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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Lead removal by using carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exposure to lead (Pb) can cause anemia, diseases of the liver and kidneys, brain damage and ultimately death. For these reasons, heavy metals must be removed as much as possible from water. The removal of Pb (II) ions from aqueous solution using carbon nanotubes (CNT) as the adsorbent was investigated. The effects of pH were studied at 25°C. Batch mode adsorption study has revealed that the removal of Pb (II) ions was maximum (85% removal) at pH 5 and achieved 83% removal at 40 mg/L of CNTs. The adsorption continuously increased in the pH range of 3-5, beyond which the adsorption could not be carried out due to the precipitation of metal. This study was also supported by characterisation of CNTs using FESEM. The characterisation suggested that at acidic condition (pH 5), the surfaces of CNTs are more aligned and well-integrated compared to CNTs at different pHs. Finally, it can be concluded that CNTs could be a potential adsorbent for the removal of Pb from wastewater.

A.A. Muataz; M. Fettouhi; A. Al-Mammum; N. Yahya

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Laser-based coatings removal  

SciTech Connect

Over the years as building and equipment surfaces became contaminated with low levels of uranium or plutonium dust, coats of paint were applied to stabilize the contaminants in place. Most of the earlier paint used was lead-based paint. More recently, various non-lead-based paints, such as two-part epoxy, are used. For D & D (decontamination and decommissioning), it is desirable to remove the paints or other coatings rather than having to tear down and dispose of the entire building.

Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Removal of cadmium and lead from soil using aescin as a biosurfactant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remediation of a soil contaminated with cadmium or lead was performed by a soil washing process using aescin as a biosurfactant. The removal of cadmium and lead from the soil was evaluated as a function of aes...

Kyung-Jin Hong; Young-Kook Choi; Shuzo Tokunaga…

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater Reyad; available online 29 October 2003 Abstract A by-product fly ash from oil shale processing was converted shale; Ash; Zeolite; Cadmium and lead removal 1. Introduction Oil shale exists in Jordan with large

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

5

Laboratory Studies of Lead Removal from Liquid Scintillator in Preparation for KamLAND's Low Background Phase  

SciTech Connect

The removal of Radon induced Lead from liquid scintillator was extensively studied in preparation for KamLAND's low background phase. This work presents the results from laboratory experiments performed at the University of Alabama and their implications for KamLAND and future low background experiments using carbon based liquid scintillator. It was observed that distillation was the most effective purification procedure and that one must consider a non-polar and non-ionic component of Lead in order to reach the levels of radio-purity required for these new class of ultra-low background experiments.

Keefer, Gregory [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

6

Membrane Based intensification of ammonia removal from wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this research was to study a novel membrane based oxygen intensification system to enhance a biological wastewater treatment process for ammonia removal. Specifically, this work is concerned with the biological nitrification process which...

Almutairi, Azel

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Lead Poisoning of Seabirds:? Environmental Risks from Leaded Paint at a Decommissioned Military Base  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Here we utilized lead isotopic fingerprinting to investigate sources of elevated lead exposure to Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) chicks in the Midway Island National Wildlife Refuge, which was established on the site of a decom missioned military base that previously had undergone lead remediation. ... Midway has had multiple uses over the past century and was the center of a major battle during World War II. ...

Myra E. Finkelstein; Roberto H. Gwiazda; Donald R. Smith

2003-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

8

Removal of copper and lead ions from aqueous solutions by adsorbent derived from sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorbent prepared from sewage sludge has been used for the adsorption of Cu2+ and Pb2+ from aqueous solutions. It was noted that an increase in removal efficiency achieved 72% and 56% when agitation time achieved 120 min, and a decrease in the removal efficiency from 81% and 70% to 36% and 40% when the heavy metals initial concentration from 10 mg L?1 to 80 mg L?1 for Cu2+ and Pb2+ concentration, the removal efficiency increased with the adsorbent concentration increased. The Langmuir model fitted the experimental data reasonably well. The adsorption capacities achieved 9.737 mg g?1 and 7.386 mg g?1 for the Cu2+ and Pb2+, respectively. Desorption studies were performed by using dilute hydrochloric acid. Quantitative recovery of the metal ion is possible. The mechanism of adsorption seems to be ion exchange.

YunBo Zhai; GuangMing Zeng; LaFang Wang; XianXun Wei; CaiTing Li; ShanHong Li

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Using Magnetically Responsive Tea Waste to Remove Lead in Waters under Environmentally Relevant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and aircrafts. Most heavy metals are toxic to humans. Specifically, lead (Pb) is a major cause of neurological-mail: reginaldthio@sutd.edu.sg Introduction As industrialization continues worldwide, heavy metal contam- ination of the environment is becoming an increasing concern for its adverse health effects on human society. Heavy metals

Doyle, Patrick S.

10

Lead  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

topic topic Lead 8:00 AM 8:15 AM Welcome and Webinar Rules Maloy 8:15 AM 8:30 AM NE Materials Introduction Lesica 8:30 AM 9:00 AM Advanced Reactor Concepts Sham 9:00 AM 9:30 AM SMR Corwin 9:30 AM 10:00 AM VHTR Materials Wright 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Coffee Break 10:15 AM 10:45 AM Fuel Cycle Research and Development Maloy 10:45 AM 11:15 AM LWR Sustainability Busby 11:15 AM 11:45 AM Summary/Discussion All Discussion topic - Development of Advanced ODS alloys Lead 8:00 AM 8:15 AM Welcome and Webinar Rules Maloy 8:15 AM 8:30 AM Advanced Materials for Fast Reactor Core Materials Maloy 8:30 AM 9:00 AM High Dose MA-957 testing Toloczko 9:00 AM 9:30 AM FCRD ODS Material Development- FCRD-NFA1 Hoelzer 9:30 AM 10:00 AM NFA Processing Odette 10:00 AM 10:15 AM Coffee Break 10:15 AM 10:45 AM 9Cr ODS Material Development Byun 10:45 AM

11

Application of electrochemical technology for removing petroleum hydrocarbons from produced water using lead dioxide and boron-doped diamond electrodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Although diverse methods exist for treating polluted water, the most promising and innovating technology is the electrochemical remediation process. This paper presents the anodic oxidation of real produced water (PW), generated by the petroleum exploration of the Petrobras plant-Tunisia. Experiments were conducted at different current densities (30, 50 and 100 mA cm?2) using the lead dioxide supported on tantalum (Ta/PbO2) and boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes in an electrolytic batch cell. The electrolytic process was monitored by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the residual total petroleum hydrocarbon [TPH] in order to know the feasibility of electrochemical treatment. The characterization and quantification of petroleum wastewater components were performed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The COD removal was approximately 85% and 96% using PbO2 and BDD reached after 11 and 7 h, respectively. Compared with PbO2, the BDD anode showed a better performance to remove petroleum hydrocarbons compounds from produced water. It provided a higher oxidation rate and it consumed lower energy. However, the energy consumption and process time make useless anodic oxidation for the complete elimination of pollutants from PW. Cytotoxicity has shown that electrochemical oxidation using BDD could be efficiently used to reduce more than 90% of hydrocarbons compounds. All results suggest that electrochemical oxidation could be an effective approach to treat highly concentrated organic pollutants present in the industrial petrochemical wastewater and significantly reduce the cost and time of treatment.

Boutheina Gargouri; Olfa Dridi Gargouri; Bochra Gargouri; Souhel Kallel Trabelsi; Ridha Abdelhedi; Mohamed Bouaziz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Eurospeech 2001 -Scandinavia Sub-Band Based Additive Noise Removal for Robust Speech  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eurospeech 2001 - Scandinavia Sub-Band Based Additive Noise Removal for Robust Speech Recognition J analysis, etc. We will then introduce a sub-band based scheme to remove the noise effect from corrupted speech to make recognition system immune to additive noise. We will report on experiments on TI digits

13

DOE-funded Silicon-Graphene Research Leads to Chicago-based Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE-funded Silicon-Graphene Research Leads to Chicago-based Technology Startup Graduate students at Northwestern University are commercializing a silicon (Si)-graphene technology...

14

Glass-like structure of a lead-based relaxor ferroelectric  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the basis of diffuse scattering analysis, the structure of lead-based relaxors is shown to correspond to the specific dipole glassy state, as opposed to the concept of polar nanoregions.

Bosak, A.

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

15

Novel Sorbent-Based Process for High Temperature Trace Metal Removal  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to demonstrate the efficacy of a novel sorbent can effectively remove trace metal contaminants (Hg, As, Se and Cd) from actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams at high temperature (above the dew point of the gas). The performance of TDA's sorbent has been evaluated in several field demonstrations using synthesis gas generated by laboratory and pilot-scale coal gasifiers in a state-of-the-art test skid that houses the absorbent and all auxiliary equipment for monitoring and data logging of critical operating parameters. The test skid was originally designed to treat 10,000 SCFH gas at 250 psig and 350 C, however, because of the limited gas handling capabilities of the test sites, the capacity was downsized to 500 SCFH gas flow. As part of the test program, we carried out four demonstrations at two different sites using the synthesis gas generated by the gasification of various lignites and a bituminous coal. Two of these tests were conducted at the Power Systems Demonstration Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama; a Falkirk (North Dakota) lignite and a high sodium lignite (the PSDF operator Southern Company did not disclose the source of this lignite) were used as the feedstock. We also carried out two other demonstrations in collaboration with the University of North Dakota Energy Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) using synthesis gas slipstreams generated by the gasification of Sufco (Utah) bituminous coal and Oak Hills (Texas) lignite. In the PSDF tests, we showed successful operation of the test system at the conditions of interest and showed the efficacy of sorbent in removing the mercury from synthesis gas. In Test Campaign No.1, TDA sorbent reduced Hg concentration of the synthesis gas to less than 5 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and achieved over 99% Hg removal efficiency for the entire test duration. Unfortunately, due to the relatively low concentration of the trace metals in the lignite feed and as a result of the intermittent operation of the PSDF gasifier (due to the difficulties in the handling of the low quality lignite), only a small fraction of the sorbent capacity was utilized (we measured a mercury capacity of 3.27 mg/kg, which is only a fraction of the 680 mg/kg Hg capacity measured for the same sorbent used at our bench-scale evaluations at TDA). Post reaction examination of the sorbent by chemical analysis also indicated some removal As and Se (we did not detect any significant amounts of Cd in the synthesis gas or over the sorbent). The tests at UNDEERC was more successful and showed clearly that the TDA sorbent can effectively remove Hg and other trace metals (As and Se) at high temperature. The on-line gas measurements carried out by TDA and UNDEERC separately showed that TDA sorbent can achieve greater than 95% Hg removal efficiency at 260 C ({approx}200g sorbent treated more than 15,000 SCF synthesis gas). Chemical analysis conducted following the tests also showed modest amounts of As and Se accumulation in the sorbent bed (the test durations were still short to show higher capacities to these contaminants). We also evaluated the stability of the sorbent and the fate of mercury (the most volatile and unstable of the trace metal compounds). The Synthetic Ground Water Leaching Procedure Test carried out by an independent environmental laboratory showed that the mercury will remain on the sorbent once the sorbent is disposed. Based on a preliminary engineering and cost analysis, TDA estimated the cost of mercury removal from coal-derived synthesis gas as $2,995/lb (this analysis assumes that this cost also includes the cost of removal of all other trace metal contaminants). The projected cost will result in a small increase (less than 1%) in the cost of energy.

Gokhan Alptekin

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

A Study of the Zn-based Desulfurization Sorbents for H2S Removal in the IGCC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, the possibility for the simultaneous removal of H2S and NH3...on the Zn–Ti-based sorbents has been tested by various researchers using several additives like Co, Ni, Fe, Mo and ... W. However, the resea...

Suk Yong Jung; Soo Chool Lee; Hee Kwon Jun; Jae Chang Kim

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Combination of struvite pyrolysate recycling with mixed-base technology for removing ammonium from fertilizer wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Removal of ammonium from wastewater via struvite (MAP) pyrolysate recycling combined with a mixed-base NaOH/Mg(OH)2 technology was investigated, and the phosphate and magnesium concentration in the supernatant were measured. The optimal parameters for acidolysis were a pH of 1; temperature of 120 °C and time of 2 h. The presence of derivatives of amorphous magnesium hydrogen phosphate (MgHPO4), namely magnesium phosphate (Mg3(PO4)2) and magnesium pyrophosphate (Mg2P2O7) were verified by experiment. The ammonium removal ratio in this combined mixed-base technology was 96.8% in the first cycle, 80.6% in the second, and 81.0% after acidolysis. The phosphate and magnesium ions concentration in the supernatant were about 1 mg/L and 40 mg/L, respectively. The grain size of MAP was 1.52 nm without seeding and 1.79 nm with seeding, and the growth rate of MAP was 17.6%.

Rongtai Yu; Jinju Geng; Hongqiang Ren; Yanru Wang; Ke Xu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

New Techniques to Characterize and Remove Water-Based Drilling Fluids Filter Cake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Filter cake characterization is very important in drilling and completion operations. Heterogeneity of the filter cake plays a key role in the design of chemical treatments needed to remove the filter cake. The objectives of this study...

Elkatatny, Salaheldin Mahmoud

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

19

The reproducibility of [sup 109]Cd-based X-ray fluorescence measurements of bone lead  

SciTech Connect

We assessed the reproducibility of X-ray fluorescence-based lead measurements from multiple measurements made on a low-concentration plaster of paris phantom and in five subjects measured five times on two occasions. Over a 6-month period, 220 measurements of the same phantom were obtained and showed a standard deviation of 1.29 [mu]g Pb (g plaster of paris)[sup [minus]1]. The two sets of in vivo measurements were made 10 months apart and revealed a mean standard deviation of 3.4 [mu]Pb (g bone mineral)[sup [minus]1] and 5.1 [mu]g Pb (g bone mineral)[sup [minus]1] for males and females, respectively. Our measured standard deviation exceeded by 20-30% the calculated standard deviation associated with a single measurement both in the phantom and in subjects. This indicates that some variance is introduced during the measurement process. Operator learning and consistency significantly minimized this increased variability. Measured lead concentrations of the left and right tibia in 14 subjects showed no significant differences between legs. As a result, either tibia can be sampled and compared over time. The levels of reproducibility we report here mean that X-ray fluorescence-based determinations of bone lead concentrations are reliable both over the short and long term. Thus, reasonably sized confidence intervals can be placed on detected changes in concentration and should permit acquisition of longitudinal data within a reasonable length of time. 19 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Gordon, C.L. (Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)); Webber, C.E.; Chettle, D.R. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 9, Removal action system design  

SciTech Connect

This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Efficiencies and Optimization of Weak Base Anion Ion-Exchange Resin for Groundwater Hexavalent Chromium Removal at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) contractor, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, has successfully converted a series of groundwater treatment facilities to use a new treatment resin that is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiency in treating groundwater contamination at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. During the production era, the nuclear reactors at the Hanford Site required a continuous supply of high-quality cooling water during operations. Cooling water consumption ranged from about 151,417 to 378,541 L/min (40,000 to 100,000 gal/min) per reactor, depending on specific operating conditions. Water from the Columbia River was filtered and treated chemically prior to use as cooling water, including the addition of sodium dichromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Hexavalent chromium was the primary component of the sodium dichromate and was introduced into the groundwater at the Hanford Site as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from the reactors starting in 1944. Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other contaminants related to nuclear reactor operations resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated, leading to the use of pump-and-treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex™ 21K, a regenerable, strong-base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which was performed offsite. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion for the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. As a result, CH2M HILL performed testing at the Hanford Site in 2009 and 2010 to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at different waste sites. The testing demonstrated that a weak-base anion, single-use resin, specifically ResinTech SIR-700 ®, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently onsite, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation, and return of resin for regeneration.

Nesham, Dean O. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Ivarson, Kristine A. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Hanson, James P. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Miller, Charles W. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Meyers, P. [USDOE, Richland Operations Office, WA (United States); Jaschke, Naomi M. [USDOE, Richland Operations Office, WA (United States)

2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

22

Development of an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an Integrated an Integrated Multicontaminant Removal Process Applied to Warm Syngas Cleanup for Coal-Based Advanced Gasification Systems Background The U.S. has more coal than any other country, and it can be converted through gasification into electricity, liquid fuels, chemicals, or hydrogen. However, for coal gasification to become sufficiently competitive to benefit the U.S. economy and help reduce our dependence on foreign fuels, gasification costs must be reduced

23

RCRA closure of an explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) range, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio: Circumstances leading to a risk based approach  

SciTech Connect

After approximately 40 years of operation of an Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Range at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio, operations were suspended in late 1990 by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA). The closure of several notice of violations and reopening of the EOD Range were the initial objectives, but in 1995 a formal commitment for RCRA closure was made. The EOD Range, used for disposal of ordnance via open burning and open detonation, is a fenced 5 acre site and is located in a 100 year flood plain. Investigations performed in 1991 through 1994 to fully characterize the site indicated the presence of heavy metals and petroleum contamination in soils. Of particular concern were elevated levels of arsenic and lead. Localized remediations were attempted in 1993, but because of continued disagreement on cleanup levels with OEPA, these remediations were unsuccessful. Strict interpretation of OEPA RCRA closure guidance would have required the removal of soil from the entire five acre EOD Range to a depth of 4--5 feet, at a cost of approximately $6,000,000. However, in early 1995 a partnering session held with OEPA led to an improved regulatory relationship with OEPA. This improved relationship, along with new information compiled on industrial background concentrations of heavy metals at RCRA sites in Ohio, and emerging OEPA guidance on broader risk ranges for closure may prove to be key in reducing closure requirements. A draft Closure Plan has been submitted to OEPA which proposes a risk-based approach for closure. The plan is currently under review by OEPA. If approved, the AF could realize a substantial savings of greater than $5,000,000. This paper details the sequence of events in performing a RCRA closure at the EOD range, including the site conditions and field activities, and the evolution of closure requirements.

Tumbusch, C. [Air Force, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States). Office of Environmental Management; Martin, J. [International Technology Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding  

SciTech Connect

Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially of planned decommissioning operations. Thus lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for contaminated lead is removing the superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a scaled-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling.

Lussiez, G.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding  

SciTech Connect

Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium trader pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of contaminated lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling.

Lussiez, G.W.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding  

SciTech Connect

Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium trader pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of contaminated lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling.

Lussiez, G.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Urinary Lead Exposure and Breast Cancer Risk in a Population-Based Case-Control Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...modern-day human exposure as a result of past and continuing use in automobiles and aviation fuels and in a myriad of common uses (e.g., batteries, paints, solders, glazes, plastics). Arguably, the degree of environmental lead contamination...

Jane A. McElroy; Martin M. Shafer; Ronald E. Gangnon; Luis A. Crouch; and Polly A. Newcomb

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A priori information in a regularized sinogram-based method for removing ring artefacts in tomography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A ring artefact suppression method based on ideas of the theory of inverse problems is proposed for the case of parallel-beam geometry.

Titarenko, S.

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

29

Removal of Filter Cake Generated by Manganese Tetraoxide Water-based Drilling Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three effective solutions to dissolve the filter cake created by water-based drilling fluids weighted with Mn3O4 particles were developed. Hydrochloric acid at concentration lower than 5 wt% can dissolve most of Mn3O4-based filter cake. Dissolving...

Al Mojil, Abdullah Mohammed A.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

30

Lead-free precussion primer mixes based on metastable interstitial composite (MIC) technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lead-free percussion primer composition and a percussion cup containing e composition. The lead-free percussion primer composition is comprised of a mixture of about 45 wt % aluminum powder having an outer coating of aluminum oxide and molybdenum trioxide powder or a mixture of about 50 wt % aluminum powder having an outer coating of aluminum oxide and polytetrafluoroethylene powder. The aluminum powder, molybdenum trioxide powder and polytetrafluoroethylene powder has a particle size of 0.1 .mu.m or less, more preferably a particle size of from about 200-500 angstroms.

Dixon, George P. (Alexandria, VA); Martin, Joe A. (Espanola, NM); Thompson, Don (Ridgecrest, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Doppler Effect removal based on instantaneous frequency estimation and time domain re-sampling for wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The phenomenon of Doppler Effect in the acoustic signal recorded by the wayside acoustic defective bearing detector (ADBD) leads to the difficulty for fault diagnosis of train bearings with a high moving speed, which is a barrier that would badly reduce the effectiveness of online defect detection. In order to improve the performance of condition monitoring of the bearings on a passing train with microphones amounted besides the railway, the elimination of the Doppler Effect should be solved firstly. An effective method for removing the Doppler Effect embedded in the source signal is presented in this paper. The Short Time Fourier Transform-Viterbi Algorithm (STFT-VA) is applied to obtain instantaneous frequency estimation of the distorted signal. According to the acoustic theory of Morse, the non-linear data fitting is then carried out to get the fitting instantaneous frequencies. The necessary parameters for time domain interpolation re-sampling, which is totally based on the kinematic analysis, are acquired from the fitting curve and the re-sampling sequence could be established in the time domain. As a result of the preceding steps, the fault diagnosis for the train bearings could be implemented with the restored signal. The effectiveness of this proposed method is verified by means of a simulation with three adjacent frequencies and an experiment with practical acoustic signals of train bearings with a crack on the outer race and the inner race. The results of the simulation and the experiment indicate that the proposed method has an excellent performance in removing Doppler Effect, and could be well employed to the condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of train bearings with a high moving speed.

Chao Wang; Fanrang Kong; Qingbo He; Fei Hu; Fang Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Microsoft Word - FOR WEB REMOVE EDIT - Royal Pacific 33004 based on Act One 49001 NPCP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(ceiling fans, ceiling fan light kits, medium base compact fluorescent lamps, illuminated exit signs) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2013-SE-33004 NOTICE OF PROPOSED CIVIL PENALTY Date issued: July 5, 2013 Number of alleged violations: 2,555 (7 basic models; 365 days) Maximum possible assessment: $511,000 Proposed civil penalty: $51,100 The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") Office of the General Counsel, Office of Enforcement, alleges that Royal Pacific, Ltd. ("Royal Pacific") has violated certain provisions of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, 42 U.S.C. § 6291 et seq. ("the Act"), and 10 C.F.R. § 429.12. Specifically, DOE alleges: 1. Royal Pacific has manufactured 1 a variety of medium base compact fluorescent lamps

33

Novel sorbents for removal of gadolinium-based contrast agents in sorbent dialysis and hemoperfusion: preventive approaches to nephrogenic systemic fibrosis  

SciTech Connect

Gd based contrast agents in many forms of organocomplex have recently been linked to a debilitating and a potentially fatal skin disease called Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF) in patients with renal failures. Free Gd released from the complexes by transmetallation is believed to be the most important trigger for NSF. Removal of Gd complex from the patients immediately after the contrast study would prevent the dissociation of Gd and should eliminate NSF as a complication. Although removal of Gd based contrast agents may be accomplished with conventional hemodialysis, it requires three hemodialysis sessions at 3 hours each to remove 98% of the contrast agents. In this work, mesoporous silica material that are functionalized with 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO-SAMMS®) has been evaluated for effective removal of both free and chelated Gd (Magnevist, a brand of gadopentetate dimeglumine) from the dialysate and sodium chloride solution. The material has high affinity, rapid removal rate, and large sorption capacity for both free and chelated Gd, the properties that are far superior to those of activated carbon and zirconium phosphate currently used in the state-of-the-art sorbent dialysis systems. 99% of both free and chelated Gd would be removed in a single pass thru the sorbent bed of 1,2-HOPO-SAMMS®. The sorbent provides an effective and predicable strategy for removing Gd from patients with impaired renal function, thus it would allow for the continued use of contrast MRI while removing the risk of NSF and would represent a safe alternative to traditional contrast studies in the patient population.

Yantasee, Wassana; Fryxell, Glen E.; Porter, George A.; Pattamakomsan, Kanda; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Koonsiripaiboon, View; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Thermal lens study of thermo-optical properties and concentration quenching of Er3+-doped lead pyrophosphate based glasses  

SciTech Connect

In this work, we have used the thermal lens technique combined with conventional spectroscopy to characterize the thermo-optical properties of Er3+-doped lead pyrophosphate-based glasses. More precisely, we have investigated and quantified experimentally the fluorescence quantum efficiencies of the Er3+ levels, and we describe the role of concentration quenching effects. The fluorescence quantum efficiency of the 4I13/2 level is very high when compared to other phosphate glasses, while that of the green-coupled levels is very small. Other important photonic materials parameters, such as the thermal diffusivity and temperature coefficient of the optical path length change, were obtained and compared with those of other glass systems. The cumulative results obtained here for the Er-doped lead pyrophosphate glass show that this material is a good candidate for photonic applications with a characteristic Er3+ infrared emission around 1550 nm.

Santos, C. C. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Ceara, Brazil; Rocha, U. [Grupo de Fotônica e Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Física, Brazil; Guedes, Ilde [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Ceara, Brazil; Vermelho, M. V. D. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Brazil; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Jacinto, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Brazil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

A Community-Based Approach to Leading the Nation in Smart Energy Use  

SciTech Connect

Project Objectives The AEP Ohio gridSMART® Demonstration Project (Project) achieved the following objectives: • Built a secure, interoperable, and integrated smart grid infrastructure in northeast central Ohio that demonstrated the ability to maximize distribution system efficiency and reliability and consumer use of demand response programs that reduced energy consumption, peak demand, and fossil fuel emissions. • Actively attracted, educated, enlisted, and retained consumers in innovative business models that provided tools and information reducing consumption and peak demand. • Provided the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) information to evaluate technologies and preferred smart grid business models to be extended nationally. Project Description Ohio Power Company (the surviving company of a merger with Columbus Southern Power Company), doing business as AEP Ohio (AEP Ohio), took a community-based approach and incorporated a full suite of advanced smart grid technologies for 110,000 consumers in an area selected for its concentration and diversity of distribution infrastructure and consumers. It was organized and aligned around: • Technology, implementation, and operations • Consumer and stakeholder acceptance • Data management and benefit assessment Combined, these functional areas served as the foundation of the Project to integrate commercially available products, innovative technologies, and new consumer products and services within a secure two-way communication network between the utility and consumers. The Project included Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), Distribution Management System (DMS), Distribution Automation Circuit Reconfiguration (DACR), Volt VAR Optimization (VVO), and Consumer Programs (CP). These technologies were combined with two-way consumer communication and information sharing, demand response, dynamic pricing, and consumer products, such as plug-in electric vehicles and smart appliances. In addition, the Project incorporated comprehensive cyber security capabilities, interoperability, and a data assessment that, with grid simulation capabilities, made the demonstration results an adaptable, integrated solution for AEP Ohio and the nation.

None

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Characterization of coastal urban watershed bacterial communities leads to alternative community-based indicators  

SciTech Connect

Microbial communities in aquatic environments are spatially and temporally dynamic due to environmental fluctuations and varied external input sources. A large percentage of the urban watersheds in the United States are affected by fecal pollution, including human pathogens, thus warranting comprehensive monitoring. Using a high-density microarray (PhyloChip), we examined water column bacterial community DNA extracted from two connecting urban watersheds, elucidating variable and stable bacterial subpopulations over a 3-day period and community composition profiles that were distinct to fecal and non-fecal sources. Two approaches were used for indication of fecal influence. The first approach utilized similarity of 503 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) common to all fecal samples analyzed in this study with the watershed samples as an index of fecal pollution. A majority of the 503 OTUs were found in the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The second approach incorporated relative richness of 4 bacterial classes (Bacilli, Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and a-proteobacteria) found to have the highest variance in fecal and non-fecal samples. The ratio of these 4 classes (BBC:A) from the watershed samples demonstrated a trend where bacterial communities from gut and sewage sources had higher ratios than from sources not impacted by fecal material. This trend was also observed in the 124 bacterial communities from previously published and unpublished sequencing or PhyloChip- analyzed studies. This study provided a detailed characterization of bacterial community variability during dry weather across a 3-day period in two urban watersheds. The comparative analysis of watershed community composition resulted in alternative community-based indicators that could be useful for assessing ecosystem health.

Wu, C.H.; Sercu, B.; Van De Werhorst, L.C.; Wong, J.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Hazen, T.C.; Holden, P.A.; Andersen, G.L.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

MERCURY REMOVAL IN A NON-THERMAL, PLASMA-BASED MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

Powerspan has conducted pilot scale testing of a multi-pollutant control technology at FirstEnergy's Burger Power Plant under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy. The technology, Electro-Catalytic Oxidation (ECO), simultaneously removes sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) and mercury (Hg) from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Powerspan's ECO{reg_sign} pilot test program focused on optimization of Hg removal in a 1-MWe slipstream pilot while maintaining greater than 90% removal of NO{sub x} and 98% removal of SO{sub 2}. This Final Technical Report discusses pilot operations, installation and maintenance of the Hg SCEMS instrumentation, and performance results including component and overall removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, PM and Hg from the flue gas and removal of captured Hg from the co-product fertilizer stream.

Christopher R. McLaron

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Physics-based simulation of the impact of demand response on lead-acid emergency power availability in a datacenter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper uses a one-dimensional, physics-based model of a valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) battery to examine the impact of demand response on uninterruptible power supply (UPS) availability in a datacenter. Datacenters are facilities that provide services such as cloud computing, web search, etc. They are also large electricity consumers. An energy-efficient 15 MW datacenter, for instance, may pay $1 m per month for electricity. Datacenters often utilize VRLA batteries to ensure high reliability in serving their computational demand. This motivates the paper's central question: to what extent does the use of datacenter UPS batteries for demand response affect their availability for their primary purpose (namely, emergency power)? We address this question using a physics-based model of the coupled diffusion-reaction dynamics of VRLA batteries. We discretize this model using finite differences, and simulate it for different datacenter battery pack sizes. The results show that for a typical datacenter power demand profile, a VRLA battery pack sized for UPS functionality can provide demand response with only a minimal loss of UPS availability.

A. Mamun; D. Wang; I. Narayanan; A. Sivasubramaniam; H.K. Fathy

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal...

40

MERCURY REMOVAL IN A NON-THERMAL, PLASMA-BASED MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR UTILITY BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

This technical report describes the results from Task 1 of the Cooperative Agreement. Powerspan has installed, tested, and validated Hg SCEMS systems for measuring oxidized and elemental mercury at the pilot facility at R.E. Burger Generating Station in Shadyside, Ohio. When operating properly, these systems are capable of providing near real-time monitoring of inlet and outlet gas flow streams and are capable of extracting samples from different locations to characterize mercury removal at these different ECO process stages. This report discusses the final configuration of the Hg CEM systems and the operating protocols that increase the reliability of the HG SCEM measurements. Documentation on the testing done to verify the operating protocols is also provided. In addition the report provides details on the protocols developed and used for measurement of mercury in process liquid streams and in captured ash.

Matthew B. Loomis

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Ozone removal by HVAC filters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Residential and commercial HVAC filters that have been loaded with particles during operation in the field can remove ozone from intake or recirculated air. However, knowledge of the relative importance of HVAC filters as a removal mechanism for ozone in residential and commercial buildings is incomplete. We measured the ozone removal efficiencies of clean (unused) fiberglass, clean synthetic filters, and field-loaded residential and commercial filters in a controlled laboratory setting. For most filters, the ozone removal efficiency declined rapidly but converged to a non-zero (steady-state) value. This steady-state ozone removal efficiency varied from 0% to 9% for clean filters. The mean steady-state ozone removal efficiencies for loaded residential and commercial filters were 10% and 41%, respectively. Repeated exposure of filters to ozone following a 24-h period of no exposure led to a regeneration of ozone removal efficiency. Based on a theoretical scaling analysis of mechanisms that are involved in the ozone removal process, we speculate that the steady-state ozone removal efficiency is limited by reactant diffusion out of particles, and that regeneration is due to internal diffusion of reactive species to sites available to ozone for reaction. Finally, by applying our results to a screening model for typical residential and commercial buildings, HVAC filters were estimated to contribute 22% and 95%, respectively, of total ozone removal in HVAC systems.

P. Zhao; J.A. Siegel; R.L. Corsi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Analyzing the Limits and Extent of Alpha-Amylase Catalyzed Removal of Starch-Based Filter Cake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability of starch to impart functions including fluid-loss control, cuttings transport, and rheological characteristics to water-based drilling fluids has led to its widespread use in the oil industry. The filter cake deposited by these drilling...

Dharwadkar, Pavan S.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

43

Highly Attrition Resistant Zinc Oxide-Based Sorbents for H2S Removal by Spray Drying Technique  

SciTech Connect

Primary issues for the fluidized-bed/transport reactor process are high attrition resistant sorbent, its high sorption capacity and regenerability, durability, and cost. The overall objective of this project is the development of a superior attrition resistant zinc oxide-based sorbent for hot gas cleanup in integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC). Sorbents applicable to a fluidized-bed hot gas desulfurization process must have a high attrition resistance to withstand the fast solid circulation between a desulfurizer and a regenerator, fast kinetic reactions, and high sulfur sorption capacity. The oxidative regeneration of zinc-based sorbent usually initiated at greater than 600 C with highly exothermic nature causing deactivation of sorbent as well as complication of sulfidation process by side reaction. Focusing on solving the sorbent attrition and regenerability of zinc oxide-based sorbent, we have adapted multi-binder matrices and direct incorporation of regeneration promoter. The sorbent forming was done with a spray drying technique that is easily scalable to commercial quantity.

