pay just a dollar bill for your monthly electrical energy consumption? Yes, this is what renewable Imagine a day, you drove your car without spilling a dime from your pocket? A day, you energy resources does! We have means to achieve this if we make use of the natural resources

Kostic, Milivoje M.

29

Reduces electric energy consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption · Reduces nonhazardous solid waste and wastewater generation · Potential annual savings, and recycling. Alcoa provides the packaging, automotive, aerospace, and construction markets with a variety

30

OpenEI - Electricity Consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Electricity Annual Electricity Consumption (1980 - 2009) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/877 Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). License

Type of License:  Other (please specify below)
Source of data

31

Electricity Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Electricity Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_electricity_net_consumption_1980_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 50.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

32

Historical Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Historical Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Historical Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 1989-2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption by source and end use between 1989 and 2008. This data was published and compiled by the Energy Information Administration. Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords annual energy consumption consumption EIA renewable energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon historical_renewable_energy_consumption_by_sector_and_energy_source_1989-2008.xls (xls, 41 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 1989-2008 License License Creative Commons CCZero Comment Rate this dataset

33

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector and Source Consumption by Sector and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

34

Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector SERIES: Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector Release date: November 7, 2014...

35

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet),...

36

Renewable Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper provides an overview of the use of renewable energy sources to generate electricity in the United States and a critical analysis of the federal and state policies that have supported the deployment of renewable ...

Schmalensee, Richard

37

Renewable Electricity Standard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Electricity Standard Renewable Electricity Standard Renewable Electricity Standard < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Missouri Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Missouri Public Service Commission In November 2008, voters in Missouri enacted Proposition C, a ballot initiative that repealed the state's existing voluntary renewable energy and energy efficiency objective and replaced it with an expanded, mandatory renewable electricity standard of 15% by 2021. The standard also contains a solar electricity carve-out of 2% of each interim portfolio requirement meaning that by 2021, 0.3% of retail electricity sales must be derived from

38

Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper highlights the key results from the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study. It is a detailed consideration of renewable electricity in the United States. The paper focuses on technical issues related to the operability of the U. S. electricity grid and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. The results indicate that the future U. S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and the further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway. The central conclusion of the analysis is that renewable electricity generation from technologies that are commercially available today, in combination with a more flexible electric system, is more than adequate to supply 80% of the total U. S. electricity generation in 2050 while meeting electricity demand on an hourly basis in every region of the United States.

Mai, Trieu; Hand, Maureen; Baldwin, Sam F.; Wiser , Ryan; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, Paul; Arent, Doug; Porro, Gian; Sandor, Debra; Hostick, Donna J.; Milligan, Michael; DeMeo, Ed; Bazilian, Morgan

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

Integrating Renewable Electricity on the Grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The demand for carbon?free electricity is driving a growing movement of adding renewable energy to the grid. Renewable Portfolio Standards mandated by states and under consideration by the federal government envision a penetration of 20?30% renewable energy in the grid by 2020 or 2030. The renewable energy potential of wind and solar far exceeds these targets suggesting that renewable energy ultimately could grow well beyond these initial goals.

George Crabtree; Jim Misewich; Ron Ambrosio; Kathryn Clay; Paul DeMartini; Revis James; Mark Lauby; Vivek Mohta; John Moura; Peter Sauer; Francis Slakey; Jodi Lieberman; Humayun Tai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Renewable electricity policies, heterogeneity, and cost effectiveness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Renewable electricity policies promote investment in renewable electricity generators and have become increasingly common around the world. Because of intermittency and the composition of other generators in the power system, the value of certain renewable – particularly wind and solar – varies across locations and technologies. This paper investigates the implications of this heterogeneity for the cost effectiveness of renewable electricity policies. A simple model of the power system shows that renewable electricity policies cause different investment mixes. Policies also differ according to their effect on electricity prices, and both factors cause the cost effectiveness to vary across policies. We use a detailed, long-run planning model that accounts for intermittency on an hourly basis to compare the cost effectiveness for a range of policies and alternative parameter assumptions. The differences in cost effectiveness are economically significant, where broader policies, such as an emissions price, outperform renewable electricity policies.

Harrison Fell; Joshua Linn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Renewable Electricity Futures Study: Executive Summary  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Executive Summary Executive Summary NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U.S. Department of Energy DeMeo, E. Renewable Energy Consulting Services, Inc. Reilly, J.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mai, T. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Arent, D. Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis Porro, G. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Meshek, M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sandor, D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Suggested Citations Renewable Electricity Futures Study (Entire Report)

42

Renewable Electricity Futures: Exploration of Up to 80% Renewable Electricity Penetration in the United States (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Hand, M.; DeMeo, E.; Hostick, D.; Mai, T.; Schlosser, C. A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Renewable Electricity Generation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation Geothermal Read more Solar Read more Water Read more Wind Read more Our nation has abundant solar, water, wind, and geothermal energy resources, and many U.S. companies are developing, manufacturing, and installing cutting-edge, high-tech renewable energy systems. The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) leads a large network of researchers and other partners to deliver innovative technologies that will make renewable electricity generation cost competitive with traditional sources of energy. Working with our national laboratories and through these partnerships, we are catalyzing the transformation of the nation's energy system and building on a tradition of U.S. leadership in science and

44

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout – Renewable Electricity Generation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout – Renewable Electricity Generation, May 2013.

45

Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

46

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies Volume 2 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U.S. Department of Energy DeMeo, E. Renewable Energy Consulting Services, Inc. Reilly, J.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mai, T. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Arent, D. Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis Porro, G. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Meshek, M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sandor, D. National Renewable

47

Analyzing electricity consumption via data mining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes a model to analyze the massive data of electricity. Feature subset is determined by the correlation ... be determined further. The effects on analyzing electricity consumption of the other thr...

Jinshuo Liu; Huiying Lan; Yizhen Fu; Hui Wu…

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative - Renewable Energy Rebates |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative - Renewable Energy Rebates Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative - Renewable Energy Rebates Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative - Renewable Energy Rebates < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate PV: $8,000 Solar Water Heaters: $1,000 Solar Water Wells: $750 Wind-electric: $6,000 Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount PV: $2.00/watt Solar Water Heaters: $1,000/unit Solar Water Wells: $750/unit Wind-electric: $1.00/watt Provider Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative '''''The $1.5 million budget cap for PV rebates in 2013 has been met. No additional applications for PV rebates will be accepted. '''''

49

Renewable Generation and Interconnection to the Electrical Grid...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Renewable Generation and Interconnection to the Electrical Grid in Southern California Renewable Generation and Interconnection to the Electrical Grid in Southern California...

50

Renewable Electricity in the Annual Energy Outlook 2014  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2014 For Renewable Electricity Working Group AEO2014 Second Meeting September 26, 2013 Christopher Namovicz and Gwen Bredehoeft, Renewable Electricity Analysis Team Agenda...

51

Energy for Keeps: Electricity and Renewable Energy Teacher Information...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Keeps: Electricity and Renewable Energy Teacher Information Energy for Keeps: Electricity and Renewable Energy Teacher Information Below is information about the student...

52

Renewable Electricity in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

For Renewable Electricity Working Group July 24, 2014 Christopher Namovicz and Gwen Bredehoeft Renewable Electricity Analysis Team AEO2014 results and status updates for the...

53

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and...

54

Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona) - Renewable Energy Rebates |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona) - Renewable Energy Rebates Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona) - Renewable Energy Rebates Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona) - Renewable Energy Rebates < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Maximum Rebate $5,000 per site $20,000 per total system per year Rebate is capped at wattage that meets 25% of customer's annual kWhr use Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $1,000 per peak kW Provider Farmers Electric Cooperative Farmer's Electric Cooperative (Kalona) offers rebates for the installation of small wind and solar photovoltaic (PV) systems to its member customers. The amount of the rebate is set at $1,000 per peak kilowatt (kW) for both technologies, with a maximum rebate of $5,000. It is only available for

55

The renewable electric plant information system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explains the procedures used for creating the Renewable Electric Plant Information System (REPiS) database, describes the database fields, and summarizes the data. The REPiS database contains comprehensive information on grid-connected renewable electric generation plants in the United States. Originally designed in 1987 and updated in 1990, the database includes information through 1994. The report also illustrates ways of using the data for analysis is and describes how researchers validated the data.

Sinclair, K.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

NREL: Energy Analysis - Renewable Electricity Futures Study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renewable Electricity Futures Study Renewable Electricity Futures Study RE Futures Visualizations These visualizations are based on RE Futures modeling and represent the transformation of the U.S. electric system to a high renewable system from 2010 to 2050 and the hourly operation and transmission flow of that system in 2050. Transformation of the Electric Sector (Compare to Baseline Projections) Screen capture of a dynamic map that is animated to display the transformation of the electric sector in 2010 through 2050 Hourly Operation in 2050 (Compare to Baseline Projections) Screen capture of a dynamic map that is animated to display hourly operation in 2010 through 2050 Power Flow in 2050 (Compare to Baseline Projections) Screen capture of a dynamic map that is animated to display power flow in 2010 through 2050

57

Renewable Energy Consumption for Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description This dataset provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion Btu) for nonelectric use in the United States by energy use sector and energy source between 2004 and 2008. The data was compiled and published by EIA; the spreadsheet provides more details about specific sources for data used in the analysis. Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Nonelectric Renewable Energy Consumption Residential transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.Consumption.for_.Non-Elec.Gen_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 27.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

58

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1: Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Mai, T.; Wiser, R.; Sandor, D.; Brinkman, G.; Heath, G.; Denholm, P.; Hostick, D.J.; Darghouth, N.; Schlosser, A.; Strzepek, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

webinar-renewable-energy-electricity-generatio Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentrenewable-energy-electricity-generati Language: English Policies: "Deployment...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Below is...

62

Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Publications Website: www.iea.org/g8/2008/Empowering_Variable_Renewables.pdf Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems Screenshot References: Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity Systems[1] Summary "Increasing the share of renewables in energy portfolios is a key tool in the drive to reduce anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, as well as

63

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southwest Southwest Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 116, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Southwest Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Southwest (xls, 119.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

64

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Power Pool Area Northwest Power Pool Area Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 118, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. This dataset contains data for the northwest power pool area of the U.S. Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Northwest Power Pool Area Renewable Energy Generation WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Northwest Power Pool Area - Reference (xls, 119.3 KiB)

65

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California California Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 117, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO California EIA Renewable Energy Generation Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / California (xls, 119.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

66

Visualization of United States Renewable Consumption | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Visualization of United States Renewable Consumption Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Visualization of United States Renewable Consumption Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Information Administration Sector: Energy Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: en.openei.org/wiki/Visualization_of_United_States_Renewable_Consumptio Country: United States Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Community Generated UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

67

Guide to Purchasing Green Power: Renewable Electricity, Renewable Energy Certificates, and On-Site Renewable Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Purchasing Green Power Renewable Electricity, Renewable Energy Certificates, and On-Site Renewable Generation DOE/EE-0307 This guide can be downloaded from: www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/technologies/renewable_purchasingpower.html www.epa.gov/greenpower/ www.wri.org/publications www.resource-solutions.org/publications.php Office of Air (6202J) EPA430-K-04-015 www.epa.gov/greenpower March 2010 ISBN: 1-56973-577-8 Guide to Purchasing Green Power i Table of Contents Summary ........................................................................................................................................................1 Chapter 1: Introduction ....................................................................................................................................2

68

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockies Rockies Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 119, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. The dataset contains data for the Rockies region of WECC. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Rockies WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Rockies- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB)

69

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and Vacant Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) In Total Floor space In Occupied Floor space In Vacant Floor space Per Square Foot Per Occupied Square Foot Per Vacant Square Foot All Buildings 4,590 2,600 2,563 37 39 42 8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 2,532 334 331 3 48 51 6 5,001 to 10,000 946 250 247 3 36 38 6 10,001 to 25,000

71

Publicly-Owned Electric Utilities and the California Renewables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Publicly-Owned Electric Utilities and the California Renewables Portfolio Standard: A Summary Salazar Contract Manager Heather Raitt Project Manager Drake Johnson Acting Office Manager RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFICE Valerie Hall Deputy Director EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLES & DEMAND ANALYSIS DIVISION B. B

72

Electricity Consumption Simulation Based on Multi-agent System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to simulate impact on electricity of macroeconomic policy and foreign trade, Electricity Consumption Simulation System (ECMAS) was established based ... according to I/O table and data of electricity consumption

Minjie Xu; Zhaoguang Hu; Baoguo Shan…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) Electrical energy can be generated from renewable resources the potential to meet the worldwide demand of electricity and they contribute to the total generation

Suo, Zhigang

74

Renewable energy sources in the Egyptian electricity market: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review paper presents an appraisal of renewable energy RE options in Egypt. An appraisal review of different \\{REs\\} is presented. The study shows that electric energy produced from \\{REs\\} in Egypt are very poor compared with other energy sources. The utilization of the renewable energies can also be a good opportunity to fight the desertification and dryness in Egypt which is about 60% of Egypt territory. The rapid growth of energy production and consumption is strongly affecting and being affected by the Egyptian economy in many aspects. It is evident that energy will continue to play an important role in the development of Egypt's economy in coming years. The total installed electricity generating capacity had reached around 22025 MW with a generating capacity reached 22605 MW at the end of 2007. Hydropower and coal has no significant potential increase. During the period 1981/82–2004/05 electricity generation has increased by 500% from nearly 22 TWh for the year 1981/1982 to 108.4 TWh in the year 2004/2005 at an average annual growth rate of 6.9%. Consequently, oil and gas consumed by the electricity sector has jumped during the same period from around 3.7 MTOE to nearly 21 MTOE. The planned installed capacity for the year 2011/2012 is 28813 MW and the required fuel (oil and gas) for the electricity sector is estimated to reach about 29 MTOE by the same year. The renewable energy strategy targets to supply 3% of the electricity production from renewable resources by the year 2010. Electrical Coverage Electrical energy has been provided for around 99.3% of Egypt's population, representing a positive sign for the welfare of the Egyptian citizen due to electricity relation to all development components in all walks of life. The article discusses perspectives of wind energy in Egypt with projections to generate ? 3.5 GWe by 2022, representing ?9% of the total installed power at that time (40.2 GW). Total renewables (hydro + wind + solar) are expected to provide ?7.4 GWe by 2022 representing ? 19% of the total installed power. Such a share would reduce dependence on depleting oil and gas resources, and hence improve country's sustainable development.

A. Ibrahim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Renewable energy-combined scheduling for electric vehicle charging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper designs a heuristic-based charging scheduler capable of integrating renewable energy for electric vehicles, aiming at reshaping power load induced from the large deployment of electric vehicles. Based on the power consumption profile as well as the preemptive charging task model which includes the time constraint on the completion time, a charging schedule is created as a form of time tables. Each entry indicates the source of power supply, namely, either regular power or renewable energy, and how much power is supplied to a vehicle. Basically, it assigns the charging operation to those slots having the smallest power load one at a time, taking different allocation orders according to slack, operation length, and per-slot power demand. Finally, the peaking task of the peaking slot is iteratively picked to assign renewable energy stored in the station battery. The performance measurement result shows that our scheme can reduce the peak load by up to 37.3% compared with the earliest allocation scheme for the given parameter set.

Junghoon Lee; Gyung-Leen Park

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - NREL to Showcase Renewable Electricity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NREL to Showcase Renewable Electricity Generation Systems and Advanced NREL to Showcase Renewable Electricity Generation Systems and Advanced Vehicles at Denver Earth Day Fair April 18, 2013 The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will showcase two mobile renewable electricity generation systems and three advanced vehicles-a Toyota Highlander fuel cell electric vehicle, a plug-in Toyota Prius hybrid electric vehicle, and a Mitsubishi i-MiEV electric vehicle-at the Denver Earth Day Fair on April 22. The larger of NREL's two renewable electricity generation systems features a 12 kilowatt biodiesel-powered back-up generator as well as a 1.8 kilowatt photovoltaic array that taps into energy from the sun to produce renewable electricity, which will power the fair. The smaller system includes a 384

77

Standby electricity consumption and saving potentials of Turkish households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The share of the residential sector currently accounts for about 25% of the national electricity consumption in Turkey. Due to increase in household income levels and decrease in the costs of appliances; significant increases in appliance ownerships and residential electricity consumption levels have been observed in recent years. Most domestic appliances continue consuming electricity when they are not performing their primary functions, i.e. at standby mode, which can constitute up 15% of the total household electricity consumption in some countries. Although the demand in Turkish residential electricity consumption is increasing, there are limited studies on the components of the residential electricity consumption and no studies specifically examining the extent and effects of standby electricity consumption using a surveying/measurement methodology. Thus, determining the share of standby electricity consumption in total home electricity use and the ways of reducing it are important issues in residential energy conservation strategies. In this study, surveys and standby power measurements are conducted at 260 households in Ankara, Turkey, to determine the amount, share, and saving potentials of the standby electricity consumption of Turkish homes. The survey is designed to gather information on the appliance properties, lights, electricity consumption behavior, economic and demographics of the occupants, and electricity bills. A total of 1746 appliances with standby power are measured in the surveyed homes. Using the survey and standby power measurements data, the standby, active, and lighting end-use electricity consumptions of the surveyed homes are determined. The average Turkish household standby power and standby electricity consumption are estimated as 22 W and 95 kW h/yr, respectively. It was also found that the standby electricity consumption constitutes 4% of the total electricity consumption in Turkish homes. Two scenarios are then applied to the surveyed homes to determine the potentials in reducing standby electricity consumption of the households.

Mustafa Cagri Sahin; Merih Aydinalp Koksal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kauai...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

7% renewable energy installed in their system. Their strategic plan calls for 50% of electricity from renewable energy by 2023. KIUC is well on their way to achieving this goal...

79

The effectiveness of the policies on renewable electricity in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After the legislation of the Renewable Energy Law, China's government established a series of policies to promote renewable energy source electricity (RES-e) from 2005-2012. The effectiveness of the policies varies depending ...

Xiao, Qing S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Household activities through various lenses: crossing surveys, diaries and electric consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparison between electricity consumption and behavioralU.S. residential electricity consumption” Energy Policy, 42(of the residential electricity consumption. ” Energy Policy,

Durand-Daubin, Mathieu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Impacts of Electric Vehicles on Primary Energy Consumption and Petroleum Displacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Btu, EC is the electricity consumption of EVs in Kwh perreductions EV in electricity consumption contributedsensitive to EV electricity consumption, which,in turn,is

Wang, Quanlu; Delucchi, Mark A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Procurement Options for New Renewable Electricity Supply | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Procurement Options for New Renewable Electricity Supply Procurement Options for New Renewable Electricity Supply Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Procurement Options for New Renewable Electricity Supply Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Finance, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Lessons learned/best practices, Technical report Website: nrelpubs.nrel.gov/Webtop/ws/nich/www/public/Record?rpp=25&upp=0&m=1&w= Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): feed-in tariffs, renewable portfolio standards, FITs, FIT, RPS, renewable energy, procurement UN Region: Northern America Language: English Tool Overview "State renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies require utilities and

83

Renewable and non-renewable energy consumption and economic growth relationship revisited: Evidence from G7 countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to investigate the long-run and causal relationships between renewable and non-renewable energy consumption and economic growth by using classical and augmented production functions, and making a comparison between renewable and non-renewable energy sources in order to determine which type of energy consumption is more important for economic growth in G7 countries for 1980–2009 period. Autoregressive Distributed Lag approach to cointegration was employed for this purpose. Also, causality among energy consumption and economic growth was investigated by employing a recently developed causality test by Hatemi-J (2012). The long-run estimates showed that either renewable or non-renewable energy consumption matters for economic growth and augmented production function is more effective on explaining the considered relationship. On the other hand, although bidirectional causality is found for all countries in case of classical production function, mixed results are found for each country when the production function is augmented.

Can Tansel Tugcu; Ilhan Ozturk; Alper Aslan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Prediction of Electric Load using Kohonen Maps -Application to the Polish Electricity Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of Electric Load using Kohonen Maps - Application to the Polish Electricity Consumption on Kohonen maps is proposed. This method is applied to the prediction of the Polish electricity consumption of the electric load is specific. For each day, we have 24 values (or more) of the electricity consumption

Verleysen, Michel

85

Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

schemes in the European electricity market. Scheer H. , ThePromoting electricity from renewable energy sources –2001 on the promotion of electricity produced from renewable

Haas, Reinhard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Analysis of Two Proposed Renewable Electricity Standards  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Impacts of a 25-Percent Renewable Electricity Standard as Proposed in the American Clean Energy and Security Act Discussion Draft April 2009 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by

87

Use renewables to be cleaner: Meta-analysis of the renewable energy consumption–economic growth nexus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The renewable energy consumption–economic growth nexus is a growing area of research over the last few years, emanating to mixed results. The aim of the current study is to quantitatively synthesise the empirical literature on the subject using the meta-analysis approach. In particular, a meta-multinomial regression is employed to investigate the sources of variation in the direction of causality between renewable energy consumption and economic growth. This causal relationship takes the form of four hypotheses, namely the feedback, conservation, growth and neutrality hypotheses. To the best of author?s knowledge, this study constitutes the first meta-analysis undertaken on the renewable energy consumption–economic growth nexus. The empirical results reveal that the variation in the supported hypotheses is due to a number of characteristics including model specification, data characteristics, estimation techniques (cointegration methods and causality tests), and development level of the country on which a study was conducted.

Maamar Sebri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Focus Area: Water power Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-renewable-energy-electricity-generatio Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-electricity-generati Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This video teaches the viewer about the current status and future

89

Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings Kill­09 and is expected to spend more than $17.1 million in 2009­10. In an effort to reduce electricity consumption; 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY UC Berkeley spent $16.39 million on purchased electricity in 2008

Doudna, Jennifer A.

90

Contracting Issues with Renewable Electricity | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contracting Issues with Renewable Electricity Contracting Issues with Renewable Electricity Contracting Issues with Renewable Electricity October 16, 2013 - 5:08pm Addthis For many Federal agencies integrating renewable energy into a construction project, the technical and contracting issues associated with generating power at the facility are new. This page summarizes the various contracting issues that result from having on-site power generation that is actively interconnected with the power grid instead of using only a back-up generator. Many of these agreements depend on the ownership structure of the renewable energy system. Common agreements associated with a renewable electricity-generation facility include: An interconnection agreement covers the safe connection of the system to the power grid, including provisions for safe design, connection,

91

Long Island Power Authority - Renewable Electricity Goal | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Electricity Goal Renewable Electricity Goal Long Island Power Authority - Renewable Electricity Goal < Back Eligibility Municipal Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Long Island Power Authority As a municipal utility, the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) is not obligated to comply with the [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=N... New York Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS)]. The LIPA Board of Trustees has nevertheless decided to make their own renewable energy commitment mirroring the requirements for New York's investor owned utilities. The initiative is outlined in LIPA's 2004-2013 Energy Plan, approved in June

92

Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Owner: The NEED Project Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency ENERGY EDUCATION AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT This educational...

93

On Minimizing the Energy Consumption of an Electrical Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apr 20, 2011 ... The problem that we focus on, is the minimization of the energy consumption of an electrical vehicle achievable on a given driving cycle.

Abdelkader Merakeb

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

94

Electricity consumption and economic growth empirical evidence from Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present article uses the Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) bounds testing procedure to identify the long run equilibrium relationship between electricity consumption and economic growth. Toda Yamamoto and...

Muhammad Shahbaz; Mete Feridun

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

96

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as buffer for local renewables? Michael Stadler, Gonçaloas buffer for local renewables? *) Michael Stadler Gonçaloowners to integrate renewables and electric vehicles?

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Mongolia Renewable Energy and Rural Electricity Access Project | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mongolia Renewable Energy and Rural Electricity Access Project Mongolia Renewable Energy and Rural Electricity Access Project Jump to: navigation, search Name of project Mongolia Renewable Energy and Rural Electricity Access Project Location of project Mongolia Energy Services Lighting, Cooking and water heating, Space heating, Cooling, Earning a living Year initiated 2006 Organization World Bank Website http://documents.worldbank.org Coordinates 46.862496°, 103.846656° References The World Bank[1] The objective of the Renewable Energy and Rural Electricity Access Project is to increase access to electricity and improve reliability of electricity service among the herder population and in off-grid soum centers by: (i) assisting the development of institutions and delivery mechanisms; (ii) facilitating herders' investments in Solar Home Systems (SHSs) and small

98

Policies for Renewable Electricity Use | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Policies for Renewable Electricity Use Policies for Renewable Electricity Use Policies for Renewable Electricity Use October 16, 2013 - 5:12pm Addthis The renewable energy screening should include an assessment of several key utility policies at the facility site. In addition to financial incentives, states and local governments have adopted policies to remove barriers to the use of renewable energy and to facilitate the use of these technologies in a safe and fair manner. These policies are focused on electric-generating technologies and enabling the economic use of on-site power generation at a customer's site. The screening needs to outline the key provisions at the facility site and assess the impact on the use of these technologies at the site under review. Key policies include: Interconnection

99

Scaling-up Renewable Electricity in BC: Tackling the Institutional and Political Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scaling-up Renewable Electricity in BC: Tackling the Institutional and Political Challenges Dr.................................................................................................................................... 4 2. Renewable Electricity and Hydropower in BC................................................................................................... 6 3. Institutions and Processes for Renewable Electricity Development

Pedersen, Tom

100

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Dataset Summary Description Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh, and total electricity generation by sector (e.g. wind, solar, nuclear, coal) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh. Source NREL Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Consumption Electricity Generation States Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon 2008 State Electricity Generation and Consumption (format: xls) (xlsx, 56.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona) - Renewable Energy Purchase Rate |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona) - Renewable Energy Purchase Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona) - Renewable Energy Purchase Rate Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona) - Renewable Energy Purchase Rate < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Maximum Rebate Payment limited to 25% of customers monthly kWh usage Program Info State Iowa Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount $0.20/kWh Provider Farmers Electric Cooperative Farmers Electric Cooperative offers a production incentive to members that install qualifying wind and solar electricity generating systems. Qualifying grid-tied solar and wind energy systems are eligible for a $0.20 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) production incentive for up to 10 years for energy production that offsets up to 25% of monthly energy usage.

102

Presentation to EAC: Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status, October 29, 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation to the Electricity Advisory Committee, October 29, 2010, on Renewable Electricity Futures Activities & Status. The presentation provides a high-level overview of the Renewable...

103

Cumberland Valley Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficiency and Renewable  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cumberland Valley Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficiency and Cumberland Valley Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Cumberland Valley Electric Cooperative - Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Insulation: $400 Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Source Heat Pump: $100 Insulation: $20 for every 1000 BTU offset Geothermal Heat Pump: $100 Provider Cumberland Valley Electric Cumberland Valley Electric offers a number of programs to promote energy conservation. This program offers rebates for air source heat pumps,

104

The Outlook for Renewable Electricity in the United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. annual electricity generation capacity additions gigawatts Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2014 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Other renewables Solar...

