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1

Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Increases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Increases in Safe and Responsible Production from Depleted U.S. Oil Fields Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Increases in Safe and Responsible Production from Depleted U.S. Oil Fields April 25, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that an innovative technology has successfully improved oil recovery at a 106-year old Illinois field by more than 300 percent. This method of extraction could help pull as many as 130 million additional barrels of oil from the depleted field, which is past peak production using traditional drilling. "The Energy Department is making critical investments in innovations today that are helping the U.S. find and develop every available source of

2

Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Increases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Increases in Safe and Responsible Production from Depleted U.S. Oil Fields Innovative DOE Technology Demonstrates Potential for Significant Increases in Safe and Responsible Production from Depleted U.S. Oil Fields April 25, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that an innovative technology has successfully improved oil recovery at a 106-year old Illinois field by more than 300 percent. This method of extraction could help pull as many as 130 million additional barrels of oil from the depleted field, which is past peak production using traditional drilling. "The Energy Department is making critical investments in innovations today that are helping the U.S. find and develop every available source of

3

NETL: News Release - Revolutionary Technology Could Significantly Increase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 15, 2005 August 15, 2005 Revolutionary Technology Could Significantly Increase Heavy Oil Production One-Step Well Completion Method Reduces Costs, Risks WASHINGTON, D.C. - A revolutionary new DOE-funded oil production technology that promises lower costs, reduced environmental and safety risks, and increased production is being commercialized by research partner Completion Concepts Inc., Katy, TX. The announcement follows last year's successful full-scale testing of the new technology, called "Teleperfs." An upcoming "real-world" test of the unit in an Alaska injection well will be conducted later this year. "Teleperf" "Teleperfs" are telescoping devices that are projected into the face of a formation, anchoring a well liner in place and providing entry ports for formation fluids.

4

DOE Steps Lead to Significant Increase in Compliance with Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steps Lead to Significant Increase in Compliance with Energy Steps Lead to Significant Increase in Compliance with Energy Efficiency Reporting Requirements DOE Steps Lead to Significant Increase in Compliance with Energy Efficiency Reporting Requirements January 12, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON DC - The Department of Energy announced today that it has received certifications for over 600,000 residential appliances in 15 different product categories in response to the Department's enhanced energy efficiency enforcement efforts. DOE recently announced that manufacturers had until January 8, 2010 to submit correct energy use data to the Department of Energy before aggressive enforcement actions were taken. The certification data provided by 160 different manufacturers will allow DOE to review manufacturers' compliance with minimum energy

5

The demand for high performance computing research has been significantly increasing over the past few years. Various  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand for high performance computing research has been significantly increasing over the past to promote the effective use of High Performance Computing in the research environment. In addition facility has enabled cutting-edge computations material research, "Having a high-performance computing

Akhmedov, Azer

6

A Prolonged Time Interval Between Trauma and Prophylactic Radiation Therapy Significantly Increases the Risk of Heterotopic Ossification  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To ascertain whether the time from injury to prophylactic radiation therapy (RT) influences the rate of heterotopic ossification (HO) after operative treatment of displaced acetabular fractures. Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution, retrospective analysis of patients referred for RT for the prevention of HO. Between January 2000 and January 2009, 585 patients with displaced acetabular fractures were treated surgically followed by RT for HO prevention. We analyzed the effect of time from injury on prevention of HO by RT. In all patients, 700 cGy was prescribed in a single fraction and delivered within 72 hours postsurgery. The patients were stratified into five groups according to time interval (in days) from the date of their accident to the date of RT: Groups A {<=}3, B {<=}7, C {<=}14, D {<=}21, and E >21days. Results: Of the 585 patients with displaced acetabular fractures treated with RT, (18%) 106 patients developed HO within the irradiated field. The risk of HO after RT increased from 10% for RT delivered {<=}3 days to 92% for treatment delivered >21 days after the initial injury. Wilcoxon test showed a significant correlation between the risk of HO and the length of time from injury to RT (p < 0.0001). Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis showed no significant association between all other factors and the risk of HO (race, gender, cause and type of fracture, surgical approach, or the use of indomethacin). Conclusions: Our data suggest that there is higher incidence and risk of HO if prophylactic RT is significantly delayed after a displaced acetabular fracture. Thus, RT should be administered as early as clinically possible after the trauma. Patients undergoing RT >3 weeks from their displaced acetabular fracture should be informed of the higher risk (>90%) of developing HO despite prophylaxis.

Mourad, Waleed F., E-mail: Waleed246@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (Israel); Packianathan, Satyaseelan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Shourbaji, Rania A. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS (United States); Zhang Zhen; Graves, Mathew [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Khan, Majid A. [Department of Radiology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Baird, Michael C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Russell, George [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States); Vijayakumar, Srinivasan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS (United States)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how hydrogen photoproduction activity in algal cultures can be improved dramatically by increasing the gas-phase to liquid-phase volume ratio of the photobioreactor. NREL, in partnership with subcontractors from the Institute of Basic Biological Problems in Pushchino, Russia, demonstrated that the hydrogen photoproduction rate in algal cultures always decreases exponentially with increasing hydrogen partial pressure above the culture. The inhibitory effect of high hydrogen concentrations in the photobioreactor gas phase on hydrogen photoproduction by algae is significant and comparable to the effect observed with some anaerobic bacteria.