Ryu, C.K.; Lee, J.B.; Ahn, D.H.; Kim, J.J.; Yi, C.K.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

44

lead-isotope dating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

lead-isotope dating, lead-lead dating, lead-isotope age measurement, lead-lead age measurement ? Blei-Isotopen(-Alters)bestimmung, f, Blei-Isotopen-Datierung

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A Primal-Dual Proximal Algorithm for Sparse Template-Based Adaptive Filtering: Application to Seismic Multiple Removal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unveiling meaningful geophysical information from seismic data requires to deal with both random and structured "noises". As their amplitude may be greater than signals of interest (primaries), additional prior information is especially important in performing efficient signal separation. We address here the problem of multiple reflections, caused by wave-field bouncing between layers. Since only approximate models of these phenomena are available, we propose a flexible framework for time-varying adaptive filtering of seismic signals, using sparse representations, based on inaccurate templates. We recast the joint estimation of adaptive filters and primaries in a new convex variational formulation. This approach allows us to incorporate plausible knowledge about noise statistics, data sparsity and slow filter variation in parsimony-promoting wavelet frames. The designed primal-dual algorithm solves a constrained minimization problem that alleviates standard regularization issues in finding hyperparameters. Th...

Pham, Mai Quyen; Chaux, Caroline; Pesquet, Jean-Christophe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A multi-level distance learning-based course for high-school computer science leading-teachers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this poster we present a flexible model for a multi-level distance learning-based teacher training. The model was implemented to introduce curricular and pedagogical aspects of teaching logic programming (LP) to high-school computer science in-service ... Keywords: computer science education, distance learning, teacher training

Noa Ragonis; Bruria Haberman

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

ZSM-5- and MgAl2O4-Based Bifunctional Additives for Enhancing the Production of Propene and Removal of SO2 in the Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ZSM-5- and MgAl2O4-Based Bifunctional Additives for Enhancing the Production of Propene and Removal of SO2 in the Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) Process† ... The effects of adding the bifunctional additives containing MgAl2O4 and the commercial propene additive ZSM-5/kaolin to the base catalyst in cracking of vacuum gas oil (VGO) were investigated. ... Those additives adsorb SOx and then transfer sulfur back into the riser, where it is released as H2S, which is removed in the usual way (Claus process). ...

Xiaoling Xu; Xiaoli Ran; Qiukai Cui; Chunyi Li; Honghong Shan

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

48

Technologies for Boron Removal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tests were performed to examine the removal of boron from aqueous solution either with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) alone or by both PVA and other inorganic additives under room temperature. ... Added calcium hydroxide increased the co-removal of borate with PVA, and this offers a polishing treatment after borate removal by liming. ... As boron removal can be achieved by chemical precipitation and coagulation, it is logical to assume that the EC could remove boron from water and industrial effluent. ...

Yonglan Xu; Jia-Qian Jiang

2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

49

Parameters influencing the deposition of methylammonium lead halide iodide in hole conductor free perovskite-based solar cells  

SciTech Connect

Perovskite is a promising light harvester for use in photovoltaic solar cells. In recent years, the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells has been dramatically increased, making them a competitive source of renewable energy. An important parameter when designing high efficiency perovskite-based solar cells is the perovskite deposition, which must be performed to create complete coverage and optimal film thickness. This paper describes an in-depth study on two-step deposition, separating the perovskite deposition into two precursors. The effects of spin velocity, annealing temperature, dipping time, and methylammonium iodide concentration on the photovoltaic performance are studied. Observations include that current density is affected by changing the spin velocity, while the fill factor changes mainly due to the dipping time and methylammonium iodide concentration. Interestingly, the open circuit voltage is almost unaffected by these parameters. Hole conductor free perovskite solar cells are used in this work, in order to minimize other possible effects. This study provides better understanding and control over the perovskite deposition through highly efficient, low-cost perovskite-based solar cells.

Cohen, Bat-El; Gamliel, Shany; Etgar, Lioz, E-mail: lioz.etgar@mail.huji.ac.il [Institute of Chemistry, Casali Center for Applied Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 90400 (Israel)

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Non-constrictive bead immobilization leading to decreased and uniform shear stress in microfluidic bead-based ELISA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microfluidic biosensors have been utilized for sensing a wide range of antigens using numerous configurations. Bead based microfluidic sensors have been a popular modality due to the plug and play nature of analyte choice and the favorable geometry of spherical sensor scaffolds. While constriction of beads against fluid flow remains a popular method to immobilize the sensor, it results in poor fluidic regimes and shear conditions around sensor beads that can affect sensor performance. We present an alternative means of sensor bead immobilization using poly-carbonate membrane. This system results in several orders of magnitude lower variance of flow radially around the sensor bead. Shear stress experienced by our non-constrictive immobilized bead was three orders of magnitude lower. We demonstrate ability to quantitatively sense EpCAM protein, a marker for cancer stem cells and operation under both far-red and green wavelengths with no auto-fluorescence.

Mitra, Kinshuk; Chidambaram, Preethi; Maharry, Aaron P; Xu, Ronald X; Tweedle, Michael F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Effect of V2O5 additive on simultaneous SO2 and NO removal from flue gas over a monolithic cordierite-based CuO/Al2O3 catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A monolithic cordierite-based CuO/Al2O3 catalyst showed industrial potential for simultaneous SO2 and NO removal from flue gases at 350–400 °C. However, it is still a challenge to prevent CuO from aggregation and to keep it in an active state during the removal and regeneration processes. This work shows that addition of V2O5 to the catalyst can significantly reduce CuO particle size and improve SO2 removal activity, and maintain a high selective catalytic reduction (SCR) activity for NO removal. Furthermore, V2O5 additive prevents aggregation of SiO2 in the cordierite with the coated Al2O3, and inhibits over reduction of the SO2 removal product, CuSO4, during the regeneration by NH3, which are important to the catalyst's stability. V2O5 additive changes the regeneration product from Cu3N to CuO and thus may avoid the temperature rise and \\{NOx\\} release in the subsequent removal process.

Qingya Liu; Zhenyu Liu; Weize Wu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Simultaneous removal of H2S and COS using Zn-based solid sorbents in the bench-scale continuous hot gas desulfurization system integrated with a coal gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A bench-scale continuous hot gas desulfurization system using Zn-based solid sorbents was developed to remove H2S and COS simultaneously in a 110 Nm3.../h of real coal-gasified syngas. The bench-scale unit, which...

Young Cheol Park; Sung-Ho Jo; Ho-Jung Ryu…

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

lead-isotope age  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

lead-isotope age, lead-lead age [An age in years calculated from the ratio of lead-207 to lead-206, a by-product of the uranium-thorium-lead age method] ? Blei-Isotopen-Alter n

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Turbomachinery debris remover  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for removing debris from a turbomachine. The apparatus includes housing and remotely operable viewing and grappling mechanisms for the purpose of locating and removing debris lodged between adjacent blades in a turbomachine.

Krawiec, Donald F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kraf, Robert J. (North Huntingdon, PA); Houser, Robert J. (Monroeville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Bubble inclusion and removal using PDMS membrane-based gas permeation for applications in pumping, valving and mixing in microfluidic devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several advancements in fluid handling applications of a gas-permeable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane are demonstrated. Devices for controlled pumping, bubble injection, bubble removal and mixing are demonstrated using a three-layered fabrication method. The ability of a gas-permeable membrane to control flow in glass channels is determined. Consistent flow rates ranging from approximately 1 to 14 µl min?1 were observed using control pressures from 100 to 700 mbar. Bubble injection and removal from microfluidic channels was performed in monolithic PDMS devices using several bubble trap geometries at fluid flow rates over 100 µl min?1. The rate of removal of the air in the bubble trap was determined as a function of the area of membrane exposed and the applied vacuum. The PDMS membrane was shown to be an effective tool for the injection and removal of air bubbles in a method of enhancing mixing using bubbles and branched microchannels. The amount of mixing was optically determined before and after bubbles entered the fluid channel. The ability to produce all of these compatible components using a single fabrication process is a step toward inexpensive, parallel, highly integrated microfluidic systems with minimal external controls.

Michael Johnson; Greg Liddiard; Mark Eddings; Bruce Gale

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Part 3: Removal Action | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Removal Action 3: Removal Action Part 3: Removal Action Question: When may removal actions be initiated? Answer: Removal actions may be initiated when DOE determines that the action will prevent, minimize, stabilize, or eliminate a risk to health or the environment. The NCP specifies that the determination that a risk to health or the environment is appropriate for removal action should be based on: actual or potential exposure of humans, animals, or the food chain the presence of contained hazardous substances that pose a threat of release the threat of migration of the hazardous substances the threat of fire or explosion the availability of an appropriate Federal or State response capability [section 300.415(b)(2)]. In essence, where DOE identifies a threat of exposure to or migration of

57

Risk Removal | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Risk Removal Risk Removal Workers safely remove old mercury tanks from the Y-12 National Security Complex. Workers safely remove old mercury tanks from the Y-12 National Security...

58

Development of a straightness measurement and compensation system with multiple right-angle reflectors and a lead zirconate titanate-based compensation stage  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a real-time straightness measurement and compensation system with an optical straightness measurement system and a single-axis flexure-hinge type lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based compensation stage. The optical straightness measurement system consists of a He-Ne laser, a quadrant photodiode detector, and five right-angle reflectors. Multiple laser beam reflections between the right-angle reflectors increase the sensitivity of the straightness measurement by a factor of 6. The right-angle reflectors can be moved by the flexure-hinge type PZT-based compensation stage that is actuated by a PZT actuator to ensure that the laser beam is always projected onto the center of the quadrant detector. These two systems are integrated and fixed on a scanning stage. The resolution of the straightness measurement system is 0.1 {mu}m. Using the real-time straightness compensation system, the straightness error of the scanning stage is fed back to the control system. The compensated straightness error of the scanning stage system was reduced from 6.5 {mu}m to less than 1 {mu}m.

Liu, Chien-Hung; Chen, Jui-Hung [Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Huwei, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China); Teng, Yun-Feng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Chung-Cheng University, Chiayi 621, Taiwan (China)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal silica using small gel particles. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Silica Scaling Removal Process Applications: Cooling tower systems Water treatment systems Water evaporation systems Potential mining applications (produced water) Industry applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits: Reduces scaling in cooling towers by up to 50% Increases the number of cycles of concentration substantially Reduces the amount of antiscaling chemical additives needed Decreases the amount of makeup water and subsequent discharged water (blowdown) Enables considerable cost savings derived from reductions in

60

Continuous sulfur removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream using a membrane comprising a metal oxide deposited on a porous support is disclosed. 4 figures.

Jalan, V.; Ryu, J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Recommendations of treatment technologies for radioactively contaminated lead at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Approximately one million pounds of radioactively contaminated lead are currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and must be treated according to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This excess lead exists in various forms, including brick, sheet, shot, wool, blankets, steel-jacketed casks, scrap, and miscellaneous solids. Several lead treatment technologies were evaluated based on effectiveness, applicability, feasibility, availability of equipment and materials, health and safety, generation of secondary waste streams, cost, and flexibility. Emphasis is given in this report to those treatment technologies that yield recyclable lead products. Methods that treat lead for storage and disposal were also investigated. Specific treatment technologies for decontaminating the excess lead at the INEL are recommended. The proposed treatment for lead brick, sheet, shot, blankets, and scrap is a series of surface decontamination techniques followed by melt-refining, if necessary. The recommended series of treatments for lead casks begins with removing and macroencapsulating the steel jackets, followed by size reducing and melt-refining the lead. Macroencapsulation is the proposed treatment for miscellaneous lead solids. Recycling lead that has been successfully decontaminated and macroencapsulating or stabilizing the treatment residuals is also recommended.

Neupauer, R.M.; Zukauskas, J.F.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

ADVANCES IN HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for conversion to the new resin. This paper will describe the results of the testing, performance in the facilities, continued optimization in the pump and treat facilities, and the estimated savings and non-tangible benefits of the conversion.

NESHEM DO; RIDDELLE J

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

63

Drinking Water Problems: Lead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead in drinking water can damage the brain, kidneys, nervous system and red blood cells. This publication explains how lead can enter drinking water, how to have your water tested, and how to eliminate lead from drinking water....

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

64

Getting the Lead Out  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Discarded electronics no longer pose an environmental hazard from lead solder thanks to a lead-free alternative developed at the Ames Laboratory.

Gibson, Kerry

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

65

Drum lid removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tool for removing the lid of a metal drum wherein the lid is clamped over the drum rim without protruding edges, the tool having an elongated handle with a blade carried by an angularly positioned holder affixed to the midsection of the handle, the blade being of selected width to slice between lid lip and the drum rim and, when the blade is so positioned, upward motion of the blade handle will cause the blade to pry the lip from the rim and allow the lid to be removed.

Pella, Bernard M. (Martinez, GA); Smith, Philip D. (North Augusta, SC)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

66

Condensate removal device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A condensate removal device is disclosed which incorporates a strainer in unit with an orifice. The strainer is cylindrical with its longitudinal axis transverse to that of the vapor conduit in which it is mounted. The orifice is positioned inside the strainer proximate the end which is remoter from the vapor conduit.

Maddox, James W. (Newport News, VA); Berger, David D. (Alexandria, VA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Palaeoclimate Coordinating Lead Authors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6 Palaeoclimate Coordinating Lead Authors: Eystein Jansen (Norway), Jonathan Overpeck (USA) Lead (UK) This chapter should be cited as: Jansen, E., J. Overpeck, K.R. Briffa, J.-C. Duplessy, F. Joos, V

68

DOE Removes Brookhaven Contractor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Removes DOE Removes Brookhaven Contractor Peña sends a message to DOE facilities nationwide INSIDE 2 Accelerator Rx 4 FermiKids 6 Spring at Fermilab Photos courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory by Judy Jackson, Office of Public Affairs Secretary of Energy Federico Peña announced on Thursday, May 1, that the Department of Energy would immediately terminate the current management contract with Associated Universities, Inc. at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York. Peña said that he made the decision after receiving the results of a laboratory safety management review conducted by the independent oversight arm of DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. In addition, the Secretary said he found unacceptable "the continued on page 8 Volume 20 Friday, May 16, 1997

69

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

Neuhaus, J.E.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

70

Lead and Lead-210 in Rainwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... residence time of the lead-210 can be estimated from the ratio of its specific activity to that of one of its decay products, bismuth-210 or polonium-21058, this ... rainwater. The samples, of between 1 and 6 L, were filtered through a fritted glass filter before analysis. Analyses of both portions of the sample showed that less than ...

G. L. TER HAAR; R. B. HOLTZMAN; H. F. LUCAS

1967-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

71

Leading neutron spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the observation of the spectra of leading neutrons from proton beams can be a good probe of absorptive and migration effects. We quantify how these effects modify the Reggeized pion-exchange description of the measurements of leading neutrons at HERA. We are able to obtain a satisfactory description of all the features of these data. We also briefly discuss the corresponding data for leading baryons produced in hadron-hadron collisions.

A. B. Kaidalov; V. A. Khoze; A. D. Martin; M. G. Ryskin

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

72

Ordered Vertex Removal Subgraph Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the vertex removal and subgraph problems are shown to be P­complete. In addition, a natural lex­ icographicOrdered Vertex Removal and Subgraph Problems Ray Greenlaw Department of Computer Science University­8703196. #12; Vertex Removal and Graph Problems Ray Greenlaw Department of Computer Science FR­35

Greenlaw, Ray

73

Thermal degradation of acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene (ABS) containing flame retardants using a fluidized bed reactor: The effects of Ca-based additives on halogen removal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, the thermal degradation of a waste fraction of acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene containing brominated flame retardants was performed to reduce halogen content in the pyrolysis oil. Thermal degradation was completed using Ca-based additives (calcium oxide, calcium hydroxide and oyster shells) in a bench-scale pyrolysis plant equipped with a fluidized bed reactor and char separation system. Pyrolysis was carried out in a temperature range of 430–510 °C. In the absence of any additive, the oil yield amounted to about 77 wt.%. With the additives, the oil yield was markedly reduced to within a range of 45–64 wt.%. The principle compounds in the oils were toluene, ethylbenzene, styrene, cumene, ?-methylstyrene, phenol and heteroatom-containing compounds. When Ca(OH)2 was applied, total bromine and chlorine contents in the oil decreased to 0.05 and 0.04 wt.%, respectively. In addition, Ca(OH)2 reduced the antimony content in the oil to below 0.001 ppm. Most of the halogens and antimony in the feed material were present in the char obtained after pyrolysis.

Su-Hwa Jung; Seon-Jin Kim; Joo-Sik Kim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Regenerable MgO-based sorbent for high temperature CO2 removal from syngas: 3. CO2 capture and sorbent enhanced water gas shift reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Regenerable MgO-based sorbent, which was prepared and evaluated in the thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) in part 1, was also evaluated in high-pressure packed-bed unit in CO2/N2/H2O mixture and simulated pre-combustion syngas environment. In CO2/N2/H2O environment, the CO2 absorption capacity of the sorbent increases with increasing temperatures from 6.7% at 350 °C to 9.5% 450 °C. The sorbent is capable of achieving over 95% CO2 capture and 40% conversion in the water gas shift (WGS) reaction, which should be attributed to positive effect of WGS reaction in producing CO2 during the process. The sorbent reactivity and absorption capacity toward CO2, as well as its WGS catalytic activity decreases with increasing temperature. The maximum pre-breakthrough WGS conversion occurs at 350 °C, which diminishes as the sorbent is carbonated. The variable diffusivity shrinking core reaction model coupled with the two-fluid computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was shown to accurately predict the break-through gas compositions at different operating conditions.

Emadoddin Abbasi; Armin Hassanzadeh; Shahin Zarghami; Hamid Arastoopour; Javad Abbasian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Nitrogen removal from natural gas  

SciTech Connect

According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Photoactivated metal removal  

SciTech Connect

The authors propose the use of photochromic dyes as light activated switches to bind and release metal ions. This process, which can be driven by solar energy, can be used in environmental and industrial processes to remove metals from organic and aqueous solutions. Because the metals can be released from the ligands when irradiated with visible light, regeneration of the ligands and concentration of the metals may be easier than with conventional ion exchange resins. Thus, the process has the potential to be less expensive than currently used metal extraction techniques. In this paper, the authors report on their studies of the metal binding of spirogyran dyes and the hydrolytic stability of these dyes. They have prepared a number of spirogyrans and measured their binding constants for calcium and magnesium. They discuss the relationship of the structure of the dyes to their binding strengths. These studies are necessary towards determining the viability of this technique.

Nimlos, M.R.; Filley, J.; Ibrahim, M.A.; Watt, A.S.; Blake, D.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Site Lead TQP Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualification Standard for the Qualification Standard for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Program May 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy 1 Qualification Standard for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Lead Program A Site Lead is an individual, normally at a senior General Schedule (GS) level or Excepted Service, who is assigned the responsibility to assess and evaluate management systems, safety and health programs, and technical activities associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. Typically, a Site Lead has previously qualified as a Nuclear Safety Specialist or a Senior Technical Safety Manager. For exceptionally qualified individuals,

78

Thermoforming plastic in lead shield construction  

SciTech Connect

Radiation treatments using low energy X-rays or electrons frequently require a final field defining shield to be placed on the patient's skin. A custom made lead cut-out is used to provide a close fit to a particular patient's surface contours. We have developed a procedure which utilizes POLYFORM thermoplastic to obtain a negative mold of the patient instead of the traditional plaster bandage or dental impression gel. The Polyform is softened in warm water, molded carefully over the patient's surface, and is removed when set or hardened, usually within five minutes. Then lead sheet cut-outs can be formed within this negative. For shielding cut-outs requiring thicker lead sheet, a positive is made from dental stone using this Polyform negative. We have found this procedure to be neat, fast and comfortable for both patient and the dosimetrist.

Abrahams, M.E.; Chow, C.H.; Loyd, M.D. (Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Removing Arsenic from Drinking Water  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

See how INL scientists are using nanotechnology to remove arsenic from drinking water. For more INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

80

Removing Arsenic from Drinking Water  

SciTech Connect

See how INL scientists are using nanotechnology to remove arsenic from drinking water. For more INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Grant Reference Lead / Sole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rank Overall Score Grant Reference Lead / Sole Grant Grant Holder Research Organisation Project sediment-concentration and velocity data for submarine turbidity currents Standard Grant DEC12 1 9 NE-concentration and velocity data for submarine turbidity currents Standard Grant DEC12 2 8 NE/K015184/1 Y Alistair Pike

82

Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

83

Improved Lining Material for Gasifiers Could Lead to Wider  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improved Lining Material for Gasifiers Could Lead to Wider Improved Lining Material for Gasifiers Could Lead to Wider Commercialization of Clean and Efficient Energy Technology Improved Lining Material for Gasifiers Could Lead to Wider Commercialization of Clean and Efficient Energy Technology November 16, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Refractories removed from adjacent positions in a slagging gasifier. The NETL refractory (right) has approximately 50 percent more material remaining after the test. Refractories removed from adjacent positions in a slagging gasifier. The NETL refractory (right) has approximately 50 percent more material remaining after the test. Washington, DC - A new improved-performance refractory lining material developed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been successfully tested and could lead to greatly

84

Improved Lining Material for Gasifiers Could Lead to Wider  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improved Lining Material for Gasifiers Could Lead to Wider Improved Lining Material for Gasifiers Could Lead to Wider Commercialization of Clean and Efficient Energy Technology Improved Lining Material for Gasifiers Could Lead to Wider Commercialization of Clean and Efficient Energy Technology November 16, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Refractories removed from adjacent positions in a slagging gasifier. The NETL refractory (right) has approximately 50 percent more material remaining after the test. Refractories removed from adjacent positions in a slagging gasifier. The NETL refractory (right) has approximately 50 percent more material remaining after the test. Washington, DC - A new improved-performance refractory lining material developed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been successfully tested and could lead to greatly

85

WCH Removes Massive Test Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, WA -- Hanford's River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has met a significant cleanup challenge on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site by removing a 1,082...

86

Lead magnesium niobate actuator for micropositioning  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved lead magnesium niobate actuator is disclosed comprising a cylindrical lead magnesium niobate crystal stack mounted in a cylindrical casing wherein a bias means, such as one or more belleville washers, is located between one end of the crystal stack and a partially closed end of the casing; and adjustment means are provided which bear against the opposite end of the crystal stack, whereby an adjustable compressive force is constantly applied against the crystal stack, whether the crystal stack is actuated in an extended position, or is in an unactuated contracted position. In a preferred embodiment, cooling ports are provided for the circulation of coolant in the actuator to cool the crystal stack, and provision is made for removal and replacement of the crystal stack without disconnecting the actuator from the external device being actuated.

Swift, Charles D. (Livermore, CA); Bergum, John W. (Concord, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Lead magnesium niobate actuator for micropositioning  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved lead magnesium niobate actuator is disclosed comprising a cylindrical lead magnesium niobate crystal stack mounted in a cylindrical casing wherein a bias means, such as one or more belleville washers, is located between one end of the crystal stack and a partially closed end of the casing; and adjustment means are provided which bear against the opposite end of the crystal stack, whereby an adjustable compressive force is constantly applied against the crystal stack, whether the crystal stack is actuated in an extended position, or is in an unactuated contracted position. In a preferred embodiment, cooling ports are provided for the circulation of coolant in the actuator to cool the crystal stack, and provision is made for removal and replacement of the crystal stack without disconnecting the actuator from the external device being actuated. 3 figs.

Swift, C.D.; Bergum, J.W.

1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

88

Get the Lead Out! | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lead Out Get the Lead Out Bioremediation research vies to eliminate subsurface heavy metal hazard Heavy metal contamination of subsurface soils, groundwater and surface water is...

89

Environmental lead: insidious health problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental lead: insidious health problem ... Several federal programs aim to reduce human exposure to lead, but which source is most dangerous is subject of growing controversy ...

LOIS R. EMBER; C&EN; WASHINGTON

1980-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

90

Inadvertent Climate Modification Due to Anthropogenic Lead  

SciTech Connect

The relationship between atmospheric particulate matter and the formation of clouds is among the most uncertain aspects of our current understanding of climate change1. One specific question that remains unanswered is how anthropogenic particulate emissions are affecting the nucleation of ice crystals. Satellites show ice clouds cover more than a third of the globe2 and models suggest that ice nucleation initiates the majority of terrestrial precipitation3. It is therefore not possible to adequately understand either climate change or the global water cycle without understanding ice nucleation. Here we show that lead-containing particles are among the most efficient ice nucleating substances commonly found in the atmosphere. Field observations were conducted with mass spectrometry and electron microscopy at two remote stations on different continents, far removed from local emissions. Laboratory studies within two cloud chambers using controlled experimental conditions support the field data. Because the dominate sources of particulate lead are anthropogenic emissions such as aviation fuel, power generation, smelting, and the re-suspension of residue from tetra-ethyl leaded gasoline4, it is likely that cloud formation and precipitation have been affected when compared to pre-industrial times. A global climate model comparing pre-industrial and anthropogenically perturbed conditions shows that lead-containing particles may be increasing the outgoing longwave radiation by 0.2 to 0.8 W m-2, thereby offsetting a portion of the warming attributed to greenhouse gases1.

Cziczo, Daniel J.; Stetzer, Olaf; Worringen, Annette; Ebert, Martin; Weinbruch, Stephan; Kamphus, M.; Gallavardin, S. J.; Curtius, J.; Borrmann, S.; Froyd, Karl D.; Mertes, S.; Mohler, Ottmar; Lohmann, U.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Recommendation 199: Recommendation to Remove Uncontaminated Areas...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

9: Recommendation to Remove Uncontaminated Areas of the Oak Ridge Reservation from the National Priorities List Recommendation 199: Recommendation to Remove Uncontaminated Areas of...

92

Mixed noise removal by weighted low rank model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Mixed noise removal has been a challenging task due to the complex noise distribution. One representative type of mixed noise is the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) coupled with impulse noise (IN). Most mixed noise removal methods first detect and restore impulse pixels using median-type filters, and then perform AWGN removal. Such mixed noise removal methods, however, are less effective in preserving image structures, and tend to over-smooth image details. In this paper, we present a novel mixed noise removal method by proposing a weighted low rank model (WLRM). By grouping image nonlocal similar patches as a matrix, we reconstruct the clean image by finding the weighted low rank approximation or representation of the matrix. IN can be well suppressed by the adaptive weight setting, while the image global structure and local edges can be well preserved via the low rank model fitting. The weight setting and low rank model fitting are jointly optimized in WLRM. Our experiments validate that WLRM leads to very promising mixed noise removal results in terms of both quantitative measure and visual perception.

Jielin Jiang; Jian Yang; Yan Cui; Lei Luo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

SciTech Connect

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

94

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

95

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

96

Removing Stains from Washable Fabrics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of May 8, 1914, as amended, and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture. Zerle L. Carpenter, Director, Texas Agricultural Extension Service, The Texas A&M University System. lOM-1l-88, New CLO ...I UUL. Z TA24S.7 8873 NO.1616 B.1616 / Texas Agricultural Extension Service LIBRARY FEB 0 1 1989 Texas A&M University Removing Stains from Washable Fabrics Ann Vanderpoorten 8eard* Most spots and stains can be removed by prompt...

Beard, Ann Vanderpoorten

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanford's 300 Area Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed...

98

Multipollutant Removal with WOWClean® System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as petcoke, coal, wood, diesel and natural gas. In addition to significant removal of CO2, test results demonstrate the capability to reduce 99.5% SOx (from levels as high as 2200 ppm), 90% reduction of NOx, and > 90% heavy metals. The paper will include...

Romero, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Final soil removal report for the remediation of contaminated soils at the Old Burn Area (site 11), Savannah Air National Guard Base, Savannah International Airport, Savannah, Georgia. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Partial Contents: Source removal requirements, remediation activities, general site activities, excavation and backfilling of pit, excavation and backfilling of PIT, 4.4 off-site soil treatment and disposal, site restoration activities, final site inspection, analytical laboratory results, PIT No. 1, perimeter Sampling - Pit No. 1, Pit Floor Sampling - Pit No. 1, Pit No. 2. Perimeter Sampling - Pit No. 2. Pit Floor Sampling - Pit No. 2. quality assurance/quality control samples.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Multi-component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,255,842 entitled "Multi-component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia." This patent discloses a method for the removal of potential environmental-impacting compounds from flue gas streams. The method oxidizes some or all of the acid precursors such as sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitric oxides (NO x ) into sulfur trioxide and nitrogen dioxide, respectively. Following this step, the gas stream is then treated with aqua ammonia or ammonium hydroxide to capture the compounds via chemical absorption through acid-base or neutralization reactions where a fertilizer is formed.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Building Removal Ongoing at DOE's Paducah Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Removal Ongoing at DOE's Paducah Site Building Removal Ongoing at DOE's Paducah Site Building Removal Ongoing at DOE's Paducah Site August 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Buz Smith Robert.Smith@lex.doe.gov 270-441-6821 PADUCAH, KY - Work is ongoing at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) to raze a 65,000-square-foot facility known as the C-340 Metals Plant, which was used to make uranium metal during the Cold War. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup contractor LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky began removing more than 1,500 panels of cement-asbestos siding from the Metals Plant complex Wednesday in anticipation of New Jersey-based LVI Services starting demolition Sept. 19. Demolition work is projected to last through the end of calendar 2012. "This is an important milestone because the C-340 Metals Plant is the

102

Operability test procedure [Tank] 241-SY-101 equipment removal system  

SciTech Connect

The 241-SY-101 equipment removal system (ERS) consists of components, equipment, instrumentation and procedures that will provide the means to disconnect, retrieve, contain, load and transport the Mitigation Pump Assembly (MPA) from waste Tank 241-SY-101 to the Central Waste Complex (CWC). The Operability Test Procedure (OTP) will test the interfaces between ERS components and will rehearse the procedure for MPA removal and transportation to the extent they can be mocked-up at the CTF (Cold Test Facility). At the conclusion of the OTP, the ERS components and equipment will be removed from the CTF, entered into the Component Based Recall System (CBRS), and stored until needed for actual MPA removal and transportation.

Mast, J.C.

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

103

Breakthrough: Lead-free Solder  

SciTech Connect

Ames Laboratory senior metallurgist Iver Anderson explains the importance of lead-free solder in taking hazardous lead out of the environment by eliminating it from discarded computers and electronics that wind up in landfills. Anderson led a team that developed a tin-silver-copper replacement for traditional lead-tin solder that has been adopted by more than 50 companies worldwide.

Anderson, Iver

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Summary of Surface Swipe Sampling for Beryllium on Lead Bricks and Shielding  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 25,000 lbs of lead bricks at Site 300 were assessed by the Site 300 Industrial Hygienis tand Health Physicist for potential contamination of beryllium and radiation for reuse. These lead bricks and shielding had been used as shielding material during explosives tests that included beryllium and depleted uranium. Based on surface swipe sampling that was performed between July 26 and October 11, 2010, specifically for beryllium, the use of a spray encapsulant was found to be an effective means to limit removable surface contamination to levels below the DOE release limit for beryllium, which is 0.2 mcg/100 cm{sup 2}. All the surface swipe sampling data for beryllium and a timeline of when the samples were collected (and a brief description) are presented in this report. On December 15, 2010, the lead bricks and shielding were surveyed with an ion chamber and indicated dose rates less than 0.05 mrem per hour on contact. This represents a dose rate consistent with natural background. An additional suevey was performed on February 8, 2011, using a GM survey instrument to estimate total activity on the lead bricks and shielding, confirming safe levels of radioactivity. The vendor is licensed to possess and work with radioactive material.

Paik, S Y; Barron, D A

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

105

Removing Barriers to Interdisciplinary Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant amount of high-impact contemporary scientific research occurs where biology, computer science, engineering and chemistry converge. Although programmes have been put in place to support such work, the complex dynamics of interdisciplinarity are still poorly understood. In this paper we interrogate the nature of interdisciplinary research and how we might measure its "success", identify potential barriers to its implementation, and suggest possible mechanisms for removing these impediments.

Naomi Jacobs; Martyn Amos

2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

106

Characterization of natural and chemically modified kaolinite from Mako (Senegal) to remove lead from aqueous solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...molecules (Yariv, 2002; Xi et al., 2007). This...Jiang M. , Wang Q., Jin X. & Chen Z. (2009...Y. , Peng Y., Hong-ping H., Zong-hua Q., Qing Z., Jian-xi Z. & Dong L. (2012...and Hall, London, UK. Xi Y. , Zhou Q., Frost...

A. Mbaye; C. A. K. Diop; J. Miehe-Brendle; F. Senocq; F. Maury

107

Lead-Free Surface Finishes for Electronic Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead-Free Surface Finishes for Electronic Components: Tin Whisker Growth METALS This project degraded by the switch to lead- free technology. In particular, the state of compressive stress and the localized creep response (whisker growth) of tin-based lead-free electrodeposits are being measured

108

Nitrogen Removal From Low Quality Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. It is especially important in the residential sector, where it supplies nearly half of all the energy consumed in U.S. homes. However, significant quantities of natural gas cannot be produced economically because its quality is too low to enter the pipeline transportation system without some type of processing, other than dehydration, to remove the undesired gas fraction. Such low-quality natural gas (LQNG) contains significant concentration or quantities of gas other than methane. These non- hydrocarbons are predominantly nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide, but may also include other gaseous components. The nitrogen concentrations usually exceeds 4%. Nitrogen rejection is presently an expensive operation which can present uneconomic scenarios in the potential development of natural gas fields containing high nitrogen concentrations. The most reliable and widely used process for nitrogen rejection from natural gas consists of liquefying the feed stream using temperatures in the order of - 300{degrees}F and separating the nitrogen via fractionation. In order to reduce the gas temperature to this level, the gas is compressed, cooled by mullet-stream heat exchangers, and expanded to low pressure. Significant energy for compression and expensive materials of construction are required. Water and carbon dioxide concentrations must be reduced to levels required to prevent freezing. SRI`s proposed research involves screening new nitrogen selective absorbents and developing a more cost effective nitrogen removal process from natural gas using those compounds. The long-term objective of this project is to determine the technical and economical feasibility of a N{sub 2}2 removal concept based on complexation of molecular N{sub 2} with novel complexing agents. Successful development of a selective, reversible, and stable reagent with an appropriate combination of capacity and N{sub 2} absorption/desorption characteristics will allow selective separation of N{sub 2} from LQNG.

