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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater Reyad; available online 29 October 2003 Abstract A by-product fly ash from oil shale processing was converted shale; Ash; Zeolite; Cadmium and lead removal 1. Introduction Oil shale exists in Jordan with large

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

2

Low-cost, Effective Materials for Lead Removal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

output from this innovative group. Environmental, Energetic, and Economic Potential of Biochar Biochar) are using integrated economic, energy, and life-cycle data analysis to quantify biochar's potential's food supply. Biochar-Based Fibers for Personal Protective Equipment Replacing current technologies

Choate, Paul M.

3

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Mrowka, Stanley (Richmond, CA)

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

4

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact laser system is disclosed that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1,000 ft{sup 2}/hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, D.L.; Celliers, P.M.; Hackel, L.; Da Silva, L.B.; Dane, C.B.; Mrowka, S.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

5

Using Magnetically Responsive Tea Waste to Remove Lead in Waters under Environmentally Relevant Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the use of a simple yet highly effective magnetite-waste tea composite to remove lead(II) (Pb[superscript 2+]) ions from water. Magnetite-waste tea composites were dispersed in four different types of water–deionized ...

Yeo, Siang Yee

6

Laboratory Studies of Lead Removal from Liquid Scintillator in Preparation for KamLAND's Low Background Phase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The removal of Radon induced Lead from liquid scintillator was extensively studied in preparation for KamLAND's low background phase. This work presents the results from laboratory experiments performed at the University of Alabama and their implications for KamLAND and future low background experiments using carbon based liquid scintillator. It was observed that distillation was the most effective purification procedure and that one must consider a non-polar and non-ionic component of Lead in order to reach the levels of radio-purity required for these new class of ultra-low background experiments.

Keefer, Gregory [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

7

Biotechnology Based Processes for Arsenic Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective Recovery of Gold from E-wastes by Using Cellulosic Wastes · Stabilization of Chromium-Based Slags with FeS2 and FeSO4 · Sulphide Precipitation ...

8

High-resolution lithography based on selective removal of atoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method of high-resolution lithography based on selective removal of atoms is described. Drawbacks of lift-off lithography in comparison with the method proposed are pointed out and test structures of metal (Mo) stripes with a thickness of 50 nm are obtained.

Domantovskii, A. G.; Gurovich, B. A.; Maslakov, K. I. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Design of passive decay heat removal system for the lead cooled flexible conversion ratio fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lead-cooled flexible conversion ratio fast reactor shows many benefits over other fast-reactor designs; however, the higher power rating and denser primary coolant present difficulties for the design of a passive decay ...

Whitman, Joshua (Joshua J.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Method for removing oil-based materials from water surface  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for removing oil-based materials floating on the surface of ballast water contained in the ballast tank of a cargo carrier having vertical steel surfaces. The method consists of adding to said surface a spreading agent having a spreading force greater than the oil-based material in an amount sufficient to force substantially all of the material against the surfaces. The ballast water is discharged from the tank at a point below the surface of the water, the oil-based material is forced to deposit on the steel surfaces vacated by the discharged water.

Shewmaker, J.E.

1981-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

11

Lead  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

topic topic Lead 8:00 AM 8:15 AM Welcome and Webinar Rules Maloy 8:15 AM 8:30 AM NE Materials Introduction Lesica 8:30 AM 9:00 AM Advanced Reactor Concepts Sham 9:00 AM 9:30 AM SMR Corwin 9:30 AM 10:00 AM VHTR Materials Wright 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Coffee Break 10:15 AM 10:45 AM Fuel Cycle Research and Development Maloy 10:45 AM 11:15 AM LWR Sustainability Busby 11:15 AM 11:45 AM Summary/Discussion All Discussion topic - Development of Advanced ODS alloys Lead 8:00 AM 8:15 AM Welcome and Webinar Rules Maloy 8:15 AM 8:30 AM Advanced Materials for Fast Reactor Core Materials Maloy 8:30 AM 9:00 AM High Dose MA-957 testing Toloczko 9:00 AM 9:30 AM FCRD ODS Material Development- FCRD-NFA1 Hoelzer 9:30 AM 10:00 AM NFA Processing Odette 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Coffee Break 10:15 AM 10:45 AM 9Cr ODS Material Development Byun 10:45 AM

12

Comparison of NOx Removal Efficiencies in Compost Based Biofilters Using Four Different Compost Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1998, 3.6 trillion kilowatt-hours of electricity were generated in the United States. Over half of this was from coal-fired power plants, resulting in more than 8.3 million tons of nitrogen oxide (NOx) compounds being released into the environment. Over 95% of the NOx compounds produced during coal combustion are in the form of nitric oxide (NO). NOx emission regulations are becoming increasingly stringent, leading to the need for new, cost effective NOx treatment technologies. Biofiltration is such a technology. NO removal efficiencies were compared in compost based biofilters using four different composts. In previous experiments, removal efficiencies were typically highest at the beginning of the experiment, and decreased as the experiments proceeded. This work tested different types of compost in an effort to find a compost that could maintain NO removal efficiencies comparable to those seen early in the previous experiments. One of the composts was wood based with manure, two were wood based with high nitrogen content sludge, and one was dairy compost. The wood based with manure and one of the wood based with sludge composts were taken directly from an active compost pile while the other two composts were received in retail packaging which had been out of active piles for an indeterminate amount of time. A high temperature (55-60°C) off-gas stream was treated in biofilters operated under denitrifying conditions. Biofilters were operated at an empty bed residence time of 13 seconds with target inlet NO concentrations of 500 ppmv. Lactate was the carbon and energy source. Compost was sampled at 10-day intervals to determine aerobic and anaerobic microbial densities. Compost was mixed at a 1:1 ratio with lava rock and calcite was added at 100g/kg of compost. In each compost tested, the highest removal efficiencies occurred within the first 10 days of the experiment. The wood based with manure peaked at day 3 (77.14%), the dairy compost at day 1 (80.74%), the active wood based with sludge at day 5 (68.15%) and the inactive wood based with sludge at day 9 (63.64%, this compost was frozen when received). These levels gradually decreased throughout the remainder of the experiment until they fell between 40% and 60%. Decreasing removal efficiency was characteristic of all the composts tested, regardless of their makeup or activity state prior to testing. Although microbial densities and composition between composts may have differed, there was little change in densities within each experiment.

Lacey, Jeffrey Alan; Lee, Brady Douglas; Apel, William Arnold

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Materials Reliability Program: Hot Cell Testing of Baffle/Former Bolts Removed from Two Lead PWR Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) has been observed in core shroud baffle former bolts in pressurized water reactor (PWR) internals. This report describes hot cell testing results for bolts removed from one Westinghouse three-loop nuclear power plant, Farley Unit 1, and one two-loop plant, Point Beach Unit 2.

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

14

New Web-based System Leads to Better, More Timely Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New Web-based System Leads to Better, More Timely Data. For Immediate Release: October 26, 2006. ... Web Release Date: October 11, 2006. ...

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

New Techniques to Characterize and Remove Water-Based Drilling Fluids Filter Cake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Filter cake characterization is very important in drilling and completion operations. Heterogeneity of the filter cake plays a key role in the design of chemical treatments needed to remove the filter cake. The objectives of this study are to characterize the filter cake under static and dynamic conditions, evaluate the using of polylactic acid and chelating agents to remove calcium carbonate-based filter cake, assess glycolic acid to remove Mn3O4-based filter cake, and evaluate ilmenite as a weighting material for water-based drilling fluid. In order to characterize the filter cake, computer tomography (CT) was used in combination with the scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) to analyze the filter cake. A modified HPHT filter cell was developed to perform the filtration tests. A see-through-cell was used to check the compatibility of different chemicals that were used to remove the filter cake. The results obtained from the CT scan showed that the filter cake was heterogeneous and contained two layers with different properties under static and dynamic conditions. Under static conditions, the formation of filter cake changed from compression to buildup; while under dynamic conditions, the filter cake was formed under continuous buildup. Polylactic acid was used as a component of the drilling fluid components and the results obtained showed that the drill-in fluid had stable rheological properties up to 250?F over 24 hrs. The removal efficiency of the filter cake was nearly 100% and the return permeability was about 100% for Indiana limestone and Berea sandstone cores, when using a weight ratio of polylactic acid to calcium carbonate 3 to 1. GLDA (pH 3.3) and HEDTA (pH 4) can be used to remove the filter cake in one step without using ?-amylase enzyme solutions. GLDA (20 wt% in a 200 g solution and pH of 3.3) and HEDTA (20 wt% in a 200 g solution and pH 4) had 100% removal efficiency of the filter cake using Indiana limestone and Berea sandstone cores. Chelate solutions, GLDA (pH of 3.3 - 13) and HEDTA (pH of 4 and 7) were incompatible with ?-amylase enzyme solutions over a wide range of temperatures. CT results showed that no formation damage was observed when using chelating agents as a breaker to remove the calcium carbonate filter cake. Manganese tetraoxide-based filter cake had a removal efficiency of 85% after 20 hrs soaking with glycolic acid (5 wt%) after soaking with ?-amylase for 24 hrs, and 89% after reaction with acid mixture (1 wt% HCl and 7 wt% glycolic acid) for 16 hrs. for both methods, the retained permeability was 100% for Indiana limestone cores and 120% for Berea sandstone cores, which indication maximum productivity of these formations. Ilmenite-based filter cake was ideal for HPHT applications, 0.2 in. thickness and 12 cm3 filtrate under dynamic conditions. The filtrate volume was reduced by adding a minor amount of CaCO3 solids that improved the particles packing. No sag problem was observed when using the micronized ilmenite in water-based drilling fluids. Ilmenite has a negative zeta potential in alkaline media and had a stable dispersion in water at pH > 7.

Elkatatny, Salaheldin Mahmoud

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Characteristics and removal of filter cake formed by formate-based drilling mud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formate-based mud has been used to drill deep gas wells in Saudi Arabia since 2004. This mud typically contains XC-polymer, starch, polyanionic cellulose, and a relatively small amount of calcium carbonate particles, and is used to drill a deep sandstone reservoir (310°F). Calcium carbonate particles are frequently used as weighting material to maintain the pressure that is required for well control and minimize the leak-off. Such solids become consolidated and trapped in the polymeric material and this makes the filter cake a strong permeability barrier. Various cleaning fluids were proposed to remove drilling mud filter cake; including: solid-free formate brine and formate brine doped with organic acids (acetic, formic, and citric acids), esters, and enzymes. The main objective of this research is to assess the effectiveness of these cleaning fluids in removing drilling mud filter cake. A dynamic high-pressure/high-temperature (HPHT) cell was used to determine characteristics of the drilling mud filter cake. Drilling mud and completion fluids were obtained from the field. Compatibility tests between potassium formate brine, cleaning fluids, and formation brine were performed at 300şF and 200 psi using HPHT visual cells. Surface tensions of various cleaning fluids were also measured at high temperatures. The conventional method for cleaning the filter cake is by circulating solid-free formate brines at a high flow rate. This mechanical technique removes only the external drilling fluid damage. Citric acid at 10 wt%, formic acid, and lactic acid were found to be incompatible with formate brine at room temperature. However, these acids were compatible with formate brine at temperatures greater than 122°F. Only acetic acid was compatible with formate brine. A formula was developed that is compatible at room and reservoir temperature. This formula was effective in removing filter cake. A corrosion inhibitor was added to protect downhole tubulars. In general detail, this research will discuss the development of this formula and all tests that led to its development.

Alotaibi, Mohammed Badri

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

New photomultiplier active base for Hall C Jefferson Lab lead tungstate calorimeter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new photomultiplier tube active base was designed and tested. The base combines active voltage division circuit and fast amplifier, powered by the current flowing through voltage divider. This base is developed to upgrade older photomultiplier bases of Jefferson Lab lead-tungsten calorimeter (about ?1200 crystals of PbWO{sub 4} from the PrimEx experimental setup). This is needed for the extension of detectors' rate capability to meet requirements of new Hall C proposal PR12-11-102 of measurements of the L/T separated cross sections and their ratio R = ?L/?T in neutral-pion p(e,e??0)p deep exclusive and p(p(e,e??{sup 0})p)X semi-inclusive scattering regions. New active base is direct replacement of older passive base circuit without adding of additional power or signal lines. However, it extends detectors rate capability with factor over 20. Moreover, transistorized voltage divider improves detector's amplitude resolution due to reduction of photomultiplier gain dependence from tube anode current. The PMT active base is the invention disclosed in V. Popov's U.S. Patent No. 6,791,269, which successfully works over ten years in several Jefferson Lab Cherenkov detectors. The following design is a new revised and improved electronic circuit with better gain stability and linearity in challenge to meet requirements of new Hall C experimental setup. New active base performance was tested using fast LED light source and Pr:LuAG scintillator and gamma sources. Electronics radiation hardness was tested on JLab accelerator. Results of testing R4125 Hamamatsu photomultiplier tube in new active base are presented.

Popov, Vladimir E. [JLAB; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet G. [Artem Alikhanian National Laboratory

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Removal of Filter Cake Generated by Manganese Tetraoxide Water-based Drilling Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three effective solutions to dissolve the filter cake created by water-based drilling fluids weighted with Mn3O4 particles were developed. Hydrochloric acid at concentration lower than 5 wt% can dissolve most of Mn3O4-based filter cake. Dissolving the filter cake in two-stage treatment of enzyme and organic acid was effective and eliminated the associated drawbacks of using HCl. Finally, combining low and safe concentration of HCl with an organic acid in one-stage treatment was very effective. Hydrochloric acid (10-wt%) dissolved 78 wt% of Mn3O4-based filter cake at 250°F after 28 hours soaking time. However, Chlorine gas was detected during the reaction of 5 to 15-wt% HCl with Mn3O4 particles. At 190°F, 1- and 4-wt% HCl dissolved most Mn3O4 particles (up to 70-wt% solubility). Their reactions with Mn3O4 particles followed Eq. 8 at 190°F, which further confirmed the absence of chlorine gas production at HCl concentrations lower than 5-wt%. EDTA and DTPA at high pH (12) and acetic, propionic, butyric, and gluconic acids at low pH (3-5) showed very low solubilities of Mn3O4 particles. GLDA, citric, oxalic, and tartaric acids produced large amount of white precipitation upon the reactions with Mn3O4 particles. Similarly, DTPA will produce damaging material if used to dissolve Mn3O4-based filter cake in sandstone formation. At 4-wt% acid concentration, lactic, glycolic, and formic acids dissolved Mn3O4 particles up to 76 wt% solubility at 190°F. Malonic acid at lower concentration (2-wt%) dissolved 54 wt% of Mn3O4 particles at 190°F. Manganese tetraoxide particles were covered with polymeric material (starch), which significantly reduced the solubility of filter cake in organic acids. Therefore, there was a need to remove Mn3O4-based filter cake in two-stage treatment. Enzyme-A (10-wt%) and Precursor of lactic acid (12.5-wt%) dissolved 84 wt% of the filter cake. An innovative approach led to complete solubility of Mn3O4 particles when low and safe concentration of HCl (1-wt%) combined with 4-wt% lactic acid at 190°F. HCl (1-wt%) combined with lactic acid (4-wt%), dissolved 85 wt% of the Mn3O4-based filter cake after 18-22 hours soaking time at 250°F in one stage treatment.

Al Mojil, Abdullah Mohammed A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

LEADING WITH LEADING INDICATORS  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents Fluor Hanford's use of Leading Indicators, management leadership, and statistical methodology in order to improve safe performance of work. By applying these methods, Fluor Hanford achieved a significant reduction in injury rates in 2003 and 2004, and the improvement continues today. The integration of data, leadership, and teamwork pays off with improved safety performance and credibility with the customer. The use of Statistical Process Control, Pareto Charts, and Systems Thinking and their effect on management decisions and employee involvement are discussed. Included are practical examples of choosing leading indicators. A statistically based color coded dashboard presentation system methodology is provided. These tools, management theories and methods, coupled with involved leadership and employee efforts, directly led to significant improvements in worker safety and health, and environmental protection and restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

PREVETTE, S.S.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

20

Characterization of thick lead zirconate titanate films fabricated using a new sol gel based process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) films 60 {mu}m in thickness have been fabricated using a new sol gel based process. PZT powders are dispersed in a sol gel matrix to form a 0{endash}3 ceramic/ceramic composite. The dielectric properties of these films have been studied as a function of powder concentration, frequency, and temperature. The characteristic Curie point is observed at 420{degree}C. The ferroelectric behavior measured in terms of the remanant polarization (P{sub r}=35 {mu}C/cm{sup 2}) and coercive field (E{sub c}=20 kV/cm) was an improvement over values quoted for thin PZT films but lower than that of bulk ceramic. The piezoelectric properties d{sub 33} (325 pC/N) and d{sub 31} ({minus}80 pC/N) were comparable with those of the bulk ceramic. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Barrow, D.A. [Datec Coating Corporation, Stirling Hall, 99 University Avenue, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Petroff, T.E. [Datec Coating Corporation, Stirling Hall, 99 University Avenue, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada)]|[Department of Chemistry, Queen`s University, Kingston, Ontario KL7 3NG (Canada); Tandon, R.P. [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi (India); Sayer, M. [Department of Physics, Queen`s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Development of an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an Integrated an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems Background The U.S. has more coal than any other country, and it can be converted through gasification into electricity, liquid fuels, chemicals, or hydrogen. However, for coal gasification to become sufficiently competitive to benefit the U.S. economy and help reduce our dependence on foreign fuels, gasification costs must be reduced

22

Electrochemistry theorem based state-of-charge estimation of the lead acid batteries for electric vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for the estimation of the state-of-charge in lead-acid batteries for electric vehicles is investigated. The electrochemistry theorem is introduced to measure the resistance effect of the electrode reaction and to estimate the internal energy ... Keywords: digital signal processor, electric vehicles, electrode reaction, electrolyte specific gravity, lead-acid battery, state-of-charge

Ying-Shing Shiao; Ding-Tsair Su; Jui-Liang Yang; Rong-Wen Hung

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Lead-free precussion primer mixes based on metastable interstitial composite (MIC) technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lead-free percussion primer composition and a percussion cup containing e composition. The lead-free percussion primer composition is comprised of a mixture of about 45 wt % aluminum powder having an outer coating of aluminum oxide and molybdenum trioxide powder or a mixture of about 50 wt % aluminum powder having an outer coating of aluminum oxide and polytetrafluoroethylene powder. The aluminum powder, molybdenum trioxide powder and polytetrafluoroethylene powder has a particle size of 0.1 .mu.m or less, more preferably a particle size of from about 200-500 angstroms.

Dixon, George P. (Alexandria, VA); Martin, Joe A. (Espanola, NM); Thompson, Don (Ridgecrest, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Fuzzy Logic-Based State-of-Health Determination of Lead Acid Batteries Pritpal Singh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. A large valve-regulated lead acid (VRLA) battery bank provides sustained off-grid power for all 50 items shown above the distribution panel are physically separated from the user environment-DC converter and the VRLA batteries could all be significantly higher for a non- prototype system installed

Singh, Pritpal

25

Graphitic packing removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Microsoft Word - FOR WEB REMOVE EDIT - Royal Pacific 33004 based on Act One 49001 NPCP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(ceiling fans, ceiling fan light kits, medium base compact fluorescent lamps, illuminated exit signs) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-SE-33004 NOTICE OF PROPOSED CIVIL PENALTY Date issued: July 5, 2013 Number of alleged violations: 2,555 (7 basic models; 365 days) Maximum possible assessment: $511,000 Proposed civil penalty: $51,100 The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") Office of the General Counsel, Office of Enforcement, alleges that Royal Pacific, Ltd. ("Royal Pacific") has violated certain provisions of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, 42 U.S.C. § 6291 et seq. ("the Act"), and 10 C.F.R. § 429.12. Specifically, DOE alleges: 1. Royal Pacific has manufactured 1 a variety of medium base compact fluorescent lamps

27

Thermal lens study of thermo-optical properties and concentration quenching of Er3+-doped lead pyrophosphate based glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we have used the thermal lens technique combined with conventional spectroscopy to characterize the thermo-optical properties of Er3+-doped lead pyrophosphate-based glasses. More precisely, we have investigated and quantified experimentally the fluorescence quantum efficiencies of the Er3+ levels, and we describe the role of concentration quenching effects. The fluorescence quantum efficiency of the 4I13/2 level is very high when compared to other phosphate glasses, while that of the green-coupled levels is very small. Other important photonic materials parameters, such as the thermal diffusivity and temperature coefficient of the optical path length change, were obtained and compared with those of other glass systems. The cumulative results obtained here for the Er-doped lead pyrophosphate glass show that this material is a good candidate for photonic applications with a characteristic Er3+ infrared emission around 1550 nm.

Santos, C. C. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Ceara, Brazil; Rocha, U. [Grupo de Fotônica e Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Física, Brazil; Guedes, Ilde [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Ceara, Brazil; Vermelho, M. V. D. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Brazil; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Jacinto, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Brazil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Characterization of coastal urban watershed bacterial communities leads to alternative community-based indicators  

SciTech Connect

Microbial communities in aquatic environments are spatially and temporally dynamic due to environmental fluctuations and varied external input sources. A large percentage of the urban watersheds in the United States are affected by fecal pollution, including human pathogens, thus warranting comprehensive monitoring. Using a high-density microarray (PhyloChip), we examined water column bacterial community DNA extracted from two connecting urban watersheds, elucidating variable and stable bacterial subpopulations over a 3-day period and community composition profiles that were distinct to fecal and non-fecal sources. Two approaches were used for indication of fecal influence. The first approach utilized similarity of 503 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) common to all fecal samples analyzed in this study with the watershed samples as an index of fecal pollution. A majority of the 503 OTUs were found in the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The second approach incorporated relative richness of 4 bacterial classes (Bacilli, Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and a-proteobacteria) found to have the highest variance in fecal and non-fecal samples. The ratio of these 4 classes (BBC:A) from the watershed samples demonstrated a trend where bacterial communities from gut and sewage sources had higher ratios than from sources not impacted by fecal material. This trend was also observed in the 124 bacterial communities from previously published and unpublished sequencing or PhyloChip- analyzed studies. This study provided a detailed characterization of bacterial community variability during dry weather across a 3-day period in two urban watersheds. The comparative analysis of watershed community composition resulted in alternative community-based indicators that could be useful for assessing ecosystem health.

Wu, C.H.; Sercu, B.; Van De Werhorst, L.C.; Wong, J.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Hazen, T.C.; Holden, P.A.; Andersen, G.L.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Ion Removal  

INL’s ion removal technology leverages the ability of phosphazene polymers discriminate between water and metal ions, which allows water to pass ...

30

Analyzing the Limits and Extent of Alpha-Amylase Catalyzed Removal of Starch-Based Filter Cake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability of starch to impart functions including fluid-loss control, cuttings transport, and rheological characteristics to water-based drilling fluids has led to its widespread use in the oil industry. The filter cake deposited by these drilling fluids often employs sized solid particles and starch to inhibit fluid loss into the formation. This inherently causes damage to the formation by impairing the permeability and must be removed before production. An alpha-amylase enzyme treatment was found to provide an effective approach to degrading starch in filter cake. In this work, an alpha-amylase enzyme treatment was analyzed by determining the extent of degradation of starch in filter cake using the iodine test, identifying degradants using high performance liquid chromatography, spectrophotometrically monitoring the concentration of enzyme, and measuring the cleanup efficiency of the enzyme treatment using a static filter press apparatus. The alpha-amylase enzyme used in this study was found to have a molecular weight under 30,000. The activity of the alpha-amylase enzyme was found to be sensitive to pH and temperature. The alpha-amylase enzyme was found to denature at temperatures above 165 degrees F and reversibly deactivate at pH below 4. Optimal conditions for alpha-amylase activity were found to be 150 degrees F and pH 6.5. The enzyme treatment works by hydrolyzing the interior glycosidic bonds of amylose and amylopectin residues of starch, creating soluble poly- and oligosaccharides and glucose. The enzyme treatment did not dissolve the calcium carbonate sized solids and a 5 wt. % hydrochloric acid postflush was necessary. The cleanup efficiency of the enzyme at pH 6.5 and room temperature treatment in conjunction with the postflush in a static test was 73% at 10% v/v concentration. Degradants resulting from alpha-amylase were identified chromatographically. Enzyme concentration remained steady prior to and after treatment.

Dharwadkar, Pavan S.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Electrochemical Interpretation of a Stress Corrosion Cracking of Thermally Treated Ni base Alloys in a Lead Contaminated Water  

SciTech Connect

Since the PbSCC(Lead stress corrosion cracking) of alloy 600 tubing materials was reported by Copson and Dean in 1965, the effect of lead on a corrosion film and cracking morphology have been continually debated. An electrochemical interaction of lead with the alloying elements of SG tubings was studied and the corrosion products were analyzed. It was found that lead enhanced the anodic dissolution of alloy 600 and alloy 690 in the electrochemical test. The lead preferentially dissolved the Cr from the corrosion film of alloy 600 and alloy 690 in alkaline water. The lead ion seemed to penetrate into the TG crack tip and react with the corrosion film. A selective Cr depletion was observed to weaken the stability of the passive film on the alloys. Whereas passivity of Ni became stable in lead containing solution, Cr and Fe passivity became unstable.

Hwang, Seong Sik; Lim, Yun Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Kim, Joung Soo; Thomas, Larry E.

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

32

The Influence of Lewis Acid/Base Chemistry on the Removal of Gallium by Volatility from Weapons-Grade Plutonium Dissolved in Molten Chlorides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been proposed that GaCl{sub 3} can be removed by direct volatilization from a Pu-Ga alloy that is dissolved in a molten chloride salt. Although pure GaCl{sub 3} is quite volatile (boiling point: 201 deg. C), the behavior of GaCl{sub 3} dissolved in chloride salts is quite different because of solution effects and is critically dependent upon the composition of the solvent salt (i.e., its Lewis acid/base character). In this technical note, the behavior of gallium in prototypical Lewis acid and Lewis base salts is contrasted. It is found that gallium volatility is suppressed in basic melts and promoted in acidic melts. These results have an important influence on the potential for simple gallium removal in molten salt systems.

Williams, David F.; Cul, Guillermo D. del [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Toth, Louis M. [Electrochemical Systems (United States); Collins, Emory D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Development of an Integrated Multi-Contaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project met the objective to further the development of an integrated multi-contaminant removal process in which H2S, NH3, HCl and heavy metals including Hg, As, Se and Cd present in the coal-derived syngas can be removed to specified levels in a single/integrated process step. The process supports the mission and goals of the Department of Energyâ??s Gasification Technologies Program, namely to enhance the performance of gasification systems, thus enabling U.S. industry to improve the competitiveness of gasification-based processes. The gasification program will reduce equipment costs, improve process environmental performance, and increase process reliability and flexibility. Two sulfur conversion concepts were tested in the laboratory under this project, i.e., the solventbased, high-pressure University of California Sulfur Recovery Process â?? High Pressure (UCSRP-HP) and the catalytic-based, direct oxidation (DO) section of the CrystaSulf-DO process. Each process required a polishing unit to meet the ultra-clean sulfur content goals of <50 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) as may be necessary for fuel cells or chemical production applications. UCSRP-HP was also tested for the removal of trace, non-sulfur contaminants, including ammonia, hydrogen chloride, and heavy metals. A bench-scale unit was commissioned and limited testing was performed with simulated syngas. Aspen-Plus®-based computer simulation models were prepared and the economics of the UCSRP-HP and CrystaSulf-DO processes were evaluated for a nominal 500 MWe, coal-based, IGCC power plant with carbon capture. This report covers the progress on the UCSRP-HP technology development and the CrystaSulf-DO technology.

Howard Meyer

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Combustion systems and power plants incorporating parallel carbon dioxide capture and sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein are combustion systems and power plants that incorporate sweep-based membrane separation units to remove carbon dioxide from combustion gases. In its most basic embodiment, the invention is a combustion system that includes three discrete units: a combustion unit, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In a preferred embodiment, the invention is a power plant including a combustion unit, a power generation system, a carbon dioxide capture unit, and a sweep-based membrane separation unit. In both of these embodiments, the carbon dioxide capture unit and the sweep-based membrane separation unit are configured to be operated in parallel, by which we mean that each unit is adapted to receive exhaust gases from the combustion unit without such gases first passing through the other unit.

Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

35

MERCURY REMOVAL IN A NON-THERMAL, PLASMA-BASED MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

This technical report describes the results from Task 1 of the Cooperative Agreement. Powerspan has installed, tested, and validated Hg SCEMS systems for measuring oxidized and elemental mercury at the pilot facility at R.E. Burger Generating Station in Shadyside, Ohio. When operating properly, these systems are capable of providing near real-time monitoring of inlet and outlet gas flow streams and are capable of extracting samples from different locations to characterize mercury removal at these different ECO process stages. This report discusses the final configuration of the Hg CEM systems and the operating protocols that increase the reliability of the HG SCEM measurements. Documentation on the testing done to verify the operating protocols is also provided. In addition the report provides details on the protocols developed and used for measurement of mercury in process liquid streams and in captured ash.

Matthew B. Loomis

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A thyratron-based pulse generator for fundamental studies of NO{sub x} removal in nonthermal plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In collaboration with the Army Research Laboratory (ARL), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and McMaster University, the authors are investigating the removal of NOx from engine exhaust streams using nonthermal plasmas (NTPs). The near-term experiments focus on measuring temperature distributions and reactive species concentrations in electric discharge NTP reactors using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), with first experiments on LIF measurements of OH in a pulsed dielectric-barrier discharge. Because the self extinguishing microdischarges in a conventional (low frequency driven) barrier discharge are both short lived (a few to a few tens of nanoseconds) and randomly distributed in the process volume, it is difficult to measure the time-varying properties of the species produced by the plasma. To synchronize the plasma ignition with the optical diagnostics, a thyratron switched, high voltage pulse generator has been constructed to drive a small dielectric-barrier plasma cell. A fast rise time thyratron tube is used in a low inductance geometry to deliver a negative high voltage pulse to the cell. The output voltage pulse has a rise time of 6.5 ns, a peak voltage of 40 kV, and a repetition rate of 20 Hz. A microdischarge streamer occurs between the pin electrode and the glass barrier during the rise time of the voltage pulse. The delay between the input signal and the microdischarge is 250 ns with a jitter of 4 ns, thus allowing repetitive initiation of a microdischarge with low temporal jitter. The energy per pulse is obtained from the voltage and current versus time, v(t) and i(t), measured at the cell. The fast rising pulse also produces a higher E/N at breakdown in the discharge than in conventional NTP cells, which may affect the removal efficiency of pollutants.

