Sample records for removing tall growing

  1. Tall building collapse mechanisms initiated by fire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usmani, Asif; Roben, Charlotte; Johnston, Louise; Flint, Graeme

    This paper introduces the hypothesis of two possible failure mechanisms for tall buildings in multiple floor fires. This paper extends the previous work done on the WTC towers by investigating more "generic" tall building frames made of standard...

  2. Internal tide generation by tall ocean ridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Echeverri Mondragón, Paula

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Internal tides are internal waves of tidal period generated by tidal currents flowing over submarine topography. Tall ridges that are nominally two-dimensional (2-D) are sites of particularly strong generation. The subsequent ...

  3. Microsoft Word - Tall_Pines_CX.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Provision of funds to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game for purchase of the Tall Pines Property. Fish and Wildlife Project No.:...

  4. Dynamic interrelationship between technology and architecture in tall buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Kyoung-Sun

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interrelationship between the technology and architecture of tall buildings is investigated from the emergence of tall buildings in the late 19th century to the present. Through the historical research, a filtering ...

  5. Fire Induced Collapse of Tall Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flint, Graeme

    This research was designed to investigate possible mechanisms that fires could initiate that might lead to collapse of a tall building of similar design to the WTC Towers. It was not designed to be a forensic study and no initial damage was applied...

  6. Tall Corn Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:Holdings Co08.0 -TEEMP JumpTakigamiTalbotts LtdTall Corn

  7. Wind Shear Characteristics at Central Plains Tall Towers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, M.; Elliott, D.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference paper for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing the wind shear characteristics at tall tower sites in the Central Plains of the United States.

  8. Improved recovery of tall oil from black liquors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zucker, J.

    1980-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Applying a d.c. of less than 15 V to acidified black liquor separates a significant amount of tall oil remaining in the black liquor sludge. An apparatus with graphite electrodes for this process is described.

  9. Process for tertiary oil recovery using tall oil pitch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radke, C.J.

    1983-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and compositions for enhancing the recovery of acid crudes are disclosed. The process involves injecting caustic solutions into the reservoir to maintain a pH of 11 to 13. The fluid contains an effective amount of multivalent cation for inhibiting alkaline silica dissolution with the reservoir. A tall oil pitch soap is added as a polymeric mobility control agent. (DMC)

  10. Process for tertiary oil recovery using tall oil pitch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radke, Clayton J. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and process employing same for enhancing the recovery of residual acid crudes, particularly heavy crudes, by injecting a composition comprising caustic in an amount sufficient to maintain a pH of at least about 11, preferably at least about 13, and a small but effective amount of a multivalent cation for inhibiting alkaline silica dissolution with the reservoir. Preferably a tall oil pitch soap is included and particularly for the heavy crudes a polymeric mobility control agent.

  11. Prolongation technologies for campaign life of tall oven

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doko, Yoshiji; Saji, Takafumi; Kitayama, Yoshiteru; Yoshida, Shuhei [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Kashima, Ibaraki (Japan). Kashima Steel Works

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In Kashima Steel Works, 25-year-old 7-meter-high coke ovens have damage on their walls. However, by using new methods of internal in-situ investigation, ceramic welding for the extended central and upper portions of coke ovens has prolonged the campaign life for over 40 years without large-scale hot repair. In this paper, introduction of these new methods, its application in Kashima and the policy of repairing the tall coke oven are reported.

  12. DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR FOR CONTEXT;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR to assess downstream channel changes associated with a small dam removal. The Brownsville Dam, a 2.1 m tall downstream from the dam and in an upstream control reach using aerial photos (1994­2008) and in the field

  13. Mechanism of collapse of tall steel moment frame buildings under earthquake excitation Swaminathan Krishnan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Swaminathan

    . Classical energy balance analysis shows that only long- period excitation imparts energy to tall buildings significant story-overlap, typically separated by just one story. It is shown that a simple work-energy tall steel buildings in the 1985 Mexico City earthquake, there has been sustained interest

  14. Aerodynamic Loads on Tall Buildings: Interactive Database Yin Zhou. M.ASCE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    tools in commercial design practice. However, considering the cost and lead time needed for wind tunnel.M.ASCE2 ; and Ahsan Kareem, M.ASCE3 Abstract: Under the action of wind, tall buildings oscillate measurements on a host of isolated tall building models. Combined with the analysis procedure provided

  15. CELL BIOLOGY & MOLECULAR GENETICS Infection of Somatic Embryos of Tall Fescue with Acremonium coenophialum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    by the endophyte naturally occurs in planta, attempts were made to duplicate this phenomenon in vitro. Callus of the interactions between tall fescue and its endophyte. TALL FESCUE is & pasture grass grown on 16 million ha in Canada and the southeastern USA (Bacon and Siegel, 1988). It is commonly infected with an endophytic

  16. Does a toxic fungal endophyte of tall fescue affect reproduction of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Ian

    Does a toxic fungal endophyte of tall fescue affect reproduction of takahe on offshore islands? DOC. References 9 #12;4 Jamieson & Easton--Tall fescue-endophytes and takahe reproction on offshore islands Final of Conservation. This paper may be cited as: Jamieson, I.; Sydney Easton, H. 2002: Does a toxic fungal endophyte

  17. Room to grow | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room to grow Room to grow Released: June 26, 2012 New lithium ion battery strategy offers more energy, longer life cycle In situ transmission electron microscopy at EMSL was used...

  18. tall tower facility and instrumentation New coNstraiNts oN the Nitrous oxide budget of agricultural ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    tall tower facility and instrumentation New coNstraiNts oN the Nitrous oxide budget of agricultural approach involves multiple tunable diode laser (TDL) spectroscopy systems, a tall tower, automated chambers hectare. Measurements are also made at the tall tower trace gas observatory (TGO) located at RROC

  19. Diabetes: The Growing Epidemic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamant, Allison L.; Babey, Susan H.; Brown, E. Richard; Hastert, Theresa A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Brief August 2007 Diabetes: The Growing Epidemicof people diagnosed with diabetes in California continues tohad been diagnosed with diabetes, up from 1.5 million in

  20. Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program Overview Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry, one business at a time Website: http-3547 agincubator@ctahr.hawaii.edu Grow Your Business If you are looking to start an agriculture-related business with our program · Positively impact the agriculture industry in Hawaii with their success

  1. The role of the aerodynamic modifications of the shapes of tall buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jooeun, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advances in technology, recent tall building design has undergone a shift to the free-style geometric forms in the exuberant and liberal atmosphere. As a height of the building increases, it is more susceptible ...

  2. FLUX MEASUREMENTS FROM A TALL TOWER IN A COMPLEX LANDSCAPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurzeja, R.; Weber, A.; Chiswell, S.; Parker, M.

    2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The accuracy and representativeness of flux measurements from a tall tower in a complex landscape was assessed by examining the vertical and sector variability of the ratio of wind speed to momentum flux and the ratio of vertical advective to eddy flux of heat. The 30-60 m ratios were consistent with theoretical predictions which indicate well mixed flux footprints. Some variation with sector was observed that were consistent with upstream roughness. Vertical advection was negligible compared with vertical flux except for a few sectors at night. This implies minor influence from internal boundary layers. Flux accuracy is a function of sector and stability but 30-60 m fluxes were found to be generally representative of the surrounding landscape. This paper will study flux data from a 300 m tower, with 4 levels of instruments, in a complex landscape. The surrounding landscape will be characterized in terms of the variation in the ratio of mean wind speed to momentum flux as a function of height and wind direction. The importance of local advection will be assessed by comparing vertical advection with eddy fluxes for momentum and heat.

  3. What Really Grows Exports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    What Really Grows Exports Bringing It All Back Home Should We Be Afraid of Accruals? Products of Their Environment a report on new research from the tuck school of business at dartmouth | fall 2014 Do exporters Competitiveness Diagnostic Toolkit," which was written to help developing nations increase their exports

  4. Grow Iron, Slow Pollution | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grow Iron, Slow Pollution Grow Iron, Slow Pollution Scientists connect previous studies on electron transport in hematite Making a Deposit: Scanning electron micrographs of...

  5. Rapid Estimation of Damage to Tall Buildings Using Near Real-Time Earthquake and Archived Structural Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tape, Carl

    Rapid Estimation of Damage to Tall Buildings Using Near Real-Time Earthquake and Archived Structural Simulations by Swaminathan Krishnan, Emanuele Casarotti, Jim Goltz, Chen Ji, Dimitri Komatitsch a new approach to rapidly estimate the damage to tall buildings immediately following a large earthquake

  6. Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) is the pre-dominant forage species on over one million acres of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Fungal Endophyte While occasional negative responses of animals con- suming tall fescue were observed an endophyte because it is found within tissue and does not affect the outward appear- ance of the grass. In the scientific community, the tall fescue fungal endophyte was formerly known as Acremonium coenophialum, but has

  7. Ergopeptine Alkaloid Production by Endophytes in a Common Tall Fescue Genotype iN. s. Hill,* W.A. Parrott, and D. D. Pope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    Ergopeptine Alkaloid Production by Endophytes in a Common Tall Fescue Genotype iN. s. Hill,* W the plantwithaddedvigor,developmentof endophyte-infectedtall fescuepopulationsthatareincapableof producingergopeptineal thatwasinfectedbytwodifferentendophyteisolatesthatexpress differentlevels of alkaloidswhenin theirhostplants.Endophyte- free tall fescueGenotypePDN2

  8. Growing Blackberries In Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, H. F.; Garner, C. F.; Hancock, Bluefford; Smith, Harlan

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiment , Substation No. 2, Tyler. LAWTON is an erect-growing variety with good plant vigor and medium-early maturity. It , is unusually vigorous, with the parent stool protluc- ing up to seven new canes each season. There ale many laterals 2 to 3... of these insects attack the berry plant and its fruit after the cover crop has been plowed under. Some growers consider it more economical to provide the required nutrients in a sidedressing and to allow the natural seeding of weeds and grasses to provide...

  9. AUTHOR: Mitchell A. Pavao-Zuckerman, John C. Waller, Teri Ingle, and Henry A. TITLE: Methane Emissions of Beef Cattle Grazing Tall Fescue Pastures at Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell

    : Methane Emissions of Beef Cattle Grazing Tall Fescue Pastures at Three Levels of Endophyte Infestation.) is an important forage in the eastern United States. The toxic syndrome associated with the endophytic fungus taurus) on two pastures each of E+ tall fescue, of endophyte free (E-) tall fescue, of E+/E- (1:1 ratio

  10. Stand persistence of tall fescue pasture cultivars free of or infested with Acremonium coenophialum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -1071, USA The endophytic fungus A. coenophialum in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) is associated of endophyte free (E-) cultivars leads to improved livestock performance, persistence and stress tolerance of E. Levels of endophyte infestation were monitored yearly and remained constant. Stand density, ground cover

  11. Endophyte symbiosis with tall fescue: how strong are the impacts on communities and ecosystems?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudgers, Jennifer

    Review Endophyte symbiosis with tall fescue: how strong are the impacts on communities: Competition Herbivory Lolium arundinaceum MAXQ endophyte Neotyphodium coenophialum Predators Soil Trophc interactions a b s t r a c t We have investigated community and ecosystem consequences of endophyte symbiosis

  12. Nutrient composition of tall fescue pasture forage free of or infested with Acremonium coenophialum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    with the endophytic fungus A. coenophialum is associated with substantial economic reduction in grazing livestock shown that the use of endophyte-free (E-) cultivars leads to improved cattle performance (increased weight gain, milk production, and conception rate) compared to endophyte infected (E+) tall fescue

  13. Peroxidase activity of perennial ryegrass and tall fescue seedlings artificially infected with endophytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    with endophytes Walid Naffaaa Catherine Ravelb Nicole Boyer' Jean-Jacques Guillaumina a Unité de pathologie. The peroxidase activity of tall fescue cv. Clarine artificially infected with Neotyphodium coenophialum or with e-endophytes ryegrass cv. Vigor artificially infected with different e-endophytes. In contrast, artificial infection

  14. Lightning strikes to tall objects: Currents inferred from far electromagnetic fields versus directly measured currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    -field-to-current conversion factor for lightning strikes to flat ground based on the transmission line model and (b currents on tall towers are used for testing the validity of field-to-current conversion equations [e on current measurement location (e.g., near the top or bottom of the tower) and on whether initial or largest

  15. Gone are the days of awkwardly angling your tall plastic water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baskaran, Mark

    Gone are the days of awkwardly angling your tall plastic water bottle under the rushing arc of the number of plastic water bottles saved from landfills.As of Oct.31, the station in the RFC alone has with Facilities Planning and Management, retrofitted six standard drinking fountains with new EZH2O water bottle

  16. Collapse scenarios of WTC 1 & 2 with extension to generic tall buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usmani, Asif; Flint, Graeme; Jowsey, Allan; Roben, Charlotte; Torero, Jose L

    the collapse of the tall buildings of the World Trade Center (WTC) complex on September 11, 2001 following the terrorist attacks that day. The aim of these analyses has no been to carry out a “forensic” investigation (as this was done by official US government...

  17. The Use of Tall Tower Field Data for Estimating Wind Turbine Power Performance , J. Chapman1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    The Use of Tall Tower Field Data for Estimating Wind Turbine Power Performance A. Swift1 , J data acquisition tower is continuously measuring and recording atmospheric conditions at multiple providing barometric pressure and temperature data. A second data acquisition tower approximately 100m

  18. Bioproducts and Biofuels – Growing Together!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2B—Integration of Supply Chains II: Bioproducts—Enabling Biofuels and Growing the Bioeconomy Bioproducts and Biofuels – Growing Together! Andrew Held, Senior Director, Deployment and Engineering, Virent, Inc.

  19. A contribution to urbanism--the tall building as a multi-dimensional framework for additive growth and change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, David J. (David Jeffrey)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Skyscrapers do not destroy cities; they make them look different and they make the urban space more crowded, but they have not yet put an end to the urban environment. Many of the problems with the early tall buildings ...

  20. Chemical characterization of acidic components in a commercial depitching of crude tall oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsurumi, Toshio

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    observations were made in the examination of the composition of the tall oil fractions by GC-MS analyses, some of which have not been previously reported. Pal ustr ic acid 1s one of the major resin acid found 1n tall oil. The correspond1ng spectrum.... 59 316 5. 69 382 0. 31 (167) 0. 01 316 10. 92 314 4. 56 14:0 Myr 15:0 ai 16:0 Pal 17:0 ai (17:0) 18:0 18:0 Stea 18:1 Ole 18:2 18:2 Lin 18:3 Linn 20:0 18:2 18:2 18:2 18:2 18:2 conj 18:3 20:2 Seco +22: 0 P Sec o SA PAL...

  1. Growing Up in Scotland: Growing Up in Rural Scotland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Lynn; Bradshaw, Paul; Ormston, Rachel

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report uses data from the Growing up in Scotland ( GUS) study to explore what is distinctive about growing up in rural, remote and small-town Scotland in comparison with urban Scotland. Findings are based on the first sweep of GUS, which...

  2. Engaging and Growing Small Contractor Businesses | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Growing Small Contractor Businesses Engaging and Growing Small Contractor Businesses Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce Peer Exchange Call: Engaging and Growing...

  3. Grow Missouri Loan Fund (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Grow Missouri Loan Fund is open to private companies with fewer than 500 existing employees. One of the key advantages of the program is that the funding can be used as a prior commitment for...

  4. Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of local investment and business planning. Timber volume production will be estimated at sub. Planning of operations. Control of the growing stock. Wider reporting (under UKWAS). The calculation fellings and removals are handled in the 2011 Production Forecast system. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan

  5. Organization of growing random networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S.

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The organizational development of growing random networks is investigated. These growing networks are built by adding nodes successively, and linking each to an earlier node of degree k with an attachment probability A{sub k}. When A{sub k} grows more slowly than linearly with k, the number of nodes with k links, N{sub k}(t), decays faster than a power law in k, while for A{sub k} growing faster than linearly in k, a single node emerges which connects to nearly all other nodes. When A{sub k} is asymptotically linear, N{sub k}(t){similar_to}tk{sup {minus}{nu}}, with {nu} dependent on details of the attachment probability, but in the range 2{lt}{nu}{lt}{infinity}. The combined age and degree distribution of nodes shows that old nodes typically have a large degree. There is also a significant correlation in the degrees of neighboring nodes, so that nodes of similar degree are more likely to be connected. The size distributions of the in and out components of the network with respect to a given node{emdash}namely, its {open_quotes}descendants{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ancestors{close_quotes}{emdash}are also determined. The in component exhibits a robust s{sup {minus}2} power-law tail, where s is the component size. The out component has a typical size of order lnt, and it provides basic insights into the genealogy of the network.

  6. focusing on research still growing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cesare, Bernardo

    Dical sciences anD international stuDies MATHEMATICS, PHYSICAL SCIENCES, INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION of pharmaceutical anD pharmacological sciences PSYCHOLOGY Department of philosophy, sociology, eDucation anD applieD49 focusing on research still growing SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS

  7. HighwayForestCoast Inside City Tall BuildingStreetOpenCountryMountain Oliva and Torralba, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jianxiong

    HighwayForestCoast Inside City Tall BuildingStreetOpenCountryMountain Oliva and Torralba, 2001 or designed several state-of-art features that are potentially useful for scene classification, and several cellar barrel storage discotheque harbor classroom electrical substation (74%) industrial area oil

  8. Seasonal development of ozone-induced foliar injury on tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Howard S.

    Seasonal development of ozone-induced foliar injury on tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata) in Great by symptoms of foliar ozone injury. Abstract The goals of this study were to document the development of ozone-induced foliar injury, on a leaf-by-leaf basis, and to develop ozone exposure relationships for leaf cohorts

  9. ROFESSOR SUSAN J SMITH doesn't look like a radical. Tall, elegant and softly spoken she

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    26 CAM 59 #12;P ROFESSOR SUSAN J SMITH doesn't look like a radical. Tall, elegant and softly spoken she might be, but under that calm exterior, Professor Smith has a startling ­ and seemingly highly, Susan J Smith (the initial, she says, essential in a world dictated by Google) rather enjoys swimming

  10. Measurements of Atmospheric O2 Variations at the WLEF Tall-tower Site Figure 4. Comparison to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Britton B.

    adapted a commercially available fuel-cell detector to make the first atmospheric O2 measurements from. The fuel-cell instrument has successfully measured O2 concentrations at the WLEF tall-tower research site in Environmental Sciences, CU, Boulder, Colorado, 2 NOAA Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory, Boulder

  11. On carbon footprints and growing energy use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On carbon footprints and growing energy use Curtis M.reductions in the carbon footprint of a growing organizationhis own organization's carbon footprint and answers this

  12. Bioproducts and Biofuels - Growing Together! | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioproducts and Biofuels - Growing Together Bioproducts and Biofuels - Growing Together Breakout Session 2B-Integration of Supply Chains II: Bioproducts-Enabling Biofuels and...

  13. Growing Potatoes in Your Home Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Growing Potatoes in Your Home Garden Grow Potatoes in Your Home Garden! Kelly A. Zarka and David S. Douches Ph.D. Potato Breeding and Genetics Program Michigan State University Why grow potatoes in your home garden? *Growing potatoes produces a bountiful harvest....depending on which variety your choose

  14. 3-amino thioacridone inhibits DNA synthesis and induces DNA damage in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) in a p16-dependent manner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sequential therapy of acute leukemia with flavopiridol: indamage in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) in aT-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Blood 91:735-746,

  15. 3-amino thioacridone inhibits DNA synthesis and induces DNA damage in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) in a p16-dependent manner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Blood 91:735-746,damage in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) in arelapse in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with

  16. Green Button Initiative Growing | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Initiative Growing Green Button Initiative Growing May 17, 2013 - 1:17pm Addthis The Green Button initiative, which is the common-sense idea that electricity customers should...

  17. Silicon crystal growing by oscillating crucible technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwuttke, G.H.; Kim, K.M.; Smetana, P.

    1983-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for growing silicon crystals from a molten melt comprising oscillating the container during crystal growth is disclosed.

  18. Silica Scaling Removal Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sidestreams of cooling tower water by providing a substrate for the deposition and adsorption of silica. The removal of the silica prevents scaling deposition on heat transfer...

  19. How Plants Grow name______________ Plants can grow from more than just seeds. Let's look at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    How Plants Grow name______________ Plants can grow from more than just seeds. Let's look at some of these ways you can grow plants. CUTTINGS Many plants can be started from cuttings (pieces of a bigger plant). A good place to make a cutting is fromone of the growing points of the plant (stem-tip). Some plants like

  20. Social disruption caused by tobacco growing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marty Otanez

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Child labour still blights Kazakhstan: too little being doneand cotton growing in Kazakhstan. Almaty: ILO/MOT; 2006. 66.excessively long hours. 63 Kazakhstan: Children as young as

  1. Overlooked? The Growing Threat of Desertification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Julian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overlooked? The Growing Threat of Desertification Julian Zhuovergrazing directly threat- ens the natural resilience ofspite the fact that the threat of desertification is both

  2. Maine Company Growing with Weatherization Work

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maine's BIOSAFE Environmental Services expands into weatherization, assisting low-income families with their services and creating jobs as business grows.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: growing autotrophic microalgae

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    growing autotrophic microalgae The National Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership Kick-Off Meeting at Arizona State University On July 25, 2013, in Biofuels, Energy, News, News...

  4. Growing Potatoes in Your Home Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Growing Potatoes in Your Home Garden A Guide to Growing Potatoes In Your Home Garden Yes potatoes! Potatoes, along with many other vegetables, can be prepared as part of a healthy diet. Luckily, potatoes are versatile and are easy to prepare. Whether baked, boiled, roasted or fried

  5. Microalgae Cultivation using Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiley, Patrick Edward

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    enclosures for growing algae (OMEGA). J. Sustainableenclosures for growing algae (OMEGA). Bioresour. Technol.enclosures for growing algae (OMEGA). Journal of Sustainable

  6. Reactor for removing ammonia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luo, Weifang (Livermore, CA); Stewart, Kenneth D. (Valley Springs, CA)

    2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a device for removing trace amounts of ammonia from a stream of gas, particularly hydrogen gas, prepared by a reformation apparatus. The apparatus is used to prevent PEM "poisoning" in a fuel cell receiving the incoming hydrogen stream.

  7. Continuous sulfur removal process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jalan, V.; Ryu, J.

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream using a membrane comprising a metal oxide deposited on a porous support is disclosed. 4 figures.

  8. http://www.staradvertiser.com/newspremium/20130824_Small_school_stands_tall_as_science_powerhouse_.html?id=220927791&c=n Page 1 of 3 Aug 28, 2013 07:39:07PM MDT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    http://www.staradvertiser.com/newspremium/20130824_Small_school_stands_tall_as_science_powerhouse_.html?id=220927791&c=n Page 1 of 3 Aug 28, 2013 07:39:07PM MDT Small school stands tall as science powerhouse POSTED roughly 2,000 feet, then transmitted data to Earth as it aero-braked and fell at prescribed speeds before

  9. Social disruption caused by tobacco growing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marty Otanez

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    suffocating. The smell and the poison grow in your mouth.of the question going near that poison [tobacco pesticides].doesn’t let me do the poison now because of what happened

  10. On carbon footprints and growing energy use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as overall energy use grows and fossil fuels remain the mainmarketed energy supply comes from carbon-rich fossil fueland fossil fuels as they are used today makes energy

  11. Orthopedic Correction of Growing Retrognathic Hyperdivergent Patients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrillo, Roberto

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this prospective study was to determine whether dental intrusion is effective in treating growing retrognathic hyperdivergent patients without negatively affecting the roots and periodontal structures. The sample consisted of 17 (7...

  12. Arsenic removal from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM); Anderson, D. Richard (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  13. Only tough choices in Meeting growing demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. electricity demand is not growing very fast by international or historical standards. Yet meeting this relatively modest growth is proving difficult because investment in new capacity is expected to grow at an even slower pace. What is more worrisome is that a confluence of factors has added considerable uncertainties, making the investment community less willing to make the long-term commitments that will be needed during the coming decade.

  14. Drum lid removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pella, Bernard M. (Martinez, GA); Smith, Philip D. (North Augusta, SC)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A tool for removing the lid of a metal drum wherein the lid is clamped over the drum rim without protruding edges, the tool having an elongated handle with a blade carried by an angularly positioned holder affixed to the midsection of the handle, the blade being of selected width to slice between lid lip and the drum rim and, when the blade is so positioned, upward motion of the blade handle will cause the blade to pry the lip from the rim and allow the lid to be removed.

  15. Removable feedwater sparger assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Challberg, R.C.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A removable feedwater sparger assembly includes a sparger having an inlet pipe disposed in flow communication with the outlet end of a supply pipe. A tubular coupling includes an annular band fixedly joined to the sparger inlet pipe and a plurality of fingers extending from the band which are removably joined to a retention flange extending from the supply pipe for maintaining the sparger inlet pipe in flow communication with the supply pipe. The fingers are elastically deflectable for allowing engagement of the sparger inlet pipe with the supply pipe and for disengagement therewith. 8 figs.