Alvarado, D.B.; Asaro, M.F.; Bomben, J.L.; Damle, A.S.; Bhown, A.S.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

High temperature superconductor current leads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical lead is disclosed having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths. 9 figs.

Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

110

Libya HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Libya HEU Removal Libya HEU Removal Location Libya United States 27 34' 9.5448" N, 17 24' 8.4384" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

111

Canada HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Canada HEU Removal Canada HEU Removal Location Canada United States 53 47' 24.972" N, 104 35' 23.4384" W See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

112

Israel HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Israel HEU Removal Israel HEU Removal Location Israel United States 30 53' 18.2328" N, 34 52' 14.178" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

113

Uzbekistan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Uzbekistan HEU Removal Uzbekistan HEU Removal Location Uzbekistan United States 42 6' 56.196" N, 63 22' 8.9076" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

114

France HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Four-Year Plan France HEU Removal France HEU Removal Location United States 45 44' 20.0544" N, 2 17' 6.5616" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

115

Chile HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Four-Year Plan Chile HEU Removal Chile HEU Removal Location United States 25 28' 1.4916" S, 69 33' 55.548" W See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

116

Taiwan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Taiwan HEU Removal Taiwan HEU Removal Location Taiwan United States 24 35' 37.4964" N, 120 53' 36.798" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

117

Romania HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Romania HEU Removal Romania HEU Removal Location Romania United States 45 47' 1.932" N, 24 41' 50.1576" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

118

Serbia HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Serbia HEU Removal Serbia HEU Removal Location Serbia United States 44 22' 45.7068" N, 20 26' 4.452" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

119

Poland HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Poland HEU Removal Poland HEU Removal Location Poland United States 53 23' 50.2872" N, 17 50' 30.4692" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

120

Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Plan Vietnam HEU Removal Vietnam HEU Removal Location Vietnam United States 13 12' 30.8628" N, 108 19' 30.702" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Ukraine HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home content Four-Year Plan Ukraine HEU Removal Ukraine HEU Removal Location Ukraine United States 50 12' 24.8688" N,...

122

Japan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home content Four-Year Plan Japan HEU Removal Japan HEU Removal Location Japan United States 37 36' 59.5872" N, 140...

123

Process for removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permitting the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Hancher, C.W.; Saunders, M.B.; Googin, J.M.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

124

Remove Condensate with Minimal Air Loss  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tip sheet outlines several condensate removal methods as part of maintaining compressed air system air quality.

125

Removal of Cu, Pb and Zn by foam fractionation and a soil washing process from contaminated industrial soils using soapberry-derived saponin: A comparative effectiveness assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The feasibility of using the eco-friendly biodegradable surfactant saponin (a plant-based surfactant) from soapberry and surfactin from Bacillus subtilis (BBK006) for the removal of heavy metals from contaminated industrial soil (6511 mg kg?1 copper, 4955 mg kg?1 lead, and 15 090 mg kg?1 zinc) by foam fractionation and a soil flushing process was evaluated under variation of fundamental factors (surfactant concentration, pH, temperature and time). The results of latter process showed that 1–2% Pb, 16–17% Cu and 21–24% Zn was removed by surfactin after 48 h, whereas the removal of Pb, Cu and Zn was increased from 40% to 47%, 30% to 36% and 16% to 18% in presence of saponin with an increase from 24 to 72 h at room temperature by the soil washing process at pH 4. In the foam fractionation process, the metal removal efficiencies were increased with increases in the saponin concentration (0.075–0.15 g L?1) and time (24–72 h), whereas the efficiency was decreased with increasing pH (4–10) and temperature (>40 °C). The removal efficiencies of Pb, Cu and Zn were increased significantly from 57% to 98%, 85% to 95% and 55% to 56% with an increase in the flow rate from 0.2 to 1.0 L min?1 at 0.15 g L?1 saponin (pH 4 and 30 °C). The present investigation indicated that the foam fractionation process is more efficient for the removal of heavy metal from contaminated industrial soil in comparison to the soil washing process. The plant-based eco-friendly biodegradable biosurfactant saponin can be used for environmental cleanup and pollution management.

Jyoti Prakash Maity; Yuh Ming Huang; Chun-Mei Hsu; Ching-I Wu; Chien-Cheng Chen; Chun-Yi Li; Jiin-Shuh Jean; Young-Fo Chang; Chen-Yen Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Enabling Technologies Lead: Mark Davis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Technologies Lead: Mark Davis 3.2 Omics Platforms for Systems Biology Lead: Tim Tschaplinski 3.3 Advanced Pretreatment Configuration and Conditions Lead: Charles Wyman 3.1 Characterization of Biomass Features that Enhance Sugar Release Lead: Art Ragauskas 3.1.1 Support for Identification of the TOP40 Recalcitrant Lines (Gjersing) 3.1.2 In-Depth Cell Wall Characterization (Ragauskas) 3.2.1 Transcriptomics & Resequencing (Brown) 3.2.2 Proteomics (Hettich) 3.3.4 Demonstration of Improved Plants with CBP Organisms (Yee) 3.4 Computational Biology Lead: Ying Xu 3.3.1 Enhance Understanding of Pretreatment Fundamentals and Control Recalcitrance (Wyman) 3.3.2 Integrate, Optimize, and Understand Pretreatment with Advanced Plants (Wyman) 3.4.1 An Integrated Omics Data Analysis and

127

Method of making thermally removable epoxies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making a thermally-removable epoxy by mixing a bis(maleimide) compound to a monomeric furan compound containing an oxirane group to form a di-epoxy mixture and then adding a curing agent at temperatures from approximately room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a thermally-removable epoxy. The thermally-removable epoxy can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The epoxy material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Russick, Edward M. (Rio Rancho, NM); McElhanon, James R. (Albuquerque, NM); Saunders, Randall S. (late of Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

It's Elemental - The Element Lead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thallium Thallium Previous Element (Thallium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Bismuth) Bismuth The Element Lead [Click for Isotope Data] 82 Pb Lead 207.2 Atomic Number: 82 Atomic Weight: 207.2 Melting Point: 600.61 K (327.46°C or 621.43°F) Boiling Point: 2022 K (1749°C or 3180°F) Density: 11.342 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 14 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Anglo-Saxon word lead. Lead's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for waterworks, plumbum. Say what? Lead is pronounced as LED. History and Uses: Lead has been known since ancient times. It is sometimes found free in nature, but is usually obtained from the ores galena (PbS), anglesite (PbSO4), cerussite (PbCO3) and minum (Pb3O4). Although lead makes up only

129

Extended sudden approximation modeling of high-energy nucleon-removal reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Calculations based on the sudden approximation have been performed to describe high-energy single-nucleon removal reactions. Within this approach, which takes as its starting point the formalism developed to describe the breakup of well-developed single-neutron halo systems, the nucleon-removal cross section and the full three-dimensional momentum distributions of the core fragments, including absorption, diffraction, Coulomb, and nuclear-Coulomb interference amplitudes, have been computed. The Coulomb, breakup has been treated to all orders for the dipole interaction. The results are compared here to experimental data for a range of light, neutron-rich psd-shell nuclei taken at beam energies of 43–68MeV?nucleon. Good agreement is found for the inclusive cross sections and both the longitudinal and transverse momentum distributions. In the case of C17, comparison is also made with the results of calculations using the transfer-to-the-continuum model. The three-dimensional momentum distributions computed within the sudden approximation model exhibit longitudinal and transverse momentum components that are strongly coupled by the reaction for s-wave states, while no such effect is apparent for d waves. Incomplete detection of transverse momenta arising from limited experimental acceptances thus leads to a narrowing of the longitudinal distributions for nuclei with significant s-wave valence neutron configurations, as confirmed by the data. Asymmetries in the longitudinal momentum distributions attributed to diffractive dissociation are also explored.

F. Carstoiu; E. Sauvan; N. A. Orr; A. Bonaccorso

2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

130

Active Space Debris Removal using Capture and Ejection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

object as well as its launch vehicle and parts thereof." Based on this de ni- tion, space debris are uncontrolled space objects serving no function, such as expired satellites, jettisoned components, and collision shrapnel. Traveling at speeds around.... Many alternative proposals to remove space debris have been made: laser impingement [5], ground-based laser design \\Project Orion" [3], ion guns [4], remote vehicles that capture debris and return to a central station [6], passively intercepting...

Missel, Jonathan William

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

131

NATIONAL LEAD ,COMPANY OF OHIO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

tic.. 02-j . . NATIONAL LEAD ,COMPANY OF OHIO 2186002 I ,""ll"IAWl OF NL. Irl>"Or"ICI. INC. CINCINNATI. OHIO 45239 June 1, 1979 TRIP REPORT - VISIT M THORILIM STORAGE FACILITY OF...

132

Negative kinetic energy term of general relativity and its removing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We first present a new Lagrangian of general relativity, which can be divided into kinetic energy term and potential energy term. Taking advantage of vierbein formalism, we reduce the kinetic energy term to a sum of five positive terms and one negative term. Some gauge conditions removing the negative kinetic energy term are discussed. Finally, we present a Lagrangian that only include positive kinetic energy terms. To remove the negative kinetic energy term leads to a new field equation of general relativity in which there are at least five equations of constraint and at most five dynamical equations, this characteristic is different from the normal Einstein field equation in which there are four equations of constraint and six dynamical equations.

T. Mei

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

Utilization of Partially Gasified Coal for Mercury Removal  

SciTech Connect

In this project, General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) developed a novel mercury (Hg) control technology in which the sorbent for gas-phase Hg removal is produced from coal in a gasification process in-situ at a coal burning plant. The main objective of this project was to obtain technical information necessary for moving the technology from pilot-scale testing to a full-scale demonstration. A pilot-scale gasifier was used to generate sorbents from both bituminous and subbituminous coals. Once the conditions for optimizing sorbent surface area were identified, sorbents with the highest surface area were tested in a pilot-scale combustion tunnel for their effectiveness in removing Hg from coal-based flue gas. It was determined that the highest surface area sorbents generated from the gasifier process ({approx}600 m{sup 2}/g) had about 70%-85% of the reactivity of activated carbon at the same injection rate (lb/ACF), but were effective in removing 70% mercury at injection rates about 50% higher than that of commercially available activated carbon. In addition, mercury removal rates of up to 95% were demonstrated at higher sorbent injection rates. Overall, the results of the pilot-scale tests achieved the program goals, which were to achieve at least 70% Hg removal from baseline emissions levels at 25% or less of the cost of activated carbon injection.

Chris Samuelson; Peter Maly; David Moyeda

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

134

A leading index of drilling activity: Update and improvements  

SciTech Connect

A five-component composite leading index of United States rotary rig drilling activity is updated. The index is presented for 1949 through April 1986 and is shown to consistently lead turning points in drilling activity. Seven new leading indices based on some new components are also presented. A forecast of drilling activity is made for the remainder of 1986 based on the leading index and the current economic condition of the petroleum industry. The methods used to prepare time series and construct indices are reviewed.

Buell, R.S.; Maurer, R.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Process for particulate removal from coal liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Suspended solid particulates are removed from liquefied coal products by first subjecting such products to hydroclone action for removal in the underflow of the larger size particulates, and then subjecting the overflow from said hydroclone action, comprising the residual finer particulates, to an electrostatic field in an electrofilter wherein such finer particulates are deposited in the bed of beads of dielectric material on said filter. The beads are periodically cleaned by backwashing to remove the accumulated solids.

Rappe, Gerald C. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Install Removable Insulation on Valves and Fittings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tip sheet on installing removable insulation on valves and fittings provides how-to advice for improving steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

139

Method of making thermally removable polymeric encapsulants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making a thermally-removable encapsulant by heating a mixture of at least one bis(maleimide) compound and at least one monomeric tris(furan) or tetrakis(furan) compound at temperatures from above room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a gel and cooling the gel to form the thermally-removable encapsulant. The encapsulant can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C., preferably in a polar solvent. The encapsulant can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the encapsulant for component repair, modification or quality control.

Small, James H. (Santa Fe, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); McElhanon, James R. (Albuquerque, NM); Saunders, Randall S. (late of Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Australia HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Australia HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Argentina HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Argentina HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

142

Keeler-Pennwalt Wood Pole Removal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

natural environment. The entire remaining length of the Keeler-Pennwalt transmission line, from Keeler Substation to Structure 96, will be removed (approximately 9 miles)....

143

Lead Auditor - Auditor Preparation Checklist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lead Auditor - Auditor Preparation Checklist Lead Auditor - Auditor Preparation Checklist |Number|Item|Status | ||Staff the Audit || ||Auditor Qualifications|| ||Audit Notification & Audit Plan Issued|| ||Auditor access issues resolved|| ||Audit team facilities|| ||Auditor audit areas / elements assigned|| ||Check lists Prepared Issued || ||Audited Org Docs to team QPP Work plans etc|| ||Past Audits to team || ||PC availability for Auditors|| ||Audit forms to auditors People Interviewed Documents reviewed Entrance Meeting Attendance Exit Meeting Attendance, Issue Development Sheet[1] Form 11 Form 21|| ||Audit protocols, conduct of auditors|| ||Entrance meeting slides|| ||Exit meeting slide outline|| ||Report Shell to Team|| ----------------------- [1] Use of this will be explained in the second article of the series

144

Lead concentrations in blood and milk from periparturient dairy heifers seven months after an episode of acute lead toxicosis  

SciTech Connect

In September 1988, 100 of 300 yearling dairy heifers developed blindness, tachypnea, foaming at the mouth, chewing, and facial fasciculations. Twenty-five animals died. Lead toxicosis was diagnosed based on the clinical signs and the presence of excessive concentrations of lead in whole blood, liver, kidney, and rumen contents of affected animals. The source of the lead was sudan grass silage that had been contaminated by soil that contained up to 77,000 mg/kg of lead. Lead concentrations were determined approximately 7 months after the acute episode of lead toxicosis. Whole blood and milk samples were obtained from heifers and a group of control cows 2 weeks prior to (blood only), at the time of, and 2 and 4 weeks after freshening. No lead was found in any of the milk samples (detection limit = 0.055 mg/liter). Animals that had been severely affected by lead toxicosis experienced a transient increase in whole blood lead concentrations at freshening that was not high enough to be considered toxic. No similar increases in blood lead were observed for control cows or heifers that had experienced milder toxicosis. These findings suggest that at parturition lead is mobilized into the blood of cattle previously exposed to excessive lead.

Galey, F.D.; Slenning, B.D.; Anderson, M.L.; Breneman, P.C.; Littlefield, E.S.; Melton, L.A.; Tracy, M.L. (California Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory System-Toxicology Laboratory, University of California, Davis (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

t-t AL- 1. + T fi r,y* t ,.- . NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO Ofll i iy Ci)wp HEALTH AND SAFETY DIVISION - ANALYTICAL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET U-G b ;33y jl:tL G c-w &3(y I...

146

A leading German government official  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Transatlantic Coopera- tion, called the Upstate Honors hosts German M.P. "an impressive example of our strong German- American partnership" and described Greenville as a leading example of close transatlantic busi program during their May 2012 visit to Berlin. In his role as Coordinator for Transatlantic Coopera- tion

Duchowski, Andrew T.

147

Acid dyes removal using low cost adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dyestuff production units and dyeing units have always had pressing need techniques that allow economical pre-treatment for colour in the effluent. The effectiveness of adsorption for dye removal from wastewaters has made it an ideal alternative to other expensive treatment options. Removal of acid green

A.H. Aydin; Y. Bulut; O. Yavuz

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Small Column Ion Exchange Testing of Superlig 644 for Removal of 137Cs from Hanford Tank Waste Envelope C (Tank 241-AN-107)  

SciTech Connect

The current BNFL Inc. flowsheet for the pretreatment of the Hanford high-level tank wastes includes the use of Superlig{reg_sign} materials for removing {sup 137}Cs from the aqueous fraction of the waste. The Superlig materials applicable to cesium removal include the cesium-selective Superlig 632and Superlig 644. These materials have been developed and supplied by IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, Utah. This report describes the testing of the Superlig 644 ion exchange material in a small dual-column system. The bed volume of the lead column was 18.6 mL (L/D = 7), and the bed volume of the lag column was 15.9 mL (L/D = 6) during the loading phase. The sample processed was approximately 1.6 L of diluted waste ([Na{sup +}] = 4.84 M) from Tank 241-AN-107 (Envelope C). This sample had been previously treated for removal of Sr/transuranic (TRU) values and clarified in a single tube cross-flow filtration unit. All ion exchange process steps were tested, including resin-bed preparation, loading, feed displacement, water rinse, elution, eluant rinse, and resin regeneration. A summary of performance measures for both columns is shown in Table S1. The Cs {lambda} values represent a measure of the effective capacity of the SL-644 resin. The Cs {lambda} of 20 for the lead column is much lower than the estimated 150 obtained by the Savannah River Technology Center during Phase 1A testing. Equilibrium data obtained with batch contacts using the AN-107 Cs IX feed predicts a Cs {lambda} of 183. A Cs {lambda} for the lag column could not be determined due to insufficient breakthrough, but it appeared to work well and removed nearly all of the cesium not removed by the lead column. The low value for the lead column indicates that it did not perform as expected. This may have been due to air or gas in the bed that caused fluid channeling or blinding of the resin. The maximum decontamination factor (DF) for {sup 137}Cs listed in Table S1 is based on {sup 137}Cs concentration in the first samples collected from each column and the {sup 137}Cs concentration in the feed. The composite DF for {sup 137}Cs was 1,760, which provided an effluent with a {sup 137}Cs concentration of 8.7E-02 Ci/m{sup 3}. The {sup 137}Cs concentration is below the basis of design limit and is 7.2% of the contract limit for {sup 137}Cs.

DE Kurath; DL Blanchard; JR Bontha

2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

149

Batch sorption of lead (II) from aqueous solutions using natural kaolinite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential to remove lead (II) ions from aqueous solutions using natural kaolinite was investigated. The effects of several parameters including solution pH, adsorbent dose, ionic strength and solution temperature on adsorption were examined. The sorption data followed the Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. The adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. Dynamics of the sorption process were studied and the values of rate constant of adsorption were calculated. The kaolinite can be used to remove lead (II) ions from aqueous solutions.

Xue-Song Wang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

NDE Studies on CRDMs Removed From Service  

SciTech Connect

Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are focused on assessing the effectiveness of NDE inspections of control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of ultrasonic testing (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. In describing two CRDM assemblies removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE measurements, this paper will address the following questions: 1) What did each technique detect?, 2) What did each technique miss?, 3) How accurately did each technique characterize the detected flaws? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. One contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data; the other contained evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, but this was unconfirmed. The selected NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory based NDE methods will be employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper will also describe the NDE methods used and discus the NDE results. Future work will involve using the results from these NDE studies to guide the development of a destructive characterization plan to reveal the crack morphology, to be compared with NDE responses.

Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Schuster, George J.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Abrefah, John

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Numerical and experimental investigation of DNAPL removal mechanisms in a layered porous medium by means of soil vapor extraction  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work is to identify the mechanisms that govern the removal of carbon tetrachloride (CT) during soil vapor extraction (SVE) by comparing multiphase flow simulations with a detailed data set from a well-defined two-dimensional flow cell experiment. The flow cell was packed with two sandy soils including an embedded fine-grained sand layer. Gas concentrations at the outlet of the flow cell and 15 sampling ports inside the flow cell were measured during SVE. A dual-energy gamma radiation system was used to measure an initial NAPL saturation profile in a fine-grained sand layer. Imaging result from a dual-energy gamma radiation system with dyed CT mark along CT migration was used to construct the distribution of initial NAPL saturation in the flow cell for input to numerical simulations. Gas concentration results and photographs during SVE were compared to simulation results using a continuum-based multiphase flow simulator, STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases). The measured effluent gas concentration decreased quickly at first, and then started to decrease gradually, resulting in long-term tailing. CT mass was removed quickly in coarse sand, followed by a slow removal from the fine-grained sand layer. An analytical solution for a one-dimensional advection and first-order volatilization model matched the tailing well with two fitting parameters. However, given detailed knowledge of the permeability field and initial NAPL distribution, we can predict the tailing and gas concentration profiles at sampling ports using equilibrium NAPL volatilization. NAPL flow occurs in the presence of free NAPL, and must be accounted for to accurately predict NAPL removal during the SVE experiment. The model prediction was accurate within the uncertainty of the measured or literature derived parameters (i.e., dispersivity and soil parameters). This study provides insights into the physical mechanisms of NAPL removal from a low permeability zone, and use of the local equilibrium assumption for NAPL volatilization during SVE. In addition, this study demonstrates that lack of detailed information regarding NAPL distribution and heterogeneity pattern lead overall NAPL removal to a kinetically controlled system at a 2-D flow cell scale.

Yoon, Hongkyu; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Werth, Charles J.; Valocchi, Albert J.

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

152

COST OF MERCURY REMOVAL IN IGCC PLANTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost of Mercury Removal Cost of Mercury Removal in an IGCC Plant Final Report September 2002 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory By: Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group Inc. Reading, Pennsylvania Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania DOE Product Manager: Gary J. Stiegel DOE Task Manager: James R. Longanbach Principal Investigators: Michael G. Klett Russell C. Maxwell Michael D. Rutkowski PARSONS The Cost of Mercury Removal in an IGCC Plant Final Report i September 2002 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page 1 Summary 1 2 Introduction 3 3 Background 4 3.1 Regulatory Initiatives 4 3.2 Mercury Removal for Conventional Coal-Fired Plants 4 3.3 Mercury Removal Experience in Gasification 5 3.4 Variability of Mercury Content in Coal 6 4 Design Considerations 7 4.1 Carbon Bed Location

153

Tritium Removal from Carbon Plasma Facing Components  

SciTech Connect

Tritium removal is a major unsolved development task for next-step devices with carbon plasma-facing components. The 2-3 order of magnitude increase in duty cycle and associated tritium accumulation rate in a next-step tokamak will place unprecedented demands on tritium removal technology. The associated technical risk can be mitigated only if suitable removal techniques are demonstrated on tokamaks before the construction of a next-step device. This article reviews the history of codeposition, the tritium experience of TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and JET (Joint European Torus) and the tritium removal rate required to support ITER's planned operational schedule. The merits and shortcomings of various tritium removal techniques are discussed with particular emphasis on oxidation and laser surface heating.

C.H. Skinner; J.P. Coad; G. Federici

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

154

Preparation and selection of Fe-Cu sorbent for COS removal in syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of iron-based sorbents prepared with iron trioxide hydrate, cupric oxide by a novel method was studied in a fixed-bed reactor for COS removal from syngas at moderate temperature. In addition, the sorbent...

Bowu Cheng; Zhaofei Cao; Yong Bai…

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Removal of bisphenol A (BPA) from water by various nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The removal of an endocrine disrupting compound, bisphenol A (BPA), from model solutions by selected nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes was studied. The commercially available membranes NF 90, NF 270, XLE BWRO, BW 30 (Dow FilmTech), CE BWRO and AD SWRO (GE Osmonics) were used to compare their performances for BPA removal. The water permeability coefficients, rejection of BPA and permeate flux values were calculated for all membranes used. No significant changes in their BPA removal were observed for all tight polyamide based NF and RO membranes tested except for loose NF 270 membrane. The polyamide based membranes exhibited much better performance than cellulose acetate membrane for BPA removal. Almost a complete rejection (?98%) for BPA was obtained with three polyamide based RO membranes (BW 30, XLE BWRO and AD SWRO). But cellulose acetate based CE BWRO membrane offered a low and variable (10–40%) rejection for BPA.

Suna Yüksel; Nalan Kabay; Mithat Yüksel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Leadership and Leading Indicators Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leadership Leadership and Leading Indicators Peter S. Winokur, Ph.D., Member Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Thanks to Matt Moury and Doug Minnema August 28, 2008 Objectives * A few thoughts about leadership * Actions taken by leaders * Role of leading indicators * Consider the future August 28, 2008 2 3 Safety Culture Safety culture is an organization's values and behaviors - modeled by its leaders and internalized by its members - that serve to make nuclear safety an overriding priority.* - Dating back to SEN-35-91, it's DOE Policy; - It's perishable; - EFCOG/DOE ISMS Safety Culture Task Team. *INPO, Principles for a Strong Nuclear Safety Culture, November 2004. August 28, 2008 4 Leadership & Mission Top 10 Ways To Know You Have A Safety Culture: * #1 is Leadership - the talk and the walk

157

More Economical Sulfur Removal for Fuel Processing Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

enabled TDA to develop and commercialize its direct oxidation process-a simple, catalyst-based system for removing sulfur from natural gas and petroleum-that was convenient and economical enough for smaller fuel processing plants to use. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) of Wheat Ridge, CO, formed in 1987, is a privately-held R&D company that brings products to market either by forming internal business

158

ADVANCES IN DUST DETECTION AND REMOVAL FOR TOKAMAKS  

SciTech Connect

Dust diagnostics and removal techniques are vital for the safe operation of next step fusion devices such as ITER. In the tokamak environment, large particles or fi bers can fall on the electrostatic detector potentially causing a permanent short. An electrostatic dust detector developed in the laboratory is being applied to the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). We report on the development of a gas puff system that uses helium to clear such particles from the detector. Experiments at atmospheric pressure with varying nozzle designs, backing pressures, puff durations and exit fl ow orientations have given an optimal confi guration that effectively removes particles from a 25 cm² area. Similar removal effi ciencies were observed under a vacuum base pressure of 1 mTorr. Dust removal from next step tokamaks will be required to meet regulatory dust limits. A tri-polar grid of fi ne interdigitated traces has been designed that generates an electrostatic traveling wave for conveying dust particles to a “drain.” First trials with only two working electrodes have shown particle motion in optical microscope images.

Campos, A.; Skinner, C.H.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Lead Speciation in House Dust from Canadian Urban Homes Using EXAFS, Micro-XRF, and Micro-XRD  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lead Speciation in House Dust from Canadian Urban Homes Using EXAFS, Micro-XRF, and Micro-XRD ... As lead carbonate and basic lead carbonates were common ingredients in lead-based paints,(23) lead paint appears as the most probable source of the lead carbonates in the oldest home (CHDS-020). ...

Lachlan C. W. MacLean; Suzanne Beauchemin; Pat E. Rasmussen

2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

160

In situ removal of contamination from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination. The process also uses further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed. 5 figs.

Lindgren, E.R.; Brady, P.V.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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161

Project Title: DOE Code: Project Lead: NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Code: DOE Code: Project Lead: NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY # 258 Project lnfonnation Rewire electrical to pole at 77SHX10 Mike Preston Date: 11-19-09 Contractor Code: Project Overview No~ rea has been previously disturbed. The trenching will be th,ugh pre-existing right of way for the 1. What are the environmental ~ ~=~d ~ impacts? 2. What is the legal location? Repair a~ replacement of electrical lines to the Pole next to well at 77S~1 0. This will require trenching 3. What is the duration of the project? across the road a~ to the pole. Removing old lines and replacement of lines. 4. What major equipment will be used if any (wor1< over rig, drilling rig, 1 day etc.)? Back hole The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA

162

Hungary HEU removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

removal | National Nuclear Security Administration removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Hungary HEU removal Hungary HEU removal Location Hungary United States 47° 11' 51.6336" N, 19° 41' 15" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view this map.

163

Mexico HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Mexico HEU Removal Mexico HEU Removal Location Mexico United States 24° 24' 35.298" N, 102° 49' 55.3116" W See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view this map.

164

Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Kazakhstan HEU Removal Kazakhstan HEU Removal Location Kazakhstan United States 48° 59' 44.1492" N, 67° 3' 37.9692" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

165

Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Sweden Plutonium Removal Sweden Plutonium Removal Location Sweden United States 62° 24' 4.4136" N, 15° 22' 51.096" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

166

Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

Cook, G.T.; Holshouser, S.K.; Coleman, R.M.; Harless, C.E.; Whinnery, W.N. III

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

167

Part removal of 3D printed parts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed to understand the correlation between printing parameters in the FDM 3D printing process, and the force required to remove a part from the build platform of a 3D printing using a patent ...

Peña Doll, Mateo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Turkey HEU Removal Turkey HEU Removal Location Turkey United States 38° 26' 50.2044" N, 40° 15' 14.0616" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

169

Laser removal of sludge from steam generators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing unwanted chemical deposits known as sludge from the metal surfaces of steam generators with laser energy is provided. Laser energy of a certain power density, of a critical wavelength and frequency, is intermittently focused on the sludge deposits to vaporize them so that the surfaces are cleaned without affecting the metal surface (sludge substrate). Fiberoptic tubes are utilized for laser beam transmission and beam direction. Fiberoptics are also utilized to monitor laser operation and sludge removal.

Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Oil removal from water via adsorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WILLIAM EDWARD JACOBS 1974 OIL REMOVAL FROM WATER VIA ADSORPTION A Thesis by WILLIAM EDWARD JACOBS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1973 Major Subject: Civil Engineering OIL REMOVAL FROM WATER VIA ADSORPTION A Thesis by WILLIAM EDWARD JACOBS Approved as to style and content by: C airman of Committee ea o Department m er Member Memb December 1973 ABSTRACT Oil...

Jacobs, William Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

171

NETL Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise Power and Cost Savings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise Power and Cost Savings Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise Power and Cost Savings NETL Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise Power and Cost Savings May 30, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Carbon dioxide removal sorbents developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) could result in power and cost savings for users of some heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems under a recently signed license agreement. NETL, the research and development laboratory for DOE's Office of Fossil Energy, entered into a patent license agreement with Boston-based Enverid Systems Inc. for NETL-developed solid sorbents that remove CO2 from gas streams. NETL's sorbents will be incorporated into an Enverid product called EnClaire™, which adds on to HVAC systems to reduce power

172

Sodium removal process development for LMFBR fuel subassemblies  

SciTech Connect

Two 37-pin scale models of Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant fuel subassemblies were designed, fabricated and used at Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division in the development and proof-testing of a rapid water-based sodium removal process for the ORNL Hot Experimental Facility, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Cycle. Through a series of development tests on one of the models, including five (5) sodium wettings and three (3) high temperature sodium removal operations, optimum process parameters for a rapid water vapor-argon-water rinse process were identified and successfully proof-tested on a second model containing argon-pressurized, sodium-corroded model fuel pins simulating the gas plenum and cladding conditions expected for spent fuel pins in full scale subassemblies. Based on extrapolations of model proof test data, preliminary process parameters for a water vapor-nitrogen-water rinse process were calculated and recommended for use in processing full scale fuel subassemblies in the Sodium Removal Facility of the Fuel Receiving Cell, ORNL HEF.

Simmons, C.R.; Taylor, G.R.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead February 4, 2013 Nick Nick Wright has been named head of the National Energy...

174

Distributed Generation Lead-by-Example Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

State governments can lead by example by promoting renewable energy programs and policies. Efforts to lead by example include using renewable energy resources (including alternative fuel for...

175

Methods for removing contaminant matter from a porous material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT) [Bozeman, MT; Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

176

Apparatus for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

Bala, Gregory A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Charles P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Method for removing hydrocarbon contaminants from solid materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for removing hydrocarbons from solid materials. Contaminated solids are combined with a solvent (preferably terpene based) to produce a mixture. The mixture is washed with water to generate a purified solid product (which is removed from the system) and a drainage product. The drainage product is separated into a first fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a second fraction (containing solids and water). The first fraction is separated into a third fraction (consisting mostly of contaminated solvent) and a fourth fraction (containing residual solids and water). The fourth fraction is combined with the second fraction to produce a sludge which is separated into a fifth fraction (containing water which is ultimately reused) and a sixth fraction (containing solids). The third fraction is then separated into a seventh fraction (consisting of recovered solvent which is ultimately reused) and an eighth fraction (containing hydrocarbon waste).

Bala, Gregory A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thomas, Charles P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Scintillation properties of lead sulfate  

SciTech Connect

We report on the scintillation properties of lead sulfate (PbSO{sub 4}), a scintillator that show promise as a high energy photon detector. It physical properties are well suited for gamma detection, as its has a density of 6.4 gm/cm{sup 3}, a 1/e attenuation length for 511 keV photons of 1.2 cm, is not affected by air or moisture, and is cut and polished easily. In 99.998% pure PbSO{sub 4} crystals at room temperature excited by 511 keV annihilation photons, the fluorescence decay lifetime contains significant fast components having 1.8 ns (5%) and 19 ns (36%) decay times, but with longer components having 95 ns (36%) and 425 ns (23%) decays times. The peak emission wavelength is 335 nm, which is transmitted by borosilicate glass windowed photomultiplier tubes. The total scintillation light output increases with decreasing temperature fro 3,200 photons/MeV at +45{degrees}C to 4, 900 photons/MeV at room temperature (+25{degrees}C) and 68,500 photons/MeV at {minus}145{degrees}C. In an imperfect, 3 mm cube of a naturally occurring mineral form of PbSO{sub 4} (anglesite) at room temperature, a 511 keV photopeak is seen with a total light output of 60% that BGO. There are significant sample to sample variations of the light output among anglesite samples, so the light output of lead sulfate may improve when large synthetic crystals become available. 10 refs.

Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Shlichta, P.J. [Crystal Research, San Pedro, CA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Removal of \\{PAHs\\} with surfactant-enhanced soil washing: Influencing factors and removal effectiveness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

PAH removal with surfactant enhanced washing was investigated through a series of laboratory tests to examine the effect of stirring speed, washing time, surfactant concentration, liquid/solid ratio, temperature, and on-and-off mode. The first four factors show significant influence on the PAH removal while the latter two do not. Total removal ratio and a new proposed parameter, solubilization percentage, are used to evaluate the effectiveness quantitatively.

Sheng Peng; Wei Wu; Jiajun Chen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling Pb-Contaminated Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling The Source of Airborne Lead: Recycling Pb-Contaminated Soils Starting in the 1970s, federal regulatory control and eventual elimination of lead-based "anti-knock" additives in gasoline decreased the level of airborne Pb in the USA by two orders-of-magnitude [1]. Blood lead levels of the USA figure 1 Figure 1. The good, the bad, and the ugly. Ambient airborne particulate matter captured on filters of woven silica fiber (large strips) and TeflonTM (round). Clean fiber filter at bottom for comparison. Take a deep breath? population decreased correspondingly [2,3]. Despite this dramatic improvement in both exposure risk and body burden of Pb, the sources and health threat of the low levels of lead in our "unleaded" air remain topics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Evaluation of Passive and Active Soot Filters for Removal of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Passive and Active Soot Filters for Removal of Particulate Emissions from Diesel Engines Evaluation of Passive and Active Soot Filters for Removal of Particulate Emissions from...

182

High Metal Removal Rate Process for Machining Difficult Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Metal Removal Rate Process for Machining Difficult Materials High Metal Removal Rate Process for Machining Difficult Materials highmetalremovalprocessfactsheet.pdf More...

183

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

184

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers...

185

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Removing Barriers...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Review 2014: Removing Barriers, Implementing Policies and Advancing Alternative Fuels Markets in New England Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Removing Barriers,...

186

Advanced Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction Advanced Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction advwaterremovalmse.pdf More Documents & Publications Advance Patent Waiver...

187

SEEWEC Consortium lead partner Ghent University | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEEWEC Consortium lead partner Ghent University SEEWEC Consortium lead partner Ghent University Jump to: navigation, search Name SEEWEC Consortium lead partner Ghent University Address Sint Pietersnieuwstraat 41 Place Gent Zip 9000 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http://www.seewec.org Region Belgium LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: SEEWEC Consortium Brevik NO This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: FO This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=SEEWEC_Consortium_lead_partner_Ghent_University&oldid=678456" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

188

241-AZ-101 pump removal trough analysis  

SciTech Connect

As part of the current Hanford mission of environmental cleanup, various long length equipment must be removed from highly radioactive waste tanks. The removal of equipment will utilize portions of the Equipment Removal System for Project W320 (ERS-W320), specifically the 50 ton hydraulic trailer system. Because the ERS-W320 system was designed to accommodate much heavier equipment it is adequate to support the dead weight of the trough, carriage and related equipment for 241AZ101 pump removal project. However, the ERS-W320 components when combined with the trough and its` related components must also be analyzed for overturning due to wind loads. Two troughs were designed, one for the 20 in. diameter carriage and one for the 36 in. diameter carriage. A proposed 52 in. trough was not designed and, therefore is not included in this document. In order to fit in the ERS-W320 strongback the troughs were design with the same widths. Structurally, the only difference between the two troughs is that more material was removed from the stiffener plates on the 36 in trough. The reduction in stiffener plate material reduces the allowable load. Therefore, only the 36 in. trough was analyzed.

Coverdell, B.L.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

189

Biochemical Removal of HAP Precursors from Coal  

SciTech Connect

Column biooxidation tests with Kentucky coal confirmed results of earlier shake flask tests showing significant removal from the coal of arsenic, selenium, cobalt, manganese, nickel and cadmium. Rates of pyrite biooxidation in Kentucky coal were only slightly more than half the rates found previously for Indiana and Pittsburgh coals. Removal of pyrite from Pittsburgh coal by ferric ion oxidation slows markedly as ferrous ions accumulate in solution, requiring maintenance of high redox potentials in processes designed for removal of pyrite and hazardous air pollutant (HAP) precursors by circulation of ferric solutions through coal. The pyrite oxidation rates obtained in these tests were used by Unifield Engineering to support the conceptual designs for alternative pyrite and HAP precursor bioleaching processes for the phase 2 pilot plant. Thermophilic microorganisms were tested to determine if mercury could be mobilized from coal under elevated growth temperatures. There was no evidence for mercury removal from coal under these conditions. However, the activity of the organisms may have liberated mercury physically. It is also possible that the organisms dissolved mercury and it readsorbed to the clay preferentially. Both of these possibilities are undergoing further testing. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory?s (INEEL) slurry column reactor was operated and several batches of feed coal, product coal, waste solids and leach solutions were submitted to LBL for HAP precursor analysis. Results to date indicate significant removal of mercury, arsenic and other HAP precursors in the combined physical-biological process.

Gregory J. Olson

1997-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

190

NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~y-f-hjLo-- yy; 4: j ).,Ic ~y-f-hjLo-- yy; 4: j ).,Ic +- NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO s _ HEALTH AND SAFETY DIVISION - ANALYTICAL DEPT. . ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET o-0 1. H. NO. TRIAL, HYGIENE AND RADIATION DEPT. AMPLE Nti.1. //- 6:itEC TEDI it/;/L 5 .,- -..-- -- -.._-. -. I --- --- 1 ANALYTICA .OATE RECeiVEDi mri /-2-v& 3 Li >,a. HCJ _-..k.-*..- -.v._ 1 NO. DISTRIBUTION OF COPIES 1 Analytlcal Labwatwy (RECORD COPP) 2 Industrial Hygiene 8 Radlation Dept. . 3' Water Treatment Plant (Far Water Smmplos Only)' t' , /,' 30 ,I7 \ I _- ' -I .;35; /z , / /-7 . jj ,j> b :3 cl /1' , i),: A,' . i] NLO-HbS-736 (REV. 10/14~6Or I. .-- . s N A T I O N A L L E A D C O M P A N Y O F O H IO H E A L T H A N D S A F E T Y DIVISION - A N A L Y T I C A L D E P T . A N A L Y T I C A L D A T A S H E E T i. I- . '4 ( '.. /a ' li 4 '. r I if 1. - I :

191

Shorts due to diagnostic leads  

SciTech Connect

The superconducting toroidal field coils that are being tested in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) are heavily instrumented. General Electric coil, a lead wire of an internal sensor became shorted across an estimated three or four turns of the pancake winding. This short occurred during the final stages of the winding fabrication and was not accessible for repair. Resistance, voltage gradient, and transient voltage decay measurements were performed to characterize the short and the magnetic damping of the large steel bobbin and outer structural ring. The 32-gage wire causing the short was estimated to be about 10 cm long, with a resistance of 55 m..cap omega... As a safety measure, we decided to burn out the shorted wire at room temperature before installing the coil in LCTF. Tests were made to determine the energy needed to vaporize a small wire. Computer calculations indicated that within the voltage limits set for the coil, it was not feasible to burn out the wire by rapidly dumping the coil from a low-current dc charge-up. We accomplished the burnout by applying 800 V at 3.25 A, and 60 Hz for about 1 s. Transient voltage decay measurements made after the burnout and compared with those made before the attempt confirmed that the short had indeed been opened.

Ellis, J.F.; Lubell, M.S.; Pillsbury, R.D.; Shen, S.S.; Thome, R.J.; Walstrom, P.L.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

NITROGEN REMOVAL FROM NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop a membrane process for the denitrogenation of natural gas. Large proven reserves in the Lower-48 states cannot be produced because of the presence of nitrogen. To exploit these reserves, cost-effective, simple technology able to reduce the nitrogen content of the gas to 4-5% is required. Technology applicable to treatment of small gas streams (below 10 MMscfd) is particularly needed. In this project membranes that selectively permeate methane and reject nitrogen in the gas were developed. Preliminary calculations show that a membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 3 to 5 is required to make the process economically viable. A number of polymer materials likely to have the required selectivities were evaluated as composite membranes. Polyacetylenes such as poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) [PTMSP] and poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP] had high selectivities and fluxes, but membranes prepared from these polymers were not stable, showing decreasing flux and selectivity during tests lasting only a few hours. Parel, a poly(propylene oxide allyl glycidyl ether) had a selectivity of 3 at ambient temperatures and 4 or more at temperatures of {minus}20 C. However, Parel is no longer commercially available, and we were unable to find an equivalent material in the time available. Therefore, most of our experimental work focused on silicone rubber membranes, which have a selectivity of 2.5 at ambient temperatures, increasing to 3-4 at low temperatures. Silicone rubber composite membranes were evaluated in bench-scale module tests and with commercial-scale, 4-inch-diameter modules in a small pilot plant. Over six days of continuous operation at a feed gas temperature of {minus}5 to {minus}10 C, the membrane maintained a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 3.3. Based on the pilot plant performance data, an analysis of the economic potential of the process was prepared. We conclude that a stand-alone membrane process is the lowest-cost technology for small gas streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. The membrane process can recover more than 60-70% of the hydrocarbon content of the gas at a cost of $0.60-0.70/Mscfd. The capital cost of the process is about $100-200/Mscf. A number of small operators appear to be ready to use the technology if these costs can be demonstrated in the field. A second, and perhaps better, application of the technology is to combine the membrane process with a cryogenic process to treat large gas streams containing 10-20% nitrogen. The combination process achieves significant synergies. The membrane process performs a bulk separation of the gas, after which the cryogenic process treats the membrane residue (nitrogen-enriched) gas to recover more methane. Overall, hydrocarbon recoveries are greater than 95%. The capital cost of the combination process is lower than that of either process used alone and the processing costs are in the range $0.30-0.40/Mscf. This operating cost would be attractive to many gas producers. MTR is collaborating with a producer of cryogenic systems to further develop the combination process. A number of innovations in membrane process designs were made during the project; four U.S. patents covering various aspects of the technology were filed and issued.

K.A. Lokhandwala; M.B. Ringer; T.T. Su; Z. He; I. Pinnau; J.G. Wijmans; A. Morisato; K. Amo; A. DaCosta; R.W. Baker; R. Olsen; H. Hassani; T. Rathkamp

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Novel sorbents for removal of gadolinium-based contrast agents...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and hemoperfusion: preventive approaches to nephrogenic systemic fibrosis ."Nanomedicine 6(1):1-8. doi:10.1016j.nano.2009.05.002 Authors: W Yantasee GE Fryxell GA Porter K...

194

Method of making thermally removable polyurethanes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making a thermally-removable polyurethane material by heating a mixture of a maleimide compound and a furan compound, and introducing alcohol and isocyanate functional groups, where the alcohol group and the isocyanate group reacts to form the urethane linkages and the furan compound and the maleimide compound react to form the thermally weak Diels-Alder adducts that are incorporated into the backbone of the urethane linkages during the formation of the polyurethane material at temperatures from above room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. The polyurethane material can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The polyurethane material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); McElhanon, James R. (Livermore, CA); Saunders, Randall S. (late of Albuquerque, NM); Durbin-Voss, Marvie Lou (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Nitrate removal from drinking water -- Review  

SciTech Connect

Nitrate concentrations in surface water and especially in ground water have increased in Canada, the US, Europe, and other areas of the world. This trend has raised concern because nitrates cause methemoglobiinemia in infants. Several treatment processes including ion exchange, biological denitrification, chemical denitrification, reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, and catalytic denitrification can remove nitrates from water with varying degrees of efficiency, cost, and ease of operation. Available technical data, experience, and economics indicate that ion exchange and biological denitrification are more acceptable for nitrate removal than reverse osmosis. Ion exchange is more viable for ground water while biological denitrification is the preferred alternative for surface water. This paper reviews the developments in the field of nitrate removal processes.

Kapoor, A.; Viraraghavan, T. [Univ. of Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Removal of 2-Aminophenol Using Novel Adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The positive values of entropy show the increased randomness at solid/solution interface with some structural changes in the adsorbate and adsorbent and the affinity of adsorbents toward 2AP. ... Upon doubling the adsorbent amount from 10 to 20 g/L, the amount of phenol adsorbed also increases by almost two-fold. ... It is quite evident that, after 6 h of equilibrium, 27% of the total 2-aminophenol is removed by 10 g/L of the adsorbent slag, while 20 g/L of slag removed 37% of 2-aminophenol and 30 g/L of adsorbent adsorbs 42% under identical experimental conditions. ...

Vinod K. Gupta; Dinesh Mohan; Suhas; Kunwar P. Singh

2006-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

197

Process for removing metals from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions. 2 tabs.

Napier, J.M.; Hancher, C.M.; Hackett, G.D.

1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

198

Children and lead: new findings and concerns  

SciTech Connect

An editorial dealing with lead in the environment and its health risks to children is presented. Young children are particularly vulnerable to lead exposure. Through hand-to-mouth activities, such as thumb sucking, nail biting, or eating with dirty hands, lead in house dust and garden soil readily enters their bodies. Children with pica are exposed to more lead because they eat such items as paint chips, broken plaster, and dirt. Moreover, intestinal lead absorption is greater in children than in adults. The author recommends a concerted effort to reduce undue lead absorption in children. (JMT)

Lin-Fu, J.S.

1982-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

199

Fast pyrolysis of a waste fraction of high impact polystyrene (HIPS) containing brominated flame retardants in a fluidized bed reactor: The effects of various Ca-based additives (CaO, Ca(OH)2 and oyster shells) on the removal of bromine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A waste fraction of high impact polystyrene (HIPS) containing brominated flame retardants and antimony trioxide (Sb2O3) as a synergist was pyrolyzed in a bench-scale system equipped with a fluidized bed and char separation system. Experiments were carried out to observe the effects of the reaction temperature and three additives (CaO, Ca(OH)2, oyster shells) on the removal of bromine. An analysis of the pyrolysis oils obtained showed the oils were mainly composed of toluene, ethyl-benzene, styrene, cumene, ?-methylstyrene, 1,3-diphenylpropane, 1,3-diphenylbutane and (1-bromoethyl)-benzene. When the Ca-based additives were used, the concentration of styrene was markedly increased; whereas, those of ethlybenzene and cumene were reduced. The total bromine content of pyrolysis oil produced without any additive at 459 °C was about 5 wt.%. When Ca(OH)2 and oyster shells were applied, the total bromine contents of the pyrolysis oils were decreased to 1.3 and 2.7 wt.%, respectively. The antimony content in the pyrolysis oil was relatively small due to the efficient operation of the char separation system.

Su-Hwa Jung; Seon-Jin Kim; Joo-Sik Kim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Process removes Sr from nuclear wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process removes Sr from nuclear wastes ... Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have devised a chemical process for extracting and recovering strontium-90 from liquid nuclear wastes. ... Argonne chemist E. Philip Horwitz, head of the team, says it could be a significant aid in managing such radioactive wastes. ...

WARD WORTHY

1990-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Removing dissolved inorganic contaminants from water  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the physicochemical treatment processes typically used to remove the more common inorganic contaminants from water and wastewater. These are precipitation, coprecipitation, adsorption, ion exchange, membrane separations by reverse osmosis and electrodialysis, and combinations of these processes. The general criteria for process selection are discussed, and the processes and their typical applications are described.

Clifford, D.; Subramonian, S.; Sorg, T.J.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel  

At ORNL the application of ultrasonic energy, or sonication, has been shown to successfully remove or prevent the formation of 50–90% of the precipitates in biofuels. Precipitates can plug filters as biodiesel is transported from one location to another, and often cannot be detected by visual inspection....

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

203

Automatic Red Eye Removal for Digital Photography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 Automatic Red Eye Removal for Digital Photography FRANCESCA GASPARINI DISCo, Dipartimento The red eye effect is a well known problem in photography. It is often seen in amateur shots taken with a built-in flash, but the problem is also well known to professional photographers. Red eye is the red

Schettini, Raimondo

204

Plastic bottles > Remove lids (not recyclable)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plastic bottles Please: > Remove lids (not recyclable) > Empty bottles > Rinse milk bottles, & other bottles if possible > Squash bottles www.st-andrews.ac.uk/estates/environment All types of plastic bottle accepted Clear, opaque and coloured bottles Labels can remain on X No plastic bags X No plastics

Brierley, Andrew

205

ASBESTOS PIPE-INSULATION REMOVAL ROBOT SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

This final topical report details the development, experimentation and field-testing activities for a robotic asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system developed for use within the DOE's weapon complex as part of their ER and WM program, as well as in industrial abatement. The engineering development, regulatory compliance, cost-benefit and field-trial experiences gathered through this program are summarized.

Unknown

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Removable partial overdentures for the irradiated patient  

SciTech Connect

Patients who have received radiotherapy to the head and neck area must avoid dental extractions and seek simplicity in treatment and home care follow-up. For partially edentulous patients, removable partial overdenture therapy can fulfill these goals while maintaining the high level of function and aesthetics desired by patients.11 references.

Rosenberg, S.W. (New York Univ. School of Dentistry, NY (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report  

SciTech Connect

The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

NONE

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications.

Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Derzon, Dora K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nelson, Jill S. (Albuquerque, NM); Rand, Peter B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Studies On Advanced Lead-Acid Batteries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Subsequent to the studies on precursor lead-acid systems by Daniel, Grove and Sindesten, practical lead-acid batteries began with the research and inventions of Raymond Gaston… (more)

Martha, Surendra Kumar

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

ASUWT JUDICIAL BOARD REMOVAL PROCESS "The ASUWT President shall establish and preside over the removal process, which shall commence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

should not be removed. Additional time to submit supporting information may be requested and approvedASUWT JUDICIAL BOARD REMOVAL PROCESS "The ASUWT President shall establish and preside over the removal process, which shall commence within five (5) days after the Senate vote to bring removal

Borenstein, Elhanan

211

BOA: Asbestos pipe insulation removal robot system. Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

The project described in this report targets the development of a mechanized system for safe, cost-efficient and automated abatement of asbestos containing materials used as pipe insulation. Based on several key design criteria and site visits, a proof-of-concept prototype robot system, dubbed BOA, was designed and built, which automatically strips the lagging and insulation from the pipes, and encapsulates them under complete vacuum operation. The system can operate on straight runs of piping in horizontal or vertical orientations. Currently we are limited to four-inch diameter piping without obstacles as well as a somewhat laborious emplacement and removal procedure -- restrictions to be alleviated through continued development. BOA removed asbestos at a rate of 4-5 ft./h compared to 3 ft./h for manual removal of asbestos with a 3-person crew. The containment and vacuum system on BOA was able to achieve the regulatory requirement for airborne fiber emissions of 0.01 fibers/ccm/ 8-hr. shift. This program consists of two phases. The first phase was completed and a demonstration was given to a review panel, consisting of DOE headquarters and site representatives as well as commercial abatement industry representatives. Based on the technical and programmatic recommendations drafted, presented and discussed during the review meeting, a new plan for the Phase II effort of this project was developed. Phase 11 will consist of a 26-month effort, with an up-front 4-month site-, market-, cost/benefit and regulatory study before the next BOA robot (14 months) is built, and then deployed and demonstrated (3 months) at a DOE site (such as Fernald or Oak Ridge) by the beginning of FY`97.

Schempf, H.; Bares, J.E.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Applications of porous electrodes to metal-ion removal and the design of battery systems  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation treats the use of porous electrodes as electrochemical reactors for the removal of dilute metal ions. A methodology for the scale-up of porous electrodes used in battery applications is given. Removal of 4 ..mu..g Pb/cc in 1 M sulfuric acid was investigated in atmospheric and high-pressure, flow-through porous reactors. The atmospheric reactor used a reticulated vitreous carbon porous bed coated in situ with a mercury film. Best results show 98% removal of lead from the feed stream. Results are summarized in a dimensionless plot of Sherwood number vs Peclet number. High-pressure, porous-electrode experiments were performed to investigate the effect of pressure on the current efficiency. Pressures were varied up to 120 bar on electrode beds of copper or lead-coated spheres. The copper spheres showed high hydrogen evolution rates which inhibited lead deposition, even at high cathodic overpotentials. Use of lead spheres inhibited hydrogen evolution but often resulted in the formation of lead sulfate layers; these layers were difficult to reduce back to lead. Experimental data of one-dimensional porous battery electrodes are combined with a model for the current collector and cell connectors to predict ultimate specific energy and maximum specific power for complete battery systems. Discharge behavior of the plate as a whole is first presented as a function of depth of discharge. These results are combined with the voltage and weight penalties of the interconnecting bus and post, positive and negative active material, cell container, etc. to give specific results for the lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide high-temperature battery. Subject to variation is the number of positive electrodes, grid conductivity, minimum current-collector weight, and total delivered capacity. The battery can be optimized for maximum energy or power, or a compromise design may be selected.

Trost, G.G.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger. Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants - while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of a addressing the emission of SO{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase I and Phase II requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variable than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides the Final Test Plan for the first coal tested in the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.

Jankura, B.J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation of lead-210 isotope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An isotopically selective laser process and apparatus for removal of Pb-210 from natural lead that involves a one-photon near-resonant, two-photon resonant excitation of one or more Rydberg levels, followed by field ionization and then electrostatic extraction. The wavelength to the near-resonant intermediate state is counter propagated with respect to the second wavelength required to populate the final Rydberg state. This scheme takes advantage of the large first excited state cross section, and only modest laser fluences are required. The non-resonant process helps to avoid two problems: first, stimulated Raman Gain due to the nearby F=3/2 hyperfine component of Pb-207 and, second, direct absorption of the first transition process light by Pb-207.

Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Haynam, Christopher A. (Pleasanton, CA); Johnson, Michael A. (Pleasanton, CA); Worden, Earl F. (Diablo, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Atomic vapor laser isotope separation of lead-210 isotope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An isotopically selective laser process and apparatus for removal of Pb-210 from natural lead that involves a one-photon near-resonant, two-photon resonant excitation of one or more Rydberg levels, followed by field ionization and then electrostatic extraction. The wavelength to the near-resonant intermediate state is counter propagated with respect to the second wavelength required to populate the final Rydberg state. This scheme takes advantage of the large first excited state cross section, and only modest laser fluences are required. The non-resonant process helps to avoid two problems: first, stimulated Raman Gain due to the nearby F=3/2 hyperfine component of Pb-207 and, second, direct absorption of the first transition process light by Pb-207. 5 figs.

Scheibner, K.F.; Haynam, C.A.; Johnson, M.A.; Worden, E.F.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Removal of heavy metals from effluent. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the removal of lead, cadmium, mercury, and other heavy metals from waste waters. Precipitation, reverse osmosis, complexation, ultrafiltration, and adsorption are among the techniques described. The citations examine the efficiency, operational difficulties, cost effectiveness, and optimization of these methods. Prevention and remediation of metal pollution from electroplating, mining, smelting, and other industries are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path.

Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Toward Nanostructured Thermoelectrics: Synthesis and Characterization of Lead Telluride Gels and Aerogels  

SciTech Connect

The synthesis and characterization of lead telluride (PbTe) gels and aerogels with nanostructured features of potential benefit for enhanced thermoelectrics is reported. In this approach, discrete thiolate-capped PbTe nanoparticles were synthesized by a solution-based approach followed by oxidation-induced nanoparticle assembly with tetranitromethane or hydrogen peroxide to form wet gels. Drying of the wet gels by supercritical CO{sub 2} extraction yielded aerogels, whereas xerogels were produced by ambient pressure bench top drying. The gels consist of an interconnected network of colloidal nanoparticles and pores with surface areas up to 74 m{sup 2} g{sup ?1}. The thermal stability of the nanostructures relative to nanoparticles was probed with the help of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The aerogels were observed to sublime at a higher temperature and over a larger range (425–500 °C) relative to the precursor nanoparticles. TGA-DSC suggests that organic capping groups can be removed in the region 250–450 °C, and melting of PbTe nanoparticles occurs near the temperature for bulk materials (ca. 920 °C). The good thermal stability combined with the presence of nanoscale interfaces suggests PbTe gels may show promise in thermoelectric devices.

Ganguly, Shreyashi; Brock, Stephanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Laboratory Studies on the Removal of Radon-Born Lead from KamLAND's Organic Liquid Scintillator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA x Present address: Argonne

Keefer, G.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Laboratory Studies on the Removal of Radon-Born Lead from KamLAND's Organic Liquid Scintillator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Extraction A water purification system already existedfor various purification methods: water extrac- tion withThe following purification techniques were studied: water

Keefer, G.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids Final Technical Report (From October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2005) Principle Authors Aihua Zhang, Qisheng Ma, Kangshi Wang, Yongchun Tang (co-PI), William A. Goddard (PI), Date Report was issued: December 9, 2005 DOE Award number: DE-FC26-02NT15383 Name and Address of Submitting Organization California Institute of Technology 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA91125 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

222

TMI defueling project fuel debris removal system  

SciTech Connect

The three mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident on March 28, 1979, presented the nuclear community with many challenging remediation problems; most importantly, the removal of the fission products within the reactor containment vessel. To meet this removal problem, an air-lift system (ALS) can be used to employ compressed air to produce the motive force for transporting debris. Debris is separated from the transport stream by gravity separation. The entire method does not rely on any moving parts. Full-scale testing of the ALS at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has demonstrated the capability of transporting fuel debris from beneath the LCSA into a standard fuel debris bucket at a minimum rate of 230 kg/min.

Burdge, B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

TMI defueling project fuel debris removal system  

SciTech Connect

The three mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident on March 28, 1979, presented the nuclear community with many challenging remediation problems; most importantly, the removal of the fission products within the reactor containment vessel. To meet this removal problem, an air-lift system (ALS) can be used to employ compressed air to produce the motive force for transporting debris. Debris is separated from the transport stream by gravity separation. The entire method does not rely on any moving parts. Full-scale testing of the ALS at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has demonstrated the capability of transporting fuel debris from beneath the LCSA into a standard fuel debris bucket at a minimum rate of 230 kg/min.

Burdge, B.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: a. treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10 and, b. separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (a) and (b) are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Improve reformer operation with trace sulfur removal  

SciTech Connect

Modern bimetallic reforming catalysts typically have feed specifications for sulfur of 0.5 to 1 wppm in the reformer naphtha carge. Sulfur in the raw naphtha is reduced to this level by naphtha hydrotreating. While most naphtha hydrotreating operations can usually obtain these levels without substantial problems. It is difficult to obtain levels much below 0.5 to 1 wppm with this process. Revamp of a constrained existing hydrotreater to reduce product sulfur slightly can be extremely costly typically entailing replacement or addition of a new reactor. At Engelhard the authors demonstrated that if the last traces of sulfur remaining from hydrotreating can be removed, the resulting ultra-low sulfur feed greatly improves the reformer operation and provides substantial economic benefit to the refiner. Removal of the remaining trace sulfur is accomplished in a simple manner with a special adsorbent bed, without adding complexity to the reforming operation.

McClung, R.G.; Novak, W.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Categorical Exclusion 4568, Crane Removal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

l)eterminationFornl l)eterminationFornl Project Title: Crane Removal Project (4568) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is to remove an old legacy crane trolley and old crane operated cab. General Administration/Management DA I - Routine business actions DA2 - Administrative contract amendments DA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations DA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect DA6 - Procedural rulemakings upgrade DA7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged DA8 - Award of technical support/M&O/personal service contracts DA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training DAIO - Reports on non-DOE legislation DA II - Technical advice and planning assistance

227

Application of high intensity UVC-LED for the removal of acetamiprid with the photo-Fenton process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Research into the use of light-emitting diodes (LED) for wastewater treatment has increased in recent years. \\{LEDs\\} are more efficient than other UV lamps because of their reduced heat dissipation and much longer life span. However, most of the UVC-LEDs that are currently available are of such low intensity that the large number of bulbs required for effective treatment of wastewater streams makes their application uneconomic. The development of higher intensity UVC-LEDs may therefore lead to more feasible technology options for wastewater treatment with UV-based advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The aim of this work was to study the efficiency of high-intensity UVC-LED lamps (20 W/m2) for the removal of micropollutants with the photo-Fenton process. The pesticide acetamiprid was used as model pollutant at a concentration of 100 ?g/L in synthetic secondary effluent due to its recalcitrant nature. Degradation using a low-pressure UVC-lamp (LPL) was also assessed for comparative purposes. The process was operated at pH 2.8 and at natural pH. The volumetric photon absorption (VRPA) was calculated for the results at acidic pH, where the catalyst was soluble, to investigate the influence of iron and hydrogen peroxide concentrations on acetamiprid degradation, based on their absorption for both systems. A model was proposed and results indicated that the contribution of both hydrogen peroxide and iron to the generation of radicals was the same in the LED system. At natural pH, the high intensity LED system was effective in the removal of acetamiprid, achieving degradation in 20 min adding 1+1+1 mg Fe/L (sequential iron dosage) and 12 mg H2O2/L.

Irene Carra; José Antonio Sánchez Pérez; Sixto Malato; Olivier Autin; Bruce Jefferson; Peter Jarvis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ecology of the Microbial Community Removing Phosphate from Wastewater under Continuously Aerobic Conditions in a Sequencing Batch Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with synthetic wastewater eventually containing...the clarified plant effluent (Fig...Using synthetic wastewater. A typical profile...A carbon mass balance based on existing...phosphorus removal in wastewater treatment plants. Antonie Leeuwenhoek...

Johwan Ahn; Sarah Schroeder; Michael Beer; Simon McIlroy; Ronald C. Bayly; John W. May; George Vasiliadis; Robert J. Seviour

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

229

Removal of 106Ru traces from NH4NO3 effluent generated during recycling of sintered depleted uranium fuel pellets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Feasibility of using fixed bed column of conventional ion exchangers/sorbent and chemical precipitation based processes have been examined for the effective removal of the very low levels of 106Ru activity from N...

D. Banerjee; M. A. Rao; S. Chinnaesakki…

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Target-Responsive DNAzyme Cross-Linked Hydrogel for Visual Quantitative Detection of Lead  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of the severe health risks associated with lead pollution, rapid, sensitive, and portable detection of low levels of Pb2+ in biological and environmental samples is of great importance. ... (2) Lead exposure can occur through a variety of sources, including air, bare soil, home remedies, drinking water, toy jewelry, lead-based paints, and others. ...

Yishun Huang; Yanli Ma; Yahong Chen; Xuemeng Wu; Luting Fang; Zhi Zhu; Chaoyong James Yang

2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

231

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Makarewicz, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Meredith, Paul F. (Knoxville, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

REMOVAL OF LEGACY PLUTONIUM MATERIALS FROM SWEDEN  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Global Threat Reduction (GTRI) recently removed legacy plutonium materials from Sweden in collaboration with AB SVAFO, Sweden. This paper details the activities undertaken through the U.S. receiving site (Savannah River Site (SRS)) to support the characterization, stabilization, packaging and removal of legacy plutonium materials from Sweden in 2012. This effort was undertaken as part of GTRI’s Gap Materials Program and culminated with the successful removal of plutonium from Sweden as announced at the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit. The removal and shipment of plutonium materials to the United States was the first of its kind under NNSA’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative. The Environmental Assessment for the U.S. receipt of gap plutonium material was approved in May 2010. Since then, the multi-year process yielded many first time accomplishments associated with plutonium packaging and transport activities including the application of the of DOE-STD-3013 stabilization requirements to treat plutonium materials outside the U.S., the development of an acceptance criteria for receipt of plutonium from a foreign country, the development and application of a versatile process flow sheet for the packaging of legacy plutonium materials, the identification of a plutonium container configuration, the first international certificate validation of the 9975 shipping package and the first intercontinental shipment using the 9975 shipping package. This paper will detail the technical considerations in developing the packaging process flow sheet, defining the key elements of the flow sheet and its implementation, determining the criteria used in the selection of the transport package, developing the technical basis for the package certificate amendment and the reviews with multiple licensing authorities and most importantly integrating the technical activities with the Swedish partners.

Dunn, Kerry A. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Bellamy, J. Steve [Savannah River National Laboratory; Chandler, Greg T. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Iyer, Natraj C. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of; Koenig, Rich E.; Leduc, D. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Hackney, B. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Leduc, Dan R. [Savannah River National Laboratory

2013-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

233

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

1987-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Makarewicz, M.A.; Meredith, P.F.

1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

235

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, Milton (12833 S. 82nd Ct., Palos Park, IL 60464); Sinha, Shome N. (5748 Drexel, 2A, Chicago, IL 60637)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Artificial Neural Networks for Recognition of Electrocardiographic Lead Reversal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Artificial Neural Networks for Recognition of Electrocardiographic Lead Reversal Bo Heden, Iv, which are rule-based,is a diffi- cult task, even for the expert. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have lack of prop- 100%). The neural networks performed better *an `the er treatment. The pur r se

Peterson, Carsten

237

HTS power leads for the BTEV interaction region  

SciTech Connect

A new Interaction Region (IR) for the BTEV experiment was planned to be built at Fermilab. This IR would have required new superconducting quadrupole magnets and many additional power circuits for their operation. The new ''low beta'' quadrupole magnet design was based upon the Fermilab LHC quadrupole design, and would have operated at 9.56 kA in 4.5 K liquid helium. The use of conventional power leads for these circuits would have required substantially more helium for cooling than is available from the cryogenic plant, which is already operating close to its limit. To decrease the heat load and helium cooling demands, the use of HTS power leads was necessary. In developing specifications for HTS leads for the BTEV interaction region, several 6 kA HTS leads produced by American Superconductor Corporation (ASC) have been tested at over-current conditions. Final design requirements were to be based on these test results. This paper summarizes the test results and describes the design requirements for the 9.65 kA HTS power leads.