Not Available

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Increasing cellulose accessibility is more important than removing lignin: A comparison of cellulose solventbased lignocellulose fractionation and soaking in aqueous ammonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increasing Increasing Cellulose Accessibility Is More Important Than Removing Lignin: A Comparison of Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Fractionation and Soaking in Aqueous Ammonia Joseph A. Rollin, 1 Zhiguang Zhu, 1 Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh, 1,2 Y.-H. Percival Zhang 1,2,3 1 Biological Systems Engineering Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061; telephone: 1-540-231-7414; fax: Ăľ1- 540-231-3199; e-mail: ypzhang@vt.edu 2 Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Sciences (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 3 DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee Received 18 May 2010; revision received 11 August 2010; accepted 17 August 2010 Published online 1 September 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22919

9

Ion Removal  

INL’s ion removal technology leverages the ability of phosphazene polymers discriminate between water and metal ions, which allows water to pass ...

10

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal silica using small gel particles. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Silica Scaling Removal Process Applications: Cooling tower systems Water treatment systems Water evaporation systems Potential mining applications (produced water) Industry applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits: Reduces scaling in cooling towers by up to 50% Increases the number of cycles of concentration substantially Reduces the amount of antiscaling chemical additives needed Decreases the amount of makeup water and subsequent discharged water (blowdown) Enables considerable cost savings derived from reductions in

11

A Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

503 * July 2012 503 * July 2012 Hydrogen photoproduction by 500 mL of sulfur/phosphorus- deprived (-S -P) algal cultures placed in PhBRs with different headspace volumes (165-925 mL). The final percentages of H 2 gas in the gas phase of the PhBRs are indicated in the figure inset; the Y-axis reports actual amounts of H 2 produced. The yield of H 2 gas in the PhBR with a historically small gas phase volume is shown as a dotted line. A Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume Project: Biological Systems for Hydrogen Photoproduction Team: Maria L. Ghirardi and Michael Seibert, NREL; Sergey N. Kosourov, Khorcheska A. Batyrova, Ekaterina P. Petushkova, and Anatoly A. Tsygankov, IBBP, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

12

Hydrogen Removal From Heating Oil of a Parabolic Trough ...  

Hydrogen Removal From Heating Oil of a Parabolic Trough Increases the Life of the Trough and its Components A Method to Selectively Remove & Measure Hydrogen Gas from ...

13

Iran’s oil exports not expected to increase significantly ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Renewable & Alternative Fuels. Includes hydropower ... and China and India began to accept Kish P&I Club—an Iranian insurer—guarantees on the ...

14

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

15

Turbomachinery debris remover  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for removing debris from a turbomachine. The apparatus includes housing and remotely operable viewing and grappling mechanisms for the purpose of locating and removing debris lodged between adjacent blades in a turbomachine.

Krawiec, Donald F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kraf, Robert J. (North Huntingdon, PA); Houser, Robert J. (Monroeville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES WELDON SPRING SITE February 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management FINAL: ESD Weldon Spring Site February 2005 1 EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES WELDON SPRING SITE I Introduction This document is an Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) for three Records of Decision (RODs) for the Weldon Spring site located in St. Charles County, Missouri. These RODs were signed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RODs addressed by this ESD are the following: * Chemical Plant Operable Unit (CPOU) ROD, signed in September 1993. This ROD

17

Graphitic packing removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Multipollutant Removal with WOWClean® System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WOW Energy built and tested its multipollutant removal WOWClean® system in a development program with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). A 2,500 ACFM mobile unit was built to field test the removal of air pollution constituents from the flue gas of a power plant and demonstrate the technology. The system integrates proven emission reduction techniques into a single, multi-pollutant reduction system and is designed to remove Mercury, SOx, NOx, particulates, heavy metals and other pollutants from low temperature flue gases. Its advantages include robust operation, lower investment, lower operating cost and high removal rates. The WOWClean® system has been tested on flue gases resulting from the combustion of diverse fuels such as petcoke, coal, wood, diesel and natural gas. In addition to significant removal of CO2, test results demonstrate the capability to reduce 99.5% SOx (from levels as high as 2200 ppm), 90% reduction of NOx, and > 90% heavy metals. The paper will include details of the multi-pollutant system along with test results.

Romero, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

A Multi-Factor Analysis of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have significant potential as a near term source of cellulosic biomass for bioenergy production, but sustainable removal of agricultural residues requires consideration of the critical roles that residues play in the agronomic system. Previous work has developed an integrated model to evaluate sustainable agricultural residue removal potential considering soil erosion, soil organic carbon, greenhouse gas emission, and long-term yield impacts of residue removal practices. The integrated model couples the environmental process models WEPS, RUSLE2, SCI, and DAYCENT. This study uses the integrated model to investigate the impact of interval removal practices in Boone County, Iowa, US. Residue removal of 4.5 Mg/ha was performed annually, bi-annually, and tri-annually and were compared to no residue removal. The study is performed at the soil type scale using a national soil survey database assuming a continuous corn rotation with reduced tillage. Results are aggregated across soil types to provide county level estimates of soil organic carbon changes and individual soil type soil organic matter content if interval residue removal were implemented. Results show interval residue removal is possible while improving soil organic matter. Implementation of interval removal practices provide greater increases in soil organic matter while still providing substantial residue for bioenergy production.

Jared Abodeely; David Muth; Paul Adler; Eleanor Campbell; Kenneth Mark Bryden

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

LM Significant Environmental Aspects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

LM evaluates all of our activities for their potential impact on the environment, and identifies those aspects that could have a significant impact if they were not controlled. This information is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Removing Barriers to Interdisciplinary Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant amount of high-impact contemporary scientific research occurs where biology, computer science, engineering and chemistry converge. Although programmes have been put in place to support such work, the complex dynamics of interdisciplinarity are still poorly understood. In this paper we interrogate the nature of interdisciplinary research and how we might measure its "success", identify potential barriers to its implementation, and suggest possible mechanisms for removing these impediments.