  16. Condensate removal device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maddox, James W. (Newport News, VA); Berger, David D. (Alexandria, VA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A condensate removal device is disclosed which incorporates a strainer in unit with an orifice. The strainer is cylindrical with its longitudinal axis transverse to that of the vapor conduit in which it is mounted. The orifice is positioned inside the strainer proximate the end which is remoter from the vapor conduit.

  17. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuhaus, J.E.

    1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

  18. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

  19. KKG Group Paraffin Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulte, Ralph

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed a test of a paraffin removal system developed by the KKG Group utilizing the technology of two Russian scientists, Gennady Katzyn and Boris Koggi. The system consisting of chemical ''sticks'' that generate heat in-situ to melt the paraffin deposits in oilfield tubing. The melted paraffin is then brought to the surface utilizing the naturally flowing energy of the well.

  20. Growing Dry Beans for an Emerging Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Growing Dry Beans for an Emerging Market JOIN US FOR AN EVENING WITH JACK LAZOR, OF BUTTERWORKS FARM AND JOE BOSSEN, OF VERMONT BEAN CRAFTERS APRIL 10TH , 2012, 6:15-8PM AT THE KELLOGG-HUBBARD LIBRARY EAST MONTPELIER ROOM 135 MAIN ST., MONTPELIER, VT 05602 Jack Lazor has grown dry beans for local

  1. Growing Sandalwood in Nepal--Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Growing Sandalwood in Nepal--Potential Silvicultural Methods and Research Priorities1 Peter E. Neil 2 Abstract: Interest in sandalwood has increased recently in Nepal as a result of a royal directive establishment of sandalwood in Nepal. The silvicultural methods discussed could well be of use to other

  2. Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy Biomass 2014: Growing the Future Bioeconomy An error occurred. Unable to execute Javascript. Bioenergy: America's Energy Future is a...

  3. aerobacter aerogenes growing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Growing Mycobacterial Infection CiteSeer Summary: acquired surgical-site infections (SSI) caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM). All episodes of RGM infection occurred...

  4. aspergillus niger growing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Growing Mycobacterial Infection CiteSeer Summary: acquired surgical-site infections (SSI) caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM). All episodes of RGM infection occurred...

  5. Bioproducts: Enabling Biofuels and Growing the Bioeconomy | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioproducts: Enabling Biofuels and Growing the Bioeconomy Bioproducts: Enabling Biofuels and Growing the Bioeconomy Breakout Session 2B-Integration of Supply Chains II:...

  6. Los Alamos develops new technique for growing high-efficiency...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Growing high-efficiency perovskite solar cells Los Alamos develops new technique for growing high-efficiency perovskite solar cells Researchers reveal a new solution-based...

  7. Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, P.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

  8. Rubber stopper remover

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stitt, Robert R. (Arvada, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for removing a rubber stopper from a test tube is mountable to an upright wall, has a generally horizontal splash guard, and a lower plate spaced parallel to and below the splash guard. A slot in the lower plate has spaced-apart opposing edges that converge towards each other from the plate outer edge to a narrowed portion, the opposing edges shaped to make engagement between the bottom of the stopper flange and the top edge of the test tube to wedge therebetween and to grasp the stopper in the slot narrowed portion to hold the stopper as the test tube is manipulated downwardly and pulled from the stopper. The opposing edges extend inwardly to adjoin an opening having a diameter significantly larger than that of the stopper flange.

  9. GROW, EXPORT, ATTRACT, SUPPORT Universities' contribution to Scotland's economic growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    GROW, EXPORT, ATTRACT, SUPPORT Universities' contribution to Scotland's economic growth #12;Contents Summary Grow 3 Export 5 Attract 10 Support 21 #12;Universities are recognised throughout the world to grow the GVA it contributes to Scotland. Universities have a growing export role, with international

  10. Growing America's Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneral GuidanceEnergy LaunchingGrowing America's

  11. Removing Arsenic from Drinking Water

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    See how INL scientists are using nanotechnology to remove arsenic from drinking water. For more INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  12. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Canastota`

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P. (Marcellus, NY); Kopp, Richard F. (Marietta, NY); Smart, Lawrence B. (Geneva, NY); Volk, Timothy A. (Syracuse, NY)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A distinct male cultivar of Salix sachalinensis.times.S. miyabeana named `Canastota`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 2.7-fold more woody biomass than its female parent (Salix sachalinensis `SX61`), 28% greater woody biomass yield than its male parent (Salix miyabeana `SX64`), and 20% greater woody biomass yield than a standard production cultivar, Salix dasyclados `SV1` when grown in the same field for the same length of time (two growing seasons after coppice) in Tully, N.Y. `Canastota` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. `Canastota` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by willow sawfly.

  13. Growing quantum states with topological order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letscher, Fabian; Fleischhauer, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a protocol for growing states with topological order in interacting many-body systems using a sequence of flux quanta and particle insertion. We first consider a simple toy model, the superlattice Bose Hubbard model, to explain all required ingredients. Our protocol is then applied to fractional quantum Hall systems in both, continuum and lattice. We investigate in particular how the fidelity, with which a topologically ordered state can be grown, scales with increasing particle number N. For small systems exact diagonalization methods are used. To treat large systems with many particles, we introduce an effective model based on the composite fermion description of the fractional quantum Hall effect. This model also allows to take into account the effects of dispersive bands and edges in the system, which will be discussed in detail.

  14. Solar Ready Vets: Preparing Our Veterans to Join the Growing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Solar Ready Vets: Preparing Our Veterans to Join the Growing Solar Workforce Solar Ready Vets: Preparing Our Veterans to Join the Growing Solar Workforce April 6, 2015 - 2:27pm...

  15. Fact #816: February 10, 2014 Natural Gas Refueling Stations Grow...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: February 10, 2014 Natural Gas Refueling Stations Grow Over the Last Ten Years Fact 816: February 10, 2014 Natural Gas Refueling Stations Grow Over the Last Ten Years In 2003...

  16. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Canastota`

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A distinct male cultivar of Salix sachalinensis.times.S. miyabeana named `Canastota`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 2.7-fold more woody biomass than its female parent (Salix sachalinensis `SX61`), 28% greater woody biomass yield than its male parent (Salix miyabeana `SX64`), and 20% greater woody biomass yield than a standard production cultivar, Salix dasyclados `SV1` when grown in the same field for the same length of time (two growing seasons after coppice) in Tully, N.Y. `Canastota` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. `Canastota` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by willow sawfly.

  17. Multipollutant Removal with WOWClean® System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the flue gas of a power plant and demonstrate the technology. The system integrates proven emission reduction techniques into a single, multi-pollutant reduction system and is designed to remove Mercury, SOx, NOx, particulates, heavy metals...

  18. On carbon footprints and growing energy use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Could fractional reductions in the carbon footprint of a growing organization lead to a corresponding real reduction in atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions in the next ten years? Curtis M. Oldenburg, head of the Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program of LBNL’s Earth Sciences Division, considers his own organization's carbon footprint and answers this critical question? In addressing the problem of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and climate change, it is essential that we understand which activities are producing GHGs and the scale of emission for each activity, so that reduction efforts can be efficiently targeted. The GHG emissions to the atmosphere of an individual or group are referred to as the ‘carbon footprint’. This terminology is entirely appropriate, because 85% of the global marketed energy supply comes from carbon-rich fossil fuel sources whose combustion produces CO{sub 2}, the main GHG causing global climate change. Furthermore, the direct relation between CO2 emissions and fossil fuels as they are used today makes energy consumption a useful proxy for carbon footprint. It would seem to be a simple matter to reduce energy consumption across the board, both individually and collectively, to help reduce our carbon footprints and therefore solve the energyclimate crisis. But just how much can we reduce carbon footprints when broader forces, such as growth in energy use, cause the total footprint to simultaneously expand? In this feature, I present a calculation of the carbon footprint of the Earth Sciences Division (ESD), the division in which I work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and discuss the potential for reducing this carbon footprint. It will be apparent that in terms of potential future carbon footprint reductions under projections of expected growth, ESD may be thought of as a microcosm of the situation of the world as a whole, in which alternatives to the business-as-usual use of fossil fuels are needed if absolute GHG emission reductions are to be achieved.

  19. PRECOMBUSTION REMOVAL OF HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT PRECURSORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2000-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to growing environmental concerns reflected in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored several research and development projects in late 1995 as part of an initiative entitled Advanced Environmental Control Technologies for Coal-Based Power Systems. The program provided cost-shared support for research and development projects that could accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. Clean coal technologies developed under this program would serve as prototypes for later generations of technologies to be implemented in the industrial sector. In order to identify technologies with the greatest potential for commercial implementation, projects funded under Phase I of this program were subject to competitive review by DOE before being considered for continuation funding under Phase II. One of the primary topical areas identified under the DOE initiative relates to the development of improved technologies for reducing the emissions of air toxics. Previous studies have suggested that many of the potentially hazardous air pollutant precursors (HAPPs) occur as trace elements in the mineral matter of run-of-mine coals. As a result, these elements have the potential to be removed prior to combustion at the mine site by physical coal cleaning processes (i.e., coal preparation). Unfortunately, existing coal preparation plants are generally limited in their ability to remove HAPPs due to incomplete liberation of the mineral matter and high organic associations of some trace elements. In addition, existing physical coal cleaning plants are not specifically designed or optimized to ensure that high trace element rejections may be achieved.

  20. Use of microalgae to remove pollutants from power plant discharges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilde, Edward W. (1833 Pisgah Rd., North Augusta, SC 29841); Benemann, John R. (2741 O'Harte, San Pablo, CA 94806); Weissman, Joseph C. (2086 N. Porpoise Pt. La., Vero Beach, FL 32963); Tillett, David M. (911-3 Coquina La., Vero Beach, FL 32963)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for removing pollutants dissolved in the aqueous discharge of a plant, such as a power plant, from a body of water having known hydraulogy and physicochemical characteristics, the method comprising (a) modifying the hydraulic system of the body of water including use of physical barriers to define a zone in a portion of the body of water which zone includes the discharge point and where the water has a range of physicochemical characteristics; (b) selecting a large and preferably filamentous, planktonically growing strain of algae adapted to absorb the particular pollutants and genetically dominating algae at the physicochemical characteristics of the zone; (c) establishing a colony of the selected algal strain in the zone; (d) harvesting a portion of the colony; and (e) reinnoculating the zone near the discharge point with a fraction of the harvested portion. The fraction used for reinnoculation can be adjusted to balance the rate of pollutant removal to the rate of pollutant discharge.

  1. Large Component Removal/Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, D. M.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

  2. Removal of phosphorus from mud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nield, M.A.; Robbins, B.N.

    1988-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method of processing an aqueous phosphorous-containing solids-containing waste material containing about 5 to about 75 wt.% of elemental phosphorus and which is phosphorus mud obtained as a by-product in the electrothermal production of elemental phosphorus by removing the water and phosphorus substantially completely therefrom, the improvement in the processing which consists essentially of the steps of: first boiling off the water from the waste material to effect the substantially-complete removal of water therefrom, next boiling-off yellow phosphorus from the waste material, and finally burning off residual phosphorus remaining from the boiling-off of yellow phosphorus from the waste material, whereby the boiling-off of yellow phosphorus and the burning-off of the residual phosphorus effects substantially complete removal of phosphorus from the waste material to produce a substantially phosphorus-free solid residue.

  3. Actinide removal from spent salts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

  4. Metals removal from spent salts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); Von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

  5. "Explosive" atom movement is new window into growing metalnanostructu...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    movement is new window into growing metal nanostructures Michael Tringides, Materials Science and Engineering , 515-294-6439 Breehan Gerleman Lucchesi, Public Affairs,...

  6. Growing Up in Scotland: Food and Activity - Summary Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Government, Scottish

    2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report uses data from the Growing Up in Scotland study to explore issues related to, food and activity in Scotland specifically in relation to young children....

  7. FOA aimed at growing expansive database of Renewable Energy and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FOA aimed at growing expansive database of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Incentives and Policies Home > Groups > Utility Rate Graham7781's picture Submitted by...

  8. Multipollutant Removal with WOWClean® System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as petcoke, coal, wood, diesel and natural gas. In addition to significant removal of CO2, test results demonstrate the capability to reduce 99.5% SOx (from levels as high as 2200 ppm), 90% reduction of NOx, and > 90% heavy metals. The paper will include...

  9. DNA MICROARRAY DATA CLUSTERING USING GROWING SELF ORGANIZING NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koprinska, Irena

    the cells in the two different conditions are extracted and labeled with different fluorescent dyes (e developed incremental, competitive and self-organizing neural networks (Growing Cell Structures and Growing is to compare gene expression levels in two different samples (e.g. healthy and diseased cells). RNA from

  10. Removal of the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor - 13031

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herzog, C. Brad [CH2M HILL, Inc. (United States)] [CH2M HILL, Inc. (United States); Guercia, Rudolph [US-DOE (United States)] [US-DOE (United States); LaCome, Matt [Meier Engineering Inc (United States)] [Meier Engineering Inc (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 309 Facility housed the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR), an operating test reactor in the 300 Area at Hanford, Washington. The reactor first went critical in 1960 and was originally used for experiments under the Hanford Site Plutonium Fuels Utilization Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned in 1988-1989, and the facility was deactivated in 1994. The 309 facility was added to Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) response actions as established in an Interim Record of Decision (IROD) and Action Memorandum (AM). The IROD directs a remedial action for the 309 facility, associated waste sites, associated underground piping and contaminated soils resulting from past unplanned releases. The AM directs a removal action through physical demolition of the facility, including removal of the reactor. Both CERCLA actions are implemented in accordance with U.S. EPA approved Remedial Action Work Plan, and the Remedial Design Report / Remedial Action Report associated with the Hanford 300-FF-2 Operable Unit. The selected method for remedy was to conventionally demolish above grade structures including the easily distinguished containment vessel dome, remove the PRTR and a minimum of 300 mm (12 in) of shielding as a single 560 Ton unit, and conventionally demolish the below grade structure. Initial sample core drilling in the Bio-Shield for radiological surveys showed evidence that the Bio-Shield was of sound structure. Core drills for the separation process of the PRTR from the 309 structure began at the deck level and revealed substantial thermal degradation of at least the top 1.2 m (4LF) of Bio-Shield structure. The degraded structure combined with the original materials used in the Bio-Shield would not allow for a stable structure to be extracted. The water used in the core drilling process proved to erode the sand mixture of the Bio-Shield leaving the steel aggregate to act as ball bearings against the core drill bit. A redesign is being completed to extract the 309 PRTR and entire Bio-Shield structure together as one monolith weighing 1100 Ton by cutting structural concrete supports. In addition, the PRTR has hundreds of contaminated process tubes and pipes that have to be severed to allow for a uniformly flush fit with a lower lifting frame. Thirty-two 50 mm (2 in) core drills must be connected with thirty-two wire saw cuts to allow for lifting columns to be inserted. Then eight primary saw cuts must be completed to severe the PRTR from the 309 Facility. Once the weight of the PRTR is transferred to the lifting frame, then the PRTR may be lifted out of the facility. The critical lift will be executed using four 450 Ton strand jacks mounted on a 9 m (30 LF) tall mobile lifting frame that will allow the PRTR to be transported by eight 600 mm (24 in) Slide Shoes. The PRTR will then be placed on a twenty-four line, double wide, self powered Goldhofer for transfer to the onsite CERCLA Disposal Cell (ERDF Facility), approximately 33 km (20 miles) away. (authors)

  11. A vacuum disengager for tritium removal from HYLIFE-II Reactor Flibe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, T.J.; Longhurst, G.R. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Garcia-Otero, E. (Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed a vacuum disengager system to remove tritium from the Flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) molten salt coolant of the HYLIFE-II fusion reactor. There is a two-stage vacuum disengager in each of three intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) loops. Each stage consists of a vacuum chamber 4 m in diameter and 7 m tall. As 0.2 mm diameter molten salt droplets fall vertically downward into the vacuum, most of the tritium diffuses out of the droplets and is pumped away. A fraction {Phi} {approximately}10{sup {minus}5} of the 8.6 MCi/day tritium source (from breeding in the Flibe and from unburned fuel) remains in the Flibe as it leaves the vacuum disengagers, and about 21% of that permeates into the intermediate coolant loop, so about 20 Ci/day leak into the steam system. With Flibe primary coolant and a vacuum disengager, it appears that an intermediate coolant loop is not needed to prevent tritium from leaking into the steam system. An experiment is needed to demonstrate Flibe vacuum disengager operation.

  12. A vacuum disengager for tritium removal from HYLIFE-II Reactor Flibe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, T.J.; Longhurst, G.R. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Garcia-Otero, E. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed a vacuum disengager system to remove tritium from the Flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) molten salt coolant of the HYLIFE-II fusion reactor. There is a two-stage vacuum disengager in each of three intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) loops. Each stage consists of a vacuum chamber 4 m in diameter and 7 m tall. As 0.2 mm diameter molten salt droplets fall vertically downward into the vacuum, most of the tritium diffuses out of the droplets and is pumped away. A fraction {Phi} {approximately}10{sup {minus}5} of the 8.6 MCi/day tritium source (from breeding in the Flibe and from unburned fuel) remains in the Flibe as it leaves the vacuum disengagers, and about 21% of that permeates into the intermediate coolant loop, so about 20 Ci/day leak into the steam system. With Flibe primary coolant and a vacuum disengager, it appears that an intermediate coolant loop is not needed to prevent tritium from leaking into the steam system. An experiment is needed to demonstrate Flibe vacuum disengager operation.

  13. Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit Program (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit Program encourages companies to remain, expand, or locate in Illinois. The program provides tax credits to qualifying companies equal to...

  14. Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit is awarded to businesses with projects that result in net new jobs. The tax credit must be a major factor in the company’s decision to move...

  15. System development & validation process for emerging growing organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almazán López, José Antonio

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis has the main purpose of presenting the Development and Validation phase of the product development system from the point of view of an emerging and growing product development organization, denoting the obstacles ...

  16. Learn How To Grow Your Business Through Government Contracting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OPEN for Government Contracts presents: Summit for Success is a FREE event hosted by American Express OPEN. The "Grow Your Business Through Government Contracting” events are FREE, day-long events focusing on small business government contracting.

  17. The Cold War approaches and Y-12s workload grows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    approaches and Y-12's workload grows Many changes took place after the end of World War II in August, 1945. Y-12's population went from 22,000 workers in August, 1945 to a mere...

  18. Laplacian Growth: Random Matrices and singularities of growing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    (exterior)-incompressible liquid with high viscosity Oil (exterior)-incompressible liquid with high fronts 2007 #12;#12;#12;Growing branches as Stokes lines Stochastic geometry: measure on a space

  19. Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Boilers Market will grow due...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Concerns to Push Global Market to Grow at 8.1% CAGR from 2013 to 2019 Oil Shale Market is Estimated to Reach USD 7,400.70 Million by 2022 more Group members (32)...

  20. Growing Up in Scotland: Summary of Findings from Year 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Government, Scottish

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Growing Up in Scotland study ( GUS) is an important new longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Its principal aim is to provide information...

  1. Growing Up in Scotland: Year 3 - Food and Activity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marryat, Louise; Valeria, Skafida; Webster, Catriona

    2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report uses data from the Growing Up in Scotland study to explore the prevalence of, and many issues related to, food and activity in Scotland specifically in relation to young children....

  2. Growing Up in Scotland: Non Resident Parents - Summary Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Government, Scottish

    2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond....

  3. Growing Up in Scotland: first research report on Sweep 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Simon; Bradshaw, Paul; Cunningham-Burley, Sarah; Hayes, Fenella; Jamieson, Lynn; MacGregor, Andy; Marryat, Louise; Wasoff, Fran

    The Growing Up in Scotland study ( GUS) is an important and ambitious new longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Funded by the Scottish Executive...

  4. Growing Up in Scotland: Year 3 - Non-resident Parents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marryat, Louise; Reid, Susan; Wasoff, Fran

    2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report uses data from the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) to explore the prevalence of, and many issues related to, non-resident parenthood in Scotland specifically in relation to young and very young children. ...

  5. Growing Up in Scotland: Pregnancy, Birth and Early Parenting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Government, Scottish

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Growing Up in Scotland study ( GUS) is an important new longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Its principal aim is to provide information...

  6. New constraints on Northern Hemisphere growing season net flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AL. : LARGER NORTH HEMISPHERE NET ECOSYSTEM EXCHANGE L12807AL. : LARGER NORTH HEMISPHERE NET ECOSYSTEM EXCHANGE Levin,Northern Hemisphere growing season net flux Z. Yang, 1 R. A.

  7. Two-dimensional ultrasonic computed tomography of growing bones.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Two-dimensional ultrasonic computed tomography of growing bones. P. Lasaygues, E. Franceschini, R: Ultrasonic Computed Tomography, Bone imaging, Born approximation, iterative distorted method I. INTRODUCTION imaging process, using ultrasonic computed tomography. Although this method is known to provide

  8. Growing Energy - How Biofuels Can Help End America's Oil Dependence...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    27 percent of U.S. global warming pollution, as well as soot and smog that damage human lungs. NRDC.Growing.Energy.Final.3.pdf More Documents & Publications Biofuels & Greenhouse...

  9. IDENTIFYING CANDIDATE PROTEIN FOR REMOVAL OF ENVIRONMENTALLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uppsala Universitet

    IDENTIFYING CANDIDATE PROTEIN FOR REMOVAL OF ENVIRONMENTALLY HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES Pharem Biotech products and technologies for removing environmental hazardous substances in our everyday life. The products can be applied in areas from the private customer up to the global corporate perspective

  10. Arsenic removal and stabilization by synthesized pyrite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Jin Kun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method for measuring arsenic species (As(III), As(V)). The synthesized pyrite was applied to remove arsenic and its maximum capacity for arsenic removal was measured in batch adsorption experiments to be 3...

  11. A synchronized cell suspension method for growing virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuloaga Guillermo Gerardo

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : g (Hs bar j An@net L9~p'0 ABSTRACT A Synchronized Cell Suspension Method. for Growing Virus. (August 1970) Guillermo Gerardo Zuloaga, Licentiate, Buenos Aires, Argentina; M. S. , Texas ARM University Directed. by: Dr. Stewart Mc...Connell The purpose of this study was to develop tech- niques for growing viruses in a synchronized. suspen- sion cell culture system. Virus replication in such a system should potentially yield a greater quantity of high quality antigen essential for vaccine...

  12. Automatic Eyeglasses Removal from Face Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    Automatic Eyeglasses Removal from Face Images Chenyu Wu, Ce Liu, Heung-Yueng Shum, Member, IEEE an intelligent image editing and face synthesis system that automatically removes eyeglasses from an input frontal face image. Although conventional image editing tools can be used to remove eyeglasses by pixel

  13. Laser-based coatings removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D & D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building.

  14. Removing Stains from Washable Fabrics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beard, Ann Vanderpoorten

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Page Numbers Stain Page Numbers Acne medicine Blueberry Special 9 Wet 8 Adhesive tape Dye 8 Special 9 Butter Alcoholic beverages Dry 8 Wet 8 Oil 8 Tannin 8 Calamine lotion Asphalt Combination 8 Combination 8 Dye 8 Dye 8 Candle wax Automotive... the most gentle to the most harsh, so always stop treatments as soon as the stain has been removed. Dry Type Stains Dissolve the stain with a grease solvent. Lubricate the stain with dry spotter, coconut oil or mineral oil (sold in health food...

  15. he economies of China and India are grow-ing at a rapid clip. But these nations seem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    30 T he economies of China and India are grow- ing at a rapid clip. But these nations seem with a vengeance, given their enormous populations. And their "real" eco- nomic improvements, once the costs

  16. Surfing gravitational waves: can bigravity survive growing tensor modes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Amendola; Frank Koennig; Matteo Martinelli; Valeria Pettorino; Miguel Zumalacarregui

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of bigravity offers one of the simplest possibilities to describe a massive graviton while having self-accelerating cosmological solutions without a cosmological constant. However, it has been shown recently that bigravity is affected by early-time fast growing modes on the tensor sector. Here we argue that we can only trust the linear analysis up to when perturbations are in the linear regime and use a cut-off to stop the growing of the metric perturbations. This analysis, although more consistent, still leads to growing tensor modes that are unacceptably large for the theory to be compatible with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), both in temperature and polarization spectra. In order to suppress the growing modes and make the model compatible with CMB spectra, we find it necessary to either fine-tune the initial conditions, modify the theory or set the cut-off for the tensor perturbations of the second metric much lower than unity. Initial conditions such that the growing mode is sufficiently suppresed can be achieved in scenarios in which inflation ends at the GeV scale.

  17. Surfing gravitational waves: can bigravity survive growing tensor modes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amendola, Luca; Martinelli, Matteo; Pettorino, Valeria; Zumalacarregui, Miguel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of bigravity offers one of the simplest possibilities to describe a massive graviton while having self-accelerating cosmological solutions without a cosmological constant. However, it has been shown recently that bigravity is affected by early-time fast growing modes on the tensor sector. Here we argue that we can only trust the linear analysis up to when perturbations are in the linear regime and use a cut-off to stop the growing of the metric perturbations. This analysis, although more consistent, still leads to growing tensor modes that are unacceptably large for the theory to be compatible with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), both in temperature and polarization spectra. In order to suppress the growing modes and make the model compatible with CMB spectra, we find it necessary to either fine-tune the initial conditions, modify the theory or set the cut-off for the tensor perturbations of the second metric much lower than unity. Initial conditions such that the growing mod...