Feher, S.; Carcagno, R.; Orris, D.; Page, T.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Electrochemical Immunoassay of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on A Lead Sulfide Nanoparticle Label. Electrochemical Immunoassay of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on A Lead Sulfide Nanoparticle Label. Abstract:...

239

Energy Policy 29 (2001) 11331143 Ethanol as a lead replacement: phasing out leaded gasoline in Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Policy 29 (2001) 1133­1143 Ethanol as a lead replacement: phasing out leaded gasoline cost of lead additives and of gasoline, and the falling cost of ethanol and sugarcane, have created sugarcane is produced in Africa to replace all the lead used in African gasoline; this would require Africa

Thomas, Valerie

240

Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program - Bangladesh ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLowEmissionsAsianDevel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Procurement Standards Lead-by-Example Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations.

242

Building Standards Lead-by-Example Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations.

243

Lead in Maple Syrup Produced in Connecticut  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lead in Maple Syrup Produced in Connecticut ... Department of Analytical Chemistry, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, P.O. ... Box 1106, New Haven, Connecticut 06504 ...

David E. Stilwell; Craig L. Musante

1996-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

244

Energy Efficiency Lead-by-Example Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations.

245

Selection of an acid-gas removal process for an LNG plant  

SciTech Connect

Acid gas contaminants, such as, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and mercaptans, must be removed to a very low level from a feed natural gas before it is liquefied. CO{sub 2} is typically removed to a level of about 100 ppm to prevent freezing during LNG processing. Sulfur compounds are removed to levels required by the eventual consumer of the gas. Acid-gas removal processes can be broadly classified as: solvent-based, adsorption, cryogenic or physical separation. The advantages and disadvantages of these processes will be discussed along with design and operating considerations. This paper will also discuss the important considerations affecting the choice of the best acid-gas removal process for LNG plants. Some of these considerations are: the remoteness of the LNG plant from the resource; the cost of the feed gas and the economics of minimizing capital expenditures; the ultimate disposition of the acid gas; potential for energy integration; and the composition, including LPG and conditions of the feed gas. The example of the selection of the acid-gas removal process for an LNG plant.

Stone, J.B.; Jones, G.N. [Exxon Production Research, Houston, TX (United States); Denton, R.D. [Exxon Production Malaysia, Inc., Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Cytotoxicity of lead on oligodendroglia, astroglia, and meningeal fibroblasts in culture: effects on viability and glycerolphosphate dehydrogenase activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into acid-precipitable proteins. The percentages of astroglia and fibroblaste excluding dye were unaffected by lead acetate, whereas the percentage of oligodendroglia excluding dye decreased significantly (p( 0. 01) after exposure to 100 uM lead acetate... cells were reseeded in culture dishes (corresponding to postnatal day 13-16), culture medium was removed, and the medium containing Pb acetate (MCB, Gibbstown, NJ) was added into culture dishes. Three concentrations of Pb acetate were tested: 1 uM...

Wu, Jo-Nan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

247

United Kingdom HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Removal United Kingdom HEU Removal Location United Kingdom United States 52 24' 15.1416" N, 1 34' 55.3116" W See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

248

Hanford Begins New Campaign to Remove Excess Water from Double...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Hanford Begins New Campaign to Remove Excess Water from Double-Shell Tanks Hanford Begins New Campaign to Remove Excess Water from Double-Shell Tanks September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm...

249

Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time The Lab's 1,000th shipment of transuranic waste recently left Los Alamos, on its way...

250

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

251

EM's SPRU Celebrates Waste Removal Success, Safety Milestone...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EM's SPRU Celebrates Waste Removal Success, Safety Milestone EM's SPRU Celebrates Waste Removal Success, Safety Milestone February 27, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Members of the EM and...

252

SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: LONG-TERM RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corp., the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Dravo Lime, Inc. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to power generators with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NO{sub x} control on many coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project previously tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium-and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide byproduct slurry produced from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization system. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation on two different boilers, and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. The first long-term test was conducted on FirstEnergy's BMP, Unit 3, and the second test was conducted on AEP's Gavin Plant, Unit 1. The Gavin Plant testing provided an opportunity to evaluate the effects of sorbent injected into the furnace on SO{sub 3} formed across an operating SCR reactor. This report presents the results from those long-term tests. The tests determined the effectiveness of injecting commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant) and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP) for sulfuric acid control. The results show that injecting either slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, this overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NOX control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The long-term tests also determined balance-of-plant impacts from slurry injection during the two tests. These include impacts on boiler back-end temperatures and pressure drops, SCR catalyst properties, ESP performance, removal of other flue gas species, and flue gas opacity. For the most part the balance-of-plant impacts were neutral to positive, although adverse effects on ESP performance became an issue during the BMP test.

Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

2002-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

253

Data, Feedback, & Awareness Lead to Big Energy Savings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

monthly energy feedback and monthly energy feedback and "staff monitors" to reinforce commu- nication and activity led to improved routine practices and significant energy savings. Members of the Navy Region Southwest Metro San Diego regional energy management team with an example poster from their energy awareness program. (Photo courtesy FEMP/NRSMSD.) Data, Feedback, & Awareness Lead to Big Energy Savings The Navy Region Southwest Metro San Diego Area (NRSMSD) regional energy management team achieved significant energy savings at the three major complexes: Naval Base Coronado, Naval Base San Diego, and Naval Base Point Loma, result- ing largely from a well organized energy awareness program centered on energy data

254

Data, Feedback, & Awareness Lead to Big Energy Savings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy feedback and energy feedback and "staff monitors" to reinforce commu- nication and activity led to improved routine practices and significant energy savings. Members of the Navy Region Southwest Metro San Diego regional energy management team with an example poster from their energy awareness program. (Photo courtesy FEMP/NRSMSD.) Data, Feedback, & Awareness Lead to Big Energy Savings The Navy Region Southwest Metro San Diego Area (NRSMSD) regional energy management team achieved significant energy savings at the three major complexes: Naval Base Coronado, Naval Base San Diego, and Naval Base Point Loma, result- ing largely from a well organized energy awareness program centered on energy data

255

Fan-fold shielded electrical leads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate. 3 figs.

Rohatgi, R.R.; Cowan, T.E.

1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

256

TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

257

DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements DOE Research Grant Leads to Gas Turbine Manufacturing Improvements August 16, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has led to a new licensing agreement that will improve the performance of state-of-the-art gas turbines, resulting in cleaner, more reliable and affordable energy. The collaborative technology license agreement, penned by Mikro Systems Inc. and Siemens Energy Inc., reflects growth in U.S.-based manufacturing know-how and leadership in cutting-edge technology development and rapid implementation. Gas turbines, which are used to produce electricity for industrial or central power generation applications, consist sequentially of compressor,

258

Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention in one aspect comprises a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous-derived liquids by contacting said liquid with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene polymer (i.e. PS-DVB) having catechol ligands anchored to said polymer, said contacting being at an elevated temperature. In another aspect, the invention is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene polymer by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid in accordance with the aspect described above which regenerating process comprises: (a) treating said spent catecholated polystyrene polymer with an aqueous solution of at least one member selected from the group consisting of carbonates and bicarbonates of ammonium, alkali metals, and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10, and said treating being at a temperature in the range of about 20/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/C; (b) separating the solids and liquids from each other. In a preferred embodiment the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step: (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution which includes at least one lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (c) and (d) are added. Steps (c) and (d) comprise: (c) treating the solids with an aqueous alcoholic solution of at least one ammonium, alkali or alkaline earth metal bicarbonate at a temperature in the range of about 20 to 100/sup 0/C; and (d) separating the solids from the liquids.

Fish, R.H.

1984-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

259

Fusion of Visual and Thermal Signatures with Eyeglass Removal for Robust Face Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recognition. Two types of fusion methods are discussed: data fusion and decision fusion. Data fusion produces [5]. Two types of fusion- based face recognition techniques are developed and compared: data fusionFusion of Visual and Thermal Signatures with Eyeglass Removal for Robust Face Recognition Jingu Heo

Abidi, Mongi A.

260

Macroencapsulation of lead and steel SWARF  

SciTech Connect

The treatability study to macroencapsulate radioactively contaminated lead and steel swarf (cuttings and/or chips)and chunks, a low level mixed waste, from the dismantlement of excess surplus uranium fuel handling and transfer casks was successful. Macroencapsulation is the land disposal restriction treatment standard for this waste form per 40 CFR 268.42 Table 3. An epoxy-based thermoset system was employed due to cracking failures of other types of thermoset systems. Bench scale tests were performed with a two-part epoxy (resin and hardener) using cast iron chips as a surrogate waste media. A two stage encapsulation process was employed in treating the swarf. Two liters of epoxy were added to a 2.8{ell} (3 qt) container of swarf under 51K Pa vacuum (-15-inch of Hg) during the first stage of the process. In this stage each individual particle or chip was wetted by epoxy and allowed to harden into an initial monolith. The second stage encapsulated the initial monolith with a secondary layer of epoxy forming a larger final monolith. By evacuating the air from the swarf and epoxy during the initial monolith encapsulation, a higher density (higher swarf to epoxy ratio) was achieved. Tensile and compressive strength tests were performed on samples and without any media (cast iron chips). The coupons were prepared from a series of monoliths featuring various mixtures ratios and vacuum levels. The tensile strength of epoxy without chips averaged 41M Pa (6000 psi) and 1.4M Pa (2000 psi) with cast iron chips. Compression strengths averaged 140M Pa (20,000 psi) without chips and 66.2M Pa (9600 psi) with cast iron chips.

Zirker, L.; Thiesen, T.; Tyson, D.; Beitel, G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The TMI defueling project fuel debris removal system  

SciTech Connect

The Three Mile Island (TMI) unit 2 pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident on March 28, 1979, presented the nuclear community with many challenging remediation problems. A plethora of techniques, systems, and tools have been employed for the recovery and packaging of the postaccident configuration of the reactor core. Of particular difficulty was the removal of the fuel debris located beneath the lower core support structure. Fuel debris located beneath the lower core support structure was the result of rapid cooling of the previously molten UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}, causing formation of a ceramic like rubble. Approximately 19,100 kg of this rubble settled beneath the lower core support structure and onto the lower head of the reactor containment vessel. The development and implementation of a debris collection system based on the air lift principle proved to be an effective method for gathering the fuel debris from beneath the lower core support structure.

Burge, B. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Conceptual design of an aircraft automated coating removal system  

SciTech Connect

Paint stripping of the U.S. Air Force`s large transport aircrafts is currently a labor-intensive, manual process. Significant reductions in costs, personnel and turnaround time can be accomplished by the judicious use of automation in some process tasks. This paper presents the conceptual design of a coating removal systems for the tail surfaces of the C-5 plane. Emphasis is placed on the technology selection to optimize human-automation synergy with respect to overall costs, throughput, quality, safety, and reliability. Trade- offs between field-proven vs. research-requiring technologies, and between expected gain vs. cost and complexity, have led to a conceptual design which is semi-autonomous (relying on the human for task specification and disturbance handling) yet incorporates sensor- based automation (for sweep path generation and tracking, surface following, stripping quality control and tape/breach handling).

Baker, J.E.; Draper, J.V.; Pin, F.G.; Primm, A.H.; Shekhar, S.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Removal of mercury from coal via a microbial pretreatment process  

SciTech Connect

A process for the removal of mercury from coal prior to combustion is disclosed. The process is based on use of microorganisms to oxidize iron, sulfur and other species binding mercury within the coal, followed by volatilization of mercury by the microorganisms. The microorganisms are from a class of iron and/or sulfur oxidizing bacteria. The process involves contacting coal with the bacteria in a batch or continuous manner. The mercury is first solubilized from the coal, followed by microbial reduction to elemental mercury, which is stripped off by sparging gas and captured by a mercury recovery unit, giving mercury-free coal. The mercury can be recovered in pure form from the sorbents via additional processing.

Borole, Abhijeet P. (Knoxville, TN); Hamilton, Choo Y. (Knoxville, TN)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

264

Assessment of commercially available ion exchange materials for cesium removal from highly alkaline wastes  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 61 million gallons of nuclear waste generated in plutonium production, radionuclide removal campaigns, and research and development activities is stored on the Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. Although the pretreatment process and disposal requirements are still being defined, most pretreatment scenarios include removal of cesium from the aqueous streams. In many cases, after cesium is removed, the dissolved salt cakes and supernates can be disposed of as LLW. Ion exchange has been a leading candidate for this separation. Ion exchange systems have the advantage of simplicity of equipment and operation and provide many theoretical stages in a small space. The organic ion exchange material Duolite{trademark} CS-100 has been selected as the baseline exchanger for conceptual design of the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM). Use of CS-100 was chosen because it is considered a conservative, technologically feasible approach. During FY 96, final resin down-selection will occur for IPM Title 1 design. Alternate ion exchange materials for cesium exchange will be considered at that time. The purpose of this report is to conduct a search for commercially available ion exchange materials which could potentially replace CS-100. This report will provide where possible a comparison of these resin in their ability to remove low concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions. Materials which show promise can be studied further, while less encouraging resins can be eliminated from consideration.

Brooks, K.P.; Kim, A.Y.; Kurath, D.E.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed- Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanford’s 300 Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, WA – Hanford’s River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has met a significant cleanup challenge on the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site by removing a 1,082-ton nuclear test reactor from the 300 Area.

266

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

267

EM Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge EM Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Testing and equipment simulations ensure first-of-a-kind technological processes for sludge removal can be conducted safely and efficiently. Testing and equipment simulations ensure first-of-a-kind technological processes for sludge removal can be conducted safely and efficiently. RICHLAND, Wash. - The Richland Operations Office and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company successfully removed a portion of a highly radioactive sludge from underwater storage in a large basin adjacent to the K West reactor at the Hanford site this month. In that milestone, workers removed sludge originating from knock-out pots,

268

NETL: Gasification Systems - Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Project Number: DE-SC00008243 TDA Research, Inc. is developing a high-capacity, low-cost sorbent that removes anhydrous ammonia (NH3), mercury (Hg), and trace contaminants from coal- and coal/biomass-derived syngas. The clean-up system will be used after the bulk warm gas sulfur removal step, and remove NH3 and Hg in a regenerable manner while irreversibly capturing all other trace metals (e.g., Arsenic, Selenium) reducing their concentrations to sub parts per million (ppm) levels. Current project plans include identifying optimum chemical composition and structure that provide the best sorbent performance for removing trace contaminants, determining the effect of operating parameters, conducting multiple-cycle experiments to test the life of the sorbent for NH3 and Hg removal, and conducting a preliminary design of the sorbent reactor.

269

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

270

Sustainability Peer Educator Group Lead Positions Position: Sustainability Peer Educators Group Lead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainability Peer Educator Group Lead Positions Position: Sustainability Peer Educators Group times) Term of position: September 2013 ­ April 2014 Position Summary: Working with the Sustainability Project Coordinator, the Sustainability Peer Educator Group Leads will be responsible

Boonstra, Rudy

271

Property:LeadAgency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LeadAgency LeadAgency Jump to: navigation, search Property Name LeadAgency Property Type Page Pages using the property "LeadAgency" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 + BLM + C CA-017-05-051 + BLM + CA-170-02-15 + BLM + CA-650-2005-086 + BLM + CA-670-2010-107 + BLM + CA-670-2010-CX + BLM + CA-96062042 + United States Forest Service + D DOE-EA-1116 + United States Department of Energy + DOE-EA-1621 + United States Department of Energy + DOE-EA-1676 + United States Department of Energy + DOE-EA-1733 + United States Department of Energy + DOE-EA-1759 + United States Department of Energy + DOE-EA-1849 + United States Department of Energy + DOE-EA-1961 + United States Department of Energy +

272

Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

Lara-Curzio, Edgar (Lenoir City, TN); An, Ke (Knoxville, TX); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Contescu, Cristian I. (Knoxville, TN); Baker, Frederick S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armstrong, Beth L. (Clinton, TN)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

273

Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries  

SciTech Connect

A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O; Dudney, Nancy J; Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Armstrong, Beth L

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

274

INEEL Lead Recycling in a Moratorium Environment  

SciTech Connect

Since 1999, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Lead Project successfully recycled over 700,000 pounds of excess INEEL lead to the private sector. On February 14, 2000, the Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, formalized the January 12, 2000, moratorium on recycling radioactive scrap metal that prevented the unrestricted release of recycled scrap metals to the private sector. This moratorium created significant problems for the INEEL lead recycling program and associated plans; however, through the cooperative efforts of the INEEL and Idaho State University as well as innovative planning and creative thinking the recycling issues were resolved. This collaboration has recycled over 160,000 pounds of excess lead to Idaho State University with a cost savings of over $.5M.

Kooda, K. E.; Galloway, K.; McCray, C. W.; Aitken, D. W.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

275

INEEL Lead Recycling in a Moratorium Environment  

SciTech Connect

Since 1999, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Lead Project successfully recycled over 700,000 pounds of excess INEEL lead to the private sector. On February 14, 2000, the Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, formalized the January 12, 2000, moratorium on recycling radioactive scrap metal that prevented the unrestricted release of recycled scrap metals to the private sector. This moratorium created significant problems for the INEEL lead recycling program and associated plans; however, through the cooperative efforts of the INEEL and Idaho State University as well as innovative planning and creative thinking the recycling issues were resolved. This collaboration has recycled over 160,000 pounds of excess lead to Idaho State University with a cost savings of over $.5M.

Kooda, Kevin Evan; Mc Cray, Casey William; Aitken, Darren William; Galloway, Kelly

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Richard Gerber! NERSC! User Services Group Lead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group Lead Debugging and Optimization Tools Thanks t o W oo---Sun Y ang a nd H elen H e Outline * Take---Aways * Debugging * Performance O p:miza:on * NERSC " automa:c" t ools...

277

Primer on lead-acid storage batteries  

SciTech Connect

This handbook was developed to help DOE facility contractors prevent accidents caused during operation and maintenance of lead-acid storage batteries. Major types of lead-acid storage batteries are discussed as well as their operation, application, selection, maintenance, and disposal (storage, transportation, as well). Safety hazards and precautions are discussed in the section on battery maintenance. References to industry standards are included for selection, maintenance, and disposal.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Removal Sorbents for High Temperature Gas Streams Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,767,000 entitled "Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a unique regenerable sorbent process that can remove contaminants from gas produced by the gasification of fossil fuels. Specifically, the process removes hydrogen chloride by using the regenerable sorbent and simultaneously extracts hydrogen chloride compounds and hydrogen

279

Categorical Exclusion 4566, Ash Removal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOrnI FOrnI Project Title: Ash Removal Project (4566) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is to split, containerize, package, transport and disposition one hundred and two (102) cans of mixed waste. General Administration/Management OA I - Routine business actions OA2 * Administrative contract amendments OA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations OA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect OA6 - Procedural rule makings upgrade OA 7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged OA8 . Award of technical supportlM&O/personal service contracts OA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training OA 10 - Reports on non-DOE legislation OA II -

280

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

SciTech Connect

This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Removing sulphur oxides from a fluid stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing sulphur oxides from a fluid stream, such as flue gas, comprising: providing a non-aqueous absorption liquid containing at least one hydrophobic amine, the liquid being incompletely miscible with water; treating the fluid stream in an absorption zone with the non-aqueous absorption liquid to transfer at least part of the sulphur oxides into the non-aqueous absorption liquid and to form a sulphur oxide-hydrophobic amine-complex; causing the non-aqueous absorption liquid to be in liquid-liquid contact with an aqueous liquid whereby at least part of the sulphur oxide-hydrophobic amine-complex is hydrolyzed to release the hydrophobic amine and sulphurous hydrolysis products, and at least part of the sulphurous hydrolysis products is transferred into the aqueous liquid; separating the aqueous liquid from the non-aqueous absorption liquid. The process mitigates absorbent degradation problems caused by sulphur dioxide and oxygen in flue gas.

Katz, Torsten; Riemann, Christian; Bartling, Karsten; Rigby, Sean Taylor; Coleman, Luke James Ivor; Lail, Marty Alan

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

282

Feasibility study for early removal of HEU from CPP-651-Phase II  

SciTech Connect

A two-phase feasibility study was initiated in late 1996 to identify a way to expedite the removal of SNM from the CPP-651 vault. The first phase of this study provided preliminary information that appeared promising, but needed additional detailed planning and evaluate to validate the concepts and conclusions. The focus of Phase 2 was to provide the validation via resource-loaded schedules and more detailed cost estimates. Section 1 describes the purpose and objectives of the Phase 2 tasks and the programmatic drivers that influence related CPP-651 high-enriched uranium (HEU) management issues. Section 2 identifies the evaluation criteria and methodology and the transfer issues and barriers preventing shipment. Section 3 provides site-specific background information for the CPP-651 facility and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and describes the development of the basic material removal schedule, the proposed base case plan for removal of SNM, and the proposed HEU material management/shipping issues and strategies. Section 4 identifies the proposed options for accelerated removal of SNM and how they were evaluated via detailed scheduling, resource histograms, and cost analysis. Section 5 summarizes principal tasks for implementing this plan and other related HEU CPP-651 management issues that require continued planning efforts to assure successful implementation of this proposed early removal strategy.

Smith, C.V.; Henry, R.; Milligan, C.; Harmon, B.; Peterson, J.; Thom, M.A.; Campbell, R.; Hendrix, B.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Occurrence of pharmaceuticals in a municipal wastewater treatment plant: Mass balance and removal processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Occurrence and removal efficiencies of fifteen pharmaceuticals were investigated in a conventional municipal wastewater treatment plant in Michigan. Concentrations of these pharmaceuticals were determined in both wastewater and sludge phases by a high-performance liquid chromatograph coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer. Detailed mass balance analysis was conducted during the whole treatment process to evaluate the contributing processes for pharmaceutical removal. Among the pharmaceuticals studied, demeclocycline, sulfamerazine, erythromycin and tylosin were not detected in the wastewater treatment plant influent. Other target pharmaceuticals detected in wastewater were also found in the corresponding sludge phase. The removal efficiencies of chlortetracycline, tetracycline, sulfamerazine, acetaminophen and caffeine were >99%, while doxycycline, oxytetracycline, sulfadiazine and lincomycin exhibited relatively lower removal efficiencies (e.g., mass, i.e. 41% more than the input from the influent. Based on the mass balance analysis, biotransformation is believed to be the predominant process responsible for the removal of pharmaceuticals (22% to 99%), whereas contribution of sorption to sludge was relatively insignificant (7%) for the investigated pharmaceuticals.

Pin Gao; Yunjie Ding; Hui Li; Irene Xagoraraki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Slang characterization and removal using pulse detonation technology during coal gasification  

SciTech Connect

Boiler slagging and fouling as a result of inorganic impurities in combustion gases being deposited on heat transfer tubes have caused severe problems in coal-fired power plant operation. These problems are fuel, system design, and operating condition dependent. Pulse detonation technology for the purpose of removing slag and fouling deposits in coal-fired utility power plant boilers offers great potential. The detonation wave technique based on high impact velocity with sufficient energy and thermal shock on the slag deposited on gas contact surfaces offers a convenient, inexpensive, yet efficient and effective way to supplement existing slag removal methods. These detonation waves have been demonstrated experimentally to have exceptionally high shearing capability important to the task of removing slag and fouling deposits. The experimental results show that the single shot detonation wave is capable of removing the entire slag (types of slag deposited on economizer) even at a distance of 8 in. from the exit of a detonation engine tube. Wave strength and slag orientation also have different effects on the chipping off of the slag. This paper discusses about the results obtained in effectively removing the economizer slag.

Huque, Z.; Mei, D.; Biney, P.O.; Zhou, J.

1997-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

285

Electrically Controlled Anion Exchange Based on Polypyrrole and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controlled Anion Exchange Based on Polypyrrole and Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposite for Perchlorate Removal . Electrically Controlled Anion Exchange Based on Polypyrrole and Carbon...

286

The cultural parameters of lead poisoning: A medical anthropologist's view of intervention in environmental lead exposure  

SciTech Connect

This article identifies four culturally shaped sources of lead exposure in human societies: modern and historic technological sources; food habits; culturally defined health beliefs; and beauty practices. Examples of these potential sources of lead poisoning are presented from current cultures. They include the use of lead-glazed cooking pottery in Mexican-American households; folk medical use of lead in Hispanic, Arabic, South Asian, Chinese, and Hmong communities; as well as the use of lead as a cosmetic in the Near East, Southeast Asia, and South Asia. Four interacting cultural conditions that create barriers to the reduction of lead exposure and lead poisoning are identified and discussed. These are knowledge deficiencies, communication resistance, cultural reinterpretations, and incongruity of explanatory models.

Trotter, R.T. II (Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Sandia National Laboratories: Due Diligence on Lead Acid Battery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Due Diligence on Lead Acid Battery Recycling March 23, 2011 Lead Acid Batteries on secondary containment pallet Lead Acid Batteries on secondary containment pallet In 2004, the US...

288

Application and Removal of Strippable Coatings via Remote Platform - 13133  

SciTech Connect

Florida International University's (FIU's) Applied Research Center is currently supporting the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office of D and D and Facility Engineering program. FIU is supporting DOE's initiative to improve safety, reduce technical risks, and limit uncertainty within D and D operations by identifying technologies suitable to meet specific facility D and D requirements, assessing the readiness of those technologies for field deployment, and conducting feasibility studies and technology demonstrations of selected technologies and working with technology vendors to optimize the design of their current technologies to accomplish dangerous and demanding tasks during D and D operations. To meet one identified technology gap challenge for a technology to remotely apply strippable coatings, fixatives and decontamination gels, FIU identified and performed an initial demonstration of an innovative remote fixative sprayer platform from International Climbing Machines (ICM). The selected technology was demonstrated spraying fixative products at the hot cell mockup facility at the Applied Research Center at FIU in November 2008 under cold (non-radioactive) conditions. The remotely controlled platform was remotely operated and entered the facility and sprayed a fixative onto horizontal and vertical surfaces. Based on the initial FIU demonstration and the specific technical requirements identified at the DOE facilities, a follow-up demonstration was expanded to include strippable coatings and a decontamination gel, which was demonstrated in June 2010 at the ICM facility in Ithaca, NY. This second technology evaluation documented the ability of the remote system to spray the selected products on vertical stainless steel and concrete surfaces to a height of 3 meters (10 feet) and to achieve sufficient coverage and product thickness to promote the ability to peel/remove the strippable coatings and decontamination gel. The next challenge was to determine if a remote platform could be used to remove the strippable coatings and decontamination gels. In 2012, FIU worked with the technology provider, ICM, to conduct feasibility and trade studies to identify the requirements for the remote removal of strippable coatings or decontamination gels using the existing remote controlled platform. (authors)

Shoffner, P.; Lagos, L. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)] [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Maggio, S. [International Climbing Machine, 630 Elmira Road, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)] [International Climbing Machine, 630 Elmira Road, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

FLOWSHEET FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM SLUDGE BATCH 6  

SciTech Connect

Samples of Tank 12 sludge slurry show a substantially larger fraction of aluminum than originally identified in sludge batch planning. The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to formulate Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with about one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 12 and one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 4. LWO identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days and dissolved nearly 80% of the aluminum in the sludge slurry. In 2008, LWO successfully dissolved 64% of the aluminum at approximately 60 C in 46 days with minimal tank modifications and using only slurry pumps as a heat source. This report establishes the technical basis and flowsheet for performing an aluminum removal process in Tank 51 for SB6 that incorporates the lessons learned from previous aluminum dissolution evolutions. For SB6, aluminum dissolution process temperature will be held at a minimum of 65 C for at least 24 days, but as long as practical or until as much as 80% of the aluminum is dissolved. As planned, an aluminum removal process can reduce the aluminum in SB6 from about 84,500 kg to as little as 17,900 kg with a corresponding reduction of total insoluble solids in the batch from 246,000 kg to 131,000 kg. The extent of the reduction may be limited by the time available to maintain Tank 51 at dissolution temperature. The range of dissolution in four weeks based on the known variability in dissolution kinetics can range from 44 to more than 80%. At 44% of the aluminum dissolved, the mass reduction is approximately 1/2 of the mass noted above, i.e., 33,300 kg of aluminum instead of 66,600 kg. Planning to reach 80% of the aluminum dissolved should allow a maximum of 81 days for dissolution and reduce the allowance if test data shows faster kinetics. 47,800 kg of the dissolved aluminum will be stored in Tank 8 and 21,000 kg will be stored in saltcake via evaporation. Up to 77% of the total aluminum planned for SB6 may be removed via aluminum dissolution. Storage of the aluminum-laden supernate in Tank 8 will require routine evaluation of the free hydroxide concentration in order to maintain aluminum in solution. Periodic evaluation will be established on concurrent frequency with corrosion program samples as previously established for aluminum-laden supernate from SB5 that is stored in Tank 11.

Pike, J; Jeffrey Gillam, J

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

Generalized watermarking attack based on watermark estimation and perceptual remodulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on a stochastic formulation of the watermark removal problem, considering the embedded watermark as additive noise image statistics to perform the best watermark removal or damage. The proposed attack is based and partial removal by a filtering based on a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) approach; b) watermark alteration

Genève, Université de

291

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and

292

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL’s greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A.

293

NETL: News Release - Innovative Mercury Removal Technique Shows Early  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 5, 2003 August 5, 2003 Innovative Mercury Removal Technique Shows Early Promise Photochemical Process Developed in Federal Lab Removes Mercury from Flue Gas - NETL scientist Evan Granite prepares a lab test of the UV mercury removal process. - NETL scientist Evan Granite prepares for a lab test of the UV mercury removal process. MORGANTOWN, WV - A promising technology to remove mercury from coal-fired power plants -- dubbed the "GP-254 Process" -- has been developed and is currently being tested at the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Newly patented, the GP-254 Process enhances mercury removal using ultraviolet light to induce various components of power plant stack gas to react with the mercury, and changes the

294

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL’s greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A.

295

NERSC seeks Computational Systems Group Lead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

seeks Computational Systems Group Lead seeks Computational Systems Group Lead NERSC seeks Computational Systems Group Lead January 6, 2011 by Katie Antypas Note: This position is now closed. The Computational Systems Group provides production support and advanced development for the supercomputer systems at NERSC. Manage the Computational Systems Group (CSG) which provides production support and advanced development for the supercomputer systems at NERSC (National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center). These systems, which include the second fastest supercomputer in the U.S., provide 24x7 computational services for open (unclassified) science to world-wide researchers supported by DOE's Office of Science. Duties/Responsibilities Manage the Computational Systems Group's staff of approximately 10

296

Leading By Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leading By Example Leading By Example Leading By Example November 3, 2011 - 3:08pm Addthis New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department’s headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department's headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department Brian Costlow Director, Office of Administration Brian Costlow has won several awards for his work recently, including the Federal Energy and Water Management Award and the Energy Department Energy Management Award for Exceptional Service for his efforts to make the Department's headquarter buildings models of sustainability. Every day, employees across the Energy Department work to make America more

297

Leading By Example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leading By Example Leading By Example Leading By Example November 3, 2011 - 3:08pm Addthis New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department’s headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department New cool roofs installed on the Energy Department's headquarters building in Washington DC in November, 2010. | Image credit Quentin Kruger, Energy Department Brian Costlow Director, Office of Administration Brian Costlow has won several awards for his work recently, including the Federal Energy and Water Management Award and the Energy Department Energy Management Award for Exceptional Service for his efforts to make the Department's headquarter buildings models of sustainability. Every day, employees across the Energy Department work to make America more

298

Leading Teams and Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leading Teams and Projects Leading Teams and Projects Leading Teams and Projects February 18, 2014 8:30AM EST to February 19, 2014 4:00PM EST Registration Procedure: Please use the Corporate Human Resource Information System (CHRIS) Workflow process to request training enrollment. Session: 002487 Course Code: 0001. Cost $400. For organizations not currently using the CHRIS workflow process, please follow your existing interoffice training registration process. The Office of Learning and Workforce Development (HC-20) will assess the course cost for this training session directly through each Headquarters organization's Working Capital Fund account. Field office participants should register via CHRIS. They should ensure to note the cost of the training course in the tuition field of the training request.

299

Leading Edge Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leading Edge Technologies Inc Leading Edge Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Leading Edge Technologies Inc Place Lakeland, Florida Product Profitable manufacturer of lithium ion batteries for consumer electronics makers that merged with Skylab Technologies Group Inc in September 2001 to form Solicore. Coordinates 35.264796°, -89.724114° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.264796,"lon":-89.724114,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

300

Thiacrown polymers for removal of mercury from waste streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thiacrown polymers immobilized to a polystyrene-divinylbenzene matrix react with Hg.sup.2+ under a variety of conditions to efficiently and selectively remove Hg.sup.2+ ions from acidic aqueous solutions, even in the presence of a variety of other metal ions. The mercury can be recovered and the polymer regenerated. This mercury removal method has utility in the treatment of industrial wastewater, where a selective and cost-effective removal process is required.

Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA); Fox, Glenn A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

302

Surreptitious Lead Exposure from an Asian Indian Medication  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......case-report Case Report Surreptitious Lead Exposure from an...during routine biological monitoring for lead exposure conducted...the general public. Surreptitious lead exposure from an...during routine biological monitoring for lead exposure conducted......

Leon A. Saryan

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

304

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

305

EGR Cooler Fouling- Visualization of Deposition and Removal Mechanis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presents experimental data on exhaust gas recirculation(EGR) cooler fouling using new test apparatus that allows for in-situ observation of deposition and removal processes

306

Method of removal of sulfur from coal and petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the removal of sulfur from sulfur-bearing materials such as coal and petroleum products using organophosphine and organophosphite compounds is provided.