Naomi Jacobs; Martyn Amos

2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

22

Idaho Cleanup Contractor Surpasses Significant Safety Milestones |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cleanup Contractor Surpasses Significant Safety Milestones Cleanup Contractor Surpasses Significant Safety Milestones Idaho Cleanup Contractor Surpasses Significant Safety Milestones April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI employees discuss safety procedures before they remove a spent nuclear fuel shipment from a shipping container. CWI employees discuss safety procedures before they remove a spent nuclear fuel shipment from a shipping container. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - For the second time in a little over a year, employees with DOE contractor CH2M-WG Idaho (CWI) supporting EM at the Idaho site have achieved 1 million hours without a recordable injury. They also worked more than 1.7 million hours without a lost work-time injury. "Our focus is working with employees to keep each other safe," said CWI Environmental, Safety, and Health Vice President Kevin Daniels. "We

23

Device for removing blackheads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for removing blackheads from pores in the skin having a elongated handle with a spoon shaped portion mounted on one end thereof, the spoon having multiple small holes piercing therethrough. Also covered is method for using the device to remove blackheads.

Berkovich, Tamara (116 N. Wetherly Dr., Suite 115, Los Angeles, CA)

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

The HMDS Coating Flaw Removal Tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many high energy laser systems, optics with HMDS sol gel antireflective coatings are placed in close proximity to each other making them particularly susceptible to certain types of strong optical interactions. During the coating process, halo shaped coating flaws develop around surface digs and particles. Depending on the shape and size of the flaw, the extent of laser light intensity modulation and consequent probability of damaging downstream optics may increase significantly. To prevent these defects from causing damage, a coating flaw removal tool was developed that deploys a spot of decane with a syringe and dissolves away the coating flaw. The residual liquid is evacuated leaving an uncoated circular spot approximately 1mm in diameter. The resulting uncoated region causes little light intensity modulation and thus has a low probability of causing damage in optics downstream from the mitigated flaw site.

Monticelli, M V; Nostrand, M C; Mehta, N; Kegelmeyer, L; Johnson, M A; Fair, J; Widmayer, C

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

25

Continuous sulfur removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream using a membrane comprising a metal oxide deposited on a porous support is disclosed. 4 figures.

Jalan, V.; Ryu, J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

26

Actinide removal from nitric acid waste streams  

SciTech Connect

Actinide separations research at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) has found ways to significantly improve plutonium secondary recovery and americium removal from nitric acid waste streams generated by plutonium purification operations. Capacity and breakthrough studies show anion exchange with Dowex 1x4 (50 to 100 mesh) to be superior for secondary recovery of plutonium. Extraction chromatography with TOPO(tri-n-octyl-phosphine oxide) on XAD-4 removes the final traces of plutonium, including hydrolytic polymer. Partial neutralization and solid supported liquid membrane transfer removes americium for sorption on discardable inorganic ion exchangers, potentially allowing for non-TRU waste disposal.

Muscatello, A.C.; Navratil, J.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

A New Method to Evaluate Hydrogen Sulfide Removal from Biogas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen sulfide in biogas fuel increases the speed at which the system utilizing the biogas corrodes. This corrosion may be prevented by separating and removing… (more)

Martin, Jerry H II

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Removable feedwater sparger assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A removable feedwater sparger assembly includes a sparger having an inlet pipe disposed in flow communication with the outlet end of a supply pipe. A tubular coupling includes an annular band fixedly joined to the sparger inlet pipe and a plurality of fingers extending from the band which are removably joined to a retention flange extending from the supply pipe for maintaining the sparger inlet pipe in flow communication with the supply pipe. The fingers are elastically deflectable for allowing engagement of the sparger inlet pipe with the supply pipe and for disengagement therewith. 8 figs.

Challberg, R.C.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

29

EA-1547: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1547: Finding of No Significant Impact Fast Flux Test Facility Project, Hanford Site DOE proposes to remove readioactively-contaminated sodium residuals left over from the drain of the Hanford Site radioactively-contaminated sodium inventory (i.e., FFTF, Hallam Reactor, and Sodium Reactor Experiment) by reacting the sodium metal with water (as superheated steam) to produce caustic sodium hydroxide; remove associated equipment/components to allow removal of the sodium; and remove, dispose, and stabilize miscellaneous hazards and waste streams left over from the sodium drain. Final Environmental Shutdown of the Fast Flux Test Facility Project,Hanford Site, Richland,Washington More Documents & Publications EA-1547: Final Environmental Assessment

30

EA-1080: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

80: Finding of No Significant Impact 80: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1080: Finding of No Significant Impact Commercial Demonstration of the NOXSO SO2/NOX Removal Flue Gas Cleanup System, IN and TN The Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for a project proposed by NOXSO Corporation for the cost-shared design, construction, and operation of the NOXSO SO2/NOX Removal Flue Gas Cleanup System. DOE has determined that the proposed Federal action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act. Finding of No Significant Impact for the Proposed Commercial Demonstration of the NOXSO SO2/NOX Removal Flue Gas Cleanup System, DOE/EA-1080 (June 1995) More Documents & Publications

31

DOE Removes Brookhaven Contractor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Removes DOE Removes Brookhaven Contractor Peña sends a message to DOE facilities nationwide INSIDE 2 Accelerator Rx 4 FermiKids 6 Spring at Fermilab Photos courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory by Judy Jackson, Office of Public Affairs Secretary of Energy Federico Peña announced on Thursday, May 1, that the Department of Energy would immediately terminate the current management contract with Associated Universities, Inc. at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York. Peña said that he made the decision after receiving the results of a laboratory safety management review conducted by the independent oversight arm of DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. In addition, the Secretary said he found unacceptable "the continued on page 8 Volume 20 Friday, May 16, 1997

32

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

Neuhaus, J.E.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

34

Significance Tests in Climate Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large fraction of papers in the climate literature includes erroneous uses of significance tests. A Bayesian analysis is presented to highlight the meaning of significance tests and why typical misuse occurs. The significance statistic is not a ...