  18. Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, BS

    2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

  19. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Paul J. (both Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (both Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

    1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  20. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  1. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  2. PRTR ion exchange vault water removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ham, J.E.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the removal of radiologically contaminated water from the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange vault. Approximately 57,000 liters (15,000 gallons) of water had accumulated in the vault due to the absence of a rain cover. The water was removed and the vault inspected for signs of leakage. No evidence of leakage was found. The removal and disposal of the radiologically contaminated water decreased the risk of environmental contamination.

  3. Glass Needs for a Growing Photovoltaics Industry Keith Burrows1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Glass Needs for a Growing Photovoltaics Industry Keith Burrows1 and Vasilis Fthenakis1,2* 1 Center for Life Cycle Analysis, Columbia University, New York, NY 2 Photovoltaics Environmental Research Center, Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY Abstract With the projected growth in photovoltaics

  4. Ris Energy Report 2 Three growing concerns sustainability (particularly in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Risø Energy Report 2 Three growing concerns ­ sustainability (particularly in the transport sector), security of energy supply and cli- mate change ­ have combined to increase interest in bioenergy and significant changes in energy markets. We even have a new term, "modern bioenergy", to cover those areas

  5. Communication China's growing methanol economy and its implications for energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    but scarce oil and natural gas. Adapting to such limitations, it has developed a chemical industry, with the rest coming from natural gas (Peng, 2011). Methanol is commonly used to produce formaldehyde, methylCommunication China's growing methanol economy and its implications for energy and the environment

  6. ROTATIONAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM Grow strong leadership skillsin a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    ROTATIONAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM #12;Grow strong leadership skillsin a one-of-a-kindFortune500. As an Evergreen, you'll be part of an 18-month leadership rotation at our Tacoma and Federal Way, Washington and mentor them to become a valuable part of our leadership succession plan. " Jim Hilger Chief Accounting

  7. Greater fuel diversity needed to meet growing US electricity demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, B.; Mullins, S. [Industrial Info Resources (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity demand is growing in the USA. One way to manage the uncertainty is to diversity fuel sources. Fuel sources include coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewable energy sources. Tables show actual and planned generation projects by fuel types. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Composting Successes and Failures Extending the Growing Season Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    3/18/2014 1 Composting Successes and Failures Extending the Growing Season Workshop LaMoine Nickel University of MN SWROC March 12, 2014 Beginning of compost process 9/6/2013 Finished compost product 11/19/2013 What is Composting Composting is a biological process in which microorganisms convert organic

  9. Growing the renewable chemicals and advanced biofuels cluster in MN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Growing the renewable chemicals and advanced biofuels cluster in MN #12;Renewable Chemical Value% Reduction 60% Reduction 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Gasoline Corn Ethanol Advanced Biofuel Cellulosic Biofuel Corn Ethanol 20% GHG Reduction Compared to gasoline: Advanced Biofuel 50% GHG Reduction e

  10. Diabetes A Growing Epidemic Michael McKee, MD, MPH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Diabetes ­ A Growing Epidemic Michael McKee, MD, MPH March 28, 2013 #12;Goals Diabetes Introduction Types of Diabetes Testing Prevention Treatments #12;In Memory of Benno Houver Bernd "Benno" Houver (1973-2013) #12;Diabetes Info 25.8 million people in the USA (8.3%) have diabetes ~25% of people with diabetes do

  11. Diabetes is an epidemic worldwide, growing in parallel to obesity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toledo, University of

    Diabetes is an epidemic worldwide, growing in parallel to obesity 1 out of 10 American adults have diabetes. By 2034, the incidence is expected to triple. More then one million Ohioans have diabe reported a more than 10.1% incidence of diabetes among adults in Lucas County. Ohio is among the leading

  12. General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical Removal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regarding Medical Removal Protection Benefits Pursuant to 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical...

  13. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  14. Slag capture and removal during laser cutting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Clyde O. (Newington, CT)

    1984-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Molten metal removed from a workpiece in a laser cutting operation is blown away from the cutting point by a gas jet and collected on an electromagnet.

  15. Use of microalgae to remove pollutants from power plant discharges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilde, E.W.; Benemann, J.R.; Weissman, J.C.; Tillett, D.M.

    1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system are described for removing pollutants dissolved in the aqueous discharge of a plant, such as a power plant, from a body of water having known hydraulic and physicochemical characteristics, the method comprising (a) modifying the hydraulic system of the body of water including use of physical barriers to define a zone in a portion of the body of water which zone includes the discharge point and where the water has a range of physicochemical characteristics; (b) selecting a large and preferably filamentous, planktonically growing strain of algae adapted to absorb the particular pollutants and genetically dominating algae at the physicochemical characteristics of the zone; (c) establishing a colony of the selected algal strain in the zone; (d) harvesting a portion of the colony; and (e) reinoculating the zone near the discharge point with a fraction of the harvested portion. The fraction used for reinoculation can be adjusted to balance the rate of pollutant removal to the rate of pollutant discharge. 4 figures.

  16. Optimal Management of Renewable Resources with Growing Demand and Stock Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berck, Peter

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MAi\\IAGEMEJ. 'n' OF RENEWABLE RESOURCES WIlli GROWING DEMANDthe problem of a renewable resource is: -f" (x*) P*] (~p). ~MA. ? \\IAGEMENl' OF RENEWABLE RESOURCES WIlli GROWING

  17. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  18. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  19. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  20. A Handbook of Peanut Growing in the Southwest.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    production, by counties, in Oklahoma and Texas for the year 1947. county, Comanche, produced more than 25 million pounds. Good cover crops include adapted vetch and winter peas. These legumes can be grown alone, or vetch can be used in a mixture...Bulletin 727 Texas Agricul turd Experiment Station November, 1950 Bulletin B-361 Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station A Handbook of In the Southwest PEANUT GROW TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION The Texas Agricultural...

  1. Method for changing removable bearing for a wind turbine generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY)

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

  2. Removable bearing arrangement for a wind turbine generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

  3. In situ removal of contamination from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination, and further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed.

  4. In situ removal of contamination from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, E.R.; Brady, P.V.

    1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination. The process also uses further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed. 5 figs.

  5. Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, G.T.; Holshouser, S.K.; Coleman, R.M.; Harless, C.E.; Whinnery, W.N. III

    1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

  6. Install Removable Insulation on Valves and Fittings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on installing removable insulation on valves and fittings provides how-to advice for improving the system using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  7. Part removal of 3D printed parts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peña Doll, Mateo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was performed to understand the correlation between printing parameters in the FDM 3D printing process, and the force required to remove a part from the build platform of a 3D printing using a patent ...

  8. Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Gus T. (Paducah, KY); Holshouser, Stephen K. (Boaz, KY); Coleman, Richard M. (Paducah, KY); Harless, Charles E. (Smithland, KY); Whinnery, III, Walter N. (Paducah, KY)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

  9. Growing Cutting-edge X-ray Optics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ray Conley

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Ever imagined that an Xbox controller could help open a window into a world spanning just one billionth of a meter? Brookhaven Lab's Ray Conley grows cutting-edge optics called multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) one atomic layer at a time to focus high-energy x-rays to within a single nanometer. To achieve this focusing feat, Ray uses a massive, custom-built atomic deposition device, an array of computers, and a trusty Xbox controller. These lenses will be deployed at the Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source II, due to begin shining super-bright light on pressing scientific puzzles in 2015

  10. Process for growing epitaxial gallium nitride and composite wafers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weber, Eicke R.; Subramanya, Sudhir G.; Kim, Yihwan; Kruger, Joachim

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel growth procedure to grow epitaxial Group III metal nitride thin films on lattice-mismatched substrates is proposed. Demonstrated are the quality improvement of epitaxial GaN layers using a pure metallic Ga buffer layer on c-plane sapphire substrate. X-ray rocking curve results indicate that the layers had excellent structural properties. The electron Hall mobility increases to an outstandingly high value of .mu.>400 cm.sup.2 /Vs for an electron background concentration of 4.times.10.sup.17 cm.sup.-3.

  11. Laser removal of sludge from steam generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing unwanted chemical deposits known as sludge from the metal surfaces of steam generators with laser energy is provided. Laser energy of a certain power density, of a critical wavelength and frequency, is intermittently focused on the sludge deposits to vaporize them so that the surfaces are cleaned without affecting the metal surface (sludge substrate). Fiberoptic tubes are utilized for laser beam transmission and beam direction. Fiberoptics are also utilized to monitor laser operation and sludge removal.

  12. Oil removal from water via adsorption 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, William Edward

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION I I. LITERATURE REVIEW Significance of Oil Spill Proble. ". . s Growth of Marine Commerce Superport Oil Spills Oil Spills and the Law Oil Spill Control Methods Physical Removal of Oil III. MATERIALS... IV Table V Table VI Significant Facts about Major Oil Spills Viscosity of Test Oils Determined by Capillary Viscometer Percent of Oil Remaining in Water After Removal of Oil-Carrier Combination Maximum Oil Adsorption Capacity for Light Crude...

  13. Regulation of Tall Structures (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A permit from the Department of Transportation is required for the construction or alteration of any structure higher than 200 feet above ground level, or structures near airports, highways,...

  14. Workers Remove Glove Boxes from Ventilation at Hanford's Plutonium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Remove Glove Boxes from Ventilation at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant Workers Remove Glove Boxes from Ventilation at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant January 28, 2015 -...

  15. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological Systems; Adsorption and Application. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological...

  16. Removing Barriers to Innovations: Related Codes and Standards...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Removing Barriers to Innovations: Related Codes and Standards CSI Team Removing Barriers to Innovations: Related Codes and Standards CSI Team This presentation was delivered at the...

  17. Y-12 Removes Nuclear Materials from Two Facilities to Reduce...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Home Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Y-12 Removes Nuclear Materials from Two Facilities ... Y-12 Removes Nuclear Materials from...

  18. Field Demonstration Of Permeable Reactive Barriers To Remove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field Demonstration Of Permeable Reactive Barriers To Remove Dissolved Uranium From Groundwater-001 November 2000 FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS TO REMOVE DISSOLVED URANIUM FROM

  19. New Research Facility to Remove Hurdles to Offshore Wind and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Facility to Remove Hurdles to Offshore Wind and Water Power Development New Research Facility to Remove Hurdles to Offshore Wind and Water Power Development January 10,...

  20. Selective Removal of Lanthanides from Natural Waters, Acidic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Removal of Lanthanides from Natural Waters, Acidic Streams and Dialysate. Selective Removal of Lanthanides from Natural Waters, Acidic Streams and Dialysate. Abstract: The...

  1. Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers...

  2. United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    removed HEU under this effort are Austria, Chile, Czech Republic, Libya, Mexico, Romania, Serbia, Taiwan, Turkey, Ukraine, and Vietnam. To date, the Department has removed or...

  3. An Approach for Assessing the Signature Quality of Various Chemical Assays when Predicting the Culture Media Used to Grow Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, Aimee E.; Sego, Landon H.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate an approach for assessing the quality of a signature system designed to predict the culture medium used to grow a microorganism. The system was comprised of four chemical assays designed to identify various ingredients that could be used to produce the culture medium. The analytical measurements resulting from any combination of these four assays can be used in a Bayesian network to predict the probabilities that the microorganism was grown using one of eleven culture media. We evaluated combinations of the signature system by removing one or more of the assays from the Bayes network. We measured and compared the quality of the various Bayes nets in terms of fidelity, cost, risk, and utility, a method we refer to as Signature Quality Metrics

  4. 241-AZ-101 pump removal trough analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coverdell, B.L.

    1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the current Hanford mission of environmental cleanup, various long length equipment must be removed from highly radioactive waste tanks. The removal of equipment will utilize portions of the Equipment Removal System for Project W320 (ERS-W320), specifically the 50 ton hydraulic trailer system. Because the ERS-W320 system was designed to accommodate much heavier equipment it is adequate to support the dead weight of the trough, carriage and related equipment for 241AZ101 pump removal project. However, the ERS-W320 components when combined with the trough and its` related components must also be analyzed for overturning due to wind loads. Two troughs were designed, one for the 20 in. diameter carriage and one for the 36 in. diameter carriage. A proposed 52 in. trough was not designed and, therefore is not included in this document. In order to fit in the ERS-W320 strongback the troughs were design with the same widths. Structurally, the only difference between the two troughs is that more material was removed from the stiffener plates on the 36 in trough. The reduction in stiffener plate material reduces the allowable load. Therefore, only the 36 in. trough was analyzed.

  5. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Tully Champion`

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P. (Marcellus, NY); Kopp, Richard F. (Marietta, NY); Smart, Lawrence B. (Geneva, NY); Volk, Timothy A. (Syracuse, NY)

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.S. miyabeana named `Tully Champion`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 25% more woody biomass than two current production clones (Salix dasyclados `SV1` and Salix miyabeana `SX64`), more than 2.5-fold greater biomass than one of its parents (Salix miyabeana `SX67`), and nearly 3-fold more biomass than another production clone (Salix sacchalinensis, `SX61`) when grown in the same field for the same length of time (two growing seasons after coppice) in Tully, N.Y. `Tully Champion` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested repeatedly after two to four years of growth. `Tully Champion` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.

  6. System for removal of arsenic from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical systems for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A system for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a system for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  7. Process for removing metals from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Napier, J.M.; Hancher, C.M.; Hackett, G.D.

    1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions. 2 tabs.

  8. Process for removing metals from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hancher, Charles M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hackett, Gail D. (Knoxville, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a flocculating agent, separating precipitate-containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions.

  9. Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pulley, Howard (West Paducah, KY); Seltzer, Steven F. (Paducah, KY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separting the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF.sub.2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium, without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

  10. Sorbents for mercury removal from flue gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granite, Evan J.; Hargis, Richard A.; Pennline, Henry W.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the various promoters and sorbents examined for the removal of mercury from flue gas is presented. Commercial sorbent processes are described along with the chemistry of the various sorbent-mercury interactions. Novel sorbents for removing mercury from flue gas are suggested. Since activated carbons are expensive, alternate sorbents and/or improved activated carbons are needed. Because of their lower cost, sorbent development work can focus on base metal oxides and halides. Additionally, the long-term sequestration of the mercury on the sorbent needs to be addressed. Contacting methods between the flue gas and the sorbent also merit investigation.

  11. Heat treatment of exchangers to remove coke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.D.

    1990-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a process for preparing furfural coke for removal from metallic surfaces. It comprises: heating the furfural coke without causing an evolution of heat capable of undesirably altering metallurgical properties of the surfaces in the presence of a gas containing molecular oxygen at a sufficient temperature below 800{degrees}F (427{degrees}C) for a sufficient time to change the crush strength of the coke so as to permit removal with a water jet at a pressure of five thousand pounds per square inch.

  12. Nitrate Removal in NITREXTM Permeable Reactive Barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Hole, Massachusetts 02543 USA #12;ABSTRACT Eutrophication from anthropogenic nutrient loading problems humans have caused is eutrophication by increasing the nutrient loads to these areas. Eutrophication can cause macro-algae and phytoplankton blooms, as well as increased epiphytes that grow

  13. Nesting biology of the fungus-growing ant Cyphomyrmex longiscapus Weber (Attini, Formicidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    Nesting biology of the fungus-growing ant Cyphomyrmex longiscapus Weber (Attini, Formicidae) U, nesting biology, ant- fungus symbiosis. Summary The fungus-growing ant Cyphomymrex longiscapus Weber-growing ant Cyphomyrmex longiscapus Weber (Attini, Formicidae) is known from only five collections from

  14. Recommendation 183: Preferred Alternative for the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ORSSAB Recommendation to DOE on the Preferred Alternative for the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium.

  15. ASBESTOS PIPE-INSULATION REMOVAL ROBOT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This final topical report details the development, experimentation and field-testing activities for a robotic asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system developed for use within the DOE's weapon complex as part of their ER and WM program, as well as in industrial abatement. The engineering development, regulatory compliance, cost-benefit and field-trial experiences gathered through this program are summarized.

  16. Removed Barriers: 3.32 Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    Students Average Values from Entry and Exit Surveys for Participants in 2006 Workshops ENTRY 1 BarriersResults EXIT 2 Removed Barriers: 3.32 Knowledge 3.67 GIS 3.46 Data Access 3.68 Software Use 3

  17. Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Derzon, Dora K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nelson, Jill S. (Albuquerque, NM); Rand, Peter B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications.

  18. Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Derzon, D.K.; Nelson, J.S.; Rand, P.B.

    1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications. 1 fig.

  19. Bioreactors for Removing Methyl Bromide following Contained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioreactors for Removing Methyl Bromide following Contained Fumigations L A U R E N C E G . M I L L contributes to the depletion of stratospheric ozone. A closed-system bioreactor consisting of 0.5 L recirculating air. Strain IMB-1 grew slowly to high cell densities in the bioreactor using MeBr as its sole

  20. Plastic bottles > Remove lids (not recyclable)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    Plastic bottles Please: > Remove lids (not recyclable) > Empty bottles > Rinse milk bottles, & other bottles if possible > Squash bottles www.st-andrews.ac.uk/estates/environment All types of plastic bottle accepted Clear, opaque and coloured bottles Labels can remain on X No plastic bags X No plastics

  1. MODELING OF PARTICULATE REMOVAL IN MIXED MEDIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    versus Downflow Modes DATA COLLECTION #12;4 UPFLOW CONTRUCTION #12;5 UPFLOW FILTRATION RESULTS · Drawback to downflow filtration is the need for pretreatment. Upflow filtration may remove need for pretreatment-specific, and transfer of data from lab-scale to field is not applicable. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Anitha Balakrishnan, UAB Renee

  2. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  3. NNSA B-Roll: Fuel Removals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Nuclear Security Administration established the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) to identify, secure, remove and/or facilitate the disposition of high risk vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials around the world, as quickly as possible, that pose a threat to the United States and the international community.

  4. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES FOR THE REMOVAL OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES FOR THE REMOVAL OF RESIDUAL NON-STEROIDAL ANTI- INFLAMMATORY. G. Esposito, PhD, MSc Associate Professor of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering University in Biogeochemistry University of Paris-Est Paris, France Prof. dr. ir P.N.L. Lens Professor of Biotechnology UNESCO

  5. Method of removing cesium from steam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carson, Jr., Neill J. (Clarendon Hills, IL); Noland, Robert A. (Oak Park, IL); Ruther, Westly E. (Skokie, IL)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for removal of radioactive cesium from a hot vapor, such as high temperature steam, including the steps of passing input hot vapor containing radioactive cesium into a bed of silicate glass particles and chemically incorporating radioactive cesium in the silicate glass particles at a temperature of at least about 700.degree. F.

  6. Decontaminating Human Judgments by Removing Sequential Dependencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mozer, Michael C.

    Decontaminating Human Judgments by Removing Sequential Dependencies Michael C. Mozer, Harold, and thereby decontaminate a series of ratings to obtain more meaningful human judgments. In our formulation, decontamination is fun- damentally a problem of inferring latent states (internal sensations) which, be- cause

  7. Removal of a Permanent IVC Filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Bangalore C. Anil [Queen's Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)], E-mail: anil.kumar@doctors.org.uk; Chakraverty, Sam; Zealley, Ian [Ninewells Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are increasingly used for prevention of life-threatening pulmonary emboli in patients who have contraindications to anticoagulation therapy. We report a case of the removal of a permanent IVC filter, which was inadvertently inserted due to an incorrect ultrasound report.

  8. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Tully Champion`

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.S. miyabeana named `Tully Champion`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 25% more woody biomass than two current production clones (Salix dasyclados `SV1` and Salix miyabeana `SX64`), more than 2.5-fold greater biomass than one of its parents (Salix miyabeana `SX67`), and nearly 3-fold more biomass than another production clone (Salix sacchalinensis, `SX61`) when grown in the same field for the same length of time (two growing seasons after coppice) in Tully, N.Y. `Tully Champion` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested repeatedly after two to four years of growth. `Tully Champion` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.

  9. Interest grows in African oil and gas opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knott, D.

    1997-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    As African countries continue a slow drift towards democratic government and market economics, the continent is increasingly attractive to international oil and gas companies. Though Africa remains politically diverse, and its volatile politics remains a major barrier to petroleum companies, a number of recent developments reflect its growing significance for the industry. Among recent projects and events reflecting changes in Africa: oil and gas exporter Algeria has invited foreign oil companies to help develop major gas discoveries, with a view to boosting exports to Europe; oil and gas producer Egypt invited foreign companies to explore in the Nile Delta region, and the result appears to be a flowering world scale gas play; west African offshore exploration has entered deep water and new areas, and a number of major projects are expected in years to come; Nigeria`s reputation as a difficult place to operate has been justified by recent political and civil events, but a long-planned liquefied natural gas (LNG) export plant is being built there; South Africa, which has returned to the international scene after years of trade isolation because of apartheid, is emerging as a potential driver for energy industry schemes throughout the continent. Activities are discussed.

  10. Growing Brazilian demand to spur gas network in South America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deffarges, E.H. (Booz Allen and Hamilton, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Maurer, L.I.A. (Booz Allen and Hamilton, Sao Paulo (Brazil))

    1993-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent combination in South America of economic and geopolitical factors is prompting development of a new integrated gas-pipeline network in the continent's Southern Cone. The crucial factors include privatization, regional integration, economic growth, and environmental concerns. The area, Latin America's largest regional entity, includes Brazil (population 150 million and a 1990 GNP of about $375 billion, 9th largest in the world), Argentina (population 32 million and the third largest Latin American economy after Brazil and Mexico), Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay. Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay are members of the MercoSur economic bloc whose objective is to develop free trade in the region. There are very few integrated pipeline networks in the world. Besides the giant North American system, with hundreds of producers and pipelines, there is only one other large integrated network. It connects continental European countries to their outside suppliers such as Norway, the C.I.S., and Algeria. The emergence of a new pipeline system is therefore important for the natural-gas industry worldwide and even more so if it occurs in a region now growing rapidly after a decade of economic difficulties.

  11. Soviet Union oil sector outlook grows bleaker still

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the outlook for the U.S.S.R's oil sector which grows increasingly bleak and with it prospects for the Soviet economy. Plunging Soviet oil production and exports have analysts revising near term oil price outlooks, referring to the Soviet oil sector's self-destructing and Soviet oil production in a freefall. County NatWest, Washington, citing likely drops in Soviet oil production and exports (OGJ, Aug. 5, p. 16), has jumped its projected second half spot price for West Texas intermediate crude by about $2 to $22-23/bbl. Smith Barney, New York, forecasts WTI postings at $24-25/bbl this winter, largely because of seasonally strong world oil demand and the continued collapse in Soviet oil production. It estimates the call on oil from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries at more than 25 million b/d in first quarter 1992. That would be the highest level of demand for OPEC oil since 1980, Smith Barney noted.

  12. Growing Crystaline Sapphire Fibers By Laser Heated Pedestal Techiques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phomsakha, Vongvilay (St. Petersburg, FL); Chang, Robert S. F. (Tampa, FL); Djeu, Nicholas I. (Tampa, FL)

    1997-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved system and process for growing crystal fibers comprising a means for creating a laser beam having a substantially constant intensity profile through its cross sectional area, means for directing the laser beam at a portion of solid feed material located within a fiber growth chamber to form molten feed material, means to support a seed fiber above the molten feed material, means to translate the seed fiber towards and away from the molten feed material so that the seed fiber can make contact with the molten feed material, fuse to the molten feed material and then be withdrawn away from the molten feed material whereby the molten feed material is drawn off in the form of a crystal fiber. The means for creating a laser beam having a substantially constant intensity profile through its cross sectional area includes transforming a previously generated laser beam having a conventional gaussian intensity profile through its cross sectional area into a laser beam having a substantially constant intensity profile through its cross sectional area by passing the previously generated laser beam through a graded reflectivity mirror. The means for directing the laser beam at a portion of solid feed material is configured to direct the laser beam at a target zone which contains the molten feed material and a portion of crystal fiber drawn off the molten feed material by the seed fiber. The means to support the seed fiber above the molten feed material is positioned at a predetermined height above the molten feed material. This predetermined height provides the seed fiber with sufficient length and sufficient resiliency so that surface tension in the molten feed material can move the seed fiber to the center of the molten feed material irrespective of where the seed fiber makes contact with the molten feed material. The internal atmosphere of the fiber growth chamber is composed substantially of Helium gas.

  13. Hydraulic dredging, a sediment removal technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spotts, J.W.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sediment was successfully removed from a Peabody Coal Company pond near Macon, Missouri, by a Mud Cat Model SP-810 hydraulic dredge. Previous attempts using land-based equipment had been unsatisfactory. The hydraulic-powered auger and submerged pump easily removed 882 m/sup 3/ (1154 yd/sup 3/) and pumped the slurry a distance of 305 m (1000 ft) to a disposal area. The hydraulic dredge was more effective and cheaper to operate than land-based equipment. The dredge cost was $1.31/m/sup 3/ ($1.00/yd/sup 3/), the dragline cost was $6.54/m/sup 3/ ($5.00/yd/sup 3/) and the front-end loader cost was $15.70/m/sup 3/ ($12.00/yd/sup 3/), under optimum conditions.