105

La Plata Electric Association - Renewable Generation Rebate Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

La Plata Electric Association - Renewable Generation Rebate Program La Plata Electric Association - Renewable Generation Rebate Program La Plata Electric Association - Renewable Generation Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Water Wind Maximum Rebate PV 10 kW or smaller: $4,000 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount PV 10 kW-DC or smaller: Upfront incentive of $0.40 per watt DC PV greater than 10 kW-DC: Performance-based incentive of $44.91/MWh ($0.04491/kWh) paid every 6 months for 10 years Provider La Plata Electric Association La Plata Electric Association (LPEA) offers a one-time rebate, not to exceed the cost of the system, to residential and small commercial customers who install a photovoltaic (PV), wind or hydropower facility. To

106

Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Renewable Electricity Sources: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine the potential for hydrogen production via renewable electricity sources, three aspects of the system are analyzed: a renewable hydrogen resource assessment, a cost analysis of hydrogen production via electrolysis, and the annual energy requirements of producing hydrogen for refueling. The results indicate that ample resources exist to produce transportation fuel from wind and solar power. However, hydrogen prices are highly dependent on electricity prices.

Levene, J. I.; Mann, M. K.; Margolis, R.; Milbrandt, A.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission Planning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bulk Electric Power Systems: Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission Planning Volume 4 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U.S. Department of Energy DeMeo, E. Renewable Energy Consulting Services, Inc. Reilly, J.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mai, T. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Arent, D. Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis Porro, G. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Meshek, M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sandor, D. National Renewable

108

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption Aaron Garrett, PhD Joshua load and electrical data from a highly-instrumented and automated ZEBRAlliance research home consume 40% of the US primary energy (73% of the electrical energy). By 2030, it is estimated that 60

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

109

Grid-Based Renewable Electricity and Hydrogen Integration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renewable Electricity Renewable Electricity and Hydrogen Integration Carolyn Elam Senior Project Leader - Hydrogen Production Electric & Hydrogen Technologies & Systems Center National Renewable Energy Laboratory Goals for Electrolysis in Hydrogen Fuel Supply * Goal is to supply hydrogen fuel for 20% of the light- duty vehicle fleet - 12 million short tons of hydrogen annually - 450 TWh per year * Must be competitive - With gasoline, assuming FCV will have twice the efficiency of an ICE - With other hydrogen production methods * Net zero impact or reduction in GHG emissions - Compared to Gasoline ICE - 31% reduction in carbon emissions from the current electricity mix - Compared to Natural Gas-Derived Hydrogen - 65% reduction in carbon emissions from the current electricity mix Goals for Electrolysis (cont.)

110

Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, have vast potential to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions in the electric sector. Climate change concerns, state initiatives including renewable portfolio standards, and consumer efforts are resulting in increased deployments of both technologies. Both solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind energy have variable and uncertain (sometimes referred to as intermittent) output, which are unlike the dispatchable sources used for the majority of electricity generation in the United States. The variability of these sources has led to concerns regarding the reliability of an electric grid that derives a large fraction of its energy from these sources as well as the cost of reliably integrating large amounts of variable generation into the electric grid. In this report, we explore the role of energy storage in the electricity grid, focusing on the effects of large-scale deployment of variable renewable sources (primarily wind and solar energy).

Denholm, P.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

A regression approach to infer electricity consumption of legacy telecom equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A regression approach to infer electricity consumption of legacy telecom equipment [Extended and communications technology accounts for a significant fraction of worldwide electricity consumption. Given inferring the electricity consumption of different components of the installed base of telecommu- nications

Fisher, Kathleen

112

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission Planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hein, J.; Schneider, T.; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, P.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 3: End-Use Electricity Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Hostick, D.; Belzer, D.B.; Hadley, S.W.; Markel, T.; Marnay, C.; Kintner-Meyer, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Section 406 Renewable Energy and Electric Transmission Loan Guarantee Program under ARRA  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A temporary program for rapid deployment of renewable energy and electric power transmission projects.

115

The nexus between electricity consumption and economic growth in Bahrain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper explores the relationship between electricity consumption, foreign direct investment, capital and economic growth in the case of the Kingdom of Bahrain. The Cobb–Douglas production is used over the period of 1980Q1–2010Q4. We have applied the ARDL bounds testing approach and found that cointegration exists among the series. Electricity consumption, foreign direct investment and capital add in economic growth. The VECM Granger causality analysis has exposed the feedback effect between electricity consumption and economic growth and the same is true for foreign direct investment and electricity consumption. This study suggests government authorities to explore new sources of energy to achieve sustainable economic development for the long run.

Helmi Hamdi; Rashid Sbia; Muhammad Shahbaz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Robust electricity consumption modeling of Turkey using Singular Value Decomposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Multivariable regression method is used to model Turkey’s electricity consumption through a nonlinear relationship. Electricity consumption is modeled as a function of four demographic and economic indicators such as, population, gross domestic product per capita, imports and exports. The second order model includes 15 coefficients for bias, first degree terms and second degree terms. Data preprocessing is applied to transform all variables to have zero mean and percent relative variance. Singular Value Decomposition is applied to reduce the dimensionality of the problem and to provide robustness to the estimations. Variance and covariance information in the data set is used to determine the number of important dimensions in the data. Electricity consumption of Turkey is modeled using annual data from 1970 to 2011. The results show that electricity consumption can be robustly modeled using Singular Value Decomposition.

Kadir Kavaklioglu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Power Systems Engineering Research Center Renewable Electricity Futures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

levels of renewable electricity, including variable wind and solar generation. The study also identifies Laboratory. His particular interest is in capacity expansion and dispatch modeling of the electric- ity earned his PhD in theoretical physics from the University of California Santa Cruz. Speaker Contact

Van Veen, Barry D.

118

Renewable Electricity Production Tax Credit (PTC) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Renewable Electricity Production Tax Credit (PTC) Renewable Electricity Production Tax Credit (PTC) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Program Info Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount 2.3¢/kWh for wind, geothermal, closed-loop biomass; 1.1¢/kWh for other eligible technologies. Generally applies to first 10 years of operation. Provider U.S. Internal Revenue Service '''''Note: The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 allows taxpayers eligible for the federal renewable electricity production tax credit (PTC) to take the federal business energy investment tax credit (ITC) instead of taking the PTC for new installations.'''''

119

Trends in worldwide ICT electricity consumption from 2007 to 2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Information and Communication Technology (ICT) devices and services are becoming more and more widespread in all aspects of human life. Following an increased worldwide focus on the environmental impacts of energy consumption in general, there is also a growing attention to the electricity consumption associated with ICT equipment. In this paper we assess how ICT electricity consumption in the use phase has evolved from 2007 to 2012 based on three main ICT categories: communication networks, personal computers, and data centers. We provide a detailed description of how we calculate the electricity use and evolution in these three categories. Our estimates show that the yearly growth of all three individual ICT categories (10%, 5%, and 4%, respectively) is higher than the growth of worldwide electricity consumption in the same time frame (3%). The relative share of this subset of ICT products and services in the total worldwide electricity consumption has increased from about 3.9% in 2007 to 4.6% in 2012. We find that the absolute electricity consumption of each of the three categories is still roughly equal. This highlights the need for energy-efficiency research across all these domains, rather than focusing on a single one.

Ward Van Heddeghem; Sofie Lambert; Bart Lannoo; Didier Colle; Mario Pickavet; Piet Demeester

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Sustainable Aspects of Electricity Consumption in Klang Valley  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recently, energy crisis is considered a global issue and the demand for an urgent solution seems inevitable. Residential buildings consume nearly one third of Total National Energy Consumption. Studies show that a significant part of energy use can be avoided through occupants’ awareness about energy consumption. In order to discover and understand energy use of Malaysian residents, this paper has identified the residential electricity use behavior and its determinants by an empirical study. The results showed that out of the six introduced \\{IVs\\} of the regression model to predict the electricity consumption behavior only three predictors can significantly contribute to the model.

Nehzat Jalalkamali; Mohamed Yusoff Abbas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

77 77 May 2009 Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards Patrick Sullivan, Jeffrey Logan, Lori Bird, and Walter Short National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-45877 May 2009 Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards Patrick Sullivan, Jeffrey Logan, Lori Bird, and Walter Short Prepared under Task No. SAO7.9C50 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

122

The Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

87 87 January 2010 The Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation Paul Denholm, Erik Ela, Brendan Kirby, and Michael Milligan National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-47187 January 2010 The Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation Paul Denholm, Erik Ela, Brendan Kirby, and Michael Milligan Prepared under Task No. WER8.5005 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

123

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

47 47 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281847 Varnish cache server Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB)

124

Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Powered by Renewable Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently received a Borrego fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) on loan from Kia for display at a variety of summer events. The Borrego is fueled using renewable hydrogen that is produced and dispensed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado. The hydrogen dispensed at the station is produced via renewable electrolysis as part of the wind-to-hydrogen project, which uses wind turbines and photovoltaic arrays to power electrolyzer stacks that split water into hydrogen and oxygen. The FCEV features state-of-the-art technology with zero harmful emissions.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Quantitative modelling of electricity consumption using computational intelligence aided design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High electricity consumption is of concern to the world for a variety of reasons, including its social-economic-environmental coupled impacts on well-being of individuals, social life and the federal energy policies. This paper proposes a quantitative model to examine the long-term relationship between annual electricity consumption and its major macroeconomic variables, including gross domestic product, electricity price, efficiency, economic structure, and carbon dioxide emission, using computational intelligence aided design (CIAD). It develops a firefly algorithm with variable population (FAVP) to obtain the parameters of the electricity consumption model through optimising two proposed trend indices: moving mean of the average precision (mmAP) and moving mean of standard derivation (mmSTD). The model is validated with empirical electricity consumption data in China between 1980 and 2012, based on which the error of approximations between 1980 and 2009 is ±15% and the error of predictions between 2010 and 2012 is [?8%, ?5%]. The main contributions of this research are to develop: (1) a novel quantitative model that can accurately predict the social, economic and environmental coupled impacts on the annual electricity demands; (2) the conceptual CIAD framework; (3) FAVP algorithm; and (4) two new trend indices of mmAP and mmSTD. The findings of this research can assist the decision makers in resolving the conflict between energy consumption growth and carbon emission reduction without dooming the economic prosperity in the long run.

Yi Chen; Guangfeng Zhang; Tongdan Jin; Shaomin Wu; Bei Peng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

Electric vehicles and the electric grid: A review of modeling approaches, Impacts, and renewable energy integration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electric vehicles (EVs) and renewable energy sources offer the potential to substantially decrease carbon emissions from both the transportation and power generation sectors of the economy. Mass adoption of \\{EVs\\} will have a number of impacts and benefits, including the ability to assist in the integration of renewable energy into existing electric grids. This paper reviews the current literature on EVs, the electric grid, and renewable energy integration. Key methods and assumptions of the literature are discussed. The economic, environmental and grid impacts of \\{EVs\\} are reviewed. Numerous studies assessing the ability of \\{EVs\\} to integrate renewable energy sources are assessed; the literature indicates that \\{EVs\\} can significantly reduce the amount of excess renewable energy produced in an electric system. Studies on wind–EV interaction are much more detailed than those on solar photovoltaics (PV) and EVs. The paper concludes with recommendations for future research.

David B. Richardson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

State Policies Provide Critical Support for Renewable Electricity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growth in renewable energy in the U.S. over the past decade has been propelled by a number of forces, including rising fossil fuel prices, environmental concerns, and policy support at the state and federal levels. In this article, we review and discuss what are arguably the two most important types of state policies for supporting electricity generation from geothermal and other forms of renewable energy: renewables portfolio standards and utility integrated resource planning requirements. Within the Western U.S., where the vast majority of the nation's readily-accessible geothermal resource potential resides, these two types of state policies have been critical to the growth of renewable energy, and both promise to continue to play a fundamental role for the foreseeable future. In its essence, a renewables portfolio standard (RPS) requires utilities and other retail electricity suppliers to produce or purchase a minimum quantity or percentage of their generation supply from renewable resources. RPS purchase obligations generally increase over time, and retail suppliers typically must demonstrate compliance on an annual basis. Mandatory RPS policies are backed by various types of compliance enforcement mechanisms, although most states have incorporated some type of cost-containment provision, such as a cost cap or a cap on retail rate impacts, which could conceivably allow utilities to avoid (full) compliance with their RPS target. Currently, 27 states and the District of Columbia have mandatory RPS requirements. Within the eleven states of the contiguous Western U.S., all but three (Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming) now have a mandatory RPS legislation (Utah has a more-voluntary renewable energy goal), covering almost 80% of retail electricity sales in the region. Although many of these state policies have only recently been established, their impact is already evident: almost 1800 MW of new renewable capacity has been installed in Western states following the implementation of RPS policies. To date, wind energy has been the primary beneficiary of state RPS policies, representing approximately 83% of RPS-driven renewable capacity growth in the West through 2007. Geothermal energy occupies a distant second place, providing 7% of RPS-driven new renewable capacity in the West since the late 1990s, though geothermal's contribution on an energy (MWh) basis is higher. Looking to the future, a sizable quantity of renewable capacity beyond pre-RPS levels will be needed to meet state RPS mandates: about 25,000 MW by 2025 within the Western U.S. Geothermal energy is beginning to provide an increasingly significant contribution, as evidenced by the spate of new projects recently announced to meet state RPS requirements. Most of this activity has been driven by the RPS policies in California and Nevada, where the Geothermal Energy Association has identified 47 new geothermal projects, totaling more than 2,100 MW, in various stages of development. Additional geothermal projects in Arizona, New Mexico, Oregon, and Washington are also under development to meet those states RPS requirements. The other major state policy driver for renewable electricity growth, particularly in the West, is integrated resource planning (IRP). IRP was first formalized as a practice in the 1980s, but the practice was suspended in some states as electricity restructuring efforts began. A renewed interest in IRP has emerged in the past several years, however, with several Western states (California, Montana, and New Mexico) reestablishing IRP and others developing new rules to strengthen their existing processes. In its barest form, IRP simply requires that utilities periodically submit long-term resource procurement plans in which they evaluate alternative strategies for meeting their resource needs over the following ten to twenty years. However, many states have developed specific requirements for the IRP process that directly or indirectly support renewable energy. The most general of these is an explicit requirement that utilities evaluate renewables, and that

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Electricity Consumption of Pumps in Heat Exchanging Stations of DH Systems in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study analyzed the current electricity consumption of heating exchanging stations in China. By...

Lei Dong; JianJun Xia; Yi Jiang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4047 4047 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142254047 Varnish cache server Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The water factors presented may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available.

131

Renewable energy sources in the Mexican electricity sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the role of renewable energy sources (RES) in the Mexican electricity sector in the context of the proposed renewable energy bill currently under consideration in the Mexican Congress. This paper was divided into three parts. The first part presents a chronology of institutional background related to the RES. This is followed by an analysis of the coordination and management system of the Mexican electricity sector, which can facilitate the promotion and integration of the RES without significant structural changes. Finally, the pros and cons of the renewable energy bill are analyzed in order to demonstrate the need for greater coherence between the bill and the coordination system of the sector. It is concluded that when inconsistency is eliminated, RES would strongly be promoted in Mexico.

B.J. Ruiz; V. Rodríguez-Padilla; J.H. Martínez

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Energy for Keeps: Electricity and Renewable Energy Teacher Information  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

Find multi-disciplinary student activities on topics including earth science, environmental science, physical science, social studies, math, and language arts. Activities provided include The Energy Times, Going for a Spin: Making a Model, Steam Turbine and Getting Current: Generating Electricity Using a Magnet, Watt's My Line?, Grime Scene Investigation, Renewable Energy Action Project: What's in Your Energy Portfolio?

133

The effect of tree shade on home summer electrical consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the months and years of the study. 44 Average daily mean temperatures and associated mean total and basal energy consumptions for the months and years of the study period. 46 Average April through October electrical usage per square foot of home area... the months and years of the study. 44 Average daily mean temperatures and associated mean total and basal energy consumptions for the months and years of the study period. 46 Average April through October electrical usage per square foot of home area...

Rudie, Raymond Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

State Policies Provide Critical Support for Renewable Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

against other renewable resource options. Acknowledgementsgeneration supply from renewable resources. RPS purchaseprocuring new renewable resources prior to enactment of

Barbose, Galen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas 'Super-Utility' Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas "Super-Utility" Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/lbnl-2924e.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/financial-impact-energy-efficiency-un Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: "Utility/Electricity Service Costs,Mandates/Targets" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

136

Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas "super-utility"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

state-based renewable energy policies have significantlyin renewable electricity and energy-efficiency policy.s renewable energy sources and energy efficiency policy

Cappers, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

El Paso Electric Company - Small and Medium System Renewable Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

El Paso Electric Company - Small and Medium System Renewable Energy El Paso Electric Company - Small and Medium System Renewable Energy Certificate Purchase Program El Paso Electric Company - Small and Medium System Renewable Energy Certificate Purchase Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Energy Sources Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 3/1/2009 State New Mexico Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount Systems 10 kW or less: PV: $0.04/kWh for RECs produced for a period of 8 years Wind: $0.03 /kWh for RECs produced for a period of 8 years Systems greater than 10 kW and up to 100 kW: PV: $0.04/kWh for RECs produced for a period of 8 years Wind: $0.02 /kWh for RECs produced for a period of 8 years Systems greater than 100 kW and up to 1,000 kW:

138

Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and Vacant Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) In Total Floor- space In Occupied Floor- space In Vacant Floor- space Per Square Foot Per Occupied Square Foot Per Vacant Square Foot All Buildings 4 5 5 9 4 4 4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 5 6 6 12 6 6 9 5,001 to 10,000 4 9 9 13 9 9 9 10,001 to 25,000 5 7 7 14 5 5 7 25,001 to 50,000 7 10 10 21 10 10 11 50,001 to 100,000 7 12 12 15 8 8 10 100,001 to 200,000 9 13 13 24 10 11 10 200,001 to 500,000 10 13 13 19 11 11 10 Over 500,000 26 18 18 34

139

Electricity consumption of telecommunication equipment to achieve a telemeeting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The article assesses the electricity consumption in use of telecommunication equipment to achieve one remote multi-user work meeting, an existing service proposed by Orange group. It also examines the electric gains of substitution for a meeting requiring physical transport. Equipment comprises participant computers PC and phones, access to core networks and servers to permit audio link and the share of documents on PC display between users. Each device requires power to perform hours of activity or transfer nominal bit/s of throughput. A generic and modular method is suggested to determine from this information, which is not directly related to services processed by the devices, the consumption of the service under study. The method thus provides a quantitative relation of service consumption to its characteristics – duration, number of users and access throughput – but also to device consumption efficiency and utilization rate. The relation of dependance permits to assess potential energy saving by substituting devices for more efficiency ones and/or by increasing their utilization rate at same provided service. With some utilization rates at around 10%, as observed for the servers, a telemeeting between three users and lasting 2.3 h requires 9 MJ of electricity. Using better equipment and higher rates it can be decreased to 1.5 MJ. By comparison transport of two of the users by train over a total distance of 2500 km requires 500 MJ. The method can be applied to any service provided its characteristics are known.

X. Chavanne; S. Schinella; D. Marquet; J.P. Frangi; S. Le Masson

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The water factors presented may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available. Major findings of the report include: water withdrawal and consumption factors vary greatly across and within fuel technologies, and water factors show greater agreement when organized according to cooling technologies as opposed to fuel technologies; a transition to a less carbon-intensive electricity sector could result in either an increase or a decrease in water use, depending on the choice of technologies and cooling systems employed; concentrating solar power technologies and coal facilities with carbon capture and sequestration capabilities have the highest water consumption values when using a recirculating cooling system; and non-thermal renewables, such as photovoltaics and wind, have the lowest water consumption factors. Improved power plant data and further studies into the water requirements of energy technologies in different climatic regions would facilitate greater resolution in analyses of water impacts of future energy and economic scenarios. This report provides the foundation for conducting water use impact assessments of the power sector while also identifying gaps in data that could guide future research.

J Macknick; R Newmark; G Heath; K C Hallett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Managing Variable Energy Resources to Increase Renewable Electricity's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are There Challenges in Integrating Wind and Solar Power into the Power Grid? 10 What National and State PoliciesManaging Variable Energy Resources to Increase Renewable Electricity's Contribution to the Grid P oG MEllon founDatIon, thE u.s. DEpaRtMEnt of EnERGy's natIonal EnERGy tEChnoloGy laboRatoRy, thE El

142

Managing Variable Energy Resources to Increase Renewable Electricity's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are There Challenges in Integrating Wind and Solar Power into the Power Grid? 10 What National and State PoliciesManaging Variable Energy Resources to Increase Renewable Electricity's Contribution to the Grid P oG MEllon founD atIon, thE u.s. DEpaRtMEnt of EnERGy 's natIonal E nERGy t EChnolo Gy laboRatoRy, thE El

143

Distributed Generation and Renewable Energy in the Electric Cooperative Sector  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generation and Generation and Renewable Energy in the Electric Cooperative Sector Ed Torrero Cooperative Research Network (CRN) National Rural Electric Cooperative Association September 22, 2004 Co-op Basics  Customer owned  Serve 35 million people in 47 states  75 percent of nation's area  2.3 million miles of line is close to half of nation's total  Growth rate twice that of IOU Electrics  Six customers per line-mile vs 33 for IOU  Co-ops view DP as a needed solution; not as a "problem" Broad Range of Technologies Chugach EA 1-MW Fuel Cell Installation Post Office in Anchorage, AK Chugach EA Microturbine Demo Unit at Alaska Village Electric Co-op CRN Transportable 200kW Fuel Cell at Delta- Montrose EA in Durango, CO Plug Power Fuel Cell at Fort Jackson, SC

144

Model for electric energy consumption in eastern Saudi Arabia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrical energy consumption in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia is modeled as a function of weather data, global solar radiation, population, and gross domestic product per capita. Five years of data have been used to develop the energy consumption model. Variable selection in the regression model is carried out by using the general stepping-regression technique. Model adequacy is determined from a residual analysis technique. Model validation aims to determine if the model will function successfully in its intended operating field. In this regard, new energy consumption data for a sixth year are collected, and the results predicted by the regression model are compared with the new data set. Finally, the sensitivity of the model is examined. It is found that the model is strongly influenced by the ambient temperature.

Al-Garni, A.Z.; Al-Nassar, Y.N.; Zubair, S.M.; Al-Shehri, A. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

An integrated fuzzy regression algorithm for improved electricity consumption estimation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents an integrated fuzzy regression and time-series technique to estimate and predict electricity demand. Furthermore, it is difficult to model uncertain behaviour of energy consumption with only conventional time-series and fuzzy regression, which could be an ideal substitute for such cases. After reviewing various fuzzy regression models and studying their advantages and shortcomings, the best model is selected. Also, the impact of data preprocessing and post-processing on the fuzzy regression performance is to study and to show that this method does not contribute to the efficiency of the model. In addition, another unique feature of this study is utilisation of autocorrelation function to define input variables versus trial and error method. At last, the comparison of actual data with fuzzy regression and ARIMA model, using Grangerâ??Newbold test, is achieved. Monthly electricity consumption of Iran from 1995 to 2005 is considered as the case of this study.

Ali Azadeh; Morteza Saberi; Anahita Gitiforouz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The electricity consumption impacts of commercial energy management systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation of energy management systems (EMS) in large commercial and institutional buildings in North Carolina was undertaken to determine how EMS currently affect electricity consumption and what their potential is for being used to reduce on-peak electricity demand. A survey was mailed to 5000 commercial customers; the 430 responses were tabulated and analyzed; EMS vendors were interviewed, and 30 sites were investigated in detail. The detailed assessments included a site interview and reconstruction of historic billing data to evaluate EMS impact, if any. The results indicate that well-tuned EMS can result in a 10 to 40 percent reduction in billed demand, and smaller reductions in energy.

Buchanan, S.; Taylor, R.; Paulos, S.; Warren, W.; Hay, J.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Modelling renewable electric resources: A case study of wind  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The central issue facing renewables in the integrated resource planning process is the appropriate assessment of the value of renewables to utility systems. This includes their impact on both energy and capacity costs (avoided costs), and on emissions and environmental impacts, taking account of the reliability, system characteristics, interactions (in dispatch), seasonality, and other characteristics and costs of the technologies. These are system-specific considerations whose relationships may have some generic implications. In this report, we focus on the reliability contribution of wind electric generating systems, measured as the amount of fossil capacity they can displace while meeting the system reliability criterion. We examine this issue for a case study system at different wind characteristics and penetration, for different years, with different system characteristics, and with different modelling techniques. In an accompanying analysis we also examine the economics of wind electric generation, as well as its emissions and social costs, for the case study system. This report was undertaken for the {open_quotes}Innovative IRP{close_quotes} program of the U.S. Department of Energy, and is based on work by both Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) and Tellus Institute, including America`s Energy Choices and the UCS Midwest Renewables Project.

Bernow, S.; Biewald, B.; Hall, J.; Singh, D. [Tellus Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A new adaptive fuzzy inference system for electricity consumption forecasting with hike in prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large increase or hike in energy prices has proven to impact electricity consumption in a way which cannot be drawn ... (FIS) to estimate and forecast long-term electricity consumption when prices experience larg...

S. M. Sajadi; S. M. Asadzadeh; V. Majazi Dalfard…

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout … Renewable Electricity Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 30, 2013 April 30, 2013 Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout - Renewable Electricity Generation 2 EERE's National Mission To create American leadership in the global transition to a clean energy economy 1) High-Impact Research, Development, and Demonstration to Make Clean Energy as Affordable and Convenient as Traditional Forms of Energy 2) Breaking Down Barriers to Market Entry 3 Why Clean Energy Matters To America * Winning the most important global economic development race of the 21 st century * Creating jobs through American innovation * Enhancing energy security by reducing our dependence on foreign oil and gas * Saving money by cutting energy costs for American families and businesses * Protecting health and safety by mitigating the impact

150

An Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Renewable Electricity Sources: Preprint  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Analysis of Hydrogen An Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Renewable Electricity Sources Preprint J.I. Levene, M.K. Mann, R. Margolis, and A. Milbrandt National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared for ISES 2005 Solar World Congress Orlando, Florida August 6-12, 2005 Conference Paper NREL/CP-560-37612 September 2005 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

151

Investment appraisal of technology innovations on dairy farm electricity consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to conduct an investment appraisal for milk-cooling, water-heating, and milk-harvesting technologies on a range of farm sizes in 2 different electricity-pricing environments. This was achieved by using a model for electricity consumption on dairy farms. The model simulated the effect of 6 technology investment scenarios on the electricity consumption and electricity costs of the 3 largest electricity-consuming systems within the dairy farm (i.e., milk-cooling, water-heating, and milking machine systems). The technology investment scenarios were direct expansion milk-cooling, ice bank milk-cooling, milk precooling, solar water-heating, and variable speed drive vacuum pump-milking systems. A dairy farm profitability calculator was combined with the electricity consumption model to assess the effect of each investment scenario on the total discounted net income over a 10-yr period subsequent to the investment taking place. Included in the calculation were the initial investments, which were depreciated to zero over the 10-yr period. The return on additional investment for 5 investment scenarios compared with a base scenario was computed as the investment appraisal metric. The results of this study showed that the highest return on investment figures were realized by using a direct expansion milk-cooling system with precooling of milk to 15°C with water before milk entry to the storage tank, heating water with an electrical water-heating system, and using standard vacuum pump control on the milking system. Return on investment figures did not exceed the suggested hurdle rate of 10% for any of the ice bank scenarios, making the ice bank system reliant on a grant aid framework to reduce the initial capital investment and improve the return on investment. The solar water-heating and variable speed drive vacuum pump scenarios failed to produce positive return on investment figures on any of the 3 farm sizes considered on either the day and night tariff or the flat tariff, even when the technology costs were reduced by 40% in a sensitivity analysis of technology costs.