Maarten H. P. Ambaum

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Improved Cobalt Removal: Field Testing Phase: Effects of Normally Encountered Plant Impurities on Removal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined the effects of plant impurities on cobalt removal from liquid radioactive waste. Improved process knowledge is critical to utilities that are continually working to increase the performance of their low-level waste (LLW) treatment systems. This report provides predictive chemistry information for improved cobalt removal obtained from test work at Catawba Nuclear Station. It also provides test methodologies for performing similar evaluations at other member plants.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

36

Environmental Tradeoffs of Stover Removal and Erosion in Indiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When considering the market for biomass from corn stover resources erosion and soil quality issues are important to consider. Removal of stover can be beneficial in some areas, especially when coordinated with other conservation practices, such as vegetative barrier strips and cover crops. However, benefits are highly dependent on several factors, namely if farmers see costs and benefits associated with erosion and the tradeoffs with the removal of biomass. Although typically considered an internal cost, the implication is important to policy and contracting for biomass. This paper uses results from an integrated RUSLE2/WEPS model to incorporate six different regime choices, covering management, harvest and conservation, into a simple profit maximization model to show these tradeoffs explicitly. The results of this work show how different costs for erosion, biomass and conservation managements will affect behavior. If erosion prices are low and no conservation requirement exists, biomass removal will significantly increase erosion, but only in some areas. Alternatively, when erosion prices are high, farmers will parallel socially optimal levels of erosion and conservation management practices can be incentivized through access to a market for stover.

Alicia English; Wallace E. Tyner; Juan Sesmero; Phillip Owens; David J. Muth, Jr.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Engine Removal Projection Tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Navy has over 3500 gas turbine engines used throughout the surface fleet for propulsion and the generation of electrical power. Past data is used to forecast the number of engine removals for the next ten years and determine engine down times between removals. Currently this is done via a FORTRAN program created in the early 1970s. This paper presents results of R&D associated with creating a new algorithm and software program. We tested over 60 techniques on data spanning 20 years from over 3100 engines and 120 ships. Investigated techniques for the forecast basis including moving averages, empirical negative binomial, generalized linear models, Cox regression, and Kaplan Meier survival curves, most of which are documented in engineering, medical and scientific research literature. We applied those techniques to the data, and chose the best algorithm based on its performance on real-world data. The software uses the best algorithm in combination with user-friendly interfaces and intuitively understandable displays. The user can select a specific engine type, forecast time period, and op-tempo. Graphical displays and numerical tables present forecasts and uncertainty intervals. The technology developed for the project is applicable to other logistic forecasting challenges.

Ferryman, Thomas A.; Matzke, Brett D.; Wilson, John E.; Sharp, Julia L.; Greitzer, Frank L.

2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

38

Process for removing metals from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions. 2 tabs.

Napier, J.M.; Hancher, C.M.; Hackett, G.D.

1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

39

ADVANCES IN HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for conversion to the new resin. This paper will describe the results of the testing, performance in the facilities, continued optimization in the pump and treat facilities, and the estimated savings and non-tangible benefits of the conversion.

NESHEM DO; RIDDELLE J

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

Heat recirculating cooler for fluid stream pollutant removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process by which heat is removed from a reactant fluid to reach the operating temperature of a known pollutant removal method and said heat is recirculated to raise the temperature of the product fluid. The process can be utilized whenever an intermediate step reaction requires a lower reaction temperature than the prior and next steps. The benefits of a heat-recirculating cooler include the ability to use known pollutant removal methods and increased thermal efficiency of the system.

Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Berry, David A. (Morgantown, WV)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

Urban, P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator value mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, J.F.

1991-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

43

Technetium Removal Using Tc-Goethite Coprecipitation  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Low temperature waste forms coupled with technetium removal using an alternative immobilization process such as Fe(II) treated-goethite precipitation” to increase our understanding of 99Tc long-term stability in goethite mineral form and the process that controls the 99Tc(VII) reduction and removal by the final Fe (oxy)hydroxide forms. The overall objectives of this task were to 1) evaluate the transformation process of Fe (oxy)hydroxide solids to the more crystalline goethite (?-FeOOH) mineral for 99Tc removal and 2) determine the mechanism that limits 99Tc(IV) reoxidation in Fe(II)-treated 99Tc-goethite mineral and 3) evaluate whether there is a long-term 99Tcoxidation state change for Tc sequestered in the iron solids.

Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Jung, Hun Bok; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

44

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits: Reduces scaling in cooling towers by up to 50% Increases the number of cycles of concentration substantially...

45

A novel multifunctional energy system (MES) for CO{sub 2} removal with zero energy penalty - article no. 021401  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel, multifunctional energy system (MES), in which hydrogen and electricity are cogenerated and about 90% of CO{sub 2} is removed. By integrating the methane steam reforming reaction and combustion of coal, the natural gas and coal are utilized synthetically, and coal is burned to provide high-temperature thermal energy to the methane steam reforming reaction. Afterwards, the resulting syngas enters a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit to separate about 70% of hydrogen, thereby significantly increasing the concentration of carbon dioxide from nearly 20% to 43% in the PSA tail gas. As a result, the overall efficiency of the new system becomes 63.2%. Compared to a conventional natural gas-based hydrogen plant and a coal-firing steam power plant without CO{sub 2} removal (the overall efficiency of the two systems is 63.0%), the energy penalty for CO{sub 2} removal in the new system is almost totally avoided. Based on the graphical exergy analysis, we propose that the integration of synthetic utilization of fossil fuel (natural gas and coal) and the CO{sub 2} removal process plays a significant role in zero energy penalty for CO{sub 2} removal and its liquefaction in the MES. The result obtained here provides a new approach for CO{sub 2} removal with zero or low thermal efficiency reduction (energy penalty) within an energy system.