Korzekwa, R.A.; Rosocha, L.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Grain growth kinetics and electrical properties of lanthanum modified lead zirconate titanate (9/65/35) based ferroelectric ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the microstructural characteristics on the dielectric and electrical properties has been investigated for Nd{sup 3+} doped lanthanum modified lead zirconate titanate ferroelectric ceramics, obtained by the conventional solid-state reaction method, by taking into account different sintering conditions. The grain growth mechanism has been investigated and a cubic-type grain growth law was observed for samples with grain size varying from 1.00 up to 2.35 {mu}m. The porosity and grain size dependences of the phase transition parameters, such as the maximum dielectric permittivity and its corresponding temperature ({epsilon}{sub m} and T{sub m}, respectively) were also investigated. The ac conductivity analyses followed the universal Jonscher law. The behavior of the frequency exponent (s) was analyzed through the correlated barrier hopping model. Both ac and dc conductivity results have been correlated with the observed microstructural features.

Roca, R. Alvarez; Guerrero, F. [Departamento de Fisica, Grupo de Ceramicas Ferroeletricas, UFSCar, Rod. Washington Luis, Km 235, CEP 13565-905 Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad de Oriente, 90500 Santiago de Cuba (Cuba); Botero, E. R.; Garcia, D.; Eiras, J. A. [Departamento de Fisica, Grupo de Ceramicas Ferroeletricas, UFSCar, Rod. Washington Luis, Km 235, CEP 13565-905 Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Guerra, J. D. S. [Grupo de Ferroeletricos e Materiais Multifuncionais, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, 38400-902 Uberlandia, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Lead Authors:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper has undertaken a review of current and future costs of three forms of renewable energy technology, comparing data from a range of international and Australian-specific studies, taking care to compare data on the same basis of financial assumptions (discount rates) and resource quality. The purpose was to compare both the current costs, along with the rate of decrease, and the reason for differences between the studies. The Australian-specific datasets are the ‘Australian Energy Generation Technology Costs ’ report by EPRI, and the 2010 dataset used by the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO), largely based on the EPRI data with a review from ACIL Tasman. The assessment reviewed technical and economic parameters of wind, photovoltaic and solar thermal energy generation technologies, considering technology specific learning rates and cost reduction potentials. It includes a detailed exploration of the factors contributing to the learning rates and cost reductions. Common financial assumptions (in particular discounting rates) are used, to provide a common basis of comparisons and analysis. These parameters were utilized in Levelised Cost of Energy (LCOE) calculations to develop cost outlooks, and compare the outlooks to other projections. Where relevant, LCOE is calculated from capital & operating cost data at a common renewable resource

Patrick Hearps; Dylan Mcconnell

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Magnetic Particle-Based Immunoassay of Phosphorylated p53 Using Protein-Cage Templated Lead Phosphate and Carbon Nanospheres for Signal Amplification  

SciTech Connect

Phosphorylated p53 at serin 15 (phospho-p53-15) is a potential biomarker of Gamma-radiation exposure. In this paper, we described a new magnetic particles (MPs)-based electrochemical immunoassay of human phospho-p53-15 using carbon nanospheres (CNS) and protein-cage templated lead phosphate nanoparticles for signal amplification. Greatly enhanced sensitivity was achieved by three aspects: 1) The protein-cage nanoparticle (PCN) and p53-15 signal antibody (p53-15 Ab2) are linked to CNS (PCNof each apoferritin; 3) MPs capture a large amount of primary antibodies. Using apoferritin templated metallic phosphate instead of enzyme as label has the advantage of eliminating the addition of mediator or immunoreagents and thus makes the immunoassay system simpler. The subsequent stripping voltammetric analysis of the released lead ions were detected on a disposable screen printed electrode. The response current was proportional to the phospho-p53-15 concentration in the range of 0.02 to 20 ng mL-1 with detection limit of 0.01 ng mL-1. This method shows a good stability, reproducibility and recovery.

Chen, Aiqiong; Bao, Yuanwu; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Shin, Yongsoon; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

40

Anaerobic microbial dissolution of lead and production of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method of solubilizing lead, in the form of lead oxide, found in industrial wastes, before these wastes are dumped into the environment. The lead is solubilized by dissolving the lead oxide in the wastes through contact with an anaerobic bacterial culture containing the bacterium ATCC No. 53464. The solubilized lead can then be removed from the wastes by chemical separation. It could also be removed by extending the contact period with the bacterial culture. As the culture grows, the solubilized lead is removed from the wastes by bioaccumulation by the microorganism or by immobilization by a polymer-like material produced by the microorganism. At this point, the lead is then removed from the wastes when the waste material is separated from the bacterial culture. If desired, the bacterial culture could be digested at this point to yield relatively pure lead for further industrial use.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.; Chendrayan, K.

1986-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Turbomachinery debris remover  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for removing debris from a turbomachine. The apparatus includes housing and remotely operable viewing and grappling mechanisms for the purpose of locating and removing debris lodged between adjacent blades in a turbomachine.

Krawiec, Donald F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kraf, Robert J. (North Huntingdon, PA); Houser, Robert J. (Monroeville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Engine Removal Projection Tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Navy has over 3500 gas turbine engines used throughout the surface fleet for propulsion and the generation of electrical power. Past data is used to forecast the number of engine removals for the next ten years and determine engine down times between removals. Currently this is done via a FORTRAN program created in the early 1970s. This paper presents results of R&D associated with creating a new algorithm and software program. We tested over 60 techniques on data spanning 20 years from over 3100 engines and 120 ships. Investigated techniques for the forecast basis including moving averages, empirical negative binomial, generalized linear models, Cox regression, and Kaplan Meier survival curves, most of which are documented in engineering, medical and scientific research literature. We applied those techniques to the data, and chose the best algorithm based on its performance on real-world data. The software uses the best algorithm in combination with user-friendly interfaces and intuitively understandable displays. The user can select a specific engine type, forecast time period, and op-tempo. Graphical displays and numerical tables present forecasts and uncertainty intervals. The technology developed for the project is applicable to other logistic forecasting challenges.

Ferryman, Thomas A.; Matzke, Brett D.; Wilson, John E.; Sharp, Julia L.; Greitzer, Frank L.

2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

43

Improved sulfur removal processes evaluated for IGCC  

SciTech Connect

An inherent advantage of Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electric power generation is the ability to easily remove and recover sulfur. During the last several years, a number of new, improved sulfur removal and recovery processes have been commercialized. An assessment is given of alternative sulfur removal processes for IGCC based on the Texaco coal gasifier. The Selexol acid gas removal system, Claus sulfur recovery, and SCOT tail gas treating are currently used in Texaco-based IGCC. Other processes considered are: Purisol, Sulfinol-M, Selefning, 50% MDEA, Sulften, and LO-CAT. 2 tables.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Part 3: Removal Action | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Removal Action 3: Removal Action Part 3: Removal Action Question: When may removal actions be initiated? Answer: Removal actions may be initiated when DOE determines that the action will prevent, minimize, stabilize, or eliminate a risk to health or the environment. The NCP specifies that the determination that a risk to health or the environment is appropriate for removal action should be based on: actual or potential exposure of humans, animals, or the food chain the presence of contained hazardous substances that pose a threat of release the threat of migration of the hazardous substances the threat of fire or explosion the availability of an appropriate Federal or State response capability [section 300.415(b)(2)]. In essence, where DOE identifies a threat of exposure to or migration of

45

Device for removing blackheads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for removing blackheads from pores in the skin having a elongated handle with a spoon shaped portion mounted on one end thereof, the spoon having multiple small holes piercing therethrough. Also covered is method for using the device to remove blackheads.

Berkovich, Tamara (116 N. Wetherly Dr., Suite 115, Los Angeles, CA)

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

46

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal silica using small gel particles. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Silica Scaling Removal Process Applications: Cooling tower systems Water treatment systems Water evaporation systems Potential mining applications (produced water) Industry applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits: Reduces scaling in cooling towers by up to 50% Increases the number of cycles of concentration substantially Reduces the amount of antiscaling chemical additives needed Decreases the amount of makeup water and subsequent discharged water (blowdown) Enables considerable cost savings derived from reductions in

47

Drinking Water Problems: Lead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead in drinking water can damage the brain, kidneys, nervous system and red blood cells. This publication explains how lead can enter drinking water, how to have your water tested, and how to eliminate lead from drinking water.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

Getting the Lead Out  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Discarded electronics no longer pose an environmental hazard from lead solder thanks to a lead-free alternative developed at the Ames Laboratory.

Gibson, Kerry

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

49

Refining of Recycled Lead  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...pure lead generally goes into nonbattery sources such as sheet, pipe, cable, and gasoline additives. The pure lead for battery oxide is generally supplied by primary-lead smelters. In the United States, maintenance-free batteries with lead-calcium alloy grids make up about 30% of the market, and...

50

Continuous sulfur removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream using a membrane comprising a metal oxide deposited on a porous support is disclosed. 4 figures.

Jalan, V.; Ryu, J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

51

ADVANCES IN HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for conversion to the new resin. This paper will describe the results of the testing, performance in the facilities, continued optimization in the pump and treat facilities, and the estimated savings and non-tangible benefits of the conversion.

NESHEM DO; RIDDELLE J

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Hematology of lead poisoning in the dog  

SciTech Connect

Dogs of all ages are subject to poisoning by lead but it is the growing dog of less than one year of age that is commonly involved in lead intoxication. The habit of chewing on objects of all kinds, particularly during the teething period, may bring the dog in contact with a sufficient amount of lead to produce acute or chronic poisoning. Lead based paint on wood, paper, and brushes is probably the most common source of lead for young dogs. Linoleum scraps and lead weights have also served to produce lead intoxication.

Schalm, O.W.; Holliday, T.A.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Removable feedwater sparger assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A removable feedwater sparger assembly includes a sparger having an inlet pipe disposed in flow communication with the outlet end of a supply pipe. A tubular coupling includes an annular band fixedly joined to the sparger inlet pipe and a plurality of fingers extending from the band which are removably joined to a retention flange extending from the supply pipe for maintaining the sparger inlet pipe in flow communication with the supply pipe. The fingers are elastically deflectable for allowing engagement of the sparger inlet pipe with the supply pipe and for disengagement therewith. 8 figs.

Challberg, R.C.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

54

Selective Removal of Thiophene from Liquid Fuels over Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Selective Removal of Thiophene from Liquid Fuels over Nickel -Based Nanocrystalline Zinc Oxide. Author(s), Mohammad Rafiqul Islam, Jewel ...

55

Multi-lead heat sink  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to a heat sink used to protect integrated circuits from the heat resulting from soldering them to circuit boards. A tubular housing contains a slidable member which engages somewhat inwardly extending connecting rods, each of which is rotatably attached at one end to the bottom of the housing. The other end of each rod is fastened to an expandable coil spring loop. As the member is pushed downward in the housing, its bottom edge engages and forces outward the connecting rods, thereby expanding the spring so that it will fit over an integrated circuit. After the device is in place, the member is slid upward and the spring contracts about the leads of the integrated circuit. Soldering is now conducted and the spring absorbs excess heat therefrom to protect the integrated circuit. The placement steps are repeated in reverse order to remove the heat sink for use again. 4 figs.

Roose, L.D.

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

56

Multi-lead heat sink  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to a heat sink used to protect integrated circuits from the heat resulting from soldering them to circuit boards. A tubular housing contains a slidable member which engages somewhat inwardly extending connecting rods, each of which is rotatably attached at one end to the bottom of the housing. The other end of each rod is fastened to an expandable coil spring loop. As the member is pushed downward in the housing, its bottom edge engages and forces outward the connecting rods, thereby expanding the spring so that it will fit over an integrated circuit. After the device is in place, the member is slid upward and the spring contracts about the leads of the integrated circuit. Soldering is now conducted and the spring absorbs excess heat therefrom to protect the integrated circuit. The placement steps are repeated in reverse order to remove the heat sink for use again.

Roose, L.D.

1982-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

57

Multi-lead heat sink  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to a heat sink used to protect integrated circuits from the heat resulting from soldering them to circuit boards. A tubular housing contains a slidable member which engages somewhat inwardly extending connecting rods, each of which is rotatably attached at one end to the bottom of the housing. The other end of each rod is fastened to an expandable coil spring loop. As the member is pushed downward in the housing, its bottom edge engages and forces outward the connecting rods, thereby expanding the spring so that it will fit over an integrated circuit. After the device is in place, the member is slid upward and the spring contracts about the leads of the integrated circuit. Soldering is now conducted and the spring absorbs excess heat therefrom to protect the integrated circuit. The placement steps are repeated in reverse order to remove the heat sink for use again.

Roose, Lars D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Site Lead TQP Standard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Qualification Standard for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Program May 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and...

59

Lead Zinc and Tin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"High Temperature Lead-free Solder for Microelectronics" (Overview), Frank R. Gayle, Gary Becka, Jerry Badgett, Gordon Whitten, Tsung-Yu Pan, Angela Grusd,

60

DOE Removes Brookhaven Contractor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Removes DOE Removes Brookhaven Contractor Peña sends a message to DOE facilities nationwide INSIDE 2 Accelerator Rx 4 FermiKids 6 Spring at Fermilab Photos courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory by Judy Jackson, Office of Public Affairs Secretary of Energy Federico Peña announced on Thursday, May 1, that the Department of Energy would immediately terminate the current management contract with Associated Universities, Inc. at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York. Peña said that he made the decision after receiving the results of a laboratory safety management review conducted by the independent oversight arm of DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. In addition, the Secretary said he found unacceptable "the continued on page 8 Volume 20 Friday, May 16, 1997

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

Neuhaus, J.E.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

High-temperature superconducting current leads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) for current leads to deliver power to devices at liquid helium temperature can reduce refrigeration requirements to values significantly below those achievable with conventional leads. HTS leads are now near commercial realization. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed a sinter-forge process to fabricate current leads from bismuth-based superconductors. The current-carrying capacity of these leads is five times better than that of HTS leads made by a conventional fabrication process. ANL along with Superconductivity, Inc., has developed a 1500 ampere current lead for an existing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) device. With Babcock & Wilcox Company, Argonne is creating 16-kiloampere leads for use in a 0.5 MWh SMES. In a third project Argonne performed characterization testing of a existing, proprietary conduction-cooled lead being developed by Zer Res Corp.

Niemann, R.C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Lead carbonate scintillator materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

Derenzo, Stephen E. (Pinole, CA); Moses, William W. (Berkeley, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Specifications for Recycled Lead  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...in lead are antimony, arsenic, bismuth, copper, nickel, silver, tin, and zinc. Recently, selenium and tellurium have been added as important impurities in the United States. Primary-lead companies generally produce the 99.99% Pb grade, whereas recyclers produce the 99.97% Pb grade. The major difference...

66

Production of Recycled Lead  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...production of lead from recycled and mined (primary) sources for 1980 to 1988. At present, just under half of the total world lead production of 4.3 million metric tons (4.7 million tons) comes from recycling of scrap materials. As indicated in Table 4, there has been very little change in recent...

67

Properties of Lead  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Typical room-temperature tensile properties of selected lead alloys...strip (c) 70 10 10 â?¦ Cast battery grid (L50775)/fully aged, air cooled 41â??45 6.0â??6.5 20â??35 90â??95 HR (d) High-strength casting (L50790)/fully aged, air cooled 52â??55 7.5â??8.0 20â??35 90â??95 HR (d) Chemical lead (L51120)/rolled sheet 18â??20 2.6â??2.96 42â??52 75â??84 HR (d) Hard lead, 96-4...

68

Site Lead TQP Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualification Standard for the Qualification Standard for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Program May 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy 1 Qualification Standard for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Program A Site Lead is an individual, normally at a senior General Schedule (GS) level or Excepted Service, who is assigned the responsibility to assess and evaluate management systems, safety and health programs, and technical activities associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. Typically, a Site Lead has previously qualified as a Nuclear Safety Specialist or a Senior Technical Safety Manager. For exceptionally qualified individuals,

69

Leading Testing Laboratories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fax: 86-20-6196-8925 E-Mail: york.li@ledtestlab.com Send E-Mail to Laboratory: Leading Testing Laboratories ... [22/S14] EPA Integral LED Lamps v ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

70

Nitrogen removal from natural gas  

SciTech Connect

According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

Urban, P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator value mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, J.F.

1991-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

73

Soluble Lead Flow Battery: Soluble Lead Flow Battery Technology  

SciTech Connect

GRIDS Project: General Atomics is developing a flow battery technology based on chemistry similar to that used in the traditional lead-acid battery found in nearly every car on the road today. Flow batteries store energy in chemicals that are held in tanks outside the battery. When the energy is needed, the chemicals are pumped through the battery. Using the same basic chemistry as a traditional battery but storing its energy outside of the cell allows for the use of very low cost materials. The goal is to develop a system that is far more durable than today’s lead-acid batteries, can be scaled to deliver megawatts of power, and which lowers the cost of energy storage below $100 per kilowatt hour.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Trunnion Collar Removal Machine - Gap Analysis Table  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to review the existing the trunnion collar removal machine against the ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (NSDB) [Ref. 10] requirements and to identify codes and standards and supplemental requirements to meet these requirements. If these codes and standards can not fully meet these requirements then a ''gap'' is identified. These gaps will be identified here and addressed using the ''Trunnion Collar Removal Machine Design Development Plan'' [Ref. 15]. The codes and standards, supplemental requirements, and design development requirements for the trunnion collar removal machine are provided in the gap analysis table (Appendix A, Table 1). Because the trunnion collar removal machine is credited with performing functions important to safety (ITS) in the NSDB [Ref. 10], design basis requirements are applicable to ensure equipment is available and performs required safety functions when needed. The gap analysis table is used to identify design objectives and provide a means to satisfy safety requirements. To ensure that the trunnion collar removal machine performs required safety functions and meets performance criteria, this portion of the gap analysis tables supplies codes and standards sections and the supplemental requirements and identifies design development requirements, if needed.

M. Johnson

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

75

Removal to Maximum Extent Practical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary Notes from 1 November 2007 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Removal of Highly Radioactive Radionuclides/Key Radionuclides to the Maximum Extent Practical

76

A Method for Noise Removal of LIDAR Point Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LiDAR can quickly and accurately obtain precision and high-density surface elevation data. In cooperation with high-precision GPS positioning technology and IMU attitude sensor, a typical noise removal algorithm of LIDAR point clouds based on FEA is ... Keywords: LIDAR, point clouds, noise removal, FEA

Huang Zuowei, Huang Yuanjiang, Huang Jie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Medium Power Lead Alloy Reactors: Missions for this Reactor Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiyear project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology investigated the potential of medium-power lead-alloy-cooled technology to perform two missions: (1) the production of low-cost electricity and (2) the burning of actinides from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The goal of achieving a high power level to enhance economic performance simultaneously with adoption of passive decay heat removal and modularity capabilities resulted in designs in the range of 600-800 MW(thermal), which we classify as a medium power level compared to the lower [~100 MW(thermal)] and higher [2800 MW(thermal)] power ratings of other lead-alloy-cooled designs. The plant design that was developed shows promise of achieving all the Generation-IV goals for future nuclear energy systems: sustainable energy generation, low overnight capital cost, a very low likelihood and degree of core damage during any conceivable accident, and a proliferation-resistant fuel cycle. The reactor and fuel cycle designs that evolved to achieve these missions and goals resulted from study of the following key trade-offs: waste reduction versus reactor safety, waste reduction versus cost, and cost versus proliferation resistance. Secondary trade-offs that were also considered were monolithic versus modular design, active versus passive safety systems, forced versus natural circulation, alternative power conversion cycles, and lead versus lead-bismuth coolant. These studies led to a selection of a common modular design with forced convection cooling, passive decay heat removal, and a supercritical CO2 power cycle for all our reactor concepts. However, the concepts adopt different core designs to optimize the achievement of the two missions. For the low-cost electricity production mission, a design approach based on fueling with low enriched uranium operating without costly reprocessing in a once-through cycle was pursued to achieve a long operating cycle length by enhancing in-core breeding. For the actinide-burning mission three design variants were produced: (1) a fertile-free actinide burner, i.e., a single-tier strategy, (2) a minor actinide burner with plutonium burned in the LWR fleet, i.e., a two-tier strategy, and (3) an actinide burner with characteristics balanced to also favor economic electricity production.

Neil E. Todreas; Philip E. MacDonald; Pavel Hejzlar; Jacopo Buongiorno; Eric Loewen

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Improved Lining Material for Gasifiers Could Lead to Wider  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improved Lining Material for Gasifiers Could Lead to Wider Improved Lining Material for Gasifiers Could Lead to Wider Commercialization of Clean and Efficient Energy Technology Improved Lining Material for Gasifiers Could Lead to Wider Commercialization of Clean and Efficient Energy Technology November 16, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Refractories removed from adjacent positions in a slagging gasifier. The NETL refractory (right) has approximately 50 percent more material remaining after the test. Refractories removed from adjacent positions in a slagging gasifier. The NETL refractory (right) has approximately 50 percent more material remaining after the test. Washington, DC - A new improved-performance refractory lining material developed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been successfully tested and could lead to greatly

79

Improved Lining Material for Gasifiers Could Lead to Wider  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improved Lining Material for Gasifiers Could Lead to Wider Improved Lining Material for Gasifiers Could Lead to Wider Commercialization of Clean and Efficient Energy Technology Improved Lining Material for Gasifiers Could Lead to Wider Commercialization of Clean and Efficient Energy Technology November 16, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Refractories removed from adjacent positions in a slagging gasifier. The NETL refractory (right) has approximately 50 percent more material remaining after the test. Refractories removed from adjacent positions in a slagging gasifier. The NETL refractory (right) has approximately 50 percent more material remaining after the test. Washington, DC - A new improved-performance refractory lining material developed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been successfully tested and could lead to greatly

80

Lead magnesium niobate actuator for micropositioning  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved lead magnesium niobate actuator is disclosed comprising a cylindrical lead magnesium niobate crystal stack mounted in a cylindrical casing wherein a bias means, such as one or more belleville washers, is located between one end of the crystal stack and a partially closed end of the casing; and adjustment means are provided which bear against the opposite end of the crystal stack, whereby an adjustable compressive force is constantly applied against the crystal stack, whether the crystal stack is actuated in an extended position, or is in an unactuated contracted position. In a preferred embodiment, cooling ports are provided for the circulation of coolant in the actuator to cool the crystal stack, and provision is made for removal and replacement of the crystal stack without disconnecting the actuator from the external device being actuated. 3 figs.

Swift, C.D.; Bergum, J.W.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

82

Method to remove uranium/vanadium contamination from groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R. (DeBeque, CO); Morrison, Stanley (Grand Junction, CO)

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

83

CRBRP decay heat removal systems  

SciTech Connect

The Decay Heat Removal Systems for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) are designed to adequately remove sensible and decay heat from the reactor following normal shutdown, operational occurrences, and postulated accidents on both a short term and a long term basis. The Decay Heat Removal Systems are composed of the Main Heat Transport System, the Main Condenser and Feedwater System, the Steam Generator Auxiliary Heat Removal System (SGAHRS), and the Direct Heat Removal Service (DHRS). The overall design of the CRBRP Decay Heat Removal Systems and the operation under normal and off-normal conditions is examined. The redundancies of the system design, such as the four decay heat removal paths, the emergency diesel power supplies, and the auxiliary feedwater pumps, and the diversities of the design such as forced circulation/natural circulation and AC Power/DC Power are presented. In addition to overall design and system capabilities, the detailed designs for the Protected Air Cooled Condensers (PACC) and the Air Blast Heat Exchangers (ABHX) are presented.

Hottel, R.E.; Louison, R.; Boardman, C.E.; Kiley, M.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Article removal device for glovebox  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article removal device for a glovebox is described comprising a conduit extending through a glovebox wall which may be closed by a plug within the glovebox, and a fire-resistant container closing the outer end of the conduit and housing a removable container for receiving pyrophoric or otherwise hazardous material without disturbing the interior environment of the glovebox or adversely affecting the environment outside of the glovebox. (Official Gazette)

Guyer, R.H.; Leebl, R.G.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Spray forming lead strip. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A cooperative research project was conducted between the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Johnson Controls, Inc. (JCI) to adapt the INEL spray forming process to produce near-net-shape lead alloy strip. The emphasis of the work was to spray form lead strip samples at INEL, using a variety of spray conditions, for characterization at JCI. An existing glove box apparatus was modified at INEL to spray form lead. The main spray forming components were housed inside the glove box. They included a spray nozzle, tundish (crucible), substrate assembly, gas heater and furnaces to heat the nozzle and tundish. To spray form metal strip, liquid metal was pressure-fed at a controlled rate through a series of circular orifices that span the width of the nozzle. There the metal contacted high velocity, high temperature inert gas (nitrogen) which atomized the molten material into fine droplets, entrained the droplets in a directed flow, and deposited them onto glass plates that were swept through the spray plume to form strip samples. In-flight convection cooling of the droplets followed by conduction and convection cooling at the substrate resulted in rapid solidification of the deposit. During operation, the inside of the glove box was purged with an inert gas to limit the effects of in-flight oxidation of the particles and spray-formed strips, as well as to protect personnel from exposure to airborne lead particulate. Remote controls were used to start/stop the spray and control the speed and position of the substrate. In addition, substrate samples were loaded into the substrate translator manually using the gloved side ports of the box. In this way, the glove box remained closed during a series of spray trials, and was opened only when loading the crucible with a lead charge or when removing lead strip samples for shipment to JCI.

McHugh, K.

1996-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

86

IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the second year of this project, we continued our effort to develop low temperature decarboxylation catalysts and investigate the behavior of these catalysts at different reaction conditions. We conducted a large number of dynamic measurements with crude oil and model compounds to obtain the information at different reaction stages, which was scheduled as the Task2 in our work plan. We developed a novel adsorption method to remove naphthenic acid from crude oil using naturally occurring materials such as clays. Our results show promise as an industrial application. The theoretical modeling proposed several possible reaction pathways and predicted the reactivity depending on the catalysts employed. From all of these studies, we obtained more comprehensive understanding about catalytic decarboxylation and oil upgrading based on the naphthenic acid removal concept.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang, William A. Goddard, Yongchun Tang

2005-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

87

Removal - An alternative to clearance  

SciTech Connect

This presentation shows the differences between the application of clearance and removal, both being procedures for materials leaving radiation protection areas permanently. The differentiation will be done on the basis of the German legislation but may be also applicable for other national legislation. For clearance in Germany two basic requirements must be given, i.e. that the materials are activated or contaminated and that they result from the licensed use or can be assigned to the scope of the license. Clearance needs not to be applied to objects in Germany which are to be removed only temporarily from controlled areas with the purpose of repair or reuse in other controlled areas. In these cases only the requirements of contamination control apply. In the case of removal it must either be proved by measurements that the relevant materials are neither activated nor contaminated or that the materials result from areas where activation or contamination is impossible due to the operational history considering operational procedures and events. If the material is considered neither activated nor contaminated there is no need for a clearance procedure. Therefore, these materials can be removed from radiation protection areas and the removal is in the responsibility of the licensee. Nevertheless, the removal procedure and the measuring techniques to be applied for the different types of materials need an agreement from the competent authority. In Germany a maximum value of 10% of the clearance values has been established in different licenses as a criterion for the application of removal. As approximately 2/3 of the total mass of a nuclear power plant is not expected to be contaminated or activated there is a need for such a procedure of removal for this non contaminated material without any regulatory control especially in the case of decommissioning. A remarkable example is NPP Stade where in the last three years more than 8600 Mg were disposed of by removal and only 315 Mg were released by clearance, even before the decommissioning licensing procedure was finished. (authors)

Feinhals, J.; Kelch, A. [TUV NORD SysTec GmbH and Co. KG, Hamburg (Germany); Kunze, V. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Salzgitter (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored pulse designed for high transmission through the atmosphere, as well as efficient ablative coupling to the target. The main amplifier would use either diode-pumped or flashlamp-pumped solid state gain media, depending on budget constraints of the project. A continuously operating system would use the gas-cooled amplifier technology developed for Mercury, while a burst-mode option would use the heat capacity laser technology. The ground-based system that we propose is capable of rapid engagement of targets whose orbits cross over the site, with potential for kill on a single pass. Very little target mass is ablated per pulse so the potential to create additional hazardous orbiting debris is minimal. Our cost estimates range from $2500 to $5000 per J depending on choices for laser gain medium, amplifier pump source, and thermal management method. A flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass heat-capacity laser operating in the burst mode would have costs at the lower end of this spectrum and would suffice to demonstrate the efficacy of this approach as a prototype system. A diode-pumped, gas-cooled laser would have higher costs but could be operated continuously, and might be desirable for more demanding mission needs. Maneuverability can be incorporated in the system design if the additional cost is deemed acceptable. The laser system would need to be coupled with a target pointing and tracking telescope with guide-star-like wavefront correction capability.

Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored pulse designed for high transmission through the atmosphere, as well as efficient ablative coupling to the target. The main amplifier would use either diode-pumped or flashlamp-pumped solid state gain media, depending on budget constraints of the project. A continuously operating system would use the gas-cooled amplifier technology developed for Mercury, while a burst-mode option would use the heat capacity laser technology. The ground-based system that we propose is capable of rapid engagement of targets whose orbits cross over the site, with potential for kill on a single pass. Very little target mass is ablated per pulse so the potential to create additional hazardous orbiting debris is minimal. Our cost estimates range from $2500 to $5000 per J depending on choices for laser gain medium, amplifier pump source, and thermal management method. A flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass heat-capacity laser operating in the burst mode would have costs at the lower end of this spectrum and would suffice to demonstrate the efficacy of this approach as a prototype system. A diode-pumped, gas-cooled laser would have higher costs but could be operated continuously, and might be desirable for more demanding mission needs. Maneuverability can be incorporated in the system design if the additional cost is deemed acceptable. The laser system would need to be coupled with a target pointing and tracking telescope with guide-star-like wavefront correction capability.

Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

Lead-free solder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Sn--Ag--Cu eutectic alloy is modified with one or more low level and low cost alloy additions to enhance high temperature microstructural stability and thermal-mechanical fatigue strength without decreasing solderability. Purposeful fourth or fifth element additions in the collective amount not exceeding about 1 weight % (wt. %) are added to Sn--Ag--Cu eutectic solder alloy based on the ternary eutectic Sn--4.7%Ag--1.7%Cu (wt. %) and are selected from the group consisting essentially of Ni, Fe, and like-acting elements as modifiers of the intermetallic interface between the solder and substrate to improve high temperature solder joint microstructural stability and solder joint thermal-mechanical fatigue strength.

Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Large Component Removal/Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

Wheeler, D. M.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

92

Multipollutant Removal with WOWClean® System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WOW Energy built and tested its multipollutant removal WOWClean® system in a development program with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). A 2,500 ACFM mobile unit was built to field test the removal of air pollution constituents from the flue gas of a power plant and demonstrate the technology. The system integrates proven emission reduction techniques into a single, multi-pollutant reduction system and is designed to remove Mercury, SOx, NOx, particulates, heavy metals and other pollutants from low temperature flue gases. Its advantages include robust operation, lower investment, lower operating cost and high removal rates. The WOWClean® system has been tested on flue gases resulting from the combustion of diverse fuels such as petcoke, coal, wood, diesel and natural gas. In addition to significant removal of CO2, test results demonstrate the capability to reduce 99.5% SOx (from levels as high as 2200 ppm), 90% reduction of NOx, and > 90% heavy metals. The paper will include details of the multi-pollutant system along with test results.

Romero, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removal NNSANews posted a photo: Vietnam HEU Removal A truck carrying the last highly enriched uranium in Vietnam winds through the Vietnamese countryside. Facebook Twitter Youtube...

94

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

95

Lead-free Technology Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lead-free Technology Workshop. Sponsored by: The TMS Electronic, Magnetic & Photonic Materials Division (EMPMD) Date: Sunday, February 13, 2005

96

Federal Agencies Leading by Example  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Article on Federal agencies leading by example with water efficiency and conservation efforts. Prepared for Colorado WaterWise Newsletter.

McMordie-Stoughton, Katherine L.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Metals removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); Von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Actinide removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

100

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Closure device for lead-acid batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A closure device for lead-acid batteries includes a filter of granulated activated carbon treated to be hydrophobic combined with means for preventing explosion of emitted hydrogen and oxygen gas. The explosion prevention means includes a vertical open-end tube within the closure housing for maintaining a liquid level above side wall openings in an adjacent closed end tube. Gases vent from the battery through a nozzle directed inside the closed end tube against an impingement surface to remove acid droplets. The gases then flow through the side wall openings and the liquid level to quench any possible ignition prior to entering the activated carbon filter. A wick in the activated carbon filter conducts condensed liquid back to the closure housing to replenish the liquid level limited by the open-end tube.

Ledjeff, Konstantin (Schwalbach, DE)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Non-oxidative conversion of methane with continuous hydorgen removal  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to overcome the restrictions of non-oxidative methane pyrolysis and oxidative coupling of methane by transferring hydrogen across a selective inorganic membrane between methane and air streams, without simultaneous transport of hydrocarbon reactants or products. This will make the overall reaction system exothermic, remove the thermodynamic barrier to high conversion, and eliminate the formation of carbon oxides. Our approach is to couple C-H bond activation and hydrogen removal by passage of hydrogen atoms through a dense ceramic membrane. In our membrane reactor, catalytic methane pyrolysis produces C2+ hydrogen carbons and aromatics on the one side of the membrane and hydrogen is removed through an oxide film and combusted with air on the opposite side. This process leads to a net reaction with the stoichiometry and thermodynamic properties of oxidative coupling, but without contact between the carbon atoms and oxygen species.

Borry, R.W. III [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Iglesia, E. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Lawrence Berkeley Lab.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals Forecasts A document describing how volume fellings and removals are handled in the 2011 Production Forecast system. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Felling and removals forecasts Background A fellings and removals

104

Summary of Surface Swipe Sampling for Beryllium on Lead Bricks and Shielding  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 25,000 lbs of lead bricks at Site 300 were assessed by the Site 300 Industrial Hygienis tand Health Physicist for potential contamination of beryllium and radiation for reuse. These lead bricks and shielding had been used as shielding material during explosives tests that included beryllium and depleted uranium. Based on surface swipe sampling that was performed between July 26 and October 11, 2010, specifically for beryllium, the use of a spray encapsulant was found to be an effective means to limit removable surface contamination to levels below the DOE release limit for beryllium, which is 0.2 mcg/100 cm{sup 2}. All the surface swipe sampling data for beryllium and a timeline of when the samples were collected (and a brief description) are presented in this report. On December 15, 2010, the lead bricks and shielding were surveyed with an ion chamber and indicated dose rates less than 0.05 mrem per hour on contact. This represents a dose rate consistent with natural background. An additional suevey was performed on February 8, 2011, using a GM survey instrument to estimate total activity on the lead bricks and shielding, confirming safe levels of radioactivity. The vendor is licensed to possess and work with radioactive material.

Paik, S Y; Barron, D A

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

105

Lead-Free Surface Finishes for Electronic Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead-Free Surface Finishes for Electronic Components: Tin Whisker Growth METALS This project degraded by the switch to lead- free technology. In particular, the state of compressive stress and the localized creep response (whisker growth) of tin-based lead-free electrodeposits are being measured

Magee, Joseph W.

106

High temperature superconductor current leads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical lead having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths.

Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Poeppel, Roger B. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Nuclear fuels technologies: Thermally induced gallium removal system (TIGRS), fiscal year 1998 research and development test plan  

SciTech Connect

This document details the research and development (R and D) activities that will be conducted in Fiscal Year 1998 (FY98) by the Thermally Induced Gallium Removal System (TIGRS) team for the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition. This work is a continuation and extension of experimental activities that have been conducted in support of using weapons-derived plutonium in the fabrication of mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel for reactor-based plutonium disposition. The ultimate purpose of this work is to demonstrate adequate Thermally Induced Gallium Removal with a prototypic system. This Test Plan presents more than the FY98 R and D efforts in order to frame the Task in its entirety. To achieve the TIGRS Program objectives, R and D activities during the next two years will be focused on (1) process development leading to a prototypic TIGRS design, and (2) prototypic TIGRS design and testing leading to and including a prototypic demonstration of TIGRS operation. Both the process development and system testing efforts will consist of a series of surrogate-based cold tests and plutonium-based hot tests. Some of this testing has already occurred and will continue into FY99.

Buksa, J.J.; Butt, D.P.; Chidester, K.; DeMuth, S.F.; Havrilla, G.J.; James, C.A.; Kolman, D.G.

1997-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

LEAD COMMISSIONER DRAFT RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resources technologies; development of commercial heating systems and cooling solutions, biogas. and GC Environmental, Inc. Cleaner Biogas Production The purpose of this Energy Innovations Small Grant treatment system that removes hydrogen sulfide from dairy digester biogas and nitrogen oxides from biogas

109

Building Removal Ongoing at DOE's Paducah Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Removal Ongoing at DOE's Paducah Site Building Removal Ongoing at DOE's Paducah Site Building Removal Ongoing at DOE's Paducah Site August 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Buz Smith Robert.Smith@lex.doe.gov 270-441-6821 PADUCAH, KY - Work is ongoing at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) to raze a 65,000-square-foot facility known as the C-340 Metals Plant, which was used to make uranium metal during the Cold War. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup contractor LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky began removing more than 1,500 panels of cement-asbestos siding from the Metals Plant complex Wednesday in anticipation of New Jersey-based LVI Services starting demolition Sept. 19. Demolition work is projected to last through the end of calendar 2012. "This is an important milestone because the C-340 Metals Plant is the

110

Multi-component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,255,842 entitled "Multi-component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia." This patent discloses a method for the removal of potential environmental-impacting compounds from flue gas streams. The method oxidizes some or all of the acid precursors such as sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitric oxides (NO x ) into sulfur trioxide and nitrogen dioxide, respectively. Following this step, the gas stream is then treated with aqua ammonia or ammonium hydroxide to capture the compounds via chemical absorption through acid-base or neutralization reactions where a fertilizer is formed.

111

Operability test procedure [Tank] 241-SY-101 equipment removal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 241-SY-101 equipment removal system (ERS) consists of components, equipment, instrumentation and procedures that will provide the means to disconnect, retrieve, contain, load and transport the Mitigation Pump Assembly (MPA) from waste Tank 241-SY-101 to the Central Waste Complex (CWC). The Operability Test Procedure (OTP) will test the interfaces between ERS components and will rehearse the procedure for MPA removal and transportation to the extent they can be mocked-up at the CTF (Cold Test Facility). At the conclusion of the OTP, the ERS components and equipment will be removed from the CTF, entered into the Component Based Recall System (CBRS), and stored until needed for actual MPA removal and transportation.

Mast, J.C.

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

112

Chloride removal from plutonium alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SRP is evaluating a program to recover plutonium from a metallic alloy that will contain chloride salt impurities. Removal of chloride to sufficiently low levels to prevent damaging corrosion to canyon equipment is feasible as a head-end step following dissolution. Silver nitrate and mercurous nitrate were each successfully used in laboratory tests to remove chloride from simulated alloy dissolver solution containing plutonium. Levels less than 10 ppM chloride were achieved in the supernates over the precipitated and centrifuged insoluble salts. Also, less than 0.05% loss of plutonium in the +3, +4, or +6 oxidation states was incurred via precipitate carrying. These results provide impetus for further study and development of a plant-scale process to recover plutonium from metal alloy at SRP.

Holcomb, H.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Removing Barriers to Interdisciplinary Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant amount of high-impact contemporary scientific research occurs where biology, computer science, engineering and chemistry converge. Although programmes have been put in place to support such work, the complex dynamics of interdisciplinarity are still poorly understood. In this paper we interrogate the nature of interdisciplinary research and how we might measure its "success", identify potential barriers to its implementation, and suggest possible mechanisms for removing these impediments.

Naomi Jacobs; Martyn Amos

2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

114

METHOD OF REMOVING STRONTIUM IONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for removing trace amounts of Sr/sup 90/ from solutions. Phosphate ion is added to the solution and it is then brought into contact with a solid salt such as calcium carbonate which will react methathetically with the phosphate ion to form a salt such as calcium phosphate. During this reaction, strontium will be absorbed to a high degree within the newly formed lattice. (AEC)

Rhodes, D.W.; McHenry, J.R.; Ames, L.L. Jr.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Enabling Technologies Lead: Mark Davis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Lead: Mark Davis 3.2 Omics Platforms for Systems Biology Lead: Tim Tschaplinski 3.3 Advanced Pretreatment Configuration and Conditions Lead: Charles Wyman 3.1 Characterization of Biomass Features that Enhance Sugar Release Lead: Art Ragauskas 3.1.1 Support for Identification of the TOP40 Recalcitrant Lines (Gjersing) 3.1.2 In-Depth Cell Wall Characterization (Ragauskas) 3.2.1 Transcriptomics & Resequencing (Brown) 3.2.2 Proteomics (Hettich) 3.3.4 Demonstration of Improved Plants with CBP Organisms (Yee) 3.4 Computational Biology Lead: Ying Xu 3.3.1 Enhance Understanding of Pretreatment Fundamentals and Control Recalcitrance (Wyman) 3.3.2 Integrate, Optimize, and Understand Pretreatment with Advanced Plants (Wyman) 3.4.1 An Integrated Omics Data Analysis and

116

Lead in albacore: guide to lead pollution in Americans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research report: The magnitude of lead contamination in canned tuna is used to explain the difference between the lead concentration in the diets of present-day U.S. consumers (0.2 ppm) and that in the diets of prehistoric peoples (/sup 1/m ls /sup 1/x0.002 ppm). It is also used to illustrate how skeletal concentrations of lead in typical Americans became elevated 500-fold above the natural concentrations measured in bones of Peruvians who lived in an unpolluted environment 1800 years ago. An unrecognized form of poisoning caused by this excessive exposure to lead may affect most U.S. consumers. (3 drawings, 59 references, 3 tables)

Settle, D.M.; Patterson, C.C.

1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

117

It's Elemental - The Element Lead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thallium Thallium Previous Element (Thallium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Bismuth) Bismuth The Element Lead [Click for Isotope Data] 82 Pb Lead 207.2 Atomic Number: 82 Atomic Weight: 207.2 Melting Point: 600.61 K (327.46°C or 621.43°F) Boiling Point: 2022 K (1749°C or 3180°F) Density: 11.342 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 14 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Anglo-Saxon word lead. Lead's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for waterworks, plumbum. Say what? Lead is pronounced as LED. History and Uses: Lead has been known since ancient times. It is sometimes found free in nature, but is usually obtained from the ores galena (PbS), anglesite (PbSO4), cerussite (PbCO3) and minum (Pb3O4). Although lead makes up only

118

Nitrogen Removal From Low Quality Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. It is especially important in the residential sector, where it supplies nearly half of all the energy consumed in U.S. homes. However, significant quantities of natural gas cannot be produced economically because its quality is too low to enter the pipeline transportation system without some type of processing, other than dehydration, to remove the undesired gas fraction. Such low-quality natural gas (LQNG) contains significant concentration or quantities of gas other than methane. These non- hydrocarbons are predominantly nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide, but may also include other gaseous components. The nitrogen concentrations usually exceeds 4%. Nitrogen rejection is presently an expensive operation which can present uneconomic scenarios in the potential development of natural gas fields containing high nitrogen concentrations. The most reliable and widely used process for nitrogen rejection from natural gas consists of liquefying the feed stream using temperatures in the order of - 300{degrees}F and separating the nitrogen via fractionation. In order to reduce the gas temperature to this level, the gas is compressed, cooled by mullet-stream heat exchangers, and expanded to low pressure. Significant energy for compression and expensive materials of construction are required. Water and carbon dioxide concentrations must be reduced to levels required to prevent freezing. SRI`s proposed research involves screening new nitrogen selective absorbents and developing a more cost effective nitrogen removal process from natural gas using those compounds. The long-term objective of this project is to determine the technical and economical feasibility of a N{sub 2}2 removal concept based on complexation of molecular N{sub 2} with novel complexing agents. Successful development of a selective, reversible, and stable reagent with an appropriate combination of capacity and N{sub 2} absorption/desorption characteristics will allow selective separation of N{sub 2} from LQNG.

Alvarado, D.B.; Asaro, M.F.; Bomben, J.L.; Damle, A.S.; Bhown, A.S.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Natural gas: Removing the obstacles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defining and then figuring out how to remove whatever obstacles may be blocking the wider use of natural gas was the purpose of a conference held early last month in Phoenix, Arizona. The unique, three-day event was jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). It drew an overflow crowd of more than 500, with a registration list that read like a Who's Who of the natural gas industry. This article summarizes some of the main points of this conference.

Romo, C.

1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Process for removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permitting the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Hancher, C.W.; Saunders, M.B.; Googin, J.M.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Material Removal and Disposition | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal and Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

122

Sludge Heel Removal Analysis for Slurry Pumps of Tank 11  

SciTech Connect

Computational fluid dynamics methods were used to develop and recommend a slurry pump operational strategy for sludge heel removal in Tank 11. Flow patterns calculated by the model were used to evaluate the performance of various combinations of operating pumps and their orientation. The models focused on removal of the sludge heel located at the edge of Tank 11 using the four existing slurry pumps. The models and calculations were based on prototypic tank geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Tank Closure Project (TCP) Engineering. Computational fluid dynamics models of Tank 11 with different operating conditions were developed using the FLUENT(tm) code. The modeling results were used to assess the efficiency of sludge suspension and removal operations in the 75-ft tank. The models employed a three-dimensional approach, a two-equation turbulence model, and an approximate representation of flow obstructions. The calculated local velocity was used as a measure of sludge removal and mixing capability. For the simulations, a series of the modeling calculations was performed with indexed pump orientations until an efficient flow pattern near the potential location of the sludge mound was established for sludge removal. The calculated results demonstrated that the existing slurry pumps running at 1600 rpm could remove the sludge mound from the tank with a 103 in. liquid level, based on a minimum sludge suspension velocity of 2.27 ft/sec. In this case, the only exception is the region within about 2 ft. from the tank wall. Further results showed that the capabilities of sludge removal were affected by the indexed pump orientation, the number of operating pumps, and the pump speed. A recommended operational strategy for an efficient flow pattern was developed to remove the sludge mound assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and removal. Sensitivity results showed that for a given pump speed, a higher tank level and a lower pump nozzle elevation would result in better performance in suspending and removing the sludge. The results also showed that the presence of flow obstructions such as valve housing structure were advantageous for certain pump orientations.

Lee, S.Y.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

Anaerobic microbial dissolution of lead and production of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to an anaerobic bacterial culture of Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 which solubilizes lead oxide under anaerobic conditions in coal and industrial wastes and therefore presents a method of removing lead from such wastes before they are dumped into the environment. The rate of lead dissolution during logarithmic growth of the bacteria in 40 ml medium containing 3.32 .mu.moles of lead as lead oxide was 0.042 .mu.moles ml.sup.-1 hr.sup.-1. Dissolution of lead oxide by the bacterial isolate is due to the production of metabolites and acidity in the culture medium. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 can be used in the recovery of strategic metals from ores and wastes and also for the production of lactic acid for commercial purposes. The process yields large quantities of lactic acid as well as lead complexed in a stable form with said acids.

Francis, Arokiasamy J. (Middle Island, NY); Dodge, Cleveland (Wading River, NY); Chendrayan, Krishnachetty (Coimbatore Tamil Nadu, IN); Quinby, Helen L. (Cambridge, MD)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Anaerobic microbial dissolution of lead and production of organic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention related to an anaerobic bacterial culture of Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 which solubilizes lead oxide under anaerobic conditions in coal and industrial wastes and therefore presents a method of removing lead from such wastes before they are dumped into the environment. The rat of lead dissolution during logarithmic growth of the bacteria in 40 ml medium containing 3.32 ..mu..moles of lead as lead oxide was 0.042 ..mu..moles m1/sup /-/1/ hr/sup /-/1/. Dissolution of lead oxide by the bacterial isolate is due to the production of metabolites and acidity in the culture medium. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. The major metabolites are acetic, butyric and lactic acid. Clostridium sp. ATCC No. 53464 can be used in the recovery of the strategic metals from ores and wastes and also for the production of lactic acid for commercial purposes. The process yields large quantities of lactic acid as well as lead complexed in a stable form with said acids. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.; Chendrayan, K.; Quinby, H.L.

1987-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

125

THERMALLY SHIELDED MOISTURE REMOVAL DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is presented for removing moisture from the air within tanks by condensation upon a cartridge containing liquid air. An insulating shell made in two halves covers the cartridge within the evacuated system. The shell halves are hinged together and are operated by a system of levers from outside the tank with the motion translated through a sylphon bellows to cover and uncover the cartridge. When the condensation of moisture is in process, the insulative shell is moved away from the liquid air cartridge, and during that part of the process when there is no freezing out of moisture, the shell halves are closed on the cell so thnt the accumulated frost is not evaporated. This insulating shell greatly reduces the consumption of liquid air in this condensation process.

Miller, O.E.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

126

Lead Auditor - Auditor Preparation Checklist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lead Auditor - Auditor Preparation Checklist Lead Auditor - Auditor Preparation Checklist |Number|Item|Status | ||Staff the Audit || ||Auditor Qualifications|| ||Audit Notification & Audit Plan Issued|| ||Auditor access issues resolved|| ||Audit team facilities|| ||Auditor audit areas / elements assigned|| ||Check lists Prepared Issued || ||Audited Org Docs to team QPP Work plans etc|| ||Past Audits to team || ||PC availability for Auditors|| ||Audit forms to auditors People Interviewed Documents reviewed Entrance Meeting Attendance Exit Meeting Attendance, Issue Development Sheet[1] Form 11 Form 21|| ||Audit protocols, conduct of auditors|| ||Entrance meeting slides|| ||Exit meeting slide outline|| ||Report Shell to Team|| ----------------------- [1] Use of this will be explained in the second article of the series

127

Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

Richardson, BS

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Mercury removal at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's New Waste Calcining Facility  

SciTech Connect

Technologies were investigated to determine viable processes for removing mercury from the calciner (NWCF) offgas system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Technologies for gas phase and aqueous phase treatment were evaluated. The technologies determined are intended to meet EPA Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements under the Clean Air Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Currently, mercury accumulation in the calciner off-gas scrubbing system is transferred to the tank farm. These transfers lead to accumulation in the liquid heels of the tanks. The principal objective for aqueous phase mercury removal is heel mercury reduction. The system presents a challenge to traditional methods because of the presence of nitrogen oxides in the gas phase and high nitric acid in the aqueous scrubbing solution. Many old and new technologies were evaluated including sorbents and absorption in the gas phase and ion exchange, membranes/sorption, galvanic methods, and UV reduction in the aqueous phase. Process modifications and feed pre-treatment were also evaluated. Various properties of mercury and its compounds were summarized and speciation was predicted based on thermodynamics. Three systems (process modification, NOxidizer combustor, and electrochemical aqueous phase treatment) and additional technology testing were recommended.

S. C. Ashworth

2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

129

Mercury Removal at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's New Waste Calcining Facility  

SciTech Connect

Technologies were investigated to determine viable processes for removing mercury from the calciner (NWCF) offgas system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Technologies for gas phase and aqueous phase treatment were evaluated. The technologies determined are intended to meet EPA Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements under the Clean Air Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Currently, mercury accumulation in the calciner off-gas scrubbing system is transferred to the tank farm. These transfers lead to accumulation in the liquid heels of the tanks. The principal objective for aqueous phase mercury removal is heel mercury reduction. The system presents a challenge to traditional methods because of the presence of nitrogen oxides in the gas phase and high nitric acid in the aqueous scrubbing solution. Many old and new technologies were evaluated including sorbents and absorption in the gas phase and ion exchange, membranes/sorption, galvanic methods, and UV reduction in the aqueous phase. Process modifications and feed pre-treatment were also evaluated. Various properties of mercury and its compounds were summarized and speciation was predicted based on thermodynamics. Three systems (process modification, NOxidizer combustor, and electrochemical aqueous phase treatment) and additional technology testing were recommended.

Ashworth, Samuel Clay; Wood, R. A.; Taylor, D. D.; Sieme, D. D.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Electrode Induced Removal and Recovery of Uranium (VI) from Acidic Subsurfaces  

SciTech Connect

The overarching objective of this research is to provide an improved understanding of how aqueous geochemical conditions impact the removal of U and Tc from groundwater and how engineering design may be utilized to optimize removal of these radionuclides. Experiments were designed to address the unique conditions in Area 3 of ORNL while also providing broader insight into the geochemical effectors of the removal rates and extent for U and Tc. The specific tasks of this work were to: 1) quantify the impact of common aqueous geochemical and operational conditions on the rate and extent of U removal and recovery from water, 2) investigate the removal of Tc with polarized graphite electrode, and determine the influence of geochemical and operational conditions on Tc removal and recovery, 3) determine whether U and Tc may be treated simultaneous from Area 3 groundwater, and examine the bench-scale performance of electrode-based treatment, and 4) determine the capacity of graphite electrodes for U(VI) removal and develop a mathematical, kinetic model for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution. Overall the body of work suggests that an electrode-based approach for the remediation of acidic subsurface environments, such as those observed in Area 3 of ORNL may be successful for the removal for both U(VI) and Tc. Carbonaceous (graphite) electrode materials are likely to be the least costly means to maximize removal rates and efficiency by maximizing the electrode surface area.

Gregory, Kelvin [Carnegie Mellon University] [Carnegie Mellon University

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

131

Utilization of Partially Gasified Coal for Mercury Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this project, General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) developed a novel mercury (Hg) control technology in which the sorbent for gas-phase Hg removal is produced from coal in a gasification process in-situ at a coal burning plant. The main objective of this project was to obtain technical information necessary for moving the technology from pilot-scale testing to a full-scale demonstration. A pilot-scale gasifier was used to generate sorbents from both bituminous and subbituminous coals. Once the conditions for optimizing sorbent surface area were identified, sorbents with the highest surface area were tested in a pilot-scale combustion tunnel for their effectiveness in removing Hg from coal-based flue gas. It was determined that the highest surface area sorbents generated from the gasifier process ({approx}600 m{sup 2}/g) had about 70%-85% of the reactivity of activated carbon at the same injection rate (lb/ACF), but were effective in removing 70% mercury at injection rates about 50% higher than that of commercially available activated carbon. In addition, mercury removal rates of up to 95% were demonstrated at higher sorbent injection rates. Overall, the results of the pilot-scale tests achieved the program goals, which were to achieve at least 70% Hg removal from baseline emissions levels at 25% or less of the cost of activated carbon injection.

Chris Samuelson; Peter Maly; David Moyeda

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

132

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

1988-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

133

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (both Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (both Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

135

Leadership and Leading Indicators Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leadership Leadership and Leading Indicators Peter S. Winokur, Ph.D., Member Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Thanks to Matt Moury and Doug Minnema August 28, 2008 Objectives * A few thoughts about leadership * Actions taken by leaders * Role of leading indicators * Consider the future August 28, 2008 2 3 Safety Culture Safety culture is an organization's values and behaviors - modeled by its leaders and internalized by its members - that serve to make nuclear safety an overriding priority.* - Dating back to SEN-35-91, it's DOE Policy; - It's perishable; - EFCOG/DOE ISMS Safety Culture Task Team. *INPO, Principles for a Strong Nuclear Safety Culture, November 2004. August 28, 2008 4 Leadership & Mission Top 10 Ways To Know You Have A Safety Culture: * #1 is Leadership - the talk and the walk

136

Process for particulate removal from coal liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Suspended solid particulates are removed from liquefied coal products by first subjecting such products to hydroclone action for removal in the underflow of the larger size particulates, and then subjecting the overflow from said hydroclone action, comprising the residual finer particulates, to an electrostatic field in an electrofilter wherein such finer particulates are deposited in the bed of beads of dielectric material on said filter. The beads are periodically cleaned by backwashing to remove the accumulated solids.

Rappe, Gerald C. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

138

Passive Core Decay Heat Removal Performance Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive decay heat removal systems operate without pumps when normal heat removal systems are not available. Safety is ensured by confirming that an adequate thermal margin is provided to accommodate various operating conditions, design uncertainties, and degradation. Guidelines to ensure adequate thermal performance are provided for three different system configurations.This report introduces utility systems engineers to the design and operation of passive decay heat removal systems and ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

139

Lead shot poisons bald eagles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the controversy between the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Wildlife Federation and the increased mortality of bald eagles. The eagles are being poisoned by preying on waterfowl which have ingested lead shot or have been wounded by shot and not recovered. The controversy has resulted in the establishment of new criteria for so-called non-toxic shot waterfowl hunting.

Cohn, J.P.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Assessment of Leading Microturbine Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microturbines have emerged from research and development in recent years and are now commercially available in small quantities. Microturbines have penetrated several niche markets around the world, but sales have generally fallen short of expectations. Leading developers of microturbines include Bowman Power Systems, Capstone Turbine, Elliott Energy Systems, IR Energy Systems, and Turbec AB. Worldwide, approximately 20 distinct organizations are involved with the development and/or commercialization of ...

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSANews posted a photo: Vietnam HEU Removal A convoy escorting the last highly enriched uranium in Vietnam departs Dalat. Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr Headlines Jul 23,...

142

Metal Organic Clathrates for Carbon Dioxide Removal  

removal from coal-fired power plant flue gas streams.  Modified variations of the materials can be used in a variety of other fields as well, ...

143

System for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

144

Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel  

ORNL 2010-G00619/jcn UT-B ID 200902314 Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel Technology Summary At ORNL the application of ultrasonic energy, or ...

145

Internal Controls Over Classified Computersand Classified Removable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Classified Removable Media at theLawrence Livermore National Laboratory, IG-0628 Computers are used extensively in the full range of operations at Lawrence Livermore National...

146

Removal of radioisotopes from waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention comprises removing radioisotopes from waste liquids or solutions by passing these through filters and through a column containing a suitable salt of phosphoric acid. (Official Gazette)

Kirby, H.W.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Tritium Removal Facility High Tritium Distillation Simulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A dynamic model was developed for the distillation mechanism of the Darlington Tritium Removal Facility. The model was created using the commercial software package MATLAB/Simulink.… (more)

Zahedi, Polad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Method for removal of explosives from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells was also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Torres, deceased, Agapito P. (late of Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Giralang, AU)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Method for removal of metal atoms from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells were also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Torres, deceased, Agapito P. (late of Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Kaleen, AU)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Method of manufacturing lead electrodes for storage cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of manufacturing electrodes for lead storage batteries is described. Molten lead or lead alloy is deposited on a felt of glass fibers by spraying in a molten state to fill the space between the fibers of the felt to form an electrically conductive zone defining electrode contacts. A mass of powdered lead-based material is introduced into the felt by filtration for subsequently producing an active electrode mass by at least one electrochemical transformation. The felt is then cut into individual electrodes. (auth)

Jonville, P.; Stoehr, H.; Beccu, K.D.