J. Upton; M. Murphy; I.J.M. De Boer; P. W. G. Groot Koerkamp; P.B.M. Berensten; L. Shalloo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Easy Way to Use Renewables: Buy Clean Electricity | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Easy Way to Use Renewables: Buy Clean Electricity The Easy Way to Use Renewables: Buy Clean Electricity The Easy Way to Use Renewables: Buy Clean Electricity November 17, 2009 - 8:45pm Addthis John Lippert Clean air means a lot to me. My wife and I had a small solar electric system installed on the roof of our house that produces about 2% of the annual electricity consumed by our all-electric house. We don't have a large south-facing roof, so we couldn't easily install a larger system. But what about the remaining 98% electricity that we need to buy? About half a dozen years ago we signed up for 100% wind electricity after our state deregulated its electricity industry. We didn't have much of a choice to purchase "green" electricity. Only two utility companies offered electricity produced by renewable energy to residents of Maryland where I

153

Analysis of the Behavior of Electric Vehicle Charging Stations with Renewable Generations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engine vehicles refuel at gas stations, EVs might also be charged at other facilities which provideAnalysis of the Behavior of Electric Vehicle Charging Stations with Renewable Generations Woongsup between electric vehicle charging stations (EVCSs) with renewable electricity generation facilities (REGFs

Wong, Vincent

154

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Demand and Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Demand and Consumption Electricity Demand and Consumption Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). The sectors included are: agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial (mining, food processing, wood and paper, chemicals, basic metals, other minor sectors); commercial; and residential. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago)

155

Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

156

Comparing the Risk Profiles of Renewable and Natural Gas Electricity Contracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparing the Risk Profiles of Renewable and Natural Gas Electricity Contracts: A Summary.............................................................................20 B. Natural Gas Tolling Contracts.............................................................................24 B. Natural Gas Tolling Contracts

Kammen, Daniel M.

157

Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

158

Wind Energy and Production of Hydrogen and Electricity -- Opportunities for Renewable Hydrogen: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of options for wind/hydrogen/electricity systems at both central and distributed scales provides insight into opportunities for renewable hydrogen.

Levene, J.; Kroposki, B.; Sverdrup, G.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States Coal (thousand st/d) .................... 2,361 2,207 2,586 2,287 2,421 2,237 2,720 2,365 2,391 2,174 2,622 2,286 2,361 2,437 2,369 Natural Gas (million cf/d) ............. 20,952 21,902 28,751 21,535 20,291 22,193 28,174 20,227 20,829 22,857 29,506 21,248 23,302 22,736 23,627 Petroleum (thousand b/d) ........... 128 127 144 127 135 128 135 119 131 124 134 117 131 129 127 Residual Fuel Oil ...................... 38 28 36 29 30 31 33 29 31 30 34 27 33 31 30 Distillate Fuel Oil ....................... 26 24 27 28 35 30 30 26 31 26 28 25 26 30 28 Petroleum Coke (a) .................. 59 72 78 66 63 63 66 59 62 63 67 60 69 63 63 Other Petroleum Liquids (b) ..... 5 3 4 4 7 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 4 6 6 Northeast Census Region Coal (thousand st/d) ....................

160

Overview of the Electrical Energy Segment of the Energy Information Administration/ Manufacturing Consumption Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, liquefied petroleum gas, coke and breeze, coal, and electricity, only the electricity segment is overviewed. Along with pure electrical energy consumption information, newly available data covers methods that manufacturers used to purchase and modify...

Lockhead, S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Response of office building electricity consumption to urban weather in Adelaide, South Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Knowledge of climate dependency of building energy consumption is useful for predicting the impacts of climate change and urban heat island on energy demand and associated carbon emissions, and to evaluate and improve building energy performance. Climate dependent electricity consumption is examined in this study for four office buildings in Adelaide, the capital city of South Australia with a warm-summer Mediterranean climate. Influences of both outdoor temperature and specific humidity on building electricity consumption are analyzed using the multiple linear regression, based on both sub-daily and monthly electricity consumption data. The results indicate that there is a daytime mean temperature threshold of around 17 °C, above which, electricity consumption increases with air temperature. Specific humidity also contributes to interpreting the temporal variability of office hour electricity consumption. Daytime temperature and specific humidity together determine 80–90% of office hour electricity consumption variation for days with mean daytime temperature above the threshold temperature. Office building daily electricity consumption can be examined with monthly electricity consumption data of a period of three years. The results also suggest that heatwaves may increase office building electricity demand by up to 50%, and that one degree warming can increase annual office electricity consumption by 2% in Adelaide.

Huade Guan; Veronica Soebarto; John Bennett; Roger Clay; Robert Andrew; Yunhui Guo; Saeedeh Gharib; Kathryn Bellette

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Sustainability in the Electricity Production and Consumption System – A Consumers’ Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The production and consumption systems (PACS) of electricity provide broad insights into possible actions and ... the life cycle from production and supply to consumption. More importantly for the context of the ...

Doris Fuchs; Sylvia Lorek

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Cloud-Based Massive Electricity Data Mining and Consumption Pattern Discovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the development of the power systems in China, there is large volume of basic electricity consumption data accumulated. Mining these data to discover possible consumption patterns and group the users in a .....

Chen Ming; Cao Maoyong…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Prediction of electricity energy consumption of Turkey via artificial bee colony: a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to the worldwide growth of energy consumption, analysis of energy issues and the development ... become an important issue. In this study, electricity energy consumption of Turkey is predicted by artificial b...

Feyza Gürbüz; Celal Öztürk; Panos Pardalos

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Renewable Energy Annual  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents five chapters covering various aspects of the renewable energy marketplace, along with detailed data tables and graphics. Particular focus is given to renewable energy trends in consumption and electricity; manufacturing activities of solar thermal collectors, solar photovoltaic cells/modules, and geothermal heat pumps; and green pricing and net metering programs. The Department of Energy provides detailed offshore

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 32.3 KiB)

167

Risk implications of the deployment of renewables for investments in electricity generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the potential risk implications that a large penetration of intermittent renewable electricity generation -such as wind and solar power- may have on the future electricity generation technology mix, ...

Sisternes, Fernando J. de (Fernando José de Sisternes Jiménez)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Renewable Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Renewable Portfolio Standard Renewable Portfolio Standard < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Hawaii Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Hawaii Public Utilities Commission Under Hawaii's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), each electric utility company that sells electricity for consumption in Hawaii must establish the following percentages of "renewable electrical energy" sales: * 10% of its net electricity sales by December 31, 2010;

169

Renewables  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Grants NW Energy XP Event Calendar Lands & Community Public Comments Renewables: Wind Power Generation Wind power is the fastest-growing renewable power source in the Pacific...

170

Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System Mark, alternative energy system to convert the circular motion of ocean waves as they propagate through the sea and feasible alternative, renewable, electrical energy producing subsea system. Index Terms--ocean energy, wave

Wood, Stephen L.

171

Integrating High Levels of Renewables into the Lanai Electric Grid  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Discusses an assessment of the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy sources on the island of Lanai with a stated goal of reaching 100% renewable...

172

A Real-World, Simple Wireless Sensor Network for Monitoring Electrical Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a simple, commercial WSN for monitoring electrical energy consumption. We discuss WSN characteristics, practical problems, constraints and design decisions which mainly are motivated by our concrete...

Cornelia Kappler; Georg Riegel

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is working with a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy in Hawaii. 52076.pdf More Documents & Publications Kauai, Hawaii: Solar Resource Analysis and High-Penetration PV Potential Integrating Renewable Energy into the Transmission and Distribution System of the U.S. Virgin Islands Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative

174

The Application of ARIMA Modle in the Prediction of the Electricity Consumption of Jiangsu Province  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Forecasts of electricity can play a rational allocation of resources ... regional economic development. Based on the annual electricity consumption data of Jiangsu Province, the ARIMA model of Jiangsu Province’s

Wu Min; Cao Jia-he

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Relationship between electricity consumption and economic growth of Guangdong Province in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Guangdong is a province with the most electricity consumption (EC) and the fastest economic growth ... , there has long been a contradiction between electricity supply and demand in Guangdong and this...

Lianhong Lv; Hong Luo; Baoliu Zhang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Renewable Generation and Interconnection to the Electrical Grid in Southern California  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON® SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON® SM 1 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Providence, Rhode Island April 15, 2010 Renewable Generation and Interconnection to the Electrical Grid in Southern California Daniel Tunnicliff, P.E. Manager, Government & Institutions SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON® SM 2 Overview * SCE Overview * SCE Procurement Objectives * Renewable Procurement * Challenges to Meeting Renewable Goals in California * Interconnection Processes * Lessons Learned SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA EDISON® SM 3 SCE Overview * Large system  13 million residents  4.8 million customer accounts  50,000-square-mile service area * Nation's leader in environmental solutions  Energy efficiency  Renewable energy procurement  Electric transportation  Advanced meters  Smart grid

177

Beginning of Construction for Purposes of the Renewable Electricity Production Tax Credit and Energy Investment Tax Credit  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Beginning of Construction for Purposes of the Renewable Electricity Production Tax Credit and Energy Investment Tax Credit

178

Electricity consumption and human development level: A comparative analysis based on panel data for 50 countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As a representative of modern energy, the level of electricity consumption can be regarded as an appraisal criterion of a country’s development level. This study analyses the causality between electricity consumption and human development and assesses the changing trend of electricity consumption. The models in this study are established using panel data from 1990–2009 for 50 countries divided into four groups according to income. For human development indicators, per-capita GDP, consumption expenditure, urbanisation rate, life expectancy at birth and the adult literacy rate were selected. The results show that long-run bidirectional causality exists between electricity consumption and five indicators. Additionally, the higher the income of a country, the greater is its electricity consumption and the higher is its level of human development. Further, the variables of four income-groupings vary considerably. Specifically, as income increases, the contribution of electricity consumption to GDP and consumption expenditure increases, but the urbanisation rate, life expectancy at birth and adult literacy rate present a weakening trend. This mainly because that the latter indicators in high-income countries are increasing to converge. To improve human development, electricity should be incorporated into the basic public services construction to enhance the availability of electricity for low-income residents.

Shuwen Niu; Yanqin Jia; Wendie Wang; Renfei He; Lili Hu; Yan Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

renewable energy companies compete in a rapidly growing, highly competitive global market worth hundreds of billions of dollars per year7, a market projected to grow to 460...

180

Feed-in tariff promotion and innovative measures for renewable electricity: Taiwan case analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Taiwan, located in a subtropical area, is a high energy-importing nation with approximately 98% of our energy supplied by imported fuels since 2000. In this regard, renewable electricity systems from its richness of solar radiation and strong monsoon are thus becoming attractive due to the energy, economic, and environmental policies for pursuing clean electricity supply, sustainable development and greenhouse gases emission mitigation in Taiwan. The objective of this paper was to present an analysis of profitable promotion and innovative measures for renewable electricity in Taiwan because the photovoltaic (PV) power and wind power systems have rapidly increased the total installed capacity from 2.7 MW in 2000 to 1006.2 MW in 2013. The description in the paper was thus summarized on an analysis of renewable electricity supply since 2000 and its future goals up to 2030, and then centered on the new promotion legislation (i.e., Renewable Energy Development Act) in the measures of feed-in tariff (FIT) and tax/subsidy incentives. Current subsidiary and innovative programs to promote the development of renewable electricity technologies, including roof-type PV power, off-shore wind power and biogas-to-power, were also described. Due to its innovation promotion for renewable energy exploitation in recent years, Pingtung County, located in the southernmost of Taiwan, was introduced as a case study. Finally, some recommendations for promote renewable electricity development were addressed in the paper.

Wen-Tien Tsai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electric Vehicle Grid Integration for Sustainable Military Installations (Presentation), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicle Grid Integration for Electric Vehicle Grid Integration for Sustainable Military Installations NDIA Joint Service Power Expo Mike Simpson Mike.Simpson@NREL.gov 5 May 2011 NREL/PR-5400-51519 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Agenda 2 1. NREL Transportation Research 2. Net Zero Energy Installations (NZEI) 3. Fort Carson as a Case Study - Vehicles On-Site - Utility Operations - Vehicle Charge Management 4. Full Fleet Simulation 5. Continuing Work NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY NREL is the only national laboratory solely dedicated to advancing renewable energy and energy efficiency. Our employees are committed to building a cleaner, sustainable world. Photo Credits: NREL 3 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY What is Electric Vehicle Grid Integration (EVGI)? 4 Cross Cutting Enablers Grid / Renewables

182

Renewable Generation and Interconnection to the Electrical Grid in Southern California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the topic of "Renewable Generation and Interconnection to the Electrical Grid in Southern California," given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

183

CO2 emissions related to the electricity consumption in the european primary aluminium production a comparison of electricity supply approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to estimate the specific CO2 emissions related to the electricity consumption in the European primary aluminium production and ... compare different choices of system boundaries of ...

Matthias Koch; Jochen Harnisch

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Renewable Power Options for Electrical Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is working with a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy in Hawaii. This part of the HCEI project focuses on working with Kaua'i Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) to understand how to integrate higher levels of renewable energy into the electric power system of the island of Kaua'i. NREL partnered with KIUC to perform an economic and technical analysis and discussed how to model PV inverters in the electrical grid.

Burman, K.; Keller, J.; Kroposki, B.; Lilienthal, P.; Slaughter, R.; Glassmire, J.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

MEW Efforts in Reducing Electricity and Water Consumption in Government and Private Sectors in Kuwait  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Engineers, membership No. 1715. MEW EFFORTS IN REDUCING ELECTRICITY AND WATER CONSUMPTION IN GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATE SECTORS IN KUWAIT Eng. Iqbal Al-Tayar Manager ? Technical Supervision Department Planning and Training Sector Ministry... of Electricity & Water (MEW) - Kuwait Historical Background - Electricity ? In 1913, the first electric machine was installed in Kuwait to operate 400 lambs for Al-Saif Palace. ? In 1934, two electric generators were installed with a total capacity of 60 k...

Al-Tayar, I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

EC417 --Electric Energy, Adapting to Renewable Resources Brief History of Power Systems (the great AC-DC battle)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EC417 -- Electric Energy, Adapting to Renewable Resources Fall 2014 Topics: · Brief History on renewables (solar, wind, fuel cells, biomass) · Analysis methods for 3-phase systems · Real and Reactive to the introduction of renewables (Photovoltaics, wind, etc.) · Development of the "Smart Grid" · Electric Vehicles

188

Electricity Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use Sector and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use Sector and Net Generation From Renewable Energy by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual net electricity generation (thousand kilowatt-hours) from renewable energy in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial, electric power) and by energy source (e.g. biomas, solar thermal/pv). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2004 2008 Electricity net generation renewable energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.net_.generation_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 16.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2004 - 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset

189

NREL Helps Cool the Power Electronics in Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Helps Cool the Power Helps Cool the Power Electronics in Electric Vehicles Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are developing and demonstrating innovative heat-transfer technologies for cooling power electronics devices in hybrid and electric vehicles. In collaboration with 3M and Wolverine Tube, Inc., NREL is using surface enhancements to dissipate heat more effectively, permitting a reduction in the size of power electronic systems and potentially reducing the overall costs of electric vehicles. Widespread use of advanced electric-drive vehicles-including electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs)-could revolutionize transportation and dramatically reduce U.S. oil consumption. Improving the cost and performance of these vehicles' electric-drive systems

190

Stand-by Electricity Consumption in Japanese Houses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years as Japanese household electrical appliances have become more multi-functional and high performance, the number of appliances that consume a little electricity even when turned off has grown. There...

Hidetoshi Nakagami; Akio Tanaka…

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Consumption of Electric and Electronic Equipment by Norwegian Households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Consumption of Electric and Electronic Equipment by Norwegian Households ... Conventional wisdom holds that large appliances, in particular washers, dryers, refrigerators and freezers, dominate residential energy consumption apart from heat, hot water and light. ... (16) It excludes lighting, all professional equipment, space heating, hot water, garden or car equipment, fire alarms, and air conditioning. ...

Edgar G. Hertwich; Charlotte Roux

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Consumption of Carbon in the Electric Arc. No. III. The Anode Loss  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 February 1916 research-article The Consumption of Carbon in the Electric Arc. No. III. The Anode Loss W. G. Duffield Mary D. Waller The Royal Society is collaborating with...

1916-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Household electricity consumption and CO2 emissions in the Netherlands: A model-based analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Twenty percent of the total energy consumption in the Netherlands comes from household electricity consumption. This comes from household electric appliances whose number has grown in recent years. The paper explores the effect of smart meter introduction, appliance efficiency and consumer behaviour on reducing electricity consumption in the Netherlands. It does so by combining two perspectives: a sociotechnical approach and a bottom up simulation approach. The range of scenarios explored through simulation in the paper provides an understanding of the interplay between efficiency, smart meter diffusion and consumer behaviour. The results show their effect on electricity consumption and suggest that further effort is required to control and reduce it. Insights from the paper suggest that future studies should disaggregate with respect to a number of factors.

George Papachristos

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Persuading Consumers to Reduce Their Consumption of Electricity in the Home  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous work has identified that providing real time feedback or interventions to consumers can persuade consumers to change behaviour and reduce domestic electricity consumption. However, little work has invest...

Alan F. Smeaton; Aiden R. Doherty

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid System Economic Basis for Electricity, Fuel, and Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about climate change and altering the ocean chemistry are likely to limit the use of fossil fuels. That implies a transition to a low-carbon nuclear-renewable electricity grid. Historically variable electricity demand was met using fossil plants with low capital costs, high operating costs, and substantial greenhouse gas emissions. However, the most easily scalable very-low-emissions generating options, nuclear and non-dispatchable renewables (solar and wind), are capital-intensive technologies with low operating costs that should operate at full capacities to minimize costs. No combination of fully-utilized nuclear and renewables can meet the variable electricity demand. This implies large quantities of expensive excess generating capacity much of the time. In a free market this results in near-zero electricity prices at times of high nuclear renewables output and low electricity demand with electricity revenue collapse. Capital deployment efficiency—the economic benefit derived from energy systems capital investment at a societal level—strongly favors high utilization of these capital-intensive systems, especially if low-carbon nuclear renewables are to replace fossil fuels. Hybrid energy systems are one option for better utilization of these systems that consumes excess energy at times of low prices to make some useful product.The economic basis for development of hybrid energy systems is described for a low-carbon nuclear renewable world where much of the time there are massivequantities of excess energy available from the electric sector.Examples include (1) high-temperature electrolysis to generate hydrogen for non-fossil liquid fuels, direct use as a transport fuel, metal reduction, etc. and (2) biorefineries.Nuclear energy with its concentrated constant heat output may become the enabling technology for economically-viable low-carbon electricity grids because hybrid nuclear systems may provide an economic way to produce dispatachable variable electricity with economic base-load operation of the reactor.

Charles Forsberg; Steven Aumeier

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Electricity generation:: regulatory mechanisms to incentive renewable alternative energy sources in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dissemination of renewable alternative energy sources for electricity generation has always being done through regulatory mechanisms, created and managed by the government of each country. Since these sources are more costly to generate, they have received incentives in response to worldwide environmental concerns, above all with regard to the reduction of CO2 emissions. In Brazil, the electricity generation from renewable alternative sources is experiencing a new phase of growth. Until a short time ago, environmental appeal was the strongest incentive to these sources in Brazil but it was insufficient to attain its objective. With the electricity crisis and the rationing imposed in 2001, another important factor gained awareness: the need to diversify energy sources. Within this context, this work has the objective of analyzing the regulatory mechanisms recently developed to stimulate electricity generation from renewable alternative energy sources in Brazil by following the experience of other countries such as the United States, United Kingdom and Germany.

Carla Kazue Nakao Cavaliero; Ennio Peres Da Silva

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

On the causal dynamics between economic growth, renewable energy consumption, CO2 emissions and trade openness: Fresh evidence from BRICS countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The current study investigates the causal relationship between economic growth and renewable energy consumption in the BRICS countries over the period 1971–2010 within a multivariate framework. The ARDL bounds testing approach to cointegration and vector error correction model (VECM) are used to examine the long-run and causal relationships between economic growth, renewable energy consumption, trade openness and carbon dioxide emissions. Empirical evidence shows that, based on the ARDL estimates, there exist long-run equilibrium relationships among the competing variables. Regarding the VECM results, bi-directional Granger causality exists between economic growth and renewable energy consumption, suggesting the feedback hypothesis, which can explain the role of renewable energy in stimulating economic growth in BRICS countries.

Maamar Sebri; Ousama Ben-Salha

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Cumulative energy, emissions, and water consumption for geothermal electric power production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A life cycle analysis has been conducted on geothermal electricity generation. The technologies covered in the study include flash binary enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and coproduced gas and electricity plants. The life cycle performance metrics quantified in the study include materials water and energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The life cycle stages taken into account were the plant and fuel cycle stages the latter of which includes fuel production and fuel use (operational). The plant cycle includes the construction of the plant wells and above ground piping and the production of the materials that comprise those systems. With the exception of geothermal flash plants GHG emissions from the plant cycle are generally small and the only such emissions from geothermal plants. Some operational GHGs arise from flash plants and though substantial when compared to other geothermal power plants these are nonetheless considerably smaller than those emitted from fossil fuel fired plants. For operational geothermal emissions an emission rate (g/kW h) distribution function vs. cumulative capacity was developed using California plant data. Substantial GHG emissions arise from coproduced facilities and two other “renewable” power plants but these are almost totally due to the production and use of natural gas and biofuels. Nonetheless those GHGs are still much less than those from fossil fuel fired plants. Though significant amounts of water are consumed for plant and well construction especially for well field stimulation of EGS plants they are small in comparison to estimated water consumed during plant operation. This also applies to air cooled plants which nominally should consume no water during operation. Considering that geothermal operational water use data are scarce our estimates show the lowest water consumption for flash and coproduced plants and the highest for EGS though the latter must be considered provisional due to the absence of field data. The EGS estimate was based on binary plant data.

J. L. Sullivan; C. Clark; J. Han; C. Harto; M. Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Evaluating Renewable Portfolio Standards and Carbon Cap Scenarios in the U.S. Electric Sector  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

258 258 May 2010 Evaluating Renewable Portfolio Standards and Carbon Cap Scenarios in the U.S. Electric Sector Lori Bird, Caroline Chapman, Jeff Logan, Jenny Sumner, and Walter Short National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-48258 May 2010 Evaluating Renewable Portfolio Standards and Carbon Cap Scenarios in the U.S. Electric Sector Lori Bird, Caroline Chapman, Jeff Logan, Jenny Sumner, and Walter Short Prepared under Task No. SAO9.2038 NOTICE

200

A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Preliminary Examination A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity Blair Swezey, Jørn Aabakken, and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42266 October 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 A Preliminary Examination of the Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity Blair Swezey, Jørn Aabakken, and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. WF6N.1015 Technical Report NREL/TP-670-42266 October 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Report Report NREL/TP-6A50-56324 December 2012 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors April Lee, Owen Zinaman, and Jeffrey Logan National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 * www.jisea.org Technical Report NREL/TP-6A50-56324 December 2012 Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors April Lee, Owen Zinaman, and Jeffrey Logan

202

On Minimizing the Energy Consumption of an Electrical Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electrical vehicle energy management can be expressed as a Bang-Bang .... reflects the losses due to the internal resistance of the battery. The system ...

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

203

A macroeconomic analysis of electricity consumption in Tunisia: energy policy implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electricity demand forecasting is becoming an essential instrument for energy management policy in a liberalised electricity market. To address the needs, an electricity consumption forecasting model based on macroeconomic factors for Tunisia during the period of 1971 to 2008 has been investigated. A cointegration and error correction model incorporated with causality analysis present an appropriate framework for studying the aggregate electricity demand. It is found that the there are long run relationships between electricity consumption, real income, population and the consumer price index. For causality results, it was found there are unidirectional relationships from electricity consumption to real income, from electricity consumption to consumer price index and from population to real income. The results from our study might be useful for the government in forming appropriate energy policies. Indeed, the policymaker would visibly pose problems for electricity security by increasing investment in the electricity supply sector in order to cope with the increasing demand and undertaking more research to sustain their social, economic and environmental needs by implementing an energy efficiency measures.

Néjib Chouaïbi; Tahar Abdessalem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Integrating High Levels of Renewables into the Lanai Electric...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Wind turbine * Run-of-river hydropower * Biomass power * Generator: diesel, gasoline, biogas, alternative and custom fuels, co- fired * Electric utility grid * Microturbine * Fuel...

205

Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

ReEDS Modeling of the President's 2020 U.S. Renewable Electricity Generation Goal (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

President Obama announced in 2012 an Administration Goal for the United States to double aggregate renewable electricity generation from wind, solar, and geothermal sources by 2020. This analysis, using the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, explores a full range of future renewable deployment scenarios out to 2020 to assess progress and outlook toward this goal. Under all modeled conditions, consisting of 21 scenarios, the Administration Goal is met before 2020, and as early as 2015.

Zinaman, O.; Mai, T.; Lantz, E.; Gelman, R.; Porro, G.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Development and Bottlenecks of Renewable Electricity Generation in China: A Critical Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review provides an overview on the development and status of electricity generation from renewable energy sources, namely hydropower, wind power, solar power, biomass energy, and geothermal energy, and discusses the technology, policy, and finance bottlenecks limiting growth of the renewable energy industry in China. ... Wind turbines, as well as transmission-line towers, which are often necessary for transmission of the renewable energy generated to the industrial centers or large cities, also affect wildlife, particularly birds. ... solar power plants require large amount of land, and may negatively impact wildlife protection; ...