Jin, H.G.; Han, W.; Gao, L. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. for Engineering Thermophysics

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Removal to Maximum Extent Practical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary Notes from 1 November 2007 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Removal of Highly Radioactive Radionuclides/Key Radionuclides to the Maximum Extent Practical

47

The United States has significant natural gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

United States has significant natural gas United States has significant natural gas and oil reserves. But many of these resources are increasingly harder to locate and bring into production. To help meet this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy over the years has amassed wide ranging expertise in areas related to deepwater resource location, production, safety and environmental protection. The goal of these activities has been to not only help overcome

48

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed- Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanford’s 300 Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, WA – Hanford’s River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has met a significant cleanup challenge on the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site by removing a 1,082-ton nuclear test reactor from the 300 Area.

49

EVALUATION OF ENHANCED VOC REMOVAL WITH SOIL FRACTURING IN THE SRS UPLAND UNIT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Restoration Technology Section (ERTS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted pilot scale testing to evaluate the effectiveness of using hydraulic fracturing as a means to improve soil vapor extraction (SVE) system performance. Laboratory and field research has shown that significant amounts of solvents can be entrapped in low permeability zones by capillary forces and removal by SVE can be severely limited due to low flow rates, mass transfer resistance of the hydrophobic compounds by trapped interparticle water, and diffusion resistance. Introducing sand-filled fractures into these tight zones improves the performance of SVE by (1) increasing the overall permeability of the formation and thereby increasing SVE flow rates, (2) shortening diffusion pathways, and (3) increasing air permeability by improving pore water removal. The synergistic effect of the fracture well completion methods, fracture and flow geometry, and pore water removal appears to increase the rate of solvent mass removal over that of increasing flow rate alone. A field test was conducted where a conventional well in the SRS Upland Unit was tested before and after hydraulic fracturing. ERTS teamed with Clemson University through the South Carolina University and Education Foundation (SCUREF) program utilizing their expertise in fracturing and fracture modeling. The goals of the fracturing pilot testing were to evaluate the following: (1) The effect of hydraulic fractures on the performance of a conventional well. This was the most reliable way to remove the effects of spatial variations in permeability and contaminant distribution on relative well performance. It also provided data on the option of improving the performance of existing wells using hydraulic fractures. (2) The relative performance of a conventional SVE well and isolated hydraulic fractures. This was the most reliable indicator of the performance of hydraulic fractures that could be created in a full-scale implementation. The SVE well, monitoring point arrays and four fracturing wells were installed and the well testing has been completed. Four fractures were successfully created the week of July 25, 2005. The fractures were created in an open area at the bottom of steel well casing by using a water jet to create a notch in the soil and then injecting a guar-sand slurry into the formation. The sand-filled fractures increase the effective air permeability of the subsurface formation diffusion path lengths for contaminant removal. The primary metrics for evaluation were an increase in SVE flow rates in the zone of contamination and an increase in the zone of influence. Sufficient testing has been performed to show that fracturing in the Upland Unit accelerates SVE solvent remediation and fracturing can increase flow rates in the Upland Unit by at least one order of magnitude.

Riha, B

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT Wibursement of $65 Million by the U . S . Department of Energy to the State of T e x a s for Construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center at the Former Superconducting Super Collider Site, Waxahachie, Texas AGENCY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ACTION FXNDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an environmental assessment @OE/EA-1090) of the proposed disbursement of $65 million to the State of Texas for construction of a Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) near Waxahachie, Texas. Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment

51

Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report  

SciTech Connect

The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Removal of iron from impure graphites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Iron-impregnated and ash-rich graphites have been purified by leaching with gaseous I/sub 2/ at 900/sup 0/C. With addition of H/sub 2/, the rate of removal of impurity iron can be markedly increased and becomes comparable to that obtained with Cl/sub 2/. I/sub 2/ has an advantage in that it can also volatilize Ca and perhaps Ba and Sr.

Growcock, F.B.; Heiser, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Removal of RDX and HMX from an artificial groundwater by granular activated carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption was efficient at removing high explosive contaminants such as Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-tririne (RDX) and Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetrritro-1,3,5,7-tetruocine (HMX) from an artificial groundwater (AGW). A completely mixed batch reactor (CMBR) system was selected for all rate and isotherm experiments. A number of rate and isotherm experiments were conducted to measure performance in the removal of RDX and HMX using GAC depending on dissolved oxygen, natural organic matter (NOM) preloading and GAC pretreatment. The investigation of competitive adsorption of RDX and Cr(VI) on GAC was conducted. In addition, IAST model predictions were made for RDX and HMX bisolute isotherms. When oxygen was excluded in the experimental system, there was enhancement in the removal of RDX from AGW using Fe[] pretreated GAC. However, in spite of this enhancement, it was still lower than the level of removal using virgin GAC as discussed below. According to the screening experiment results, dissolved Fe[]alone could not chemically reduce RDX. Despite expectations to the contrary based on the screening results, there was indeed some increase in the removal of RDX by Fe[] pretreated GAC under anaerobic conditions. It was suspected that in regard to the removal of RDX using GAC, there may have been chemical reactions occurring between RDX and the chemically reduced GAC surface under anaerobic conditions. Overall, the sorption capacity of GAC for RDX and HMX decreased as preloaded humid acid concentration increased. GAC procreated with a strong reluctant such as Fe[] or dithionite did not result in the enhancement of RDX removal from AGW compared with isotherms of virgin GAC under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Experimental values showed that for RDX, the single-solute isotherm data, bisolute isotherm data in the presence of Cr(VI) exhibited similar results. This suggests that the presence of Cr(VI) had negligible effect on RDX removal by GAC, indicating that competitive effects between RDX and Cr(VI) were minimal. Also, Cr(VI) removal was not significantly affected by the presence of RDX. IAST model predicted that the presence of HMX would reduce the adsorption of RDX compared to the single-solute isotherm of RDX. In the same manner, similar effects were obtained for HMX.