Verkade, John G. (Ames, IA); Mohan, Thyagarajan (Ames, IA); Angelici, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

REMOVAL OF THE CALIFORNIUM SOURCES FROM THE 222-S LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

This document develops a proposal for removal of 2-Californium sources from the 222-S Laboratory. Included in this document are assessments of shipping packages and decay calculations.

LINSTRUM D; BAUNE HL

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

308

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Heavy metals removal from oil sludge using ion exchange textiles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this research, ion exchange textiles were used for the first time for the removal of heavy metals from oil sludge. The target metals which… (more)

Muslat, Ziyad

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Searching West Virginia for a Democratic Response to Mountaintop Removal.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mountaintop removal is an aggressive form of strip mining practiced almost exclusively in Central Appalachia, and since 1977 has been regulated by state and federal… (more)

Darrow, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Y-12 Removes Nuclear Materials from Two Facilities to Reduce...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removes Nuclear Materials from Two Facilities to Reduce Site's Nuclear Footprint (Alpha 5 and 9720-38 No Longer Designated as Nuclear Facilities) | National Nuclear Security...

312

Performance evaluation of organic emulsion liquid membrane on phenol removal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The percentage removal of phenol from aqueous solution by emulsion liquid membrane and emulsion leakage was investigated experimentally for various parameters such as membrane:internal phase ratio, membrane:external phase ratio, emulsification speed, emulsification time, carrier concentration, surfactant concentration and internal agent concentration. These parameters strongly influence the percentage removal of phenol and emulsion leakage. Under optimum membrane properties, the percentage removal of phenol was as high as 98.33%, with emulsion leakage of 1.25%. It was also found that the necessity of carrier for enhancing phenol removal was strongly dependent on the internal agent concentration.

Ng, Y S; Hashim, M A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Phosphorus Removal and Recovery from Wastewater using Magnetite.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The aim of this work was to study the possibilities of using magnetite for phosphorus removal and recovery from wastewater. It was also aimed… (more)

Panasiuk, Oleksander

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

SEPARATION OF HEAVY METALS: REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

a two- or three-stage operation to remove the metals and 0il sepcrately). ComplexationSequestration Complexation involves the formation of a complex or chelating agent....

315

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

316

Study of Alternative Approaches for Transite Panel Removal |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(BJC) assembled an experienced team from both sites to evaluate both the manual and mechanical methods of transite panel removal. Study of Alternative Approaches for Transite...

317

Widget:RemovePDFImageDimensions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from PDF images. This is a temporary measure until PdfHandler extension properly gets landscapeportrait dimensions from PDF files. Usage: Widget:RemovePDFImageDimensions...

318

Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium by Means of Soil Vapor Extraction Enhanced by Desiccation and Water Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium...

319

Removal of carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium by means of soil vapor extraction enhanced by desiccation and water Removal of carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium...

320

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Heavy metal removal and recovery using microorganisms  

SciTech Connect

Microorganisms -- bacteria, fungi, and microalgae -- can accumulate relatively large amounts of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from the environment. These organisms often exhibit specificity for particular metals. The metal content of microbial biomass can be a substantial fraction of total dry weight with concentration factors (metal in dry biomass to metal in solution) exceeding one million in some cases. Both living and inert (dead) microbial biomass can be used to reduce heavy metal concentrations in contaminated waters to very low levels -- parts per billion and even lower. In many respects (e.g. specificity, residual metal concentrations, accumulation factors, and economics) microbial bioremoval processes can be superior to conventional processes, such as ion exchange and caustic (lime or hydroxide) precipitation for heavy metals removal from waste and contaminated waters. Thus, bioremoval could be developed to contribute to the clean-up of wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other DOE facilities. However, the potential advantages of bioremoval processes must still be developed into practical operating systems. A detailed review of the literature suggests that appropriate bioremoval processes could be developed for the SRS. There is great variability from one biomass source to another in bioremoval capabilities. Bioremoval is affected by pH, other ions, temperature, and many other factors. The biological (living vs. dead) and physical (immobilized vs. dispersed) characteristics of the biomass also greatly affect metal binding. Even subtle differences in the microbial biomass, such as the conditions under which it was cultivated, can have major effects on heavy metal binding.

Wilde, E.W. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Benemann, J.R. (Benemann (J.R.), Pinole, CA (United States))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The washability of lignites for clay removal  

SciTech Connect

In the washability research of the Seyitomer Lignites (Kutahya-Turkey), with lower calorific value (1,863 kcal/kg) and high ash content (51.91%), by heavy medium separation, it was found out that middling clay in the coal had an effect to change the medium density. To prevent this problem, a trommel sieve with 18 and 5 mm aperture diameter was designed, and the clay in the coal was tried to be removed using it before the coal was released to heavy medium. Following that, the obtained coal in -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm fractions was subjected to sink and float test having 1.4 gcm{sup -3} and 1.7 gcm{sup -3} medium densities (-5 mm fraction will be evaluated in a separate work). Depending on the raw coal, with the floating of -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm size fraction in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} medium density, clean coal with 60.10% combustible matter recovery, 19.12% ash, and 3,150 kcal/kg was obtained. Also floating of the samples sinking in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} in the medium density (1.7 gcm{sup -3}), middling with 18.70% combustible matter recovery, 41.93% ash, 2,150 kcal/kg, and tailing having 78.31% ash were obtained.

Oteyaka, B.; Yamik, A.; Ucar, A.; Sahbaz, O.; Demir, U. [Dumlupinar University, Kutahya (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Metagenomic analysis of phosphorus removing sludgecommunities  

SciTech Connect

Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) is not wellunderstood at the metabolic level despite being one of the best-studiedmicrobially-mediated industrial processes due to its ecological andeconomic relevance. Here we present a metagenomic analysis of twolab-scale EBPR sludges dominated by the uncultured bacterium, "CandidatusAccumulibacter phosphatis." This analysis resolves several controversiesin EBPR metabolic models and provides hypotheses explaining the dominanceof A. phosphatis in this habitat, its lifestyle outside EBPR and probablecultivation requirements. Comparison of the same species from differentEBPR sludges highlights recent evolutionary dynamics in the A. phosphatisgenome that could be linked to mechanisms for environmental adaptation.In spite of an apparent lack of phylogenetic overlap in the flankingcommunities of the two sludges studied, common functional themes werefound, at least one of them complementary to the inferred metabolism ofthe dominant organism. The present study provides a much-needed blueprintfor a systems-level understanding of EBPR and illustrates thatmetagenomics enables detailed, often novel, insights into evenwell-studied biological systems.

Garcia Martin, Hector; Ivanova, Natalia; Kunin, Victor; Warnecke,Falk; Barry, Kerrie; McHardy, Alice C.; Yeates, Christine; He, Shaomei; Salamov, Asaf; Szeto, Ernest; Dalin, Eileen; Putnam, Nik; Shapiro, HarrisJ.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Blackall, Linda Louise; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Separation of heavy metals: Removal from industrial wastewaters and contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the applicable separation technologies relating to removal of heavy metals from solution and from soils in order to present the state-of-the-art in the field. Each technology is briefly described and typical operating conditions and technology performance are presented. Technologies described include chemical precipitation (including hydroxide, carbonate, or sulfide reagents), coagulation/flocculation, ion exchange, solvent extraction, extraction with chelating agents, complexation, electrochemical operation, cementation, membrane operations, evaporation, adsorption, solidification/stabilization, and vitrification. Several case histories are described, with a focus on waste reduction techniques and remediation of lead-contaminated soils. The paper concludes with a short discussion of important research needs in the field.

Peters, R.W.; Shem, L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Removal of nitrogen and sulfur from oil-shale  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for enhancing the removal of nitrogen and sulfur from oil-shale. The process consists of: (a) contacting the oil-shale with a sufficient amount of an aqueous base solution comprised of at least a stoichiometric amount of one or more alkali metal or alkaline-earth metal hydroxides based on the total amount of nitrogen and sulfur present in the oil-shale. Also necessary is an amount sufficient to form a two-phase liquid, solid system, a temperature from about 50/sup 0/C to about 350/sup 0/C., and pressures sufficient to maintain the solution in liquid form; (b) separating the effluents from the treated oil-shale, wherein the resulting liquid effluent contains nitrogen moieties and sulfur moieties from the oil-shale and any resulting gaseous effluent contains nitrogen moieties from the oil-shale, and (c) converting organic material of the treated oil-shale to shale-oil at a temperature from about 450/sup 0/C to about 550/sup 0/C.

Olmstead, W.N.

1986-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

327

INVESTIGATION OF MIXED METAL SORBENT/CATALYSTS FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS REMOVAL OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN OXIDES  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4}-air mixtures.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

328

INVESTIGATION OF MIXED METAL SORBENT/CATALYSTS FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS REMOVAL OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN OXIDES  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded research of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4} air mixtures.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

Investigation of mixed metal sorbent/catalysts for the simultaneous removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4}-air mixtures.

Akyurtlu, A.; Akyurtlu, J.F.

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

tHe LeAdING MBA IN JAPAN Japan's Leading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tHe LeAdING MBA IN JAPAN MBA Japan #12;Japan's Leading Master of Business adMinistration prograM the mcgill mBa JaPan Program, oFFered By mcgill University's desaUtels FacUlty oF management, is the leading mBa Program in JaPan. the two-weekends-Per-month Format allows stUdents to comPlete a FUll, to

Shoubridge, Eric

331

Archaeological Lead Findings in the Ukraine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In June?August 2006 an expedition with the aim to look for low?radioactive archaeological lead at the bottom of the Black Sea near the Crimean peninsula (Ukraine) was organised by a Korean?Ukrainian collaboration. The first samples with ?0.2 tons of total mass were found at a depth of 28 m among the relics of an ancient Greek ship. Their age has been dated to the first century B.C. This lead was used as ballast in the keel of the ship. The element composition of the samples was measured by means of X?ray fluorescence and ICP?MS analyses. The first preliminary limits on the 210 Pb contamination of the samples are less than a few hundreds mBq/kg. The measurements were performed using gamma spectroscopy with HPGe?detectors and alpha spectroscopy with commercial ??detectors. Measurements of 40K Th/U in the lead samples were undertaken in Kiev and in the underground laboratories of the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS Italy). If it was found to be radio?clean this lead could be used as high efficiency shield for ultra low?level detectors and as raw material for growing radio?pure scintillation crystals such as PbMoO4 or PbWO4 for the search for rare processes.

F. A. Danevich; S. K. Kim; H. J. Kim; A. B. Kostezh; V. V. Kobychev; B. N. Kropivyansky; M. Laubenstein; V. M. Mokina; S. S. Nagorny; A. S. Nikolaiko; S. Nisi; D. V. Poda; V. I. Tretyak; S. A. Voronov

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Quality Support G. Q. Kirk, Lead (4)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quality Support G. Q. Kirk, Lead (4) R. L. Bullock (4) A. C. Hendricks (4) G. H. Henkel (4) D. L) Quality Systems and Services Division February 11, 2011 Operations Analysis E. L. Griffis L. R. Brown. Kendrick M. O. Williams Maintenance Engineering L. W. Burkle III G. L. Christensen R. A. Evans R. E. Galyon

333

The Commonwealth's Leading College of Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into an unsafe urban environment to collect data. Virginia Tech's College Of Engineering #12;College and responsibility lies before the College to advance engineering curricula that will educate the engineerThe Commonwealth's Leading College of Engineering is at Virginia Tech Faculty Expertise Guide 2010

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

334

Lead toxicity, vulnerable subpopulations and emergency preparedness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality-health endpoints for which the elderly...over the past 30 y, potential health risks from environmental Pb...mortality study. Environ. Health Perspect (2006) 114:1538-1541...cadmium, cobalt and lead as more dangerous than hitherto expected. Carcinogenesis......

Norm Healey

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Felix Wrsten ETH Zurich enjoys a leading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Felix Würsten ETH Zurich enjoys a leading position in the quantum sciences. The Executive Board now research in this area. "ETH Zurich has secured it- self a good starting position and now wishes to use physics will become the tool of the engineer." Fundamental development Together with the ETH Zurich Foun

Leonardo, Degiorgi

336

Observing Nucleon Decay in Lead Perchlorate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead perchlorate, part of the OMNIS supernova neutrino detector, contains two nuclei, 208Pb and 35Cl, that might be used to study nucleon decay. Both would produce signatures that will make them especially useful for studying less-well-studied neutron decay modes, e.g., those in which only neutrinos are emitted.

R. N. Boyd; T. Rauscher; S. D. Reitzner; P. Vogel

2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

337

Author's personal copy Pyrolytic temperatures impact lead sorption mechanisms by bagasse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Author's personal copy Pyrolytic temperatures impact lead sorption mechanisms by bagasse biochars mechanisms were invested based on isotherm and kinetic models, sorption and desorption, and FITR spectroscopy Lead Bagasse biochar Sorption kinetics Functional groups a b s t r a c t The characteristics

Ma, Lena

338

Non-Linear 12-Lead ECG Synthesis from Two Intracardiac Recordings A Kachenoura1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-Linear 12-Lead ECG Synthesis from Two Intracardiac Recordings A Kachenoura1,2 , F Por´ee1,2 , G-up of patients with implantable cardiac devices. To do so, two methods to synthesize 12-lead ECG from two in surface ECG. The indirect method is based on a preliminary or- thogonalization phase of ECG and EGM

Boyer, Edmond

339

A comparison of biologically active filters for the removal of ozone by-products, turbidity, and particles  

SciTech Connect

Biofiltration tests were performed at the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California`s 5.5-mgd (21,000 m{sup 3}d) demonstration plant using two 400 ft{sup 2} (37 m{sup 2}) anthracite/sand filters and a 6 ft{sup 2} (0.56 m{sup 2}) granular activated carbon (GAC)/sand filter operated in parallel. The empty-bed contact time (EBCT) within the GAC and anthracite ranged from 2.1-3.1 min. The filters were evaluated based on (1) conventional filtration performance (turbidity, particle removal, and headloss); (2) removal of biodegradable ozone by-products (assimilable organic carbon [AOC], aldehydes, and aldoketoacids) after startup; (3) removal of biodegradable ozone by-products at steady state; and (4) resistance to short-term process upsets such as intermittent chlorination or filter out-of-service time. Approximately 80 percent formaldehyde removal was achieved by the anthracite/sand filter operated at a 2.1-min EBCT (6 gpm/ft{sup 2} [15 m/h]) within 8 days of ozone operation. The GAC/sand filter operated at the same rate achieved 80 percent removal within 1 day, possibly as an additive effect of adsorption and biological removal. In-depth aldehyde monitoring at four depths (0.5-min EBCT intervals) provided additional insight into the removal kinetics. During periods of warmer water temperature, from 20 to 48 percent of the AOC was removed in the flocculation/sedimentation basins by 40-75 percent. This percentage removal typically resulted in AOC concentrations within 40 {mu}g C/L of the raw, unozonated water levels.

Coffey, B.M.; Krasner, S.W.; Sclimenti, M.J.; Hacker, P.A.; Gramith, J.T. [Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, La Verne, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger: Preliminary test plan for Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants -- while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of addressing the emission of S0{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase 1 and Phase 2 requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The Task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variables than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The data from these tests greatly expands the IFGT performance database for coals and is needed for the technology to progress from the component engineering phase to system integration and commercialization. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides a preliminary test plan for all of the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.

Jankura, B.J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Superstructure Optimization: Reaction Yield Dependent CO2 Removal from OCM Product Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The oxidative coupling of methane presents an alternative for the production of ethene as opposed to the standard steam cracking of crude oil. A drawback of the reaction is the byproduct creation of CO2. Due to economic reasons, CO2 needs to be removed from the product gas efficiently, while keeping the ethene loss below 5%. Therefore, an overall assessment of the reaction and gas purification section of an OCM process is required. In the past, experiments have shown that a combination of various gas separation membranes with an absorption-desorption process leads to efficient hybrid separation processes. In this contribution, superstructure optimization of the separation section is performed combining various gas separation membranes (in type and number) with an absorption-desorption process and using different input values of CO2 and ethene concentrations leading to a significant energy reduction compared to standard absorption processes.

Christian Bock; Erik Esche; David Müller; Günter Wozny

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

CBER-DETR Nevada Coincident and Leading Employment Leading Index Hits Bump in the Road  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the seasonally adjusted data reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Nevada Coincident Employment IndexCBER-DETR Nevada Coincident and Leading Employment Indexes1 Leading Index Hits Bump in the Road The Nevada Coincident Employment Index measures the ups and downs of the Nevada economy using an index

Ahmad, Sajjad

343

CBER-DETR Nevada Coincident and Leading Employment Coincident Index Rises, Leading Index Pauses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the seasonally adjusted data reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Nevada Coincident Employment IndexCBER-DETR Nevada Coincident and Leading Employment Indexes1 Coincident Index Rises, Leading Index Pauses The Nevada Coincident Employment Index measures the ups and downs of the Nevada economy using

Ahmad, Sajjad

344

Efficient Node Overlap Removal Using a Proximity Stress Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient Node Overlap Removal Using a Proximity Stress Model Emden R. Gansner and Yifan Hu AT the structural information inherent in a layout using little additional area. This paper presents a new node overlap removal algorithm that does well by these measures. 1 Introduction Most existing symmetric graph

Hu, Yifan

345

Microsoft PowerPoint - DOE Tank Removal Study Vinces presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sketch Deep Soil Excavation Page 3-3 of RPP-RPT-47167 Soil removal to 5 feet below tanks Soil removal to 5 feet below tanks 5 5 19,700 Ci Cs 137 5 feet below tank 25,100 Ci Cs...

346

Removal of heavy metals from samples of residual sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitric acid leaching processes were evaluated for removal of heavy metals from samples of residual sludge from an industrial and municipal wastewater plant. The study showed that an acid:water ratio of 1:1 and a nitric acid concentration of 2 mol 1?1 gave efficient removal of 86.7%, 100% and 100% of copper, nickel and arsenic.

Jose Abrego

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Removal of residual particulate matter from filter media  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing residual filter cakes that remain adhered to a filter after typical particulate removal methodologies have been employed, such as pulse-jet filter element cleaning, for all cleanable filters used for air pollution control, dust control, or powder control.

Almlie, Jay C; Miller, Stanley J

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

348

Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 31513160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 3151­3160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters P. Zhao, J.A. Siegel�, R May 2006; accepted 14 June 2006 Abstract Residential and commercial HVAC filters that have been loaded of the relative importance of HVAC filters as a removal mechanism for ozone in residential and commercial

Siegel, Jeffrey

349

Aluminum Removal from Photographic Waste Submitted to Dr. Tony Bi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aluminum Removal from Photographic Waste Submitted to Dr. Tony Bi By: Kristen Favel, Tiffany Jung, and Kenny Tam CHBE 484 University of British Columbia April 15, 2009 #12;ii "Aluminum Removal from photographic waste has shown elevated levels of aluminum in the fixer, which exceed sewer discharge standards

350

Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment S. Marsili wastewater is too low, full denitrification is difficult to obtain and an additional source of organic carbon predictive control; wastewater treatment plant Introduction The problem of improving the nitrogen removal

351

Continuous cryopump with a method for removal of solidified gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved cryopump for the removal of gases from a high vacuum, comprising a cryopanel incorporating honeycomb structure, refrigerant means thermally connected to the cryopanel, and a rotatable channel moving azimuthally around an axis located near the center of the cryopanel, removing gases adsorbed within the honeycomb structure by subliming them and conducting them outside the vacuum vessel. 4 figs.

Carlson, L.W.; Herman, H.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

352

Hydrodynamic effects of leading-edge tubercles on control surfaces and in flapping foil propulsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the hydrodynamic effects of biologically-inspired leading-edge tubercles. Two complementary studies examine the performance of three-dimensional hydrofoils based on the pectoral flippers of the ...

Stanway, Michael Jordan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Lead contamination in soil and groundwater in and around a lead processing industry: a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental pollution is of major concern across the world, which is affected by a variety of contaminants. Lead is one of the major heavy metals used in industrial activity. Unscientific handling and disposal of lead bearing residues or lead waste has led to contamination of the surrounding soil and water environment. A detailed investigation of soil and groundwater was carried out in and around a selected lead processing industry located in a designated industrial area in Bangalore, India. The results of the investigations carried out indicated that there is no groundwater contamination, but lead concentration in top soil is found to exceed the prescribed standard limits at many places within the industrial premises. Considering the site condition and extent of contamination ex-situ remediation can be considered as the feasible remedial option.

A. Ramesh; P.V. Sivapullaiah; H. Lakshmi Kantha; B.S. Nangendra Prakesh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Savannah River Site this month after they safely removed its rusty, orange, 75-foot-tall dome. With the help of a 660-ton crane and lifting lugs, the workers pulled the 174,000-pound dome off the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, capping more than 16 months of preparations. Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

355

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet Mar 26, 2012 At the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit, the United States, Mexico and Canada announced the successful removal of HEU from Mexico and conversion of the

356

Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic Components Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic Components The invention is a combination of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic Components The invention is a combination of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier which can be used to contact substrates for electronic parts such as semiconductor wafers or chips to remove photoresist materials which are applied to the substrates during manufacture of the electronic parts. The dense phase fluid modifier is one

357

Advanced Research: Innovation Leading to Successes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research: Innovation Leading to Research: Innovation Leading to Successes Exploring the "Grand Challenges" of Fossil Fuels December 2010 3 Exploring the "Grand Challenges" of Fossil Fuels NETL Advanced Research The Advanced Research (AR) Program within the Office of Coal and Power Systems of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the research arm of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE), fosters the development of innovative, cost-effective technologies for improving the efficiency, reliability, and environmental performance of advanced coal and power systems. In addition, AR bridges the gap between fundamental research into technology alternatives and applied research aimed at scale-up, deployment, and commercialization of the most promising technologies identified.

358

Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nick Wright Named Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead Nick Wright Named Advanced Technologies Group Lead February 4, 2013 Nick Nick Wright has been named head of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center's (NERSC) Advanced Technologies Group (ATG), which focuses on understanding the requirements of current and emerging applications to make choices in hardware design and programming models that best serve the science needs of NERSC users. ATG specializes in benchmarking, system performance, debugging and analysis, workload monitoring, use of application modeling tools, and future algorithm scaling and technology assessment. The team also engages with vendors and the general research community to advocate technological features that will enhance the effectiveness of systems for NERSC scientists.

359

Thomas-Fermi model: The leading correction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The correct treatment of strongly bound electrons is grafted smoothly onto the Thomas-Fermi computation of the total binding energy of neutral atoms. This provides a clearcut demonstration of the leading correction of relative order Z-13 which, with effects of relative order Z-23, gives an accurate account of the binding energy over a wide range of Z values. There is a brief discussion of relativistic corrections, with results that are somewhat at variance with previous numerical estimates.

Julian Schwinger

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

L I NATIONAL' LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

L L I NATIONAL' LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO tJw HEALTH AND SAFETY DI"ISION - ANALITICIL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET _I . . NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY O F OHIO HEALTH AND SAFETY DIY1SION - ANALYTICAL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET NATIONA-i LEn' D COMPANY OF OHIO HEALTH AND SAFETY Dl"lSlDN - m4ALITICAL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET NO. I DlSTRlBUTlON OF COPIES I I A,w,lytlc.al Loboratorr (RBCORD COPI) 2 Induswlol Hvalen. B Rodhtlon Dept. 3 1 Water Trsotmmt Plant c=.z w&w hnp,., Only, - . _. NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO HEALiH ANO SAFETY OIVISIOH - w4ALYTICAL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET INDUSTRIAL, HYGlENE AND RADIATION DEPT. 1 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY SECTION i. H. NO. IHPLEN0S.i . 7 RO"Te TO, D.TB RECEIVED, B", 464 9 - sD6:LzTEo, lB"' S/24/61 I DP

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NETL: News Release - DOE Seeks Cost-Shared Research Proposals to Remove  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 20, 2000 March 20, 2000 DOE Seeks Cost-Shared Research Proposals to Remove Mercury From Coal-Fired Power Plants With the Environmental Protection Agency expected to decide in December whether to regulate mercury emissions from coal-burning boilers, the U.S. Department of Energy has kicked off a new effort to develop more affordable pollution control technologies that can remove mercury from power plant flue gases. The Energy Department, through its National Energy Technology Laboratory, has issued a solicitation offering up to $13 million over three years for industry proposals on cost-cutting mercury-control methods for coal-based power systems. Currently no technology exists that can uniformly control mercury from power plant flue gas emissions. The effectiveness of existing flue gas emission controls in removing mercury can vary considerably from plant to plant, or even from boiler to boiler. With today's technologies, mercury removal can range from essentially no control to as high as 90 percent.

362

ElectroChemical Arsenic Removal (ECAR) for Rural Bangladesh-Merging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ElectroChemical Arsenic Removal (ECAR) for Rural Bangladesh-Merging ElectroChemical Arsenic Removal (ECAR) for Rural Bangladesh-Merging Technology with Sustainable Implementation Title ElectroChemical Arsenic Removal (ECAR) for Rural Bangladesh-Merging Technology with Sustainable Implementation Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2009 Authors Addy, Susan E., Ashok J. Gadgil, Kristin Kowolik, and Robert Kostecki Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Today, 35-77 million Bangladeshis drink arsenic-contaminated groundwater from shallow tube wells. Arsenic remediation efforts have focused on the development and dissemination of household filters that frequently fall into disuse due to the amount of attention and maintenance that they require. A community scale clean water center has many advantages over household filters and allows for both chemical and electricity-based technologies to be beneficial to rural areas. Full cost recovery would enable the treatment center to be sustainable over time. ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation (ECAR) is compatible with community scale water treatment for rural Bangladesh. We demonstrate the ability of ECAR to reduce arsenic levels > 500 ppb to less than 10 ppb in synthetic and real Bangladesh groundwater samples and examine the influence of several operating parameters on arsenic removal effectiveness. Operating cost and waste estimates are provided. Policy implication recommendations that encourage sustainable community treatment centers are discussed.

363

Coagulation chemistries for silica removal from cooling tower water.  

SciTech Connect

The formation of silica scale is a problem for thermoelectric power generating facilities, and this study investigated the potential for removal of silica by means of chemical coagulation from source water before it is subjected to mineral concentration in cooling towers. In Phase I, a screening of many typical as well as novel coagulants was carried out using concentrated cooling tower water, with and without flocculation aids, at concentrations typical for water purification with limited results. In Phase II, it was decided that treatment of source or make up water was more appropriate, and that higher dosing with coagulants delivered promising results. In fact, the less exotic coagulants proved to be more efficacious for reasons not yet fully determined. Some analysis was made of the molecular nature of the precipitated floc, which may aid in process improvements. In Phase III, more detailed study of process conditions for aluminum chloride coagulation was undertaken. Lime-soda water softening and the precipitation of magnesium hydroxide were shown to be too limited in terms of effectiveness, speed, and energy consumption to be considered further for the present application. In Phase IV, sodium aluminate emerged as an effective coagulant for silica, and the most attractive of those tested to date because of its availability, ease of use, and low requirement for additional chemicals. Some process optimization was performed for coagulant concentration and operational pH. It is concluded that silica coagulation with simple aluminum-based agents is effective, simple, and compatible with other industrial processes.

Nyman, May Devan; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Stewart, Tom

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Multi-component removal in flue gas by aqua ammonia  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new method for the removal of environmental compounds from gaseous streams, in particular, flue gas streams. The new method involves first oxidizing some or all of the acid anhydrides contained in the gas stream such as sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) and nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N.sub.2O) to sulfur trioxide (SO.sub.3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2). The gas stream is subsequently treated with aqua ammonia or ammonium hydroxide which captures the compounds via chemical absorption through acid-base or neutralization reactions. The products of the reactions can be collected as slurries, dewatered, and dried for use as fertilizers, or once the slurries have been dewatered, used directly as fertilizers. The ammonium hydroxide can be regenerated and recycled for use via thermal decomposition of ammonium bicarbonate, one of the products formed. There are alternative embodiments which entail stoichiometric scrubbing of nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides with subsequent separate scrubbing of carbon dioxide.

Yeh, James T. (Bethel Park, PA); Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

365

MARTIN PROSPERITY INSTITUTE is the world's leading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of technology & human rights, fighting to break through Internet censorship worldwide. RICHARD FLORIDA, cyber abuse, cyber counselling & school-based interventions with children at risk. JOHN MYLES

Sokolowski, Marla

366

Removal of Radioactive Nuclides from Mo-99 Acidic Liquid Waste - 13027  

SciTech Connect

About 200 liters highly radioactive acidic liquid waste originating from Mo-99 production was stored at INER (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research). A study regarding the treatment of the radioactive acidic liquid waste was conducted to solve storage-related issues and allow discharge of the waste while avoiding environmental pollution. Before discharging the liquid waste, the acidity, NO{sub 3}{sup -} and Hg ions in high concentrations, and radionuclides must comply with environmental regulations. Therefore, the treatment plan was to neutralize the acidic liquid waste, remove key radionuclides to reduce the dose rate, and then remove the nitrate and mercury ions. Bench tests revealed that NaOH is the preferred solution to neutralize the high acidic waste solution and the pH of solution must be adjusted to 9?11 prior to the removal of nuclides. Significant precipitation was produced when the pH of solution reached 9. NaNO{sub 3} was the major content in the precipitate and part of NaNO{sub 3} was too fine to be completely collected by filter paper with a pore size of approximately 3 ?m. The residual fine particles remaining in solution therefore blocked the adsorption column during operation. Two kinds of adsorbents were employed for Cs-137 and a third for Sr-90 removal to minimize cost. For personnel radiation protection, significant lead shielding was required at a number of points in the process. The final process design and treatment facilities successfully treated the waste solutions and allowed for environmentally compliant discharge. (authors)

Hsiao, Hsien-Ming; Pen, Ben-Li [Chemical Engineering Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, P.O. Box 3-7, Longtan 32546 Taiwan, Republic of China (China)] [Chemical Engineering Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, P.O. Box 3-7, Longtan 32546 Taiwan, Republic of China (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Astro-H high temperature superconductor lead assemblies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) instrument, one of several instruments on JAXA’s Astro-H mission, will observe diffuse X-ray sources with unparalleled spectral resolution using a microcalorimeter array operating at 50 mK. The array is cooled with a multi-stage Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator mounted on a 40 l helium tank. The tank is at the center of a typical “shell in shell” cryostat, with the innermost shield cooled by a JT cryocooler, and successive outer shields cooled by stirling-cycle cryocoolers. To achieve a multi-year liquid helium lifetime and to avoid exceeding the limited capacity of the JT cooler, very strict requirements are placed on every source of heat leak into these surfaces from the higher temperature shields. However, each ADR stage draws a maximum of 2 A, and the Wiedemann–Franz Law precludes even an optimized set of normal-metal leads capable of such high current from achieving the required low thermal conductance. Instead, a set of lead assemblies have been developed based on narrow high temperature superconductor (HTS) tapes derived from commercially available coated conductors. Although the HTS tapes are flexible and have high tensile strength, they are extremely sensitive to damage through a number of mechanisms. A robust set of assemblies have been developed that provide mechanical support to the tapes, provide appropriate interfaces at either end, and yet still meet the challenging thermal requirements. An Engineering Model (EM) set of HTS lead assemblies have survived environmental testing, both as individual units and as part of the EM cryostat, and have performed without problem in recent operation of the EM instrument. The Flight Model (FM) HTS lead assemblies are currently nearing completion.

E.R. Canavan; B.L. James; T.P. Hait; A. Oliver; D.F. Sullivan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Asian anthropogenic lead contamination in the North Pacific Ocean as evidenced by stable lead isotopic compositions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and North Central Pacific Ocean. Deep Sea Res. Part II Top.Lead Within the Northwest Pacific Ocean Evidenced by Leadventilation flux of the Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. 106(

Zurbrick, Cheryl Marie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Duct Remediation Program: Material characterization and removal/handling  

SciTech Connect

Remediation efforts were successfully performed at Rocky Flats to locate, characterize, and remove plutonium holdup from process exhaust ducts. Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) techniques were used to determine holdup locations and quantities. Visual characterization using video probes helped determine the physical properties of the material, which were used for remediation planning. Assorted equipment types, such as vacuum systems, scoops, brushes, and a rotating removal system, were developed to remove specific material types. Personnel safety and material handling requirements were addressed throughout the project.

Beckman, T.d.; Davis, M.M.; Karas, T.M.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Performance testing of lead free primers: blast waves, velocity variations, and environmental testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results are presented for lead free primers based on diazodinitrophenol (DDNP)compared with tests on lead styphnate based primers. First, barrel friction measurements in 5.56 mm NATO are presented. Second, shot to shot variations in blast waves are presented as determined by detonating primers in a 7.62x51mm rifle chamber with a firing pin, but without any powder or bullet loaded and measuring the blast wave at the muzzle with a high speed pressure transducer. Third, variations in primer blast waves, muzzle velocities, and ignition delay are presented after environmental conditioning (150 days) for two lead based and two DDNP based primers under cold and dry (-25 deg C,0% relative humidity), ambient (20 deg C, 50% relative humidity), and hot & humid (50 deg C, 100% relative humidity) conditions in 5.56 mm NATO. Taken together, these results indicate that DDNP based primers are not sufficiently reliable for service use.

Courtney, Elya; Summer, Peter David; Courtney, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Anthropogenic lead dynamics in the terrestrial and marine environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...shown in gure 7, re ect the introduction and phase-out of leaded petrol. Measuring lead concentrations in ice near Camp Century, Greenland, Murozumi et al. (1969) rst observed the Arctic anthropogenic transient, with lead concentrations increas...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Lead-Free Solders: Focus on Fundamentals, Reliability, and Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although lead-free solders have been adopted by much of the commercial electronics industry, the implementation of lead-free processes still faces some challenges. The performance of lead-free solder joints in hi...