Yuanan Hu; Hefa Cheng

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

208

The future role of renewable energy sources in European electricity supply : A model-based analysis for the EU-15.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Ambitious targets for the use of renewable electricity (RES-E) have been formulated by the EU Commission and the EU Member States. Taking into account technical,… (more)

Rosen, Johannes

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vibration sensors, for inferring electrical consumption when direct measurementvibration and light sensors, we can increase our coverage, especially in places where direct electrical measurementAND MEASUREMENT Building A/C Unit ? Accelerometer ? Fig (A) accel x Building A/C Unit ? Vibration

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Portland General Electric Company Renewable Energy RFP , Deadline Sept 28, 2001  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Portland General Electric Company Portland General Electric Company REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Issued: August 22, 2001 INTRODUCTION Portland General Electric Company (PGE) is requesting bid proposals for retail marketing services and renewable power or tradable renewable credits (TRCs) sufficient to meet the needs of PGE customer enrollments for the period from March 1, 2002 to December 31, 2003. Proposals are due by 5:00 p.m. on September 28, 2001. Pursuant to the Oregon Public Utility Commission (OPUC) adoption of Portfolio Options contained in ORS 757.603(2), OAR 860-038-0220 (refer to OPUC Order 01-337 at http://www.puc.state.or.us/orders/2001ords/01-337.pdf.) PGE is seeking to purchase Marketing Services and Renewable Energy or TRCs in support of the Company's portfolio option offers of

211

Evaluating Renewable Portfolio Standards and Carbon Cap Scenarios in the U.S. Electric Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the impact of various renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and cap-and-trade policy options on the U.S. electricity sector, focusing mainly on renewable energy generation. The analysis uses the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model that simulates the least-cost expansion of electricity generation capacity and transmission in the United States to examine the impact of an emissions cap--similar to that proposed in the Waxman-Markey bill (H.R. 2454)--as well as lower and higher cap scenarios. It also examines the effects of combining various RPS targets with the emissions caps. The generation mix, carbon emissions, and electricity price are examined for various policy combinations to simulate the effect of implementing policies simultaneously.

Bird, L.; Chapman, C.; Logan, J.; Sumner, J.; Short, W.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

As Global energy consumption rises, more research is being conducted towards alternative renewable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

renewable fuels. · Combustion modeling is being used to simulate biodiesel combustion in diesel engines operate suitably in a diesel engine. · These results also demonstrate that the methyl oleate could-1039787" Investigation of Methyl Oleate as a Surrogate Fuel for Biodiesel, in a Direct Injection Diesel

Hutcheon, James M.

213

Electricity consumption and economic growth in transition countries: A revisit using bootstrap panel Granger causality analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The purpose of this paper is to revisit the Granger causal relationship between electricity consumption and economic growth for 15 transition economies for the period 1975–2010 using a bootstrap panel causality approach that allows for both cross-sectional dependency and for heterogeneity across countries. Applying this approach, we found a unidirectional causality running from electricity consumption to economic growth only in Belarus and Bulgaria; from economic growth to electricity consumption in the Czech Republic, Latvia, Lithuania and the Russian Federation; bidirectional causality only in Ukraine while no Granger causality in any direction in Albania, Macedonia, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovak Republic and Slovenia. These results show that there is a limited support for the electricity-led growth hypothesis. Nevertheless these different findings provide important implications for energy strategies and policies for transition countries.

Yemane Wolde-Rufael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Native American Technical Assistance and Training for Renewable Energy Resource Development and Electrical Generation Facilities Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) will facilitate technical expertise and training of Native Americans in renewable energy resource development for electrical generation facilities, and distributed generation options contributing to feasibility studies, strategic planning and visioning. CERT will also provide information to Tribes on energy efficiency and energy management techniques.This project will provide facilitation and coordination of expertise from government agencies and private industries to interact with Native Americans in ways that will result in renewable energy resource development, energy efficiency program development, and electrical generation facilities management by Tribal entities. The intent of this cooperative agreement is to help build capacity within the Tribes to manage these important resources.

A. David Lester

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

215

Tribal Renewable Energy Foundational Course: Electricity Grid Basics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Watch the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy foundational course webinar on electricity grid basics by clicking on the .swf link below. You can also download the PowerPoint slides...

216

Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of natural gas prices, renewable resources in general have aSince the use of renewable resources decreases fuel priceof its electricity from renewable resources under long-term

Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Development and utilization of new and renewable energy with Stirling engine system for electricity in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

China is the largest developing country in the world. Self-supporting and self-sustaining energy supply is the only solution for development. Recently, fast economic development exposed gradually increasing pressure of energy demand and environment concern. In order to increase the production of electricity of China, the Stirling engine system should be developed. This paper provides an investigation of energy production and consumption in China. The main features of the energy consumption and the development objectives of China`s electric power industry are also described. The necessity and possibility of development of Stirling engine system is discussed.

Dong, W.; Abenavoli, R.I. [Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy). Dipt. di Meccanica e Aeronautica; Carlini, M. [Univ. della Tuscia, Viterbo (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze dell` Ambiente Forestale e delle sue Risorse

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Analysis and Simulation of Fuel Consumption and Energy Throughput on a Parallel Diesel-Electric Hybrid Powertrain.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The aim of this master thesis is to study the energy throughput and fuel consumption of a parallel diesel-electric hybrid vehicle. This has been done… (more)

Gustafsson, Johanna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The nexus of electricity consumption, economic growth and CO2 emissions in the BRICS countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study reexamines the causal link between electricity consumption, economic growth and CO2 emissions in the BRICS countries (i.e., Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa) for the period 1990–2010, using panel causality analysis, accounting for dependency and heterogeneity across countries. Regarding the electricity–GDP nexus, the empirical results support evidence on the feedback hypothesis for Russia and the conservation hypothesis for South Africa. However, a neutrality hypothesis holds for Brazil, India and China, indicating neither electricity consumption nor economic growth is sensitive to each other in these three countries. Regarding the GDP–CO2 emissions nexus, a feedback hypothesis for Russia, a one-way Granger causality running from GDP to CO2 emissions in South Africa and reverse relationship from CO2 emissions to GDP in Brazil is found. There is no evidence of Granger causality between GDP and CO2 emissions in India and China. Furthermore, electricity consumption is found to Granger cause CO2 emissions in India, while there is no Granger causality between electricity consumption and CO2 emissions in Brazil, Russia, China and South Africa. Therefore, the differing results for the BRICS countries imply that policies cannot be uniformly implemented as they will have different effects in each of the BRICS countries under study.

Wendy N. Cowan; Tsangyao Chang; Roula Inglesi-Lotz; Rangan Gupta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building energy models of existing buildings are unreliable unless calibrated so they correlate well with actual energy usage. Calibrating models is costly because it is currently an art which requires significant manual effort by an experienced and skilled professional. An automated methodology could significantly decrease this cost and facilitate greater adoption of energy simulation capabilities into the marketplace. The Autotune project is a novel methodology which leverages supercomputing, large databases of simulation data, and machine learning to allow automatic calibration of simulations to match measured experimental data on commodity hardware. This paper shares initial results from the automated methodology applied to the calibration of building energy models (BEM) for EnergyPlus (E+) to reproduce measured monthly electrical data.

Garrett, Aaron [Jacksonville State University] [Jacksonville State University; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Chandler, Theodore [Jacksonville State University] [Jacksonville State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

UK Electricity Consumption and Number of Meters at MLSOA level (2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8) 8) Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and non-domestic electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. The electricity consumption data data is split by ordinary electricity and economy7 electricity usage. All data in this set are classified as UK National Statistics. Related socio-economic data for MLSOA and IGZ levels can be accessed: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/regional/mlsoa2008/181-mlsoa-i...

222

Electric Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Electric Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. electric vehicle and infrastructure projects. To determine which codes and standards apply to a specific project, identify the codes and standards currently in effect within the jurisdiction where the project will be located. Some jurisdictions also have unique ordinances or regulations that could apply. Learn about codes and standards basics at www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/codes_standards_basics.html. Find electric vehicle and infrastructure codes and standards in these categories:

223

Electricity sector in Mexico: Current status. Contribution of renewable energy sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The challenge facing the world electricity sector is the cost incurred in maintaining the system and seeing to the environmental effects it causes. In Mexico the grid is supplied by thermal plants fed by oil products. Its great potential of renewable energies clearly shown in studies by national and international scholars has led the government to become more committed to take advantage of these energies. The goal is to reduce dependence on fossil fuels to generate electricity and to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases. In this article we analyse the current state of renewable energies, the conditions needed to foster them and the legislative changes already introduced to promote their greater part in the national electricity grid.

Yoreley Cancino-Solórzano; Eunice Villicaña-Ortiz; Antonio J. Gutiérrez-Trashorras; Jorge Xiberta-Bernat

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Electric Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart (Revised) (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Dispensing Dispensing Infrastructure NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: State and Federal Energy Regulatory Commissions CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: Local Building and Fire Departments CONTROLLING AUTHORITIES: DOT/NHTS Many standards development organizations (SDOs) are working to develop codes and standards needed for the utilization of alternative fuel vehicle technologies. This chart shows the SDOs responsible for leading the support and development of key codes and standards for electric. Electric Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Chart Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. FERC Federal Energy

225

Well-to-wheel Energy Consumption and Pollutant Emissions Comparison between Electric and Non-electric Vehicles: a Modeling Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although electric vehicles (EVs) gain more and more popularity these years, the issue on whether they are really more environmentally and ecologically sound than non-electric vehicles, e.g. gasoline and diesel fuel burned internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles has become a heat-debated one. This paper outlines an assessment model which intends to compare well-to-wheel energy consumption and pollutant emissions between \\{EVs\\} and non-electric ones, using Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) technique based on the potential environmental and ecological impact. The modeling in this case predicted that from the perspective of total energy consumption and pollution, further improvements are still necessary for the feasibility and widespread use of EVs.

Z.J. Li; X.L. Chen; M. Ding

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The socio-economic, dwelling and appliance related factors affecting electricity consumption in domestic buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper aims to investigate the socio-economic, dwelling and appliance related factors that have significant or non-significant effects on domestic electricity consumption. To achieve this aim, a comprehensive literature review of international research investigating these factors was undertaken. Although papers examining the factors affecting electricity demand are numerous, to the authors’ knowledge, a comprehensive analysis taking stock of all previous findings has not previously been undertaken. The review establishes that no less than 62 factors potentially have an effect on domestic electricity use. This includes 13 socio-economic factors, 12 dwelling factors and 37 appliance factors. Of the 62 factors, four of the socio-economic factors, seven of the dwelling factors, and nine of the appliance related factors were found to unambiguously have a significant positive effect on electricity use. This paper contributes to a better understanding of those factors that certainly affect electricity consumption and those for which effects are unclear and require further research. Understanding the effects of factors can support both the implementation of effective energy policy and aid prediction of future electricity consumption in the domestic sector.

Rory V. Jones; Alba Fuertes; Kevin J. Lomas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

renewable energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 32.3 KiB)

228

Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

The NEED Project and the U.S. Department of Energy have collaborated to bring you this educational four-page guide to energy, electricity, consumption and efficiency. It includes, on the last page, a home energy survey to help you analyze your home energy use.

229

Does energy consumption by the US electric power sector exhibit long memory behavior?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study analyzes energy consumption by the US electric power by various energy sources through fractional integration. In doing so, we are able to determine the level of persistence of the shocks affecting each energy source. The results indicate long memory behavior as each energy source is highly persistent, displaying long memory along with autoregressive behavior and strong seasonal patterns.

Luis A. Gil-Alana; David Loomis; James E. Payne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Green Computing Wanted: Electricity Consumptions in the IT Industry and by Household Computers in Five Major Chinese Cities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exhausted energy consumption becomes a world-wide issue nowadays. Computing contributes a large portion of energy consumption. The concept of green computing has been popularized. Along with the rapid development of China, energy issue becomes more and ... Keywords: energy/electricity consumption, IT industry, household computers, energy efficiency, green computing

Luyang Wang; Tao Wang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Integrated operation of electric vehicles and renewable generation in a smart distribution system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Distribution system complexity is increasing mainly due to technological innovation, renewable Distributed Generation (DG) and responsive loads. This complexity makes difficult the monitoring, control and operation of distribution networks for Distribution System Operators (DSOs). In order to cope with this complexity, a novel method for the integrated operational planning of a distribution system is presented in this paper. The method introduces the figure of the aggregator, conceived as an intermediate agent between end-users and DSOs. In the proposed method, energy and reserve scheduling is carried out by both aggregators and DSO. Moreover, Electric Vehicles (EVs) are considered as responsive loads that can participate in ancillary service programs by providing reserve to the system. The efficiency of the proposed method is evaluated on an 84-bus distribution test system. Simulation results show that the integrated scheduling of \\{EVs\\} and renewable generators can mitigate the negative effects related to the uncertainty of renewable generation.

Alireza Zakariazadeh; Shahram Jadid; Pierluigi Siano

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Table 6b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 4 5 4 4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 5 6 6 6 5,001 to 10,000 4 9 9 9 10,001 to 25,000 5 7 5 5 25,001 to 50,000 7 10 10 10 50,001 to 100,000 7 12 8 8 100,001 to 200,000 9 13 10 10 200,001 to 500,000 10 13 11 11 Over 500,000 26 18 18 21 Principal Building Activity Education 8 9 6 6 Food Sales and Service 8 9 8 7 Health Care 14 12 12 9 Lodging 11 22 16 16 Mercantile and Service 5 7 7 7 Office 6 10 7 6 Public Assembly 7 12 28 30 Public Order and Safety 18 29 18 18 Religious Worship 10 10 11 11 Warehouse and Storage

233

CO2 mitigation costs for new renewable energy capacity in the Mexican electricity sector using renewable energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide mitigation costs for the Mexican power sector are calculated in order to compare the business as usual (BAU) scenario, based on natural gas capacity growth, to a transition scenario where electricity generation growth using natural gas after 2007 is replaced by renewable energies (solar, wind, hydro and biomass). The mitigation costs are obtained using the following parameters: natural gas price, discount rate and technological progress. The latter is expressed in terms of the anticipated decrease in capital costs, as reported in electricity generation technological literature. Our results show that when technological progress is considered, CO2 mitigation costs decrease rapidly from 14 $/tCO2 (in this paper $ express 1997 US dollars and t means metric tons) to zero when the price of natural gas nears 2.68 $/GJ, (for some readers, it can be useful to know that 1.0 US$1997/GJ is 1.19 US$2001/MMBTU) which is almost the same as the 2002 price. This means that for middle natural gas prices a “no regrets” situation can be achieved. Our results also show that for prices higher than 2.80 $/GJ, the incorporation of the technological progress parameter transforms the transition scenario into a “no regrets” scenario for all the discount rate values considered in this study.

Jorge Islas; Fabio Manzini; Manuel Mart??nez

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many countries -- reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems -- are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This study documents the diverse approaches to effective integration of variable renewable energy among six countries -- Australia (South Australia), Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Spain, and the United States (Western region-Colorado and Texas)-- and summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. Each country has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. The ability to maintain a broad ecosystem perspective, to organize and make available the wealth of experiences, and to ensure a clear path from analysis to enactment should be the primary focus going forward.

Cochran, J.; Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Arent, D. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Renewables Growth Rate Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 2010-Year 1980 2.87 0.06 2.92 2.74 (1) 24.32 1981 2.72 0.06 2.79 3.01 (1) 24.49 1982 3.23 0.05 3.29 3.13 (1) 23.95 1983 3.49 0.07 3.56 3.20 (1) 24.60 1984 3.35 0.09 3.44 3.55 (1) 25.59 1985 2.94 0.11 3.05 4.08 (1) 26.09 1986 3.04 0.12 3.16 4.38 (1) 26.22 1987 2.60 0.13 2.73 4.75 (1) 26.94 1988 2.30 0.12 2.43 5.59 (1) 28.27 1989 2.81 0.41 3.22 5.60 (1) 29.88 1990 3.01 0.51 3.52 6.10 (1) 30.51 1991 2.98 0.56 3.54 6.42 (1) 30.87 1992 2.59 0.60 3.19 6.48 (1) 30.74 1993 2.86 0.62 3.48 6.41 (1) 31.86 1994 2.62 0.63 3.26 6.69 (1) 32.41 1995 3.15 0.60 3.75 7.08 (1) 33.50 1996 3.53 0.63 4.15 7.09 (1) 34.50 1997 3.58 0.64 4.22 6.60 (1) 34.90 1998 3.24 0.63 3.87 7.07 (1) 36.24 1999 3.22 0.66 3.87 7.61 (1) 36.99 2000 2.77 0.66 3.43 7.86 (1) 38.08 2001 2.21 0.55 2.76 8.03 (1) 37.25

236

Electric Vehicle Handbook: Electrical Contractors (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Electrical Electrical Contractors Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Electrical Contractors 2 Table of Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PEV Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Charging Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Installing and Maintaining EVSE . . . . . . . 9 EVSE Training for Electrical Contractors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Electrifying the Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Clean Cities Helps Deploy PEV Charging Infrastructure Installing plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charg- ing infrastructure requires unique knowledge and skills . If you need help, contact your local Clean Cities coordinator . Clean Cities is the U .S . Depart- ment of Energy's flagship alternative-transportation deployment initiative . It is supported by a diverse and capable team of stakeholders from private companies, utilities, government agencies, vehicle

237

Analysing future trends of renewable electricity in the EU in a low-carbon context  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to analyse the situation and trends of electricity from renewable energy sources (RES-E) in the EU up to 2030, taking into account several drivers and barriers and different maturity levels for the renewable energy technologies. The methodology is based on the results of simulation models providing insights on future outlooks, complemented with an analysis of regulations and other drivers and barriers. Regarding the most mature renewable electricity technologies, the main drivers will be public policies (carbon prices and support schemes) and the expected up-ward trend in fossil-fuel prices and the main barriers are related to grid access, administrative procedures and the exhaustion of places with the best wind resource. For those already commercial but expensive technologies, the main driver is support schemes (but not carbon prices) allowing the exploitation of the large potential for investment cost reductions. Barriers are mostly related to their high investment costs. Finally, for those technologies which are emerging and immature, further technical improvements as a result of R&D efforts will be needed and they cannot be expected to significantly penetrate the European electricity market until 2030.

Pablo del Río

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated the relationship between electrical power consumption per capita and GDP per capita in 130 countries using the data reported by World Bank. We found that an electrical power consumption per capita...

Aki-Hiro Sato

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION IN THE INDUSTRIAL SECTOR OF JORDAN: APPLICATION OF MULTIVARIATE LINEAR REGRESSION AND ADAPTIVE NEURO?FUZZY TECHNIQUES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study two techniques for modeling electricity consumption of the Jordanian industrial sector are presented: (i) multivariate linear regression and (ii) neuro?fuzzy models. Electricity consumption is modeled as function of different variables such as number of establishments number of employees electricity tariff prevailing fuel prices production outputs capacity utilizations and structural effects. It was found that industrial production and capacity utilization are the most important variables that have significant effect on future electrical power demand. The results showed that both the multivariate linear regression and neuro?fuzzy models are generally comparable and can be used adequately to simulate industrial electricity consumption. However comparison that is based on the square root average squared error of data suggests that the neuro?fuzzy model performs slightly better for future prediction of electricity consumption than the multivariate linear regression model. Such results are in full agreement with similar work using different methods for other countries.

M. Samhouri; A. Al?Ghandoor; R. H. Fouad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Biomass power and state renewable energy policies under electric industry restructuring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POWER AND STATE RENEWABLE ENERGY POLICIES UNDER ELECTRICPROVISIONS IN STATE RENEWABLE ENERGY POLICIES Of the 17that have adopted renewable energy policy measures as part

Porter, Kevin; Wiser, Ryan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. Download details: IP Address: 192.174.37.50 This content was downloaded on 04/11/2013 at 23:01 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more 2012 Environ. Res. Lett. 7 045802 (http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/7/4/045802) Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 045802 (10pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/045802 Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies:

242

Chapter 1 - Energy Storage for Mitigating the Variability of Renewable Electricity Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wind and solar power generation is growing quickly around the world, mainly to mitigate some of the negative environmental impacts of the electricity sector. However, the variability of these renewable sources of electricity poses technical and economical challenges when integrated on a large scale. Energy storage is being widely regarded as one of the potential solutions to deal with the variations of variable renewable electricity sources (VRES). This chapter presents an review of the state of technology, installations and some challenges of electrical energy storage (EES) systems. It particularly focuses on the applicability, advantages and disadvantages of various EES technologies for large-scale VRES integration. This chapter indicates that each challenge imposed by VRES requires a dierent set of EES characteristics to address the issue, and that there is no single EES technology that consistently outperforms the others in various applications. This chapter also discusses external factors, such as mineral availability and geographic limitations, that may aect the success of the widespread implementation of EES technologies.

Marc Beaudin; Hamidreza Zareipour; Anthony Schellenberg; William Rosehart

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Economic growth, electricity consumption, urbanization and environmental degradation relationship in United Arab Emirates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study explores the relationship between economic growth, electricity consumption, urbanization and environmental degradation in case of United Arab Emirates (UAE). The study covers the quarter frequency data over the period of 1975–2011. We have applied the ARDL bounds testing approach to examine the long run relationship between the variables in the presence of structural breaks. The VECM Granger causality is applied to investigate the direction of causal relationship between the variables. Our empirical exercise reported the existence of cointegration among the series. Further, we found an inverted U-shaped relationship between economic growth and CO2 emissions i.e. economic growth raises energy emissions initially and declines it after a threshold point of income per capita (EKC exists). Electricity consumption declines CO2 emissions. The relationship between urbanization and CO2 emissions is positive. Exports seem to improve the environmental quality by lowering CO2 emissions. The causality analysis validates the feedback effect between CO2 emissions and electricity consumption. Economic growth and urbanization Granger cause CO2 emissions.

Muhammad Shahbaz; Rashid Sbia; Helmi Hamdi; Ilhan Ozturk

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience, Summary for Policymakers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many countries -- reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems -- are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This document summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. There is no one-size-fits-all approach; each country studied has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. This study also emphatically underscores the value of countries sharing their experiences. The more diverse and robust the experience base from which a country can draw, the more likely that it will be able to implement an appropriate, optimized, and system-wide approach.

Cochran, J.; Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Arent, D. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A methodology for analysis of the renewable electricity feed-in tariff markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A feed-in tariff model has been enacted in most countries and is well accepted by the European Commission. In principle, the model offers long-term contracts to eligible renewable energy producers, typically based on guaranteed prices for fixed periods of time for electricity produced from renewable energy. This paper presents a methodology that has been developed for the feed-in tariff market approach, which should gradually help eligible producers become better prepared for market competition after long-term contracts expire. The central part of this methodology is the correction of the current guaranteed prices, based on the calculation of the cost-effectiveness ratio of the market model to the current feed-in tariff or non-market model. The common features of the designed market models are the market component, a combination of the guaranteed price with and without market indexing, and the sum of the reduced guaranteed price and the spot electricity price. The methodology has been applied to the current non-market model implemented under Croatian jurisdiction. In this case, seven different market models were designed, which are compared to the existing non-market model. The results of the cost-effectiveness ratio according to different types of renewable energy and market models for a certain period of time are given, described and used for the correction of the current guaranteed price. The first market model has been selected as the most appropriate to replace the existing non-market model in Croatia.

Vedran Uran; Slavko Krajcar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle to grave" and facilitate more consistent comparisons of energy technologies. Figure 1. Generalized life cycle stages for energy technologies Source: Sathaye et al. (2011) Life cycle GHG emissions from renewable electricity generation technologies are generally less than those from fossil fuel-based technologies, based on evidence assembled by this project. Further, the proportion of GHG emissions from each life cycle stage differs by technology. For fossil-fueled technologies, fuel combustion during operation of the facility emits the vast majority of GHGs. For nuclear and renewable energy technologies, the majority of GHG emissions occur upstream of operation. LCA of Energy Systems

247

UK Electricity Consumption and Number of Meters at MLSOA level (2005 -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 - 5 - 2007) Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) releases annual statistics on domestic and industrial/commercial electricity and gas consumption (and number of meters) at the Middle Layer Super Output Authority (MLSOA) and Intermediate Geography Zone (IGZ) level (there are over 950 of these subregions throughout England, Scotland and Wales). Both MLSOAs (England and Wales) and IGZs (Scotland) include a minimum of approximately 2,000 households. The domestic electricity consumption data data is split by ordinary electricity and economy7 electricity usage. These data are classified as UK National Statistics. Note about spreadsheets: separate tabs exist for each local authority (LA), but the tabs are hidden. To view data, simply 'unhide' the appropriate tab(s). You do not need to "enable macros" to view the data. Related socio-economic data for MLSOA and IGZ levels can be accessed: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/regional/mlsoa2008/181-mlsoa-i...

248

Production Tax Credit for Renewable Electricity Generation (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, environmental and energy security concerns were addressed at the federal level by several key pieces of energy legislation. Among them, the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), P.L. 95-617, required regulated power utilities to purchase alternative electricity generation from qualified generating facilities, including small-scale renewable generators; and the Investment Tax Credit (ITC), P.L. 95-618, part of the Energy Tax Act of 1978, provided a 10% federal tax credit on new investment in capital-intensive wind and solar generation technologies.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Control Strategies for Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Using Renewables and Local Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increase of electric vehicle (EV) and plug-in hybrid-electric vehicle (PHEV) adoption creates a need for more EV supply equipment (EVSE) infrastructure (i.e., EV chargers). The impact of EVSE installations could be significant due to limitations in the electric grid and potential demand charges for residential and commercial customers. The use of renewables (e.g., solar) and local storage (e.g., battery bank) can mitigate loads caused by EVSE on the electric grid. This would eliminate costly upgrades needed by utilities and decrease demand charges for consumers. This paper aims to explore control systems that mitigate the impact of EVSE on the electric grid using solar energy and battery banks. Three control systems are investigated and compared in this study. The first control system discharges the battery bank at a constant rate during specific times of the day based on historical data. The second discharges the battery bank based on the number of EVs charging (linear) and the amount of solar energy being generated. The third discharges the battery bank based on a sigmoid function (non-linear) in response to the number of EVs charging, and also takes into consideration the amount of renewables being generated. The first and second control systems recharge the battery bank at night when demand charges are lowest. The third recharges the battery bank at night and during times of the day when there is an excess of solar. Experiments are conducted using data from a private site that has 25 solar-assisted charging stations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN and 4 at a public site in Nashville, TN. Results indicate the third control system having better performance, negating up to 71% of EVSE load, compared with the second control system (up to 61%) and the first control system (up to 58%).

Castello, Charles C [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Maxey, L Curt [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Optimum use of renewable energy resources to generate electricity via hybrid system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The necessity of hybrid energy system is gaining more importance day by day as it incorporates two or more than two renewable energy resources that when integrated overcome limitations inherent in either. Hybrid energy system has been seen as an excellent solution for electrification of rural place where the grid extension is difficult and economically not feasible. Such system may consist of several renewable resources such as solar PV, wind, biomass, micro-hydro, geothermal and other conventional generator for back-up where the deficiency of one system can be compensated by others. This paper depicts the different system components and their optimal combination for the efficient generation of electrical energy exploiting locally available resources. The model discussed in paper compromises of micro-hydro, solar PV and biomass for the rural village in Nepal known as Kalikhola which is used as a case study. The optimised hybrid system shows a unit cost of $0.088/KWh which is obtained after the simulation considering contribution of individual renewable resources participating in the system.