Im, Jeong Ran

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

CRBRP decay heat removal systems  

SciTech Connect

The Decay Heat Removal Systems for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) are designed to adequately remove sensible and decay heat from the reactor following normal shutdown, operational occurrences, and postulated accidents on both a short term and a long term basis. The Decay Heat Removal Systems are composed of the Main Heat Transport System, the Main Condenser and Feedwater System, the Steam Generator Auxiliary Heat Removal System (SGAHRS), and the Direct Heat Removal Service (DHRS). The overall design of the CRBRP Decay Heat Removal Systems and the operation under normal and off-normal conditions is examined. The redundancies of the system design, such as the four decay heat removal paths, the emergency diesel power supplies, and the auxiliary feedwater pumps, and the diversities of the design such as forced circulation/natural circulation and AC Power/DC Power are presented. In addition to overall design and system capabilities, the detailed designs for the Protected Air Cooled Condensers (PACC) and the Air Blast Heat Exchangers (ABHX) are presented.

Hottel, R.E.; Louison, R.; Boardman, C.E.; Kiley, M.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Savannah River Site this month after they safely removed its rusty, orange, 75-foot-tall dome. With the help of a 660-ton crane and lifting lugs, the workers pulled the 174,000-pound dome off the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, capping more than 16 months of preparations. Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

56

Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

57

Article removal device for glovebox  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article removal device for a glovebox is described comprising a conduit extending through a glovebox wall which may be closed by a plug within the glovebox, and a fire-resistant container closing the outer end of the conduit and housing a removable container for receiving pyrophoric or otherwise hazardous material without disturbing the interior environment of the glovebox or adversely affecting the environment outside of the glovebox. (Official Gazette)

Guyer, R.H.; Leebl, R.G.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Method of arsenic removal from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

59

Acid treatment removes zinc sulfide scale restriction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that removal of zinc sulfide (ZnS) scale with acid restored an offshore Louisiana well's production to original rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near well bore area. The selected acid had been proven to control iron sulfide (FeS) scales in sour wells without causing harm to surface production equipment, tubing, and other downhole hardware. The successful removal of the blockage re-established previous production rates with a 105% increase in flowing tubing pressure. On production for a number of months, a high rate, high-pressure offshore well was experiencing unusually rapid pressure and rate declines. A small sample of the restrictive material was obtained during the wire line operations. The well was subsequently shut in while a laboratory analysis determined that zinc sulfide was the major component of the obstruction.

Biggs, K. (Kerr McGee Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Allison, D. (Otis Engineering Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Ford, W.G.F. (Halliburton Co., Duncan, OK (United States))

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Low-Quality Natural Gas Sulfur Removal/Recovery System  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. Much raw gas is `subquality`, that is, it exceeds the pipeline specifications for nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and/or hydrogen sulfide content, and much of this low-quality natural gas cannot be produced economically with present processing technology. Against this background, a number of industry-wide trends are affecting the natural gas industry. Despite the current low price of natural gas, long-term demand is expected to outstrip supply, requiring new gas fields to be developed. Several important consequences will result. First, gas fields not being used because of low-quality products will have to be tapped. In the future, the proportion of the gas supply that must be treated to remove impurities prior to delivery to the pipeline will increase substantially. The extent of treatment required to bring the gas up to specification will also increase. Gas Research Institute studies have shown that a substantial capital investment in facilities is likely to occur over the next decade. The estimated overall investment for all gas processing facilities up to the year 2000 alone is approximates $1.2 Billion, of which acid gas removal and sulfur recovery are a significant part in terms of invested capital. This large market size and the known shortcomings of conventional processing techniques will encourage development and commercialization of newer technologies such as membrane processes. Second, much of today`s gas production is from large, readily accessible fields. As new reserves are exploited, more gas will be produced from smaller fields in remote or offshore locations. The result is an increasing need for technology able to treat small-scale gas streams.

Lokhandwala, K.A.; Ringer, M.; Wijams, H.; Baker, R.W.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Finding of No Significant Impacts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EA 1916 DOE/EA 1916 Finding of No Significant Impacts Page 2 of 6 system; and (6) appurtenant facilities for navigation safety and operation. The project is estimated to have an annual generation of 1.25 gigawatt-hours (GWh) after the completion of Phase 2. Because the project would be connected to the existing electrical grid, on September 1, 2011, ORPC Maine applied to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for an 8-year pilot project license to construct, operate, and maintain the proposed Cobscook Bay project (FERC Project No. 12711), This application required FERC to conduct a review of the potential environmental impacts of the project in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Since DOE was considering providing financial assistance for the project, DOE

62

Enzymatic Enhancement of Water Removal In the Dry Grind Corn to Ethanol Process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The removal of water from coproducts in the fuel ethanol process requires a significant energy input. The drying of the coproducts is responsible for as… (more)