1975-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

151

Removal of beryllium from drinking water by chemical coagulation and lime softening  

SciTech Connect

The effectiveness of conventional drinking water treatment and lime softening was evaluated for beryllium removal from two drinking water sources. Jar test studies were conducted to determine how common coagulants (aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride) and lime softening performed in removing beryllium from spiked waters. Centrifugation was used to simulate filtration. The two source waters used were raw Ohio River water and groundwater from the Great Miami Aquifer. The impact of initial beryllium concentration, coagulant dose, turbidity and pH on beryllium removal was examined and optimum treatment conditions were determined. Jar tests using alum and ferric chloride coagulants were able to achieve 95% and 85% removal of beryllium respectively from surface water. Removal efficiency increased as the pH was increased. Based on the data collected in the study, coprecipitation and precipitation are the two likely mechanisms responsible for beryllium removal.

Lytle, D.A.; Summers, R.S.; Sorg, T.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Why is lead so kinky?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We revisit the problem of the kink in the charge radius shift of neutron-rich even lead isotopes. We show that the ability of a Skyrme force to reproduce the isotope shift is determined by the occupation of the neutron 1i11/2 orbital beyond N=126 and the corresponding change it causes to deeply-bound protons orbitals with a principal quantum number of 1. Given the observed position of the single-particle energies, one must either ensure occupation is allowed through correlations, or not demand that the single-particle energies agree with experimental values at the mean-field level.

P. M. Goddard; P. D. Stevenson; A. Rios

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

153

Medium-Power Lead-Alloy Reactors: Missions for This Reactor Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiyear project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology investigated the potential of medium-power lead-alloy-cooled technology to perform two missions: (1) the production of low-cost electricity and (2) the burning of actinides from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The goal of achieving a high power level to enhance economic performance simultaneously with adoption of passive decay heat removal and modularity capabilities resulted in designs in the range of 600-800 MW(thermal), which we classify as a medium power level compared to the lower [{approx}100 MW(thermal)] and higher [2800 MW(thermal)] power ratings of other lead-alloy-cooled designs. The plant design that was developed shows promise of achieving all the Generation-IV goals for future nuclear energy systems: sustainable energy generation, low overnight capital cost, a very low likelihood and degree of core damage during any conceivable accident, and a proliferation-resistant fuel cycle. The reactor and fuel cycle designs that evolved to achieve these missions and goals resulted from study of the following key trade-offs: waste reduction versus reactor safety, waste reduction versus cost, and cost versus proliferation resistance. Secondary trade-offs that were also considered were monolithic versus modular design, active versus passive safety systems, forced versus natural circulation, alternative power conversion cycles, and lead versus lead-bismuth coolant.These studies led to a selection of a common modular design with forced convection cooling, passive decay heat removal, and a supercritical CO{sub 2} power cycle for all our reactor concepts. However, the concepts adopt different core designs to optimize the achievement of the two missions. For the low-cost electricity production mission, a design approach based on fueling with low enriched uranium operating without costly reprocessing in a once-through cycle was pursued to achieve a long operating cycle length by enhancing in-core breeding. For the actinide-burning mission three design variants were produced: (1) a fertile-free actinide burner, i.e., a single-tier strategy, (2) a minor actinide burner with plutonium burned in the LWR fleet, i.e., a two-tier strategy, and (3) an actinide burner with characteristics balanced to also favor economic electricity production.

Todreas, Neil E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); MacDonald, Philip E. [INEEL0Bechtel BWXT Idaho (United States); Hejzlar, Pavel [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Buongiorno, Jacopo [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States); Loewen, Eric P. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States)

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

DISSOLUTION METHOD OF REMOVING BONDING AGENTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for removing residual aluminumsilicon bonding agents from uranium slugs after the removal of aluminum coatings. To accomplish this the slug is immersed in an aqueous solution about 0.75 N in hydrofluoric acid and about 7 N in nitric acid.

Hyman, H.H.

1960-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

155

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

156

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

158

Global Cut Framework for Removing Symmetries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a general technique for removing symmetries in CSPs during search. The idea is to record no-goods, during the exploration of the search tree, whose symmetric counterpart (if any) should be removed. The no-good, called Global ...

Filippo Focacci; Michela Milano

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

NDE Studies on CRDMs Removed From Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are focused on assessing the effectiveness of NDE inspections of control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of ultrasonic testing (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. In describing two CRDM assemblies removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE measurements, this paper will address the following questions: 1) What did each technique detect?, 2) What did each technique miss?, 3) How accurately did each technique characterize the detected flaws? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. One contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data; the other contained evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, but this was unconfirmed. The selected NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory based NDE methods will be employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper will also describe the NDE methods used and discus the NDE results. Future work will involve using the results from these NDE studies to guide the development of a destructive characterization plan to reveal the crack morphology, to be compared with NDE responses.

Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Schuster, George J.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Abrefah, John

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

COST OF MERCURY REMOVAL IN IGCC PLANTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost of Mercury Removal Cost of Mercury Removal in an IGCC Plant Final Report September 2002 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory By: Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group Inc. Reading, Pennsylvania Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania DOE Product Manager: Gary J. Stiegel DOE Task Manager: James R. Longanbach Principal Investigators: Michael G. Klett Russell C. Maxwell Michael D. Rutkowski PARSONS The Cost of Mercury Removal in an IGCC Plant Final Report i September 2002 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page 1 Summary 1 2 Introduction 3 3 Background 4 3.1 Regulatory Initiatives 4 3.2 Mercury Removal for Conventional Coal-Fired Plants 4 3.3 Mercury Removal Experience in Gasification 5 3.4 Variability of Mercury Content in Coal 6 4 Design Considerations 7 4.1 Carbon Bed Location

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Catalyst regeneration process including metal contaminants removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Spent catalysts removed from a catalytic hydrogenation process for hydrocarbon feedstocks, and containing undesired metals contaminants deposits, are regenerated. Following solvent washing to remove process oils, the catalyst is treated either with chemicals which form sulfate or oxysulfate compounds with the metals contaminants, or with acids which remove the metal contaminants, such as 5-50 W % sulfuric acid in aqueous solution and 0-10 W % ammonium ion solutions to substantially remove the metals deposits. The acid treating occurs within the temperature range of 60.degree.-250.degree. F. for 5-120 minutes at substantially atmospheric pressure. Carbon deposits are removed from the treated catalyst by carbon burnoff at 800.degree.-900.degree. F. temperature, using 1-6 V % oxygen in an inert gas mixture, after which the regenerated catalyst can be effectively reused in the catalytic process.

Ganguli, Partha S. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Numerical and experimental investigation of DNAPL removal mechanisms in a layered porous medium by means of soil vapor extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to identify the mechanisms that govern the removal of carbon tetrachloride (CT) during soil vapor extraction (SVE) by comparing multiphase flow simulations with a detailed data set from a well-defined two-dimensional flow cell experiment. The flow cell was packed with two sandy soils including an embedded fine-grained sand layer. Gas concentrations at the outlet of the flow cell and 15 sampling ports inside the flow cell were measured during SVE. A dual-energy gamma radiation system was used to measure an initial NAPL saturation profile in a fine-grained sand layer. Imaging result from a dual-energy gamma radiation system with dyed CT mark along CT migration was used to construct the distribution of initial NAPL saturation in the flow cell for input to numerical simulations. Gas concentration results and photographs during SVE were compared to simulation results using a continuum-based multiphase flow simulator, STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases). The measured effluent gas concentration decreased quickly at first, and then started to decrease gradually, resulting in long-term tailing. CT mass was removed quickly in coarse sand, followed by a slow removal from the fine-grained sand layer. An analytical solution for a one-dimensional advection and first-order volatilization model matched the tailing well with two fitting parameters. However, given detailed knowledge of the permeability field and initial NAPL distribution, we can predict the tailing and gas concentration profiles at sampling ports using equilibrium NAPL volatilization. NAPL flow occurs in the presence of free NAPL, and must be accounted for to accurately predict NAPL removal during the SVE experiment. The model prediction was accurate within the uncertainty of the measured or literature derived parameters (i.e., dispersivity and soil parameters). This study provides insights into the physical mechanisms of NAPL removal from a low permeability zone, and use of the local equilibrium assumption for NAPL volatilization during SVE. In addition, this study demonstrates that lack of detailed information regarding NAPL distribution and heterogeneity pattern lead overall NAPL removal to a kinetically controlled system at a 2-D flow cell scale.

Yoon, Hongkyu; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Werth, Charles J.; Valocchi, Albert J.

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

163

Project Title: DOE Code: Project Lead: NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Code: DOE Code: Project Lead: NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY # 258 Project lnfonnation Rewire electrical to pole at 77SHX10 Mike Preston Date: 11-19-09 Contractor Code: Project Overview No~ rea has been previously disturbed. The trenching will be th,ugh pre-existing right of way for the 1. What are the environmental ~ ~=~d ~ impacts? 2. What is the legal location? Repair a~ replacement of electrical lines to the Pole next to well at 77S~1 0. This will require trenching 3. What is the duration of the project? across the road a~ to the pole. Removing old lines and replacement of lines. 4. What major equipment will be used if any (wor1< over rig, drilling rig, 1 day etc.)? Back hole The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA

164

Free Machining Brasses with Minimized Lead Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Article describes the role of lead in free machining brass and ... Similar legislative acts take care of lead content in free machined brass.

165

Lead phosphate glass compositions for optical components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lead phosphate glass to which has been added indium oxide or scandium oe to improve chemical durability and provide a lead phosphate glass with good optical properties.

Sales, Brian C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls at the Nevada Test Site, INS-O-06-02 Concerns Regarding Lead Contamination and Radiological Controls at...

167

Lead Free Solder - Energy Innovation Portal  

Lead Free Solder A lead free solder, developed at The Ames Laboratory, combines tin, silver and copper in a novel alloy combination that is low ...

168

Power Marketing Administrations Leading the Nation's Transition...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administrations Leading the Nation's Transition to a 21st Century Electric Grid Power Marketing Administrations Leading the Nation's Transition to a 21st Century Electric...

169

Review of Lead Recycling Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective Recovery of Gold from E-wastes by Using Cellulosic Wastes · Stabilization of Chromium-Based Slags with FeS2 and FeSO4 · Sulphide Precipitation ...

170

HIGH SO2 REMOVAL EFFICIENCY TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of performance tests at six full-scale wet lime- and limestone-reagent flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The objective of these tests was to evaluate the effectiveness of low capital cost sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal upgrades for existing FGD systems as an option for complying with the provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The upgrade options tested at the limestone-reagent systems included the use of organic acid additives (dibasic acid (DBA) and/or sodium formate) as well as increased reagent ratio (higher excess limestone levels in the recirculating slurry solids) and absorber liquid-to-gas ratio. One system also tested operating at higher flue gas velocities to allow the existing FGD system to treat flue gas from an adjacent, unscrubbed unit. Upgrade options for the one lime-based system tested included increased absorber venturi pressure drop and increased sulfite concentration in the recirculating slurry liquor.

Gary M. Blythe; James L. Phillips

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past three years, we followed the work plan as we suggested in the proposal and made every efforts to fulfill the project objectives. Based on our large amount of creative and productive work, including both of experimental and theoretic aspects, we received important technical breakthrough on naphthenic acid removal process and obtained deep insight on catalytic decarboxylation chemistry. In detail, we established an integrated methodology to serve for all of the experimental and theoretical work. Our experimental investigation results in discovery of four type effective catalysts to the reaction of decarboxylation of model carboxylic acid compounds. The adsorption experiment revealed the effectiveness of several solid materials to naphthenic acid adsorption and acidity reduction of crude oil, which can be either natural minerals or synthesized materials. The test with crude oil also received promising results, which can be potentially developed into a practical process for oil industry. The theoretical work predicted several possible catalytic decarboxylation mechanisms that would govern the decarboxylation pathways depending on the type of catalysts being used. The calculation for reaction activation energy was in good agreement with our experimental measurements.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang; Yongchun Tang; William A. Goddard

2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

172

More Economical Sulfur Removal for Fuel Processing Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

enabled TDA to develop and commercialize its direct oxidation process-a simple, catalyst-based system for removing sulfur from natural gas and petroleum-that was convenient and economical enough for smaller fuel processing plants to use. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) of Wheat Ridge, CO, formed in 1987, is a privately-held R&D company that brings products to market either by forming internal business

173

A Wavelet Transform Technique for Removing Airplane Echoes from ST Radar Signals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new technique based on the wavelet transforms for removing airplane and other transitory echoes in strato–tropospheric (ST) radar measurements. This technique provides a time–frequency display of the time series, which is ...

J-C. Boisse; V. Klaus; J-P. Aubagnac

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Color Removal from Pulp Mill Effluent Using Coal Ash Produced from Georgia Coal Combustion Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Color Removal from Pulp Mill Effluent Using Coal Ash Produced from Georgia Coal Combustion Power color from pulp mill effluent using coal ash. Prevent coal ash adsorbent from leaching arsenic, chromium, lead, and zinc. Define a treatment procedure using coal ash that will result in the maximum

Hutcheon, James M.

175

Condensate Removal by Drain Orifice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Originally the Drain Orifice Assembly was developed to solve serious steam trap maintenance problems in Navy ship's high pressure systems. Installation was between two ANSI B16.5 Flanges. The high pressure systems operate at pressures between 150 psig and 1200 psig. Based on the initial test results, a program was adopted by the U.S. Navy to replace all conventional steam traps with the Drain Orifice in all high pressure drain systems on ships in the U.S. Fleet.

Guzick, L. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Actinide removal from nitric acid waste streams  

SciTech Connect

Actinide separations research at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) has found ways to significantly improve plutonium secondary recovery and americium removal from nitric acid waste streams generated by plutonium purification operations. Capacity and breakthrough studies show anion exchange with Dowex 1x4 (50 to 100 mesh) to be superior for secondary recovery of plutonium. Extraction chromatography with TOPO(tri-n-octyl-phosphine oxide) on XAD-4 removes the final traces of plutonium, including hydrolytic polymer. Partial neutralization and solid supported liquid membrane transfer removes americium for sorption on discardable inorganic ion exchangers, potentially allowing for non-TRU waste disposal.

Muscatello, A.C.; Navratil, J.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

In situ removal of contamination from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination, and further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed.

Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Method for changing removable bearing for a wind turbine generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY), Gadre; Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

179

Results from the Cooler and Lead Tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design of Current Leads for the MICE Coupling Magnet,” Proceedings International Conference of Cryogenics and Refrigeration

Green, Michael A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~y-f-hjLo-- yy; 4: j ).,Ic ~y-f-hjLo-- yy; 4: j ).,Ic +- NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO s _ HEALTH AND SAFETY DIVISION - ANALYTICAL DEPT. . ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET o-0 1. H. NO. TRIAL, HYGIENE AND RADIATION DEPT. AMPLE Nti.1. //- 6:itEC TEDI it/;/L 5 .,- -..-- -- -.._-. -. I --- --- 1 ANALYTICA .OATE RECeiVEDi mri /-2-v& 3 Li >,a. HCJ _-..k.-*..- -.v._ 1 NO. DISTRIBUTION OF COPIES 1 Analytlcal Labwatwy (RECORD COPP) 2 Industrial Hygiene 8 Radlation Dept. . 3' Water Treatment Plant (Far Water Smmplos Only)' t' , /,' 30 ,I7 \ I _- ' -I .;35; /z , / /-7 . jj ,j> b :3 cl /1' , i),: A,' . i] NLO-HbS-736 (REV. 10/14~6Or I. .-- . s N A T I O N A L L E A D C O M P A N Y O F O H IO H E A L T H A N D S A F E T Y DIVISION - A N A L Y T I C A L D E P T . A N A L Y T I C A L D A T A S H E E T i. I- . '4 ( '.. /a ' li 4 '. r I if 1. - I :

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling Pb-Contaminated Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling Pb-Contaminated Soils Starting in the 1970s, federal regulatory control and eventual elimination of lead-based "anti-knock" additives in gasoline decreased the level of airborne Pb in the USA by two orders-of-magnitude [1]. Blood lead levels of the USA figure 1 Figure 1. The good, the bad, and the ugly. Ambient airborne particulate matter captured on filters of woven silica fiber (large strips) and TeflonTM (round). Clean fiber filter at bottom for comparison. Take a deep breath? population decreased correspondingly [2,3]. Despite this dramatic improvement in both exposure risk and body burden of Pb, the sources and health threat of the low levels of lead in our "unleaded" air remain topics

182

Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Kazakhstan HEU Removal Kazakhstan HEU Removal Location Kazakhstan United States 48° 59' 44.1492" N, 67° 3' 37.9692" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

183

Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Sweden Plutonium Removal Sweden Plutonium Removal Location Sweden United States 62° 24' 4.4136" N, 15° 22' 51.096" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

184

Hungary HEU removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

removal | National Nuclear Security Administration removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Hungary HEU removal Hungary HEU removal Location Hungary United States 47° 11' 51.6336" N, 19° 41' 15" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view this map.

185

Mexico HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Mexico HEU Removal Mexico HEU Removal Location Mexico United States 24° 24' 35.298" N, 102° 49' 55.3116" W See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view this map.

186

Removal of volatile materials from forepump oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of clearing condensable vapors from forepump oil is described. Air is bubbled though the oil reservoir removing volatile material from the oil and allowing continuous pumping of materials by non?vented pumps.

Paul P. Nicole

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

Cook, Gus T. (Paducah, KY); Holshouser, Stephen K. (Boaz, KY); Coleman, Richard M. (Paducah, KY); Harless, Charles E. (Smithland, KY); Whinnery, III, Walter N. (Paducah, KY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

Cook, G.T.; Holshouser, S.K.; Coleman, R.M.; Harless, C.E.; Whinnery, W.N. III

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

189

Chile HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Removal Location United States 25 28' 1.4916" S, 69 33' 55.548" W See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view...

190

France HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Removal Location United States 45 44' 20.0544" N, 2 17' 6.5616" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view...

191

Libya HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal Location Libya United States 27 34' 9.5448" N, 17 24' 8.4384" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view...

192

Install Removable Insulation on Valves and Fittings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This revised ITP tip sheet on installing removable insulation on valves and fittings provides how-to advice for improving the system using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Turkey HEU Removal Turkey HEU Removal Location Turkey United States 38° 26' 50.2044" N, 40° 15' 14.0616" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

194

Laser removal of sludge from steam generators  

SciTech Connect

A method of removing unwanted chemical deposits known as sludge from the metal surfaces of steam generators with laser energy is provided. Laser energy of a certain power density, of a critical wavelength and frequency, is intermittently focused on the sludge deposits to vaporize them so that the surfaces are cleaned without affecting the metal surface (sludge substrate). Fiberoptic tubes are utilized for laser beam transmission and beam direction. Fiberoptics are also utilized to monitor laser operation and sludge removal.

Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

SEEWEC Consortium lead partner Ghent University | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEEWEC Consortium lead partner Ghent University SEEWEC Consortium lead partner Ghent University Jump to: navigation, search Name SEEWEC Consortium lead partner Ghent University Address Sint Pietersnieuwstraat 41 Place Gent Zip 9000 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http://www.seewec.org Region Belgium LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: SEEWEC Consortium Brevik NO This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: FO This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=SEEWEC_Consortium_lead_partner_Ghent_University&oldid=678456" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

196

Integrated AMP-PAN, TRUEX, and SREX Flowsheet Test to Remove Cesium, Surrogate Actinide Elements, and Strontium from INEEL Tank Waste Using Sorbent Columns and Centrifugal Contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three unit operations for the removal of selected fission products, actinides, and RCRA metals (mercury and lead) have been successfully integrated and tested for extended run times with simulated INEEL acidic tank waste. The unit operations were ion exchange for Cs removal, followed by TRUEX solvent extraction for Eu (actinide surrogate), Hg, and Re (Tc surrogate) removal, and subsequent SREX solvent extraction for Sr and Pb removal. Approximately 45 L of simulated INTEC tank waste was first processed through three ion exchange columns in series for selective Cs removal. The columns were packed with a composite ammonium molybdophosphate-polyacrylonitrile (AMP-PAN) sorbent. The experimental breakthrough data were in excellent agreement with modeling predictions based on data obtained with much smaller columns. The third column (220 cm3) was used for polishing and Cs removal after breakthrough of the up-stream columns. The Cs removal was >99.83% in the ion exchange system without interference from other species. Most of the effluent from the ion exchange (IX) system was immediately processed through a TRUEX solvent extraction flowsheet to remove europium (americium surrogate), mercury and rhenium (technetium surrogate) from the simulated waste. The TRUEX flowsheet test was performed utilizing 23 stages of 3.3-cm centrifugal contactors. Greater than 99.999% of the Eu, 96.3% of the Hg, and 56% of the Re were extracted from the simulated feed and recovered in the strip and wash streams. Over the course of the test, there was no detectable build-up of any components in the TRUEX solvent. The raffinate from the TRUEX test was stored and subsequently processed several weeks later through a SREX solvent extraction flowsheet to remove strontium, lead, and Re (Tc surrogate) from the simulated waste. The SREX flowsheet test was performed using the same centrifugal contactors used in the TRUEX test after reconfiguration and the addition of three stages. Approximately 99.9% of the Sr, >99.89% of the Pb, and >96.4% of the Re were extracted from the aqueous feed to the SREX flowsheet and recovered in the strip and wash sections. Approximately 41 L of simulated tank waste (based on the volume processed through the TRUEX flowsheet) was processed through the integrated flowsheet and resulted in 175 L of liquid high activity waste (HAW) and 219.6 L of liquid low activity waste (LAW). The HAW fraction would be evaporated, dried and subsequently vitrified for final disposal. Based on current baseline assumptions, including a maximum phosphate loading of 2.5 wt. % in the HAW glass, the flowsheet tested would result in the production 0.195 kg of glass per L of tank waste processed. The LAW fraction would be solidified (via evaporation and denitration) and subsequently grouted. The current baseline assumptions for grouting the LAW stream indicate 0.37 kg of grout would be produced per L of tank waste treated. Under these assumptions, treating the current inventory of ~5E+6 L (5,000 m3) of tank waste would result in 375 m3 of HAW glass and 1,135 m3 of LAW Class A performance grout. The HAW glass volume could be significantly decreased by suitable TRUEX flowsheet modifications.

Herbst, Ronald Scott; Law, Jack Douglas; Todd, Terry Allen; Wood, D. J.; Garn, Troy Gerry; Wade, Earlen Lawrence

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Integrated AMP-PAN, TRUEX, and SREX Flowsheet Test to Remove Cesium, Surrogate Actinide Elements, and Strontium from INEEL Tank Waste Using Sorbent Columns and Centrifugal Contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three unit operations for the removal of selected fission products, actinides, and RCRA metals (mercury and lead) have been successfully integrated and tested for extended run times with simulated INEEL acidic tank waste. The unit operations were ion exchange for Cs removal, followed by TRUEX solvent extraction for Eu (actinide surrogate), Hg, and Re (Tc surrogate) removal, and subsequent SREX solvent extraction for Sr and Pb removal. Approximately 45 L of simulated INTEC tank waste was first processed through three ion exchange columns in series for selective Cs removal. The columns were packed with a composite ammonium molybdophosphate-polyacrylonitrile (AMP-PAN) sorbent. The experimental breakthrough data were in excellent agreement with modeling predictions based on data obtained with much smaller columns. The third column (220 cm3) was used for polishing and Cs removal after breakthrough of the up-stream columns. The Cs removal was >99.83% in the ion exchange system without interference from other species. Most of the effluent from the ion exchange (IX) system was immediately processed through a TRUEX solvent extraction flowsheet to remove europium (americium surrogate), mercury and rhenium (technetium surrogate) from the simulated waste. The TRUEX flowsheet test was performed utilizing 23 stages of 3.3-cm centrifugal contactors. Greater than 99.999% of the Eu, 96.3% of the Hg, and 56% of the Re were extracted from the simulated feed and recovered in the strip and wash streams. Over the course of the test, there was no detectable build-up of any components in the TRUEX solvent. The raffinate from the TRUEX test was stored and subsequently processed several weeks later through a SREX solvent extraction flowsheet to remove strontium, lead, and Re (Tc surrogate) from the simulated waste. The SREX flowsheet test was performed using the same centrifugal contactors used in the TRUEX test after reconfiguration and the addition of three stages. Approximately 99.9% of the Sr, >99.89% of the Pb, and >96.4% of the Re were extracted from the aqueous feed to the SREX flowsheet and recovered in the strip and wash sections. Approximately 41 L of simulated tank waste (based on the volume processed through the TRUEX flowsheet) was processed through the integrated flowsheet and resulted in 175 L of liquid high activity waste (HAW) and 219.6 L of liquid low activity waste (LAW). The HAW fraction would be evaporated, dried and subsequently vitrified for final disposal. Based on current baseline assumptions, including a maximum phosphate loading of 2.5 wt. % in the HAW glass, the flowsheet tested would result in the production 0.195 kg of glass per L of tank waste processed. The LAW fraction would be solidified (via evaporation and denitration) and subsequently grouted. The current baseline assumptions for grouting the LAW stream indicate 0.37 kg of grout would be produced per L of tank waste treated. Under these assumptions, treating the current inventory of {approximately}5 E+6 L (5,000 m3) of tank waste would result in 375 m3 of HAW glass and 1,135 m3 of LAW Class A performance grout. The HAW glass volume could be significantly decreased by suitable TRUEX flowsheet modifications.

Herbst, R.S.; Law, J.D.; Todd, T.A.; Wood, D.J.; Garn, T.G.; Wade, E.L.

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Fission converter heat removal and safety under accident conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and safety of the heat removal system of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) design for a fission converter-based epithermal beam is discussed in this paper. Plate-type reactor fuel elements, used in the MIT research reactor (MITR-II), are also used for the fission converter. This fission converter-based beam provides epithermal neutron fluxes at the patient position in excess of 10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2}s with very low contamination of fast neutrons and gamma rays.

Sutharshan, B.; Todreas, N.E.; Harling, O.K. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition with lead additive  

SciTech Connect

This disclosure relates to a zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition containing an additive providing improved zinc-on-zinc recyclability. The improved electrolyte composition involves the use of a lead additive to inhibit undesirable irregular plating and reduce nodular or dendritic growth on the electrode surface. The lead-containing electrolyte composition of the present invention appears to influence not only the morphology of the base plate zinc, but also the morphology of the zinc-on-zinc replate. In addition, such lead-containing electrolyte compositions appear to reduce hydrogen formation.

Henriksen, Gary L. (Troy, MI)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

NETL Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise Power and Cost Savings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise Power and Cost Savings Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise Power and Cost Savings NETL Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise Power and Cost Savings May 30, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Carbon dioxide removal sorbents developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) could result in power and cost savings for users of some heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems under a recently signed license agreement. NETL, the research and development laboratory for DOE's Office of Fossil Energy, entered into a patent license agreement with Boston-based Enverid Systems Inc. for NETL-developed solid sorbents that remove CO2 from gas streams. NETL's sorbents will be incorporated into an Enverid product called EnClaire™, which adds on to HVAC systems to reduce power

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Methods for removing contaminant matter from a porous material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT); Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

202

ARM Lead Mentor Selection Process  

SciTech Connect

The ARM Climate Research Facility currently operates more than 300 instrument systems that provide ground-based observations of the atmospheric column. To keep ARM at the forefront of climate observations, the ARM infrastructure depends heavily on instrument scientists and engineers, also known as Instrument Mentors. Instrument Mentors must have an excellent understanding of in situ and remote-sensing instrumentation theory and operation and have comprehensive knowledge of critical scale-dependent atmospheric processes. They also possess the technical and analytical skills to develop new data retrievals that provide innovative approaches for creating research-quality data sets.

Sisterson, DL

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

203

Non-lead environmentally safe projectiles and explosive container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid object having controlled frangibility, such as a bullet or a container for explosives, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A wetting material is deposited on the base constituent which is made of a relative dense, hard material. The wetting material enhances the wettability of the base constituent with the binder constituent, which is lighter and softer than the base constituent.

Lowden, Richard A. (Clinton, TN); McCoig, Thomas M. (Maryville, TN); Dooley, Joseph B. (Kingston, TN); Smith, Cyrus M. (Knoxville, TN)

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Non-lead environmentally safe projectiles and explosive container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid object having controlled frangibility, such as a bullet or a container for explosives, is made by combining two different metals in proportions calculated to achieve a desired density, without using lead. A wetting material is deposited on the base constituent which is made of a relative dense, hard material. The wetting material enhances the wettability of the base constituent with the binder constituent, which is lighter and softer than the base constituent. 10 figs.

Lowden, R.A.; McCoig, T.M.; Dooley, J.B.; Smith, C.M.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Hydrogen Removal From Heating Oil of a Parabolic Trough ...  

Hydrogen Removal From Heating Oil of a Parabolic Trough Increases the Life of the Trough and its Components A Method to Selectively Remove & Measure Hydrogen Gas from ...

206

An Experimental Study of Chemical Oxygen Demand Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental results showed that the refractory organics in coking wastewater can be effectively removed by this process, and COD removal efficiency was ...

207

Michigan Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from...

208

Salt Fluxes for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2001... for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from Molten Aluminum ... Solid chloride salts containing MgC2 can be used to remove alkali ...

209

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

210

South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas...

211

Mechanical Pretreatment of Lead Based Alloy Anode for Zinc ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biosorption Characteristics of Pb(II) from Aqueous Solution onto Poplar Cotton · Characterization of Aluminum Cathode Sheets Used for Zinc Electrowinning.

212

Lead-and Boron-Based Chemically Bonded Phosphates Ceramics ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... they not only could be used for shielding gamma rays and neutrons as well, but also to ... Burst, Ring and Biaxial Creep of Zircaloy Cladding – Applications to ...