  14. Method of arsenic removal from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

  15. Removal of fluoride from aqueous nitric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruett, D.J.; Howerton, W.B.; Mailen, J.C.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several methods for removing fluoride from aqueous nitric acid were investigated and compared with the frequently used aluminum nitrate-calcium nitrate (Ca/sup 2 +/-Al/sup 3 +/) chemical trap-distillation system. Zirconium oxynitrate solutions were found to be superior in preventing volatilization of fluoride during distillation of the nitric acid, producing decontamination factors (DFs) on the order of 2 x 10/sup 3/ (vs approx. 500 for the Ca/sup 2 +/-Al/sup 3 +/ system). Several other metal nitrate systems were tested, but they were less effective. Alumina and zirconia columns proved highly effective in removing HF from HF-HNO/sub 3/ vapors distilled through the columns; fluoride DFs on the order of 10/sup 6/ and 10/sup 4/, respectively, were obtained. A silica gel column was very effective in adsorbing HF from HF-HNO/sub 3/ solutions, producing a fluoride DF of approx. 10/sup 4/.

  16. Fly ash enhanced metal removal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nonavinakere, S. [Plexus Scientific Corp., Annapolis, MD (United States); Reed, B.E. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fly ashes from local thermal power plants in the removal of cadmium, nickel, chromium, lead, and copper from aqueous waste streams. Physical and chemical characteristics of fly ashes were determined, batch isotherm studies were conducted. A practical application of using fly ash in treating spent electroless nickel (EN) plating baths by modified conventional precipitation or solid enhanced metal removal process (SEMR) was investigated. In addition to nickel the EN baths also contains completing agents such as ammonium citrate and succinic acid reducing agents such as phosphate and hypophosphite. SEMR experiments were conducted at different pHs, fly ash type and concentrations, and settling times.

  17. Acid treatment removes zinc sulfide scale restriction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, K. (Kerr McGee Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Allison, D. (Otis Engineering Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Ford, W.G.F. (Halliburton Co., Duncan, OK (United States))

    1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that removal of zinc sulfide (ZnS) scale with acid restored an offshore Louisiana well's production to original rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near well bore area. The selected acid had been proven to control iron sulfide (FeS) scales in sour wells without causing harm to surface production equipment, tubing, and other downhole hardware. The successful removal of the blockage re-established previous production rates with a 105% increase in flowing tubing pressure. On production for a number of months, a high rate, high-pressure offshore well was experiencing unusually rapid pressure and rate declines. A small sample of the restrictive material was obtained during the wire line operations. The well was subsequently shut in while a laboratory analysis determined that zinc sulfide was the major component of the obstruction.

  18. Photoacoustic removal of occlusions from blood vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Maitland, IV, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA); Esch, Victor C. (San Francisco, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Partial or total occlusions of fluid passages within the human body are removed by positioning an array of optical fibers in the passage and directing treatment radiation pulses along the fibers, one at a time, to generate a shock wave and hydrodynamics flows that strike and emulsify the occlusions. A preferred application is the removal of blood clots (thrombin and embolic) from small cerebral vessels to reverse the effects of an ischemic stroke. The operating parameters and techniques are chosen to minimize the amount of heating of the fragile cerebral vessel walls occurring during this photo acoustic treatment. One such technique is the optical monitoring of the existence of hydrodynamics flow generating vapor bubbles when they are expected to occur and stopping the heat generating pulses propagated along an optical fiber that is not generating such bubbles.

  19. Process for removing sulfur from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aida, Tetsuo (Ames, IA); Squires, Thomas G. (Gilbert, IA); Venier, Clifford G. (Ames, IA)

    1985-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

  20. Oil removal from water via adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, William Edward

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Inorganic adsorbents, such as perlite and glass wool, do not have high oil adsorption capacities compared to organ- ics and the capacities are dependent on the viscosity of the oils. The inorganic adsorbents have higher oil adsorption capacities in more... IV Table V Table VI Significant Facts about Major Oil Spills Viscosity of Test Oils Determined by Capillary Viscometer Percent of Oil Remaining in Water After Removal of Oil-Carrier Combination Maximum Oil Adsorption Capacity for Light Crude...

  1. REMOVAL OF LEGACY PLUTONIUM MATERIALS FROM SWEDEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, Kerry A. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Bellamy, J. Steve [Savannah River National Laboratory; Chandler, Greg T. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Iyer, Natraj C. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of; Koenig, Rich E.; Leduc, D. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Hackney, B. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Leduc, Dan R. [Savannah River National Laboratory

    2013-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Global Threat Reduction (GTRI) recently removed legacy plutonium materials from Sweden in collaboration with AB SVAFO, Sweden. This paper details the activities undertaken through the U.S. receiving site (Savannah River Site (SRS)) to support the characterization, stabilization, packaging and removal of legacy plutonium materials from Sweden in 2012. This effort was undertaken as part of GTRI’s Gap Materials Program and culminated with the successful removal of plutonium from Sweden as announced at the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit. The removal and shipment of plutonium materials to the United States was the first of its kind under NNSA’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative. The Environmental Assessment for the U.S. receipt of gap plutonium material was approved in May 2010. Since then, the multi-year process yielded many first time accomplishments associated with plutonium packaging and transport activities including the application of the of DOE-STD-3013 stabilization requirements to treat plutonium materials outside the U.S., the development of an acceptance criteria for receipt of plutonium from a foreign country, the development and application of a versatile process flow sheet for the packaging of legacy plutonium materials, the identification of a plutonium container configuration, the first international certificate validation of the 9975 shipping package and the first intercontinental shipment using the 9975 shipping package. This paper will detail the technical considerations in developing the packaging process flow sheet, defining the key elements of the flow sheet and its implementation, determining the criteria used in the selection of the transport package, developing the technical basis for the package certificate amendment and the reviews with multiple licensing authorities and most importantly integrating the technical activities with the Swedish partners.

  2. Process for removing sulfur from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aida, T.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.

    1983-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

  3. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

    1987-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  4. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

    1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  5. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, Milton (12833 S. 82nd Ct., Palos Park, IL 60464); Sinha, Shome N. (5748 Drexel, 2A, Chicago, IL 60637)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  6. The Impact of Global Warming on U.S. Agriculture: An Econometric Analysis of Optimal Growing Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlenker, Wolfram; Hanemann, W. Michael; Fisher, Anthony C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Agriculture: An Econometric Analysis of Optimal GrowingU.S. Agriculture: An Econometric Analysis of Optimal GrowingU.S. Agriculture: An Econometric Analysis of Optimal Growing

  7. Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success October 3, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here is...

  8. Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stories Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time The Lab's 1,000th shipment of transuranic waste recently left Los Alamos,...

  9. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y. (3807 Reynolds St., Laramie, WY 82070)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

  10. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN); Trowbridge, Lee D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag.

  11. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

  12. Partnering with Utilities and Other Program Administrators to Sustain-Grow Your Energy Efficiency Initiatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains the transcript for the Partnering with Utilities and Other Program Administrators to Sustain and Grow Your Energy Efficiency Initiatives webinar held on May 8, 2013.

  13. Growing Up in Scotland: Sweep 2 - Experiences of Pre-School Education 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Government, Scottish

    2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Research findings (of four) accompanying the full research report on Sweep 2 findings of the Growing Up in Scotland study Year 2....

  14. Growing Up in Scotland: The Impact of Children's Early Activities on Cognitive Development - Summary Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Government, Scottish

    2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report uses data from the first three waves of the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) to explore differences in children’s cognitive ability....

  15. Growing Up in Scotland: Multiple Childcare Provision and its Effects on Child Outcomes - Summary Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Government, Scottish

    2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    It presents key findings from the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) report Multiple Childcare Provision and its Effects on Child Outcomes....

  16. Growing Up in Scotland: Sweep 2 - Summary of Findings from Year 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Government, Scottish

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research findings (of four) accompanying the full research report on Sweep 2 findings of the Growing Up in Scotland Study Year 2...

  17. Growing Up in Scotland: Sweep 2 - Parenting Styles and Parental Support 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Government, Scottish

    2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Research findings (of four) accompanying the full research report on Sweep 2 findings of the Growing Up in Scotland study Year 2...

  18. Extending the Growing Season Workshop Registration Form. Preregister by Wednesday, March 5, 2014.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    the Growing Season Workshop Wednesday, March 12, 2014 from 9:00 to 2:30 ChuckDahn 1804Broadway Emmetsburg

  19. Removal of Heavy Metals from Aqueous Systems with Thiol Functionalized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy Metals from Aqueous Systems with Thiol Functionalized Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles. Removal of Heavy Metals from Aqueous Systems with Thiol Functionalized...

  20. Method for removing fluoride contamination from nitric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, W.B.; Pruett, D.J.

    1982-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluoride ions are removed from nitric acid solution by contacting the vaporized solution with alumina or zirconium.

  1. Electrostatic Dust Detection and Removal for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.H. Skinner; A. Campos; H. Kugel; J. Leisure; A.L. Roquemore; S. Wagner

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present some recent results on two innovative applications of microelectronics technology to dust inventory measurement and dust removal in ITER. A novel device to detect the settling of dust particles on a remote surface has been developed in the laboratory. A circuit board with a grid of two interlocking conductive traces with 25 ?m spacing is biased to 30 – 50 V. Carbon particles landing on the energized grid create a transient short circuit. The current flowing through the short circuit creates a voltage pulse that is recorded by standard nuclear counting electronics and the total number of counts is related to the mass of dust impinging on the grid. The particles typically vaporize in a few seconds restoring the previous voltage standoff. Experience on NSTX however, showed that in a tokamak environment it was still possible for large particles or fibers to remain on the grid causing a long term short circuit. We report on the development of a gas puff system that uses helium to clear such particles. Experiments with varying nozzle designs, backing pressures, puff durations, and exit flow orientations have given an optimal configuration that effectively removes particles from an area up to 25 cm² with a single nozzle. In a separate experiment we are developing an advanced circuit grid of three interlocking traces that can generate a miniature electrostatic traveling wave for transporting dust to a suitable exit port. We have fabricated such a 3-pole circuit board with 25 micron insulated traces that operates with voltages up to 200 V. Recent results showed motion of dust particles with the application of only 50 V bias voltage. Such a device could potentially remove dust continuously without dedicated interventions and without loss of machine availability for plasma operations.

  2. 9. Analysis a. Analysis tools for dam removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    (Randle 2003). Mechanical removal, or dredging, involves removing some or all of the reservoir sediment infrastructure and landowners, downstream confinement, presence of threatened and endangered species, and cost in stages) and type (fine or contaminated sediment can be removed through dredging prior to sediment release

  3. INVESTIGATION OF IONIC CONTAMINATION REMOVAL FROM SILICON DIOXIDE SURFACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suni, Ian Ivar

    INVESTIGATION OF IONIC CONTAMINATION REMOVAL FROM SILICON DIOXIDE SURFACES H. Lin, A. A. Busnaina, and I. I. Suni T he removal of ionic contaminants from silicon surfaces surface contamination level canM Communications L td. INTRODUCTION with increasing frequency and power, and decreases Contamination removal is one

  4. Ultracapacitor having residual water removed under vacuum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wei, Chang (Niskayuna, NY); Jerabek, Elihu Calvin (Glenmont, NY); Day, James (Scotia, NY)

    2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multilayer cell is provided that comprises two solid, nonporous current collectors, two porous electrodes separating the current collectors, a porous separator between the electrodes and an electrolyte occupying pores in the electrodes and separator. The mutilayer cell is electrolyzed to disassociate water within the cell to oxygen gas and hydrogen gas. A vacuum is applied to the cell substantially at the same time as the electrolyzing step, to remove the oxygen gas and hydrogen gas. The cell is then sealed to form a ultracapacitor substantially free from water.

  5. Specific energy for laser removal of rocks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.; Kornecki, G.; Reed, C. B.; Gahan, B. C.; Parker, R. A.; Batarseh, S.; Graves, R. M.

    2001-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of advanced high power laser technology into oil and gas well drilling has been attracting significant research interests recently among research institutes, petroleum industries, and universities. Potential laser or laser-aided oil and gas well drilling has many advantages over the conventional rotary drilling, such as high penetration rate, reduction or elimination of tripping, casing, and bit costs, and enhanced well control, perforating and side-tracking capabilities. The energy required to remove a unit volume of rock, namely the specific energy (SE), is a critical rock property data that can be used to determine both the technical and economic feasibility of laser oil and gas well drilling.

  6. TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  7. Saeltzer Dam Removal on Clear Creek 11 years later: An assessment of upstream channel changes since the dam's removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Crystal; Walker, Katelyn; Zimring, Mark

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boulder BLDR Bedrock BDRK Dam Rubble DMRB Table B1. 2011pages. Brown, M. (n.d. ). Clear Creek—McCormick-Saeltzer DamRemoval: Dam removal re-opens spring run salmon habitat. US

  8. Tailoring hydrocarbon streams for asphaltene removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Bianco, A.; Stroppa, F.; Bertero, L.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oilfield production is often hindered by asphaltene precipitation which tends to fill the pores of the reservoir rocks and plug the wellbore tubing as well as the other auxiliary equipment used during crude oil recovery. Several remedies to remove these deposits have been proposed and patented but the injection of aromatic solvents such as toluene and light petroleum distillates is normally preferred. Previous studies with a number of pure aromatic hydrocarbons have shown that the solvent capacity of these molecules may be very different and that the degree of condensation plays an important role. In this regard, tetralins and naphthalenes are superior to alkylbenzenes. However, because the use of pure compounds is not economically feasible, the authors examined various industrial streams and the authors correlated their chemical composition to the solvent capacity. This work allowed the identification of the pseudo-components whose relative concentration is crucial for evaluating the solvent performances. Based on these data, the authors were able to find new products with ideal characteristics. The efficiency of one of these products was confirmed by the analysis of the data obtained when using this new solvent to remove asphaltene in damaged wells of an Italian field.

  9. Process for removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hancher, C.W.; Saunders, M.B.; Googin, J.M.

    1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permitting the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.

  10. Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fish, R.H.

    1984-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention in one aspect comprises a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous-derived liquids by contacting said liquid with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene polymer (i.e. PS-DVB) having catechol ligands anchored to said polymer, said contacting being at an elevated temperature. In another aspect, the invention is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene polymer by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid in accordance with the aspect described above which regenerating process comprises: (a) treating said spent catecholated polystyrene polymer with an aqueous solution of at least one member selected from the group consisting of carbonates and bicarbonates of ammonium, alkali metals, and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10, and said treating being at a temperature in the range of about 20/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/C; (b) separating the solids and liquids from each other. In a preferred embodiment the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step: (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution which includes at least one lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (c) and (d) are added. Steps (c) and (d) comprise: (c) treating the solids with an aqueous alcoholic solution of at least one ammonium, alkali or alkaline earth metal bicarbonate at a temperature in the range of about 20 to 100/sup 0/C; and (d) separating the solids from the liquids.

  11. EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1 Kelly Kibler, Desiree Tullos, and Mathias Kondolf 2 ABSTRACT: Dam removal is a promising river restoration technique, particularly for the vast number of rivers impounded by small dams

  12. Brine fluxes from growing sea ice A. J. Wells,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wettlaufer, John S.

    Brine fluxes from growing sea ice A. J. Wells,1,2 J. S. Wettlaufer,1,2,3 and S. A. Orszag2] It is well known that brine drainage from growing sea ice has a controlling influence on its mechanical oceans. When the ice has exceeded a critical thickness the drainage process is dominated by brine

  13. QAre there public policy options that reward linking the growing bioeconomy to environmental stewardship?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    QAre there public policy options that reward linking the growing bioeconomy to environmental stewardship? AThree public policy options that show promise for linking the bioeconomy with environmental examined six public policy options that reward linking the growing bioeconomy to environmental stewardship

  14. Utilization of horse beans by growing finishing pigs after tryptophan supplementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Utilization of horse beans by growing finishing pigs after tryptophan supplementation Y. HENRY D., i83511 Jouy en Josas Utilization of whole horse-beans in growing-finishing pig diets was studied in presence of niacine or not, in the case of partial or almost total replacement of soya- bean meal bv horse-beans

  15. Apparatus for removing micronized coal from steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlnaty, J.

    1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Micronized coal is removed from coal-bearing steam by spraying stabilized petroleum oil into the steam and directing the resultant stream at a separation surface on which a coal-oil slurry is deposited and collected. Apparatus includes conduits which direct the resultant stream downward into a housing and normal to a surface on which the slurry is deposited by impact forces. In additional apparatus disclosed, the resultant stream is directed from a horizontal conduit circumferentially along the interior wall of a horizontally disposed cylindrical chamber at the top of the chamber and the coal-oil slurry deposited on the wall by centrifugal force is collected in a trough situated below a longitudinal slot at the bottom of the chamber. In both types of apparatus, after separation of the slurry the velocity of the steam is reduced to settle out remaining oil droplets and is then discharged to the atmosphere.

  16. IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang

    2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the first year of this project, we have established our experimental and theoretical methodologies for studies of the catalytic decarboxylation process. We have developed both glass and stainless steel micro batch type reactors for the fast screening of various catalysts with reaction substrates of model carboxylic acid compounds and crude oil samples. We also developed novel product analysis methods such as GC analyses for organic acids and gaseous products; and TAN measurements for crude oil. Our research revealed the effectiveness of several solid catalysts such as NA-Cat-1 and NA-Cat-2 for the catalytic decarboxylation of model compounds; and NA-Cat-5{approx}NA-Cat-9 for the acid removal from crude oil. Our theoretical calculations propose a three-step concerted oxidative decarboxylation mechanism for the NA-Cat-1 catalyst.

  17. Fluoride removal from water with spent catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Y.D.; Liu, J.C. [National Taiwan Institute of Technology, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The adsorption of fluoride from water with spent catalyst was studied. Adsorption density of fluoride decreased with increasing pH. Linear adsorption isotherm was utilized to describe the adsorption reaction. The adsorption was a first-order reaction, and the rate constant increased with decreasing surface loading. Adsorption reaction of fluoride onto spent catalyst was endothermic, and the reaction rate increased slightly with increasing temperature. Fluoro-alumino complex and free fluoride ion were involved in the adsorption reaction. It is proposed that both the silica and alumina fractions of spent catalyst contribute to the removal of fluoride from aqueous solution. Coulombic interaction is proposed as the major driving force of the adsorption reaction of fluoride onto spent catalyst.

  18. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  19. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  20. Removing sulphur oxides from a fluid stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Torsten; Riemann, Christian; Bartling, Karsten; Rigby, Sean Taylor; Coleman, Luke James Ivor; Lail, Marty Alan

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing sulphur oxides from a fluid stream, such as flue gas, comprising: providing a non-aqueous absorption liquid containing at least one hydrophobic amine, the liquid being incompletely miscible with water; treating the fluid stream in an absorption zone with the non-aqueous absorption liquid to transfer at least part of the sulphur oxides into the non-aqueous absorption liquid and to form a sulphur oxide-hydrophobic amine-complex; causing the non-aqueous absorption liquid to be in liquid-liquid contact with an aqueous liquid whereby at least part of the sulphur oxide-hydrophobic amine-complex is hydrolyzed to release the hydrophobic amine and sulphurous hydrolysis products, and at least part of the sulphurous hydrolysis products is transferred into the aqueous liquid; separating the aqueous liquid from the non-aqueous absorption liquid. The process mitigates absorbent degradation problems caused by sulphur dioxide and oxygen in flue gas.

  1. High SO2 Removal Efficiency Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe

    1997-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a discussion of the technical progress on DOE/PETC project number DE-AC22-92PC91338, "High Efficiency SO Removal Testing," for 2 the time period 1 October through 31 December 1996. The project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, to evaluate low capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO removal efficiency. The upgrades being 2 evaluated mostly involve using performance additives in the FGD systems. The "base" project involved testing at the Tampa Electric Company?s Big Bend Station. All five potential options to the base program have been exercised by DOE, involving testing at Hoosier Energy?s Merom Station (Option I), Southwestern Electric Power Company?s Pirkey Station (Option II), PSI Energy?s Gibson Station (Option III), Duquesne Light?s Elrama Station (Option IV), and New York State Electric and Gas Corporation?s Kintigh Station (Option V). The originally planned testing has been completed for all six sites. However, additional testing has been planned at the Big Bend Station, and that testing commenced during the current quarter. The remainder of this document is divided into four sections. Section 2, Project Summary, provides a brief overview of the status of technical efforts on this project. Section 3, Results, summarizes the outcome from technical efforts during the quarter, or results from prior quarters that have not been previously reported. In Section 4, Plans for the Next Reporting Period, an overview is provided of the technical efforts that are anticipated for the first quarter of calendar year 1996. Section 5 contains a brief acknowledgment.

  2. High SO2 Removal Efficiency Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe

    1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a discussion of the technical progress on DOE/PETC project number DE-AC22-92PC91338, "High Efficiency SO2 Removal Testing", for the time period 1 January through 31 March 1997. The project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, to evaluate low capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO2 removal efficiency. The upgrades being evaluated mostly involve using performance additives in the FGD systems. The "base" project involved testing at the Tampa Electric Company?s Big Bend Station. All five potential options to the base program have been exercised by DOE, involving testing at Hoosier Energy?s Merom Station (Option I), Southwestern Electric Power Company?s Pirkey Station (Option II), PSI Energy?s Gibson Station (Option III), Duquesne Light?s Elrama Station (Option IV), and New York State Electric and Gas Corporation?s (NYSEG) Kintigh Station (Option V). The originally planned testing has been completed for all six sites. However, additional testing is planned at the Big Bend Station. The remainder of this document is divided into four sections. Section 2, Project Summary, provides a brief overview of the status of technical efforts on this project. Section 3, Results, summarizes the outcome from technical efforts during the quarter, or results from prior quarters that have not been previously reported. In Section 4, Plans for the Next Reporting Period, an overview is provided of the technical efforts that are anticipated for the second quarter of calendar year 1997. Section 5 contains a brief acknowledgement.

  3. High SO2 Removal Efficiency Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe

    1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a discussion of the technical progress on DOE/PETC project number DE-AC22-92PC91338, "High Efficiency SO2 Removal Testing", for the time period 1 April through 30 June 1997. The project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to evaluate low capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO2 removal efficiency. The upgrades being evaluated mostly involve using performance additives in the FGD systems. The "base" project involved testing at the Tampa Electric Company?s Big Bend Station. All five potential options to the base program have been exercised by DOE, involving testing at Hoosier Energy?s Merom Station (Option I), Southwestern Electric Power Company?s Pirkey Station (Option II), PSI Energy?s Gibson Station (Option III), Duquesne Light?s Elrama Station (Option IV), and New York State Electric and Gas Corporation?s Kintigh Station (Option V). The originally planned testing has been completed for all six sites. However, additional testing is being conducted at the Big Bend Station. The remainder of this document is divided into four sections. Section 2, Project Summary, provides a brief overview of the status of technical efforts on this project. Section 3, Results, summarizes the outcome from technical efforts during the quarter, or results from prior quarters that have not been previously reported. In Section 4, Plans for the Next Reporting Period, an overview is provided of the technical efforts that are anticipated for the third quarter of calendar year 1997. Section 5 contains a brief acknowledgment.

  4. Entrapment of Guide Wire in an Inferior Vena Cava Filter: A Technique for Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdel-Aal, Ahmed Kamel, E-mail: akamel@uabmc.edu; Saddekni, Souheil [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Radiology (United States)] [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Radiology (United States); Hamed, Maysoon Farouk [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Anesthesia (United States)] [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Anesthesia (United States); Fitzpatrick, Farley [Radiology Specialists of Louisville (United States)] [Radiology Specialists of Louisville (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Entrapment of a central venous catheter (CVC) guide wire in an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter is a rare, but reported complication during CVC placement. With the increasing use of vena cava filters (VCFs), this number will most likely continue to grow. The consequences of this complication can be serious, as continued traction upon the guide wire may result in filter dislodgement and migration, filter fracture, or injury to the IVC. We describe a case in which a J-tipped guide wire introduced through a left subclavian access without fluoroscopic guidance during CVC placement was entrapped at the apex of an IVC filter. We describe a technique that we used successfully in removing the entrapped wire through the left subclavian access site. We also present simple useful recommendations to prevent this complication.

  5. Heat recirculating cooler for fluid stream pollutant removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Berry, David A. (Morgantown, WV)

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process by which heat is removed from a reactant fluid to reach the operating temperature of a known pollutant removal method and said heat is recirculated to raise the temperature of the product fluid. The process can be utilized whenever an intermediate step reaction requires a lower reaction temperature than the prior and next steps. The benefits of a heat-recirculating cooler include the ability to use known pollutant removal methods and increased thermal efficiency of the system.

  6. Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

  7. Thiacrown polymers for removal of mercury from waste streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Theodore F.; Reynolds, John G.; Fox, Glenn A.

    2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Thiacrown polymers immobilized to a polystyrene-divinylbenzene matrix react with Hg.sup.2+ under a variety of conditions to efficiently and selectively remove Hg.sup.2+ ions from acidic aqueous solutions, even in the presence of a variety of other metal ions. The mercury can be recovered and the polymer regenerated. This mercury removal method has utility in the treatment of industrial wastewater, where a selective and cost-effective removal process is required.