Thomas, Ana Beatriz

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

HAPs-Rx: Precombustion Removal of Hazardous Air Pollutant Precursors  

SciTech Connect

CQ Inc. and its project team members--Howard University, PrepTech Inc., Fossil Fuel Sciences, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and industry advisors--are applying mature coal cleaning and scientific principles to the new purpose of removing potentially hazardous air pollutants from coal. The team uniquely combines mineral processing, chemical engineering, and geochemical expertise. This project meets more than 11 goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Energy Strategy, and the 1993 Climate Change Action Plan. During this project: (1) Equations were developed to predict the concentration of trace elements in as-mined and cleaned coals. These equations, which address both conventional and advanced cleaning processes, can be used to increase the removal of hazardous air pollutant precursors (HAPs) by existing cleaning plants and to improve the design of new cleaning plants. (2) A promising chemical method of removing mercury and other HAPs was developed. At bench-scale, mercury reductions of over 50 percent were achieved on coal that had already been cleaned by froth flotation. The processing cost of this technology is projected to be less than $3.00 per ton ($3.30 per tonne). (3) Projections were made of the average trace element concentration in cleaning plant solid waste streams from individual states. Average concentrations were found to be highly variable. (4) A significantly improved understanding of how trace elements occur in coal was gained, primarily through work at the USGS during the first systematic development of semiquantitative data for mode of occurrence. In addition, significant improvement was made in the laboratory protocol for mode of occurrence determination. (5) Team members developed a high-quality trace element washability database. For example, the poorest mass balance closure for the uncrushed size and washability data for mercury on all four coals is 8.44 percent and the best is 0.46 percent. This indicates an extremely high level of reproducibility of the data. In addition, a series of ''round-robin'' tests involving various laboratories was performed to assure analytical accuracy. (6) A comparison of the cost of lowering mercury emissions through the use of coal cleaning technologies versus the use of post-combustion control methods such as activated carbon injection indicates that, in many cases, coal cleaning may prove to be the lower-cost option. The most significant disadvantage for using coal cleaning for control of mercury emissions is that a reduction of 90 percent or greater from as-fired coal has not yet been demonstrated, even at laboratory-scale.

David J. Akers; Clifford E. Raleigh

1998-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

64

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Mrowka, Stanley (Richmond, CA)

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

65

Nitrogen Removal From Low Quality Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. It is especially important in the residential sector, where it supplies nearly half of all the energy consumed in U.S. homes. However, significant quantities of natural gas cannot be produced economically because its quality is too low to enter the pipeline transportation system without some type of processing, other than dehydration, to remove the undesired gas fraction. Such low-quality natural gas (LQNG) contains significant concentration or quantities of gas other than methane. These non- hydrocarbons are predominantly nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide, but may also include other gaseous components. The nitrogen concentrations usually exceeds 4%. Nitrogen rejection is presently an expensive operation which can present uneconomic scenarios in the potential development of natural gas fields containing high nitrogen concentrations. The most reliable and widely used process for nitrogen rejection from natural gas consists of liquefying the feed stream using temperatures in the order of - 300{degrees}F and separating the nitrogen via fractionation. In order to reduce the gas temperature to this level, the gas is compressed, cooled by mullet-stream heat exchangers, and expanded to low pressure. Significant energy for compression and expensive materials of construction are required. Water and carbon dioxide concentrations must be reduced to levels required to prevent freezing. SRI`s proposed research involves screening new nitrogen selective absorbents and developing a more cost effective nitrogen removal process from natural gas using those compounds. The long-term objective of this project is to determine the technical and economical feasibility of a N{sub 2}2 removal concept based on complexation of molecular N{sub 2} with novel complexing agents. Successful development of a selective, reversible, and stable reagent with an appropriate combination of capacity and N{sub 2} absorption/desorption characteristics will allow selective separation of N{sub 2} from LQNG.

Alvarado, D.B.; Asaro, M.F.; Bomben, J.L.; Damle, A.S.; Bhown, A.S.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Removal - An alternative to clearance  

SciTech Connect

This presentation shows the differences between the application of clearance and removal, both being procedures for materials leaving radiation protection areas permanently. The differentiation will be done on the basis of the German legislation but may be also applicable for other national legislation. For clearance in Germany two basic requirements must be given, i.e. that the materials are activated or contaminated and that they result from the licensed use or can be assigned to the scope of the license. Clearance needs not to be applied to objects in Germany which are to be removed only temporarily from controlled areas with the purpose of repair or reuse in other controlled areas. In these cases only the requirements of contamination control apply. In the case of removal it must either be proved by measurements that the relevant materials are neither activated nor contaminated or that the materials result from areas where activation or contamination is impossible due to the operational history considering operational procedures and events. If the material is considered neither activated nor contaminated there is no need for a clearance procedure. Therefore, these materials can be removed from radiation protection areas and the removal is in the responsibility of the licensee. Nevertheless, the removal procedure and the measuring techniques to be applied for the different types of materials need an agreement from the competent authority. In Germany a maximum value of 10% of the clearance values has been established in different licenses as a criterion for the application of removal. As approximately 2/3 of the total mass of a nuclear power plant is not expected to be contaminated or activated there is a need for such a procedure of removal for this non contaminated material without any regulatory control especially in the case of decommissioning. A remarkable example is NPP Stade where in the last three years more than 8600 Mg were disposed of by removal and only 315 Mg were released by clearance, even before the decommissioning licensing procedure was finished. (authors)

Feinhals, J.; Kelch, A. [TUV NORD SysTec GmbH and Co. KG, Hamburg (Germany); Kunze, V. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Salzgitter (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

DOE Award Results in Several Patents, Potential Increased Coal Recovery |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Award Results in Several Patents, Potential Increased Coal Award Results in Several Patents, Potential Increased Coal Recovery DOE Award Results in Several Patents, Potential Increased Coal Recovery February 9, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- A $13 million cooperative effort with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) over the past seven years has resulted in the successful demonstration of a novel technology that addresses a problem plaguing coal operators and environmentalists alike: separating fine coal particles from water and their ultimate use as a significant energy resource. Researchers at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, Va., have developed and patented an advanced technology called a hyperbaric centrifuge that can successfully remove