213

Mixed waste removal from a hazardous waste storage tank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spent fuel transfer canal at the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor was found to be leaking 400 gallons of water per day into the surrounding soil. Sampling of the sediment layer on the floor of the canal to determine the environmental impact of the leak identified significant radiological contamination and elevated levels of cadmium and lead which are hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under RCRA regulations and Rules of Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, the canal was considered a hazardous waste storage tank. This paper describes elements of the radiological control program established in support of a fast-track RCRA closure plan that involved underwater mapping of the radiation fields, vacuuming, and ultra-filtration techniques that were successfully used to remove the mixed waste sediments and close the canal in a method compliant with state and federal regulations.

Geber, K.R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Mercury removal from solid mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

The removal of mercury from mixed wastes is an essential step in eliminating the temporary storage of large inventories of mixed waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Currently thermal treatment has been identified as a baseline technology and is being developed as part of the DOE Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP). Since thermal treatment will not be applicable to all mercury containing mixed waste and the removal of mercury prior to thermal treatment may be desirable, laboratory studies have been initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop alternative remediation technologies capable of removing mercury from certain mixed waste. This paper describes laboratory investigations of the KI/I{sub 2} leaching processes to determine the applicability of this process to mercury containing solid mixed waste.

Gates, D.D.; Morrissey, M.; Chava, K.K.; Chao, K.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Technetium Removal Using Tc-Goethite Coprecipitation  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Low temperature waste forms coupled with technetium removal using an alternative immobilization process such as Fe(II) treated-goethite precipitation” to increase our understanding of 99Tc long-term stability in goethite mineral form and the process that controls the 99Tc(VII) reduction and removal by the final Fe (oxy)hydroxide forms. The overall objectives of this task were to 1) evaluate the transformation process of Fe (oxy)hydroxide solids to the more crystalline goethite (?-FeOOH) mineral for 99Tc removal and 2) determine the mechanism that limits 99Tc(IV) reoxidation in Fe(II)-treated 99Tc-goethite mineral and 3) evaluate whether there is a long-term 99Tcoxidation state change for Tc sequestered in the iron solids.

Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Jung, Hun Bok; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

216

Improved method for removing metal vapor from gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for gas cleanup to remove one or more metallic contaminants present as vapor. More particularly, the invention relates to a gas cleanup process using mass transfer to control the saturation levels such that essentially no particulates are formed, and the vapor condenses on the gas passage surfaces. It addresses the need to cleanup an inert gas contaminated with cadmium which may escape from the electrochemical processing of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel in a hot cell. The IFR is a complete, self-contained, sodium-cooled, pool-type fast reactor fueled with a metallic alloy of uranium, plutonium and zirconium, and is equipped with a close-coupled fuel cycle. Tests with a model have shown that removal of cadmium from argon gas is in the order of 99.99%. The invention could also apply to the industrial cleanup of air or other gases contaminated with zinc, lead, or mercury. In addition, the invention has application in the cleanup of other gas systems contaminated with metal vapors which may be toxic or unhealthy.

Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

217

A Comparison of Led-From and Leads-to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Progress properties of parallel programs are often expressed using the operator leads-to, a binary relation over predicates on the program state. Informally, p leads-to q means that from a state satisfying p a state satisfying q is reached eventually. We investigate the notion of the weakest predicate that leads-to q, for some given q. We formalize this notion by defining a predicate transformer called led-from and show that led-from maps a predicate q to the weakest predicate that leads-to q. We also demonstrate that led-from and leads-to are equivalent in expressive power by showing that each can be defined in terms of the other. The advantages of basing concurrent program semantics on the predicate transformer led-from rather than the relation leads-to are similar to those of basing sequential program semantics on the predicate transformer wp rather than on the relation of Hoare-Triples {p}S{q}. In particular, questions about junctivity properties can be raised and answered. Am...

Edgar Knapp

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Process for removing metals from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions. 2 tabs.

Napier, J.M.; Hancher, C.M.; Hackett, G.D.

1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

219

Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separting the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF.sub.2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium, without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

Pulley, Howard (West Paducah, KY); Seltzer, Steven F. (Paducah, KY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separating the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

Pulley, H.; Seltzer, S.F.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Experimental validation of lead cross sections for scale and MCNP  

SciTech Connect

Moving spent nuclear fuel between facilities often requires the use of lead-shielded casks. Criticality safety that is based upon calculations requires experimental validation of the fuel matrix and lead cross section libraries. A series of critical experiments using a high-enriched uranium-aluminum fuel element with a variety of reflectors, including lead, has been identified. Twenty-one configurations were evaluated in this study. The fuel element was modelled for KENO V.a and MCNP 4a using various cross section sets. The experiments addressed in this report can be used to validate lead-reflected calculations. Factors influencing calculated k{sub eff} which require further study include diameters of styrofoam inserts and homogenization.

Henrikson, D.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Perchlorate ion (C104) removal using an electrochemically induced catalytic reaction on modified activated carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perchlorate is known to adversely affect the thyroid gland functions including iodide take up, thus perchlorate should be removed from drinking water. Bituminous coal-based activated carbon (AC) has been used for perchlorate removal in past years. Virgin carbon and carbon modified by oxidation with HNO3, NaOH and H2O2 were examined in this study for their ability to remove perchlorate by reduction or adsorption mechanisms. Surface functional groups formed on the modified AC (MAC) were examined with diffuse reflectance infrared spectrometry. Inhibition of perchlorate removal onto MAC by various anions ( - Cl , - 3 NO , and - 2 4 SO ) and solution pH (4.5, 7.2 and 10.5) were examined to characterize the MACs before an electrochemical reaction was performed. Surface functional groups were increased by oxidation. Groups that were found on the carbon include, but are not limited to lactone, quinine, carboxylate, and nitrogenoxygen groups. The effect of pH on removal of perchlorate by MAC was greatly affected by the change in the zero point charge (ZPC) induced on the carbon by modification. Virgin carbon also experienced difficulty in removing perchlorate when solution pH was above the ZPC. Anion inhibition varied with the modification process. - 3 NO inhibited perchlorate removal only by the virgin carbon. The other anions showed no major effects on the removal efficiency of perchlorate by the carbons. Electrochemical processes did not show favorable results in removal of perchlorate. The dominant mechanism of perchlorate removal during desorption tests was adsorption onto the carbon surfaces via ion exchange.

Langille, Meredith Caitlyn

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Spatial And Temporal Relationships Between Blood Lead And Soil Lead Concentrations In Detroit, Michigan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study explored variations in child blood lead levels (BLLs) relative to street-side soil lead in Detroit, Michigan. Findings showed that average BLLs steadily decreased… (more)

Bickel, Michael Jonathan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Method of dye removal for the textile industry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention comprises a method of processing a waste stream containing dyes, such as a dye bath used in the textile industry. The invention comprises using an inorganic-based polymer, such as polyphosphazene, to separate dyes and/or other chemicals from the waste stream. Membranes comprising polyphosphazene have the chemical and thermal stability to survive the harsh, high temperature environment of dye waste streams, and have been shown to completely separate dyes from the waste stream. Several polyphosplhazene membranes having a variety of organic substituent have been shown effective in removing color from waste streams.

Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Method of removing cesium from steam  

SciTech Connect

Method for removal of radioactive cesium from a hot vapor, such as high temperature steam, including the steps of passing input hot vapor containing radioactive cesium into a bed of silicate glass particles and chemically incorporating radioactive cesium in the silicate glass particles at a temperature of at least about 700.degree. F.

Carson, Jr., Neill J. (Clarendon Hills, IL); Noland, Robert A. (Oak Park, IL); Ruther, Westly E. (Skokie, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report  

SciTech Connect

The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

ASBESTOS PIPE-INSULATION REMOVAL ROBOT SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

This final topical report details the development, experimentation and field-testing activities for a robotic asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system developed for use within the DOE's weapon complex as part of their ER and WM program, as well as in industrial abatement. The engineering development, regulatory compliance, cost-benefit and field-trial experiences gathered through this program are summarized.

Unknown

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications.

Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Derzon, Dora K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nelson, Jill S. (Albuquerque, NM); Rand, Peter B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Process for removing carbon from uranium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon contamination is removed from uranium and uranium alloys by heating in inert atmosphere to 700.degree.-1900.degree.C in effective contact with yttrium to cause carbon in the uranium to react with the yttrium. The yttrium is either in direct contact with the contaminated uranium or in indirect contact by means of an intermediate transport medium.

Powell, George L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Heat exchanger with a removable tube section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is described in which the tube sheet is secured against primary liquid pressure, but which allows for easy removal of the tube section. The tube section is supported by a flange which is secured by a number of shear blocks, each of which extends into a slot which is immovable with respect to the outer shell of the heat exchanger. (auth)

Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.

1975-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

231

REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The removal of chlorides from aqueons solutions is described. The process involves contacting the aqueous chloride containing solution with a benzene solution about 0.005 M in phenyl mercuric acetate whereby the chloride anions are taken up by the organic phase and separating the organic phase from the aqueous solutions.

Schulz, W.W.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications. 1 fig.

Arnold, C. Jr.; Derzon, D.K.; Nelson, J.S.; Rand, P.B.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

233

Applications of porous electrodes to metal-ion removal and the design of battery systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This dissertation treats the use of porous electrodes as electrochemical reactors for the removal of dilute metal ions. A methodology for the scale-up of porous electrodes used in battery applications is given. Removal of 4 ..mu..g Pb/cc in 1 M sulfuric acid was investigated in atmospheric and high-pressure, flow-through porous reactors. The atmospheric reactor used a reticulated vitreous carbon porous bed coated in situ with a mercury film. Best results show 98% removal of lead from the feed stream. Results are summarized in a dimensionless plot of Sherwood number vs Peclet number. High-pressure, porous-electrode experiments were performed to investigate the effect of pressure on the current efficiency. Pressures were varied up to 120 bar on electrode beds of copper or lead-coated spheres. The copper spheres showed high hydrogen evolution rates which inhibited lead deposition, even at high cathodic overpotentials. Use of lead spheres inhibited hydrogen evolution but often resulted in the formation of lead sulfate layers; these layers were difficult to reduce back to lead. Experimental data of one-dimensional porous battery electrodes are combined with a model for the current collector and cell connectors to predict ultimate specific energy and maximum specific power for complete battery systems. Discharge behavior of the plate as a whole is first presented as a function of depth of discharge. These results are combined with the voltage and weight penalties of the interconnecting bus and post, positive and negative active material, cell container, etc. to give specific results for the lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide high-temperature battery. Subject to variation is the number of positive electrodes, grid conductivity, minimum current-collector weight, and total delivered capacity. The battery can be optimized for maximum energy or power, or a compromise design may be selected.

Trost, G.G.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

NIST Leads Revision of International Coordinate Measuring ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Leads Revision of International Coordinate Measuring Machine Standard. ... ASME) represents the final step in a decade-long effort led by the ...

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

235

Lead by Example with Smart Energy Management  

SciTech Connect

The Lead by Example with Smart Energy Management brochure describes FEMP's services, namely financing and acquisition support, technical assistance and policy, and outreach and coordination.

Not Available

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Lead-Zinc 2000 (Electronic Format)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... 55-116]Primary Lead Reduction—A Survey of Existing Smelters and Refineries[ pp. 117-126]Operations at the Doe Run Company's ...

237

WEB RESOURCE: European Lead Free soldering NETwork  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... It initial objective is to enable electronics producers in the European Union (EU) to meet an EU directive to introduce lead-free soldering. "

238

Lead by Example with Smart Energy Management  

SciTech Connect

The Lead by Example with Smart Energy Management brochure describes FEMP's services, namely financing and acquisition support, technical assistance and policy, and outreach and coordination.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger. Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants - while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of a addressing the emission of SO{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase I and Phase II requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variable than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides the Final Test Plan for the first coal tested in the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.

Jankura, B.J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Improved Cobalt Removal: Field Testing Phase: Effects of Normally Encountered Plant Impurities on Removal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined the effects of plant impurities on cobalt removal from liquid radioactive waste. Improved process knowledge is critical to utilities that are continually working to increase the performance of their low-level waste (LLW) treatment systems. This report provides predictive chemistry information for improved cobalt removal obtained from test work at Catawba Nuclear Station. It also provides test methodologies for performing similar evaluations at other member plants.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path. 2 figures.

Corletti, M.M.; Schulz, T.L.

1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

242

Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path.

Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids Final Technical Report (From October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2005) Principle Authors Aihua Zhang, Qisheng Ma, Kangshi Wang, Yongchun Tang (co-PI), William A. Goddard (PI), Date Report was issued: December 9, 2005 DOE Award number: DE-FC26-02NT15383 Name and Address of Submitting Organization California Institute of Technology 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA91125 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

244

Method of arsenic removal from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

245

Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: a. treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10 and, b. separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (a) and (b) are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Photoacoustic removal of occlusions from blood vessels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Partial or total occlusions of fluid passages within the human body are removed by positioning an array of optical fibers in the passage and directing treatment radiation pulses along the fibers, one at a time, to generate a shock wave and hydrodynamics flows that strike and emulsify the occlusions. A preferred application is the removal of blood clots (thrombin and embolic) from small cerebral vessels to reverse the effects of an ischemic stroke. The operating parameters and techniques are chosen to minimize the amount of heating of the fragile cerebral vessel walls occurring during this photo acoustic treatment. One such technique is the optical monitoring of the existence of hydrodynamics flow generating vapor bubbles when they are expected to occur and stopping the heat generating pulses propagated along an optical fiber that is not generating such bubbles.

Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Maitland, IV, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA); Esch, Victor C. (San Francisco, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Method of removing cesium from steam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The foregoing objects of the present invention are achieved by a method for removing radioactive cesium from a hot vapor, such as steam, by a technique wherein the cesium chemically reacts with a filtering material which retains the cesium without causing degradation of the filtering material. The method is carried out at temperatures in the range of from about 700{degree}F to about 1000{degree}F, and even higher, but it preferably is utilized at a temperature of at least about 800{degree}F. The method uses a silica glass which is preferably in the form of spheres as the filter material. The preferred material is a borosilicate glass (Pyrex). The degree of removal of the radioactive cesium from the hot steam or other vapor approaches 90 to 100%.

Carson, N.J. Jr.; Noland, R.A.; Ruther, W.E.

1990-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

248

Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

249

Acid treatment removes zinc sulfide scale restriction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that removal of zinc sulfide (ZnS) scale with acid restored an offshore Louisiana well's production to original rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near well bore area. The selected acid had been proven to control iron sulfide (FeS) scales in sour wells without causing harm to surface production equipment, tubing, and other downhole hardware. The successful removal of the blockage re-established previous production rates with a 105% increase in flowing tubing pressure. On production for a number of months, a high rate, high-pressure offshore well was experiencing unusually rapid pressure and rate declines. A small sample of the restrictive material was obtained during the wire line operations. The well was subsequently shut in while a laboratory analysis determined that zinc sulfide was the major component of the obstruction.

Biggs, K. (Kerr McGee Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Allison, D. (Otis Engineering Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Ford, W.G.F. (Halliburton Co., Duncan, OK (United States))

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Categorical Exclusion 4568, Crane Removal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

l)eterminationFornl l)eterminationFornl Project Title: Crane Removal Project (4568) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is to remove an old legacy crane trolley and old crane operated cab. General Administration/Management DA I - Routine business actions DA2 - Administrative contract amendments DA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations DA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect DA6 - Procedural rulemakings upgrade DA7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged DA8 - Award of technical support/M&O/personal service contracts DA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training DAIO - Reports on non-DOE legislation DA II - Technical advice and planning assistance

251

Shortage leads to green route to olefins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new study examines a green route to glycerol via ultraviolet irradiation of fats and vegetable oils that may lead to a biobased source of acrylic acid and long-chain olefins. Shortage leads to green route to olefins Publications aocs articles bo

252

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Makarewicz, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Meredith, Paul F. (Knoxville, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Makarewicz, M.A.; Meredith, P.F.

1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

254

Trojan PWR Decommissioning: Large Component Removal Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the decommissioning of large commercial nuclear plants in the United States is in its infancy, the technical challenges with associated radioactive waste management are clear. This report describes the removal and disposal of four steam generators and one pressurizer from the Trojan nuclear power plant, the first large PWR to be decommissioned in the United States. The report chronicles the problems, successes, and lessons learned in this project, which was completed on schedule and under budget in...

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

255

Removal of iron from impure graphites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Iron-impregnated and ash-rich graphites have been purified by leaching with gaseous I/sub 2/ at 900/sup 0/C. With addition of H/sub 2/, the rate of removal of impurity iron can be markedly increased and becomes comparable to that obtained with Cl/sub 2/. I/sub 2/ has an advantage in that it can also volatilize Ca and perhaps Ba and Sr.

Growcock, F.B.; Heiser, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

1987-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Process for removing sulfur from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

Aida, T.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.

1983-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

259

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, Milton (12833 S. 82nd Ct., Palos Park, IL 60464); Sinha, Shome N. (5748 Drexel, 2A, Chicago, IL 60637)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Fan-fold shielded electrical leads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate. 3 figs.

Rohatgi, R.R.; Cowan, T.E.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fan-fold shielded electrical leads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate.

Rohatgi, Rajeev R. (Mountain View, CA); Cowan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

NIOSH alert: Request for assistance in preventing lead poisoning in construction workers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for assistance in preventing the exposure of workers to lead (7439921) during the maintenance, repainting, or demolition of bridges or other steel structures coated with lead containing paints was discussed. Lead exposure may occur during abrasive blasting, sanding, cutting, burning, or welding of these structures. Specific cases were cited where lead poisoning was manifest in torch burners, burner helpers, power tool users, rivet removers, blasters, carpenters, steam fitters, and drillers. Preventive measures discussed included the use of air monitoring equipment to determine whether a hazard exists, and engineering controls including those which will protect workers during welding, cutting or burning. Surface preparation was reviewed along with proper work procedures for tasks inside containment structures and the specifications required to be in new contracts. Personal hygiene practices which can help reduce the exposure likelihood were discussed, along with the proper use of warning signs and personal protective equipment. Medical surveillance programs were reviewed, including medical monitoring, medical protection, mandatory reporting and training.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Synthesis, Characterization, to application of water soluble and easily removable cationic pressure sensitive adhesives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, the world has expressed an increasing interest in the recycling of waste paper to supplement the use of virgin fiber as a way to protect the environment. Statistics show that major countries are increasing their use of recycled paper. For example, in 1991 to 1996, the U.S. increased its recovered paper utilization rate from 31% to 39%, Germany went from 50% to 60%, the UK went from 60% to 70%, France increased from 46% to 49%, and China went from 32% to 35% [1]. As recycled fiber levels and water system closures both increase, recycled product quality will need to improve in order for recycled products to compete with products made from virgin fiber [2]. The use of recycled fiber has introduced an increasing level of metal, plastic, and adhesive contamination into the papermaking process which has added to the complexity of the already overwhelming task of providing a uniform and clean recycle furnish. The most harmful of these contaminates is a mixture of adhesives and polymeric substances that are commonly known as stickies. Stickies, which enter the mill with the pulp furnish, are not easily removed from the repulper and become more difficult the further down the system they get. This can be detrimental to the final product quality. Stickies are hydrophobic, tacky, polymeric materials that are introduced into the papermaking system from a mixture of recycled fiber sources. Properties of stickies are very similar to the fibers used in papermaking, viz. size, density, hydrophobicity, and electrokinetic charge. This reduces the probability of their removal by conventional separation processes, such as screening and cleaning, which are based on such properties. Also, their physical and chemical structure allows for them to extrude through screens, attach to fibers, process equipment, wires and felts. Stickies can break down and then reagglomerate and appear at seemingly any place in the mill. When subjected to a number of factors including changes in pH, temperature, concentration, charge, and shear forces, stickies can deposit [3]. These deposits can lead to decreased runnability, productivity and expensive downtime. If the stickie remains in the stock, then machine breaks can be common. Finally, if the stickie is not removed or deposited, it will either leave in the final product causing converting and printing problems or recirculate within the mill. It has been estimated that stickies cost the paper industry between $600 and $700 million a year due to the cost of control methods and lost production attributed to stickies [3]. Also, of the seven recycling mills opened in the United States between 1994 and 1997, four have closed citing stickies as the main reason responsible for the closure [4]. Adhesives are widely used throughout the paper and paperboard industry and are subsequently found in the recycled pulp furnish. Hodgson stated that even the best stock preparation process can only remove 99% of the contaminants, of which the remaining 1% is usually adhesives of various types which are usually 10-150 microns in effective diameter [5]. The large particles are removed by mechanical means such as cleaners and screens, and the smaller, colloidal particles can be removed with washing. The stickies that pass through the cleaning and screening processes cause 95% of the problems associated with recycling [6]. The cleaners will remove most of the stickies that have a density varying from the pulp slurry ({approx}1.0 g/cm3) and will accept stickies with densities ranging from 0.95-1.05 g/cm3 [2]. The hydrophobicity of the material is also an important characteristic of the stickie [7]. The hydrophobicity causes the stickies to agglomerate with other hydrophobic materials such as other stickies, lignin, and even pitch. The tacky and viscous nature of stickies contributes to many product and process problems, negatively affecting the practicality of recycled fiber use. The source of stickies that evade conventional removal techniques are usually synthetic polymers, including acrylates, styrene butadiene rub

Institute of Paper Science Technology

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

Data, Feedback, & Awareness Lead to Big Energy Savings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy feedback and energy feedback and "staff monitors" to reinforce commu- nication and activity led to improved routine practices and significant energy savings. Members of the Navy Region Southwest Metro San Diego regional energy management team with an example poster from their energy awareness program. (Photo courtesy FEMP/NRSMSD.) Data, Feedback, & Awareness Lead to Big Energy Savings The Navy Region Southwest Metro San Diego Area (NRSMSD) regional energy management team achieved significant energy savings at the three major complexes: Naval Base Coronado, Naval Base San Diego, and Naval Base Point Loma, result- ing largely from a well organized energy awareness program centered on energy data

265

Data, Feedback, & Awareness Lead to Big Energy Savings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

monthly energy feedback and monthly energy feedback and "staff monitors" to reinforce commu- nication and activity led to improved routine practices and significant energy savings. Members of the Navy Region Southwest Metro San Diego regional energy management team with an example poster from their energy awareness program. (Photo courtesy FEMP/NRSMSD.) Data, Feedback, & Awareness Lead to Big Energy Savings The Navy Region Southwest Metro San Diego Area (NRSMSD) regional energy management team achieved significant energy savings at the three major complexes: Naval Base Coronado, Naval Base San Diego, and Naval Base Point Loma, result- ing largely from a well organized energy awareness program centered on energy data

266

DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements August 16, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has led to a new licensing agreement that will improve the performance of state-of-the-art gas turbines, resulting in cleaner, more reliable and affordable energy. The collaborative technology license agreement, penned by Mikro Systems Inc. and Siemens Energy Inc., reflects growth in U.S.-based manufacturing know-how and leadership in cutting-edge technology development and rapid implementation. Gas turbines, which are used to produce electricity for industrial or central power generation applications, consist sequentially of compressor,

267

Progress and challenges in bipolar lead-acid battery development  

SciTech Connect

Bipolar lead-acid batteries have higher power densities than any other aqueous battery system. Predicted specific powers based on models and prototypes range from 800 kW/kg for 100 ms discharge times to 1.6 kW/kg for 10 s. A 48 V automotive bipolar battery could have 2 1/2 times the cold cranking rate of a monopolar 12 V design in the same size. Problems which have precluded the development of commercial bipolar designs include the instability of substrate materials and enhanced side reactions. Design approaches include pseudo-bipolar configurations, as well as true bipolar designs in planar and tubular configurations. Substrate materials used include lead and lead alloys, carbons, conductive ceramics, and tin-oxide-coated glass fibers. These approaches are reviewed and evaluated.

Bullock, K.R. [AT and T Bell Labs./Power Systems, Mesquite, TX (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Development of a plant dynamics computer code for analysis of a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle energy converter coupled to a natural circulation lead-cooled fast reactor.  

SciTech Connect

STAR-LM is a lead-cooled pool-type fast reactor concept operating under natural circulation of the coolant. The reactor core power is 400 MWt. The open-lattice core consists of fuel pins attached to the core support plate, (the does not consist of removable fuel assemblies). The coolant flows outside of the fuel pins. The fuel is transuranic nitride, fabricated from reprocessed LWR spent fuel. The cladding material is HT-9 stainless steel; the steady-state peak cladding temperature is 650 C. The coolant is single-phase liquid lead under atmospheric pressure; the core inlet and outlet temperatures are 438 C and 578 C, respectively. (The Pb coolant freezing and boiling temperatures are 327 C and 1749 C, respectively). The coolant is contained inside of a reactor vessel. The vessel material is Type 316 stainless steel. The reactor is autonomous meaning that the reactor power is self-regulated based on inherent reactivity feedbacks and no external power control (through control rods) is utilized. The shutdown (scram) control rods are used for startup and shutdown and to stop the fission reaction in case of an emergency. The heat from the reactor is transferred to the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle in in-reactor heat exchangers (IRHX) located inside the reactor vessel. The IRHXs are shell-and-tube type heat exchangers with lead flowing downwards on the shell side and CO{sub 2} flowing upwards on the tube side. No intermediate circuit is utilized. The guard vessel surrounds the reactor vessel to contain the coolant, in the very unlikely event of reactor vessel failure. The Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) implementing the natural circulation of air flowing upwards over the guard vessel is used to cool the reactor, in the case of loss of normal heat removal through the IRHXs. The RVACS is always in operation. The gap between the vessels is filled with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) to enhance the heat removal by air by significantly reducing the thermal resistance of a gas-filled gap.

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.

2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

269

Property:LeadAgency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LeadAgency LeadAgency Jump to: navigation, search Property Name LeadAgency Property Type Page Pages using the property "LeadAgency" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 + BLM + C CA-017-05-051 + BLM + CA-170-02-15 + BLM + CA-650-2005-086 + BLM + CA-670-2010-107 + BLM + CA-670-2010-CX + BLM + CA-96062042 + United States Forest Service + D DOE-EA-1116 + United States Department of Energy + DOE-EA-1621 + United States Department of Energy + DOE-EA-1676 + United States Department of Energy + DOE-EA-1733 + United States Department of Energy + DOE-EA-1759 + United States Department of Energy + DOE-EA-1849 + United States Department of Energy + DOE-EA-1961 + United States Department of Energy +

270

INEEL Lead Recycling in a Moratorium Environment  

SciTech Connect

Since 1999, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Lead Project successfully recycled over 700,000 pounds of excess INEEL lead to the private sector. On February 14, 2000, the Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, formalized the January 12, 2000, moratorium on recycling radioactive scrap metal that prevented the unrestricted release of recycled scrap metals to the private sector. This moratorium created significant problems for the INEEL lead recycling program and associated plans; however, through the cooperative efforts of the INEEL and Idaho State University as well as innovative planning and creative thinking the recycling issues were resolved. This collaboration has recycled over 160,000 pounds of excess lead to Idaho State University with a cost savings of over $.5M.

Kooda, K. E.; Galloway, K.; McCray, C. W.; Aitken, D. W.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

271

Coupling between Tropospheric and Stratospheric Leading Modes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupling between tropospheric and stratospheric leading modes in anomaly fields is investigated. By using daily data at many levels in addition to monthly mean data, the transition of spatial patterns and the direction and speed of the vertical ...

Hisanori Itoh; Ken-ichi Harada

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

Lara-Curzio, Edgar (Lenoir City, TN); An, Ke (Knoxville, TX); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Contescu, Cristian I. (Knoxville, TN); Baker, Frederick S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armstrong, Beth L. (Clinton, TN)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

273

Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O; Dudney, Nancy J; Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Armstrong, Beth L

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Silk Road Leads to the APS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The silk road leads to the APS Lori Khatchadourian (University of Michigan) and Adam Smith (The University of Chicago) switch sample mounts at the ChemMatCARS 15-ID-D beamline. The...

275

Sustainable agricultural residue removal for bioenergy: A spatially comprehensive US national assessment  

SciTech Connect

This study provides a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal potential across the United States for bioenergy production. Earlier assessments determining the quantity of agricultural residue that could be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at the regional and national scale faced a number of computational limitations. These limitations included the number of environmental factors, the number of land management scenarios, and the spatial fidelity and spatial extent of the assessment. This study utilizes integrated multi-factor environmental process modeling and high fidelity land use datasets to perform the sustainable agricultural residue removal assessment. Soil type represents the base spatial unit for this study and is modeled using a national soil survey database at the 10–100 m scale. Current crop rotation practices are identified by processing land cover data available from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer database. Land management and residue removal scenarios are identified for each unique crop rotation and crop management zone. Estimates of county averages and state totals of sustainably available agricultural residues are provided. The results of the assessment show that in 2011 over 150 million metric tons of agricultural residues could have been sustainably removed across the United States. Projecting crop yields and land management practices to 2030, the assessment determines that over 207 million metric tons of agricultural residues will be able to be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at that time. This biomass resource has the potential for producing over 68 billion liters of cellulosic biofuels.

Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory; Bryden, Kenneth Mark [Ames L; Nelson, R. G. [Kansas State University

2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

276

Primer on lead-acid storage batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This handbook was developed to help DOE facility contractors prevent accidents caused during operation and maintenance of lead-acid storage batteries. Major types of lead-acid storage batteries are discussed as well as their operation, application, selection, maintenance, and disposal (storage, transportation, as well). Safety hazards and precautions are discussed in the section on battery maintenance. References to industry standards are included for selection, maintenance, and disposal.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

Cha, Chang Y. (3807 Reynolds St., Laramie, WY 82070)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

279

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag.

Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN); Trowbridge, Lee D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stories Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time The Lab's 1,000th shipment of transuranic waste recently left Los Alamos,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary DOE removes all remaining HEU...