Mahmud Abdul Matin Bhuiyan; Anand Mandal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

renewable energy companies compete in a rapidly renewable energy companies compete in a rapidly growing, highly competitive global market worth hundreds of billions of dollars per year[7], a market projected to grow to $460 billion per year by 2030[1]. Due in part to a highly skilled workforce and a growing energy education system, American businesses, workers, and their communities are uniquely positioned to take advantage of this opportunity. Our nation has abundant solar, water, wind, and geothermal energy resources, and many U.S. companies are developing, manufacturing, and installing cutting edge, high-tech renewable energy systems. The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), plays a key role in advancing America's "all of the

252

The policy implications of the different interpretations of the cost-effectiveness of renewable electricity support  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The cost-effectiveness of support for renewable electricity is a main criterion to assess the success of policy instruments, together with effectiveness. The costs of support are also a source of significant concern for governments all over the world. However, significant confusion exists in the literature on the cost-effectiveness of public support for renewable electricity. While some authors define the concept of cost-effectiveness as that which complies with the equimarginality principle, many others, including documents from relevant organisations (European Commission, International Energy Agency, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) define it as “the lowest costs of support”, generally equating it with the minimisation of consumer costs. The aim of this paper is to clarify the differences between both approaches and their policy implications regarding the choice of instruments and design elements. It is shown that they partly overlap and that their policy implications clearly differ, leading to very different policy prescriptions. While the former favours technology neutral instruments and design elements, the “minimisation of consumer costs” approach favours instruments and design elements which adjust support levels to the costs of the technologies.

Pablo del Río; Emilio Cerdá

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Hamrin. 2005. “Renewable Energy Policies and Markets inKomor Paul: Renewable Energy Policy, Diebold Institute forN.I. (2004a): “Renewable energy policy in Denmark”, Energy

Haas, Reinhard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Differentiated long term projections of the hourly electricity consumption in local areas. The case of Denmark West  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Assessing grid developments the spatial distribution of the electricity consumption is important. In Denmark the electricity grid consists of transmission – and local distribution grids with different voltages that are connected via transformer stations each covering a local area with between 10.000 and 100.000 customers. Data for the hourly electricity consumption at transformer stations shows that the profile of consumption differs considerably between local areas, and this is partly due to a different weight of categories of customers in the different areas. Categories of customers have quite distinct consumption profiles and contribute quite differently to the aggregated load profile. In forecasts, demand by categories of customers is expected to develop differently implying that both the level and the profile of consumption at each transformer stations are expected to change differently. Still, in the previous planning of the transmission grid in Denmark specific local conditions have not been considered. As a first step towards differentiated local load forecasts, the paper presents a new model for long term projections of consumption in local areas and illustrates a first use of the model related to the transmission grid planning by the Danish TSO Energinet.dk. The model is a distribution system that distributes hourly consumption in an aggregated area to hourly consumption at each transformer station. Using econometrics, the model is estimated on national statistics for the hourly consumption by categories of customers and data for the hourly consumption at each transformer station for the years 2009–2011. Applying the model for load forecasts, a major conclusion is that different transformer stations will experience different changes both in the level - and in the hourly profile of load.

F.M. Andersen; H.V. Larsen; N. Juul; R.B. Gaardestrup

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).117 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration,

256

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).112 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration,

257

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind1. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy.

258

Solar and wind resource complementarity: Advancing options for renewable electricity integration in Ontario, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Ontario (Canada), the integration of renewable power is a priority policy goal. Since 2004, the circumstances under which the integration of renewable power is evaluated have changed due to successive changes in price as well as concerns that its over-production may add to grid congestion. This research investigates the value of increasing complementarity (both proximate and geographically dispersed) of wind and solar resources as a means by which electricity planners and researchers might advance electricity sustainability in Ontario. More specifically, this paper asks the following questions: 1) Does the combination of solar and wind resources in selected locations in Ontario serve to ‘smooth out’ power production, i.e., decrease instances of both high and low values, as compared to either resource producing individually? 2) Can this ‘smoothness’ be further improved by dispersing these resources geographically amongst locations? and 3) Does increasing the number of locations with solar and wind resources further ‘smooth out’ power production? Three years (2003–2005) of synchronous, hourly measurements of solar irradiance and wind speeds from Environment Canada’s Canadian Weather Energy and Engineering Data Sets (CWEEDS) are used to derive dimensionless indices for four locations in Ontario (Toronto, Wiarton, Sault Ste. Marie and Ottawa). These indices are used to develop three transparent and accessible methods of analysis: (1) graphical representation; (2) percentile ranking; and (3) using a theoretical maximum as a proxy for capacity. The article concludes that the combination of solar and wind within locations and amongst two locations improves ‘smoothness’ in power production, as compared to when each resource is produced on its own; moreover, it is further improved once more than two resources and two locations are combined. However, there is neither further benefit, nor drawback, associated with the geographic dispersion of complementarity between solar in one location and wind in another, when compared to both resources in one location.

Christina E. Hoicka; Ian H. Rowlands

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Solar and Alternative Power Supply: An Instrument towards Ecologically Sound Power Consumption?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar power and power produced by other renewable energies and supplied by power utilities are means towards replacing fossil fuels and ... friendly electricity production and consumption. We classify solar and a...

Sonja Gehrig; Nicole North

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Impacts of Electric Vehicles on Primary Energy Consumption and Petroleum Displacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L.von 2. The EV primary energy consumption relative to that~ Fig. 3. The EV primary energy consumption relative to thatVehicles on Primary Energy Consumption and Petroleum

Wang, Quanlu; Delucchi, Mark A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Climate change mitigation with integration of renewable energy resources in the electricity grid of New South Wales, Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The implementation of climate change mitigation strategies may significantly affect the current practices for electricity network operation. Increasing penetration of renewable energy generation technologies into electricity networks is one of the key mitigation strategies to achieve greenhouse gas emission reduction targets. Additional climate change mitigation strategies can also contribute to emission reduction thereby supplementing the renewable energy generation participation, which may be limited due to technical constraints of the network. In this paper, the penetration requirements for different renewable energy generation resources are assessed while concurrently examining other mitigation strategies to reduce overall emissions from electricity networks and meet requisite targets. The impacts of climate change mitigation strategies on the demand and generation mix are considered for facilitating the penetration of renewable generation. New climate change mitigation indices namely change in average demand, change in peak demand, generation flexibility and generation mix have been proposed to measure the level of emission reduction by incorporating different mitigation strategies. The marginal emissions associated with the individual generation technologies in the state of New South Wales (NSW) are modelled and the total emissions associated with the electricity grid of NSW are evaluated.

M.A. Abdullah; A.P. Agalgaonkar; K.M. Muttaqi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Energy Department Works with Sacramento Municipal Utility District on Renewable Electricity Generation and Delivery  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) in Sacramento, California, is looking to local renewable resources to help meet its aggressive goal of supplying 37% of its power from renewables in 2020.

263

Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix K RENEWABLE RESOURCE CONFIRMATION AGENDA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESOURCE CONFIRMATION AGENDA The renewable resource confirmation agenda is a set of coordinated research and wind resources. The activities include resource assessment, conflict resolution and renewable-power objectives. Table K-1 Status and Recommendations Regarding the Renewable Resources Confirmation Agenda

264

Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustainable growth of the renewable energy industry. Thegrowth of QF capacity, which included renewables, was astounding, aided by California’s diverse and abundant renewable energyrenewable generation, the EU has assumed this role since 2002, mostly due to a rapid growth of wind energy.

Haas, Reinhard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Wide scale penetration of renewable electricity in the Greek energy system in view of the European decarbonization targets for 2050  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The key policy analyzed in this paper, is the achievement of a significant decarbonization of the Greek Energy System by the year 2050 through the decarbonization of the two sectors presently responsible for the highest levels of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) emissions, namely power and transport. The objective is to reduce GHG emissions by 2050, through the maximization of renewable energy sources (RES) penetration in electricity, with a simultaneous intensive electrification of the transport sector and the electrical interconnection of non-connected islands. An important parameter considered in the present work is that expansion planning of power systems under environmental constraints leads to a rather complex techno-economic analysis involving large scale penetration of Renewable Energy Sources. The penetration level of variable renewable electricity is subject to a number of restrictions implied by the need for (a) storage capacity to decrease the energy curtailment which can occur when the customer load is low and RES electricity generation is high (b) fast reserve capacity to deal with variations of variable RES or combined heat and power (CHP) electricity generation (c) transmission system expansion related to the penetration of areas with high RES potential. New methodologies are developed and a number of novel scenarios are formulated in conformity with the European energy strategy towards 2050.

K. Tigas; G. Giannakidis; J. Mantzaris; D. Lalas; N. Sakellaridis; C. Nakos; Y. Vougiouklakis; M. Theofilidi; E. Pyrgioti; A.T. Alexandridis

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The implications of using hydrocarbon fuels to generate electricity for hydrogen fuel powered automobiles on electrical capital, hydrocarbon consumption, and anthropogenic emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper considers some of the impacts of adopting hydrogen fuel cell powered electric automobiles in the US. The change will need significant adjustments to the electrical generation industry including additional capital and hydrocarbon fuel consumption as well as impacting anthropogenic greenhouse emissions. Examining the use of three fuels to generate hydrogen fuels, using three production methods, distributed in three geographic scenarios, we determine that while the change reduces anthropogenic greenhouse emissions with minimal additional electrical generation capital expenditures, it accelerates the use of natural gas. Electrolysis provides a sustainable, longer-term solution, but requires more capital investment in electrical generation and yields an increase in anthropogenic greenhouse emissions.

Derek Tittle; Jingwen Qu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Comparison of Life Cycle Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Embodied Energy in Four Renewable Electricity Generation Technologies in New Zealand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparison of Life Cycle Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Embodied Energy in Four Renewable Electricity Generation Technologies in New Zealand ... Fugitive emissions from geothermal fields were noted, though not added to the result for geothermal power generation, but all other “CO2 emissions” pertaining to this study arose from construction, maintenance, and decommissioning of power stations, since renewable technologies (apart from geothermal) do not emit CO2 during normal operation. ... Hondo, H. Life cycle GHG emission analysis of power generation systems: Japanese case Energy 2005, 30 ( 11?12 SPEC. ...

Bridget M. Rule; Zeb J. Worth; Carol A. Boyle

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

268

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 U.S. Electricity Net Generation, by Plant Type (Billion kWh) Renewables Growth Rate Hydr(1) Oth(2) Total CHP (3) Tot.(4) 2010-year 1980 276 6 282 N.A. 1981 261 6 267 N.A. 1982 309 5 314 N.A. 1983 332 6 339 N.A. 1984 321 9 330 N.A. 1985 281 11 292 N.A. 1986 291 12 302 N.A. 1987 250 12 262 N.A. 1988 223 12 235 N.A. 1989 269 28 297 42 1990 290 35 324 61 1991 286 38 324 72 1992 250 40 290 91 1993 278 42 320 108 1994 254 42 296 123 1995 305 39 345 141 1996 341 41 382 147 1997 351 41 392 148 1998 318 42 360 154 1999 315 44 359 155 2000 271 45 316 165 2001 214 39 253 170 2002 260 44 304 194 2003 272 45 317 196 2004 265 49 314 184 2005 267 53 320 180 2006 286 62 349 165 2007 246 71 317 177 2008 253 94 347 167 2009 272 113 384 159 2010 289 100 390 165 2011 296 172 468 159 2012 296 148 444 161 2013 297 172 469 158 2014 297 186 483 161 2015 297 197 494 160 2016 297 207 504 160 2017 297 212 510 161 2018 298 224 522 161 2019 298 230 528 161 2020 298 246 544 161 2021

269

Interactions between measures for the support of electricity from renewable energy sources and CO2 mitigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As Europe wants to move towards a secure, sustainable and competitive energy market, it has taken action, amongst other, to support electricity from renewable energy sources (RES-E) and to mitigate CO2 emissions. This paper first qualitatively discusses price- and quantity-based measures for RES-E deployment as well as CO2 mitigation. Next, a simulation model is developed to quantitatively discuss the effects of a tradable green certificate system, a premium mechanism, a tradable CO2 allowance system and a CO2 tax on both RES-E deployment and CO2 mitigation. A three-regional model implementation representing the Benelux, France and Germany is used. In a first step of simulations, all measures are implemented separately. In a second step, combinations of both RES-E supporting and CO2 mitigating measures are simulated and discussed. Significant indirect effects are demonstrated, especially for RES-E supporting measures on the reduction of CO2 emissions. Interactions between different measures show that the price level of quantity-based measures can be strongly influenced.

Cedric De Jonghe; Erik Delarue; Ronnie Belmans; William D’haeseleer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The state of energy storage in electric utility systems and its effect on renewable energy resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the state of the art of electric energy storage technologies and discusses how adding intermittent renewable energy technologies (IRETs) to a utility network affects the benefits from storage dispatch. Load leveling was the mode of storage dispatch examined in the study. However, the report recommended that other modes be examined in the future for kilowatt and kilowatt-hour optimization of storage. The motivation to install storage with IRET generation can arise from two considerations: reliability and enhancement of the value of energy. Because adding storage increases cost, reliability-related storage is attractive only if the accruing benefits exceed the cost of storage installation. The study revealed that the operation of storage should not be guided by the output of the IRET but rather by system marginal costs. Consequently, in planning studies to quantify benefits, storage should not be considered as an entity belonging to the system and not as a component of IRETS. The study also indicted that because the infusion of IRET energy tends to reduce system marginal cost, the benefits from load leveling (value of energy) would be reduced. However, if a system has storage, particularly if the storage is underutilized, its dispatch can be reoriented to enhance the benefits of IRET integration.

Rau, N.S.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Transport energy consumption in mountainous roads. A comparative case study for internal combustion engines and electric vehicles in Andorra  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper analyses transport energy consumption of conventional and electric vehicles in mountainous roads. A standard round trip in Andorra has been modelled in order to characterise vehicle dynamics in hilly regions. Two conventional diesel vehicles and their electric-equivalent models have been simulated and their performances have been compared. Six scenarios have been simulated to study the effects of factors such as orography, traffic congestion and driving style. The European fuel consumption and emissions test and Artemis urban driving cycles, representative of European driving cycles, have also been included in the comparative analysis. The results show that road grade has a major impact on fuel economy, although it affects consumption in different levels depending on the technology analysed. Electric vehicles are less affected by this factor as opposed to conventional vehicles, increasing the potential energy savings in a hypothetical electrification of the car fleet. However, electric vehicle range in mountainous terrains is lower compared to that estimated by manufacturers, a fact that could adversely affect a massive adoption of electric cars in the short term.

Oriol Travesset-Baro; Marti Rosas-Casals; Eric Jover

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

showing the energy flows in the building electrical loadfocus primarily on electrical energy, which represents thefor monitoring electrical energy. However, as wireless

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Exploration of the integration of renewable resources into California's electric system using the Holistic Grid Resource Integration and Deployment (HiGRID) tool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Renewable resources represent an opportunity for environmentally preferred generation of electricity that supports energy security and independence; however integrating renewable technologies is not without challenges. Renewable resources have limitations that can include location, capacity, cost and availability. California is proactive in the implementation of renewable energy through legislation and execution of a Renewable Portfolio Standard. This work explores key challenges to achieving high penetrations of renewables onto California's grid. The Holistic Grid Resource Integration and Deployment (HiGRID) tool has been developed for this analysis and is verified herein. This tool resolves the hourly operation, performance and cost of renewable and non-renewable generation resources. Three renewable deployment strategies are explored including all wind, all solar photovoltaic, and 50/50 mixture. Initially, wind is the preferred candidate from a cost and required installed capacity perspective; however, as the penetration increases excess wind generation encourages installation of solar. The 50/50 case becomes more cost competitive at high renewable penetrations (greater than 32.4%) and provides the highest system-wide capacity factor and CO2 reduction potential. Results highlight the value of optimizing the renewable deployment strategy to minimize costs and emphasize the importance of considering capacity factor and curtailment when representing the true cost of installing renewables.

Joshua D. Eichman; Fabian Mueller; Brian Tarroja; Lori Smith Schell; Scott Samuelsen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

The impact of competitive bidding on the market prospects for renewable electric technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines issues regarding the ability of renewable-energy-based generation projects to compete fossil-fuel-based projects in competitive bidding solicitations. State and utility bidding results revealed that on a relative basis, utilities contract for less renewable-energy-based capacity under competitive bidding than under past methods of qualifying facility contracting. It was concluded that renewables are not being chosen more often under competitive bidding because it emphasizes price and operating considerations over other attributes of renewables, such as environmental considerations, fuel diversity, and fuel price stability. Examples are given of bidding approaches used by some states and utilities that have resulted in renewables-based projects winning generation bids. In addition, the appendix summarizes, by state, competitive bidding activities and results for supply-side solicitations that were open to all fuels and technologies.

Swezey, B.G.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Using Electricity Market Analytics to Reduce Cost and Environmental Impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, energy consumption has become a major issue in terms of cost, infrastructure requirements and emissions. In deregulated markets electricity prices, renewable energy contribution and emissions can vary substantially from hour to hour. ... Keywords: Cloud Computation Pricing, Demand Response, Electricity Market Analytics, Emissions Reduction, Renewable Energy Facilitation

Conor Kelly; Antonio Ruzzelli; Eleni Mangina

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels

277

On the impact of urban heat island and global warming on the power demand and electricity consumption of buildings—A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Urban heat island and global warming increase significantly the ambient temperature. Higher temperatures have a serious impact on the electricity consumption of the building sector increasing considerably the peak and the total electricity demand. The present paper aims to collect, analyze and present in a comparative way existing studies investigating the impact of ambient temperature increase on electricity consumption. Analysis of eleven studies dealing with the impact of the ambient temperature on the peak electricity demand showed that for each degree of temperature increase, the increase of the peak electricity load varies between 0.45% and 4.6%. This corresponds to an additional electricity penalty of about 21 (±10.4) W per degree of temperature increase and per person. In parallel, analysis of fifteen studies examining the impact of ambient temperature on the total electricity consumption, showed that the actual increase of the electricity demand per degree of temperature increase varies between 0.5% and 8.5%.

M. Santamouris; C. Cartalis; A. Synnefa; D. Kolokotsa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Buildings Share of U.S. Electricity Consumption/Sales (Percent) Buildings Delivered Total | Total Industry Transportation Total (10^15 Btu) 1980 | 60.9% 38.9% 0.2% 100% | 7.15 1981 | 61.4% 38.5% 0.1% 100% | 7.33 1982 | 64.1% 35.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.12 1983 | 63.8% 36.1% 0.2% 100% | 7.34 1984 | 63.2% 36.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.80 1985 | 63.8% 36.0% 0.2% 100% | 7.93 1986 | 64.8% 35.1% 0.2% 100% | 8.08 1987 | 64.9% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 8.38 1988 | 65.0% 34.8% 0.2% 100% | 8.80 1989 | 64.8% 35.0% 0.2% 100% | 9.03 1990 | 65.0% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 9.26 1991 | 65.6% 34.3% 0.2% 100% | 9.42 1992 | 64.6% 35.2% 0.2% 100% | 9.43 1993 | 65.7% 34.1% 0.2% 100% | 9.76 1994 | 65.5% 34.3% 0.2% 100% | 10.01 1995 | 66.2% 33.6% 0.2% 100% | 10.28 1996 | 66.5% 33.3% 0.2% 100% | 10.58 1997 | 66.8% 33.0% 0.2% 100% | 10.73 1998 | 67.6% 32.2% 0.2% 100% | 11.14 1999 | 67.9% 32.0% 0.2% 100% | 11.30 2000 | 68.7% 31.1% 0.2% 100% | 11.67 2001 | 70.5% 29.4% 0.2% 100% |

279

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels on Electricity Bill Savings From Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels onof Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar EnergyImpact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels on

Darghouth, Naim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas "super-utility"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generated from renewable resources (USDOE 2008). 1 Thesethe requisite amount of renewable resources under cost-of-commercially-developed renewable resources or alternatively

Cappers, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas "super-utility"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and lower costs: Combining renewable energy and energydeveloping renewable energy projects under traditional cost-in the levelized cost of renewable energy under the “build”

Cappers, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Renewable Energy Futures (REF) calculations performed by: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research, and to the results of international agreements and mitigation. Further, assessments of possible societal

Reuter, Martin

283

Forecasting short-term electricity consumption using a semantics-based genetic programming framework: The South Italy case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Accurate and robust short-term load forecasting plays a significant role in electric power operations. This paper proposes a variant of genetic programming, improved by incorporating semantic awareness in algorithm, to address a short term load forecasting problem. The objective is to automatically generate models that could effectively and reliably predict energy consumption. The presented results, obtained considering a particularly interesting case of the South Italy area, show that the proposed approach outperforms state of the art methods. Hence, the proposed approach reveals appropriate for the problem of forecasting electricity consumption. This study, besides providing an important contribution to the energy load forecasting, confirms the suitability of genetic programming improved with semantic methods in addressing complex real-life applications.

Mauro Castelli; Leonardo Vanneschi; Matteo De Felice

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Renewable Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portfolio Standard Portfolio Standard Renewable Portfolio Standard < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Heating & Cooling Water Heating Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider New York State Energy Research and Development Authority The New York Public Service Commission (PSC) adopted a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) in September 2004 and issued implementation rules in April 2005. As originally designed, New York's RPS had a renewables target of 25% of state electricity consumption by 2013, but was expanded in January 2010 to 30% by 2015 by order of the PSC. Of this 30%, approximately 20.7% of the

285

Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of renewables in the energy mix. While the specifics vary,growing percentage of energy mix in the future. This chapterelectricity from RES in their energy mix. Most schemes allow

Haas, Reinhard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Categorization of residential electricity consumption as a basis for the assessment of the impacts of demand response actions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In a smart(er) grid context, the existence of dynamic tariffs and bidirectional communications will simultaneously allow and require an active role from the end-user concerning electricity management. However, the residential end-user will not be always available to manage energy resources and decide, based on price signals and preferences/needs, the best response actions to implement or the best usage of the electricity produced locally. Therefore, energy management systems are required to monitor consumption/generation/storage and to make the best decisions according to input signals and the user's needs and preferences. The design of adequate algorithms to be implemented in those systems require the prior characterization of domestic electricity demand and categorization of loads, according to availability, typical usage patterns, working cycles and technical constraints. Automated demand response actions must be tailored and chosen according to this previous analysis of load characteristics. In this paper, a characterization of household electricity consumption is presented and an operational categorization of end-use loads is proposed. The existing potential for demand response to a diversified set of management actions is described and a tool to assess the impact of implementing several actions with different rates of penetration of energy management systems is presented. The results obtained show the potential savings for the end-user and expected changes in the load diagram with a decrease of the aggregated peak electricity demand and a smoothed valley.

Ana Soares; Álvaro Gomes; Carlos Henggeler Antunes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Shares (Percent) Renewables Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 1980 15.7% 10.8% 50.2% 11.8% 0.2% 12.1% 11.3% (1) 100% 1981 15.4% 9.0% 51.8% 11.2% 0.3% 11.4% 12.3% (1) 100% 1982 13.9% 6.6% 52.6% 13.6% 0.2% 13.8% 13.1% (1) 100% 1983 12.2% 6.3% 53.9% 14.3% 0.3% 14.6% 13.1% (1) 100% 1984 12.6% 5.1% 54.9% 13.2% 0.4% 13.5% 14.0% (1) 100% 1985 12.1% 4.2% 56.2% 11.3% 0.4% 11.8% 15.7% (1) 100% 1986 10.2% 5.6% 55.3% 11.7% 0.5% 12.1% 16.8% (1) 100% 1987 10.9% 4.7% 56.5% 9.7% 0.5% 10.2% 17.8% (1) 100% 1988 9.5% 5.6% 56.5% 8.2% 0.4% 8.6% 19.9% (1) 100% 1989 10.5% 5.7% 54.2% 9.4% 1.4% 10.8% 18.8% (1) 100% 1990 10.7% 4.2% 53.4% 9.9% 1.7% 11.6% 20.0% (1) 100% 1991 11.0% 3.9% 52.8% 9.7% 1.8% 11.5% 20.9% (1) 100% 1992 11.5% 3.2% 53.7% 8.4% 2.0% 10.4% 21.1% (1) 100% 1993 11.1% 3.5% 54.2% 9.0% 2.0% 11.0% 20.2% (1) 100% 1994 12.4% 3.3% 53.5%

288

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 U.S. Renewable Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Conv. Hydropower Geothermal Municipal Solid Waste Biomass Solar Thermal Solar PV Wind 1980 81.7 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. N.A. 1981 82.4 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1982 83.0 1.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1983 83.9 1.2 0.0 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1984 85.3 1.2 0.0 0.3 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1985 88.9 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1986 89.3 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1987 89.7 1.5 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1988 90.3 1.7 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1989 73.6 2.6 1.7 1.1 0.2 N.A. 1.5 1990 73.3 2.7 2.1 1.2 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1991 75.4 2.6 2.5 1.3 0.3 N.A. 1.9 1992 74.2 2.9 2.5 1.4 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1993 76.8 2.9 2.6 1.5 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1994 76.9 3.0 2.7 1.7 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1995 77.4 3.0 3.0 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1996 75.3 2.9 2.9 1.7 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1997 78.3 2.9 2.9 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.6 1998 78.0 2.9 3.0 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1999 78.3 2.8 3.0 1.8 0.4 N.A. 2.3 2000 78.2 2.8 3.3 1.7 0.4 N.A. 2.4 2001 77.9 2.2

289

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Renewable Electricity Generation Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout - Renewable Electricity Generation Office of Energy Efficiency and...

290

Integration of renewable energy into the transport and electricity sectors through V2G  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: V2G Vehicle to grid Energy system analysis Sustainable energy systems Electric vehicle EV for electricity, transport and heat, includes hourly fluctuations in human needs and the environment (wind energy systems allows integration of much higher levels of wind electricity without excess electric

Firestone, Jeremy

291

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption, long lifetime on batteries, low sample rates,instead of replying on batteries. At the same time, we arelow power operation on batteries is not required, since the

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Sensitivity to electricity consumption in urban business and commercial area buildings according to climatic change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, urban high temperature phenomenon has become a problem which results from human activities, the increase in energy consumption, and land-cover change in urban areas ... is increased and results in the d...