  8. Thiacrown polymers for removal of mercury from waste streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA); Fox, Glenn A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thiacrown polymers immobilized to a polystyrene-divinylbenzene matrix react with Hg.sup.2+ under a variety of conditions to efficiently and selectively remove Hg.sup.2+ ions from acidic aqueous solutions, even in the presence of a variety of other metal ions. The mercury can be recovered and the polymer regenerated. This mercury removal method has utility in the treatment of industrial wastewater, where a selective and cost-effective removal process is required.

  9. Organic removal from domestic wastewater by activated alumina adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Pe-Der

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the major groups of pollutants in wastewaters. Adsorption by granular activated carbon, a non-polar adsorbent, is now the primary treatment process for removal of residual organics from biologically treated wastewater. The ability of activated alumina... to human health if they exist in the water supply at relatively high concentrations. A wide variety of treatment processes are available to remove organic matter from wastewater. Biological treatment is the most cost effective method for removing oxygen...

  10. Use, Maintenance, Removal, Inspections, and Safety of Dams (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section describes operating plans for dams with movable structures, as well as procedures for raising or lowering of impoundment levels, dam removal, and dam safety inspections.

  11. actinide removal process: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plants (WWTPs) with biological nitrogen removal processes, using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. Literature ... Xu, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology...

  12. ammonium nitrogen removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plants (WWTPs) with biological nitrogen removal processes, using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. Literature ... Xu, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology...

  13. autotrophic nitrogen removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    treatment plants (WWTPs) with biological nitrogen removal processes, using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. Literature ... Xu, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of...

  14. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Effects of Energy Removal on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    tidal energy from estuaries; and Jesse Roberts, Sandia National Laboratory - Modeling energy removal by wave energy extraction. Participant Instructions: Webinar Login: You may...

  15. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) product removal can containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boettger, J.S.

    1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety evaluation for packaging allows the transport of nine Product Removal (PR) Cans with their Containers from the PUREX Facility to the Plutonium Finishing Plant.

  16. active debris removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rebecca Bendick a , Kevin D. Hyde b March 2013 Keywords: Debris flow Frequency Magnitude Fire Forecasting debris flow hazard is challenging Montana, University of 110 Removing...

  17. REMOVAL OF THE CALIFORNIUM SOURCES FROM THE 222-S LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LINSTRUM D; BAUNE HL

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document develops a proposal for removal of 2-Californium sources from the 222-S Laboratory. Included in this document are assessments of shipping packages and decay calculations.

  18. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

  19. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

  20. NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Press Releases Video Gallery Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NNSA Blog NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More ......

  1. Performance evaluation of organic emulsion liquid membrane on phenol removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Y S; Hashim, M A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The percentage removal of phenol from aqueous solution by emulsion liquid membrane and emulsion leakage was investigated experimentally for various parameters such as membrane:internal phase ratio, membrane:external phase ratio, emulsification speed, emulsification time, carrier concentration, surfactant concentration and internal agent concentration. These parameters strongly influence the percentage removal of phenol and emulsion leakage. Under optimum membrane properties, the percentage removal of phenol was as high as 98.33%, with emulsion leakage of 1.25%. It was also found that the necessity of carrier for enhancing phenol removal was strongly dependent on the internal agent concentration.

  2. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

  3. Removal of carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium by means of soil vapor extraction enhanced by desiccation and water Removal of carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium...

  4. Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium by Means of Soil Vapor Extraction Enhanced by Desiccation and Water Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium...

  5. Study of Alternative Approaches for Transite Panel Removal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) assembled an experienced team from both sites to evaluate both the manual and mechanical methods of transite panel removal.

  6. anesthesia optimizing removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de 7 Multiplicative Noise Removal Using Variable Splitting and Constrained Optimization CERN Preprints Summary: Multiplicative noise (also known as speckle noise) models...

  7. Method of removal of sulfur from coal and petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verkade, John G. (Ames, IA); Mohan, Thyagarajan (Ames, IA); Angelici, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the removal of sulfur from sulfur-bearing materials such as coal and petroleum products using organophosphine and organophosphite compounds is provided.

  8. Physica D xxx (2003) xxxxxx Dynamic supercoiling bifurcations of growing elastic filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolgemuth, Charles

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physica D xxx (2003) xxx­xxx Dynamic supercoiling bifurcations of growing elastic filaments Charles xxx (2003) xxx­xxx essentially unchanging as the three-dimensional form develops, and the properties

  9. Feeding Value of Wet Sorghum Distillers Grains for Growing and Finishing Beef Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feeding Value of Wet Sorghum Distillers Grains for Growing and Finishing Beef Cattle Ethanol, but sorghum grain is commonly either blended with corn before use or used as the sole grain for ethanol

  10. Growing Up in Scotland: Year 3 - The Impact of Children's Early Activities of Cognitive Development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, Paul; Wasoff, Fran

    2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond. The study is funded by ...

  11. Growing Up in Scotland: Use of Childcare by Parents of Young Children 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Government, Scottish

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Growing Up in Scotland study ( GUS) is an important new longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Its principal aim is to provide information...

  12. Growing Up In Scotland Study: GUS Exploring The Experience and Outcomes For Advantaged and Disadvantaged Families 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, Paul; Martin, Claudia; Cunningham-Burley, Sarah

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report draws on data from the first sweep of the Growing Up in Scotland ( GUS) study. The Sweep 1 Report highlighted the persistence of inequalities between advantaged and disadvantaged families which impact on parents and their children...

  13. Growing Up in Scotland: Year 3 - Multiple Childcare Provision and its Effects on Child Outcomes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, Paul; Wasoff, Fran

    2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report uses data from the first three waves of the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) to explore families’ experiences of using childcare for children under the age of 5 years old. The report focuses particularly ...

  14. Growing Up in Scotland: Year 3 - Parenting and the Neighbourhood Context 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, Paul; Sharp, Clare; Webster, Catriona; Jamieson, Lynn

    2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report uses data from the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) to explore families’ experiences of living in Scotland’s neighbourhoods, to examine parents’ views on different aspects of their local area and to consider ...

  15. Growing Up in Scotland: Parenting and the Neighbourhood Context - Summary Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Government, Scottish

    2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    It presents key findings from the Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) report Parenting and the neighbourhood context. The report uses data from GUS to explore families’ experiences of living in Scotland’s neighbourhoods....

  16. Growing Up in Scotland: Sources of Formal and Informal Support for Parents of Young Children 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Government, Scottish

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Growing Up in Scotland study ( GUS) is an important new longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond. Its principal aim is to provide information...

  17. Growing Up in Scotland: Use of Informal Support by Families with Young Children 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, Paul; Jamieson, Lynn; Wasoff, Fran

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, which draws on data from the first sweep of the Growing Up in Scotland study, starts from the position that in order to understand the types of formal support services that parents of young children require....

  18. 1.0 INTRODUCTION As the world's demand for energy continues to grow, unconventional gas will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION As the world's demand for energy continues to grow, unconventional gas energy source in the world and plays host to a lot of natural gas resources. Between 3,500 and 9

  19. Building community assets through individual development accounts : growing a strategic network in Lawrence, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Cindy C. (Cindy Cin-Wei)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis aims to inform the decision-making process for growing an asset-building program through strategic partnerships with other community-based organizations (CBOs). The impetus for this paper came from Lawrence ...

  20. Advanced Analysis of the Responses of Cotton Genotypes Growing Under Water Stress 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maeda, Murilo Minekawa 1985-

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The ever-growing world population raises the concern and necessity of rational use and distribution of limited water resources. Water deficit is the single most dominant abiotic factor limiting cotton (Gossypium hirsutum ...

  1. Sources of biological variation in residual feed intake in growing and finishing steers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Erin Gwen

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives of this research were to characterize residual feed intake (RFI) in growing and finishing steers and examine phenotypic correlations between performance, feed efficiency, carcass, digestib ility, and physiological ...

  2. n 1980, Congress responded to a growing problem of abandoned factories and other polluted sites by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    n 1980, Congress responded to a growing problem of abandoned factories and other polluted sites to be investigated. The larger sites were for- mer mine sites and ore processing facilities. One of the larger mine

  3. Evaluation of a mathematical model in predicting intake of growing and finishing cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourg, Brandi Marie

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATIONS OF A MATHEMATICAL MODEL IN PREDICTING INTAKE OF GROWING AND FINISHING CATTLE A Thesis by BRANDI MARIE BOURG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Animal Science EVALUATIONS OF A MATHEMATICAL MODEL IN PREDICTING INTAKE OF GROWING AND FINISHING CATTLE A Thesis by BRANDI MARIE BOURG Submitted...

  4. Evaluation of a mathematical model in predicting intake of growing and finishing cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourg, Brandi Marie

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATIONS OF A MATHEMATICAL MODEL IN PREDICTING INTAKE OF GROWING AND FINISHING CATTLE A Thesis by BRANDI MARIE BOURG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Animal Science EVALUATIONS OF A MATHEMATICAL MODEL IN PREDICTING INTAKE OF GROWING AND FINISHING CATTLE A Thesis by BRANDI MARIE BOURG Submitted...

  5. Metagenomic analysis of phosphorus removing sludgecommunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia Martin, Hector; Ivanova, Natalia; Kunin, Victor; Warnecke,Falk; Barry, Kerrie; McHardy, Alice C.; Yeates, Christine; He, Shaomei; Salamov, Asaf; Szeto, Ernest; Dalin, Eileen; Putnam, Nik; Shapiro, HarrisJ.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Blackall, Linda Louise; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) is not wellunderstood at the metabolic level despite being one of the best-studiedmicrobially-mediated industrial processes due to its ecological andeconomic relevance. Here we present a metagenomic analysis of twolab-scale EBPR sludges dominated by the uncultured bacterium, "CandidatusAccumulibacter phosphatis." This analysis resolves several controversiesin EBPR metabolic models and provides hypotheses explaining the dominanceof A. phosphatis in this habitat, its lifestyle outside EBPR and probablecultivation requirements. Comparison of the same species from differentEBPR sludges highlights recent evolutionary dynamics in the A. phosphatisgenome that could be linked to mechanisms for environmental adaptation.In spite of an apparent lack of phylogenetic overlap in the flankingcommunities of the two sludges studied, common functional themes werefound, at least one of them complementary to the inferred metabolism ofthe dominant organism. The present study provides a much-needed blueprintfor a systems-level understanding of EBPR and illustrates thatmetagenomics enables detailed, often novel, insights into evenwell-studied biological systems.

  6. Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

  7. Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang; Yongchun Tang; William A. Goddard

    2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past three years, we followed the work plan as we suggested in the proposal and made every efforts to fulfill the project objectives. Based on our large amount of creative and productive work, including both of experimental and theoretic aspects, we received important technical breakthrough on naphthenic acid removal process and obtained deep insight on catalytic decarboxylation chemistry. In detail, we established an integrated methodology to serve for all of the experimental and theoretical work. Our experimental investigation results in discovery of four type effective catalysts to the reaction of decarboxylation of model carboxylic acid compounds. The adsorption experiment revealed the effectiveness of several solid materials to naphthenic acid adsorption and acidity reduction of crude oil, which can be either natural minerals or synthesized materials. The test with crude oil also received promising results, which can be potentially developed into a practical process for oil industry. The theoretical work predicted several possible catalytic decarboxylation mechanisms that would govern the decarboxylation pathways depending on the type of catalysts being used. The calculation for reaction activation energy was in good agreement with our experimental measurements.

  8. The washability of lignites for clay removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oteyaka, B.; Yamik, A.; Ucar, A.; Sahbaz, O.; Demir, U. [Dumlupinar University, Kutahya (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the washability research of the Seyitomer Lignites (Kutahya-Turkey), with lower calorific value (1,863 kcal/kg) and high ash content (51.91%), by heavy medium separation, it was found out that middling clay in the coal had an effect to change the medium density. To prevent this problem, a trommel sieve with 18 and 5 mm aperture diameter was designed, and the clay in the coal was tried to be removed using it before the coal was released to heavy medium. Following that, the obtained coal in -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm fractions was subjected to sink and float test having 1.4 gcm{sup -3} and 1.7 gcm{sup -3} medium densities (-5 mm fraction will be evaluated in a separate work). Depending on the raw coal, with the floating of -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm size fraction in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} medium density, clean coal with 60.10% combustible matter recovery, 19.12% ash, and 3,150 kcal/kg was obtained. Also floating of the samples sinking in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} in the medium density (1.7 gcm{sup -3}), middling with 18.70% combustible matter recovery, 41.93% ash, 2,150 kcal/kg, and tailing having 78.31% ash were obtained.

  9. HIGH SO2 REMOVAL EFFICIENCY TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe; James L. Phillips

    1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes the results of performance tests at six full-scale wet lime- and limestone-reagent flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The objective of these tests was to evaluate the effectiveness of low capital cost sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal upgrades for existing FGD systems as an option for complying with the provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The upgrade options tested at the limestone-reagent systems included the use of organic acid additives (dibasic acid (DBA) and/or sodium formate) as well as increased reagent ratio (higher excess limestone levels in the recirculating slurry solids) and absorber liquid-to-gas ratio. One system also tested operating at higher flue gas velocities to allow the existing FGD system to treat flue gas from an adjacent, unscrubbed unit. Upgrade options for the one lime-based system tested included increased absorber venturi pressure drop and increased sulfite concentration in the recirculating slurry liquor.

  10. Growing machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Saul Thomas, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    construction is developed in three dimensions. It is similarly shown that right-angled tetrahedrons, when folded from an edge-connected string, can generate any three dimensional structure where the primitive pixel (or ...

  11. Growing smarter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swyden, Courtney

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Colorado River Authority are challenging residents to use 10 percent less water. Both cities are prepared to show residents how to save water and are working towards raising residents? water IQ. To kick off its campaign, NTMWD chose a Plano couple?Mike...

  12. Growing pains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meadows, R.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The issue of environmental exposure to carcinogens, toxic materials and radiation are more serious for children and infants. This article describes the differences in exposure for children and adults to air pollution, pesticides, DDT, hazardous wastes, radiation, radon and EMFs. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Applications of non-growing cells to bioremediation: a feasibility study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widrig, Raquel Dawn

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was inorganic in nature. Studies by Ossio and Fox on oil shale retorting process waste water demonstrated the importance of ammonia removal and neutralization of the waste water on the inhibitory effect. Other studies by Cross, Kuhn, Suidan, Nutt, Benjamin...

  14. Mechanisms of virus removal during transport in unsaturated porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Mechanisms of virus removal during transport in unsaturated porous media Yanjie Chu and Yan Jin retention and retardation during transport in unsaturated systems. In this study, bacteriophages X174 and MS at the solid-water interface rather than at the air-water interface dominates in virus removal and transport

  15. An Adaptive Kalman Filter for Removing Baseline Wandering in ECG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Povinelli, Richard J.

    An Adaptive Kalman Filter for Removing Baseline Wandering in ECG Signals MA Mneimneh, EE Yaz, MT to baseline removal. This paper proposes an adaptive Kalman filter for the real time re- moval of baseline is used with an adaptive Kalman filter to estimate the state variables, including the baseline wandering

  16. Continuous cryopump with a method for removal of solidified gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, L.W.; Herman, H.

    1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved cryopump for the removal of gases from a high vacuum, comprising a cryopanel incorporating honeycomb structure, refrigerant means thermally connected to the cryopanel, and a rotatable channel moving azimuthally around an axis located near the center of the cryopanel, removing gases adsorbed within the honeycomb structure by subliming them and conducting them outside the vacuum vessel. 4 figs.

  17. Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janoski, E.J.; Hollstein, E.J.

    1984-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

  18. Process for removing pyritic sulfur from bituminous coals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pawlak, Wanda (Edmonton, CA); Janiak, Jerzy S. (Edmonton, CA); Turak, Ali A. (Edmonton, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw L. (Edmonton, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for removing pyritic sulfur and lowering ash content of bituminous coals by grinding the feed coal, subjecting it to micro-agglomeration with a bridging liquid containing heavy oil, separating the microagglomerates and separating them to a water wash to remove suspended pyritic sulfur. In one embodiment the coal is subjected to a second micro-agglomeration step.

  19. Removal of Estrogenic Pollutants from Contaminated Water Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    Removal of Estrogenic Pollutants from Contaminated Water Using Molecularly Imprinted Polymers Z I H that this material may be appropriate for treating a complex mixture of estrogenic pollutants. The feasibility of removing estrogenic compounds from environmental water by the MIP was demonstrated using lake water spiked

  20. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, C.Y.

    1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. 1 figure.

  1. UNL/OSU Researchers Try Promising Technique to Remove Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    UNL/OSU Researchers Try Promising Technique to Remove Groundwater Contamination Under Former Oklahoma State University have joined to test promising new methods of removing longstanding groundwater into specially drilled injection wells, where it mixes with contaminants in the groundwater under the former

  2. Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 31513160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 3151­3160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters P. Zhao, J.A. Siegel�, R May 2006; accepted 14 June 2006 Abstract Residential and commercial HVAC filters that have been loaded of the relative importance of HVAC filters as a removal mechanism for ozone in residential and commercial

  3. Removal of residual particulate matter from filter media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Almlie, Jay C; Miller, Stanley J

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for removing residual filter cakes that remain adhered to a filter after typical particulate removal methodologies have been employed, such as pulse-jet filter element cleaning, for all cleanable filters used for air pollution control, dust control, or powder control.

  4. Aluminum Removal from Photographic Waste Submitted to Dr. Tony Bi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum Removal from Photographic Waste Submitted to Dr. Tony Bi By: Kristen Favel, Tiffany Jung, and Kenny Tam CHBE 484 University of British Columbia April 15, 2009 #12;ii "Aluminum Removal from photographic waste has shown elevated levels of aluminum in the fixer, which exceed sewer discharge standards

  5. Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment S. Marsili predictive control; wastewater treatment plant Introduction The problem of improving the nitrogen removal wastewater is too low, full denitrification is difficult to obtain and an additional source of organic carbon

  6. Method for removing metals from a cleaning solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deacon, Lewis E. (Waverly, OH)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for removing accumulated metals from a cleaning solution is provided. After removal of the metals, the cleaning solution can be discharged or recycled. The process manipulates the pH levels of the solution as a means of precipitating solids. Preferably a dual phase separation at two different pH levels is utilized.

  7. Passive shut-down heat removal system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hundal, Rolv (Greensburg, PA); Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved shut-down heat removal system for a liquid metal nuclear reactor of the type having a vessel for holding hot and cold pools of liquid sodium is disclosed herein. Generally, the improved system comprises a redan or barrier within the reactor vessel which allows an auxiliary heat exchanger to become immersed in liquid sodium from the hot pool whenever the reactor pump fails to generate a metal-circulating pressure differential between the hot and cold pools of sodium. This redan also defines an alternative circulation path between the hot and cold pools of sodium in order to equilibrate the distribution of the decay heat from the reactor core. The invention may take the form of a redan or barrier that circumscribes the inner wall of the reactor vessel, thereby defining an annular space therebetween. In this embodiment, the bottom of the annular space communicates with the cold pool of sodium, and the auxiliary heat exchanger is placed in this annular space just above the drawn-down level that the liquid sodium assumes during normal operating conditions. Alternatively, the redan of the invention may include a pair of vertically oriented, concentrically disposed standpipes having a piston member disposed between them that operates somewhat like a pressure-sensitive valve. In both embodiments, the cessation of the pressure differential that is normally created by the reactor pump causes the auxiliary heat exchanger to be immersed in liquid sodium from the hot pool. Additionally, the redan in both embodiments forms a circulation flow path between the hot and cold pools so that the decay heat from the nuclear core is uniformly distributed within the vessel.

  8. Demonstrations and commercial applications of innovative sediment removal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelletier, J.P. [Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Contaminated Sediment Removal Program (CSRP) of Environment Canada was founded in November 1990 following a request from the Great Lakes Cleanup Fund to the Environmental Protection Service-Ontario Region to provide the leadership in the identification of removal technologies and procedures for contaminated sediments in the Great Lakes. Following a request for proposal issued by the CSRP, proposals were received from vendors of innovative sediment removal technologies to conduct contaminated sediment removal demonstrations in different Areas of Concern (AOCs) on the Canadian side of the Great Lakes. In 1992, the CSRP conducted the demonstration of two innovative sediment removal technologies at three different sites. The Cable Arm 100E clamshell bucket was demonstrated in Toronto and Hamilton Harbors, while the Pneuma Pump was demonstrated in Collingwood Harbor. Those three demonstrations led to the first Canadian commercial applications of the Cable Arm 100E clamshell bucket in Pickering, Ontario, and of the Pneuma Pump in Collingwood, Ontario.

  9. Regenerable hydrogen chloride removal sorbent and regenerable multi-functional hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen chloride removal sorbent for high temperature gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, Ranjani (Morgantown, WV)

    2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Regenerable hydrogen chloride removal sorbent and regenerable multi-functional hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen chloride removal sorbent for high temperature gas streams

  10. Passive removal of manganese from acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brant, D.L.; Ziemkiewicz, P.F. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Removal of manganese (Mn) from mine drainage is difficult due to the abnormal chemistry of the element. The removal requires the oxidation of Mn(II) (the form found in mine drainage) to the more oxidized forms (Mn(III) or Mn(IV)). The more oxidized forms exist only as solids and will not return to Mn(II) spontaneously. Chemical treatment of Mn often requires a pH near 10 to initiate the oxidation quickly. A stabilized pH of 10 normally causes more harm to aquatic organisms than the Mn and is not desirable, making additional steps in the treatment necessary. Biological removal of Mn can be achieved at near neutral pH levels. The Shade Mining site in Somerset County, PA has been treating Mn to discharge limits since the early 1990`s (reducing Mn concentrations from 12 - 25 mg/L in the influent to <2 mg/L in the effluent). The treatment system consists of an anoxic limestone drain discharging into a wetland to remove iron, aluminum, and acidity, while increasing pH and alkalinity. The wetland effluent flows into two limestone beds (Mn removal). The limestone beds developed a black slime coating as the Mn removal increased. This system continues to remove Mn in all weather conditions and has not required chemical treatment since the black coating appeared on the limestone. A laboratory study was conducted using limestone collected from the Shade site to use the same naturally occurring Mn oxidizing microbes. The lab study compared W removal rates of microbial oxidation, MnO{sub 2} catalyzed limestone, and fresh uncoated limestone. The microbial removal performed the best (25 mg/L Mn reduced to <2 mg/L in 72 hours).

  11. Tank 241-CX-70 waste removal and packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuVon, D.K.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tank 241-CX-70, located on the Hanford Site in Washington State, is a 30,000 gal single-shell storage tank built in 1952 to hold high-level process waste from pilot tests of the reduction-oxidation process. In 1979 decommissioning operations were begun by pumping liquid waste from the tank to the double-shell tank (DST) 101-AY. Not all the waste was removed at that time. Approximately 10,300 gal of sludge remained. On September 25, 1987, operations were resumed to remove the remaining waste using a sluicing and pumping method. This report documents the final removal of waste from Tank 241-CX-70.

  12. Tank 241-CX-70 waste removal and packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuVon, D.K.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tank 241-CX-70, located on the Hanford Site in Washington State, is a 30,000 gal single-shell storage tank built in 1952 to hold high-level process waste from pilot tests of the reduction-oxidation process. In 1979 decommissioning operations were begun by pumping liquid waste from the tank to the double-shell tank (DST) 101-AY. Not all the waste was removed at that time. Approximately 10,300 gal of sludge remained. On September 25, 1987, operations were resumed to remove the remaining waste using a sluicing and pumping method. This report documents the final removal of waste from Tank 241-CX-70.

  13. Solid materials for removing metals and fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coronado, Paul R.; Reynolds, John G.; Coleman, Sabre J.

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid materials have been developed to remove contaminating metals and organic compounds from aqueous media. The contaminants are removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the metals and the organics leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are sol-gel and or sol-gel and granulated activated carbon (GAC) mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards the contaminant(s). The contaminated solid materials can then be disposed of or the contaminant can be removed and the solids recycled.

  14. Third and fourth limiting amino acids in sorghum for growing and finishing swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purser, Kenneth Wayne

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -methionine (Met) and L-isoleucine (Ile) were added individually and in all combinations to a vitamin, mineral, lysine and threonine fortified sorghum basal diet (B) and fed to growing and finishing pigs (18. 1 and 50. 0 kg average initial weight, respectively...). The B diet was formulated with equimolar additions of glycine (Gly) and L-glutamic acid (Glu) to provide 12. 0 and 11. 5X crude protein (N x 6. 25) for growing and finish- ing diets, respectively. Trp, Met and Ile were added at the expense of Gly...

  15. Self-selection of diets and lysine requirements of growing-finishing swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen, Kevin Qua

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SELF-SELECTION OF DIETS AND LYSINE REQUIREMENTS OF GROWING- F INI SHING SWINE A Thesis by KEVIN QUA OWEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degr ee of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Nutrition SELF-SELECTION OF DIETS AND LYSINE REQUIREMENTS OF GROWING- F I NI SHING SW I NE A Thesis by KEVIN QUA OWEN Approved as to style and content by. Darrel1 A, Knabe (Chair of Committee) L. W. Greene...