Babak Arfaei

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Lead in Your Drinking Water Lead (Pb) is an extremely toxic heavy metal that unfortunately occurs widely in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead in Your Drinking Water Lead (Pb) is an extremely toxic heavy metal that unfortunately occurs of metallic lead in the soil (4) Drinking water ­ water as it leaves the treatment plant has no lead;Common metals used for the supply pipe are lead, copper and galvanized iron. Also in the system

Maynard, J. Barry

374

Usage leading to an abrupt collapse of connectivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Network infrastructures are essential for the distribution of resources such as electricity and water. Typical strategies to assess their resilience focus on the impact of a sequence of random or targeted failures of network nodes or links. Here we consider a more realistic scenario, where elements fail based on their usage. We propose a dynamic model of transport based on the Bak–Tang–Wiesenfeld sandpile model where links fail after they have transported more than an amount ? (threshold) of the resource and we investigate it on the square lattice. As we deal with a new model, we provide insight on its fundamental behavior and dependence on parameters. We observe that, for low values of the threshold due to a positive feedback of link failure, an avalanche develops that leads to an abrupt collapse of the lattice. By contrast, for high thresholds the lattice breaks down in an uncorrelated fashion. We determine the critical threshold ?* separating these two regimes and show how it depends on the toppling threshold of the nodes and the mass increment added stepwise to the system. We find that the time of major disconnection is well described with a linear dependence on ?. Furthermore, we propose a lower bound for ?* by measuring the strength of the dynamics leading to abrupt collapses.

D. V. Stäger; N. A. M. Araújo; H. J. Herrmann

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Removal of phenol and chlorophenols from water by new ozone generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Presence of phenol in river water occasionally disturbs the production of drinking water. Phenol often originated from coal power plants or pesticides. New ozone generator [Kuraica et al., Vacuum, 73 (2004) 705] was used for removal of phenol and chlorophenols from water. The ozone generator was based on coaxial dielectricbarrier-discharge and operated in the air at an atmospheric pressure. Flowing water was one of dielectric layers. Ozone and ozonized water were generated in the same volume of the discharge. This type of ozone generator has considerable advantages in comparison with the classical ones. In this paper five experiments were described, three with bidistilled water and two with different water samples from river Danube. In all cases, 5L of water containing 6mg/L of corresponding phenol was passed once through the ozonizer. The concentration of dissolved ozone in water was 7–40mg/L. The ozonization lasted 1 h, but the total contact time was up to 94 h. In all cases, before and after the treatment of water with ozone, the concentration of corresponding phenol [Standard Methods for Examination of Water and Wastewater, method 510 B, Chloroform Extraction Method, American Public Health Association, Washington, 1985, p. 558], dissolved and residual ozone [Standard Methods for Examination of Water and Wastewater, Methods 2-41, 2-42 (dissolved ozone) Iodometric Method; method 4-104 (ozone residual) Indigo Colorimetric Method, American Public Health Association, Washington, 1995] were determined by standard methods. In experiments with distilled water most of the phenol was removed during ozonization (89.5%). After 24 and 96 h the percentage of removed phenol increased to 93.3 and 98.9%, respectively. With 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol, 99.8 and 98.9% of corresponding phenols were removed. In experiments with two different water samples from Danube, the phenol was also mostly removed during ozonization, 76.7 and 80.0%, respectively.

D. Manojlovic; D.R. Ostojic; B.M. Obradovic; M.M. Kuraica; V.D. Krsmanovic; J. Puric

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

BOA: Asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system. Phase I. Topical report, November 1993--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

Based on several key design criteria and site visits, we developed a Robot design and built a system which automatically strips the lagging and insulation from the pipes, and encapsulates them under complete vacuum operation. The system can operate on straight runs of piping in horizontal or vertical orientations. Currently we are limited to four-inch diameter piping without obstacles as well as a somewhat laborious emplacement and removal procedure. Experimental results indicated that the current robotic abatement process is sound yet needs to be further expanded and modified. One of the main discoveries was that a longitudinal cut to fully allow the paddles to dig in and compress the insulation off the pipe is essential. Furthermore, a different cutting method might be explored to alleviate the need for a deeper cut and to enable a combination of certain functions such as compression and cutting. Unfortunately due to a damaged mechanism caused by extensive testing, we were unable to perform vertical piping abatement experiments, but foresee no trouble in implementing them in the next proposed Phase. Other encouraging results have BOA removing asbestos at a rate of 4-5 ft./h compared to 3 ft./h for manual removal of asbestos with a 3-person crew. However, we feel confident that we can double the asbestos removal rate by improving cutting speed, and increasing the length of the BOA robot. The containment and vacuum system on BOA is able to achieve the regulatory requirement for airborne fiber emissions of 0.01 fibers/ccm/8-hr. shift. Currently, BOA weighs about 117 pounds which is more than a human is permitted to lift overhead under OSHA requirements (i.e., 25 pounds). We are considering designing the robot into two components (i.e., locomotor section and cutter/removal section) to aid human installation as well as incorporating composite materials. A more detailed list of all the technical modifications is given in this topical report.

Schempf, H.; Bares, J.E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Carbon dioxide removal and capture for landfill gas up-grading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Within the frame of an EC financially supported project - LIFE05 ENV/IT/000874 GHERL (Greenhouse Effect Reduction from Landfill)–a pilot plant was set up in order to demonstrate the feasibility of applying chemical absorption to remove carbon dioxide from landfill gas. After proper upgrading - basically removal of carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulphide, ammonia and other trace gas compound–the gas might be fed into the distribution grid for natural gas or used as vehicle fuel, replacing a fossil fuel thus saving natural resources and carbon dioxide emissions. Several experiences in Europe have been carried out concerning the landfill gas - and biogas from anaerobic digestion - quality up-grading through CO2 removal, but in all of them carbon dioxide was vented to the atmosphere after separation, without any direct benefit in terms of greenhouse gases reduction. With respect to those previous experiences, in this work the attention was focused on CO2 removal from landfill gas with an effective capture process, capable of removing carbon dioxide from atmosphere, through a globally carbon negative process. In particular, processes capable of producing final solid products were investigated, with the aim of obtaining as output solid compounds which can be either used in the chemical industry or disposed off. The adopted absorption process is based on using aqueous solutions of potassium hydroxide, with the final aim of producing potassium carbonate. Potassium carbonate is a product which has several applications in the chemical industry if obtained with adequate quality. It can be sold as a pulverised solid, or in aqueous solution. Several tests were carried out at the pilot plant, which was located at a landfill site, in order to feed it with a fraction of the on-site collected landfill gas. The results of the experimental campaign are reported, explained and commented in the paper. Also a discussion on economic issues is presented.

Lidia Lombardia; Andrea Corti; Ennio Carnevale; Renato Baciocchi; Daniela Zingaretti

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The use of ethanol to remove sulfur from coal. Final report, September 1991--December 1992; Revision  

SciTech Connect

The initial technical goal in the project was to develop a chemical method for the cost effective removal of both inorganic and organic sulfur from Ohio coals. Verifying and using a process of reacting ethanol vapors with coal under conditions disclosed in U.S. Patent 4,888,029, the immediate technical objectives were to convert a small scale laborative batch process to a larger scale continuous process which can serve as the basis for commercial development of the technology. This involved getting as much information as possible from small scale batch autoclave or fluid bed laboratory reactors for use in pilot plant studies. The laboratory data included material balances on the coal and sulfur, temperature and pressure ranges for the reaction, minimum reaction times at different conditions, the effectiveness of different activators such as oxygen and nitric oxide, the amount and nature of by-products such as sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and acetaldehyde, the effect of coal particle size on the speed and completeness of the reaction, and the effectiveness of the reaction on different Ohio coals. Because the laboratory experiments using the method disclosed in U.S. 4,888,029 were not successful, the objective for the project was changed to develop a new laboratory process to use ethanol to remove sulfur from coal. Using copper as a catalyst and as an H{sub 2}S scavenger, a new laboratory procedure to use ethanol to remove sulfur from coal has been developed at Ohio University and a patent application covering this process was filed in March, 1993. The process is based on the use of copper as a catalyst for the dehydrogenation of ethanol to produce nascent hydrogen to remove sulfur from the coal and the use of copper as a scavenger to capture the hydrogen sulfide formed from the sulfur removed from coal.

Savage, R.L.; Lazarov, L.K.; Prudich, M.E.; Lange, C.A.; Kumar, N.

1994-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

379

Electrochemical Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic Heavy Metals: The Next Generation of Personal Exposure Electrochemical Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic Heavy...

380

Scheibe named lead scientist for EMSL computing | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lead scientist for EMSL computing He will oversee Multiscale Modeling and High Performance Computing Tim Scheibe EMSL has selected Tim Scheibe as lead scientist for Multiscale...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Research Led by Sandia Reveals Leading-Edge Erosion Significantly...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Led by Sandia Reveals Leading-Edge Erosion Significantly Reduces Wind Turbine Performance Research Led by Sandia Reveals Leading-Edge Erosion Significantly Reduces Wind...

382

Inspiration from world-class scientists leads Patricia Langan...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

leads student to nanoscience Inspiration from world-class scientists leads Patricia Langan to nanoscience Graduate research assistant discovered her passion while interning as...

383

Anthropogenic Lead Emissions in the Ocean: The Evolving Global Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the current distribution of lead and lead isotopes in the ocean with regard to the evolving pattern of human emissions during the past decades and centuries.

Lee, Jong-Mi

384

AVTA: 2010 Honda Civic HEV with Experimental Ultra Lead Acid...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 Honda Civic HEV with Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery Testing Results AVTA: 2010 Honda Civic HEV with Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery Testing Results The Vehicle...

385

Combined Heat and Power System Enables 100% Reliability at Leading...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enables 100% Reliability at Leading Medical Campus - Case Study, 2013 Combined Heat and Power System Enables 100% Reliability at Leading Medical Campus - Case Study, 2013 Thermal...

386

Hydrogen diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate. Hydrogen diffusion in Lead Zirconate Titanate and Barium Titanate. Abstract: Hydrogen is a potential clean-burning,...

387

Cambodia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in up to 11 partner countries: Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. USAID LEAD Factsheet LEAD Fact...

388

University of Maryland Wins Architecture Prize, Pulls Into Lead...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maryland Wins Architecture Prize, Pulls Into Lead in 2011 Solar Decathlon University of Maryland Wins Architecture Prize, Pulls Into Lead in 2011 Solar Decathlon September 28, 2011...

389

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Press Release High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Nov 15, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

390

United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone November 4, 2013 - 2:09pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced under a multi-year international effort coordinated between Hungary, the United States, the Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the successful removal of all remaining highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Hungary. This makes Hungary the twelfth country to completely eliminate HEU from its borders since President Obama's 2009 announcement

391

Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron and Heterogeneous Photocatalysis with TiO2 Speaker(s): Marta Litter Date: November 19, 2010 - 11:00am Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Hugo Destaillats Arsenic in groundwater is a dramatic global problem due to the high incidence of arsenicosis or HACRE (Chronic Endemic Regional Hydro-arsenicism, Hidroarsenicismo Crónico Regional Endémico in Spanish), a severe illness causing skin lesions and cancer in extended regions of the world. For this reason, research on low-cost technologies for As removal to be applied in isolated, poor, rural locations is mandatory. This seminar will present a brief overview of arsenic pollution issues and mitigation needs in Latin America. It will also present results on As(V) removal using

392

Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites In January 2013, the Department of Energy issued the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste. Among the elements contained in this strategy is an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites. This focus is consistent with the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, which identified removal of stranded used nuclear fuel at shutdown sites as a priority so that these sites may be completely decommissioned and put to other beneficial uses. Shutdown sites are defined as those commercial nuclear power reactor sites where the

393

Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Convection Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility Scaling Basis Full Scale Half Scale NSTF Argonne National Laboratory's Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) - one of the world's largest facilities for ex-vessel passive decay heat removal testing-confirms the performance of reactor cavity cooling systems (RCCS) and similar passive confinement or containment decay heat removal systems in modern Small Modular Reactors. Originally built to aid in the development of General Electric's Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS), the NSTF has a long history of providing confirmatory data for the airside of the RVACS. Argonne National Laboratory's NSTF is a state-of-the-art, large-scale facility for evaluating performance

394

Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet Mar 27, 2012 Sweden has been a global leader on nonproliferation, and was one of the

395

Czech Republic HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Czech Republic HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Czech Republic HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Czech Republic HEU Removal Czech Republic HEU Removal Location Czech Republic United States 49° 35' 23.3628" N, 15° 4' 23.6712" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

396

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Press Release High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Nov 15, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

397

South Africa HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

South Africa HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration South Africa HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > South Africa HEU Removal South Africa HEU Removal Location South Africa United States 30° 33' 35.0604" S, 22° 19' 27.1884" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

398

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Mar 26, 2012 For nearly two decades, the United States and Ukraine have cooperated on a

399

Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Transition Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Transition December 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Laborers place a disposable liner in a tailings container. Laborers place a disposable liner in a tailings container. MOAB, Utah - The Moab mill tailings removal project in Utah ended the year having shipped more than 35 percent of the total 16 million tons of uranium mill tailings off-site. The tailings are being transported by rail 30 miles north to a disposal cell for permanent storage. More than 1 million tons of tailings were shipped during fiscal year 2012, which closed at the end of September. The Moab Project also successfully transitioned both of its prime contracts

400

Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material ... Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima Posted By Office of Public Affairs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Thief Process Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process for the Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas Process for the Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 6,521,021 entitled "Thief Process for the Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas." Disclosed in this patent is a novel process in which partially combusted coal is removed from the combustion chamber of a power plant using a lance (called a "thief"). This partially combusted coal acts as a thermally activated adsorbent for mercury. When it is in- jected into the duct work of the power plant downstream from the exit port of the combustion chamber, mercury within the flue gas contacts and adsorbs onto the thermally activated sorbent. The sorbent-mercury

402

Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Transition Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Transition December 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Laborers place a disposable liner in a tailings container. Laborers place a disposable liner in a tailings container. MOAB, Utah - The Moab mill tailings removal project in Utah ended the year having shipped more than 35 percent of the total 16 million tons of uranium mill tailings off-site. The tailings are being transported by rail 30 miles north to a disposal cell for permanent storage. More than 1 million tons of tailings were shipped during fiscal year 2012, which closed at the end of September. The Moab Project also successfully transitioned both of its prime contracts

403

Removal of phenanthrene from soil by additive-enhanced electrokinetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Removal of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) using an additive-enhanced electrokinetic method was studied in a ... (EK) column experiments were performed using these additives. When no additive was used, a

Ji-Yeon Park; Yan Chen; Jian Chen; Ji-Won Yang

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Oil and Gas- Leases to remove or recover (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act states that a lease or agreement conveying the right to remove or recover oil, natural gas or gas of any other designation from lessor to lessee shall not be valid if such lease does not...

405

Unsupervised One-Class Learning for Automatic Outlier Removal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Outliers are pervasive in many computer vision and pattern recognition problems. Automatically eliminating outliers scattering among practical data collections becomes increasingly important, especially for Internet inspired vision applications. In this ... Keywords: One-Class Learning, Outlier Removal

Wei Liu, Gang Hua, John R. Smith

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Remote target removal for the Oak Ridge 86-inch Cyclotron  

SciTech Connect

A remotely operated target remover has been plaed in operation at the 86-Inch Cyclotron located in Oak Ridge. The system provides for the remote removal of a target from inside the cyclotron, loading it into a cask, and the removal of the cask from the 1.5 m (5-ft) shielding walls. The remote system consists of multiple electrical and pneumatically operated equipment which is designed for controlled step-by-step operation, operated with an electrical control panel, and monitored by a television system. The target remover has reduced the radiation exposures to operating personnel at the facility and has increased the effective operating time. The system is fast, requires a minimum of skill to operate, and has demonstrated both reliability and durability.

Walls, A.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Reconvergent Fanout Removal Through Partial BIST Insertion Ian G. Harris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reconvergent Fanout Removal Through Partial BIST Insertion Ian G. Harris Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Massachusetts at Amherst E-mail: harris@ecs.umass.edu I. ABSTRACT

Harris, Ian G.

408

Layered metal sulfides: Exceptionally selective agents for radioactive strontium removal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...07 mmol, 40 mg) in water (20 ml), an excess...washed several times with water, acetone, and...Complex Environmental Remediation Problems , ed Blacklick...removal from contaminated ground water and wastewater...

Manolis J. Manos; Nan Ding; Mercouri G. Kanatzidis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluated the ozone removal performance of moderate-cost particle filters containing activated carbon when installed in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Filters containing 300 g of activated carbon per 0.09 m2 of filter face area were installed in two 'experimental' filter banks within an office building located in Sacramento, CA. The ozone removal performance of the filters was assessed through periodic measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. Ozone concentrations were also measured upstream and downstream of a 'reference' filter bank containing filters without any activated carbon. The filter banks with prefilters containing activated carbon were removing 60percent to 70percent of the ozone 67 and 81 days after filter installation. In contrast, there was negligible ozone removal by the reference filter bank without activated carbon.

Fisk, William; Spears, Mike; Sullivan, Douglas; Mendell, Mark

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Transite panel removal begins on K-31 Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Workers have begun removing transite paneling from the outside of the K-31 Building at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP).  The 1.49 million ft former gaseous diffusion building was once used to...

411

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate Title Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6221E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Amrose, Susan, Ashok J. Gadgil, Venkat Srinivasan, Kristin Kowolik, Marc Muller, Jessica Huang, and Robert Kostecki Journal Joournal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering Volume 48 Issue 9 Pagination 1019-1030 Date Published 04/2013 Keywords arsenic, bangladesh, Cambodia, dosage rate, electrocoagulation, india, water treatment Abstract We demonstrate that electrocoagulation (EC) using iron electrodes can reduce arsenic below 10 μg/L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater and in real groundwater from Bangladesh and Cambodia while investigating the effect of operating parameters that are often overlooked, such as charge dosage rate. We measure arsenic removal performance

412

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Salony, DOE Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov 509-376-0402 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Dee_Millikin@rl.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) announced today the removal of the first phase of highly radioactive sludge from under water storage in the K West Basin about 400 yards away from the Columbia River. "This is a major step forward in protecting the river and a historic

413

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Salony, DOE Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov 509-376-0402 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Dee_Millikin@rl.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) announced today the removal of the first phase of highly radioactive sludge from under water storage in the K West Basin about 400 yards away from the Columbia River. "This is a major step forward in protecting the river and a historic

414

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Mar 26, 2012 For nearly two decades, the United States and Ukraine have cooperated on a

415

NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston Press Release NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston Nov 22, 2013

416

Removal Rate Model for Magnetorheological Finishing of Glass  

SciTech Connect

Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a deterministic subaperture polishing process. The process uses a magntorheological (MR) fluid that consists of micrometer-sized, spherical, magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) particles, nonmagnetic polishing abrasives, water, and stabilizers. Material removal occurs when the CI and nonmagnetic polishing abrasives shear material off the surface being polished. We introduce a new MRF material removal rate model for glass. This model contains terms for the near surface mechanical properties of glass, drag force, polishing abrasive size and concentration, chemical durability of the glass, MR fluid pH, and the glass composition. We introduce quantitative chemical predictors for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, into an MRF removal rate model. We validate individual terms in our model separately and then combine all of the terms to show the whole MRF material removal model compared with experimental data. All of our experimental data were obtained using nanodiamond MR fluids and a set of six optical glasses.

DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; WIlson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Jacobs, S.D.

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

417

Review of potential impacts to sea turtles from underwater explosive removal of offshore structures  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to collect and synthesize existing information relevant to the explosive removal of offshore structures (EROS) in aquatic environments. Data sources were organized and summarized by topic - explosive removal methods, physics of underwater explosions, sea turtle resources, documented impacts to sea turtles, and mitigation of effects. Information was gathered via electronic database searches and literature source review. Bulk explosive charges are the most commonly used technique in EROS. While the physical principles of underwater detonations and the propagation of pressure and acoustic waves are well understood, there are significant gaps in the application of this knowledge. Impacts to sea turtles from explosive removal operations may range from non-injurious effects (e.g. acoustic annoyance; mild tactile detection or physical discomfort) to varying levels of injury (i.e. non-lethal and lethal injuries). Very little information exists regarding the impacts of underwater explosions on sea turtles. Effects of explosions on turtles often must be inferred from documented effects to other vertebrates with lungs or other gas-containing organs, such as mammals and most fishes. However, a cautious approach should be used when determining impacts to sea turtles based on extrapolations from other vertebrates. The discovery of beached sea turtles and bottlenose dolphins following an explosive platform removal event in 1986 prompted the initiation of formal consultation between the U.S. Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service (MMS) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), authorized through the Endangered Species Act Section 7, to determine a mechanism to minimize potential impacts to listed species. The initial consultation resulted in a requirement for oil and gas companies to obtain a permit (through separate consultations on a case-by-case basis) prior to using explosives in Federal waters. Because many offshore structure removal operations are similar, a 'generic' Incidental Take Statement was established by the NMFS that describes requirements to protect sea turtles when an operator's individual charge weights did not exceed 50 lb (23 kg). Requirements associated with the Incidental Take Permit were revised in 2003 and 2006 to accommodate advances in explosive charge technologies, removals of structures in deeper waters, and adequate protection of deep water marine mammal species in Gulf of Mexico waters. Generally, these requirements include pre- and post-detonation visual monitoring using standard surface and aerial survey methods for sea turtles and marine mammals, and, in some scenarios, passive acoustic survey methods for marine mammals within a specified radius from an offshore structure. The survey program has been successful in mitigating impacts to sea turtles associated with EROS. However, even with these protective measures in place, there have been observations of sea turtles affected by explosive platform removals.

Viada, Stephen T. [CSA International, Inc., 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter, FL 33477 (United States)], E-mail: sviada@conshelf.com; Hammer, Richard M. [CSA International, Inc., 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter, FL 33477 (United States)], E-mail: rhammer@conshelf.com; Racca, Roberto [JASCO Research Ltd., Vancouver Island Technology Park, Suite 2101, 4464 Markham Street, Victoria, British Columbia, V8Z 7X8 (Canada)], E-mail: rob@jasco.com; Hannay, David [JASCO Research Ltd., Vancouver Island Technology Park, Suite 2101, 4464 Markham Street, Victoria, British Columbia, V8Z 7X8 (Canada)], E-mail: dave@jasco.com; Thompson, M. John [CSA International, Inc., 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter, FL 33477 (United States)], E-mail: jthompson@conshelf.com; Balcom, Brian J. [CSA International, Inc., 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter, FL 33477 (United States)], E-mail: bbalcom@conshelf.com; Phillips, Neal W. [CSA International, Inc., 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter, FL 33477 (United States)], E-mail: nphillips@conshelf.com

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Laser Systems for Orbital Debris Removal  

SciTech Connect

The use of a ground based laser for space debris cleaning was investigated by the ORION project in 1996. Since that study the greatest technological advance in the development of high energy pulsed laser systems has taken place within the NIF project at LLNL. The proposed next laser system to follow the NIF at LLNL will be a high rep rate version of the NIF based on diode-pumping rather than flashlamp excitation; the so called 'LIFE' laser system. Because a single 'LIFE' beamline could be built up in a few year time frame, and has performance characteristics relevant to the space debris clearing problem, such a beamline could enable a near term demonstration of space debris cleaning. Moreover, the specifics of debris cleaning make it possible to simplify the LIFE laser beyond what is required for a fusion drive laser, and so substantially reduce its cost. Starting with the requirements for laser intensity on the target, and then considering beam delivery, we will flow back the laser requirements needed for space debris cleaning. Using these derived requirements we will then optimize the pulse duration, the operational regime, and the output pulse energy of the laser with a focus of simplifying its overall design. Anticipated simplifications include operation in the heat capacity regime, eliminating cooling requirements on the laser gain slabs, and relaxing B-integral and birefrigence requirements.

Rubenchik, A M; Barty, C P; Beach, R J; Erlandson, A C; Caird, J A

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

419

Quantitative study on removal of SU-8 photoresist patterns by supercritical CO2 emulsion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supercritical CO"2 emulsion (SCE) was found to be effective in removal of epoxy-type SU-8 photoresist. The ability to remove SU-8 was compared between a commercially available Remover PG (RPG) solution and SCE. Both RPG and SCE were effective in removing ... Keywords: Lithography, SU-8 removal, Supercritical CO2 emulsion

Tso-Fu Mark Chang; Chiemi Ishiyama; Tatsuo Sato; Masato Sone

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Mercury and tritium removal from DOE waste oils  

SciTech Connect

This work covers the investigation of vacuum extraction as a means to remove tritiated contamination as well as the removal via sorption of dissolved mercury from contaminated oils. The radiation damage in oils from tritium causes production of hydrogen, methane, and low-molecular-weight hydrocarbons. When tritium gas is present in the oil, the tritium atom is incorporated into the formed hydrocarbons. The transformer industry measures gas content/composition of transformer oils as a diagnostic tool for the transformers` condition. The analytical approach (ASTM D3612-90) used for these measurements is vacuum extraction of all gases (H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, etc.) followed by analysis of the evolved gas mixture. This extraction method will be adapted to remove dissolved gases (including tritium) from the SRS vacuum pump oil. It may be necessary to heat (60{degrees}C to 70{degrees}C) the oil during vacuum extraction to remove tritiated water. A method described in the procedures is a stripper column extraction, in which a carrier gas (argon) is used to remove dissolved gases from oil that is dispersed on high surface area beads. This method appears promising for scale-up as a treatment process, and a modified process is also being used as a dewatering technique by SD Myers, Inc. (a transformer consulting company) for transformers in the field by a mobile unit. Although some mercury may be removed during the vacuum extraction, the most common technique for removing mercury from oil is by using sulfur-impregnated activated carbon (SIAC). SIAC is currently being used by the petroleum industry to remove mercury from hydrocarbon mixtures, but the sorbent has not been previously tested on DOE vacuum oil waste. It is anticipated that a final process will be similar to technologies used by the petroleum industry and is comparable to ion exchange operations in large column-type reactors.

Klasson, E.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Removal of deposited copper from nuclear steam generators  

SciTech Connect

A review of the copper-removal process implemented during the cleaning of the NPD nuclear steam generator in Ontario revealed that major shortcomings in the process were depletion of the strong ammonia solution and relatively poor copper removal. Tests have shown that the concentration of the ammonia solution can be preserved close to its initial value, and high concentrations of complexed copper obtained, by sparging the ammonia solution with oxygen recirculating through a gas recirculation loop. Using recirculating oxygen for sparging at ambient air temperature, approximately 11 g/l of copper were dissolved by 100 g/l ammonia solution while the gaseous ammonia content of the recirculating gas remained well below the lower flammability limit. The corrosion rates of mild steel and commonly used nuclear steam generator tube materials in oxygenated ammonia solution were less than 30 mil/yr and no intergranular attack of samples was observed during tests. A second technique studied for the removal of copper is to ammoniate the spent iron-removal solvent to approximately pH 9.5 and sparge with recirculating oxygen. Complexed ferric iron in the spent iron-removal solvent was found to be the major oxidizing agent for metallic copper. The ferric iron can be derived from oxidation of dissolved ferrous iron to the ferric state or from dissolved oxides of iron directly. To extract copper from the secondary sides of nuclear steam generators, strong ammonia solution sparged with recirculating oxygen is recommended as the first stage, while ammoniated spent iron-removal solvent sparged with recirculating oxygen may be used to remove the copper freshly exposed during the removal of iron.

McSweeney, P.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Radiator debris removing apparatus and work machine using same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiator assembly includes a finned radiator core and a debris removing apparatus having a compressed air inlet and at least one compressed air outlet configured to direct compressed air through the radiator core. A work machine such as a wheel loader includes a radiator and a debris removing apparatus coupled with on-board compressed air and having at least one pressurized gas outlet configured to direct a gas toward the face of the radiator.

Martin, Kevin L. (Washburn, IL); Elliott, Dwight E. (Chillicothe, IL)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

424

Organic removal from domestic wastewater by activated alumina adsorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the major groups of pollutants in wastewaters. Adsorption by granular activated carbon, a non-polar adsorbent, is now the primary treatment process for removal of residual organics from biologically treated wastewater. The ability of activated alumina..., which is a polar adsorbent, to remove total organic carbon (TOC) and some trace organics from domestic wastewater has been evaluated. Batch adsorption experiments were used to investigate the effect of pH and total dissolved solids on activated...

Yang, Pe-Der

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

425

Solid materials for removing arsenic and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid materials have been developed to remove arsenic compounds from aqueous media. The arsenic is removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the arsenic leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are aerogels or xerogels and aerogels or xerogels and solid support structure, e.g., granulated activated carbon (GAC), mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards arsenic.

Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Sabre J. (Oakland, CA); Sanner, Robert D. (Livermore, CA); Dias, Victoria L. (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Reverse osmosis treatment to remove inorganic contaminants from drinking water  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the research project was to determine the removal of inorganic contaminants from drinking water using several state-of-the-art reverse osmosis membrane elements. A small 5-KGPD reverse osmosis system was utilized and five different membrane elements were studied individually with the specific inorganic contaminants added to several natural Florida ground waters. Removal data were also collected on naturally occurring substances.

Huxstep, M.R.; Sorg, T.J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench waters from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot plants  

SciTech Connect

Studies were initiated to assess the efficiency of bench-scale, activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from coal-gasification process effluents. Samples of pilot-plant, raw-gas quench waters were obtained from the HYGAS process of the Institute of Gas Technology and from the slagging, fixed-bed (SFB) process of the Grand Forks Energy Technology Center. The types of coal employed were Bituminous Illinois No. 6 for the HYGAS and Indian Head lignite for the SFB process. These pilot-plant quench waters, while not strictly representative of commercial condensates, were considered useful to evaluate the efficiency of biological oxidation for the removal of organics. Biological-reactor influent and effluent samples were extracted using a methylene chloride pH-fractionation method into acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry. Influent acid fractions of both HYGAS and SFB condensates showed that nearly 99% of extractable and chromatographable organic material comprised phenol and alkylated phenols. Activated-sludge treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Removal efficiency of base-fraction organics was generally good, except for certain alkylated pyridines. Removal of neutral-fraction organics was also good, except for certain alkylated benzenes, certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and certain cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes, especially at low influent concentrations.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Removal of BPA by enzyme polymerization using NF membranes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The application of laccase and peroxidase from horseradish (HRP) to facilitate the removal of bisphenol A (BPA) from aqueous solutions was investigated. Effect of pH and the enzyme dose was evaluated in order to determine the optimum conditions for the enzyme performance. The results indicate that BPA was quickly removed from aqueous solution since a BPA conversion over 95% was obtained in 180 min for both enzymes in optimal conditions; the higher the enzyme dose, the higher the removal percentage of BPA. It was also found that the optimum pH for the removal efficiency of BPA was around 7 for both enzymes. The use of a membrane-reactor integrated system with recycling of enzyme for BPA degradation is also presented. These results demonstrate the potential and limitations of using enzymatic BPA degradation, operated in a recycling mode coupled to a nanofiltration membrane. BPA removal efficiencies for several NF membranes were related to the BPA molecular weight, membrane pore sizes and membrane hydrophobicity. NF270 showed the best performance in membrane-assisted enzyme treatment: 89% removal of BPA for the two enzyme treatments and less than 35% flux decay were observed.

Ivonne Escalona; Joris de Grooth; Josep Font; Kitty Nijmeijer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Research Plans  

SciTech Connect

The MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometry (LSDS) project has been evaluating the feasibility of using LSDS techniques to assay fissile isotopes in used nuclear fuel assemblies. The approach has the potential to provide considerable improvement in the assay of fissile isotopic masses in fuel assemblies compared to other non-destructive techniques in a direct and independent manner. The LSDS collaborations suggests that the next step to in empirically testing the feasibility is to conduct measurements on fresh fuel assemblies to understand investigate self-attenuation and fresh mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel rodlets so we may betterto understand extraction of masses for 235U and 239Pu. While progressing toward these goals, the collaboration also strongly suggests the continued development of enabling technology such as detector development and algorithm development, thatwhich could provide significant performance benefits.

Warren, Glen A.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Gavron, Victor; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Harris, Jason; Stewart, T.

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

430

Synthesis and regeneration of lead (IV) acetate  

SciTech Connect

Lead acetate [Pb(O{sub 2}CMe){sub 4}] was easily synthesized from a warm solution of Pb{sub 3}O{sub 4}, HO{sub 2}CMe and O(OCMe){sub 2} following literature preparations when the appropriate measures to minimize water contamination were followed. Furthermore, Pb(O{sub 2}CMe){sub 4} which has been decomposed (evidenced by the appearance of a purple color due to oxidation) can be regenerated using a similar preparatory route. Introduction of Pb(O{sub 2}CMe){sub 4} from the two routes outlined above into the IMO process for production of PZT thin films gave films with comparable ferroelectric properties to commercially available Pb(O{sub 2}CMe){sub 4} precursors. However, the freshly synthesized material yields PZT films with better properties compared to the recycled material.

Boyle, T.J.; Al-Shareef, H.N.; Moore, G.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Lab.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

BOA: Asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system, Phase 2. Topical report, January--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report explored the regulatory impact and cost-benefit of a robotic thermal asbestos pipe-insulation removal system over the current manual abatement work practice. The authors are currently in the second phase of a two-phase program to develop a robotic asbestos abatement system, comprised of a ground-based support system (including vacuum, fluid delivery, computing/electronics/power, and other subsystems) and several on-pipe removal units, each sized to handle pipes within a given diameter range. The intent of this study was to (i) aid in developing design and operational criteria for the overall system to maximize cost-efficiency, and (ii) to determine the commercial potential of a robotic pipe-insulation abatement system.