Kang-guk Lee; Sung-bum Kim; Won-hwa Hong

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Supplementing an emissions tax by a feed-in tariff for renewable electricity to address learning spillovers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the presence of learning spillovers related to renewable energy technologies, an optimal strategy to mitigate climate change should complement an emissions tax by a subsidy for renewables. This article addresses the question how such subsidy should be designed. It is shown that the widely-used approach of a revenue-neutral fixed feed-in tariff can yield an optimal outcome under restrictive conditions only. It has to be adapted continuously as the electricity price changes. Moreover, funding the tariff by a surcharge on the electricity price has important implications for the design of the emission tax. The optimal tax rate has to be below the Pigovian level, differentiated across fossil fuels and adapted over time as the patterns of technological development change. These requirements may pose a formidable challenge for practical decision-making. However, it is important to point out that the eventual choices made with respect to the design and funding of a feed-in tariff have to be based on a careful and more comprehensive policy assessment, including, inter alia, economic effects beyond the electricity sector and existing institutional constraints.

Paul Lehmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Potential of using olive pomace as a source of renewable energy for electricity generation in the Kingdom of Jordan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the potential of using olive pomace as a clean renewable and reliable source of energy that has the potential to contribute to the total energy supply of the Kingdom of Jordan. Available data were first compiled on available quantities of this raw material in Jordan calculating the useful stored energy that can be eventually converted into electricity. The data then were reflected against the energy demand in Jordan. Finally recommendations on the prospect of this alternative energysource would be made. Statistical data for electricity demand in the Kingdom of Jordan show a growth by around 7.4% in 2010 compared to 2009 and an electric peak load increases by 15%. The Kingdom's local crude oil and natural gas production are contributing only 2.8% of the total energy needs of the country and the rest is being imported while renewable sources share to the energy mix has not exceeded 2% as of 2010. Therefore the need for new energysources is highly imperative.

Oraib Al-Ketan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E. Kahn (2011). Electricity Consumption and Durable Housing:49 3.3.3. Pre-installation electricity consumption of CSIon Electricity Consumption .

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Determining the best source of renewable electricity to power a remote site for the National Park Service  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable energy technologies have economic and environmental advantages in many remote applications. They can provide most of the power to off-grid loads, where batteries and another power source such as a generator or a fuel cell may be required to ensure availability and feasibility. In support of the National Park Service, the Federal Energy Management Program Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has evaluated several methods for providing a renewable source of electricity to a beach campsite at Kirby Cove, Marin County, California. This site requires 2 kWh per day to power a campground host in a motor home five months power year. The existing electricity line to the site is in need of replacement and the NPS is interested in evaluating more cost-effective and environmentally sensitive alternatives. Photovoltaics, tidal current, and wind power systems in combination with a back-up electric system (standard, thermoelectric, and Stirling generator and fuel cell) and an energy storage medium (battery, flywheel, and hydrogen) were analyzed. Multi-objective optimization criteria include initial cost, operating cost, emissions, maintenance requirements, and to be consistent with the NPS requirements, the system must be clean, silent, and sustainable. The best system combination was designed according to these evaluation criteria and a demonstration system is to be constructed. This paper describes the optimization procedure and design. Results indicate that a 800 Watt photovoltaic array with a hydrogen fuel cell best serves the requirements for clean, silent power. Since fuel cells are developmental, a propane generator is recommended as an alternative.

Azerbegl, R.; Mas, C.; Walker, A.; Morris, R.; Christensen, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has five submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, solar, and wind; a sixth renewable, conventional hydroelectric power, is represented in the Electricity Market Module (EMM).109 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

298

The Consumption of Carbon in the Electric Arc. I. Variation with Current and Arc-Length. II. Influence upon the Luminous Radiation from the Arc  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 December 1915 research-article The Consumption of Carbon in the Electric Arc. I. Variation with Current and Arc-Length. II. Influence upon the Luminous Radiation from the...

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Electrical Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrical Characterization Electrical Characterization Laboratory may include: * Equipment manufacturers * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Energy Systems Integration Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam Carolyn.Elam@nrel.gov 303-275-4311 Electrical Characterization Laboratory Electrical Characterization Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) focuses on the detailed electrical characterization of components and systems. This laboratory allows researchers to test the ability of equipment to withstand high voltage surges and high current faults, including equipment using

300

Renewable energy annual 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents summary data on renewable energy consumption, the status of each of the primary renewable technologies, a profile of each of the associated industries, an analysis of topical issues related to renewable energy, and information on renewable energy projects worldwide. It is the second in a series of annual reports on renewable energy. The renewable energy resources included in the report are biomass (wood and ethanol); municipal solid waste, including waste-to-energy and landfill gas; geothermal; wind; and solar energy, including solar thermal and photovoltaic. The report also includes various appendices and a glossary.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Monthly/Annual Energy Review - renewable section  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Monthly and latest annual statistics on renewable energy production and consumption and overviews of fuel ethanol and biodiesel.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Effects of variable renewable power on a country-scale electricity system: High penetration of hydro power plants and wind farms in electricity generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present article analyses the effects caused by variable power. The analysis concerns a country-scale electricity system with a relatively high penetration of seasonally variable hydro power plants and wind farms in the total electricity generation in 2030. For this purpose, the Latvian electricity system was chosen as an appropriate case study, as around half of its electricity is already generated from hydro power and numerous wind farm installations are planned for 2030. Results indicate that in such systems high renewable power variations occur between seasons causing a high probability of power deficit in the winter and power surplus in the spring. Based on the results, the wind farms' influence on the power deficit and surplus occurrences are discussed in detail. Wind farm generation decreases the probability of the electricity system being in power deficit, but increases the probability of the system being in power surplus. In the latter situation, the maximum value of power surplus increases since it is enhanced by the wind farm generation. Probability equations to express these changes are provided.

Arturs Purvins; Ioulia T. Papaioannou; Irina Oleinikova; Evangelos Tzimas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Renewable Hydrogen Economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Renewable energies usually claim to be the alternative to oil. Renewable energies provide us with electricity, heat and fuels from biomass. Thus, these latter appear first as an energy alternative to oil. In f...

Roberto Bermejo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Renewable Energy Footprint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the shift toward renewable energy comes the potential for staggering land impacts – many millions of acres may be consumed to meet demand for electricity and fuel over the next 20 years. To conservationists’ dismay, the more renewable energy we...

Outka, Uma

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Evaluation of energy storage technologies for integration with renewable electricity: Quantifying expert opinions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solving climate change and the associated need for increasing renewable energy supply make energy storage a critical technological component of the future energy landscape. Research to build more reliable and cost-effective energy storage technologies is now on the rise. As a result, many new technologies and applications are evolving and competing. This paper presents a method to evaluate and select energy storage technologies for investor-owned or public utilities. For this purpose, energy storage applications which could benefit wind power in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States are identified through internal interviews and surveys with experts at the federal wholesale power marketing agency in Portland, Oregon. The study employs a technology evaluation process integrating fuzzy Delphi method, analytic hierarchy process and fuzzy consistent matrix. The result shows that compressed air storage is the most promising technology for sustainable growth of renewable energy in the region.

Tugrul U. Daim; Xin Li; Jisun Kim; Scott Simms

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Predicting electricity consumption and cost for South African mines / S.S. (Stephen) Cox.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Electricity costs in South Africa have risen steeply; there are a number of factors that have contributed to this increase. The increased costs have a… (more)

Cox, Samuel Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy flows in the building electrical load tree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .intrinsic property of energy load trees is additivity - thevisualization of energy flows in the load tree, as shown in

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels on Electricity Bill Savings From Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the costs of renewable energy procurement, the costs of theRE is the total costs of renewable energy procurement, r resThough the total costs of renewable energy procurement (C

Darghouth, Naim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of electricity retail rates or on the private economics ofelectricity rates and hence the customer economics of residential, behind-the-meter PV. We calculate the private

Barbose, Galen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently, total electricity consumption of furnaces isthe total furnace electricity consumption and are primarilyto calculate the electricity consumption during cooling

Franco, Victor; Florida Solar Energy Center

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in forecasting electricity consumption in the residentialmodeling, since household electricity consumption is largelyup forecasting of electricity consumption by combining

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

battery Utility electricity consumption Electricity providedis expressed in electricity consumption of the electricis expressed in electricity consumption of the electric

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Carbon emission and mitigation cost comparisons between fossil fuel, nuclear and renewable energy resources for electricity generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study was conducted to compare the electricity generation costs of a number of current commercial technologies with technologies expected to become commercially available within the coming decade or so. The amount of greenhouse gas emissions resulting per kWh of electricity generated were evaluated. A range of fossil fuel alternatives (with and without physical carbon sequestration), were compared with the baseline case of a pulverised coal, steam cycle power plant. Nuclear, hydro, wind, bioenergy and solar generating plants were also evaluated. The objectives were to assess the comparative costs of mitigation per tonne of carbon emissions avoided, and to estimate the total amount of carbon mitigation that could result from the global electricity sector by 2010 and 2020 as a result of fuel switching, carbon dioxide sequestration and the greater uptake of renewable energy. Most technologies showed potential to reduce both generating costs and carbon emission avoidance by 2020 with the exception of solar power and carbon dioxide sequestration. The global electricity industry has potential to reduce its carbon emissions by over 15% by 2020 together with cost saving benefits compared with existing generation.

Ralph E.H. Sims; Hans-Holger Rogner; Ken Gregory

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Barriers to green electricity subscription in Australia: “Love the environment, love renewable energy … but why should I pay more?”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Although a large proportion of the Australian public express concern for the environment and support various ‘green’ initiatives, attitude-consistent behaviour is rarely observed. Rather, daily life illustrates that when pro-environmental action incurs personal risks, costs or losses, people often fail to behave in an environmentally friendly manner. One example of this divergence between self-reported attitudes and observed behaviour is the low subscription rate of Australian householders to low-emission ‘green’ electricity, which is typically perceived as more environmentally friendly but also more expensive than conventional ‘grey’ electricity. To identify some key factors underpinning this low subscription rate, a large national survey was conducted with over 900 Australian energy consumers who had not subscribed to the National GreenPower Programme. A quantitative analysis of qualitative data indicated that a range of self-reported reasons were significant barriers to subscription – including financial costs, limited knowledge, awareness and availability of green electricity programmes, and already engaging in other energy efficiency behaviour (e.g. renewable energy generation). Together, the results from this study suggest that currently low subscription rates may potentially be increased by improving public awareness and understanding of green electricity, alongside implementing behaviour change strategies and policies that harness principles from behavioural economics and social psychology.

Elizabeth V. Hobman; Elisha R. Frederiks

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

The Department of Energy's Renewable Energy Efforts, OAS-M-12-04  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Energy Efforts Renewable Energy Efforts OAS-M-12-04 April 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 30, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Department of Energy's Renewable Energy Efforts" BACKGROUND In an effort to promote generation of renewable energy, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) requires that by Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 at least 7.5 percent of a Federal agency's annual electricity consumption be from renewable sources. Renewable sources include wind, solar, geothermal, hydropower, and various forms of biomass. Agencies can obtain renewable energy

316

A Clustering Model for Mining Consumption Patterns from Imprecise Electric Load Time Series Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel clustering model for mining patterns from imprecise electric load time series. The model consists of three components. First, it contains a process that deals with representation an...

Qiudan Li; Stephen Shaoyi Liao; Dandan Li

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Understanding Socio-Economic Driving Factors of Indonesian Households Electricity Consumption in Two Urban Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indonesia is one of the most diverse countries in the world in terms of its society. Therefore, there are several different characteristics in daily practices, including in consuming electricity. In order to unde...

Muhammad Ery Wijaya; Tetsuo Tezuka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Improvements in Test Protocols for Electric Vehicles to Determine Range and Total Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As electric vehicles have entered the market fairly recently, ... tested the same way as the ICE-driven cars with the exception that determining range is ... However, the current procedures address mainly primary...

Juhani Laurikko; Jukka Nuottimäki…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 System Architecture 3.1 Building as a2.1 Energy Flows in Buildings . . . . . . . . 2.1.1 Electric2.3.2 Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 Building Energy

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Warming to Renewable Energy: Policies to Promote Renewable Heat in the UK   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 2009, the UK government set a target of achieving 15% of overall energy consumption from renewable sources by 2020, as part of the EU's goals of reducing emission levels within the EU and increasing consumption from renewable energy sources...

Hawkins, Henry R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

certification procedure for wind turbines as early as 1978electricity from onshore wind turbines between 2003 and 2005from abroad, may own wind turbines in Denmark. At the end of

Haas, Reinhard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrated solar power (CSP), and wind penetrations in theis met by wind, solar PV, concentrating solar power with 6schemes on power prices: The case of wind electricity in

Barbose, Galen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Embedding renewable energy pricing policies in day-ahead electricity market clearing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Since the 90s various policies have been applied for supporting the development of Renewable Energy Sources (RES), including quota or amount-based systems and price-based systems (feed-in tariffs or “FiT”). In both cases, there is a political stress when there is a need to increase the renewable uplift charge rates (out-of-market mechanism), in order to finance the RES projects. This issue is resolved by adopting a novel market framework, in which the demand entities’ clearing price entails the whole cost they are willing to pay for their participation in the energy market, including energy prices, reserve prices and the RES uplift price. A Mixed Complementarity Problem is utilized for clearing the market, in which the demand clearing prices are implicitly defined by mixing the explicit prices for energy, reserves and the RES uplift. The model retains the consistency of the supply (energy and reserves) and demand cleared quantities with the respective bids and the clearing prices, and attains a significant decrease of the payments through the relevant uplift accounts. The efficiency of the proposed model is demonstrated on a 24-h day-ahead market simulation using the IEEE RTS-96, defining endogenously the RES uplift under a system-wide FiT and a Green Certificate mechanism.

Andreas G. Vlachos; Pandelis N. Biskas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Electricity - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Find statistics on electric power plants, capacity, generation, fuel Find statistics on electric power plants, capacity, generation, fuel consumption, sales, prices and customers. + EXPAND ALL Summary Additional formats Summary electricity statistics 2001-2011 › XLS Supply and disposition of electricity 2002-2011 › XLS Electricity overview › Generation, retail sales, electricity trade, losses PDF XLS Consumption for electricity generation › Fossil and renewable fuel consumption for electricity generation PDF XLS Generating capacity › Electric net summer capacity by specific energy source more on electricity PDF XLS Monthly electricity overview - back to 1973 CSV PDF XLS Latest month total electric power industry summary statistics › Overview XLS Year-to-date total electric power industry summary statistics ›

325

Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many countries--reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems--are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy (RE) on the grid. Australia (South Australia), Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Spain, and the United States (Colorado and Texas), for example, have effectively integrated variable RE utilizing diverse approaches. Analysis of the results from these case studies reveals a wide range of mechanisms that can be used to accommodate high penetrations of variable RE (e.g., from new market designs to centralized planning). Nevertheless, the myriad approaches collectively suggest that governments can best enable variable RE grid integration by implementing best practices in five areas of intervention: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations.

Not Available

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Evolution of Wholesale Electricity Market Design with Increasing Levels of Renewable Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable generation such as wind and photovoltaic solar power has increased substantially in recent years. Variable generation has unique characteristics compared to the traditional technologies that supply energy in the wholesale electricity markets. These characteristics create unique challenges in planning and operating the power system, and they can also influence the performance and outcomes from electricity markets. This report focuses on two particular issues related to market design: revenue sufficiency for long-term reliability and incentivizing flexibility in short-term operations. The report provides an overview of current design and some designs that have been proposed by industry or researchers.

Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Bloom, A.; Botterud, A.; Townsend, A.; Levin, T.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. STEP 1 Assess the Local Industry and Resource Potential STEP 2 Identify Challenges to Local Development STEP 3 Evaluate Current Policy STEP 4 Consider Policy Options STEP 5 Implement Policies Increased Development Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation This document identifies and describes five steps for implementing geothermal policies that may reduce barriers and result in deployment and implementation of geothermal technologies that can be used for electricity generation, such as conventional hydrothermal, enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), geopressured, co-production, and low temperature geothermal resources. Step 1: Assess the Local Industry and Resource Potential Increasing the use of geothermal

328

Smart Beijing: Correlation of Urban Electrical Energy Consumption with Urban Environmental Sensing for Optimizing Distribution Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameters (air quality, noise pollution, traffic levels, water quality, etc.) in a distributed manner and create anomolies in pollution levels in specific locations, such as sporting events, rallies and fairs pollution and a series of other social problems. The urban electrical energy development has also been

Beigl, Michael

329

A Supply Chain Network Perspective for Electric Power Generation, Supply, Transmission, and Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the economics of power production. For example, new gas-fired combined cycle power plants are more effi- cientA Supply Chain Network Perspective for Electric Power Generation, Supply, Transmission the behavior of the various decision-makers, who operate in a decentralized manner and include power generators

Nagurney, Anna

330

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Renewable Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind1. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost energy storage systems.

331

Clean Cities Now, Vol. 15, No. 1, April 2011: Plugging In, Cities are planning for electric vehicle infrastructure (Brochure), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 April 2011 Clean Cities TV to Broadcast Coalition Successes Keeping Trash from Going to Waste with Renewable Natural Gas Renewable Fuels in New Jersey Raleigh, NC Los Angeles, CA Houston, TX Oregon Cities are planning for electric vehicle infrastructure Plugging In Dear Readers, In preparation for the widespread adoption of all-electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, city officials, utility companies, and local leaders are working together to speed up permitting processes for installing home charging equipment. To help cities navigate this new territory, Clean Cities devel- oped case studies detailing the experiences of four electric vehicle pacesetters-the state of Oregon, Houston, Los Angeles, and Raleigh, North Carolina-that are leading the charge. Our feature article on

332

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 U.S. Electric Power Sector Cumulative Power Plant Additions Needed to Meet Future Electricity Demand (1) Typical New Number of New Power Plants to Meet Demand Electric Generator Plant Capacity (MW) 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Coal Steam 1,300 7 8 8 8 8 Combined Cycle 540 28 29 43 79 130 Combustion Turbine/Diesel 148 62 105 174 250 284 Nuclear Power 2,236 1 3 3 3 4 Pumped Storage 147 (2) 0 0 0 0 0 Fuel Cells 10 0 0 0 0 0 Conventional Hydropower 20 (2) 20 47 81 125 185 Geothermal 50 9 26 41 62 81 Municipal Solid Waste 50 1 1 1 1 1 Wood and Other Biomass 50 5 5 5 5 6 Solar Thermal 100 9 9 9 9 9 Solar Photovoltaic 150 11 11 13 23 52 Wind 100 123 124 153 182 262 Total 277 372 538 760 1,041 Distributed Generation 148 (3) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Cumulative additions after Dec. 31, 2010. 2) Based on current stock average capacity. 3) Combustion turbine/diesel data used.

333

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Table C22. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace...

334

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

335

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

336

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

337

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

338

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

339

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

340

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels on Electricity Bill Savings From Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Renewable Energy, Solar Technologies Program of the U.S.Renewable Energy (Solar Energy Technologies Program) and thetechnologies, both utility-scale and behind-the-meter. Future installations of residential solar

Darghouth, Naim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Optimized energy management for large organizations utilizing an on-site PHEV fleet, storage devices and renewable electricity generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Note that this paper does not make decisions about when/how to use renewable generation. The scope of this study is to consider the power generated by renewable resources as a source of power with distinct cost o...

Yogesh Dashora; J. Wesley Barnes; Rekha S. Pillai; Todd Combs…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Factual Introduction to Experience from the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric Markets: The Renewables Portfolio Standard. ” TheDuckworth. “Can We Afford a Renewables Portfolio Standard? ”Consensus on National Renewables Policy: The Renewables

Wiser, R.; Namovicz, C.; Gielecki, M.; Smith, R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Recharging U.S. Energy Policy: Advocating for a National Renewable Portfolio Standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for sup- porting renewable energy growth. 106 The Europeanfa- cilitate renewable energy production growth in the E.U.renewable energy and support renewable electricity's growth.

Lunt, Robin J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Effective Renewable Energy Policy: Leave It to the States?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Berkeley Effective Renewable Energy Policy: Leave It to therealities related to renewable energy policy suggest thatof a new energy policy—using renewable electric generation

Weissman, Steven

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

NREL: News - NREL Releases the 2013 Renewable Energy Data Book...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

newly released 2013 Renewable Energy Data Book illustrates United States and global energy statistics, including renewable electricity generation, renewable energy development,...

346

Managing R&D Risk in Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from 2007. Table 6: Renewable Energy Costs, Transportationmegajoules. Table 7: Renewable Energy Costs, Electricity ($/1: DOE Renewable Energy Milestones cellulosic ethanol cost

Rausser, Gordon C.; Papineau, Maya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Simulation and analysis of a solar assisted heat pump system with two different storage types for high levels of PV electricity self-consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The incentives for PV-systems in Europe is being gradually lowered or ended. This makes a higher level of self-consumption interesting for owners of PV-systems. Sweden has an incentive of 35% of the investment cost for PV-systems. Unfortunately not all consumers can get this incentive. Therefore a high level of self-consumption will be necessary if the PV-systems are to be profitable in Sweden. A reference system with two different energy storage technologies is investigated in this paper. One system with 48 kW h of batteries and one system with a hot water storage tank where the electricity is stored as heat. The research questions in this paper are: Which storage system gives the highest level of PV electricity self-consumption? Are the storage systems profitable with the assumptions made in this paper? What are the levelized costs of electricity (LCOE) for the reference system with different storage system? The system with batteries has a self-consumption of 89% of the annual PV-electricity output and the system with a hot water storage tank has 88%. The system with batteries has a levelized cost of electricity two times higher than the system with a hot water storage tank.

Richard Thygesen; Björn Karlsson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Energy Consumption U.S. Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector Share of Energy Consumed byEnergy Efficiency & Renewable Energy 2010 Fuel Cell Project Kick-off Dr. Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Fuel Cells Team Leader U.S. Department of Energy gy Fuel Cell Technologies Program September 28

349

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) June 2011 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2009 2009 Consumption Summary Tables Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2009 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/ Losses f Net Electricity Imports Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,906.8 631.0 473.9 583.9 1,688.8 415.4 272.9 -470.3 0.0 383.2 266.0 788.5 469.2 Alaska 630.4 14.5 344.0 255.7 614.1 0.0 16.3 0.0 (s) 53.4 61.0 325.4 190.6 Arizona 1,454.3 413.3 376.7 520.8 1,310.8 320.7 103.5 -279.9 -0.8 400.8 352.1 207.8 493.6 Arkansas 1,054.8 264.1 248.1 343.1 855.3 158.7 126.5 -85.7 0.0 226.3 167.0 372.5

350

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nations around the world pursue a variety of sustainable nations around the world pursue a variety of sustainable transportation solutions, the hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) presents a promising opportunity for American consumers and automakers. FCEVs are important to our nation's future because they can: * Play an important role in our portfolio of sustainable transportation options * Provide a cost-competitive, appealing alternative for drivers * Reduce dependence on imported oil and diversify energy sources for transportation * Enable global economic leadership and job growth. Offering a Sustainable Transportation Option Americans have tremendous freedom to travel wherever and whenever they want. Ninety percent of travel in the United States is achieved by automobiles that refuel quickly

351

Impact of Generator Flexibility on Electric System Costs and Integration of Renewable Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flexibility of traditional generators plays an important role in accommodating the increased variability and uncertainty of wind and solar on the electric power system. Increased flexibility can be achieved with changes to operational practices or upgrades to existing generation. One challenge is in understanding the value of increasing flexibility, and how this value may change given higher levels of variable generation. This study uses a commercial production cost model to measure the impact of generator flexibility on the integration of wind and solar generators. We use a system that is based on two balancing areas in the Western United States with a range of wind and solar penetrations between 15% and 60%, where instantaneous penetration of wind and solar is limited to 80%.

Palchak, D.; Denholm, P.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 U.S. Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Coal Steam Other Fossil Combine Cycle Combustion Turbine Nuclear Pumped Total 1980 0.0 1981 0.0 1982 0.0 1983 0.0 1984 0.0 1985 0.0 1986 0.0 1987 0.0 1988 0.0 1989 18.1 1990 19.5 1991 18.4 1992 21.2 1993 21.1 1994 21.2 1995 21.4 1996 21.1 1997 19.3 1998 19.5 1999 19.6 2000 19.5 2001 19.7 2002 20.4 2003 20.5 2004 20.8 2005 21.3 2006 21.5 2007 21.9 2008 21.9 2009 22.2 2010 22.2 2011 22.2 2012 22.2 2013 22.2 2014 22.2 2015 22.2 2016 22.2 2017 22.2 2018 22.2 2019 22.2 2020 22.2 2021 22.2 2022 22.2 2023 22.2 2024 22.2 2025 22.2 2026 22.2 2027 22.2 2028 22.2 2029 22.2 285.6 87.9 211.3 161.19 114.7 882.9 285.6 87.9 205.3 159.30 114.7 875.0 285.6 88.6 201.8 159.01 114.7 871.8 285.6 88.9 199.6 158.22 114.7 869.2 285.6 89.0 194.5 154.88 114.7 860.8 285.6 89.0 191.9 153.01 113.9 855.6 285.6 89.0 189.2 150.00 113.2

353

Novel effects of demand side management data on accuracy of electrical energy consumption modeling and long-term forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Worldwide implementation of demand side management (DSM) programs has had positive impacts on electrical energy consumption (EEC) and the examination of their effects on long-term forecasting is warranted. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of historical DSM data on accuracy of EEC modeling and long-term forecasting. To achieve the objective, optimal artificial neural network (ANN) models based on improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO) and shuffled frog-leaping (SFL) algorithms are developed for EEC forecasting. For long-term EEC modeling and forecasting for the U.S. for 2010–2030, two historical data types used in conjunction with developed models include (i) EEC and (ii) socio-economic indicators, namely, gross domestic product, energy imports, energy exports, and population for 1967–2009 period. Simulation results from IPSO-ANN and SFL-ANN models show that using socio-economic indicators as input data achieves lower mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) for long-term EEC forecasting, as compared with EEC data. Based on IPSO-ANN, it is found that, for the U.S. EEC long-term forecasting, the addition of DSM data to socio-economic indicators data reduces MAPE by 36% and results in the estimated difference of 3592.8 MBOE (5849.9 TW h) in EEC for 2010–2030.

F.J. Ardakani; M.M. Ardehali

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

WILL RENEWABLE ENERGY SAVE OUR PLANET?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses some important fundamental issues behind application of renewable energy (RE) to evaluate its impact as a climate change mitigation technology. The discussed issues are the following: definition of renewable energy concentration of RE by weight and volume generation of electrical energy and its power at unit area electrical energy demand per unit area life time approach vs. layman approach energy return time energy return ratio CO 2 return time energy mix for RES production and use geographical distribution of RES use huge scale of energy shift from RES to non?RES increase in energy consumption Thermodynamic equilibrium of earth and probable solutions for energy future of our energy and environmental crisis of today.

Milorad Boji?