  16. High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored pulse designed for high transmission through the atmosphere, as well as efficient ablative coupling to the target. The main amplifier would use either diode-pumped or flashlamp-pumped solid state gain media, depending on budget constraints of the project. A continuously operating system would use the gas-cooled amplifier technology developed for Mercury, while a burst-mode option would use the heat capacity laser technology. The ground-based system that we propose is capable of rapid engagement of targets whose orbits cross over the site, with potential for kill on a single pass. Very little target mass is ablated per pulse so the potential to create additional hazardous orbiting debris is minimal. Our cost estimates range from $2500 to $5000 per J depending on choices for laser gain medium, amplifier pump source, and thermal management method. A flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass heat-capacity laser operating in the burst mode would have costs at the lower end of this spectrum and would suffice to demonstrate the efficacy of this approach as a prototype system. A diode-pumped, gas-cooled laser would have higher costs but could be operated continuously, and might be desirable for more demanding mission needs. Maneuverability can be incorporated in the system design if the additional cost is deemed acceptable. The laser system would need to be coupled with a target pointing and tracking telescope with guide-star-like wavefront correction capability.

  17. USDA Ag in the Classroom-www.agclassroom.org Oats, Peas, Beans and Barley Grow -Grades 2-5: S-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    USDA ­ Ag in the Classroom-www.agclassroom.org Oats, Peas, Beans and Barley Grow -Grades 2-5: S-1 Oats, Peas, Beans and Barley Grow (do the motions while singing) Oats, peas, beans and barley grow, Oats, peas, beans and barley grow, Can you or I or anyone know How oats, peas, beans and barley grow

  18. USDA Ag in the Classroom-www.agclassroom.org Oats, Peas, Beans and Barley Grow -Grades PreK-1: S-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    USDA ­ Ag in the Classroom-www.agclassroom.org Oats, Peas, Beans and Barley Grow -Grades PreK-1: S-1 Oats, Peas, Beans and Barley Grow (do the motions while singing) Oats, peas, beans and barley grow, Oats, peas, beans and barley grow, Can you or I or anyone know How oats, peas, beans and barley grow

  19. Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Spears, Mike; Sullivan, Douglas; Mendell, Mark

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluated the ozone removal performance of moderate-cost particle filters containing activated carbon when installed in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Filters containing 300 g of activated carbon per 0.09 m2 of filter face area were installed in two 'experimental' filter banks within an office building located in Sacramento, CA. The ozone removal performance of the filters was assessed through periodic measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. Ozone concentrations were also measured upstream and downstream of a 'reference' filter bank containing filters without any activated carbon. The filter banks with prefilters containing activated carbon were removing 60percent to 70percent of the ozone 67 and 81 days after filter installation. In contrast, there was negligible ozone removal by the reference filter bank without activated carbon.

  20. CPP-603 Chloride Removal System Decontamination and Decommissioning. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, C.L.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CPP-603 (annex) Chloride Removal System (CRS) Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project is described in this report. The CRS was used for removing Chloride ions and other contaminants that were suspended in the waters of the underwater fuel storage basins in the CPP-603 Fuel Receiving and Storage Facility (FRSF) from 1975 to 1981. The Environmental Checklist and related documents, facility characterization, decision analysis`, and D&D plans` were prepared in 1991. Physical D&D activities were begun in mid summer of 1992 and were completed by the end of November 1992. All process equipment and electrical equipment were removed from the annex following accepted asbestos and radiological contamination removal practices. The D&D activities were performed in a manner such that no radiological health or safety hazard to the public or to personnel at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) occurred.

  1. apu controller removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contamination control 12;10 Transfer of Graphite to Supersack (V) 12;11 Moving graphite pile Complete shipment of graphite to DOE's Nevada Test Site Removal of biological shield...

  2. azo dye removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contamination control 12;10 Transfer of Graphite to Supersack (V) 12;11 Moving graphite pile Complete shipment of graphite to DOE's Nevada Test Site Removal of biological shield...

  3. acetic acid removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contamination control 12;10 Transfer of Graphite to Supersack (V) 12;11 Moving graphite pile Complete shipment of graphite to DOE's Nevada Test Site Removal of biological shield...

  4. aromatic hydrocarbon removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contamination control 12;10 Transfer of Graphite to Supersack (V) 12;11 Moving graphite pile Complete shipment of graphite to DOE's Nevada Test Site Removal of biological shield...

  5. aeruginosa requiring removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contamination control 12;10 Transfer of Graphite to Supersack (V) 12;11 Moving graphite pile Complete shipment of graphite to DOE's Nevada Test Site Removal of biological shield...

  6. after-heat removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contamination control 12;10 Transfer of Graphite to Supersack (V) 12;11 Moving graphite pile Complete shipment of graphite to DOE's Nevada Test Site Removal of biological shield...

  7. acid dye removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contamination control 12;10 Transfer of Graphite to Supersack (V) 12;11 Moving graphite pile Complete shipment of graphite to DOE's Nevada Test Site Removal of biological shield...

  8. Considering removing "Show Preview" button on utility rate form...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 22 April, 2013 - 13:55 Utility Rates I'm considering removing the "Show Preview" button, since it does not work (javascript...

  9. Comparison of proton and neutron carrier removal rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pease, R.L.; Enlow, E.W.; Dinger, G.L.; Marshall, P.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Displacement damage induced carrier removal rates for proton irradiations in the energy range 10-175 MeV were compared to 1 MeV equivalent neutrons using power MOSFETs as a test vehicle. The results showed that, within experimental error, the degradation mechanisms were qualitatively similar and the ratio of proton to neutron carrier removal rates as a function of proton energy correlate with a calculation based on nonionization energy loss in silicon. For exposures under junction bias, p-type silicon was found to have a smaller carrier removal rate for both proton and neutron irradiations, whereas, for n-type silicon, junction bias had little effect on the carrier removal rate.

  10. Method to remove uranium/vanadium contamination from groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzler, Donald R. (DeBeque, CO); Morrison, Stanley (Grand Junction, CO)

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

  11. Oil and Gas- Leases to remove or recover (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states that a lease or agreement conveying the right to remove or recover oil, natural gas or gas of any other designation from lessor to lessee shall not be valid if such lease does not...

  12. Energy Savings for CO2 Removal in Ammonia Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pouilliart, R.; Van Hecke, F. C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of approx. 27 GJ/h (GHV) of natural gas is possible by using exhaust steam from a back pressure turbine instead of L.T. shift gas as the heat supply source for a Carsol C02 removal system....

  13. Channel response to Dam Removal, Clear Creek, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Peter; Vizcaino, Pilar

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Dam Removal, Clear Creek, California Peter Miller and9, 2004 Abstract Clear Creek drains 720 km 2 , joining the2002) Saeltzer Dam on Clear Creek was a good candidate for

  14. Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site by removing a 1,082-ton nuclear test reactor from the 300 Area. The River Corridor is a 220-square-mile section of land...

  15. Web Indexing on a Diet: Template Removal with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Paul

    April 2009 Web Indexing on a Diet: Template Removal with the Sandwich Algorithm Stephen Wan stephen.wan@csiro.au Paul Thomas paul.thomas@csiro.au Tom Rowlands tom.rowlands@csiro.au #12;Copyright and Disclaimer

  16. Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

  17. Removal of phenols from wastewater by soluble and immobilized tyrosinase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wada, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Tatsumi, Kenji (National Inst. for Resources and Environment, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An enzymatic method for removal of phenols from industrial wastewater was investigated. Phenols in an aqueous solution were removed after treatment with mushroom tyrosinase. The reduction order of substituted phenols is catechol > p-cresol > p-chlorophenol > phenol > p-methoxyphenol. In the treatment of tyrosinase alone, no precipitate was formed but a color change from colorless to dark-brown was observed. The colored products were removed by chitin and chitosan which are available abundantly as shellfish waste. In addition, the reduction rate of phenols was observed to be accelerated in the presence of chitosan. Tyrosinase, immobilized by using amino groups in the enzyme on cation exchange resins, can be used repeatedly. By treatment with immobilized tyrosinase, 100% of phenol was removed after 2 h, and the activity was reduced very little even after 10 repeat treatments.

  18. Removal of testa from food grade copra by air classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopitakwong, Rommanee

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REMOVAL OF TESTA FROM FOOD GRADE COPRA BY AIR CLASSIFICATION A Thesi. s by ROMMANEE LOPITAKWONG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1975 Major Subject: Food Technology REMOVAL OF TESTA FROM FOOD GRADE COPRA BY AIR CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by ROMMANEE LOPITAKWONG Approved as to style and content by: (Ch irman of Comm'ttee) ad of Dep tment) Member) (Member) December 1975...

  19. Method for removing oxide contamination from titanium diboride powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brynestad, Jorulf (Oak Ridge, TN); Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for removing oxide contamination from titanium diboride powder involves the direct chemical treatment of TiB.sub.2 powders with a gaseous boron halide, such as BCl.sub.3, at temperatures in the range of 500.degree.-800.degree. C. The BCl.sub.3 reacts with the oxides to form volatile species which are removed by the BCl.sub.3 exit stream.

  20. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  1. Assessing Arsenic Removal By Zero-Valent Iron Under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6 8 10 12 14 ­.5 0 .5 1 pH Eh(volts) SO4 -- HS - H2S(aq) HSO4 - 20°C Dell Fri Feb 08 2008 DiagramSO4Assessing Arsenic Removal By Zero-Valent Iron Under Various Water Quality Conditions Paul Pepler and operate. #12;7 Best Available Technologies for As Removal (USEPA 2003) Ion exchange Activated alumina

  2. Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

    1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

  3. Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

    1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

  4. Solid materials for removing arsenic and method thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Sabre J. (Oakland, CA); Sanner, Robert D. (Livermore, CA); Dias, Victoria L. (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid materials have been developed to remove arsenic compounds from aqueous media. The arsenic is removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the arsenic leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are aerogels or xerogels and aerogels or xerogels and solid support structure, e.g., granulated activated carbon (GAC), mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards arsenic.

  5. Solid materials for removing arsenic and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Sabre J. (Oakland, CA); Sanner, Robert D. (Livermore, CA); Dias, Victoria L. (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid materials have been developed to remove arsenic compounds from aqueous media. The arsenic is removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the arsenic leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are aerogels or xerogels and aerogels or xerogels and solid support structure, e.g., granulated activated carbon (GAC), mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards arsenic.

  6. Accelerating Bitcoin's Transaction Processing Fast Money Grows on Trees, Not Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accelerating Bitcoin's Transaction Processing Fast Money Grows on Trees, Not Chains Yonatan Sompolinsky Aviv Zohar Abstract Bitcoin is a potentially disruptive new crypto-currency based that will affect Bitcoin's success, is whether or not it will be able to scale to support the high volume

  7. The Economic Impact of Oregon's Urban Research University $1.4 billion and growing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    The Economic Impact of Oregon's Urban Research University $1.4 billion and growing #12;From this in the face of tough economic times. This report offers a snapshot of the economic benefits Portland State are an economic catalyst through our partnerships, our research and our programs. Continue to expect great things

  8. Printed on July 28, 1997 Morphology and stability of growing multiwall carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­1116 2 Department of Physics and Semiconductor Physics Research Center, Jeonbuk National University at the open edge involves rearrangement of these bonds, which are mediated by carbon atoms bridging the gap that carbon atoms ad­ sorbing at the growing edge often prefer to bridge the gap between adjacent wall edges

  9. This internship provided me with a lot of opportunities to grow as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    This internship provided me with a lot of opportunities to grow as a person, both professionally This internship helped me realize what kind of career I would like to have, and what skills I should attain internShip program Ã? Turn your classroom knowledge into valuable professional experience. yoy ur

  10. A Growing and Costly Issue An estimated 1.8 million adult Texans have been

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Growing and Costly Issue An estimated 1.8 million adult Texans have been diagnosed with diabetes, while the diabetes in another 460,000 remains undiagnosed. The annual cost of diabetes in Texas's Response Diabetes is not curable, but it is manageable. People can learn skills to effectively manage

  11. A Growing and Costly Issue An estimated 1.8 million adult Texans have been

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Growing and Costly Issue An estimated 1.8 million adult Texans have been diagnosed with diabetes, while the diabetes of another 460,000 remains undiagnosed. The annual cost of diabetes in Texas's Response Diabetes is not curable, but it is manageable. People can learn skills to effectively manage

  12. A Growing and Costly Issue Texans spend approximately $146 billion annually on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Higher diabetes incidence rates and increased costs in the future are expected due to the growing of educational programs focusing on health- related issues for adults and youth, including diabetes education diabetes, better manage diabetes, reduce the risk for complications, prepare nutritious meals, stretch food

  13. UWA Institute of Agriculture 1 "Sustaining productive agriculture for a growing world"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    UWA Institute of Agriculture 1 "Sustaining productive agriculture for a growing world" Agriculture Science graduates show their talents at the Young Professionals in Agriculture Forum Institute of Agriculture photo:MrPeterMaloney The Australian Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology (AIAST

  14. NRRI's Bill Berguson promotes fast-growing trees as part of America's new energy future.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    NRRI's Bill Berguson promotes fast-growing trees as part of America's new energy future. Winter in 2005 by the Departments of Energy and Agriculture concluded that, with the current supply of forest and agricultural land, the United States should be able to produce nearly one billion dry tons of biomass annually

  15. improving energy efficiency in the built environment is now seen as a growing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotchen, Matthew J.

    improving energy efficiency in the built environment is now seen as a growing policy priority the 1973 oil embargo. Codes by state but they generally establish a minimum energy efficiency stan- dard.S. Department of Energy to establish building code energy efficiency targets by January 1, 2014. it also

  16. An extremely sharp phase transition threshold for the slow growing hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiermann, Andreas

    threshold point'. An everyday life example of this is the change from one material state to a different oneAn extremely sharp phase transition threshold for the slow growing hierarchy Andreas Weiermann of. This article is part of our general research program on phase transitions in logic

  17. Agricultural Experiment Station SP701-A Growing and Harvesting Switchgrass for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    Agricultural Experiment Station SP701-A Growing and Harvesting Switchgrass for Ethanol Production feedstock for ethanol production. It is anticipated that switchgrass can yield sufficient biomass to produce approximately 500 gal- lons of ethanol per acre. While the Tennessee Biofuels Initiative includes

  18. Technology Assistance Program Growing technology-based business with free service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Assistance Program Growing technology-based business with free service Economic Development Is your small, technology-based business faced with a specific challenge, but lacking scientist or engineer help your company? If the answer is yes, the Technology Assistance Program (TAP

  19. Transition state-finding strategies for use with the growing string method Anthony Goodrow,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis T.

    Transition state-finding strategies for use with the growing string method Anthony Goodrow,1 Alexis Efficient identification of transition states is important for understanding reaction mechanisms. Most transition state search algorithms require long computational times and a good estimate of the transition

  20. Mechanical Properties of Growing Melanocytic Nevi and the Progression to Melanoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethna, James P.

    Mechanical Properties of Growing Melanocytic Nevi and the Progression to Melanoma Alessandro Taloni, Italy Abstract Melanocytic nevi are benign proliferations that sometimes turn into malignant melanoma that osmotic stress and collagen inhibit growth in primary melanoma cells while the effect is much weaker

  1. Electronic Medical Device Reliability The growing sophistication of electronic medical devices results in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    Electronic Medical Device Reliability Objective The growing sophistication of electronic medical-defined lifetimes. To assist the medical electronics industry in achieving the needed reliability, this project-driven projects--medical electronic components, implant- ed electronic leads, and portable electronic medical

  2. Sources of biological variation in residual feed intake in growing and finishing steers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Erin Gwen

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    from linear regression of DMI on mid-test metabolic BW. During the growing phase, initial ultrasound measures of 12th rib fat thickness (FT) and final ultrasound measures of Longissimus muscle area (LMA), FT, and intramuscular fat (IMF) were obtained...

  3. RESEARCH ARTICLE Biological notes on a fungus-growing ant, Trachymyrmex cf. zeteki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    (near Gamboa, Panama´). Rela- tively little is known about the biology and natural history of these ants Panama´ from June to September 2006, and 20 nests from July 2009. We reared six wasp morphotypes; two wasps Á Adaptive radiations Á Trachymyrmex Introduction The New World fungus-growing ants (Hymenoptera

  4. Singlet Oxygen Singlet oxygen generation and detection are growing fields with applications in such areas as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Mathew G. - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto

    Singlet Oxygen Singlet oxygen generation and detection are growing fields with applications in such areas as cancer treatment, photosensitized oxidations, and biomolecular degradation. Ground state oxygen state of an oxygen molecule is a singlet state, which can readily react with other singlet molecules

  5. Detection of Oil Spills in SAR Images Using Wavelets and Region Growing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    Detection of Oil Spills in SAR Images Using Wavelets and Region Growing RÉGIA T. S. ARAÚJO, FÁTIMA an algorithm to detect oil spills in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images that can be used to support sensing of environmental disasters. Spillage of oil in coastal waters can be a catastrophic event

  6. Inverse Modeling and Animation of Growing Single-stemmed Trees at Interactive Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsen, Lars

    residents. Benefits include energy savings, air pol- lutant uptake, CO2 sequestration, storm-water runoffInverse Modeling and Animation of Growing Single-stemmed Trees at Interactive Rates Steffen Rudnick species may best fit a particular environment. The models used for the animation must conform to real

  7. Carbon nanotubes grow in combustion flames Issued on March 31, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, Ryo

    Carbon nanotubes grow in combustion flames Issued on March 31, 2014 Quantum chemical simulations reveal an unprecedented relationship between the mechanism of carbon nanotube growth and hydrocarbon of carbon nanotube (CNT) growth and hydrocarbon combustion actually share many similarities. In studies

  8. Growing season methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes at a sub-arctic wetland in Sweden 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardacre, Catherine J.; Blei, Emanuel; Heal, Mathew R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes were measured at several sites in a sub-arctic wetland near Abisko, Sweden (68°28?N 18°49?E) throughout the 2008 growing season. Averaged over 92 flux measurements the sub-arctic wetland was found to be a...

  9. Growing a Business with Social Conscience and Sustainability Vision: Lessons from Jain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    Irrigation Systems Limited (JISL), India In this talk, Kulkarni will discuss the Jain Irrigation SystemsGrowing a Business with Social Conscience and Sustainability Vision: Lessons from Jain Irrigation Systems, India Friday, November 22, 2013 9:00 - 10:30 a.m. Wrigley Hall, Room 481 Arizona State University

  10. Web API Growing Pains: Stories from Client Developers and Their Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaidman, Andy

    APIs make use of REST interfaces which can be easily integrated with through a single HTTP requestWeb API Growing Pains: Stories from Client Developers and Their Code Tiago Espinha, Andy Zaidman.g.gross}@tudelft.nl Abstract--Web APIs provide a systematic and extensible approach for application-to-application interaction

  11. Watching GaN Nanowires Grow Eric A. Stach,*, Peter J. Pauzauskie, Tevye Kuykendall,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong

    Watching GaN Nanowires Grow Eric A. Stach,*, Peter J. Pauzauskie, Tevye Kuykendall, Joshua of the growth of GaN nanowires via a self-catalytic vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. High temperature thermal decomposition of GaN in a vacuum yields nanoscale Ga liquid droplets and gallium/nitrogen vapor species

  12. Curvature-Dependent Surface Tension of a Growing Droplet Michael P. Moody and Phil Attard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attard, Phil

    Curvature-Dependent Surface Tension of a Growing Droplet Michael P. Moody and Phil Attard School-vapor interfaces. It is shown that the surface tension decreases approximately linearly with the supersaturation ratio and that it vanishes at the spinodal. The effect leads to a curvature-dependent surface tension

  13. Wind power is a rapidly growing and evolving field that crosses traditional academic disciplines and increasingly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    ways in which society's understanding and acceptance of renewable energy power generation can impactWind power is a rapidly growing and evolving field that crosses traditional academic disciplines and increasingly requires practitioners who understand the relationships among the various components of wind

  14. Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

  15. Pushmataha Forest Habitat Research Area TALL TIMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    . Determine the effects of fire and fire frequency on post oak and blackjack oak acorn production, crown vigor monitored other than through pellet count data on the FHRA. Plots were laid out and fire guards bladed

  16. Background Energy efficiency has become a growing concern in a world driven by a fossil fuel economy. To this end,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    Background Energy efficiency has become a growing concern in a world driven by a fossil fuel have been developed at Brayton Energy Canada, but several difficulties are encountered

  17. Growing consumption of petroleum products worldwide has resulted in the proliferation of vessels carrying oil, chemicals, and gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    Growing consumption of petroleum products worldwide has resulted in the proliferation of vessels carrying oil, chemicals, and gases into our harbors. Meeting our society's surging demand for commodities

  18. Removable pellicle for lithographic mask protection and handling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Hector, Scott D. (Oakland, CA); Nguyen, Khanh B. (Sunnyvale, CA); Stulen, Richard H. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A removable pellicle for a lithographic mask that provides active and robust particle protection, and which utilizes a traditional pellicle and two deployments of thermophoretic protection to keep particles off the mask. The removable pellicle is removably attached via a retaining structure to the mask substrate by magnetic attraction with either contacting or non-contacting magnetic capture mechanisms. The pellicle retaining structural is composed of an anchor piece secured to the mask substrate and a frame member containing a pellicle. The anchor piece and the frame member are in removable contact or non-contact by the magnetic capture or latching mechanism. In one embodiment, the frame member is retained in a floating (non-contact) relation to the anchor piece by magnetic levitation. The frame member and the anchor piece are provided with thermophoretic fins which are interdigitated to prevent particles from reaching the patterned area of the mask. Also, the anchor piece and mask are maintained at a higher temperature than the frame member and pellicle which also prevents particles from reaching the patterned mask area by thermophoresis. The pellicle can be positioned over the mask to provide particle protection during mask handling, inspection, and pumpdown, but which can be removed manually or robotically for lithographic use of the mask.

  19. Treatment Facility F: Accelerated Removal and Validation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, J.J.; Buettner, M.H.; Carrigan, C.R. [and others

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Accelerated Removal and Validation (ARV) phase of remediation at the Treatment Facility F (TFF) site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was designed to accelerate removal of gasoline from the site when compared to normal, single shift, pump-and-treat operations. The intent was to take advantage of the in-place infrastructure plus the increased underground temperatures resulting from the Dynamic Underground Stripping Demonstration Project (DUSDP). Operations continued 24-hours (h) per day between October 4 and December 12, 1993. Three contaminant removal rate enhancement approaches were explored during the period of continuous operation. First, we tried several configurations of the vapor pumping system to maximize the contaminant removal rate. Second, we conducted two brief trials of air injection into the lower steam zone. Results were compared with computer models, and the process was assessed for contaminant removal rate enhancement. Third, we installed equipment to provide additional electrical heating of contaminated low-permeability soil. Four new electrodes were connected into the power system. Diagnostic capabilities at the TFF site were upgraded so that we could safely monitor electrical currents, soil temperatures, and water treatment system processes while approximately 300 kW of electrical energy was being applied to the subsurface.

  20. Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a fast growing cyanobacterial chassis for biosynthesis using light and CO2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Jingjie; Liberton, Michelle; Cliften, Paul F.; Head, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.; Koppenaal, David W.; Brand, Jerry J.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Photosynthetic microbes are of emerging interest as production organisms in biotechnology because they can grow autotrophically using sunlight, an abundant energy source, and CO2, a greenhouse gas. Important traits for such microbes are fast growth and amenability to genetic manipulation. Here we describe Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973, a unicellular cyanobacterium capable of rapid autotrophic growth, comparable to heterotrophic industrial hosts such as yeast. Synechococcus 2973 can be readily transformed for facile generation of desired knockout and knock-in mutations. Genome sequencing coupled with global proteomics studies revealed that Synechococcus 2973 is a close relative of the widely studied cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatusmore »PCC 7942, an organism that grows more than two times slower. A small number of nucleotide changes are the only significant differences between the genomes of these two cyanobacterial strains. Thus, our study has unraveled genetic determinants necessary for rapid growth of cyanobacterial strains of significant industrial potential.« less

  1. Modeling of AAR affected structures using the GROW3D FEA program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, D.D. [Acres International Limited, Niagara Falls, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to present a rational and practical methodology for finite element stress analysis of AAR affected structures. The methodology is presented using case history studies which illustrate the practical application of the GROW3D program. GROW3D uses an anisotropic expansion strain function and concrete properties which simulates the following key characteristics of AAR affected concrete (1) concrete growth expansion rates dependent on the stress vectors at each point; (2) concrete growth rate variation due to changes in moisture content and temperature; and (3) time-dependent, enhanced creep behavior. GROW3D has been applied to several hydropower structures and case histories from the Mactaquac Generating Station are presented herein. Mactaquac is selected because extensive instrumentation data before and after remedial measures have been used to calibrate and test the model. The results of analyses of three different structures are given, i.e., the intake, diversion sluiceway and powerhouse. The analysis results are used to identify potential structural problems and the need and timing of remedial measures. The output from GROW3D includes displacement rates, total displacements, global stresses and local factors of safety. The local factors of safety (or strength to stress ratios) are computed for several modes of failure including crushing, cracking, shear and sliding on horizontal construction joints. The analysis results are compared with field measurements which are taken before and after slot cutting. The effects of including the above-mentioned characteristics and other modeling assumptions on the computed results is discussed herein. Finally, a brief discussion on the recent enhancements to the model is given. These enhancements include the implementation of a more rigorous treatment of concrete creep effects.