Schempf, H.; Bares, J.E.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Characterisation of rotary kiln residues from the pyrolysis of shredder residues: Issues with lead  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stringent legislation is being to be implemented across Europe relating to heavy metal contamination into the environment. This study thus focuses on developing a method for reliably determining the lead content of automotive shredder residue (ASR). The material is first pyrolysed to remove organic fractions. Different analytical methods were then used to investigate the concentrations of heavy metals in the burned char, which varies from chunks of metals in larger sized fractions to fine powders of mostly non-metals. By considering results from ICP-MS, EDXRF, WDXRF and a portable EDXRF, it was found that varying values were obtained but that consistent ‘consensus values’ could be determined. Such ‘consensus’ values of lead, copper, iron and zinc are thus reported, and show that properly depolluted \\{ELVs\\} have significantly lower lead levels than normal shredder residue (SR) feed ?8000 ppm versus 16,000 ppm. The finest fraction, <850 ?m, makes up around half of the mass of the SR and has only 2700 ppm and 5400 ppm lead concentration values for depolluted \\{ELVs\\} and normal SR, respectively, making it of interest for further work to develop uses as a feed in other industries.

Osric T. Forton; Lucas McGrady; M.M. Singh; E.R.M. Taylor; Norman R. Moles; Marie K. Harder

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Partially Sulfated Lime-Fly Ash Sorbents Activated by Water or Steam for SO2 Removal at a Medium Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Partially Sulfated Lime-Fly Ash Sorbents Activated by Water or Steam for SO2 Removal at a Medium Temperature ... The low utilization of calcium-based sorbent is caused by the formation of calcium sulfite or sulfate, which have larger molar volumes than CaO or Ca(OH)2. ... ignition?loss ...

Liming Shi; Xuchang Xu

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

434

Comparison of leading and next-to-leading logarithmic electroweak corrections to Higgs production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using soft-collinear effective theory, the leading-log radiative electroweak corrections are written in a closed and analytical form for the hadronic cross section of Higgs production through vector boson fusion, qq->qqH, one of the most promising channels for studying the Higgs boson at the LHC. The simple leading-log resummation is compared with a full next-to-leading-log calculation, and its accuracy is found to be of order 1% up to 10 TeV, i.e. better than the accuracy of PDFs. Corrections are found to be larger than predicted by one-loop fixed order approximations at LHC energies. The method provides a simple way of incorporating the electroweak corrections in software packages, improving the accuracy of simulations.

Fabio Siringo

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

435

Comparison of leading and next-to-leading logarithmic electroweak corrections to Higgs production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using soft-collinear effective theory, the leading-log radiative electroweak corrections are written in a closed and analytical form for the hadronic cross section of Higgs production through vector boson fusion, qq->qqH, one of the most promising channels for studying the Higgs boson at the LHC. The simple leading-log resummation is compared with a full next-to-leading-log calculation, and its accuracy is found to be of order 1% up to 10 TeV, i.e. comparable with the accuracy of PDFs. Corrections are found to be larger than predicted by one-loop fixed order approximations at LHC energies. The method provides a simple way of incorporating the electroweak corrections in software packages, improving the accuracy of simulations.

Siringo, Fabio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Lead Poisoning: A Preventable Childhood Disease of the Slums  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...complications prevention & control Paint poisoning Socioeconomic Factors...han-dled better and more cheaply by robots. "If manned planetary exploration...the lead from chipping leaded paint in old buildings. Lead poisoning...objects, such as chips of leaded paint, even if they are not hungry-a...

Mark W. Oberle

1969-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

437

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Honeymoons Lead to Upgrades in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Honeymoons Honeymoons Lead to Upgrades in Western Vermont to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Honeymoons Lead to Upgrades in Western Vermont on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Honeymoons Lead to Upgrades in Western Vermont on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Honeymoons Lead to Upgrades in Western Vermont on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Honeymoons Lead to Upgrades in Western Vermont on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Honeymoons Lead to Upgrades in Western Vermont on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Honeymoons Lead to Upgrades in Western Vermont on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress

438

Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

San Diego Leads in San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs on AddThis.com... Sept. 3, 2011 San Diego Leads in Promoting EVs W atch how San Diego is leading the way in promoting electric vehicles. For information about this project, contact San Diego Regional Clean Cities

439

Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule  

SciTech Connect

This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T&FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420oC. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

Soli T. Khericha

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Lead(ii) Detection An Exceptionally Selective Lead(ii)-Regulatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-spore- forming bacillus that flourishes in millimolar concentrations of toxic heavy metals.[12] It is the only that responds to lead(ii) ions with a high selectivity over other heavy metal ions. This has not been achieved developed for the detection of other small molecules, but with limited success for heavy metal ions

He, Chuan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Lead Safety Awareness This Bulletin provides information on the safe handling of lead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per cubic meter of air (50 ug/m 3 ), averaged over an 8-hour work-day. For potentially higher exposure necessary, seal off the work area with 6-millimeter plastic and wear properly fitting High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) respirator and protective clothing and equipment. · Post warning signs where lead

442

Lead Defendant Cases Filed Injunctions - Remands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Cases Filed in 2011 2011 NEPA Case Dispositions NEPA Cases Filed in 2011 2011 NEPA Case Dispositions Lead Defendant Cases Filed Injunctions - Remands Judgment for defendant 79 ARMY-USACE 3 2 Dismissal w/o settlement 20 DHS-USCG 1 1 Settlement 18 DOD 0 0 Adverse dispositions: 29 DOE-Energy 2 0 TRO 0 DOE-FERC 0 0 Preliminary Injunction 5 DOE-NNSA 0 0 Permanent Injunction 3 DOI-BIA 0 0 Remand 21 DOI-BLM 22 8 DOI-BOEM 0 0 Basis for 2011 NEPA Dispositions DOI-BOR 1 2 Jurisdictional - P prevailed 2 DOI-FWS 4 2 Jurisdictional - D prevailed 20 DOI-NPS 4 0 NEPA - Not required 4 DOJ 0 0 NEPA - Is required 4 DOS 0 0 CE - Adequate 5 DOT-FMCSA 1 0 CE - Not Adequate 5 DOT-FAA 3 1 EA - Adequate* 24 DOT-FHWA 14 2 EA - Not Adequate* 5 DOT-FTA 2 0 EIS - Adequate* 32 DOT-STB 0 1 EIS - Not Adequate* 15

443

Pyrolysis of Mixed Plastic Wastes for the Recovery of Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene (BTX) Aromatics in a Fluidized Bed and Chlorine Removal by Applying Various Additives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It seems that the char removal system, which was composed of a cyclone and a hot filter, almost perfectly removed the char particles. ... To absorb the hydrogen chloride that was formed from the degradation of the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) in the mixed plastic wastes, additives (calcium oxide, calcium hydroxide, crushed oyster shells, and rice straw) were added to a fraction of the mixed plastic wastes. ... For different additives, different Ca/Cl ratios should be chosen based on the cost, HCl removal efficiency and utilization efficiency of additive. ...

Min-Hwan Cho; Su-Hwa Jung; Joo-Sik Kim

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results & Policy Implications Title Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results & Policy Implications Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2009 Authors Mathieu, Johanna L., Ashok J. Gadgil, Kristin Kowolik, and Susan E. Addy Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate-bottom ash from coal fired power plants-is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more thanhalf of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing anarsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages

445

A method for removing arm backscatter from EPID images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To develop a method for removing the support arm backscatter from images acquired using current Varian electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs).Methods: The effect of arm backscatter on EPID images was modeled using a kernel convolution method. The parameters of the model were optimized by comparing on-arm images to off-arm images. The model was used to develop a method to remove the effect of backscatter from measured EPID images. The performance of the backscatter removal method was tested by comparing backscatter corrected on-arm images to measured off-arm images for 17 rectangular fields of different sizes and locations on the imager. The method was also tested using on- and off-arm images from 42 intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) fields.Results: Images generated by the backscatter removal method gave consistently better agreement with off-arm images than images without backscatter correction. For the 17 rectangular fields studied, the root mean square difference of in-plane profiles compared to off-arm profiles was reduced from 1.19% (standard deviation 0.59%) on average without backscatter removal to 0.38% (standard deviation 0.18%) when using the backscatter removal method. When comparing to the off-arm images from the 42 IMRT fields, the mean {gamma} and percentage of pixels with {gamma} < 1 were improved by the backscatter removal method in all but one of the images studied. The mean {gamma} value (1%, 1 mm) for the IMRT fields studied was reduced from 0.80 to 0.57 by using the backscatter removal method, while the mean {gamma} pass rate was increased from 72.2% to 84.6%.Conclusions: A backscatter removal method has been developed to estimate the image acquired by the EPID without any arm backscatter from an image acquired in the presence of arm backscatter. The method has been shown to produce consistently reliable results for a wide range of field sizes and jaw configurations.

King, Brian W. [School of Mathematical and Physics Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales 2308 (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales 2310 (Australia); School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales 2308 (Australia)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

A struggle for Cherokee community : excavating identity in post-removal North Carolina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Cherokee Removal of 1838 was intended to remove all members of the Cherokee Nation to west of the Mississippi River. However, a small number… (more)

Greene, Lance.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Survey and Down-Selection of Acid Gas Removal Systems for the Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass to Ethanol with a Detailed Analysis of an MDEA System  

SciTech Connect

The first section (Task 1) of this report by Nexant includes a survey and screening of various acid gas removal processes in order to evaluate their capability to meet the specific design requirements for thermochemical ethanol synthesis in NREL's thermochemical ethanol design report (Phillips et al. 2007, NREL/TP-510-41168). MDEA and selexol were short-listed as the most promising acid-gas removal agents based on work described in Task 1. The second report section (Task 2) describes a detailed design of an MDEA (methyl diethanol amine) based acid gas removal system for removing CO2 and H2S from biomass-derived syngas. Only MDEA was chosen for detailed study because of the available resources.

Nexant, Inc., San Francisco, California

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Removable pellicle for lithographic mask protection and handling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A removable pellicle for a lithographic mask that provides active and robust particle protection, and which utilizes a traditional pellicle and two deployments of thermophoretic protection to keep particles off the mask. The removable pellicle is removably attached via a retaining structure to the mask substrate by magnetic attraction with either contacting or non-contacting magnetic capture mechanisms. The pellicle retaining structural is composed of an anchor piece secured to the mask substrate and a frame member containing a pellicle. The anchor piece and the frame member are in removable contact or non-contact by the magnetic capture or latching mechanism. In one embodiment, the frame member is retained in a floating (non-contact) relation to the anchor piece by magnetic levitation. The frame member and the anchor piece are provided with thermophoretic fins which are interdigitated to prevent particles from reaching the patterned area of the mask. Also, the anchor piece and mask are maintained at a higher temperature than the frame member and pellicle which also prevents particles from reaching the patterned mask area by thermophoresis. The pellicle can be positioned over the mask to provide particle protection during mask handling, inspection, and pumpdown, but which can be removed manually or robotically for lithographic use of the mask.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Albuquerque, NM); Hector, Scott D. (Oakland, CA); Nguyen, Khanh B. (Sunnyvale, CA); Stulen, Richard H. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: SHORT-TERM RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to utilities with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species, a precursor to acid aerosol/condensable emissions, and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of SCR for NOX control on some coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project is testing the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium- and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents have been tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry produced from a wet flue gas desulfurization system waste stream, from a system that employs a Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime scrubbing process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles into the front wall of upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests. The longer-term tests are being conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. This reports presents the results of the short-term tests; the long-term test results will be reported in a later document. The short-term test results showed that three of the four reagents tested, dolomite powder, commercial magnesium hydroxide slurry, and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry, were able to achieve 90% or greater removal of sulfuric acid compared to baseline levels. The molar ratio of alkali to flue gas sulfuric acid content (under baseline conditions) required to achieve 90% sulfuric acid removal was lowest for the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry. However, this result may be confounded because this was the only one of the three slurries tested with injection near the top of the furnace across from the pendant superheater platens. Injection at the higher level was demonstrated to be advantageous for this reagent over injection lower in the furnace, where the other slurries were tested.

Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

450

SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: SHORT-TERM RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to utilities with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species, a precursor to acid aerosol/condensable emissions, and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of SCR for NO{sub x} control on some coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project is testing the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium- and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents have been tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two First Energy Bruce Mansfield Plant units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry produced from a wet flue gas desulfurization system waste stream, from a system that employs a Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime scrubbing process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles into the front wall of upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests. The longer-term tests are being conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. This reports presents the results of the short-term tests; the long-term test results will be reported in a later document. The short-term test results showed that three of the four reagents tested, dolomite powder, commercial magnesium hydroxide slurry, and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry, were able to achieve 90% or greater removal of sulfuric acid compared to baseline levels. The molar ratio of alkali to flue gas sulfuric acid content (under baseline conditions) required to achieve 90% sulfuric acid removal was lowest for the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry. However, this result may be confounded because this was the only one of the three slurries tested with injection near the top of the furnace across from the pendant superheater platens. Injection at the higher level was demonstrated to be advantageous for this reagent over injection lower in the furnace, where the other slurries were tested.

Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

451

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alabama City Leads Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and Ethanol on AddThis.com... July 21, 2012 Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and Ethanol L earn how the City of Hoover uses biodiesel and ethanol to fuel municipal

452

Small-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102  

SciTech Connect

The pretreatment process for BNFL, Inc.'s Hanford River Protection Project is to provide decontaminated low activity waste and concentrated eluate streams for vitrification into low and high activity waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, cesium, transuranics, technetium, and strontium. The cesium (Cs-137) and technetium (Tc-99) ion exchange removal is accomplished by using SuperLig 644, and 639 resins from IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah. The resins were shown to selectively remove cesium and technetium (as anionic pertechnetate ) from alkaline salt solutions. The efficiency of ion exchange column loading and elution is a complex function involving feed compositions, equilibrium and kinetic behavior of ion exchange resins, diffusion, and the ionic strength and pH of the aqueous solution. A previous experimental program completed at the Savannah River Tech nology Center2 demonstrated the conceptualized flow sheet parameters with an Envelope C sample from Hanford Tank 241-AN-107. Those experiments also included determination of Cs and Tc batch distribution coefficients by SuperLig 644 and 639 resins and demonstration of small-scale column breakthrough and elution. The experimental findings were used in support of preliminary design bases and pretreatment flow sheet development by BNFL, Inc.

Hassan, N.M.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

453

Small-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-103  

SciTech Connect

The pretreatment process for BNFL, Inc.'s Hanford River Protection Project is to provide decontaminated low activity waste and concentrated eluate streams for vitrification into low activity and high level waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, cesium, transuranics, technetium, and strontium. The ion exchange removal of cesium (Cs) and technetium (Tc) ions is accomplished by using SuperLig 644, and 639 resins from IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah. The resins were shown to selectively remove cesium and technetium (as pertechnetate), from alkaline salt solutions. The efficiency of ion exchange column loading and elution is a complex function involving feed compositions, equilibrium and kinetic behavior of ion exchange resins, diffusion, and the ionic strength and pH of the aqueous solution. A previous experimental program completed at the Savannah River Technology Center demonstrated the conceptualized flow sheet parameters with a similar Hanford tank sample (241-AW-101). Those experiments included determination of Cs and Tc batch distribution coefficients by SuperLig 644 and 639 resins and demonstration of small-scale column breakthrough and elution. The experimental findings were used in support of preliminary design bases and pretreatment flow sheet development by BNFL, Inc.

Hassan, N.M.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

454

Using large environmental chamber technique for gaseous contaminant removal equipment test  

SciTech Connect

The US Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) has set a voluntary standard for testing the initial dust-removal capacity of portable air cleaners. In the authors` test of portable air cleaners for the local consumer council, the AHAM method was extended to test the initial removal capacity for gaseous phase pollutants. Also, carbon filters` efficiency change over time in toluene removal on a number of air cleaners was tested. In using a large chamber to carry out these tests, the chamber wall adsorption and re-emission effects were experimentally quantified. These tests indicated that a large chamber, with its wall surface adsorption controlled, is simple and robust to use to quantify the initial cleaning capacity for gaseous phase pollutants. Based on these test results, a large chamber method is proposed to test the performance lifetimes of portable air cleaners. The system advantages of the method over the in-duct performance life test methods are that no continuous air-cleaning system is required and that the chamber`s humidity and temperature can be maintained at the desired values more easily with the combination of a unitary dehumidifier and a bubbler system. This paper will present the trial results with portable air cleaner tests and discuss the large environmental chamber techniques.

Niu, J.; Tung, T.C.W.; Chui, V.W.Y. [Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ. (Hong Kong). Dept. of Building Services Engineering

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

Lab sets new record for waste volume removed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab Sets New Record for Waste Volume Removed Lab Sets New Record for Waste Volume Removed Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Lab sets new record for waste volume removed The Transuranic Waste Program has met its commitment to ship 800 cubic meters of TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant during fiscal year 2012. November 1, 2012 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email A lot of people worked together to make this happen, including our partners at the State of New Mexico and WIPP, as well as NNSA, the Los Alamos Site Office, and the Laboratory. The LANL Transuranic (TRU) Waste Program has met its commitment to ship 800 cubic meters of TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during

456

Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stories » Stories » Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time The Lab's 1,000th shipment of transuranic waste recently left Los Alamos, on its way to a permanent repository near Carlsbad, NM. June 26, 2012 Governor Martinez applauding the 1014th TRU waste shipment New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez and other dignitaries applaud as the 1,014th shipment of transuranic waste leaves Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email "The milestone we're celebrating is one that has been a long-term environmental commitment." Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time Elected officials and other dignitaries recently gathered at Los Alamos

457

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success October 3, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here is the Moab uranium mill tailings pile. Tailings excavation and conditioning activities are seen in the foreground. The water spray is used to eliminate extracted contaminated groundwater. Pictured here is the Moab uranium mill tailings pile. Tailings excavation and conditioning activities are seen in the foreground. The water spray is used to eliminate extracted contaminated groundwater. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler stands on a final cover layer of the disposal cell. Several other layers are visible behind him. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler stands on a final cover layer

458

Rocket Slated for Removal Following Inspections | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocket Slated for Removal Following Inspections Rocket Slated for Removal Following Inspections Rocket Slated for Removal Following Inspections April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Though not linked to activities at Clean Slate III, the rocket is situated inside the historic testing location, identified for the plutonium dispersal test conducted under Operation Roller Coaster in June 1963. Though not linked to activities at Clean Slate III, the rocket is situated inside the historic testing location, identified for the plutonium dispersal test conducted under Operation Roller Coaster in June 1963. LAS VEGAS - Nevada Field Office and U.S. Air Force staff conducted inspections of a partially-buried rocket located at a historic testing location on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) earlier this year. While the origin of the rocket and the time frame of its launch are

459

Energy Department Announces New Initiative to Remove Barriers for Industry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Initiative to Remove Barriers for Initiative to Remove Barriers for Industry to Work with National Labs, Commercialize Technology Energy Department Announces New Initiative to Remove Barriers for Industry to Work with National Labs, Commercialize Technology December 8, 2011 - 12:30pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - As part of President Obama's commitment to helping U.S businesses create jobs and strengthen their competitiveness by speeding up the transfer of federal research and development from the laboratory to the marketplace, U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman today announced a new pilot initiative to reduce some of the hurdles that prevent innovative companies from working with the Department of Energy's national laboratories. The new Agreements for Commercializing Technology

460

Mobile system for microwave removal of concrete surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the microwave removal of contaminated concrete surfaces. The apparatus comprises a housing adapted to pass over a support surface. The housing includes a waveguide for directing microwave energy to the surface at an angle maximizing absorption of microwave energy by the surface. The apparatus is further provided with a source of microwave energy operably associated with the waveguide, wherein the microwave energy has a frequency of between about 10.6 GHz and about 24 GHz and acts to remove the uppermost layer from the surface. The apparatus further includes a debris containment assembly comprising a vacuum assembly operably associated with the housing. The vacuum assembly is adapted to remove debris from the area adjacent the surface.

White, Terry L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Schaich, Charles R. (Lenoir City, TN); Foster, Jr., Don (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removing lead base" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Evaluation of Technologies to Remove Suspended Solids from Waste Water  

SciTech Connect

The Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at the Savannah River Site utilizes pH adjustment, submicron filtration, Hg removal resin, activated carbon, reverse osmosis, cationic exchange, and evaporation to remove contaminants from radioactive waste water. After startup, the ETF had difficulty achieving design capacity. The primary problem was fouling of the ceramic microfilters. Typical filter flow rates were only 20 percent of design capacity.A research program was conducted to identify and evaluate technologies for improving suspended solids removal from radioactive wastewater at the Savannah River Site. Technolgies investigated were a ceramic microfilter, a tubular polymeric ultrafilter, two porous metal filters, a polymeric centrifugal ultrafilter, a deep bed filter, a backwashable cartridge filter, a fabric filter, and a centriguge.

Poirier, M.R.

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Other States Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 513 491 515 539 557 534 541 579 574 585 558 573 1998 578 536 591 581 517 456 486 486 471 477 457 468 1999 466 438 489 495 499 510 547 557 544 555 541 579 2000 587 539 605 587 615 570 653 629 591 627 609 611 2001 658 591 677 690 718 694 692 679 686 697 688 700 2002 639 591 587 621 622 605 654 639 649 650 623 638 2003 689 624 649 676 702 691 733 732 704 734 719 748 2004 741 697 727 692 692 688 718 729 706 723 711 718

463

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Celebrates 5 Years of Success October 3, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here is the Moab uranium mill tailings pile. Tailings excavation and conditioning activities are seen in the foreground. The water spray is used to eliminate extracted contaminated groundwater. Pictured here is the Moab uranium mill tailings pile. Tailings excavation and conditioning activities are seen in the foreground. The water spray is used to eliminate extracted contaminated groundwater. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler stands on a final cover layer of the disposal cell. Several other layers are visible behind him. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler stands on a final cover layer

464

Adsorptive Membranes vs. Resins for Acetic Acid Removal from Biomass Hydrolysates  

SciTech Connect

Acetic acid is a compound commonly found in hemicellulosic hydrolysates. This weak acid strongly influences the bioconversion of sugar containing hydrolysates. Previous investigators have used anion exchange resins for acetic acid removal from different hemicellulosic hydrolysates. In this study, the efficiency of an anion exchange membrane was compared to that of an anion exchange resin, for acetic acid removal from a DI water solution and an acidic hemicellulose hydrolysate pretreated using two different methods. Ion exchange membranes and resins have very different geometries. Here the performance of membranes and resins is compared using two dimensionless parameters, the relative mass throughput and chromatographic bed number. The relative mass throughput arises naturally from the Thomas solution for ion exchange. The results show that the membrane exhibit better performance in terms of capacity, and loss of the desired sugars. In addition acetic acid may be eluted at a higher concentration from the membrane thus leading to the possibility of recovery and re-use of the acetic acid.

Han, B.; Carvalho, W.; Canilha, L.; da Silva, S. S.; e Silva, J. B. A.; McMillan, J. D.; Wickramasinghe, S. R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases from Flashed-Steam Geothermal Power Plants:April 1999 - March 2000 Dataset Summary Description This dataset corresponds to the final report on a screening study to compare six methods of removing noncondensable gases from direct-use geo-thermal steam power plants. This report defines the study methodologies and compares the performance and economics of selected gas-removal systems. Recommendations are presented for follow-up investigations and implementation of some of the technologies discussed. The specific gas-removal methods include five vacuum system configurations using the conventional approach of evacuating gas/vapor mixtures from the power plant condenser system and a system for physical separation of steam and gases upstream of the power turbine. The study focused on flashed-steam applications, but the results apply equally well to flashed-steam and dry-steam geothermal power plant configurations. Two gas-removal options appear to offer profitable economic potential. The hybrid vacuum system configurations and the reboiler process yield positive net present value results over wide-ranging gas concentrations. The hybrid options look favorable for both low-temperature and high-temperature resource applications. The reboiler looks profitable for low-temperature resource applications for gas levels above about 20,000 parts per million by volume. A vacuum system configuration using a three-stage turbocompressor battery may be profitable for low-temperature resources, but results show that the hybrid system is more profitable. The biphase eductor alternative cannot be recommended for commercialization at this time. The report is available from NREL's publication database.

466

SEPARATION OF HEAVY METALS: REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SEPARATION SEPARATION OF HEAVY METALS: REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS AND CONTAMINATED SOIL* Robert W. Peters + and Linda Shem Energy Systems Division Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439 Abstract This paper reviews the applicable separation technologies relating to removal of heavy metals from solution and from soils in order to present the state-of-the-art in the field. Each technology is briefly described and typical operating conditions and technology performance are presented. Technologies described include chemical precipitation (including hydroxide, carbonate, or sulfide reagents), coagulation/flocculation, ion exchange, solvent extraction, extraction with chelating agents, complexation, electrochemical operation, cementation, membrane operations, evaporation, adsorption, solidification/stabilization, and

467

Neutron removal cross section as a measure of neutron skin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the relation between neutron removal cross section (?-N) and neutron skin thickness for finite neutron-rich nuclei using the statistical abrasion ablation model. Different sizes of neutron skin are obtained by adjusting the diffuseness parameter of neutrons in the Fermi distribution. It is demonstrated that there is a good linear correlation between ?-N and the neutron skin thickness for neutron-rich nuclei. Further analysis suggests that the relative increase of neutron removal cross section could be used as a quantitative measure for neutron skin thickness in neutron-rich nuclei.

D. Q. Fang (???); Y. G. Ma (???); X. Z. Cai (???); W. D. Tian (???); H. W. Wang (???)

2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

468

Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

Olson, Edwin S. (Grand Forks, ND); Holmes, Michael J. (Thompson, ND); Pavlish, John H. (East Grand Forks, MN)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

469

Method for removal of beryllium contamination from an article  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removal of beryllium contamination from an article is disclosed. The method typically involves dissolving polyisobutylene in a solvent such as hexane to form a tackifier solution, soaking the substrate in the tackifier to produce a preform, and then drying the preform to produce the cleaning medium. The cleaning media are typically used dry, without any liquid cleaning agent to rub the surface of the article and remove the beryllium contamination below a non-detect level. In some embodiments no detectible residue is transferred from the cleaning wipe to the article as a result of the cleaning process.

Simandl, Ronald F.; Hollenbeck, Scott M.

2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

470

Water Recycling removal using temperature-sensitive hydronen  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project was to study the proposed Water Recycling/Removal Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogels. The main element of this technology is the design of a suitable hydrogel that can perform needed water separation for pulp and paper industry. The specific topics studied are to answer following questions: (a) Can water be removed using hydrogel from large molecules such as lignin? (b) Can the rate of separation be made faster? (c) What are the molecular interactions with hydrogel surface? (d) Can a hydrogel be designed for a high ionic strength and high temperature? Summary of the specific results are given.

Rana B. Gupta

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

471

Investigating the Use of Biosorbents to Remove Arsenic from Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,2,3 ?...........................................................................?36? Table?9?Arsenic?removal?and?its?adsorption?capacity?for?various?adsorbents?.....?37? ? ? ? ? 1? ? ? ? 1. INTRODUCTION 1 ? Arsenic?is?a?colorless?and?odorless?Group?V?element?discovered?in?1250?AD.? Arsenic?has?an?atomic?number?of?33?and?is?the?20...?present?an?oxidant?must?be?added?to?oxidize?As(III)? to?As(V)?and?form?anions?in?solutions?[27].? 1.5.5.?Adsorption?? Arsenic?removal?is?also?achieved?through?adsorption?on?commercial? adsorbents...

Erapalli, Shreyas

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

472

Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

Olson, Edwin S.; Holmes, Michael J.; Pavlish, John Henry

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

473

Methods of hydrotreating a liquid stream to remove clogging compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method includes producing formation fluid from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a gas stream. At least a portion of the liquid stream is provided to a hydrotreating unit. At least a portion of selected in situ heat treatment clogging compositions in the liquid stream are removed to produce a hydrotreated liquid stream by hydrotreating at least a portion of the liquid stream at conditions sufficient to remove the selected in situ heat treatment clogging compositions.

Minderhoud, Johannes Kornelis [Amsterdam, NL; Nelson, Richard Gene [Katy, TX; Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria [Houston, TX; Ryan, Robert Charles [Houston, TX; Nair, Vijay [Katy, TX

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

474

Particle removal challenges with EUV patterned mask for the sub-22nm HP node  

SciTech Connect

The particle removal efficiency (PRE) of cleaning processes diminishes whenever the minimum defect size for a specific technology node becomes smaller. For the sub-22 nm half-pitch (HP) node, it was demonstrated that exposure to high power megasonic up to 200 W/cm{sup 2} did not damage 60 nm wide TaBN absorber lines corresponding to the 16 nm HP node on wafer. An ammonium hydroxide mixture and megasonics removes {ge}50 nm SiO{sub 2} particles with a very high PRE, A sulfuric acid hydrogen peroxide mixture (SPM) in addition to ammonium hydroxide mixture (APM) and megasonic is required to remove {ge}28 nm SiO{sub 2} particles with a high PRE. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOFSIMS) studies show that the presence of O{sub 2} during a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ({lambda} = 172 nm) surface conditioning step will result in both surface oxidation and Ru removal, which drastically reduce extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask life time under multiple cleanings. New EUV mask cleaning processes show negligible or no EUV reflectivity loss and no increase in surface roughness after up to 15 cleaning cycles. Reviewing of defect with a high current density scanning electron microscope (SEM) drastically reduces PRE and deforms SiO{sub 2} particles. 28 nm SiO{sub 2} particles on EUV masks age very fast and will deform over time, Care must be taken when reviewing EUV mask defects by SEM. Potentially new particles should be identified to calibrate short wavelength inspection tools, Based on actinic image review, 50 nm SiO{sub 2} particles on top of the EUV mask will be printed on the wafer.

Rastegar, A.; Eichenlaub, S.; Kadaksham, A. J.; Lee, B.; House, M.; Huh, S.; Cha, B.; Yun, H.; Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

475

Laser isotope purification of lead for use in semiconductor chip interconnects  

SciTech Connect

Lead, used throughout the electronics industries, typically contains small amounts of radioactive {sup 210}Pb (a daughter product of the planet`s ubiquitous {sup 210}U) whose {sup 210}Po daughter emits and {alpha}-particle that is known to cause soft errors in electronic circuits. The {sup 210}Pb is not easily separable by chemical means. This paper describes the generic Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) process developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) over the last 20 years, with particular emphasis on recent efforts to develop the process physics and component technologies required to remove the offending {sup 210}Pb using lasers. We have constructed a developmental facility that includes a process laser development area and a test bed for the vaporizer and ion and product collectors. We will be testing much of the equipment and demonstrating pilot-scale AVLIS on a surrogate material later this year. Detection of the very low alpha emission even from commercially available low-alpha lead is challenging. LLNL`s detection capabilities will be described. The goal of the development of lead purification technology is to demonstrate the capability in FY97, and to begin filling orders of up to several MT/y of isotopically purified material in FY98.

Scheibner, K.; Haynam, C.; Worden, E.; Esser, B.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Protocol, Site Leads - May 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Leads - May 2011 Site Leads - May 2011 Protocol, Site Leads - May 2011 May 2011 Protocol for Site Leads The purpose of this protocol is to establish the requirements and responsibilities for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Leads. The Site Lead's primary responsibility is to perform independent safety oversight at their assigned site(s). Site Leads are assigned to Department of Energy (DOE) sites with nuclear facilities to maintain operational awareness, establish and implement a prioritized set of oversight activities focused on high hazard nuclear facilities and tailored to site conditions, activities and issues. Protocol, Site Leads - May 2011 More Documents & Publications Appraisal Process Protocols, Independent Oversight - November 2012

477

Protocol, Site Leads - May 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protocol, Site Leads - May 2011 Protocol, Site Leads - May 2011 Protocol, Site Leads - May 2011 May 2011 Protocol for Site Leads The purpose of this protocol is to establish the requirements and responsibilities for the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Site Leads. The Site Lead's primary responsibility is to perform independent safety oversight at their assigned site(s). Site Leads are assigned to Department of Energy (DOE) sites with nuclear facilities to maintain operational awareness, establish and implement a prioritized set of oversight activities focused on high hazard nuclear facilities and tailored to site conditions, activities and issues. Protocol, Site Leads - May 2011 More Documents & Publications Appraisal Process Protocols, Independent Oversight - November 2012

478

Systems Engineering Leading Indicators Guide, Version 1.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Systems Engineering Leading Indicators guide set reflects the initial subset of possible indicators that were considered to be the highest priority for evaluating effectiveness before the fact. A leading indicator is ...

Lean Advancement Initiative

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

Lab Discovery: Water Leads to Chemical that "Gunks Up" Biofuels...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lab Discovery: Water Leads to Chemical that "Gunks Up" Biofuels Production Lab Discovery: Water Leads to Chemical that "Gunks Up" Biofuels Production November 20, 2014 - 12:16pm...

480

Solar Decathlon Team Leading the Way Toward Sustainable Living...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Leading the Way Toward Sustainable Living, Even in the Wake of Disasters Solar Decathlon Team Leading the Way Toward Sustainable Living, Even in the Wake of Disasters August 18,...

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481

DOE ZERH Second Leading Builder Round Table Meeting Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On October 23rd-24th, 2014, the ZERH program held its Second Leading Production Builder Round Table Meeting in Suwanee, GA. The purpose was to provide top executives from leading builders with a...

482

Lead levels in the water of suburban Glasgow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... per ml RBC per min (Units). Blood and water lead levels were measured by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry (Table 1).

GAIL ADDIS; MICHAEL R. MOORE

1974-11-08T23:59:59.000Z