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Spanish energy roadmap to 2020: Socioeconomic implications of renewable targets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The European Union has established challenging targets for the share of renewable energies to be achieved by 2020; for Spain, 20% of the final energy consumption must be from renewable sources at such time. The aim of this paper is the analysis of the consequences for the electricity sector (in terms of excess cost of electricity, investment requirements, land occupation, CO2 emissions and overcapacity of conventional power) of several possibilities to comply with the desired targets. Scenarios are created from different hypotheses for energy demand, biofuel share in final energy in transport, contribution of renewables for heating and cooling, renewable electricity generation (generation mix, deployment rate, learning curves, land availability) and conventional power generation (lifetime of current installations, committed deployment, fossil fuel costs and CO2 emissions cost). A key input in the estimations presented is the technical potential and the cost of electricity from renewable sources, which have been estimated in previous, detailed studies by the present authors using a methodology based on a GIS (Geographical Information System) and high resolution meteorological data. Depending on the scenario, the attainment of the targets will lead to an increase in the cost of electricity from 19% to 37% with respect to 2007.

Antonio Gómez; Javier Zubizarreta; César Dopazo; Norberto Fueyo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Renewable Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Renewable Energy The WIPP Site Holds Promise as an Ideal Source of Renewable Energy Encompassing 16 square miles of open Chihuahuan desert with abundant sunshine and minimal surface roughness, the WIPP site is ideal for either solar- or wind-generated electricity production, demonstration or testing. In fact, WIPP is striving to take advantage of its abundance of sunshine and wind. The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management has created what is being called the Energy Park Initiative (EPI). This initiative's goal is to convert DOE facilities into assets by focusing on providing solutions for renewable energy technologies. WIPP, which has always been a DOE leader in terms of safety, has set the additional goal of trying to become the first DOE site operating with 100 percent clean energy. A team, consisting of representatives from CBFO, WTS, Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico State University, Texas Tech, the Carlsbad community and area utilities, have come up with several potential solutions. Members of the team are continuing to look into these solutions.

357

Renewables Portfolio Standard Procurement Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewables Portfolio Standard Procurement Plan November 2013 Roseville Electric 2090 Hilltop Circle Council will deliberate in public on the RPS Procurement Plan. Information distributed to the City Council regarding Roseville's renewable energy resources procurement status and future plans for consideration

358

Combining forecasts of electricity consumption in China with time-varying weights updated by a high-order Markov chain model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Electricity consumption forecasting has been always playing a vital role in power system management and planning. Inaccurate prediction may cause wastes of scarce energy resource or electricity shortages. However, forecasting electricity consumption has proven to be a challenging task due to various unstable factors. Especially, China is undergoing a period of economic transition, which highlights this difficulty. This paper proposes a time-varying-weight combining method, i.e. High-order Markov chain based Time-varying Weighted Average (HM-TWA) method to predict the monthly electricity consumption in China. HM-TWA first calculates the in-sample time-varying combining weights by quadratic programming for the individual forecasts. Then it predicts the out-of-sample time-varying adaptive weights through extrapolating these in-sample weights using a high-order Markov chain model. Finally, the combined forecasts can be obtained. In addition, to ensure that the sample data have the same properties as the required forecasts, a reasonable multi-step-ahead forecasting scheme is designed for HM-TWA. The out-of-sample forecasting performance evaluation shows that HM-TWA outperforms the component models and traditional combining methods, and its effectiveness is further verified by comparing it with some other existing models.

Weigang Zhao; Jianzhou Wang; Haiyan Lu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Renewable energy has political support, room to grow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable energy sources enjoy growing political support and have plenty of room to grow in the worldwide energy mix. And grow they will, according to most projections. The US Energy Information Administration`s (EIA`s) International Energy Outlook 1997 says consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewables will increase by 56% during 1995--2015. The renewable share of the total energy mix will remain at about current levels, however. The EIA projection includes only renewable fuels used in the generation of electricity. It therefore excludes most biomass energy. Despite the importance of biomass energy, data on consumption of it are sparse. IEA estimates that in the industrialized world, the biomass share of primary energy consumption amounts to 3.5%. Also excluded from EIA`s projection because of insufficiency of data are dispersed renewables, a category that includes energy consumed at the site of production, such as solar panels used for water heating. This paper discusses regional trends, North American activity, Western Europe, Asian developments, and the rest of the world.

NONE

1997-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

360

Vehicle to Micro-Grid: Leveraging Existing Assets for Reliable Energy Management (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Micro-Grid: Leveraging Existing Assets for Reliable Energy Management to Micro-Grid: Leveraging Existing Assets for Reliable Energy Management Mike Simpson, Tony Markel, and Michael O'Keefe National Renewable Energy Laboratory INTRODUCTION OPPORTUNITY National Renewable Energy Laboratory Presented at the 4th International Conference on Integration of Renewable & Distributed Energy Resources, December 6-10 , 2010 * Albuquerque, New Mexico U.S. military bases, such as Fort Carson, are interested in opportunities to lower energy consumption and use renewable resources. l Electricity GCV Micro-Grid The Smith Electric Newton all-electric truck Fort Carson Photovoltaic Installation NREL PIX 17631 NREL PIX # 17394 Natural Gas Renewable Energy Truck Fleet Diesel Generators

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Modelling household electricity consumption.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A number of conclusions are drawn, however given the limited and non-representative na- ture of the data on which the model is calibrated, these can… (more)

de la Rue, Philip Martin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

renewable.gif (4875 bytes) renewable.gif (4875 bytes) The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) consists of five distinct submodules that represent the major renewable energy technologies. Although it is described here, conventional hydroelectric is included in the Electricity Market Module (EMM) and is not part of the RFM. Similarly, ethanol modeling is included in the Petroleum Market Module (PMM). Some renewables, such as municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not require the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using wind, solar, and geothermal energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittence, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

363

Current conflicts in U.S. Electric transmission planning, cost allocation and renewable energy policies: More heat than light?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To surmount obstacles to expanding and upgrading the nation's transmission system that are impeding development of the renewables sector, it is critical that these issues be resolved quickly and on a consistent rather than ad hoc basis. (author)

Bloom, David; Forrester, J. Paul; Klugman, Nadav

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Renewables Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewables Portfolio Standard Renewables Portfolio Standard Renewables Portfolio Standard < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Retail Supplier Savings Category Other Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Connecticut Public Utilities Regulatory Authority Established in 1998 and subsequently revised several times, Connecticut's renewables portfolio standard (RPS) requires each electric supplier and each electric distribution company wholesale supplier to obtain at least 23% of its retail load by using renewable energy by January 1, 2020. The RPS also requires each electric supplier and each electric distribution

365

Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems: Sensitivities to Changes in Future Electricity Market Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USA. CEC, 2012. Electricity Consumption by Planning http://beyond their electricity consumption within each hour. Overwith significant electricity consumption. The variation in

Darghouth, Naim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Renewable Portfolio Standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydroelectric Project as its original baseline eligible renewable energy resource project, and MID also hydroelectric unit, the Stone Drop Electric Generation Station (the Stone Drop Station). The Stone Drop

367

NREL Reveals Links Among Climate Control, Battery Life, and Electric Vehicle Range (Fact Sheet), Innovation: The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reveals Links Among Reveals Links Among Climate Control, Battery Life, and Electric Vehicle Range Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are providing new insights into the relationships between the climate-control systems of plug-in electric vehicles and the distances these vehicles can travel on a single charge. In particular, NREL research has determined that "preconditioning" a vehicle- achieving a comfortable cabin temperature and preheating or precooling the battery while the vehicle is still plugged in-can extend its driving range and improve battery life over the long term. One of the most significant barriers to widespread deployment of electric vehicles is range anxiety-a driver's uncertainty about the vehicle's ability to reach a destination before fully

368

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

369

Renewable energy in Armenia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Armenia does not have any fossil fuel or coal reserves; therefore, it is entirely dependent on the imported fuel for transportation, electricity generation, and heat production. Armenian Government has plans to develop renewable energy resources. Renewable energy may not be the major source of energy development in Armenia but it should be an important component of it. A renewable energy road map for Armenia was prepared to evaluate feasible and reasonable renewable energy resources and plan a course of action for utilising them. This paper is a summary of the findings and conclusions of the studies and the roadmap.

Tamara Babayan; Areg Gharabegian; Artak Hambarian; Morten Sondergaard; Kenell Touryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

THE NEXUS BETWEEN ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN OECD COUNTRIES: A DECOMPOSITION ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 THE NEXUS BETWEEN ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN OECD COUNTRIES: A DECOMPOSITION the impacts of renewable and non-renewable energy consumption on economic activities to find out whether and both renewable and non-renewable energy consumption in the short- and long run. This finding confirms

371

Renewable Energy Goal | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Energy Goal Renewable Energy Goal Renewable Energy Goal < Back Eligibility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Energy Sources Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Oklahoma Corporation Commission In May 2010, Oklahoma established a renewable energy goal for electric utilities operating in the state. The goal calls for 15% of the total installed generation capacity in Oklahoma to be derived from renewable sources by 2015. There are no interim targets, and the goal does not extend past 2015. Eligible renewable energy resources include wind, solar, hydropower, hydrogen, geothermal, biomass, and other renewable energy

372

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module Renewable Fuels Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for forecasts of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources, biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind.112 Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was one of the first electric generation technologies, to newer power systems using biomass, geothermal, LFG, solar, and wind energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon the availability of low-cost energy storage systems.

373

Challenges in Integrating Renewable Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. To seamlessly integrate renewable resources in the grid, research and development must address challenges reliability and econ- omy. The challenges of integrating high penetrations of renewable energy technologiesChallenges in Integrating Renewable Technologies into an Electric Power System White Paper Power

374

OpenEI - consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91/0 en Operational water 91/0 en Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/969 This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions.

License

375

One of These Homes is Not Like the Other: Residential Energy Consumption Variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption. Total energy consumption (in thousand BTUs) waselectricity and total energy consumption. Because all homesin gas, electric, and total energy consumption. Removing

Kelsven, Phillip

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Purchasing Renewable Power | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technologies » Renewable Energy » Purchasing Renewable Power Technologies » Renewable Energy » Purchasing Renewable Power Purchasing Renewable Power October 7, 2013 - 9:43am Addthis Federal agencies can purchase renewable power or renewable energy certificates (RECs) from a utility or other organization to meet Federal renewable energy requirements. Renewable power and RECs are good choices for facilities where on-site projects may be difficult or capital budgets are limited. There are three methods for purchasing renewable power that's not generated on a Federal site: Renewable Energy Certificates: Also known as renewable energy credits, green certificates, green tags, or tradable renewable certificates, RECs represent the environmental attributes of the power produced from renewable energy projects and are sold separately from commodity electricity. RECs

377

Renewables Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewables Portfolio Standard Renewables Portfolio Standard Renewables Portfolio Standard < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Wind Solar Home Weatherization Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission New Hampshire's renewable portfolio standard (RPS), established in May 2007, requires the state's electricity providers -- with the exception of municipal utilities -- to acquire by 2025 renewable energy certificates (RECs) equivalent to 24.8% of retail electricity sold to end-use customers.

378

Renewable energy sources for Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the basis of present consumption patterns and reserve estimates, Selim Estefan predicts that Egypt and other developing countries will face severe fossil fuel supply problems unless they invest now in rapid development of renewable sources. He outlines some of the Egyptian renewable energy projects currently underway or being studied, and argues that the immediate exploitation of indigenous renewable sources is both economically feasible and can be achieved with existing technology.

Selim F. Estefan

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Warming to Renewable Energy: Policies to Promote Renewable Heat in the UK.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In 2009, the UK government set a target of achieving 15% of overall energy consumption from renewable sources by 2020, as part of the EU's… (more)

Hawkins, Henry R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Features of a fully renewable US electricity system: Optimized mixes of wind and solar PV and transmission grid extensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduction goals as well as energy security, price stability, and affordability considerations make renewable, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA c Department of Physics, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark d University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 31 January 2014 Received

Jacobson, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

World energy consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical and projected world energy consumption information is displayed. The information is presented by region and fuel type, and includes a world total. Measurements are in quadrillion Btu. Sources of the information contained in the table are: (1) history--Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Annual 1992, DOE/EIA-0219(92); (2) projections--EIA, World Energy Projections System, 1994. Country amounts include an adjustment to account for electricity trade. Regions or country groups are shown as follows: (1) Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), US (not including US territories), which are included in other (ECD), Canada, Japan, OECD Europe, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, other Europe, and other OECD; (2) Eurasia--China, former Soviet Union, eastern Europe; (3) rest of world--Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and other countries not included in any other group. Fuel types include oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and other. Other includes hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, biomass, wind, and other renewable sources.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Sustainable Development of Renewable Energy Mini-grids for Energy Access: A Framework for Policy Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity supply,” Renewable and Sustainable EnergyGanapathy, “Decetralized Renewable Energy (DRE) Micro-gridsextension, off-grid and renewable energy sources,” in World

Deshmukh, Ranjit

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1: U.S. and International Renewable Hydrogen Demonstrationfueling station powered by renewable electricity. The systemand Natural Gas, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, U.S.

Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Fostering a Renewable Energy Technology Industry: An International Comparison of Wind Industry Policy Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Competitiveness in the Renewable Energy Sector: The CaseMechanisms to Incentive Renewable Alternative Energy Sourcesand Regulation Concerning Renewable Energy Electricity

Lewis, Joanna; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Energy-efficiency standards for homes have the potential to reduce energy consumption and peak electrical demand.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Issue Energy-efficiency standards for homes have the potential to reduce energy consumption HVAC system efficiency, including problems with airflows, refrigerant system components, and ductwork standards, but little data is available on the actu- al energy performance of new homes. The Solution

386

Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for 90% of household electricity consumption in China. Usinggives an annual electricity consumption of 12kWh assumingto look at is electricity consumption at the household

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Electric Vehicle Grid Integration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric Vehicle Grid Integration Project Electric Vehicle Grid Integration Project Plug-in electric vehicle charging at NREL. PEV charging in the VTIF. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL/PIX 19758 The Electric Vehicle Grid Integration Project supports the development and implementation of electrified transportation systems, particularly those that integrate renewable-based vehicle charging systems. Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs)-including all-electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs)-provide a new opportunity to reduce oil consumption by drawing on power from the electric grid. To maximize the benefits of PEVs, the emerging PEV infrastructure must provide access to clean electricity generated from renewable sources, satisfy driver expectations, and ensure safety. Value creation from systems

388

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure investment for reducing US gasoline consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Federal electric vehicle (EV) policies in the United States currently include vehicle purchase subsidies linked to EV battery capacity and subsidies for installing charging stations. We assess the cost-effectiveness of increased battery capacity vs. nondomestic charging infrastructure installation for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles as alternate methods to reduce gasoline consumption for cars, trucks, and \\{SUVs\\} in the US. We find across a wide range of scenarios that the least-cost solution is for more drivers to switch to low-capacity plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (short electric range with gasoline backup for long trips) or gasoline-powered hybrid electric vehicles. If more gasoline savings are needed per vehicle, nondomestic charging infrastructure installation is substantially more expensive than increased battery capacity per gallon saved, and both approaches have higher costs than US oil premium estimates. Cost effectiveness of all subsidies are lower under a binding fuel economy standard. Comparison of results to the structure of current federal subsidies shows that policy is not aligned with fuel savings potential, and we discuss issues and alternatives.

Scott B. Peterson; Jeremy J. Michalek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The Treatment of Renewable Energy Certificates, Emissions Allowances, and Green Power Programs in State Renewables Portfolio Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mexico: “…generation of electricity through the use of renewable energyMexico: Legislation passed in March 2007 defines a renewable energyrenewable energy standards or any voluntary clean electricity market or voluntary clean electricity program. ” New Mexico

Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan H.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Green Power Network: Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Table of Retail Products Table of Retail Products Table of Commercial Certificate Marketers List of REC Marketers REC Prices National Renewable Energy Certificate Tracking Systems Map Carbon Offsets State Policies Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) Renewable energy certificates (RECs), also known as renewable energy credits, green certificates, green tags, or tradable renewable certificates, represent the environmental attributes of the power produced from renewable energy projects and are sold separate from commodity electricity. Customers can buy green certificates whether or not they have access to green power through their local utility or a competitive electricity marketer. And they can purchase green certificates without having to switch electricity suppliers. Table of Retail Products

391

Renewable Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Portfolio Standard Renewable Portfolio Standard Renewable Portfolio Standard < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Home Weatherization Heating & Cooling Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Public Service Commission of Wisconsin In 1998 Wisconsin enacted Act 204, requiring regulated utilities in eastern Wisconsin to install to an aggregate total of 50 MW of new renewable-based electric capacity by December 31, 2000. In October 1999 Wisconsin enacted Act 9, becoming the first state to enact a renewable portfolio standard

392

2009 Renewable Energy Data Book, August 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Renewable Energy Data Book for 2009 provides facts and figures on energy in general, renewable electricity in the United States, global renewable energy development, wind power, solar energy, geothermal power, biopower, hydropower, advanced water power, hydrogen, renewable fuels, and clean energy investments.

Not Available

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

2013 Renewable Energy Data Book (Book)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Renewable Energy Data Book for 2013 provides facts and figures on energy in general, renewable electricity in the United States, global renewable energy development, wind power, solar power, geothermal power, biopower, hydropower, advanced water power, hydrogen, renewable fuels, and clean energy investment.

Esterly, S.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countries and what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004) Survey on Electricity Consumption Characteristics ofof residential electricity consumption in rapidly developingbusiness as usual’ electricity consumption by country/region

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Residen- iv tial Electricity Consumption 8 Introduction 9Observed residential electricity consumption 2003 to 2006total residential electricity consumption for 2006 by five-

Aroonruengsawat, Anin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Electric power annual 1997. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1 -- with a focus on US electric utilities -- contains final 1997 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1997 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on a monthly sample: Form EIA-826, ``Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions``). Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 167 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources: biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind [1]. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve the

398

Renewable Fuels Module This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuels Module Fuels Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 175 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Renewable Fuels Module The NEMS Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) provides natural resources supply and technology input information for projections of new central-station U.S. electricity generating capacity using renewable energy resources. The RFM has seven submodules representing various renewable energy sources: biomass, geothermal, conventional hydroelectricity, landfill gas, solar thermal, solar photovoltaics, and wind [1]. Some renewables, such as landfill gas (LFG) from municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as water, wind, and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not involve

399

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 . Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,931.3 651.0 614.8 549.5 1,815.4 411.8 260.6 -556.6 0.0 376.9 257.2 810.0 487.2 Alaska 637.9 15.5 337.0 267.1 619.6 0.0 18.4 0.0 (s) 53.7 68.2 315.4 200.7 Arizona 1,431.5 459.9 293.7 500.9 1,254.5 327.3 136.6 -288.4 1.5 394.7 345.5 221.2 470.1 Arkansas 1,117.1 306.1 288.6 335.7 930.5 148.5 123.7 -85.6 0.0 246.3 174.7 405.0 291.2 California 7,858.4 55.3 2,196.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 383.6 928.5 868.6 20.1 1,516.1 1,556.1 1,785.7 3,000.5 Colorado 1,480.8 368.9 476.5 472.9 1,318.3

400

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Public Charging Station Hosts (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Public Charging Station Hosts Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Public Charging Station Hosts 2 Table of Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PEV Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Charging Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Benefits and Costs of Hosting a Charging Station . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Charging Station Locations and Hosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Ownership and Payment Models . . . . . . 14 Installing and Maintaining Charging Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Electrifying the Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Clean Cities Helps Establish PEV Charging Stations Establishing plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging stations requires unique knowledge and skills . If you need help, contact your local Clean Cities coordinator . Clean Cities is the U .S . Department of Energy's flagship alterna- tive-transportation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Intelligent decision-making system with green pervasive computing for renewable energy business in electricity markets on smart grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is about the intelligent decision-making system for the smart grid based electricity market which requires distributed decision making on the competitive environments composed of many players and components. It is very important to consider ...

Dong-Joo Kang; Jong Hyuk Park; Sang-Soo Yeo

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetration Levels on Electricity Bill Savings From Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrated solar power (CSP), and wind penetrations in theis met by wind, solar PV, concentrating solar power with 6schemes on power prices: The case of wind electricity in

Barbose, Galen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Development of an electrical impedance computed tomographic two-phase flows analyzer. Annual technical report for program renewal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report details the theoretical development, numerical results, experimental design (mechanical), experimental design (electronic), and experimental results for the research program for the development of an electrical impedance computed tomographic two-phase flow analyzer.

Jones, O.C.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

NREL: Energy Analysis: High Renewable Generation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Renewable Generation High Renewable Generation Feasibility of Higher Levels of Renewable Electricity Deployment As requirements for renewable electricity generation increase, with some states now requiring as much as 30% renewables in their renewable portfolio standards (RPS), the question arises: how much can renewables contribute to future electricity demand? NREL's grid integration studies use state-of-the-art modeling and analysis techniques to evaluate the operational and infrastructure impacts of higher wind and solar penetrations at regional and national scales. NREL's grid integration studies show that: The U.S. electric system is operable with 20%-50% variable generation from wind and solar power in the regional and national scenarios examined to date. Increased electric system flexibility, needed to enable electricity

405

Federal Energy Management Program: Purchasing Renewable Power  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Purchasing Renewable Power Purchasing Renewable Power Federal agencies can purchase renewable power or renewable energy certificates (RECs) from a utility or other organization to meet Federal renewable energy requirements. Renewable power and RECs are good choices for facilities where on-site projects may be difficult or capital budgets are limited. There are three methods for purchasing renewable power that's not generated on a Federal site: Renewable Energy Certificates: Also known as renewable energy credits, green certificates, green tags, or tradable renewable certificates, RECs represent the environmental attributes of the power produced from renewable energy projects and are sold separately from commodity electricity. RECs are an attractive option for Federal facilities located where renewable power is not readily available.

406

Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Carbon Dioxide, and Mercury and a Renewable Portfolio Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 ERRATA Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Carbon Dioxide, and Mercury and a Renewable Portfolio Standard July 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This Service Report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Contacts This report was prepared by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Energy Information Adminis- tration. General questions concerning the report may be directed to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222, mhutzler @eia.doe.gov), Director of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Scott B. Sitzer (202/586-2308,

407

"State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " "State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production" ,"Coal a",,"Natural Gas b",,"Crude Oil c",,,,"Biofuels d",,"Other e",,"Total" ,"Trillion Btu" "Alabama",468.671,,226.821,,48.569,,411.822,,0,,245.307,,245.307,,1401.191 "Alaska",33.524,,404.72,,1188.008,,0,,0,,15.68,,15.68,,1641.933 "Arizona",174.841,,0.171,,0.215,,327.292,,7.784,,107.433,,115.217,,617.734 "Arkansas",2.985,,1090.87,,34.087,,148.531,,0,,113.532,,113.532,,1390.004 "California",0,,279.71,,1123.408,,383.644,,25.004,,812.786,,837.791,,2624.553

408

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Renewable Fuels Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Renewable Fuels Module (RFM) consists of five distinct submodules that represent the major renewable energy technologies. Although it is described here, conventional hydroelectric is included in the Electricity Market Module (EMM) and is not part of the RFM. Similarly, ethanol modeling is included in the Petroleum Market Module (PMM). Some renewables, such as municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass materials, are fuels in the conventional sense of the word, while others, such as wind and solar radiation, are energy sources that do not require the production or consumption of a fuel. Renewable technologies cover the gamut of commercial market penetration, from hydroelectric power, which was an original source of electricity generation, to newer power systems using wind, solar, and geothermal energy. In some cases, they require technological innovation to become cost effective or have inherent characteristics, such as intermittency, which make their penetration into the electricity grid dependent upon new methods for integration within utility system plans or upon low-cost energy storage.

409

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories Webinar: Renewable...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories Webinar: Renewable Energy Parks (text version) Community Renewable Energy Success Stories Webinar: Renewable Energy Parks (text version)...

410

City of Phoenix- Renewable Energy Goal  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In 2008, the Phoenix City Council approved a renewable energy goal for the city. The city aims for 15% of the electricity used by the city to come from renewable energy sources by 2025. This goal...

411

Renewable energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Report on International Congress on Renewable Energy Sources, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 18-23 May 1986, Madrid, Spain.

M Alonso

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Public Charging Station Hosts (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Public Charging Public Charging Station Hosts Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Public Charging Station Hosts 2 Table of Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PEV Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Charging Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Benefits and Costs of Hosting a Charging Station . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Charging Station Locations and Hosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Ownership and Payment Models . . . . . . 14 Installing and Maintaining Charging Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Electrifying the Future . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Clean Cities Helps Establish PEV Charging Stations Establishing plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging stations requires unique knowledge and skills . If you need help, contact your local Clean Cities coordinator . Clean Cities is the U .S . Department of Energy's flagship alterna- tive-transportation deployment initiative . It is supported

413

Managing R&D Risk in Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

75: 547-561. Chevron (2008). Renewable Energy At Chevron.www.chevronenergy.com/renewable_energy/ . Accessed on JuneOptimizing the Level of Renewable Electric R&D Expenditures

Rausser, Gordon C.; Papineau, Maya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

The Social Complexity of Renewable Energy Production in the Countryside  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

new buildings equipped with renewable energy feeding intoand consensus building. Renewable energy is therefore not abuilding with electricity from a small-scale wind turbine 21 German law on renewable energy

Kunze, Conrad; Busch, Henner

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Regional-Scale Estimation of Electric Power and Power Plant CO2 Emissions Using Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System Nighttime Satellite Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For estimation, the relationship between Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) annual nighttime stable light product (NSL) for 2006 and statistical data on power generation, power consumption, and power plant CO2 emissions in 10 electric power supply regions of Japan was investigated. ... There are similar linear correlations of electricity consumption for lighting and total electricity consumption at the regional (e.g., state and province) level, but possibly not for CO2 emissions because of regional concentrations of electricity from renewable energy and nuclear power plants, which produce low CO2 emissions. ...

Husi Letu; Takashi Y. Nakajima; Fumihiko Nishio

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

416

Investigation and Analysis of Energy Consumption and Cost of Electric Air Conditioning Systems in Civil Buildings in Changsha  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

based on the electric refrigeration. Among the heat sources, the prospect of gas boilers is better. In addition, the air source heat pump depends heavily on whether some crucial issues such as frost can be solved during its application. The water-source...