  2. Spatial Metrics to Study Urban Patterns in Growing and Shrinking Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reis, José P.; Silva, Elisabete A.; Pinho, Paulo

    2015-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    of smart cities, mainly seen on Western Europe and on the largest US urban areas; to the urban decline of former US and Western European mining and industrial cities and to the severe decline of important Eastern European agglomerations. After many...   Title: Spatial Metrics to Study Urban Patterns in Growing and Shrinking Cities Authors: José P. Reis(corresponding author) University of Cambridge, Department of Land Economy 19 Silver Street, Cambridge, CB3 9EP (United Kingdom) jpdffr2@cam...

  3. Food-stamp use triples as local despair grows By ANA M. VALDES AND ADAM PLAYFORD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Food-stamp use triples as local despair grows By ANA M. VALDES AND ADAM PLAYFORD Palm Beach Post Staff Writers Updated: 8:49 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2011 Posted: 10:55 p.m. Monday, Oct. 3, 2011 The load be in this situation; how can my family be here?' Or, 'I used to give to you; now I'm getting.' " Geneva Wilkins, 75

  4. Modeling water uptake by a root system growing in a fixed soil volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrieu, J L Blengino; Tarzia, D A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water uptake by roots of plants is examined for an ideal situation, with an approximation that resembles plants growing in pots, meaning that the total soil volume is fixed. We propose a coupled water uptake-root growth model. A one-dimensional model for water flux and water uptake by a root system growing uniformly distributed in the soil is presented, and the Van Genuchten model for the transport of water in soil is used. The governing equations are represented by a moving boundary model for which the root length, as a function of time, is prescribed. The solution of the model is obtained by front-fixing and finite element methods. Model predictions for water uptake by a same plant growing in loam, silt and clay soils are obtained and compared. A sensitivity analysis to determine relative effects on water uptake when system parameters are changed is also presented and shows that the model and numerical method proposed are more sensitive to the root growth rate than to the rest of the parameters. This se...

  5. Mobile system for microwave removal of concrete surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Terry L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Schaich, Charles R. (Lenoir City, TN); Foster, Jr., Don (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the microwave removal of contaminated concrete surfaces. The apparatus comprises a housing adapted to pass over a support surface. The housing includes a waveguide for directing microwave energy to the surface at an angle maximizing absorption of microwave energy by the surface. The apparatus is further provided with a source of microwave energy operably associated with the waveguide, wherein the microwave energy has a frequency of between about 10.6 GHz and about 24 GHz and acts to remove the uppermost layer from the surface. The apparatus further includes a debris containment assembly comprising a vacuum assembly operably associated with the housing. The vacuum assembly is adapted to remove debris from the area adjacent the surface.

  6. Removal of impurities from dry scrubbed fluoride enriched alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuh, L. [ABB Corporate Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wedde, G. [ABB Environmental, Oslo (Norway)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pot-gas from an aluminum electrolytic cell is cleaned by a dry scrubbing process using fresh alumina as a scrubbing agent. This alumina is enriched with fluorides and trace impurities in a closed loop system with the pots. The only significant removal of the impurities is due to metal tapping. An improved technique has been developed that is more effective than earlier stripper systems. The impurity-rich fine fraction (< 10 {micro}m) of the enriched alumina is partly attached to the coarser alumina. That attachment has to be broken. Selective impact milling under special moderate conditions and air classifying have shown to be a cost effective process for the removal of impurities. For iron (Fe) and phosphorus (P) about 30--70% can be removed by the separation of 0.5--1% of the alumina. Full scale tests have successfully confirmed these results.

  7. Metal chelate process to remove pollutants from fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, S.G.T.

    1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to improved methods using an organic iron chelate to remove pollutants from fluids, such as flue gas. Specifically, the present invention relates to a process to remove NO[sub x] and optionally SO[sub 2] from a fluid using a metal ion (Fe[sup 2+]) chelate wherein the ligand is a dimercapto compound wherein the --SH groups are attached to adjacent carbon atoms (HS--C--C--SH) or (SH--C--CCSH) and contain a polar functional group so that the ligand of DMC chelate is water soluble. Alternatively, the DMC is covalently attached to a water insoluble substrate such as a polymer or resin, e.g., polystyrene. The chelate is regenerated using electroreduction or a chemical additive. The dimercapto compound bonded to a water insoluble substrate is also useful to lower the concentration or remove hazardous metal ions from an aqueous solution. 26 figures.

  8. Mobile system for microwave removal of concrete surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, T.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Schaich, C.R.; Foster, D. Jr.

    1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microwave removal of contaminated concrete surfaces. The apparatus comprises a housing adapted to pass over a support surface. The housing includes a waveguide for directing microwave energy to the surface at an angle maximizing absorption of microwave energy by the surface. The apparatus is further provided with a source of microwave energy operably associated with the waveguide, wherein the microwave energy has a frequency of between about 10.6 GHz and about 24 GHz and acts to remove the uppermost layer from the surface. The apparatus further includes a debris containment assembly comprising a vacuum assembly operably associated with the housing. The vacuum assembly is adapted to remove debris from the area adjacent the surface. 7 figs.

  9. Removal of fluoride impurities from UF/sub 6/ gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beitz, J.V.

    1984-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of purifying a UF/sub 6/ gas stream containing one or more metal fluoride impurities composed of a transuranic metal, transition metal or mixtures thereof, is carried out by contacting the gas stream with a bed of UF/sub 5/ in a reaction vessel under conditions where at least one impurity reacts with the UF/sub 5/ to form a nongaseous product and a treated gas stream, and removing the treated gas stream from contact with the bed. The nongaseous products are subsequently removed in a reaction with an active fluorine affording agent to form a gaseous impurity which is removed from the reaction vessel. The bed of UF/sub 5/ is formed by the reduction of UF/sub 6/ in the presence of uv light. One embodiment of the reaction vessel includes a plurality of uv light sources as tubes on which UF/sub 5/ is formed. 2 figures.

  10. Savannah River Site Waste Removal Program - Past, Present and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saldivar, E.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site has fifty-one high level waste tanks in various phases of operation and closure. These tanks were originally constructed to receive, store, and treat the high level waste (HLW) created in support of the missions assigned by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) requires the high level waste to be removed from the tanks and stabilized into a final waste form. Additionally, closure of the tanks following waste removal must be completed. The SRS HLW System Plan identifies the interfaces of safe storage, waste removal, and stabilization of the high level waste and the schedule for the closure of each tank. HLW results from the dissolution of irradiated fuel components. Desired nuclear materials are recovered and the byproducts are neutralized with NaOH and sent to the High Level Waste Tank Farms at the SRS. The HLW process waste clarifies in the tanks as the sludge settles, resulting in a layer of dense sludge with salt supernate settling above the sludge. Salt supernate is concentrated via evaporation into saltcake and NaOH liquor. This paper discusses the history of SRS waste removal systems, recent waste removal experiences, and the challenges facing future removal operations to enhance efficiency and cost effectiveness. Specifically, topics will include the evolution and efficiency of systems used in the 1960's which required large volumes of water to current systems of large centrifugal slurry pumps, with significant supporting infrastructure and safety measures. Interactions of this equipment with the waste tank farm operations requirements will also be discussed. The cost and time improvements associated with these present-day systems is a primary focus for the HLW Program.

  11. Removal of pollutants from solid matrices using supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasko, D.L. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Macnaughton, S.J.; Foster, N.R. [Univ. of South Wales, Kensington (Australia)] [and others

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several supercritical fluid extraction (SCFE) processes have been proposed for removing toxic and intractable organic compounds from a range of contaminated solids. These include soil remediation and the regeneration of absorbents used to treat wastewater streams such as granular activated carbon (GAC). As a separation technique for environmental control, SCFR has several distinct advantages over conventional liquid extraction methods and incineration. Most notably, the contaminant is removed from the solvent in a concentrated form via a change in pressure or temperature and can be completely separated upon expansion to atmospheric pressure. The viability of SCFE hinges on process conditions such as solvent-feed ratio and solvent recycle ratio. The necessity of recycling solvent complicates the contaminant separation step since a complete reduction to atmospheric pressure would create large recompression costs. Because of this, the pressure and temperature dependence of contaminant solubility must be understood so that operating conditions for the separation step can be defined. Fortunately, this is the most developed aspect of SCF technology. However, the mass transfer limitations to removing contaminants from solids change with solvent flow rate. This paper discusses the use of SCFE for environmental control and presents results for the removal of DDT and 2-chlorophenol from GAC. 2-chlorophenol is almost completely removed with pure CO{sub 2} at 40{degrees}C and 101 bar while only 55% of the DDT is removed at 40{degrees}C and 200 bar. These differences in regeneration efficiency cannot be understood solely in terms of solubility but point to a need for detailed studies of adsorption equilibrium and mass transfer resistances in supercritical fluid systems.

  12. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Edwin S.; Holmes, Michael J.; Pavlish, John Henry

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  13. Method for removing undesired particles from gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durham, Michael Dean (Castle Rock, CO); Schlager, Richard John (Aurora, CO); Ebner, Timothy George (Westminster, CO); Stewart, Robin Michele (Arvada, CO); Hyatt, David E. (Denver, CO); Bustard, Cynthia Jean (Littleton, CO); Sjostrom, Sharon (Denver, CO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency.

  14. Method for removal of beryllium contamination from an article

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Hollenbeck, Scott M.

    2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removal of beryllium contamination from an article is disclosed. The method typically involves dissolving polyisobutylene in a solvent such as hexane to form a tackifier solution, soaking the substrate in the tackifier to produce a preform, and then drying the preform to produce the cleaning medium. The cleaning media are typically used dry, without any liquid cleaning agent to rub the surface of the article and remove the beryllium contamination below a non-detect level. In some embodiments no detectible residue is transferred from the cleaning wipe to the article as a result of the cleaning process.

  15. Methods of hydrotreating a liquid stream to remove clogging compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minderhoud, Johannes Kornelis [Amsterdam, NL; Nelson, Richard Gene [Katy, TX; Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria [Houston, TX; Ryan, Robert Charles [Houston, TX; Nair, Vijay [Katy, TX

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method includes producing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a gas stream. At least a portion of the liquid stream is provided to a hydrotreating unit. At least a portion of selected in situ heat treatment clogging compositions in the liquid stream are removed to produce a hydrotreated liquid stream by hydrotreating at least a portion of the liquid stream at conditions sufficient to remove the selected in situ heat treatment clogging compositions.

  16. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Edwin S. (Grand Forks, ND); Holmes, Michael J. (Thompson, ND); Pavlish, John H. (East Grand Forks, MN)

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  17. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Edwin S. (Grand Forks, ND); Holmes, Michael J. (Thompson, ND); Pavlish, John H. (East Grand Forks, MN)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  18. Method for removing semiconductor layers from salt substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shuskus, Alexander J. (West Hartford, CT); Cowher, Melvyn E. (East Brookfield, MA)

    1985-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for removing a CVD semiconductor layer from an alkali halide salt substrate following the deposition of the semiconductor layer. The semiconductor-substrate combination is supported on a material such as tungsten which is readily wet by the molten alkali halide. The temperature of the semiconductor-substrate combination is raised to a temperature greater than the melting temperature of the substrate but less than the temperature of the semiconductor and the substrate is melted and removed from the semiconductor by capillary action of the wettable support.

  19. Method for the removal and recovery of mercury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Easterly, C.E.; Vass, A.A.; Tyndall, R.L.

    1997-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is an enhanced method for the removal and recovery of mercury from mercury-contaminated matrices. The method involves contacting a mercury-contaminated matrix with an aqueous dispersant solution derived from specific intra-amoebic isolates to release the mercury from the mercury-contaminated matrix and emulsify the mercury; then, contacting the matrix with an amalgamating metal from a metal source to amalgamate the mercury to the amalgamating metal; removing the metallic source from the mercury-contaminated matrix; and heating the metallic source to vaporize the mercury in a closed system to capture the mercury vapors.

  20. Method for removal of furfural coke from metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.D.

    1990-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a process for preparing furfural coke for removal from metallic surfaces. It comprises: heating ship furfural coke without causing an evolution of heat capable of undesirably altering metallurgical properties of the surfaces in the presence of a gas with a total pressure of less than 100 psig containing molecular oxygen. The gas being at a sufficient temperature below 800{degrees}F. (427{degrees}C.) for a sufficient time to change the crush strength of the coke so as to permit removal with a water jet at a pressure of about 5000 psi.

  1. Compositions and methods for removing arsenic in water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gadgil, Ashok Jagannth (El Cerrito, CA)

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods and for contaminants from water are provided. The compositions comprise ferric hydroxide and ferric oxyhydride coated substrates for use in removing the contaminant from the water. Contacting water bearing the contaminant with the substrates can substantially reduce contaminant levels therein. Methods of oxidizing the contaminants in water to facilitate their removal by the ferric hydroxide and ferric oxyhydride coated substrates are also provided. The contaminants include, but are not limited to, arsenic, selenium, uranium, lead, cadmium, nickel, copper, zinc, chromium and vanadium, their oxides and soluble salts thereof.

  2. Water Recycling removal using temperature-sensitive hydronen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana B. Gupta

    2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project was to study the proposed Water Recycling/Removal Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogels. The main element of this technology is the design of a suitable hydrogel that can perform needed water separation for pulp and paper industry. The specific topics studied are to answer following questions: (a) Can water be removed using hydrogel from large molecules such as lignin? (b) Can the rate of separation be made faster? (c) What are the molecular interactions with hydrogel surface? (d) Can a hydrogel be designed for a high ionic strength and high temperature? Summary of the specific results are given.

  3. PATENT/DISCLOSURE LIST (1) A. Bindal, "Sidewall Lithography for Growing Horizontal Carbon Nano Tubes and a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eirinaki, Magdalini

    Tubes and a Process Flow for Complementary Carbon Nano Tube Field Effect Transistor (CCFET) FabricationPATENT/DISCLOSURE LIST (1) A. Bindal, "Sidewall Lithography for Growing Horizontal Carbon Nano for Manufacturing Nano-Interconnects and Catalyst Islands for Growing Carbon Nano Tubes", provisional patent

  4. f your soil has a high salinity content, the plants growing there will not be as vigorous as they would

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I f your soil has a high salinity content, the plants growing there will not be as vigorous as they would be in normal soils. Seeds will germinate poorly, if at all, and the plants will grow slowly much you water them. Routine soil testing can identify your soil's salinity levels and suggest measures

  5. Administrator's Perceptions on Growing Populations of Students who are English Language Learners in the State of Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shannon, Keri Leigh

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    the perspectives of district leadership regarding the growing population of ELs in the state. The purpose of the study was to understand what district leaders in the State of Wyoming are doing in terms of this growing population. The study focused on four areas...

  6. Technical note Barriers and opportunities for passive removal of indoor ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    Technical note Barriers and opportunities for passive removal of indoor ozone Elliott T. Gall presents a Monte Carlo simulation to assess passive removal materials (PRMs) that remove ozone of homes in Houston, Texas, were taken from the literature and combined with back- ground ozone removal

  7. Development of Silica/Vanadia/ Titania Catalysts for Removal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ying

    mercury (Hg0) from simulated coal-combustion flue gas. Experiments were carried out in fixed-bed reactorsDevelopment of Silica/Vanadia/ Titania Catalysts for Removal of Elemental Mercury from Coal-Combustion the composition and microstructures of SCR (selective catalytic reduction) catalysts for Hg0 oxidation in coal-combustion

  8. The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications Kris Hauser Abstract on three example applications: generating human-interpretable excuses for failure, motion planning under their failures. · In human-robot interaction, semantically meaningful explanations would help people diagnose

  9. The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    The Minimum Constraint Removal Problem with Three Robotics Applications Kris Hauser September 13 strategies. It is demonstrated on three example applications: gener- ating human-interpretable excuses, then they provide no explanation for the failure. For several applications, it would be useful for planners

  10. ADVANCES IN DUST DETECTION AND REMOVAL FOR TOKAMAKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campos, A.; Skinner, C.H.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dust diagnostics and removal techniques are vital for the safe operation of next step fusion devices such as ITER. In the tokamak environment, large particles or fi bers can fall on the electrostatic detector potentially causing a permanent short. An electrostatic dust detector developed in the laboratory is being applied to the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). We report on the development of a gas puff system that uses helium to clear such particles from the detector. Experiments at atmospheric pressure with varying nozzle designs, backing pressures, puff durations and exit fl ow orientations have given an optimal confi guration that effectively removes particles from a 25 cm² area. Similar removal effi ciencies were observed under a vacuum base pressure of 1 mTorr. Dust removal from next step tokamaks will be required to meet regulatory dust limits. A tri-polar grid of fi ne interdigitated traces has been designed that generates an electrostatic traveling wave for conveying dust particles to a “drain.” First trials with only two working electrodes have shown particle motion in optical microscope images.

  11. GROUNDWATER NITRATE REMOVAL CAPACITY OF RIPARIAN ZONES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Art

    , and 3 in Urban watersheds to study denitrification capacity. Mini-piezometers were installed at eachGROUNDWATER NITRATE REMOVAL CAPACITY OF RIPARIAN ZONES IN URBANIZING WATERSHEDS BY TARA KIMBERLY and geomorphology of riparian zones, potentially changing riparian groundwater denitrification capacity. Little work

  12. Thief process for the removal of mercury from flue gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA); Granite, Evan J. (Wexford, PA); Freeman, Mark C. (South Park Township, PA); Hargis, Richard A. (Canonsburg, PA); O'Dowd, William J. (Charleroi, PA)

    2003-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for removing mercury from the flue gas of a coal-fired power plant is described. Mercury removal is by adsorption onto a thermally activated sorbent produced in-situ at the power plant. To obtain the thermally activated sorbent, a lance (thief) is inserted into a location within the combustion zone of the combustion chamber and extracts a mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas. The semi-combusted coal has adsorptive properties suitable for the removal of elemental and oxidized mercury. The mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas is separated into a stream of gas and semi-combusted coal that has been converted to a stream of thermally activated sorbent. The separated stream of gas is recycled to the combustion chamber. The thermally activated sorbent is injected into the duct work of the power plant at a location downstream from the exit port of the combustion chamber. Mercury within the flue gas contacts and adsorbs onto the thermally activated sorbent. The sorbent-mercury combination is removed from the plant by a particulate collection system.

  13. Potential Supply Impacts of Removal of 1-Pound RVP Waiver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    trends, and current laws and regulations. The EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2002 (AEO2002) is usedPotential Supply Impacts of Removal of 1-Pound RVP Waiver September 2002 #12;ii Energy Information by the Office of Oil and Gas of the Energy Information Administration. General questions concerning the report

  14. Process for removing polymer-forming impurities from naphtha fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kowalczyk, Dennis C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Bricklemyer, Bruce A. (Avonmore, PA); Svoboda, Joseph J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer precursor materials are vaporized without polymerization or are removed from a raw naphtha fraction by passing the raw naphtha to a vaporization zone (24) and vaporizing the naphtha in the presence of a wash oil while stripping with hot hydrogen to prevent polymer deposits in the equipment.

  15. Process for removing polymer-forming impurities from naphtha fraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kowalczyk, D.C.; Bricklemyer, B.A.; Svoboda, J.J.

    1983-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer precursor materials are vaporized without polymerization or are removed from a raw naphtha fraction by passing the raw naphtha to a vaporization zone and vaporizing the naphtha in the presence of a wash oil while stripping with hot hydrogen to prevent polymer deposits in the equipment. 2 figs.

  16. Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

  17. Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer's position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates.

  18. Energy Savings for CO2 Removal in Ammonia Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pouilliart, R.; Van Hecke, F. C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An exergy analysis of carbonate solution C02 removal systems which use solution flashing shows that there is no energy saving by using a mechanical thermocompressor instead of a steam-jet ejector. In a 1000 ShT/D ammonia plant an energy saving...

  19. Decay heat removal by natural convection - the RVACS system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzanos, C. P.

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In conclusion, this work shows that for sodium coolant the reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) is an effective passive heat removal system if the reactor power does not exceed about 1600 MW(th). Its effectiveness is limited by the effective radiative heat transfer coefficient in the inner gap. In a lead cooled system, economic considerations may impose a lower limit.

  20. Removing Redundancy and Inconsistency in Memory-Based Collaborative Filtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tresp, Volker

    Removing Redundancy and Inconsistency in Memory- Based Collaborative Filtering Kai Yu Siemens AG, Corporate Technology & University of Munich, Germany kai.yu.external@mchp.siemens. de Xiaowei Xu Information Science Department University of Arkansas at Little Rock xwxu@ualr.edu Anton Schwaighofer Siemens AG

  1. Guide wire extension for shape memory polymer occlusion removal devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maitland, Duncan J. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Small, IV, Ward (Livermore, CA); Hartman, Jonathan (Sacramento, CA)

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A flexible extension for a shape memory polymer occlusion removal device. A shape memory polymer instrument is transported through a vessel via a catheter. A flexible elongated unit is operatively connected to the distal end of the shape memory polymer instrument to enhance maneuverability through tortuous paths en route to the occlusion.

  2. Apparatus for removably holding a plurality of microballoons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, B.S.

    1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to the manipulation of microballoons and more particularly to an apparatus for removably holding a plurality of microballoons in order to more efficiently carry out the filling of the microballoons with a known quantity of gas.

  3. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  4. Investigating the Use of Biosorbents to Remove Arsenic from Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erapalli, Shreyas

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    , As (III), and arsenate, As (V), from water. Batch reactors were employed to assess the percent removal, reaction kinetics, adsorption capacity, and desorption of each arsenic species onto/from biosorbents under pH buffered and non?buffered conditions...

  5. Biological Removal of Siloxanes from Landfill and Digester Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Removal of Siloxanes from Landfill and Digester Gases: Opportunities and Challenges S U) presents challenges for using landfill and digester gases as energy fuels because of the formation volatilize from waste at landfills and wastewater treatment plants (1). As a result, biogas produced

  6. Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amrhein, Gerald T. (Louisville, OH)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

  7. Instructions for use Removal of Oxygen and Nitrogen from Niobium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachizawa, Kazuya

    Instructions for use #12;------ Removal of Oxygen and Nitrogen from Niobium by External Gettering External Gettering, Purification of Niobium, Thermodynamics of Impurities, Oxygen Diffusion, Purity niobium even below 1500K. The oxygen concentration in the deposit and the Nb bulk is evaluated

  8. Apparatuses and methods for removal of ink buildup

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cudzinovic, Michael; Pass, Thomas; Rogers, Rob; Sun, Ray-Hon; Sun, Sheng; Wahlstrom, Ben; Fuhrman, Dennis Jason; Altendorf, Kyle David

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A substrate patterning method including the steps of spraying ink on a surface of a substrate, the spraying of the ink resulting in an overspray of excess ink past an edge of the substrate; changing a temperature of the excess ink to cause a change in a viscosity of the excess ink; and removing the excess ink having the changed viscosity.

  9. Argonne Electrochemical Technology Program Sulfur removal from reformate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argonne Electrochemical Technology Program Sulfur removal from reformate Xiaoping Wang, Theodore Krause, and Romesh Kumar Chemical Engineering Division Argonne National Laboratory Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies 2003 Merit Review Berkeley, CA May 19-22, 2003 #12;Argonne Electrochemical Technology

  10. Method for removal of mercury from various gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.

    2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides for a method for removing elemental mercury from a fluid, the method comprising irradiating the mercury with light having a wavelength of approximately 254 nm. The method is implemented in situ at various fuel combustion locations such as power plants and municipal incinerators.

  11. Blood storage device and method for oxygen removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitensky, Mark W. (Waban, MA); Yoshida, Tatsuro (Newton, MA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a storage device and method for the long-term storage of blood and, more particularly, to a blood storage device and method capable of removing oxygen from the stored blood and thereby prolonging the storage life of the deoxygenated blood.

  12. Sea Turtle Observations at Explosive Removals of Energy Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sea Turtle Observations at Explosive Removals of Energy Structures GREGG R. GITSCHLAG and BRYAN A. HERCZEG Introduction In July 1992 the total number of oil and gas production platformsI in the Gulfof. In that year 51 dead sea turtles were found on upper Texas beaches during mid-March to mid-April following

  13. Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, G.S.

    1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Particulate contamination removal from wafers is disclosed using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer`s position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates. 4 figs.