282

Method for removal of methane from coalbeds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing methane gas from underground coalbeds prior to mining the coal which comprises drilling at least one borehole from the surface into the coalbed. The borehole is started at a slant rather than directly vertically, and as it descends, a gradual curve is followed until a horizontal position is reached where the desired portion of the coalbed is intersected. Approaching the coalbed in this manner and fracturing the coalbed in the major natural fraction direction cause release of large amounts of the trapped methane gas.

Pasini, III, Joseph (Morgantown, WV); Overbey, Jr., William K. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Removal of Fluoride from Waste Water of Aluminium Smelter by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , General Abstracts: Light Metals Division. Presentation Title, Removal of ...

284

Method for removing fluoride contamination from nitric acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fluoride ions are removed from nitric acid solution by contacting the vaporized solution with alumina or zirconium.

Pruett, David J. (Knoxville, TN); Howerton, William B. (Kingston, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Removing Pollutants from Water, Solar Energy - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 5, 2013 ... B. Materials for the Environment: Removing Pollutants from Water, Solar Energy Program Organizers: Fernand Marquis, Naval Postgraduate ...

286

Powder Removal from Complex Structures Produced Using Electron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Additive Manufacturing of Metals. Presentation Title, Powder Removal from ...

287

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

288

Removal of Inclusions from Solar Grade Silicon Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polysilicon in Photovoltaics: Market Conditions & Competing PV Technologies ... Removal of Inclusions from Solar Grade Silicon Using Electromagnetic Field.

289

Modified Bayer Process for Alumina Removal from Hanford Waste  

AREVA NC Inc. Modified Bayer Process for Alumina Removal from Hanford Waste January 24, 2007 Don Geniesse AREVA NC Inc.

290

Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention in one aspect comprises a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous-derived liquids by contacting said liquid with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene polymer (i.e. PS-DVB) having catechol ligands anchored to said polymer, said contacting being at an elevated temperature. In another aspect, the invention is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene polymer by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid in accordance with the aspect described above which regenerating process comprises: (a) treating said spent catecholated polystyrene polymer with an aqueous solution of at least one member selected from the group consisting of carbonates and bicarbonates of ammonium, alkali metals, and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10, and said treating being at a temperature in the range of about 20/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/C; (b) separating the solids and liquids from each other. In a preferred embodiment the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step: (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution which includes at least one lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (c) and (d) are added. Steps (c) and (d) comprise: (c) treating the solids with an aqueous alcoholic solution of at least one ammonium, alkali or alkaline earth metal bicarbonate at a temperature in the range of about 20 to 100/sup 0/C; and (d) separating the solids from the liquids.

Fish, R.H.

1984-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

291

TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

292

CLEANSPACE 'Small Debris Removal By Laser Illumination And Complementary Technologies'  

SciTech Connect

Studies show that the number of debris in Low Earth Orbit is exponentially growing despite future debris release mitigation measures considered. Especially, the already existing population of small and medium debris (between 1 cm and several dozens of cm) is today a concrete threat to operational satellites. A ground based laser solution which can remove at low expense and in a non-destructive way hazardous debris of decimetric size around selected space assets appears as one highly promising answer. This solution will be studied in the frame of CLEANSPACE project which is a part of the FP7 space theme. The overall CLEANSPACE objective is threefold: to propose an efficient and affordable global system architecture, to tackle safety regulation aspects, political implications and future collaborations, to develop affordable technological bricks and to establish roadmap for the development and the future implantation of a fully functional laser protection system. This paper will present the CLEANSPACE project.

Esmiller, Bruno [Astrium Space Transportation, 66 route de Verneuil, 78133 Les Mureaux (France); Jacquelard, Christophe [CILAS, 8 avenue Buffon - ZI La Source - BP 6319, 45063 Orleans (France)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

293

Removal of mercury from coal via a microbial pretreatment process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for the removal of mercury from coal prior to combustion is disclosed. The process is based on use of microorganisms to oxidize iron, sulfur and other species binding mercury within the coal, followed by volatilization of mercury by the microorganisms. The microorganisms are from a class of iron and/or sulfur oxidizing bacteria. The process involves contacting coal with the bacteria in a batch or continuous manner. The mercury is first solubilized from the coal, followed by microbial reduction to elemental mercury, which is stripped off by sparging gas and captured by a mercury recovery unit, giving mercury-free coal. The mercury can be recovered in pure form from the sorbents via additional processing.

Borole, Abhijeet P. (Knoxville, TN); Hamilton, Choo Y. (Knoxville, TN)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

294

Introduction Imperial College is a world leading University. In 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for hydrogen storage » Removal of siloxanes from biogas » Using solvent effects in synthesis » Physical organic

Alavi, Ali

295

The Motion and Removal Efficiency of Particles in Circular Tube Settlers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the assumption that flow pattern in tube settlers is laminar and the distribution of flow velocity is a circumgyratetional paraboloid, general hydraulic equations are deduced, with consideration of the effectors of acceleration and initial fall ... Keywords: Motion, Circular tube settlers, Hydraulic calculation, Removal efficiency

Min Xie; Zhou Shi; Xiaobo Liu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Intelligent control aeration and external carbon addition for improving nitrogen removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuzzy logic can in several ways be applied to improve the control of the activated sludge system. In this paper, fuzzy logic based control strategies for external carbon flow in the anoxic zone and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the aerobic zone ... Keywords: Energy saving, External carbon addition, Fuzzy control, Nitrogen removal, Predenitrification process

M. Yong; P. Yong-zhen; W. Xiao-lian; W. Shu-ying

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

298

NERSC seeks Computational Systems Group Lead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

seeks Computational Systems Group Lead seeks Computational Systems Group Lead NERSC seeks Computational Systems Group Lead January 6, 2011 by Katie Antypas Note: This position is now closed. The Computational Systems Group provides production support and advanced development for the supercomputer systems at NERSC. Manage the Computational Systems Group (CSG) which provides production support and advanced development for the supercomputer systems at NERSC (National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center). These systems, which include the second fastest supercomputer in the U.S., provide 24x7 computational services for open (unclassified) science to world-wide researchers supported by DOE's Office of Science. Duties/Responsibilities Manage the Computational Systems Group's staff of approximately 10

299

Leading By Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leading By Example Leading By Example Leading By Example November 3, 2011 - 3:08pm Addthis New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department’s headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department's headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department Brian Costlow Director, Office of Administration Brian Costlow has won several awards for his work recently, including the Federal Energy and Water Management Award and the Energy Department Energy Management Award for Exceptional Service for his efforts to make the Department's headquarter buildings models of sustainability. Every day, employees across the Energy Department work to make America more

300

Leading By Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leading By Example Leading By Example Leading By Example November 3, 2011 - 3:08pm Addthis New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department’s headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department's headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department Brian Costlow Director, Office of Administration Brian Costlow has won several awards for his work recently, including the Federal Energy and Water Management Award and the Energy Department Energy Management Award for Exceptional Service for his efforts to make the Department's headquarter buildings models of sustainability. Every day, employees across the Energy Department work to make America more

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Leading Teams and Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leading Teams and Projects Leading Teams and Projects Leading Teams and Projects February 18, 2014 8:30AM EST to February 19, 2014 4:00PM EST Registration Procedure: Please use the Corporate Human Resource Information System (CHRIS) Workflow process to request training enrollment. Session: 002487 Course Code: 0001. Cost $400. For organizations not currently using the CHRIS workflow process, please follow your existing interoffice training registration process. The Office of Learning and Workforce Development (HC-20) will assess the course cost for this training session directly through each Headquarters organization's Working Capital Fund account. Field office participants should register via CHRIS. They should ensure to note the cost of the training course in the tuition field of the training request.

302

Leading Edge Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leading Edge Technologies Inc Leading Edge Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Leading Edge Technologies Inc Place Lakeland, Florida Product Profitable manufacturer of lithium ion batteries for consumer electronics makers that merged with Skylab Technologies Group Inc in September 2001 to form Solicore. Coordinates 35.264796°, -89.724114° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.264796,"lon":-89.724114,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

303

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed- Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanford’s 300 Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, WA – Hanford’s River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has met a significant cleanup challenge on the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site by removing a 1,082-ton nuclear test reactor from the 300 Area.

304

Arsenic removal and stabilization by synthesized pyrite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arsenic is ubiquitous whether it is naturally occurring or produced by humans. It is found at sites on the National Priority List and at sites operated by DOE, where it is the second most commonly found contaminant. More wastes containing arsenic will be produced due to the lowering of the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for arsenic in drinking water which will result in more treatment facilities for arsenic removal that will generate residuals. Furthermore, arsenic can be released from such wastes under the reduced conditions that are found in landfills. Pyrite (FeS2) is believed to be a compound that has a high affinity for arsenic and is stable under anoxic conditions. The first task of this research was to develop a method for making pyrite crystals of defined size with minimal reaction time and at high yield. Effects on the synthesis of pyrite particles of pH, the ratio of Fe/S, temperature and reaction time were investigated in batch reactor systems. Pyrite was synthesized within 24 hours at pH values ranging from pH 3.6 through pH 5.6, and at a ratio of Fe/S of 0.5. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to size and characterize the pyrite particles. Experimental and analytical procedures developed for this work, included a hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method for measuring arsenic species (As(III), As(V)). The synthesized pyrite was applied to remove arsenic and its maximum capacity for arsenic removal was measured in batch adsorption experiments to be 3.23 ?mol/g for As(III) and 113 ?mol/g for As(V). Information obtained on the characteristics of chemical species before and after the reaction with arsenic showed that iron and sulfur were oxidized. Last, how strongly arsenic was bound to pyrite was investigated and it was determined that release of arsenic from As(III)-pyrite is not affected by pH, but release from As(V)-pyrite is affected by pH with minimum release in the range pH 5 to pH 8.

Song, Jin Kun

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

306

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

307

EM Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge EM Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Testing and equipment simulations ensure first-of-a-kind technological processes for sludge removal can be conducted safely and efficiently. Testing and equipment simulations ensure first-of-a-kind technological processes for sludge removal can be conducted safely and efficiently. RICHLAND, Wash. - The Richland Operations Office and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company successfully removed a portion of a highly radioactive sludge from underwater storage in a large basin adjacent to the K West reactor at the Hanford site this month. In that milestone, workers removed sludge originating from knock-out pots,

308

NETL: Gasification Systems - Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Project Number: DE-SC00008243 TDA Research, Inc. is developing a high-capacity, low-cost sorbent that removes anhydrous ammonia (NH3), mercury (Hg), and trace contaminants from coal- and coal/biomass-derived syngas. The clean-up system will be used after the bulk warm gas sulfur removal step, and remove NH3 and Hg in a regenerable manner while irreversibly capturing all other trace metals (e.g., Arsenic, Selenium) reducing their concentrations to sub parts per million (ppm) levels. Current project plans include identifying optimum chemical composition and structure that provide the best sorbent performance for removing trace contaminants, determining the effect of operating parameters, conducting multiple-cycle experiments to test the life of the sorbent for NH3 and Hg removal, and conducting a preliminary design of the sorbent reactor.

309

Categorical Exclusion 4566, Ash Removal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOrnI FOrnI Project Title: Ash Removal Project (4566) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is to split, containerize, package, transport and disposition one hundred and two (102) cans of mixed waste. General Administration/Management OA I - Routine business actions OA2 * Administrative contract amendments OA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations OA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect OA6 - Procedural rule makings upgrade OA 7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged OA8 . Award of technical supportlM&O/personal service contracts OA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training OA 10 - Reports on non-DOE legislation OA II -

310

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

SciTech Connect

This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

311

Electrochemical removal of material from metallic work  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Deburring, polishing, surface forming and the like are carried out by electrochemical machining with conformable electrode means including an electrically conducting and an insulating web. The surface of the work to be processed is covered by a deformable electrically insulating web or cloth which is perforated and conforms with the work. The web is covered by a deformable perforated electrically conducting screen electrode which also conforms with, and is insulated from, the work by the insulating web. An electrolyte is conducted through the electrode and insulating web and along the work through a perforated elastic member which engages the electrode under pressure pressing the electrode and web against the work. High current under low voltage is conducted betwen the electrode and work through the insulator, removing material from the work. Under the pressure of the elastic member, the electrode and insulator continue to conform with the work and the spacing between the electrode and work is maintained constant.

Csakvary, Tibor (Wilkens Township, Allegheny County, PA); Fromson, Robert E. (Wilkens Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1980-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

312

The HMDS Coating Flaw Removal Tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many high energy laser systems, optics with HMDS sol gel antireflective coatings are placed in close proximity to each other making them particularly susceptible to certain types of strong optical interactions. During the coating process, halo shaped coating flaws develop around surface digs and particles. Depending on the shape and size of the flaw, the extent of laser light intensity modulation and consequent probability of damaging downstream optics may increase significantly. To prevent these defects from causing damage, a coating flaw removal tool was developed that deploys a spot of decane with a syringe and dissolves away the coating flaw. The residual liquid is evacuated leaving an uncoated circular spot approximately 1mm in diameter. The resulting uncoated region causes little light intensity modulation and thus has a low probability of causing damage in optics downstream from the mitigated flaw site.

Monticelli, M V; Nostrand, M C; Mehta, N; Kegelmeyer, L; Johnson, M A; Fair, J; Widmayer, C

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

313

IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS  

SciTech Connect

In the first year of this project, we have established our experimental and theoretical methodologies for studies of the catalytic decarboxylation process. We have developed both glass and stainless steel micro batch type reactors for the fast screening of various catalysts with reaction substrates of model carboxylic acid compounds and crude oil samples. We also developed novel product analysis methods such as GC analyses for organic acids and gaseous products; and TAN measurements for crude oil. Our research revealed the effectiveness of several solid catalysts such as NA-Cat-1 and NA-Cat-2 for the catalytic decarboxylation of model compounds; and NA-Cat-5{approx}NA-Cat-9 for the acid removal from crude oil. Our theoretical calculations propose a three-step concerted oxidative decarboxylation mechanism for the NA-Cat-1 catalyst.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang

2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

314

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

315

Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Removal Sorbents for High Temperature Gas Streams Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,767,000 entitled "Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a unique regenerable sorbent process that can remove contaminants from gas produced by the gasification of fossil fuels. Specifically, the process removes hydrogen chloride by using the regenerable sorbent and simultaneously extracts hydrogen chloride compounds and hydrogen

316

Energy and Health Convening Lead Author (CLA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transparent Cost Database on OpenEI Leads: Austin Brown, Ryan McKeel The Transparent Cost Database provides and downloadable. http://en.openei.org/wiki/Transparent_Cost_Database Renewable Electricity Futures Study Authors) level. Additional states are being added. http://en.openei.org/wiki/GRR Navajo Generating Station

317

Separators for valve regulated lead acid batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews some aspects of the past history of the valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) battery in relationship to microglass separators that have been used from the conception of VRLA technology. It also focuses on some aspects of compression properties of the separator.

Zguris, G.C. [Hollingsworth & Vose Co., West Groton, MT (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Quality Support G. Q. Kirk, Lead (4)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Division Day Shift Supervisor B. H. Cupp HFIR Plant Manager Scheduling R. C. Conaway, Lead C. G. Corley B. Valentine Maintenance Basis Authority B. G. Rothrock HFIR Operations R. J. Reagan, Manager ESH&Q L. D, Secy. Systems Engineering Y. S. Kwon, Manager HFIR Maintenance D. H. Abercrombie, Manager A. M. Aaron

319

Employment Opportunities (Consultant) Program Review Lead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Working with the Program Manager, the Program Review Lead will facilitate discussions with an advisory group and will work with instructors and other subject matter experts to complete the program review of the program review process; working with instructors to develop learning plans and advising on instructional

Hitchcock, Adam P.

320

JOINT DEGREE PROGRAM LEADING TO THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

programs prior to beginning their graduate work. If a student decides to enter the combined program after with advanced work may be admitted to the Graduate School through the Graduate Program in Urban PlanningJOINT DEGREE PROGRAM LEADING TO THE MASTER OF URBAN PLANNING AND MASTER OF ARTS IN GEOGRAPHY DEGREE

Peterson, Blake R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Lead-Free Solder: Digital Resource Center -- Getting Lead out of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ARTICLE: Public Health and Environmental Benefits of Adopting Lead-Free Solders O.A. Ogunseitan; JOM article overviewing indutrial ecology and global ...

322

Removal of heavy metals from aqueous waste streams using surface-modified nanosized TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) colloidal particles ({approximately}45{angstrom}) whose surfaces were modified with chelating agents for photocatalytic removal of heavy-metal ions and their subsequent reduction to metallic form were investigated. Experiments were performed on nanoparticle TiO{sub 2} colloids derivatized with bidentate and tridentate ligands (thiolactic acid [TLA], cysteine, and alanine [ALA]) in batch mode in a photoreactor with 254nm light. We used catalysts designed and synthesized for selective and efficient removal of Pb and Cu with and without added hole scavenger (methanol). Parallel experiments also have been carried out in the dark to study metal ion adsorption properties. Solutions have been filtered to remove TiO{sub 2}, and metal particulates. Both the native solution and the metal deposited on the nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} particles were analyzed. Results demonstrate that for the case of lead, the most effective TiO{sub 2} surface modifier was TLA (>99% Pb(II) removed from solution). Experiments performed to study Cn removal using TiO{sub 2} colloids modified with alanine showed that copper ions were effectively removed and reduced to metallic form in the presence of methanol.

Meshkov, N. K.

1998-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

323

Photon position eigenvectors lead to complete photon wave mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have recently constructed a photon position operator with commuting components. This was long thought to be impossible, but our position eigenvectors have a vortex structure like twisted light. Thus they are not spherically symmetric and the position operator does not transform as a vector, so that previous non-existence arguments do not apply. We find two classes of position eigenvectors and obtain photon wave functions by projection onto the bases of position eigenkets that they define, following the usual rules of quantum mechanics. The hermitian position operator, r0, leads to a Landau-Peierls wave function, while field-like eigenvectors of the nonhermitian position operator and its adjoint lead to a biorthonormal basis. These two bases are equivalent in the sense that they are related by a similarity transformation. The eigenvectors of the nonhermitian position operators lead to a field-potential wave function pair. These field-like positive frequency wave functions satisfy Maxwell's equations, and thus justify the supposition that MEs describe single photon wave mechanics. The expectation value of the number operator is photon density with undetected photons integrated over, consistent with Feynman's conclusion that the density of non-interacting particles can be interpreted as probability density.

Margaret Hawton

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Field sampling and analysis plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The former YS-860 Firing Ranges are located at the eastern end of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant outside the primary facility fence line and west of Scarboro Road within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek watershed in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. A decision has been made by the US Department of Energy to conduct a removal action of lead-contaminated soils at this site as part of early source actions within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek watershed. This non-time critical removal action of bullets and lead-contaminated soil from the YS-860 Firing Ranges is being conducted as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 action. These actions are consistent with the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. The removal action will focus on the excavation of bullets and lead-contaminated soil from the shooting range berms, transportation of the material to a permitted treatment facility for disposal, demolition and land filling of a concrete trench and asphalt pathways at the site, and grading and revegetating of the entire site. This report is the field sampling and analysis plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges. The field sampling and analysis plan addresses environmental sampling for lead after the removal of lead-contaminated soil from the target berm area. The objective of this sampling plan is to obtain sufficient analytical data to confirm that the removal action excavation has successfully reduced lead levels in soil to below the action level of 1,400 micrograms/g.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Standard Guide for Dry Lead Glass and Oil-Filled Lead Glass Radiation Shielding Window Components for Remotely Operated Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standard Guide for Dry Lead Glass and Oil-Filled Lead Glass Radiation Shielding Window Components for Remotely Operated Facilities

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Feasibility study for early removal of HEU from CPP-651-Phase II  

SciTech Connect

A two-phase feasibility study was initiated in late 1996 to identify a way to expedite the removal of SNM from the CPP-651 vault. The first phase of this study provided preliminary information that appeared promising, but needed additional detailed planning and evaluate to validate the concepts and conclusions. The focus of Phase 2 was to provide the validation via resource-loaded schedules and more detailed cost estimates. Section 1 describes the purpose and objectives of the Phase 2 tasks and the programmatic drivers that influence related CPP-651 high-enriched uranium (HEU) management issues. Section 2 identifies the evaluation criteria and methodology and the transfer issues and barriers preventing shipment. Section 3 provides site-specific background information for the CPP-651 facility and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and describes the development of the basic material removal schedule, the proposed base case plan for removal of SNM, and the proposed HEU material management/shipping issues and strategies. Section 4 identifies the proposed options for accelerated removal of SNM and how they were evaluated via detailed scheduling, resource histograms, and cost analysis. Section 5 summarizes principal tasks for implementing this plan and other related HEU CPP-651 management issues that require continued planning efforts to assure successful implementation of this proposed early removal strategy.

Smith, C.V.; Henry, R.; Milligan, C.; Harmon, B.; Peterson, J.; Thom, M.A.; Campbell, R.; Hendrix, B.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

FLOWSHEET FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM SLUDGE BATCH 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of Tank 12 sludge slurry show a substantially larger fraction of aluminum than originally identified in sludge batch planning. The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to formulate Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with about one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 12 and one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 4. LWO identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days and dissolved nearly 80% of the aluminum in the sludge slurry. In 2008, LWO successfully dissolved 64% of the aluminum at approximately 60 C in 46 days with minimal tank modifications and using only slurry pumps as a heat source. This report establishes the technical basis and flowsheet for performing an aluminum removal process in Tank 51 for SB6 that incorporates the lessons learned from previous aluminum dissolution evolutions. For SB6, aluminum dissolution process temperature will be held at a minimum of 65 C for at least 24 days, but as long as practical or until as much as 80% of the aluminum is dissolved. As planned, an aluminum removal process can reduce the aluminum in SB6 from about 84,500 kg to as little as 17,900 kg with a corresponding reduction of total insoluble solids in the batch from 246,000 kg to 131,000 kg. The extent of the reduction may be limited by the time available to maintain Tank 51 at dissolution temperature. The range of dissolution in four weeks based on the known variability in dissolution kinetics can range from 44 to more than 80%. At 44% of the aluminum dissolved, the mass reduction is approximately 1/2 of the mass noted above, i.e., 33,300 kg of aluminum instead of 66,600 kg. Planning to reach 80% of the aluminum dissolved should allow a maximum of 81 days for dissolution and reduce the allowance if test data shows faster kinetics. 47,800 kg of the dissolved aluminum will be stored in Tank 8 and 21,000 kg will be stored in saltcake via evaporation. Up to 77% of the total aluminum planned for SB6 may be removed via aluminum dissolution. Storage of the aluminum-laden supernate in Tank 8 will require routine evaluation of the free hydroxide concentration in order to maintain aluminum in solution. Periodic evaluation will be established on concurrent frequency with corrosion program samples as previously established for aluminum-laden supernate from SB5 that is stored in Tank 11.

Pike, J; Jeffrey Gillam, J

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

328

Metal Cutting for Large Component Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of large components mainly consisting of the reactor vessel, steam generators and pressurizer. In order to remove and package these large components nozzles must be cut from the reactor vessel to precise tolerances. In some cases steam generators must be segmented for size and weight reduction. One innovative technology that has been used successfully at several commercial nuclear plant decommissioning is diamond wire sawing. Diamond wire sawing is performed by rotating a cable with diamond segments attached using a flywheel approximately 24 inches in diameter driven remotely by a hydraulic pump. Tension is provided using a gear rack drive which also takes up the slack in the wire. The wire is guided through the use of pulleys keeps the wire in a precise location. The diamond wire consists of 1/4 inch aircraft cable with diamond beads strung over the cable separated by springs and brass crimps. Standard wire contains 40 diamond beads per meter and can be made to any length. Cooling the wire and controlling the spread of contamination presents significant challenges. Under normal circumstances the wire is cooled and the cutting kerf cleaned by using water. In some cases of reactor nozzle cuts the use of water is prohibited because it cannot be controlled. This challenge was solved by using liquid Carbon Dioxide as the cooling agent. The liquid CO{sub 2} is passed through a special nozzle which atomizes the liquid into snowflakes which is introduced under pressure to the wire. The snowflakes attach to the wire keeping it cool and to the metal shavings. As the CO{sub 2} and metal shavings are released from the wire due to its fast rotation, the snowflakes evaporate leaving only the fine metal shavings as waste. Secondary waste produced is simply the small volume of fine metal shavings removed from the cut surface. Diamond wire sawing using CO{sub 2} cooling has been employed for cutting the reactor nozzles at San Onofre Unit 1 and at Connecticut Yankee. These carbon steel nozzles ranged up to 54 inch diameter with a 15 inch thick wall and an interior stainless cladding. Diamond wire sawing using traditional water cooling has been used to segment the reactor head at Rancho Seco and for cutting reactor nozzles and control rod drive tubes at Dairyland Power's Lacrosse BWR project. Advantages: - ALARA: All cutting is preformed remotely significantly reducing dose. Stringing of wires is accomplished using long handle tools. - Secondary waste is reduced to just the volume of material cut with the diamond wire. - The potential for airborne contamination is eliminated. Due to the flexibility of the wire, any access restrictions and interferences can be accommodated using pulleys and long handle tools. - The operation is quiet. Disadvantages: - With Liquid Carbon Dioxide cooling and cleaning, delivery of the material must be carefully planned. The longer the distance from the source to the cut area, the greater the chance for pressure drop and subsequent problems with line freezing. - Proper shrouding and ventilation are required for environmental reasons. In each case, the metal structures were cut at a precise location. Radiation dose was reduced significantly by operating the equipment from a remote location. The cuts were very smooth and completed on schedule. Each project must be analyzed individually and take into account many factors including access, radiological conditions, environmental conditions, schedule requirements, packaging requirements and size of cuts.

Hulick, Robert M. [Bluegrass Concrete Cutting Inc., 107 Mildred Street PO Box 427, Greenville, Alabama 36037 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Novel methods for respirable dust removal. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Two novel devices with potential for controlling emissions of dust particles in the respirable size range (0.3 to 3 microns) are the electrostatically enhanced cyclone (or electrocyclone) and acoustic agglomeration. The electrocyclone combines electrostatic, inertial forces and larger unit size compared to conventional cyclones to achieve improved performance. The acoustic agglomerator uses an oscillating acoustic flow field to cause particle collision and agglomeration. The resulting large particles are then more readily separable by conventional methods. The application of these novel methods to respirable dust control in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and conventional pulverized coal combustion for electric power generation is explored in this study. In a PFBC power plant, dust particles entrained in the combustion gases must be removed at high temperature and pressure in order to protect a gas turbine from erosion. A key technical issue in this application is whether the hot gas cleanup equipment can satisfy the NSPS, or whether supplementary stack gas cleanup, such as a baghouse, is required downstream of the gas turbine. The potential of both the electrocyclone and the acoustic agglomerator for achieving NSPS ahead of the gas turbine has been assessed. In conventional PC power plants, particulate cleanup is normally accomplished with electrostatic precipitators. However, plants burning low sulfur western coals have experienced difficulty achieving adequate particulate emissions control with electrostatic precipitators, due to the high resistivity of the coal ash. For these applications the electrocyclone or an acoustic agglomerator coupled with either an electrocyclone or more conventional removal technique, might prove attractive. The principal conclusions drawn from the work performed and the recommendations based on the results are detailed. (LTN)

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Advanced Research: Innovation Leading to Successes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research: Innovation Leading to Research: Innovation Leading to Successes Exploring the "Grand Challenges" of Fossil Fuels December 2010 3 Exploring the "Grand Challenges" of Fossil Fuels NETL Advanced Research The Advanced Research (AR) Program within the Office of Coal and Power Systems of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the research arm of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE), fosters the development of innovative, cost-effective technologies for improving the efficiency, reliability, and environmental performance of advanced coal and power systems. In addition, AR bridges the gap between fundamental research into technology alternatives and applied research aimed at scale-up, deployment, and commercialization of the most promising technologies identified.

331

Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nick Wright Named Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead February 4, 2013 Nick Nick Wright has been named head of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center's (NERSC) Advanced Technologies Group (ATG), which focuses on understanding the requirements of current and emerging applications to make choices in hardware design and programming models that best serve the science needs of NERSC users. ATG specializes in benchmarking, system performance, debugging and analysis, workload monitoring, use of application modeling tools, and future algorithm scaling and technology assessment. The team also engages with vendors and the general research community to advocate technological features that will enhance the effectiveness of systems for NERSC scientists.

332

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL’s greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A.

333

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and

334

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL’s greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A.

335

NETL: News Release - Innovative Mercury Removal Technique Shows Early  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 5, 2003 August 5, 2003 Innovative Mercury Removal Technique Shows Early Promise Photochemical Process Developed in Federal Lab Removes Mercury from Flue Gas - NETL scientist Evan Granite prepares a lab test of the UV mercury removal process. - NETL scientist Evan Granite prepares for a lab test of the UV mercury removal process. MORGANTOWN, WV - A promising technology to remove mercury from coal-fired power plants -- dubbed the "GP-254 Process" -- has been developed and is currently being tested at the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Newly patented, the GP-254 Process enhances mercury removal using ultraviolet light to induce various components of power plant stack gas to react with the mercury, and changes the

336

Lead Fuel Assembly Programs Analysis: Utility Perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Licensees, in association with nuclear fuel vendors, conduct lead fuel assembly (LFA) programs to test new design features prior to batch implementation. A limited number of LFAs are irradiated to obtain data and to confirm successful operation in the host reactor environment. The new LFA design features range from minor changes of dimensions and/or materials to an entirely new design from an alternate fuel vendor. LFA program elements can consist of design activities, methods development, analysis, ...