Xie, D.; Chen, J.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Renewable Resource Integration Project - Scoping Study of Strategic Transmission, Operations, and Reliability Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12 Table 3. Renewable Energy Production Required forTable  Table 3. Renewable Energy Production Required forEnergy Consumption Renewable Energy Production B kWH Year In

Budhraja, Vikram

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Jay Apt, Paulina Jaramillo, and Stephen Rose Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center (CEIC)'s RenewElec Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the mix of energy sources in a way that is clean, reliable, affordable and sustainable · Creating Mellon Founda5on U.S. Department of Energy Electric Power Research Ins5tute Heinz plants. ­ Municipal solid waste-to-energy. ­ Landfill methane. · Geothermal: heated water from

McGaughey, Alan

419

Western Electricity Coordinating | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Western Electricity Coordinating Western Electricity Coordinating Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 117, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO California EIA Renewable Energy Generation Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / California (xls, 119.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

420

Renewables Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Retail Supplier Retail Supplier Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Energy Sources Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Maine Public Utilities Commission Maine's original Renewable Resource Portfolio Requirement was passed as part of the state's 1997 electric-utility restructuring law. In 1999, Maine's Public Utility Commission (PUC) adopted rules requiring each electricity provider to supply at least 30% of their total electric sales using electricity generated by eligible renewable and certain energy efficiency resources. Actually, at the time of passage, the required percentage of renewables was actually lower than the existing percentage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

An Analysis of the Costs, Benefits, and Implications of Different Approaches to Capturing the Value of Renewable Energy Tax Incentives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Issue Brief: Reassessing Renewable Energy Subsidies. Marchupdate: PTC resurrection” Renewable Energy-Research Note,and Public Economics of Renewable Electricity Generation. ”

Bolinger, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Columbia - Renewables Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Columbia - Renewables Portfolio Standard Columbia - Renewables Portfolio Standard Columbia - Renewables Portfolio Standard < Back Eligibility Municipal Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Missouri Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Columbia Water and Light In November 2004, voters in Columbia, Missouri approved a proposal to adopt a local renewables portfolio standard (RPS).* The initiative requires the city's municipal utility, Columbia Water and Light, to generate or purchase electricity generated from eligible renewable-energy resources at the following levels: * 2% by December 31, 2007 * 5% by December 31, 2012 * 10% by December 31, 2017 * 15% by December 31, 2022

423

Environmental degradation, economic growth and energy consumption: Evidence of the environmental Kuznets curve in Malaysia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper tests for the short and long-run relationship between economic growth, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and energy consumption, using the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) by employing both the aggregated and disaggregated energy consumption data in Malaysia for the period 1980–2009. The Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) methodology and Johansen–Juselius maximum likelihood approach were used to test the cointegration relationship; and the Granger causality test, based on the vector error correction model (VECM), to test for causality. The study does not support an inverted U-shaped relationship (EKC) when aggregated energy consumption data was used. When data was disaggregated based on different energy sources such as oil, coal, gas and electricity, the study does show evidences of the EKC hypothesis. The long-run Granger causality test shows that there is bi-directional causality between economic growth and CO2 emissions, with coal, gas, electricity and oil consumption. This suggests that decreasing energy consumption such as coal, gas, electricity and oil appears to be an effective way to control CO2 emissions but simultaneously will hinder economic growth. Thus suitable policies related to the efficient consumption of energy resources and consumption of renewable sources are required.

Behnaz Saboori; Jamalludin Sulaiman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

annual energy consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy consumption energy consumption Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption by source and end use between 1989 and 2008. This data was published and compiled by the Energy Information Administration. Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords annual energy consumption consumption EIA renewable energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon historical_renewable_energy_consumption_by_sector_and_energy_source_1989-2008.xls (xls, 41 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 1989-2008 License License Creative Commons CCZero Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset

425

Please cite this article in press as: Hughes L, Meeting residential space heating demand with wind-generated electricity, Renewable Energy (2009), doi:10.1016/j.renene.2009.11.014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or compressed air (Blarke and Lund 2008). Energy suppliers are forced to go to these lengths when integrating. The benefits as well as the limitations of the approach are discussed in detail. Keywords: Energy storage- generated electricity, Renewable Energy (2009), doi:10.1016/j.renene.2009.11.014 ERG/200909 Meeting

Hughes, Larry

426

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles as a way to maximize the integration of variable renewable energy in power systems: The case of wind generation in northeastern Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several studies have proposed different tools for analyzing the integration of variable renewable energy into power grids. This study applies an optimization tool to model the expansion of the electric power system in northeastern Brazil, enabling the most efficient dispatch of the variable output of the wind farms that will be built in the region over the next 20 years. The expected combined expansion of wind generation with conventional inflexible generation facilities, such as nuclear plants and run-of-the-river hydropower plants, poses risks of future mismatch between supply and demand in northeastern Brazil. Therefore, this article evaluates the possibility of using a fleet of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) to regularize possible energy imbalances. Findings indicate that a dedicated fleet of 500 thousand \\{PHEVs\\} in 2015, and a further 1.5 million in 2030, could be recharged overnight to take advantage of the surplus power generated by wind farms. To avoid the initial costs of smart grids, this article suggests, as a first step, the use of a governmental PHEV fleet that allows fleet managers to control battery charging times. Finally, the study demonstrates the advantages of optimizing simultaneously the power and transport sectors to test the strategy suggested here.

Bruno Soares M.C. Borba; Alexandre Szklo; Roberto Schaeffer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Optimized Energy Management for Large Organizations Utilizing an On-Site PHEV fleet, Storage Devices and Renewable Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract This paper focuses on the daily electricity management problem for organizations with a large number of employees working within a relatively small geographic location. The organization manages its electric grid including limited on-site energy generation facilities, energy storage facilities, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) charging stations installed in the parking lots. A mixed integer linear program (MILP) is modeled and implemented to assist the organization in determining the temporal allocation of available resources that will minimize energy costs. We consider two cost compensation strategies for PHEV owners: (1) cost equivalent battery replacement reimbursement for utilizing vehicle to grid (V2G) services from PHEVs; (2) gasoline equivalent cost for undercharging of PHEV batteries. Our case study, based on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) campus, produced encouraging results and substantiates the importance of controlled PHEV fleet charging as opposed to uncontrolled charging methods. We further established the importance of realizing V2G capabilities provided by PHEVs in terms of significantly reducing energy costs for the organization.

Dashora, Yogesh [University of Texas, Austin; Barnes, J. Wesley [University of Texas, Austin; Pillai, Rekha S [ORNL; Combs, Todd E [ORNL; Hilliard, Michael R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

International Data Base for the U.S. Renewable Energy Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Data Base for the US Renewable Energy Industry was developed to provide the US renewable energy industry with background data for identifying and analyzing promising foreign market opportunities for their products and services. Specifically, the data base provides the following information for 161 developed and developing countries: (1) General Country Data--consisting of general energy indicators; (2) Energy Demand Data--covering commercial primary energy consumption; (3) Energy Resource Data--identifying annual average insolation, wind power, and river flow data; (4) Power System Data--indicating a wide range of electrical parameters; and (5) Business Data--including currency and credit worthiness data.

none

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Data Center Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Site Assessment: Anderson Readiness Center; Salem, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results from the data center energy efficiency and renewable energy site assessment conducted for the Oregon Army National Guard in Salem, Oregon. A team led by NREL conducted the assessment of the Anderson Readiness Center data centers March 18-20, 2014 as part of ongoing efforts to reduce energy use and incorporate renewable energy technologies where feasible. Although the data centers in this facility account for less than 5% of the total square footage, they are estimated to be responsible for 70% of the annual electricity consumption.

Metzger, I.; Van Geet, O.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Renewables Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Renewables Portfolio Standard Renewables Portfolio Standard < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Minnesota Department of Commerce Minnesota enacted legislation in 2007 that created a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) for Xcel Energy, created a separate RPS for other electric utilities,* and modified the state's existing non-mandated renewable-energy objective. In 2013, further legislation (H.F 729) was enacted to create a 1.5% solar standard for public utilities, a distributed generation

431

Austin - Renewables Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Austin - Renewables Portfolio Standard Austin - Renewables Portfolio Standard Austin - Renewables Portfolio Standard < Back Eligibility Municipal Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Austin Energy The City of Austin, Texas, has been an early adopter of the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) regulatory incentive. Using long term planning strategies, the City has set annual benchmarks for the percentage of renewable energy it uses annually. In February 2007, the Austin City Council approved Resolution 20070215-023, adopting the mayor's [http://www.austintexas.gov/department/austin-climate-protection-program Climate Protection Plan]. The Resolution increased Austin's renewable

432

Property Tax Assessment for Renewable Energy Equipment | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Property Tax Assessment for Renewable Energy Equipment Property Tax Assessment for Renewable Energy Equipment Property Tax Assessment for Renewable Energy Equipment < Back Eligibility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount Renewable-energy equipment assessed at 20% of its depreciated cost Provider Arizona Department of Revenue Renewable energy equipment owned by utilities and other entities operating in Arizona is assessed at 20% of its depreciated cost for the purpose of determining property tax. "Renewable energy equipment" is defined as "electric generation facilities, electric transmission, electric distribution, gas distribution or combination gas and electric transmission

433

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Workplace Charging Hosts (Brochure), Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Workplace Workplace Charging Hosts Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Workplace Charging Hosts 2 Table of Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PEV Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Charging Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Benefits of Workplace Charging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Evaluating and Planning for Workplace Charging . . . . . . . 9 Workplace Charging Management and Policy Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Workplace Charging Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Electrifying Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Clean Cities Helps Establish Charging Infrastructure The U .S . Department of Energy's Clean Cities program supports local actions to reduce petroleum use in transportation . Nearly 100 Clean Cities coalitions across the country work

434

Renewable Energy Certificates | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Energy Certificates Renewable Energy Certificates Renewable Energy Certificates October 16, 2013 - 5:15pm Addthis Image of a red balloon reading 'Electricity' plus a green balloon reading 'REC' equals a purple balloon reading 'Renewable Power' Components of a Renewable Energy Certificate Two separate products exist from electricity produced by renewable energy projects that can be sold together or treated separately. One is the actual electrons produced, which can either be transferred through the power grid to provide power to utility customers or used off-grid or at a customer site. Although they are not common in the market, Federal renewable energy policy recognizes renewable energy certificates (RECs) from thermal renewable energy projects. For thermal RECs the energy product is British

435

Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cumulative electricity consumption deficit amounts toper unit of electricity consumption than the overalldata on value added and electricity consumption by sectors

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Potential Benefits from Improved Energy Efficiency of Key Electrical Products: The Case of India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thus, reduced electricity consumption from higher efficiencyestimated the daily electricity consumption from a survey ofby total commercial electricity consumption. The price of

McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Stephen; Letschert, Virginie; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contributor to annual electricity consumption, and certainplay in “Other” electricity consumption in new homes, andor range. “Other” electricity consumption was derived by

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan, Gregory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Electricity and Natural Gas Efficiency Improvements for Residential Gas Furnaces in the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by natural gas. Electricity consumption by a furnace blowerto the annual electricity consumption of a major appliance.not account for the electricity consumption of the appliance

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James E.; McNeil, Michael; Lutz, Jim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Dynamics of Electricity Markets with Unknown Utility Functions: An Extremum Seeking Control Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time and schedule the electricity consumption and productionclearing price. The electricity consumption of the consumerswhere x i is the electricity consumption of consumer i ? N

Ma, Kai; Hu, Guoqiang; Spanos, Costas J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Renewable Energy is energy obtained from sources which are practically inexhaustible.[1] Prominent examples include solar energy, wind energy, and geothermal energy. The table below lists some of the conversion technologies that are used to harness the energy from these resources[2] . Renewable Resource Energy Conversion Technology Biomass, solid fuels Combustion (direct-fired, cofiring with coal); Gasification/Pyrolysis Biomass, gas and liquid fuels Fuel Cells Geothermal Dry steam electric; Flash electric; Binary cycle electric; Direct use; Geothermal heat pumps Solar Photovoltaics (PV); Concentrating solar thermal electric (parabolic trough, parabolic trough, power tower); Thermal water heating; Absorption chilling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Renewable Energy Sales Tax Exemption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Certain renewable energy systems and equipment sold in Rhode Island are exempt from the state's sales and use tax. Eligible products include solar electric systems, DC-to-AC inverters that...

442

Recharging U.S. Energy Policy: Advocating for a National Renewable Portfolio Standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity generated from the following sources qualifies as renewable energy: "solar thermal electric, photovoltaics, landfill gas, wind, biomass, geothermal

Lunt, Robin J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Renewable Diesel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Diesel Paraffinic (C 13 -C 18 ) No Oxygen No Double Bonds In Heart of Diesel Fuel (C 10 -C 22 ) High Cetane Feedstock Independent Cold Flow...

444

Renewable Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Learn how the Energy Department's investments in clean, renewable energy technologies -- including wind, solar and geothermal sources -- are helping strengthen the American economy.

445

Renewable Energy: Distributed Generation Policies and Programs...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Distributed Generation Policies and Programs Distributed generation is the term used when electricity is generated from sources, often renewable energy sources, near the point of...

446

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Report Identifies Research...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Report Identifies Research Needed to Address Power Market Design Challenges Developing a New Primer on the Nation's Electricity Markets...

447

SC e-journals, Renewable Energy  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Energy Agricultural & Forest Meteorology Biomass & Bioenergy BioEnergy Research Electricity Journal, The Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy Process Biochemistry...

448

Moorhead Public Service Utility- Renewable Energy Incentive  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Moorhead Public Service (MPS) offers rebates for qualifying electricity producing solar or wind renewable energy systems. Wind rebates are not availble to residential customers. Rebates are for up...

449

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Hydroelectricity and Other Renewable  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The renewable energy share of total world energy consumption is expected to continue at a level of about 8 percent from 1997 through 2020, despite a projected 54-percent increase in consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable resources. The renewable energy share of total world energy consumption is expected to continue at a level of about 8 percent from 1997 through 2020, despite a projected 54-percent increase in consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable resources. The development of renewable energy sources is constrained in the International Energy Outlook 2000 (IEO2000) reference case projections by expectations that fossil fuel prices will remain low and, as a result, renewables will have a difficult time competing. Although energy prices rebounded in 1999 from 1998 lows, it remains unlikely that renewable energy can compete economically over the projection period. Failing a strong worldwide commitment to environmental considerations, such as the limitations and reductions of carbon emissions outlined in the Kyoto

450

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Fleet Managers (Brochure), Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fleet Managers Fleet Managers Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Fleets 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the ac- curacy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or any agency thereof. The views and

451

Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Consumers (Brochure), Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Consumers Consumers Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Consumers 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the ac- curacy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or any agency thereof. The views and

452

Investigation of Energy Demand Modeling and Management for Local Communities. Investigation of the electricity demand modeling and management including consumption behaviour, dynamic tariffs, and use of renewable energy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Various forecasting tools, based on historical data, exist for planners of national networks that are very effective in planning national interventions to ensure energy security,… (more)

Ihbal, Abdel-Baset Mostafa Imbarek

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

charging kW Utility electricity consumption Electricityis expressed in electricity consumption of the electricis expressed in electricity consumption of the electric

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4. Figure 5-5. 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by EndkWh/ft ) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Useof Total) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use

Konopacki, S.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Electricity Monthly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S....

456

Renewables Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewables Portfolio Standard Renewables Portfolio Standard Renewables Portfolio Standard < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State Delaware Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Delaware Public Service Commission In 2005, [http://depsc.delaware.gov/electric/rpsact.pdf S.B. 74] established a renewables portfolio standard (RPS) requiring retail electricity suppliers to purchase 10% of the electricity sold in the state from renewable sources by 2019-2020 (the compliance year, or CY, runs from June - May). [http://legis.delaware.gov/LIS/lis144.nsf/vwLegislation/SB+19/$file/legis.html?open

457

The effect of natural gas supply on US renewable energy and CO2 emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increased use of natural gas has been promoted as a means of decarbonizing the US power sector, because of superior generator efficiency and lower CO2 emissions per unit of electricity than coal. We model the effect of different gas supplies on the US power sector and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Across a range of climate policies, we find that abundant natural gas decreases use of both coal and renewable energy technologies in the future. Without a climate policy, overall electricity use also increases as the gas supply increases. With reduced deployment of lower-carbon renewable energies and increased electricity consumption, the effect of higher gas supplies on GHG emissions is small: cumulative emissions 2013–55 in our high gas supply scenario are 2% less than in our low gas supply scenario, when there are no new climate policies and a methane leakage rate of 1.5% is assumed. Assuming leakage rates of 0 or 3% does not substantially alter this finding. In our results, only climate policies bring about a significant reduction in future CO2 emissions within the US electricity sector. Our results suggest that without strong limits on GHG emissions or policies that explicitly encourage renewable electricity, abundant natural gas may actually slow the process of decarbonization, primarily by delaying deployment of renewable energy technologies.

Christine Shearer; John Bistline; Mason Inman; Steven J Davis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Deregulation and environmental differentiation in the electric utility industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity from Renewable Resources: A Review of Utilityprovision of power from renewable resources, the end resultinvestments in renewable energy generating resources. Hence:

Delmas, M; Russo, M V; Montes-Sancho, M J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upstate New York Upstate New York Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 105, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Upstate New York Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Upstate New York- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

460

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delta Delta Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 109, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Delta EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Delta- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Virginia-Carolina Virginia-Carolina Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 113, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Carolina EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Virginia Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

462

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeastern Southeastern Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 111, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Southeastern Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Southeastern- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

463

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East East Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 106, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released July 25th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO East EIA Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / East- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

464

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan Michigan Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 107, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Michigan Reliability First Corporation Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / Michigan- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

465

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Island Long Island Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 104, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Long Island Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Long Island- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

466

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 108, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Reliability First Corporation Renewable Energy Generation West Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / West- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

467

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

468

Renewables Portfolio Standard | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewables Portfolio Standard Renewables Portfolio Standard Jump to: navigation, search Renewable portfolio standards (RPS) require utilities to use renewable energy or renewable energy credits (RECs) to account for a certain percentage of their retail electricity sales -- or a certain amount of generating capacity -- according to a specified schedule. (Renewable portfolio goals are similar to RPS policies, but renewable portfolio goals are not legally binding.) Most U.S. states have established an RPS. The term "set-aside" or "carve-out" refers to a provision within an RPS that requires utilities to use a specific renewable resource (usually solar energy) to account for a certain percentage of their retail electricity sales (or a certain amount of generating capacity) within a specified

469

Renewable Energy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 21 November, 2013 - 12:53 NREL releases 2012 Renewable Energy Data Book 2012 data book electricity NREL OpenEI Renewable Energy The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has released the 2012 Renewable Energy Data Book on behalf of the Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 Living Walls ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing

470

Renewables Portfolio Standards | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewables Portfolio Standards Renewables Portfolio Standards Jump to: navigation, search Renewable portfolio standards (RPS) require utilities to use renewable energy or renewable energy credits (RECs) to account for a certain percentage of their retail electricity sales -- or a certain amount of generating capacity -- according to a specified schedule. (Renewable portfolio goals are similar to RPS policies, but renewable portfolio goals are not legally binding.) Most U.S. states have established an RPS. The term "set-aside" or "carve-out" refers to a provision within an RPS that requires utilities to use a specific renewable resource (usually solar energy) to account for a certain percentage of their retail electricity sales (or a certain amount of generating capacity) within a specified

471

Renewable Resource Standard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Resource Standard Renewable Resource Standard Renewable Resource Standard < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Montana Public Service Commission Montana's renewable portfolio standard (RPS), enacted in April 2005 as part of the Montana Renewable Power Production and Rural Economic Development Act, requires public utilities and competitive electricity suppliers to obtain a percentage of their retail electricity sales from eligible renewable resources according to the following schedule: * 5% for compliance years 2008-2009 (1/1/2008 - 12/31/2009) * 10% for compliance years 2010-2014 (1/1/2010 - 12/31/2014)

472

Renewables Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewables Portfolio Standard Renewables Portfolio Standard Renewables Portfolio Standard < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Kansas Corporation Commission Kansas adopted the Renewable Energy Standards Act in 2009 (K.S.A. 66-1256), establishing a renewable portfolio standard (RPS). This statute requires the state's investor-owned and cooperative utilities to generate or purchase 10% of their electricity from eligible renewable resources in the years 2011-2015, 15% in the years 2016-2019, and 20% by 2020.

473

Electric power annual 1996. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1--with a focus on US electric utilities--contains final 1996 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1996 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA. Data published in the Electric Power Annual Volume 1 are compiled from three statistical forms filed monthly and two forms filed annually by electric utilities. These forms are described in detail in the Technical Notes. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B. Atanasiu (2006). Electricity Consumption and Efficiencywill see their electricity consumption rise significantly.the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

476

" Electricity Sales/Transfers Out",96,4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" 4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Selected Energy Sources, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"RSE" ,,"Row" "Selected Energy Sources","Total","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factor:",1 "Coal ",2105,4 "Natural Gas",6835,3 "Net Electricity",2656,2 " Purchased Electricity",2689,1 " Transfers In",53,4 " Generation from Noncombustible",," " " Renewable Resources",10,10 " Electricity Sales/Transfers Out",96,4 "Coke and Breeze",449,8 "Residual Fuel Oil",490,3

477

Renewable and Non-Renewable Resources Tariff RNR-7 (Georgia) | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable and Non-Renewable Resources Tariff RNR-7 (Georgia) Renewable and Non-Renewable Resources Tariff RNR-7 (Georgia) Renewable and Non-Renewable Resources Tariff RNR-7 (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Green Power Purchasing Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Georgia Power Company The Renewable and Non-Renewable Resource tariff is authorized by the Georgia Public Service Commission (PSC), which requires that the investor owned utility, Georgia Power Company, purchase renewable energy cumulative

478

Renewable Mongolia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Broadcast Transcript: As China's economy booms, its demand for energy grows. With oil prices up and coal-fired power plants choking Chinese cities and people, the government is aggressively developing renewable energy sources, particularly wind...

Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

479

Energy consumption and environmental pollution: a stochastic model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......indicated that total energy consumption in sugar beet production...pollution. Although energy consumption increased sugar beet yield...and found that hybrid and electric car technologies exhibit (efficiency...ergy efficiency, affects consumption choice by Swedish households......

Charles S. Tapiero

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Consumption & Efficiency - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Find statistics on energy consumption and efficiency across all fuel sources. + EXPAND ALL Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Household characteristics Release Date: March 28, 2011 Survey data for occupied primary housing units. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "renewable electricity consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Strategic Renewal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Renewal Renewal of the Advanced Photon Source Proposal for Approval to Proceed with Conceptual Design (CD-0) Submitted to the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences May 31, 2009 Advanced Photon Source A BS t R AC t This document proposes a coordinated upgrade of the accelerator, beamlines, and enabling technical infrastructure that will equip future users of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to address key

482

Renewable energy 1998: Issues and trends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the following five papers: Renewable electricity purchases: History and recent developments; Transmission pricing issues for electricity generation from renewable resources; Analysis of geothermal heat pump manufacturers survey data; A view of the forest products industry from a wood energy perspective; and Wind energy developments: Incentives in selected countries. A glossary is included. 19 figs., 27 tabs.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

PEV Integration with Renewables (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses current research at NREL on integrating plug-in electric vehicles with the grid and using renewable energy to charge the grid. The Electric Vehicle Grid Integration (EVGI) and Integrated Network Testbed for Energy Grid Research and Technology Experimentation (INTEGRATE) are addressing the opportunities and technical requirements for vehicle grid integration that will increase marketability and lead to greater petroleum reduction.

Markel, T.

2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

484

Wood pellets production costs and energy consumption under different framework conditions in Northeast Argentina  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of cleaner and renewable energy sources are needed in order to reduce dependency and global warming. Wood pellets are a clean renewable fuel and has been considered as one of the substitutes for fossil fuels. In Argentina, large quantities of sawmill residues are still unused and wood pellets production could be seen as both, as an environmental solution and an extra economical benefit. The general aim of this study was to determine the wood pellets production costs and energy consumption under different framework conditions in northeast Argentina. The specific costs of wood pellets for the different scenarios showed relative lower costs comparing to the ones reported in other studies, ranging from 35 to 47 €/Mgpellets. Raw material costs represented the main cost factor in the calculation of the total pellets production costs. A lower specific production cost was observed when 50% of the raw material input was wood shavings. The specific electricity consumption per metric ton of pellet was lower in scenarios with higher production rate. Lower heat energy consumption was observed in scenarios that have a mixed raw material input. The most promising framework condition for Northeast Argentina, in terms of costs effectiveness and energy consumption could be acquired with production rates of 6 Mg/h with sawdust and wood shavings as raw material. However, simultaneous increment of the electricity by 50% and raw material price by 100% may increase the specific costs up to 50%.

Augusto Uasuf; Gero Becker

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

INTRODUCTION Ukiah Electric Utility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION Ukiah Electric Utility Renewable Energy Resources Procurement Plan Per Senate Billlx 2 renewable energy resources, including renewable energy credits, as a specified percentage of Ukiah's total,2011 to December 31, 2013, Ukiah shall procure renewable energy resources equivalent to an average of at least

486

Tool Improves Electricity Demand Predictions to Make More Room...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Tool Improves Electricity Demand Predictions to Make More Room for Renewables Tool Improves Electricity Demand Predictions to Make More Room for Renewables October 3, 2011 -...

487

New England Wind Forum: State Renewable Energy Funds  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

State Renewable Energy Funds State Renewable Energy Funds Renewable Energy Funds in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island are Public Benefit Funds set up as part of electric industry restructuring legislation. They are funded through systems benefit charges (SBCs) collected from electric ratepayers in these states as part of their monthly electricity bills. Using tools including investments, grants, technical assistance, and research funding, these funds support renewable energy businesses and generation projects, development of renewable energy market demand and infrastructure, and increased awareness and public support. Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust Fund Operated by the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative. Connecticut Clean Energy Fund Operated by Connecticut Innovations, Inc.

488

N. Mariana Islands - Renewables Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

N. Mariana Islands - Renewables Portfolio Standard N. Mariana Islands - Renewables Portfolio Standard N. Mariana Islands - Renewables Portfolio Standard < Back Eligibility Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard The Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands enacted its Renewables Portfolio Standard in September 2007, in which a certain percentage of its net electricity sales must come from renewable energy. Under the law, the Commonwealth Utilities Corporation (the Islands' only and semi-autonomous public utility provider) must meet the following benchmarks: * 10% of net electricity sales by December 31, 2008

489

National Renewable Energy Laboratory | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory October 30, 2007 - 4:21pm Addthis Remarks Prepared for Secretary Bodman Thank you. It is a pleasure to be with you once again in beautiful Colorado. It is only fitting that we are here at the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory-our nation's premier laboratory for renewable energy and energy efficiency research-to recognize leadership in applying new energy technology in very tangible ways - to power, heat, and reduce energy consumption at these facilities. Today, we celebrate the accomplishments of our talented team with the announcement of three new facilities. In January 2007, the President signed an Executive Order which called upon all federal agencies to reduce energy intensity, or consumption per square

490

IEA: Renewable Energy to Grow During the Next 5 Years | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

renewable generation, while it identifies developments that may emerge in other important markets. Of the 710 gigawatts of new global renewable electricity capacity expected, China...

491

Tobacco Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tobacco consumption is the use of tobacco products in different forms such as , , , water-pipes or tobacco products. Cigarettes and tobacco products containing tobacco are highly engineered so as to creat...

Martina Pötschke-Langer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temporally-dependent renewable energy production profiles,renewable energy offsets natural gas-fired electricity production.renewable energy to be more labor-intensive than conventional forms o