  14. Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 OZONE REMOVAL BY RESIDENTIAL HVAC FILTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 2366 OZONE REMOVAL BY RESIDENTIAL HVAC FILTERS P Zhao1,2 , JA Siegel1, Austin, Texas 78758, USA ABSTRACT HVAC filters have a significant influence on indoor air quality% for Filter #2 at a face velocity of 0.81 cm/s. The potential for HVAC filters to affect ozone concentrations

  15. MAILLER et al. Removal of priority and emerging substances by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of micropollutants in conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) composed by primary and biological treatmentsMAILLER et al. Removal of priority and emerging substances by biological and tertiary treatments in the case of urban areas (Heberer 2002). This implies a large understanding of wastewater treatment

  16. Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603.862.4024 http://www.unhsc.unh.edu #12;POROUS ASPHALT Watershed Boundary #12;#12;Gravel Wetland Effluent sampling

  17. Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603;Gravel Wetland Sampling within the system #12;NEIWPCC-UNH Project Goals Validation of constructed gravel

  18. Detroit Edison's Fermi 1 - Preparation for Reactor Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swindle, Danny [Sargent and Lundy Engineers, LLC, 55 E. Monroe Street, Chicago, IL 60603 (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is intended to provide information about the ongoing decommissioning tasks at Detroit Edison's Fermi 1 plant, and in particular, the work being performed to prepare the reactor for removal and disposal. In 1972 Fermi 1 was shutdown and the fuel returned to the Atomic Energy Commission. By the end of 1975, a retirement plan was prepared, the bulk sodium removed, and the plant placed in a safe store condition. The plant systems were left isolated with the sodium containing systems inert with carbon dioxide in an attempt to form a carbonate layer, thus passivating the underlying reactive sodium. In 1996, Detroit Edison determined to evaluate the condition of the plant and to make recommendations in relation to the Fermi 1 future plans. At the end of 1997 approval was obtained to remove the bulk asbestos and residual alkali-metals (i.e., sodium and sodium potassium (NaK)). In 2000, full nuclear decommissioning of the plant was approved. To date, the bulk asbestos insulation has been removed, and the only NaK remaining is located in six capillary instrument tubes. The remaining sodium is contained within the reactor, two of the three primary loops, and miscellaneous removed pipes and equipment to be processed. The preferred method for removing or reacting sodium at Fermi 1 is by injecting superheated steam into a heated, nitrogen inert system. The byproducts of this reaction are caustic sodium hydroxide, hydrogen gas, and heat. The decision was made to separate the three primary loops from the reactor for better control prior to processing each loop and the reactor separately. The first loop has already been processed. The main focus is now to process the reactor to allow removal and disposal of the Class C waste prior to the anticipated June 2008 closure of the Barnwell radioactive waste disposal facility located in South Carolina. Lessons learnt are summarized and concern: the realistic schedule and adherence to the schedule, time estimates, personnel accountability, back up or fill in work, work packages, condensation control, radiological contamination control, and organization of the waste stream.

  19. Solar Photovoltaic Economic Development: Building and Growing a Local PV Industry, August 2011 (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. photovoltaic (PV) industry is forecast to grow, and it represents an opportunity for economic development and job creation in communities throughout the United States. This report helps U.S. cities evaluate economic opportunities in the PV industry. It serves as a guide for local economic development offices in evaluating their community?s competitiveness in the solar PV industry, assessing the viability of solar PV development goals, and developing strategies for recruiting and retaining PV companies to their areas.

  20. Response to Comments on "A Bacterium That Can Grow Using Arsenic Instead of Phosphorus"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe-Simon, F; Blum, J S; Kulp, T R; Gordon, G W; Hoeft, S E; Pett-Ridge, J; Stolz, J F; Webb, S M; Weber, P K; Davies, P W; Anbar, A D; Oremland, R S

    2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns have been raised about our recent study describing a bacterium that can grow using arsenic (As) instead of phosphorus (P). Our data suggested that As could act as a substitute for P in major biomolecules in this organism. Although the issues raised are of investigative interest, we contend that they do not invalidate our conclusions. We argue that while no single line of evidence we presented was sufficient to support our interpretation of the data, taken as an entire dataset we find no plausible alternative to our conclusions. Here we reply to the critiques and provide additional arguments supporting the assessment of the data we reported.

  1. Umatilla Tribes to Grow Native Plants for Hanford | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 -Helicopter AccidentSeptemberDepartmentUmatilla Tribes to Grow

  2. On atomic structure of Ge huts growing on the Ge/Si(001) wetting layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arapkina, Larisa V.; Yuryev, Vladimir A. [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)] [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural models of growing Ge hut clusters—pyramids and wedges—are proposed on the basis of data of recent STM investigations of nucleation and growth of Ge huts on the Si(001) surface in the process of molecular beam epitaxy. It is shown that extension of a hut base along <110> directions goes non-uniformly during the cluster growth regardless of its shape. Growing pyramids, starting from the second monolayer, pass through cyclic formation of slightly asymmetrical and symmetrical clusters, with symmetrical ones appearing after addition of every fourth monolayer. We suppose that pyramids of symmetrical configurations composed by 2, 6, 10, etc., monolayers over the wetting layer are more stable than asymmetrical ones. This might explain less stability of pyramids in comparison with wedges in dense arrays forming at low temperatures of Ge deposition. Possible nucleation processes of pyramids and wedges on wetting layer patches from identical embryos composed by 8 dimers through formation of 1 monolayer high 16-dimer nuclei different only in their symmetry is discussed. Schematics of these processes are presented. It is concluded from precise STM measurements that top layers of wetting layer patches are relaxed when huts nucleate on them.

  3. Protein levels and lysine supplementation of sorghum grain-soybean meal rations for growing-finishing swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escobosa, Adrian

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Efficiency of Gain and Feed Cost of Growing-Finishing Swine 25 26 Effect of Level of Dietary Protein on Carcass Meri. t of Growing-Finishing Swine Effect of Level of Dietary Protein on Rate and Efficiency of Gain and Feed Cost of Growing- Finishing... to the 16-13 and 13 + lysine regimes. Car'ooss Meri t The pooled carcass data for all experiments are given in table 6 while the same data for the three separate experiments are given in appendix tables 4, 5 and 6. There were no significant differences...

  4. (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-11): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Record of Decision (ROD). Planning Steps 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. The work involved will be to clear tall growing vegetation that is...

  5. (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-10): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Record of Decision (ROD). Planning Steps 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. The work involved will be to clear tall growing vegetation that is...

  6. (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-27): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Record of Decision (ROD). Planning Steps 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. The work involved will be to clear tall growing vegetation that is...

  7. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Record of Decision (ROD). Planning Steps 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. The work involved will be to clear tall growing vegetation that is...

  8. Methods of using adsorption media for separating or removing constituents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herbst, R. Scott (Idaho Falls, ID); Mann, Nicholas R. (Blackfoot, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID)

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of using an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises contacting an adsorption medium with a feed stream comprising at least one constituent and removing the at least one constituent from the feed stream. The adsorption medium comprises a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) matrix and at least one metal hydroxide homogenously dispersed therein. The adsorption medium may comprise from approximately 15 wt % to approximately 90 wt % of the PAN and from approximately 10 wt % to approximately 85 wt % of the at least one metal hydroxide. The at least one metal hydroxide may be selected from the group consisting of ferric hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, lanthanum hydroxide, cerium hydroxide, titanium hydroxide, copper hydroxide, antimony hydroxide, and molybdenum hydroxide.

  9. Method of removing nitrogen oxides from exhaust gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batha, H.D.; Mason, J.H.; Thompson, S.R.

    1980-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing nitrogen oxides (NOX) from exhaust gas mixtures is described. The removal of NOX from exhaust gas mixtures is accomplished by exposing the exhaust gas mixture, in a manner that does not substantially impede the gas flow, to a ceramic material containing from about 75% to about 95% by weight silicon carbide and from about 0.3% to about 10.0% silica. A reduction of at least 85% of NOX from the mixture is to be expected and reductions up to 95 to 100% are attainable. Ceramic mixtures containing silicon nitride in amounts between about 10% and about 30% are found to reduce the amount of NOX in exhaust gases at temperatures as low as 200* C.

  10. Apparatus for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1996-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste). 4 figs.

  11. Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bala, Gregory A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Charles P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

  12. Apparatus for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bala, Gregory A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Charles P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

  13. Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste). 4 figs.

  14. Process for removing sulfate anions from waste water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, David N. (Lebanon, OR); Galvan, Gloria J. (Albany, OR); Hundley, Gary L. (Corvallis, OR); Wright, John B. (Albany, OR)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid emulsion membrane process for removing sulfate anions from waste water is disclosed. The liquid emulsion membrane process includes the steps of: (a) providing a liquid emulsion formed from an aqueous strip solution and an organic phase that contains an extractant capable of removing sulfate anions from waste water; (b) dispersing the liquid emulsion in globule form into a quantity of waste water containing sulfate anions to allow the organic phase in each globule of the emulsion to extract and absorb sulfate anions from the waste water and (c) separating the emulsion including its organic phase and absorbed sulfate anions from the waste water to provide waste water containing substantially no sulfate anions.

  15. Removal of field and embedded metal by spin spray etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Contolini, R.J.; Mayer, S.T.; Tarte, L.A.

    1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of removing both the field metal, such as copper, and a metal, such as copper, embedded into a dielectric or substrate at substantially the same rate by dripping or spraying a suitable metal etchant onto a spinning wafer to etch the metal evenly on the entire surface of the wafer. By this process the field metal is etched away completely while etching of the metal inside patterned features in the dielectric at the same or a lesser rate. This process is dependent on the type of chemical etchant used, the concentration and the temperature of the solution, and also the rate of spin speed of the wafer during the etching. The process substantially reduces the metal removal time compared to mechanical polishing, for example, and can be carried out using significantly less expensive equipment. 6 figs.

  16. An investigation of sorbents for mercury removal from flue gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.; Haddad, G.J.; Hargis, R.A. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory-scale packed-bed reactor system is used to screen sorbents for their capability to remove elemental mercury from a carrier gas. An on-line atomic fluorescence spectrophotometer, used in a continuous mode, monitors the elemental mercury concentration in the inlet and outlet streams of the packed-bed reactor. The mercury concentration in the reactor inlet gas and the reactor temperature are held constant during a test. The capacities and breakthrough times of several commercially available activated carbons, as well as novel sorbents, were determined as a function of various parameters. The mechanisms of mercury removal by the sorbents are suggested by combining the results of the packed-bed testing with various analytical results.

  17. Method for removing undesired particles from gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Ebner, T.G.; Stewart, R.M.; Hyatt, D.E.; Bustard, C.J.; Sjostrom, S.

    1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency. 11 figs.

  18. Negative kinetic energy term of general relativity and its removing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mei

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We first present a new Lagrangian of general relativity, which can be divided into kinetic energy term and potential energy term. Taking advantage of vierbein formalism, we reduce the kinetic energy term to a sum of five positive terms and one negative term. Some gauge conditions removing the negative kinetic energy term are discussed. Finally, we present a Lagrangian that only include positive kinetic energy terms. To remove the negative kinetic energy term leads to a new field equation of general relativity in which there are at least five equations of constraint and at most five dynamical equations, this characteristic is different from the normal Einstein field equation in which there are four equations of constraint and six dynamical equations.

  19. Methods for removing contaminant matter from a porous material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT) [Bozeman, MT; Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  20. Fairer Trade, Removing Gender Bias in US Import Taxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Lori L.; Dar, Jawad

    Fairer Trade Removing Gender Bias in US Import Taxes LORI L. TAYLOR AND JAWAD DAR Mosbacher Institute VOLUME 6 | ISSUE 3 | 2015 There are many inequalities in US tariff policy. Products imported from certain countries enter duty free..., the US Su- preme Court refused to hear appeals from import- ers Rack Room Shoes Inc. and Forever 21 Inc., thereby blocking their attempts to challenge an earlier ruling by the Court of Internation- al Trade. The importers had argued before the Court...

  1. System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weidner, Jerry R. (Iona, ID); Downs, Wayne C. (Sugar City, ID); Kaser, Timothy G. (Ammon, ID); Hall, H. James (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources.

  2. Efficiency of alum coagulation for removal of trihalomethane precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shannon, Joe Dan

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFICIENCY OF ALUM COAGULATION FOR REMOUAL OF TRIHALOMETHANE PRECURSORS A Thesis by JOE DAN SHANNON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1980 Major Subject: Civil Engineering EFFICIENCY OF ALUM COAGULATION FOR REMOVAL OF TRIHALOMETHANE PRECURSORS A Thesis by JOE DAN SHANNON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Memb ) (Head of Department...

  3. System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weidner, J.R.; Downs, W.C.; Kaser, T.G.; Hall, H.J.

    1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources. 4 figs.

  4. Inflatable containment diaphragm for sealing and removing stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meskanick, G.R.; Rosso, D.T.

    1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A diaphragm with an inflatable torus-shaped perimeter is used to seal at least one end of a stack so that debris that might be hazardous will not be released during removal of the stack. A diaphragm is inserted and inflated in the lower portion of a stack just above where the stack is to be cut such that the perimeter of the diaphragm expands and forms a seal against the interior surface of the stack.

  5. Microbial removal of no.sub.x from gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sublette, Kerry L. (Tulsa, OK)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a process by which a gas containing nitric oxide is contacted with an anaerobic microbial culture of denitrifying bacteria to effect the chemical reduction of the nitric oxide to elemental nitrogen. The process is particularly suited to the removal of nitric oxide from flue gas streams and gas streams from nitric acid plants. Thiobacillus dentrificians as well as other bacteria are disclosed for use in the process.

  6. Active Space Debris Removal using Capture and Ejection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missel, Jonathan William

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    object as well as its launch vehicle and parts thereof." Based on this de ni- tion, space debris are uncontrolled space objects serving no function, such as expired satellites, jettisoned components, and collision shrapnel. Traveling at speeds around.... Many alternative proposals to remove space debris have been made: laser impingement [5], ground-based laser design \\Project Orion" [3], ion guns [4], remote vehicles that capture debris and return to a central station [6], passively intercepting...

  7. Removable, hermetically-sealing, filter attachment system for hostile environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayfield, Glenn L [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A removable and reusable filter attachment system. A filter medium is fixed o, and surrounded by, a filter frame having a coaxial, longitudinally extending, annular rim. The rim engages an annular groove which surrounds the opening of a filter housing. The annular groove contains a fusible material and a heating mechanism for melting the fusible material. Upon resolidifying, the fusible material forms a hermetic bond with the rim and groove. Remelting allows detachment and replacement of the filter frame.

  8. Nitrogen removal from natural gas using two types of membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Wijmans, Johannes G.; Da Costa, Andre R.

    2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for treating natural gas or other methane-rich gas to remove excess nitrogen. The invention relies on two-stage membrane separation, using methane-selective membranes for the first stage and nitrogen-selective membranes for the second stage. The process enables the nitrogen content of the gas to be substantially reduced, without requiring the membranes to be operated at very low temperatures.

  9. Active Space Debris Removal using Capture and Ejection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missel, Jonathan William

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    object as well as its launch vehicle and parts thereof." Based on this de ni- tion, space debris are uncontrolled space objects serving no function, such as expired satellites, jettisoned components, and collision shrapnel. Traveling at speeds around.... Many alternative proposals to remove space debris have been made: laser impingement [5], ground-based laser design \\Project Orion" [3], ion guns [4], remote vehicles that capture debris and return to a central station [6], passively intercepting...

  10. Superfund fact sheet: The removal program. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fact sheet describes the Superfund Emergency Response Program, a program specifically designed to respond to multi-media hazardous materials accidents (e.g. illegal disposal or improper handling of materials, transportation accidents, chemical fires) that endanger people and/or the environment. Explanations of how the removal program works and how the affected communities are involved are given. The fact sheet is one in a series providing reference information about Superfund issues and is intended for readers with no scientific training.

  11. BOA: Pipe-asbestos insulation removal robot system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.; Mutschler, E. [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the BOA system, a mobile pipe-external crawler used to remotely strip and bag (possibly contaminated) asbestos-containing lagging and insulation materials (ACLIM) from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations across the DOE weapons complex. The mechanical removal of ACLIM is very cost-effective due to the relatively low productivity and high cost involved in human removal scenarios. BOA, a mechanical system capable of removing most forms of lagging (paper, plaster, aluminum sheet, clamps, screws and chicken-wire), and insulation (paper, tar, asbestos fiber, mag-block) uses a circular cutter and compression paddles to cut and strip the insulation off the pipe through compression, while a HEPA-filter and encapsulant system maintain a certifiable vacuum and moisture content inside the system and on the pipe, respectively. The crawler system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. Key design parameters and performance parameters are developed and used in performance testing. Since the current system is a testbed, we also discuss future enhancements and outline two deployment scenarios (robotic and manual) for the final system to be designed and completed by the end of FY `95. An on-site demonstration is currently planned for Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee.

  12. Method for removing oxide contamination from silicon carbide powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brynestad, J.; Bamberger, C.E.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The described invention is directed to a method for removing oxide contamination in the form of oxygen-containing compounds such as SiO/sub 2/ and B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ from a charge of finely divided silicon carbide. The silicon carbide charge is contacted with a stream of hydrogen fluoride mixed with an inert gas carrier such as argon at a temperature in the range of about 200/sup 0/ to 650/sup 0/C. The oxides in the charge react with the heated hydrogen fluoride to form volatile gaseous fluorides such as SiF/sub 4/ and BF/sub 3/ which pass through the charge along with unreacted hydrogen fluoride and the carrier gas. Any residual gaseous reaction products and hydrogen fluoride remaining in the charge are removed by contacting the charge with the stream of inert gas which also cools the powder to room temperature. The removal of the oxygen contamination by practicing the present method provides silicon carbide powders with desirable pressing and sintering characteristics. 1 tab.

  13. Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel from Shutdown Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph E.; Ross, Steven B.; Buxton, Kenneth A.; England, Jeffery L.; McConnell, Paul E.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report fulfills the M2 milestone M2FT-13PN0912022, “Stranded Sites De-Inventorying Report.” In January 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste (DOE 2013). Among the elements contained in this strategy is an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites. This focus is consistent with the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future, which identified removal of stranded used nuclear fuel at shutdown sites as a priority so that these sites may be completely decommissioned and put to other beneficial uses (BRC 2012). Shutdown sites are defined as those commercial nuclear power reactor sites where the nuclear power reactors have been shut down and the site has been decommissioned or is undergoing decommissioning. In this report, a preliminary evaluation of removing used nuclear fuel from 12 shutdown sites was conducted. The shutdown sites were Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, Zion, Crystal River, Kewaunee, and San Onofre. These sites have no other operating nuclear power reactors at their sites and have also notified the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission that their reactors have permanently ceased power operations and that nuclear fuel has been permanently removed from their reactor vessels. Shutdown reactors at sites having other operating reactors are not included in this evaluation.

  14. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pentek metal coating removal system consists of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER(R), and VAC-PAC(R). The system is designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M ROTO-PEEN tungsten carbide cutters, while the CORNER-CUTTER(R) uses solid needles for descaling activities. These are used with the VAC-PAC(R) vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure was minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended, since the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place may skew the results. It is feasible that dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment. Other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  15. Removal of fluoride from aqueous solution by using alum sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sujana, M.G.; Thakur, R.S.; Rao, S.B. [CSIR, Bhubaneswar (India). Regional Research Lab.] [CSIR, Bhubaneswar (India). Regional Research Lab.

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of treated alum sludge to remove fluoride from aqueous solution has been investigated. The studies were carried out as functions of contact time, concentration of adsorbent and adsorbate, temperature, pH, and effect of concentrations of other anions. The data indicate that treated alum sludge surface sites are heterogeneous in nature and that fits into a heterogeneous site binding model. The optimum pH for complete removal of fluoride from aqueous solution was found to be 6. The rate of adsorption was rapid during the initial 5 minutes, and equilibrium was attained within 240 minutes. The adsorption followed first-order rate kinetics. The present system followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The loading factor (i.e., the milligram of fluoride adsorbed per gram of alum sludge) increased with initial fluoride concentration, whereas a negative trend was observed with increasing temperature. The influence of addition of anions on fluoride removal depends on the relative affinity of the anions for the surface and the relative concentrations of the anions.

  16. The thief process for mercury removal from flue gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granite, E.J.; Freeman, M.C.; Hargis, R.A.; O'Dowd, W.J.; Pennline, H.W.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thief Process is a cost-effective variation to activated carbon injection (ACI) for removal of mercury from flue gas. In this scheme, partially combusted coal from the furnace of a pulverized coal power generation plant is extracted by a lance and then re-injected into the ductwork downstream of the air preheater. Recent results on a 500-lb/h pilot-scale combustion facility show similar removals of mercury for both the Thief Process and ACI. The tests conducted to date at laboratory, bench, and pilot-scales demonstrate that the Thief sorbents exhibit capacities for mercury from flue gas streams that are comparable to those exhibited by commercially available activated carbons. A patent for the process was issued in February 2003. The Thief sorbents are cheaper than commercially-available activated carbons; exhibit excellent capacities for mercury; and the overall process holds great potential for reducing the cost of mercury removal from flue gas. The Thief Process was licensed to Mobotec USA, Inc. in May of 2005.

  17. Cesium removal using crystalline silicotitanate. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 100 million gallons of radioactive waste is stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation, and Savannah River Site (SRS). Most of the radioactivity comes from {sup 137}Cs, which emits high-activity gamma radiation. The Cesium Removal System is a modular, transportable, ion-exchange system configured as a compact processing unit. Liquid tank waste flows through columns packed with solid material, called a sorbent, that selectively adsorbs cesium and allows the other materials to pass through. The sorbent is crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an engineered material with a high capacity for sorbing cesium from alkaline wastes. The Cesium Removal System was demonstrated at Oak Ridge using Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) waste for feed. Demonstration operations began in September 1996 and were completed during June 1997. Prior to the demonstration, a number of ion-exchange materials were evaluated at Oak Ridge with MVST waste. Also, three ion-exchange materials and three waste types were tested at Hanford. These bench-scale tests were conducted in a hot cell. Hanford's results showed that 300 times less sorbent was used by selecting Ionsiv IE-911 over organic ion-exchange resins for cesium removal. This paper gives a description of the technology and discusses its performance, applications, cost, regulatory and policy issues and lessons learned.

  18. Ammonia removal process upgrade to the Acme Steel Coke Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J.L. [Acme Steel Co., Chicago, IL (United States). Chicago Coke Plant

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to upgrade the ammonia removal process at the Acme Steel Coke Plant developed with the installation of the benzene NESHAP (National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) equipment, specifically the replacement of the final cooler. At Acme Steel it was decided to replace the existing open cooling tower type final cooler with a closed loop direct spray tar/water final cooler. This new cooler has greatly reduced the emissions of benzene, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen cyanide to the atmosphere, bringing them into environmental compliance. At the time of its installation it was not fully recognized as to the effect this would have on the coke oven gas composition. In the late seventies the decision had been made at Acme Steel to stop the production of ammonia sulfate salt crystals. The direction chosen was to make a liquid ammonia sulfate solution. This product was used as a pickle liquor at first and then as a liquid fertilizer as more markets were developed. In the fall of 1986 the ammonia still was brought on line. The vapors generated from the operation of the stripping still are directed to the inlet of the ammonia absorber. At that point in time it was decided that an improvement to the cyclical ammonia removal process was needed. The improvements made were minimal yet allowed the circulation of solution through the ammonia absorber on a continuous basis. The paper describes the original batch process and the modifications made which allowed continuous removal.

  19. Process for off-gas particulate removal and apparatus therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carl, D.E.

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In the event of a breach in the off-gas line of a melter operation requiring closure of the line, a secondary vessel vent line is provided with a particulate collector utilizing atomization for removal of large particulates from the off-gas. The collector receives the gas containing particulates and directs a portion of the gas through outer and inner annular channels. The collector further receives a fluid, such as water, which is directed through the outer channel together with a second portion of the particulate-laden gas. The outer and inner channels have respective ring-like termination apertures concentrically disposed adjacent one another on the outer edge of the downstream side of the particulate collector. Each of the outer and inner channels curves outwardly away from the collector`s centerline in proceeding toward the downstream side of the collector. Gas flow in the outer channel maintains the fluid on the channel`s wall in the form of a ``wavy film,`` while the gas stream from the inner channel shears the fluid film as it exits the outer channel in reducing the fluid to small droplets. Droplets formed by the collector capture particulates in the gas stream by one of three mechanisms: impaction, interception or Brownian diffusion in removing the particulates. The particulate-laden droplets are removed from the fluid stream by a vessel vent condenser or mist eliminator. 4 figs.

  20. Process for off-gas particulate removal and apparatus therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carl, Daniel E. (Orchard Park, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the event of a breach in the off-gas line of a melter operation requiring closure of the line, a secondary vessel vent line is provided with a particulate collector utilizing atomization for removal of large particulates from the off-gas. The collector receives the gas containing particulates and directs a portion of the gas through outer and inner annular channels. The collector further receives a fluid, such as water, which is directed through the outer channel together with a second portion of the particulate-laden gas. The outer and inner channels have respective ring-like termination apertures concentrically disposed adjacent one another on the outer edge of the downstream side of the particulate collector. Each of the outer and inner channels curves outwardly away from the collector's centerline in proceeding toward the downstream side of the collector. Gasflow in the outer channel maintains the fluid on the channel's wall in the form of a "wavy film," while the gas stream from the inner channel shears the fluid film as it exits the outer channel in reducing the fluid to small droplets. Droplets formed by the collector capture particulates in the gas stream by one of three mechanisms: impaction, interception or Brownian diffusion in removing the particulates. The particulate-laden droplets are removed from the fluid stream by a vessel vent condenser or mist eliminator.