2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

337

L I NATIONAL' LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

L L I NATIONAL' LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO tJw HEALTH AND SAFETY DI"ISION - ANALITICIL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET _I . . NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY O F OHIO HEALTH AND SAFETY DIY1SION - ANALYTICAL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET NATIONA-i LEn' D COMPANY OF OHIO HEALTH AND SAFETY Dl"lSlDN - m4ALITICAL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET NO. I DlSTRlBUTlON OF COPIES I I A,w,lytlc.al Loboratorr (RBCORD COPI) 2 Induswlol Hvalen. B Rodhtlon Dept. 3 1 Water Trsotmmt Plant c=.z w&w hnp,., Only, - . _. NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO HEALiH ANO SAFETY OIVISIOH - w4ALYTICAL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET INDUSTRIAL, HYGlENE AND RADIATION DEPT. 1 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY SECTION i. H. NO. IHPLEN0S.i . 7 RO"Te TO, D.TB RECEIVED, B", 464 9 - sD6:LzTEo, lB"' S/24/61 I DP

338

Insulating shade assembly with removable cover  

SciTech Connect

An insulating window shade assembly is described which consists of: bracket means adapted to be mounted on the frame of a window; a first roller carrying an insulating shade and being disposed within the bracket means on the inside of the window, the shade being adapted to be drawn from the roller to cover the inside of the window and to be wound upon the roller to expose the window, a second roller carrying a removable cover fabric on the inside of the shade and being supported by the bracket means, the second roller being spaced from and disposed independently of the first roller, means disposed adjacent only the bottom edge of the insulating shade for connecting only the bottom edge of the cover fabric to the bottom only of the insulating shade so that the insulating shade and cover fabric may be drawn together over the inside of the window; guide means disposed adjacent the second roller and between the second roller and the insulating shade, the cover fabric passing over the guide means, for causing the cover fabric to hang closely adjacent the front of the insulating shade when the insulating shade is drawn over the window and when the insulating shade and cover fabric are connected together by the connecting means, and means for continually tensioning the cover fabric when the insulating shade is drawn and when the cover fabric is connected thereto so that the cover fabric lies smoothly over the shade.

Hausmann, S.; McLane, A. Jr.

1986-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

339

Metagenomic analysis of phosphorus removing sludgecommunities  

SciTech Connect

Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) is not wellunderstood at the metabolic level despite being one of the best-studiedmicrobially-mediated industrial processes due to its ecological andeconomic relevance. Here we present a metagenomic analysis of twolab-scale EBPR sludges dominated by the uncultured bacterium, "CandidatusAccumulibacter phosphatis." This analysis resolves several controversiesin EBPR metabolic models and provides hypotheses explaining the dominanceof A. phosphatis in this habitat, its lifestyle outside EBPR and probablecultivation requirements. Comparison of the same species from differentEBPR sludges highlights recent evolutionary dynamics in the A. phosphatisgenome that could be linked to mechanisms for environmental adaptation.In spite of an apparent lack of phylogenetic overlap in the flankingcommunities of the two sludges studied, common functional themes werefound, at least one of them complementary to the inferred metabolism ofthe dominant organism. The present study provides a much-needed blueprintfor a systems-level understanding of EBPR and illustrates thatmetagenomics enables detailed, often novel, insights into evenwell-studied biological systems.

Garcia Martin, Hector; Ivanova, Natalia; Kunin, Victor; Warnecke,Falk; Barry, Kerrie; McHardy, Alice C.; Yeates, Christine; He, Shaomei; Salamov, Asaf; Szeto, Ernest; Dalin, Eileen; Putnam, Nik; Shapiro, HarrisJ.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Blackall, Linda Louise; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

343

Thiacrown polymers for removal of mercury from waste streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thiacrown polymers immobilized to a polystyrene-divinylbenzene matrix react with Hg.sup.2+ under a variety of conditions to efficiently and selectively remove Hg.sup.2+ ions from acidic aqueous solutions, even in the presence of a variety of other metal ions. The mercury can be recovered and the polymer regenerated. This mercury removal method has utility in the treatment of industrial wastewater, where a selective and cost-effective removal process is required.

Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA); Fox, Glenn A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Heat recirculating cooler for fluid stream pollutant removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process by which heat is removed from a reactant fluid to reach the operating temperature of a known pollutant removal method and said heat is recirculated to raise the temperature of the product fluid. The process can be utilized whenever an intermediate step reaction requires a lower reaction temperature than the prior and next steps. The benefits of a heat-recirculating cooler include the ability to use known pollutant removal methods and increased thermal efficiency of the system.

Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Berry, David A. (Morgantown, WV)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

345

Separation of heavy metals: Removal from industrial wastewaters and contaminated soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the applicable separation technologies relating to removal of heavy metals from solution and from soils in order to present the state-of-the-art in the field. Each technology is briefly described and typical operating conditions and technology performance are presented. Technologies described include chemical precipitation (including hydroxide, carbonate, or sulfide reagents), coagulation/flocculation, ion exchange, solvent extraction, extraction with chelating agents, complexation, electrochemical operation, cementation, membrane operations, evaporation, adsorption, solidification/stabilization, and vitrification. Several case histories are described, with a focus on waste reduction techniques and remediation of lead-contaminated soils. The paper concludes with a short discussion of important research needs in the field.

Peters, R.W.; Shem, L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Separation of heavy metals: Removal from industrial wastewaters and contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the applicable separation technologies relating to removal of heavy metals from solution and from soils in order to present the state-of-the-art in the field. Each technology is briefly described and typical operating conditions and technology performance are presented. Technologies described include chemical precipitation (including hydroxide, carbonate, or sulfide reagents), coagulation/flocculation, ion exchange, solvent extraction, extraction with chelating agents, complexation, electrochemical operation, cementation, membrane operations, evaporation, adsorption, solidification/stabilization, and vitrification. Several case histories are described, with a focus on waste reduction techniques and remediation of lead-contaminated soils. The paper concludes with a short discussion of important research needs in the field.

Peters, R.W.; Shem, L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

348

Application of Feed and Bleed Operations to Remove High Level ...  

Cleaning Method Phase Date. 5 Process Identification • After Mechanical Sludge Removal and Chemical Cleaning: ... Block Diagram Filtrate Solids Separation Solids Slurry

349

Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas ...  

Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas ... required for sequestration, an area of research identified as a high priority

350

Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam - Time Lapse Video...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(MOST) and the Russian Federation successfully removed 11 kilograms of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute. This is the eleventh country...

351

Heading Error Removal System for Tracking Devices - Energy ...  

Systems are able to reduce or remove slowly-varying drift errors, such as heading errors, rate of rotation errors, and direction of travel errors, to correct the ...

352

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

353

NETL: News Release - NETL Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power and Cost Savings DOE Laboratory Signs License Agreement Incorporating Sorbents in HVAC Add-on Technology Washington, DC - Carbon dioxide removal sorbents developed by the...

354

A New Method to Evaluate Hydrogen Sulfide Removal from Biogas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen sulfide in biogas fuel increases the speed at which the system utilizing the biogas corrodes. This corrosion may be prevented by separating and removing… (more)

Martin, Jerry H II

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Impurity Removal from Petroleum Coke - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Impurity Removal from Petroleum Coke. Author(s), Alexandre Gagnon, Hans Darmstadt, Nigel Backhouse, Esme Ryan, Laurence Dyer, David ...

356

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study to compare six methods of removing noncondensable gases from direct-use geo-thermal steam power plants. This report defines the study methodologies and compares the...

357

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; ... Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures United States Patent ...

358

Study of Alternative Approaches for Transite Panel Removal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) assembled an experienced team from both sites to evaluate both the manual and mechanical methods of transite panel removal.

359

Method of removal of sulfur from coal and petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the removal of sulfur from sulfur-bearing materials such as coal and petroleum products using organophosphine and organophosphite compounds is provided.

Verkade, John G. (Ames, IA); Mohan, Thyagarajan (Ames, IA); Angelici, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Using Microwave Radiation for Removing Heavy Metal Ions and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Using Microwave Radiation for Removing Heavy Metal Ions and Producing Biofuels. Author(s), Aharon Gedanken. On-Site Speaker (Planned ) ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

362

Hydrogen Removal From Heating Oil of a Parabolic Trough ...  

A Method to Selectively Remove & Measure Hydrogen Gas from a Fluid Volume Parabolic trough power plants use concentrated solar thermal energy to ...

363

REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF DEPOSITS FROM COAL GASIFICATION ...  

A method is provided for on-line removal and recovery of deposits from fossil fuel gasification systems to improve plant performance and recover a valuable metalloid.

364

Use, Maintenance, Removal, Inspections, and Safety of Dams (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes operating plans for dams with movable structures, as well as procedures for raising or lowering of impoundment levels, dam removal, and dam safety inspections.

365

Method for Removal of Mercury from Various Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 6,576,092 entitled "Method for Removal of Mercury from Various Gas Streams."...

366

Nitrogen removal from natural gas using two types of membranes ...  

A process for treating natural gas or other methane-rich gas to remove excess nitrogen. The invention relies on two-stage membrane separation, using ...

367

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

369

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants from syngas typically rely on chemical or physical absorption processes operating at low temperatures. When cooled...

370

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

372

Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

373

US, International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam, Set Nuclear Security Milestone | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile...

374

Test of English as a Foreign LanguageTM Leading. www.ets.org/toefl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test of English as a Foreign LanguageTM Listening. Learning. Leading. www.ets.org/toefl Information Internet-based testing ONLY. Information about TOEFL computer-based testing,TOEFL paper-based testing, and the Test of Spoken English is in a separate Bulletin. Read all of the information in this Bulletin

375

Removal of RDX and HMX from an artificial groundwater by granular activated carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption was efficient at removing high explosive contaminants such as Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-tririne (RDX) and Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetrritro-1,3,5,7-tetruocine (HMX) from an artificial groundwater (AGW). A completely mixed batch reactor (CMBR) system was selected for all rate and isotherm experiments. A number of rate and isotherm experiments were conducted to measure performance in the removal of RDX and HMX using GAC depending on dissolved oxygen, natural organic matter (NOM) preloading and GAC pretreatment. The investigation of competitive adsorption of RDX and Cr(VI) on GAC was conducted. In addition, IAST model predictions were made for RDX and HMX bisolute isotherms. When oxygen was excluded in the experimental system, there was enhancement in the removal of RDX from AGW using Fe[] pretreated GAC. However, in spite of this enhancement, it was still lower than the level of removal using virgin GAC as discussed below. According to the screening experiment results, dissolved Fe[]alone could not chemically reduce RDX. Despite expectations to the contrary based on the screening results, there was indeed some increase in the removal of RDX by Fe[] pretreated GAC under anaerobic conditions. It was suspected that in regard to the removal of RDX using GAC, there may have been chemical reactions occurring between RDX and the chemically reduced GAC surface under anaerobic conditions. Overall, the sorption capacity of GAC for RDX and HMX decreased as preloaded humid acid concentration increased. GAC procreated with a strong reluctant such as Fe[] or dithionite did not result in the enhancement of RDX removal from AGW compared with isotherms of virgin GAC under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Experimental values showed that for RDX, the single-solute isotherm data, bisolute isotherm data in the presence of Cr(VI) exhibited similar results. This suggests that the presence of Cr(VI) had negligible effect on RDX removal by GAC, indicating that competitive effects between RDX and Cr(VI) were minimal. Also, Cr(VI) removal was not significantly affected by the presence of RDX. IAST model predicted that the presence of HMX would reduce the adsorption of RDX compared to the single-solute isotherm of RDX. In the same manner, similar effects were obtained for HMX.

Im, Jeong Ran

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Removal site evaluation report on the Tower Shielding Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This removal site evaluation report for the Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared to provide the Environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the Tower Shielding Facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment (i.e., a high probability of adverse effects) and if remedial site evaluations or removal actions are, therefore, required. The scope of the project included a review of historical evidence regarding operations and use of the facility; interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past operating practices; a site inspection; and identification of hazard areas requiring maintenance, removal, or remedial actions. Based an the findings of this removal site evaluation, adequate efforts are currently being made at the TSF to contain and control existing contamination and hazardous substances on site in order to protect human health and the environment No conditions requiring maintenance or removal actions to mitigate imminent or potential threats to human health and the environment were identified during this evaluation. Given the current conditions and status of the buildings associated with the TSF, this removal site evaluation is considered complete and terminated according to the requirements for removal site evaluation termination.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Leading twist nuclear shadowing phenomena in hard processes with nuclei  

SciTech Connect

We present and discuss the theory and phenomenology of the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing which is based on the combination of the generalization of Gribov-Glauber theory, QCD factorization theorems, and HERA QCD analysis of diffraction in lepton-proton deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We apply this technique for the analysis of a wide range of hard processes with nuclei-inclusive DIS on deuterons, medium-range and heavy nuclei, coherent and incoherent diffractive DIS with nuclei, and hard diffraction in proton-nucleus scattering - and make predictions for the effect of nuclear shadowing in the corresponding sea quark and gluon parton distributions. We also analyze the role of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in generalized parton distributions in nuclei and certain characteristics of final states in nuclear DIS. We discuss the limits of applicability of the leading twist approximation for small x scattering off nuclei and the onset of the black disk regime and methods of detecting it. It will be possible to check many of our predictions in the near future in the studies of the ultraperipheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Further checks will be possible in pA collisions at the LHC and forward hadron production at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Detailed tests will be possible at an Electon-Ion Collider (EIC) in USA and at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) at CERN.

Leonid Frankfurt, Vadim Guzey, Mark Strikman

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Advanced lead acid battery development project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project involved laboratory and road testing of the Horizon (registered) advanced lead acid batteries produced by Electrosource, Inc. A variety of electric vehicles in the fleet operated by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District and McClellan Air Force Base were used for road tests. The project was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency under RA 93-23 entitled Electric Vehicle Technology and Infrastructure. The Horizon battery is a valve regulated, or sealed, lead acid battery produced in a variety of sizes and performance levels. During the project, several design and process improvements on the Horizon battery resulted in a production battery with a specific energy approaching 45 watt-hours per kilogram (Whr/kg) capable of delivering a peak current of 450 amps. The 12 volt, 95 amp-hour (Ahr) Horizon battery, model number 12N95, was placed into service in seven (7) test vehicles, including sedans, prototype lightweight electric vehicles, and passenger vans. Over 20,000 miles have been driven to date on vehicles powered by the Horizon battery. Road test results indicate that when the battery pack is used with a compatible charger and charge management system, noticeably improved acceleration characteristics are evident, and the vehicles provide a useful range almost 20% greater than with conventional lead-acid batteries.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Removal of Atmospheric Effects prom AVHRR Albedos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on numerical simulations, coefficients are determined to be used in a linear relationship between clear-sky planetary albedo and surface albedo. Thew coefficients are given as functions of solar zenith angle and atmospheric parameters for ...

Peter Koepke

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Removing of Formation Damage and Enhancement of Formation Productivity Using Environmentally Friendly Chemicals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matrix acidizing is used in carbonate formations to create wormholes that connect the formation to the wellbore. Hydrochloric acid, organic acids, or mixtures of these acids are typically used in matrix acidizing treatments of carbonate reservoirs. However, the use of these acids in deep wells has some major drawbacks including high and uncontrolled reaction rate and corrosion to well tubulars, especially those made of chrome-based tubulars (Cr-13 and duplex steel), and these problems become severe at high temperatures. Hydrochloric acid (HCl) and its based fluids have a major drawback in stimulating shallow (low fracture gradient) formations as they may cause face dissolution (formation surface washout) if injected at low rates. The objective of stimulation of sandstone reservoirs is to remove the damage caused to the production zone during drilling or completion operations. Many problems may occur during sandstone acidizing with Hydrochloric/Hydrofluoric acids (HCl/HF) mud acid. Among those problems: decomposition of clays in HCl acids, precipitation of fluosilicates, the presence of carbonate can cause the precipitation of calcium fluorides, silica-gel filming, colloidal silica-gel precipitation, and mixing between various stages of the treatment. To overcome problems associated with strong acids, chelating agents were introduced and used in the field. However, major concerns with most of these chemicals are their limited dissolving power and negative environmental impact. Glutamic acid diacetic acid (GLDA) a newly developed environmentally friendly chelate was examined as stand-alone stimulation fluid in deep oil and gas wells. In this study we used GLDA to stimulate carbonate cores (calcite and dolomite). GLDA was also used to stimulate and remove the damage from different sandstone cores containing different compositions of clay minerals. Carbonate cores (calcite and dolomite) of 6 and 20 in. length and 1.5 in. diameter were used in the coreflood experiments. Coreflood experiments were run at temperatures ranging from 180 to 300oF. Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA), hydroxyl ethylethylene diaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA), and GLDA were used to stimulate and remove the damage from different sandstone cores at high temperatures. X-ray Computed Topography (CT) scans were used to determine the effectiveness of these fluids in stimulation calcite and dolomite cores and removing the damage from sandstone cores. The sandstone cores used in this study contain from 1 to 18 wt percent illite (swellable and migratable clay mineral). GLDA was found to be highly effective in creating wormholes over a wide range of pH (1.7-13) in calcite cores. Increasing temperature enhanced the reaction rate, more calcite was dissolved, and larger wormholes were formed for different pH with smaller volumes of GLDA solutions. GLDA has a prolonged activity and leads to a decreased surface spending resulting in face dissolution and therefore acts deeper in the formation. In addition, GLDA was very effective in creating wormholes in the dolomite core as it is a good chelate for magnesium. Coreflood experiments showed that at high pH values (pH =11) GLDA, HEDTA, and EDTA were almost the same in increasing the permeability of both Berea and Bandera sandstone cores. GLDA, HEDTA, and EDTA were compatible with Bandera sandstone cores which contains 10 wt percent Illite. The weight loss from the core was highest in case of HEDTA and lowest in case of GLDA at pH 11. At low pH values (pH =4) 0.6M GLDA performed better than 0.6M HEDTA in the coreflood experiments. The permeability ratio (final/initial) for Bandera sandstone cores was 2 in the case of GLDA and 1.2 in the case of HEDTA at pH of 4 and 300oF. At high pH HEDTA was the best chelating agent to stimulate different sandstone cores, and at low pH GLDA was the best one. For Berea sandstone cores EDTA at high pH of 11 was the best in increasing the permeability of the core at 300oF. The low pH GLDA based fluid has been especially designed for high temperature oil well stimulation i

Mahmoud, Mohamed Ahmed Nasr Eldin

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Leading neutrons from polarized pp collisions  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the cross section and single-spin azimuthal asymmetry, A{sub n}(t) for inclusive neutron production in pp collisions at forward rapidities relative to the polarized proton. Absorptive corrections to the pion pole generate a relative phase between the spin-flip and non-flip amplitudes, which leads to an appreciable spin asymmetry. However, the asymmetry observed recently in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC at very small |t|{approx}0.01 GeV{sup 2} cannot be explained by this mechanism.

Kopeliovich, B. Z. [Departamento de Fisica y Centro de Estudios Subatomicos, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik der Universitaet, Philosophenweg 19, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica y Centro de Estudios Subatomicos, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile); Soffer, J. [Department of Physics, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122-6082 (United States)

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

382

Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the progress that has been completed in the first half of FY2012 in the MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer project. Significant progress has been made on the algorithm development. We have an improve understanding of the experimental responses in LSDS for fuel-related material. The calibration of the ultra-depleted uranium foils was completed, but the results are inconsistent from measurement to measurement. Future work includes developing a conceptual model of an LSDS system to assay plutonium in used fuel, improving agreement between simulations and measurement, design of a thorium fission chamber, and evaluation of additional detector techniques.

Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bonebrake, Eric; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, Victor A.; Haight, R. C.; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Weltz, Adam

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

383

Lead-free solder technology transfer from ASE Americas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To safeguard the environmental friendliness of photovoltaics, the PV industry follows a proactive, long-term environmental strategy involving a life-of-cycle approach to prevent environmental damage by its processes and products from cradle to grave. Part of this strategy is to examine substituting lead-based solder on PV modules with other solder alloys. Lead is a toxic metal that, if ingested, can damage the brain, nervous system, liver and kidneys. Lead from solder in electronic products has been found to leach out from municipal waste landfills and municipal incinerator ash was found to be high in lead also because of disposed consumer electronics and batteries. Consequently, there is a movement in Europe and Japan to ban lead altogether from use in electronic products and to restrict the movement across geographical boundaries of waste containing lead. Photovoltaic modules may contain small amounts of regulated materials, which vary from one technology to another. Environmental regulations impact the cost and complexity of dealing with end-of-life PV modules. If they were classified as hazardous according to Federal or State criteria, then special requirements for material handling, disposal, record-keeping and reporting would escalate the cost of decommissioning the modules. Fthenakis showed that several of today's x-Si modules failed the US-EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for potential leaching of Pb in landfills and also California's standard on Total Threshold Limit Concentration (TTLC) for Pb. Consequently, such modules may be classified as hazardous waste. He highlighted potential legislation in Europe and Japan which could ban or restrict the use of lead and the efforts of the printed-circuit industries in developing Pb-free solder technologies in response to such expected legislation. Japanese firms already have introduced electronic products with Pb-free solder, and one PV manufacturer in the US, ASE Americas has used a Pb-free solder exclusively in their modules since 1993. Finding a safe, reliable and cost-effective substitute for lead-containing solders is not easy. Tin/lead solder has been the standard solder technology for several decades and extensive knowledge has been gained on the practical and theoretical aspects of its use. The printed circuit and the electronics industries recently embarked on a multi-million-dollar R and D effort to develop such alternatives, focusing on material properties, manufacturing processes, cost of alloys and long-term availability and reliability. Fthenakis outlined such efforts and listed alternatives examined by the electronics industries. One of the most promising alternatives (for electronics) is the 96.5%Sn/3.5%Ag solder that ASE Americas developed and use. ASE Americas' research and independent field testing showed it is at least as reliable as the standard one. This solder is slightly more expensive than the regular Sn/Pb solder. However, to the audience gratification, Steel Heddle, a solder manufacturer, announced that they will absorb the incremental cost and will supply 96.5%Sn/3.5%Ag at the same price as the conventional Sn/Pb solder ribbon. Another issue is the low TTLC for Ag in California (i.e., 0.5 g / kg of module), but Fthenakis showed that the Sn/Ag solder will add less than 10% of this quantity (i.e., 0.05 g of Ag / kg of module). The major point made by Fthenakis was that alternatives exist that are both environmentally benign and cost-effective, and that the PV industry can only benefit by being proactive in switching to Pb-free materials, thereby exceeding the expectations of its supporters and averting potential future legislation.

FTHENAKIS,V.

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

384

Do Producer Prices Lead Consumer Prices?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increased rapidly. Excluding food and energy, prices of crude materials and intermediate goods rose at annual rates of 7.2 and 16.7 percent, respectively. At the same time, however, prices of consumer goods and services excluding food and energy increased a more modest 2.9 percent. Many analysts are concerned that recent increases in the prices of crude and intermediate goods may be passed through to consumers, resulting in a higher rate of inflation in consumer prices later this year and perhaps in 1996. This article examines whether price increases at the early stages of production should be expected to move through the production chain, leading to increases in consumer prices. In the first section, a review of basic economic theory suggests there should be a pass-through effect—that is, producer prices should lead and thereby help predict consumer prices. A more sophisticated analysis, though, suggests the pass-through effect may be weak. In the second section, an examination of the empirical evidence indicates that producer prices are not always good predictors of consumer prices. The article Todd E. Clark is an economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. Mangal Goswami, a research associate at the bank, helped prepare the article. concludes that the recent increases in some producer prices do not necessarily signal higher inflation.

E. Clark

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Precipitation in a lead calcium tin anode  

SciTech Connect

Samples from a hot rolled sheet of a tin and calcium bearing lead alloy were solution heat treated at 300 Degree-Sign C and cooled down to room temperature at different rates; these samples were left at room temperature to study natural precipitation of CaSn{sub 3} particles. The samples were aged for 45 days before analysing their microstructure, which was carried out in a scanning electron microscope using secondary and backscattered electron detectors. Selected X-ray spectra analyses were conducted to verify the nature of the precipitates. Images were taken at different magnifications in both modes of observation to locate the precipitates and record their position within the images and calculate the distance between them. Differential scanning calorimeter analyses were conducted on selected samples. It was found that the mechanical properties of the material correlate with the minimum average distance between precipitates, which is related to the average cooling rate from solution heat treatment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distance between precipitates in a lead alloy is recorded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relationship between the distance and the cooling rate is established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is found that the strengthening of the alloy depends on the distance between precipitates.

Perez-Gonzalez, Francisco A., E-mail: fco.aurelio@inbox.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Centro de Innovacion, Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Camurri, Carlos G., E-mail: ccamurri@udec.cl [Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Universidad de Concepcion (Chile); Carrasco, Claudia A., E-mail: ccarrascoc@udec.cl [Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Universidad de Concepcion (Chile); Colas, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.colas@uanl.edu.mx [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Centro de Innovacion, Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 31513160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 3151­3160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters P. Zhao, J.A. Siegel�, R May 2006; accepted 14 June 2006 Abstract Residential and commercial HVAC filters that have been loaded of the relative importance of HVAC filters as a removal mechanism for ozone in residential and commercial

Siegel, Jeffrey

387

Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

Janoski, Edward J. (Havertown, PA); Hollstein, Elmer J. (Wilmington, DE)

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. 1 figure.

Cha, C.Y.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

Process for removing pyritic sulfur from bituminous coals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for removing pyritic sulfur and lowering ash content of bituminous coals by grinding the feed coal, subjecting it to micro-agglomeration with a bridging liquid containing heavy oil, separating the microagglomerates and separating them to a water wash to remove suspended pyritic sulfur. In one embodiment the coal is subjected to a second micro-agglomeration step.

Pawlak, Wanda (Edmonton, CA); Janiak, Jerzy S. (Edmonton, CA); Turak, Ali A. (Edmonton, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw L. (Edmonton, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A Simple Rapid Method for the Removal of Leukocytes From  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Filtration of human blood cells through lamb's wool columns removed more than 96 % of all leukocytes in a series of experiments, while the retention of erythrocytes by the column averaged 6.4%. This method should prove extremely useful for obtaining pure erythrocyte preparations for use in biochemical and physiological studies, and for removing leukocytes from blood prior to transfusion.

Human Blood; Edward Palmer; Frederic Waldman; William Dewitt

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Continuous cryopump with a method for removal of solidified gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved cryopump for the removal of gases from a high vacuum, comprising a cryopanel incorporating honeycomb structure, refrigerant means thermally connected to the cryopanel, and a rotatable channel moving azimuthally around an axis located near the center of the cryopanel, removing gases adsorbed within the honeycomb structure by subliming them and conducting them outside the vacuum vessel. 4 figs.

Carlson, L.W.; Herman, H.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

392

Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

Janoski, E.J.; Hollstein, E.J.

1984-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

393

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Condenser Air Removal Equipment Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Condenser Air Removal Equipment Maintenance Guide provides power plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on this system. This guide will assist the plant maintenance personnel in improving reliability and reducing maintenance costs for the condenser air removal (CAR) equipment.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

394

A novel multifunctional energy system (MES) for CO{sub 2} removal with zero energy penalty - article no. 021401  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel, multifunctional energy system (MES), in which hydrogen and electricity are cogenerated and about 90% of CO{sub 2} is removed. By integrating the methane steam reforming reaction and combustion of coal, the natural gas and coal are utilized synthetically, and coal is burned to provide high-temperature thermal energy to the methane steam reforming reaction. Afterwards, the resulting syngas enters a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit to separate about 70% of hydrogen, thereby significantly increasing the concentration of carbon dioxide from nearly 20% to 43% in the PSA tail gas. As a result, the overall efficiency of the new system becomes 63.2%. Compared to a conventional natural gas-based hydrogen plant and a coal-firing steam power plant without CO{sub 2} removal (the overall efficiency of the two systems is 63.0%), the energy penalty for CO{sub 2} removal in the new system is almost totally avoided. Based on the graphical exergy analysis, we propose that the integration of synthetic utilization of fossil fuel (natural gas and coal) and the CO{sub 2} removal process plays a significant role in zero energy penalty for CO{sub 2} removal and its liquefaction in the MES. The result obtained here provides a new approach for CO{sub 2} removal with zero or low thermal efficiency reduction (energy penalty) within an energy system.

Jin, H.G.; Han, W.; Gao, L. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. for Engineering Thermophysics

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Horizontal Heat Exchanger Design and Analysis for Passive Heat Removal Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a three-year project to investigate the major factors of horizontal heat exchanger performance in passive containment heat removal from a light water reactor following a design basis accident LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident). The heat exchanger studied in this work may be used in advanced and innovative reactors, in which passive heat removal systems are adopted to improve safety and reliability The application of horizontal tube-bundle condensers to passive containment heat removal is new. In order to show the feasibility of horizontal heat exchangers for passive containment cooling, the following aspects were investigated: 1. the condensation heat transfer characteristics when the incoming fluid contains noncondensable gases 2. the effectiveness of condensate draining in the horizontal orientation 3. the conditions that may lead to unstable condenser operation or highly degraded performance 4. multi-tube behavior with the associated secondary-side effects This project consisted of two experimental investigations and analytical model development for incorporation into industry safety codes such as TRAC and RELAP. A physical understanding of the flow and heat transfer phenomena was obtained and reflected in the analysis models. Two gradute students (one funded by the program) and seven undergraduate students obtained research experience as a part of this program.

Vierow, Karen

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

396

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet Mar 26, 2012 At the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit, the United States, Mexico and Canada announced the successful removal of HEU from Mexico and conversion of the

397

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Savannah River Site this month after they safely removed its rusty, orange, 75-foot-tall dome. With the help of a 660-ton crane and lifting lugs, the workers pulled the 174,000-pound dome off the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, capping more than 16 months of preparations. Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

398

Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic Components Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic Components The invention is a combination of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic Components The invention is a combination of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier which can be used to contact substrates for electronic parts such as semiconductor wafers or chips to remove photoresist materials which are applied to the substrates during manufacture of the electronic parts. The dense phase fluid modifier is one

399

White Oak Creek Embayment time-critical CERCLA removal action sediment-retention structure. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

Over a 20-month period between September 1990 and April 1992, the Department of Energy (DOE), acting through Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., managing contractor for the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR), conducted a DOE-lead and DOE-funded time-critical removal action at the White Oak Creek Embayment (WOCE), pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The time-critical removal action specifically consisted of the design and construction of a sediment-retention structure across the mouth of WOCE to prevent off-site migration of sediments contaminated by cesium ({sup 137}Cs) into the Clinch River. Construction of a sediment-retention structure was completed in mid-April 1992. The purpose of this report is to meet the substantive requirements of 40 CFR 300.165 describing ``a complete report on the removal operation and the actions taken.`` This section of the NCP specifically addresses on-scene coordinator reports for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund-lead actions and includes several elements that are not applicable to this DOE-lead action. Only those sections that are pertinent and applicable are addressed in this final report.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Lead-Free Solder - Home - Energy Innovation Portal  

Energy Innovation Portal ... Technology Marketing Summary A lead-free solder for use in electronic soldering including ... Benefits * An industry standard for lead ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements August 16, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington,...

402

Robert C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

... Robert C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program January 19, 1975 Washington, DC Robert C. Seamans, Jr. Appointed to Lead Nuclear Weapons Program The Energy...

403

Bush Administration Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing Global Climate Change Bush Administration Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing Global Climate Change February 27, 2007 -...

404

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear...

405

Separator plate for lead-acid battery  

SciTech Connect

A separator plate for the negative electrode of a lead-acid battery comprising a molded, synthetic plastic wall or planar member of generally rectangular configuration. A pair of like separator plates are vertically oriented in the battery casing to sandwich the negative electrode therebetween including juxtaposed retention mats common in such a negative electrode assembly. The sandwich provides a clear-through channel along opposite extremities of the electrode for flow of electrolyte. The sandwich assembly is maintained by means of cooperating locking and sealing formations integral with the separator plates of the assembly. Wrapping of the positive electrode thereby is rendered unnecessary when assembling the battery and enables automated assembly of the battery using the separator plate sandwich.

Wozniak, E.

1985-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

406

Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Research Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometry (LSDS) project has been evaluating the feasibility of using LSDS techniques to assay fissile isotopes in used nuclear fuel assemblies. The approach has the potential to provide considerable improvement in the assay of fissile isotopic masses in fuel assemblies compared to other non-destructive techniques in a direct and independent manner. The LSDS collaborations suggests that the next step to in empirically testing the feasibility is to conduct measurements on fresh fuel assemblies to understand investigate self-attenuation and fresh mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel rodlets so we may betterto understand extraction of masses for 235U and 239Pu. While progressing toward these goals, the collaboration also strongly suggests the continued development of enabling technology such as detector development and algorithm development, thatwhich could provide significant performance benefits.

Warren, Glen A.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Gavron, Victor; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Harris, Jason; Stewart, T.

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

407

512-S Facility, Actinide Removal Process Radiological Design Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains top-level requirements for the various areas of radiological protection for workers. Detailed quotations of the requirements for applicable regulatory documents can be found in the Radiological Design Summary Report Implementation Guide. For the purposes of demonstrating compliance with these requirements, per Engineering Standard 01064, ''shall consider / shall evaluate'' indicates that the designer must examine the requirement for the design and either incorporate or provide a technical justification as to why the requirement is not incorporated. This report describes how the Building 512-S, Actinide Removal Process meets the required radiological design criteria and requirements based on 10CFR835, DOE Order 420.1A, WSRC Manual 5Q and various other DOE guides and handbooks. The analyses supporting this Radiological Design Summary Report initially used a source term of 10.6 Ci/gallon of Cs-137 as the basis for bulk shielding calculations. As the project evolved, the source term was reduced to 1.1 Ci/gallon of Cs-137. This latter source term forms the basis for later dose rate evaluations.

Nathan, S.J.

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

408

Multi-component removal in flue gas by aqua ammonia  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new method for the removal of environmental compounds from gaseous streams, in particular, flue gas streams. The new method involves first oxidizing some or all of the acid anhydrides contained in the gas stream such as sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) and nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N.sub.2O) to sulfur trioxide (SO.sub.3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2). The gas stream is subsequently treated with aqua ammonia or ammonium hydroxide which captures the compounds via chemical absorption through acid-base or neutralization reactions. The products of the reactions can be collected as slurries, dewatered, and dried for use as fertilizers, or once the slurries have been dewatered, used directly as fertilizers. The ammonium hydroxide can be regenerated and recycled for use via thermal decomposition of ammonium bicarbonate, one of the products formed. There are alternative embodiments which entail stoichiometric scrubbing of nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides with subsequent separate scrubbing of carbon dioxide.

Yeh, James T. (Bethel Park, PA); Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

409

Coagulation chemistries for silica removal from cooling tower water.  

SciTech Connect

The formation of silica scale is a problem for thermoelectric power generating facilities, and this study investigated the potential for removal of silica by means of chemical coagulation from source water before it is subjected to mineral concentration in cooling towers. In Phase I, a screening of many typical as well as novel coagulants was carried out using concentrated cooling tower water, with and without flocculation aids, at concentrations typical for water purification with limited results. In Phase II, it was decided that treatment of source or make up water was more appropriate, and that higher dosing with coagulants delivered promising results. In fact, the less exotic coagulants proved to be more efficacious for reasons not yet fully determined. Some analysis was made of the molecular nature of the precipitated floc, which may aid in process improvements. In Phase III, more detailed study of process conditions for aluminum chloride coagulation was undertaken. Lime-soda water softening and the precipitation of magnesium hydroxide were shown to be too limited in terms of effectiveness, speed, and energy consumption to be considered further for the present application. In Phase IV, sodium aluminate emerged as an effective coagulant for silica, and the most attractive of those tested to date because of its availability, ease of use, and low requirement for additional chemicals. Some process optimization was performed for coagulant concentration and operational pH. It is concluded that silica coagulation with simple aluminum-based agents is effective, simple, and compatible with other industrial processes.

Nyman, May Devan; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Stewart, Tom

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Program on Technology Innovation: Biotechnological Approaches to Removing Boron from Electric Utility Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-based electric power generation faces compliance difficulties with respect to boron (B) contamination. Concentrations of B in coal-combustion byproduct electric utility effluents commonly range from 30 to 120 ppm; there is a critical need for cost-effective technologies to treat and remove B from these effluents to levels around 1.7 ppm. Wetland treatment systems offer significant operational and maintenance cost savings over chemical treatment alternatives for wastewater discharges from ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

411

NETL: News Release - DOE Seeks Cost-Shared Research Proposals to Remove  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 20, 2000 March 20, 2000 DOE Seeks Cost-Shared Research Proposals to Remove Mercury From Coal-Fired Power Plants With the Environmental Protection Agency expected to decide in December whether to regulate mercury emissions from coal-burning boilers, the U.S. Department of Energy has kicked off a new effort to develop more affordable pollution control technologies that can remove mercury from power plant flue gases. The Energy Department, through its National Energy Technology Laboratory, has issued a solicitation offering up to $13 million over three years for industry proposals on cost-cutting mercury-control methods for coal-based power systems. Currently no technology exists that can uniformly control mercury from power plant flue gas emissions. The effectiveness of existing flue gas emission controls in removing mercury can vary considerably from plant to plant, or even from boiler to boiler. With today's technologies, mercury removal can range from essentially no control to as high as 90 percent.

412

ElectroChemical Arsenic Removal (ECAR) for Rural Bangladesh-Merging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ElectroChemical Arsenic Removal (ECAR) for Rural Bangladesh-Merging ElectroChemical Arsenic Removal (ECAR) for Rural Bangladesh-Merging Technology with Sustainable Implementation Title ElectroChemical Arsenic Removal (ECAR) for Rural Bangladesh-Merging Technology with Sustainable Implementation Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2009 Authors Addy, Susan E., Ashok J. Gadgil, Kristin Kowolik, and Robert Kostecki Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Today, 35-77 million Bangladeshis drink arsenic-contaminated groundwater from shallow tube wells. Arsenic remediation efforts have focused on the development and dissemination of household filters that frequently fall into disuse due to the amount of attention and maintenance that they require. A community scale clean water center has many advantages over household filters and allows for both chemical and electricity-based technologies to be beneficial to rural areas. Full cost recovery would enable the treatment center to be sustainable over time. ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation (ECAR) is compatible with community scale water treatment for rural Bangladesh. We demonstrate the ability of ECAR to reduce arsenic levels > 500 ppb to less than 10 ppb in synthetic and real Bangladesh groundwater samples and examine the influence of several operating parameters on arsenic removal effectiveness. Operating cost and waste estimates are provided. Policy implication recommendations that encourage sustainable community treatment centers are discussed.

413

Fate of soluble uranium in the I{sub 2}/KI leaching process for mercury removal  

SciTech Connect

General Electric Corporation has developed an extraction and recovery system for mercury, based upon the use of iodine (oxidant) and iodide ion (complexing agent). This system has been proposed for application to select mercury-contaminated mixed waste (i.e., waste containing radionuclides as well as other hazardous constituents), which have been generated by historic activities in support of US Department of Energy (DOE) missions. This system is compared to a system utilizing hypochlorite and chloride ions for removal of mercury and uranium from a sample of authentic mixed waste sludge. Relative to the hypochlorite (bleach) system, the iodine system mobilized more mercury and less uranium from the sludge. An engineering flowsheet has been developed to treat spent iodine-containing extraction medium, allowing the system to be recycled. The fate of soluble uranium in this series of treatment unit operations was monitored by tracing isotopically-enriched uranyl ion into simulated spent extraction medium. Treatment with use of elemental iron is shown to remove > 85% of the traced uranium while concurrently reducing excess iodine to the iodide ion. The next unit operation, adjustment of the solution pH to a value near 12 by the addition of lime slurry to form a metal-laden sludge phase (an operation referred to as lime-softening), removed an additional 57% of soluble uranium activity, for an over-all removal efficiency of {approximately} 96%. However, the precipitated solids did not settle well, and some iodide reagent is held up in the wet filtercake.

Bostick, W.D.; Davis, W.H.; Jarabek, R.J. [East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials and Chemistry Lab.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Design and operation of the coke-oven gas sulfur removal facility at Geneva Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coke-oven gas sulfur removal facility at Geneva Steel utilizes a combination of two technologies which had never been used together. These two technologies had proven effective separately and now in combination. However, it brought unique operational considerations which has never been considered previously. The front end of the facility is a Sulfiban process. This monoethanolamine (MEA) process effectively absorbs hydrogen sulfide and other acid gases from coke-oven gas. The final step in sulfur removal uses a Lo-Cat II. The Lo-Cat process absorbs and subsequently oxidizes H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur. These two processes have been effective in reducing sulfur dioxide emissions from coke-oven gas by 95%. Since the end of the start-up and optimization phase, emission rate has stayed below the 104.5 lb/hr limit of equivalent SO{sub 2} (based on a 24-hr average). In Jan. 1995, the emission rate from the sulfur removal facility averaged 86.7 lb/hr with less than 20 lb/hr from the Econobator exhaust. The challenges yet to be met are decreasing the operating expenses of the sulfur removal facility, notably chemical costs, and minimizing the impact of the heating system on unit reliability.

Havili, M.U.; Fraser-Smyth, L.L.; Wood, B.W. [Geneva Steel, Provo, UT (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator May 2011 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), Califo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator May 2011 © Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

de Lijser, Peter

416

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator August 2011 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), Cal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator August 2011 © Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

de Lijser, Peter

417

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator November 2012 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator November 2012 © Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

de Lijser, Peter

418

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator November 2011 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator November 2011 © Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

de Lijser, Peter

419

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator February 2012 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator February 2012 © Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

de Lijser, Peter

420

Southern California Leading Economic IndicatorSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorSouthern California Leading Economic Indicator May 2010 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), Cal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern California Leading Economic IndicatorSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorSouthern California Leading Economic Indicator May 2010 © Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

de Lijser, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator May 2012 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), Califo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator May 2012 © Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

de Lijser, Peter

422

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator November 2010 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator November 2010 © Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

de Lijser, Peter

423

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator August 2012 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), Cal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator August 2012 © Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

de Lijser, Peter

424

Regional Lead Agents and County Coordinators 2011 RESPONSIBILITY NAME COUNTY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coordinator Jay Crouch Newberry County Coordinator Vicky Bertagnolli Aiken REGION 8 Regional Lead Karissa

Bolding, M. Chad

425

Compatibility of SiC and SiC Composites with Molten Lead  

SciTech Connect

The choice of structural material candidates to contain Lead at 1000 C are limited in number. Silicon carbide composites comprise one choice of possible containment materials. Short term screening studies (120 hours) were undertaken to study the behavior of Silicon Carbide, Silicon Nitride, elemental Silicon and various Silicon Carbide fiber composites focusing mainly on melt infiltrated composites. Isothermal experiments at 1000 C utilized graphite fixtures to contain the Lead and material specimens under a low oxygen partial pressure environment. The corrosion weight loss values (grams/cm{sup 2} Hr) obtained for each of the pure materials showed SiC (monolithic CVD or Hexoloy) to have the best materials compatibility with Lead at this temperature. Increased weight loss values were observed for pure Silicon Nitride and elemental Silicon. For the SiC fiber composite samples those prepared using a SiC matrix material performed better than Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} as a matrix material. Composites prepared using a silicon melt infiltration process showed larger corrosion weight loss values due to the solubility of silicon in lead at these temperatures. When excess silicon was removed from these composite samples the corrosion performance for these material improved. These screening studies were used to guide future long term exposure (both isothermal and non-isothermal) experiments and Silicon Carbide composite fabrication work.

H Tunison

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

426

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Honeymoons Lead to Upgrades in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Honeymoons Honeymoons Lead to Upgrades in Western Vermont to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Honeymoons Lead to Upgrades in Western Vermont on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Honeymoons Lead to Upgrades in Western Vermont on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Honeymoons Lead to Upgrades in Western Vermont on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Honeymoons Lead to Upgrades in Western Vermont on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Honeymoons Lead to Upgrades in Western Vermont on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Honeymoons Lead to Upgrades in Western Vermont on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress

427

Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

San Diego Leads in San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs on AddThis.com... Sept. 3, 2011 San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs W atch how San Diego is leading the way in promoting electric vehicles. For information about this project, contact San Diego Regional Clean Cities

428

Coordinated development of leading biomass pretreatment technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and xylose yields increased with increasing xyla- nase supplementation. Glucan conversion was almost doubled conversion (y)/% increase in xylan conversion (x). nd, not determined. 310 Biotechnol. Prog., 2009, Vol. 25 concentrations in a simultane- ous-saccharification-and-fermentation-based bioethanol process: technical

California at Riverside, University of

429

Lead Defendant Cases Filed Injunctions - Remands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Cases Filed in 2011 2011 NEPA Case Dispositions NEPA Cases Filed in 2011 2011 NEPA Case Dispositions Lead Defendant Cases Filed Injunctions - Remands Judgment for defendant 79 ARMY-USACE 3 2 Dismissal w/o settlement 20 DHS-USCG 1 1 Settlement 18 DOD 0 0 Adverse dispositions: 29 DOE-Energy 2 0 TRO 0 DOE-FERC 0 0 Preliminary Injunction 5 DOE-NNSA 0 0 Permanent Injunction 3 DOI-BIA 0 0 Remand 21 DOI-BLM 22 8 DOI-BOEM 0 0 Basis for 2011 NEPA Dispositions DOI-BOR 1 2 Jurisdictional - P prevailed 2 DOI-FWS 4 2 Jurisdictional - D prevailed 20 DOI-NPS 4 0 NEPA - Not required 4 DOJ 0 0 NEPA - Is required 4 DOS 0 0 CE - Adequate 5 DOT-FMCSA 1 0 CE - Not Adequate 5 DOT-FAA 3 1 EA - Adequate* 24 DOT-FHWA 14 2 EA - Not Adequate* 5 DOT-FTA 2 0 EIS - Adequate* 32 DOT-STB 0 1 EIS - Not Adequate* 15

430

Lead Safety Awareness This Bulletin provides information on the safe handling of lead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

paints, radiation shielding, and ammunition. In addition, the Department has thousands of tons of lead 60 percent of the occurrences resulted in worker exposures and unsafe exposure levels in work spaces-forming system, internal organs, including the reproductive system, kidneys, nervous system, and the brain

431

Laser Systems for Orbital Debris Removal  

SciTech Connect

The use of a ground based laser for space debris cleaning was investigated by the ORION project in 1996. Since that study the greatest technological advance in the development of high energy pulsed laser systems has taken place within the NIF project at LLNL. The proposed next laser system to follow the NIF at LLNL will be a high rep rate version of the NIF based on diode-pumping rather than flashlamp excitation; the so called 'LIFE' laser system. Because a single 'LIFE' beamline could be built up in a few year time frame, and has performance characteristics relevant to the space debris clearing problem, such a beamline could enable a near term demonstration of space debris cleaning. Moreover, the specifics of debris cleaning make it possible to simplify the LIFE laser beyond what is required for a fusion drive laser, and so substantially reduce its cost. Starting with the requirements for laser intensity on the target, and then considering beam delivery, we will flow back the laser requirements needed for space debris cleaning. Using these derived requirements we will then optimize the pulse duration, the operational regime, and the output pulse energy of the laser with a focus of simplifying its overall design. Anticipated simplifications include operation in the heat capacity regime, eliminating cooling requirements on the laser gain slabs, and relaxing B-integral and birefrigence requirements.

Rubenchik, A M; Barty, C P; Beach, R J; Erlandson, A C; Caird, J A

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

432

Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet Mar 27, 2012 Sweden has been a global leader on nonproliferation, and was one of the

433

Czech Republic HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Czech Republic HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Czech Republic HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Czech Republic HEU Removal Czech Republic HEU Removal Location Czech Republic United States 49° 35' 23.3628" N, 15° 4' 23.6712" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

434

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Press Release High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Nov 15, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

435

South Africa HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

South Africa HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration South Africa HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > South Africa HEU Removal South Africa HEU Removal Location South Africa United States 30° 33' 35.0604" S, 22° 19' 27.1884" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

436

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Mar 26, 2012 For nearly two decades, the United States and Ukraine have cooperated on a

437

Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Transition Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Transition December 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Laborers place a disposable liner in a tailings container. Laborers place a disposable liner in a tailings container. MOAB, Utah - The Moab mill tailings removal project in Utah ended the year having shipped more than 35 percent of the total 16 million tons of uranium mill tailings off-site. The tailings are being transported by rail 30 miles north to a disposal cell for permanent storage. More than 1 million tons of tailings were shipped during fiscal year 2012, which closed at the end of September. The Moab Project also successfully transitioned both of its prime contracts

438

Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material ... Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima Posted By Office of Public Affairs

439

Thief Process Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process for the Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas Process for the Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 6,521,021 entitled "Thief Process for the Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas." Disclosed in this patent is a novel process in which partially combusted coal is removed from the combustion chamber of a power plant using a lance (called a "thief"). This partially combusted coal acts as a thermally activated adsorbent for mercury. When it is in- jected into the duct work of the power plant downstream from the exit port of the combustion chamber, mercury within the flue gas contacts and adsorbs onto the thermally activated sorbent. The sorbent-mercury

440

Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Transition Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Transition December 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Laborers place a disposable liner in a tailings container. Laborers place a disposable liner in a tailings container. MOAB, Utah - The Moab mill tailings removal project in Utah ended the year having shipped more than 35 percent of the total 16 million tons of uranium mill tailings off-site. The tailings are being transported by rail 30 miles north to a disposal cell for permanent storage. More than 1 million tons of tailings were shipped during fiscal year 2012, which closed at the end of September. The Moab Project also successfully transitioned both of its prime contracts

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Removal of Methylene Blue from Aqueous Solutions Using a Novel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition ... the removal of MB and the state balance of absorption capacity up to 86.89% and 2.6040 mg/g. ... New Development Model for Bauxite Deposits - Dedicated Compact Refinery.

442

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Press Release High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Nov 15, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

443

United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone November 4, 2013 - 2:09pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced under a multi-year international effort coordinated between Hungary, the United States, the Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the successful removal of all remaining highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Hungary. This makes Hungary the twelfth country to completely eliminate HEU from its borders since President Obama's 2009 announcement

444

Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron and Heterogeneous Photocatalysis with TiO2 Speaker(s): Marta Litter Date: November 19, 2010 - 11:00am Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Hugo Destaillats Arsenic in groundwater is a dramatic global problem due to the high incidence of arsenicosis or HACRE (Chronic Endemic Regional Hydro-arsenicism, Hidroarsenicismo Crónico Regional Endémico in Spanish), a severe illness causing skin lesions and cancer in extended regions of the world. For this reason, research on low-cost technologies for As removal to be applied in isolated, poor, rural locations is mandatory. This seminar will present a brief overview of arsenic pollution issues and mitigation needs in Latin America. It will also present results on As(V) removal using

445

Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites In January 2013, the Department of Energy issued the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste. Among the elements contained in this strategy is an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites. This focus is consistent with the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, which identified removal of stranded used nuclear fuel at shutdown sites as a priority so that these sites may be completely decommissioned and put to other beneficial uses. Shutdown sites are defined as those commercial nuclear power reactor sites where the

446

Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Convection Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility Scaling Basis Full Scale Half Scale NSTF Argonne National Laboratory's Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) - one of the world's largest facilities for ex-vessel passive decay heat removal testing-confirms the performance of reactor cavity cooling systems (RCCS) and similar passive confinement or containment decay heat removal systems in modern Small Modular Reactors. Originally built to aid in the development of General Electric's Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS), the NSTF has a long history of providing confirmatory data for the airside of the RVACS. Argonne National Laboratory's NSTF is a state-of-the-art, large-scale facility for evaluating performance

447

Oil and Gas- Leases to remove or recover (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act states that a lease or agreement conveying the right to remove or recover oil, natural gas or gas of any other designation from lessor to lessee shall not be valid if such lease does not...

448

Biosorption beads for removal of dissolved metals from aqueous streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process for removing heavy metals from aqueous waste streams 5 by contacting such streams with certain biological adsorbents, either living, dead or in fragments, that may be immobilized in gel beads. 1 tab.

Scott, C.D.

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

449

Considering removing "Show Preview" button on utility rate form...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rate Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(287) Contributor 22 April, 2013 - 14:55 Utility Rates I'm considering removing the "Show Preview" button, since it does not work...

450

Removal of mineral matter including pyrite from coal  

SciTech Connect

Mineral matter, including pyrite, is removed from coal by treatment of the coal with aqueous alkali at a temperature of about 175.degree. to 350.degree. C, followed by acidification with strong acid.

Reggel, Leslie (Pittsburgh, PA); Raymond, Raphael (Bethel Park, PA); Blaustein, Bernard D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

451

US, International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and eliminating weapons-usable nuclear materials," said U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz. "Today, with the complete removal of all highly enriched uranium from Vietnam, we can...

452

December 28, 2000, DOE letter regarding the removal of spent...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office (RL) associated with removing spent nuclear fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site as part of its Recommendation 94-1, which was recently combined into...

453

NETL: Releases & Briefs - Photochemical removal of mercury from...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photochemical Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas Scientist Evan Granite explains that UV-C light drives the reaction Scientist Evan Granite explains that UV-C light drives the...

454

User Oriented Climatic Information for Planning a Snow Removal Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many activities associated with the transportation sector are weather sensitive. This study is concerned with highway maintenance activities, specifically snow removal, and the budgeting of same by the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT)...

Stewart J. Cohen

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Plans to Resume Train Shipments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plans to Resume Train Shipments in March; All of the Laid Off Workers Will Return Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Plans to Resume Train Shipments in March; All of the Laid Off...

456

Effective Boron Removal by Calcium Silicate Slags Combined with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A New Centrifuge CVD Reactor that will Challenge the Siemens Process ... Boron Removal from Silicon Melts by H2O/H2 Gas Blowing – Gas-phase Mass ...

457

Removal of Phosphor in Metallurgical Silicon by Rare Earth Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A New Centrifuge CVD Reactor that will Challenge the Siemens Process ... Boron Removal from Silicon Melts by H2O/H2 Gas Blowing – Gas-phase Mass ...

458

Research on the Forecast Model of the Boron Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A New Centrifuge CVD Reactor that will Challenge the Siemens Process ... Boron Removal from Silicon Melts by H2O/H2 Gas Blowing – Gas-phase Mass ...

459

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate Title Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6221E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Amrose, Susan, Ashok J. Gadgil, Venkat Srinivasan, Kristin Kowolik, Marc Muller, Jessica Huang, and Robert Kostecki Journal Joournal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering Volume 48 Issue 9 Pagination 1019-1030 Date Published 04/2013 Keywords arsenic, bangladesh, Cambodia, dosage rate, electrocoagulation, india, water treatment Abstract We demonstrate that electrocoagulation (EC) using iron electrodes can reduce arsenic below 10 ÎĽg/L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater and in real groundwater from Bangladesh and Cambodia while investigating the effect of operating parameters that are often overlooked, such as charge dosage rate. We measure arsenic removal performance

460

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Salony, DOE Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov 509-376-0402 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Dee_Millikin@rl.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) announced today the removal of the first phase of highly radioactive sludge from under water storage in the K West Basin about 400 yards away from the Columbia River. "This is a major step forward in protecting the river and a historic

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461

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Salony, DOE Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov 509-376-0402 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Dee_Millikin@rl.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) announced today the removal of the first phase of highly radioactive sludge from under water storage in the K West Basin about 400 yards away from the Columbia River. "This is a major step forward in protecting the river and a historic

462

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Mar 26, 2012 For nearly two decades, the United States and Ukraine have cooperated on a

463

NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston Press Release NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston Nov 22, 2013

464

A process for off-gas particulate removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This paper describes an off-gas system for the removal of radioactive particulates from a melter for the vitrification of radioactive wastes to form glass waste forms. A diagram is provided.

Carl, D.E.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Epitaxial Growth of GaN-based LEDs on Simple Sacrificial Substrates  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to produce alternative substrate technologies for GaN-based LEDs by developing an ALD interlayer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on sacrificial substrates such as ZnO and Si. A sacrificial substrate is used for device growth that can easily be removed using a wet chemical etchant leaving only the thin GaN epi-layer. After substrate removal, the GaN LED chip can then be mounted in several different ways to a metal heat sink/reflector and light extraction techniques can then be applied to the chip and compared for performance. Success in this work will lead to high efficiency LED devices with a simple low cost fabrication method and high product yield as stated by DOE goals for its solid state lighting portfolio.

Ian Ferguson; Chris Summers

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

466

Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T&FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420oC. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

Soli T. Khericha

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Plant experience using hydrogen peroxide for enhanced fat flotation and BOD removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen peroxide (H[sub 2]O[sub 2]), is known in the food processing industry to reduce COD, BOD, to prevent anaerobic conditions in pipes, tanks and lagoons and to remove malodorous sulfides in effluents from anaerobic wastewater treatment. It has recently been shown to also provide effective solids removal from food processing wastewater. The wastewater of food processing plants often contains a very high loading of organic material consisting of fat, oil and grease (FOG), resulting in unacceptable BOD and COD levels. Since many wastewater treatment systems are being pushed to the limit of their capacity or are already overloaded, the high FOG loading cannot be removed well by the conventional means of treating the wastewater with dissolved air flotation or grease traps. As a result, many food processors are paying surcharges for not being in compliance with the tight discharge limits. To overcome these problems, a process has been developed using H[sub 2]O[sub 2] for enhanced FOG recovery and BOD removal. The process is based on the formation of microbubbles which attach themselves to the FOG particles and float them to the surface where they can be easily skimmed off. In addition to meeting effluent standards, the process has been able to yield a material that is very renderable and suitable for reuse. Technical and operational data of several industrial applications in the US and Canada are presented, together with process costs. H[sub 2]O[sub 2] treatment will generally be most applicable when improvement of solids removal is required without major investment costs, e.g. emergency situations, during seasonal peaks or increased production. 12 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Steiner, N.; Gec, R. (Degussa Corp., Allendale, NJ (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Removal of sulfur compounds from combustion product exhaust  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device are disclosed for removing sulfur containing contaminents from a combustion product exhaust. The removal process is carried out in two stages wherein the combustion product exhaust is dissolved in water, the water being then heated to drive off the sulfur containing contaminents. The sulfur containing gases are then resolublized in a cold water trap to form a concentrated solution which can then be used as a commercial product.

Cheng, Dah Y. (Palo Alto, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Solid materials for removing arsenic and method thereof  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid materials have been developed to remove arsenic compounds from aqueous media. The arsenic is removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the arsenic leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are aerogels or xerogels and aerogels or xerogels and solid support structure, e.g., granulated activated carbon (GAC), mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards arsenic.

Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Sabre J. (Oakland, CA); Sanner, Robert D. (Livermore, CA); Dias, Victoria L. (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

471

Solid materials for removing arsenic and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid materials have been developed to remove arsenic compounds from aqueous media. The arsenic is removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the arsenic leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are aerogels or xerogels and aerogels or xerogels and solid support structure, e.g., granulated activated carbon (GAC), mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards arsenic.

Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Sabre J. (Oakland, CA); Sanner, Robert D. (Livermore, CA); Dias, Victoria L. (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Improved Antimony Removal Using a Chemical Treatment and Microfiltration Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Antimony removal can be a challenge because the species can exist in a number of valence states, in both soluble and insoluble forms. This report summarizes a test program conducted at Duke Power Company's Oconee plant, directed at removing antimony isotopes from the liquid radwaste stream. Treatments investigated included pH adjustment, use of oxidizing and reducing agents, application of seed materials, and addition of polyelectrolytes -- all combined with crossflow filtration. The report provides the ...