68

DOE Award Results in Several Patents, Potential Increased Coal Recovery |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Award Results in Several Patents, Potential Increased Coal DOE Award Results in Several Patents, Potential Increased Coal Recovery DOE Award Results in Several Patents, Potential Increased Coal Recovery February 9, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- A $13 million cooperative effort with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) over the past seven years has resulted in the successful demonstration of a novel technology that addresses a problem plaguing coal operators and environmentalists alike: separating fine coal particles from water and their ultimate use as a significant energy resource. Researchers at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, Va., have developed and patented an advanced technology called a hyperbaric centrifuge that can successfully remove

69

Large Component Removal/Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

Wheeler, D. M.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

70

Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removal NNSANews posted a photo: Vietnam HEU Removal A truck carrying the last highly enriched uranium in Vietnam winds through the Vietnamese countryside. Facebook Twitter Youtube...

71

Program on Technology Innovation: Feasibility Assessment of a Core Vacuum for Foreign Material and Activity Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for increased fuel reliability and radioactive source term reduction motivated EPRI to investigate methods for removing small foreign material and activated corrosion products from reactor vessels. Several methods exist to remove these materials from above the core plate of the reactor vessel, but there has been limited research and development of techniques to remove them from underneath the core plate. This report investigates the development of a core vacuum to remove debris and corrosion pro...

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

72

Metals removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); Von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Actinide removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Rapid Changes in Soil Carbon and Structural Properties Due to Stover Removal from No-Till Corn Plots  

SciTech Connect

Harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover for producing ethanol may be beneficial to palliate the dependence on fossil fuels and reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, but stover harvesting may deplete soil organic carbon (SOC) and degrade soil structure. We investigated the impacts of variable rates of stover removal from no-till (NT) continuous corn systems on SOC and soil structural properties after 1 year of stover removal in three soils in Ohio: Rayne silt loam (fine-loamy, mixed, active, mesic Typic Hapludults) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston. This study also assessed relationships between SOC and soil structural properties as affected by stover management. Six stover treatments that consisted of removing 100, 75, 50, 25, and 0, and adding 100% of corn stover corresponding to 0 (T0), 1.25 (T1.25), 2.50 (T2.5), 3.75 (T3.75), 5.00 (T5), and 10.00 (T10) Mg haj1 of stover, respectively, were studied for their total SOC concentration, bulk density (>b), aggregate stability, and tensile strength (TS) of aggregates. Effects of stover removal on soil properties were rapid and significant in the 0- to 5-cm depth, although the magnitude of changes differed among soils after only 1 year of stover removal. The SOC concentration declined with increase in removal rates in silt loams but not in clay loam soils. It decreased by 39% at Coshocton and 30% at Charleston within 1 year of complete stover removal. At the same sites, macroaggregates contained 10% to 45% more SOC than microaggregates. Stover removal reduced 94.75-mm macroaggregates and increased microaggregates (P G 0.01). Mean weight diameter (MWD) and TS of aggregates in soils without stover (T0) were 1.7 and 3.3 times lower than those in soils with normal stover treatments (T5) across sites. The SOC concentration was negatively correlated with >b and positively with MWD and LogTS. Stover removal at rates as low as 1.25 Mg haj1 reduced SOC and degraded soil structure even within 1 year, but further monitoring is needed to establish threshold levels of stover removal in relation to changes in soil quality.

Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Owens, L B.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

EA-1660: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Finding of No Significant Impact 0: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1660: Finding of No Significant Impact Combined Community Communications Facility and Infrastructure Cleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington The Environmental Assessment (EA) provides information and analyses of proposed U.S. Department of Energy activities associated with consolidating existing communications operations and removing excess facilities and infrastructure within the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) at the Hanford Site near the City of Richland, Washington. DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. Finding of No Significant Impact for the Combined Community Communications

76

EA-1044: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact EA-1044: Finding of No Significant Impact Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project- Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Based on the...

77

Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals Forecasts A document describing how volume fellings and removals are handled in the 2011 Production Forecast system. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Felling and removals forecasts Background A fellings and removals

78

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact laser system is disclosed that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1,000 ft{sup 2}/hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, D.L.; Celliers, P.M.; Hackel, L.; Da Silva, L.B.; Dane, C.B.; Mrowka, S.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

79

EA-1848: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1848: Finding of No Significant Impact Loan Guarantee to Fulcrum Sierra Biofuels, LLC for Waste-to-Ethanol Facility in McCarran, Storey County, Nevada The U.S. Department of Energy conducted an environmental assessment that analyzed the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a waste-to-ethanol facility for the production of ethanol from sorted municipal solid waste (MSW) from which recyclables and non-biomass components have been removed (Feedstock). Finding of No Significant Impact Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Fulcrum Sierra Biofuels, LLC for a Waste-to-Ethanol Facility in McCarran, Storey County, Nevada, DOE/EA-1848 (June 2011) More Documents & Publications EA-1848: Final Environmental Assessment

80

The Potential for Activated Biochar to Remove Waterborne Viruses from Environmental Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need for clean potable water and sustainable energy are two current and pressing issues with implications affecting the global population. Renewed interests in alternative energy have prompted researchers to investigate the full capacity of biofuels. These interests have led to not only the examination of current method limitations, but also to the investigation of new conversion methods. One promising method for bioenergy production is pyrolysis of lignocellulosic feedstocks. Through pyrolysis, a single crop may produce ethanol, bio-oil, and/or gaseous energy (syngas). The remaining solid phase product is a black carbon dubbed 'biochar'. In the current study, biochar was used as a both an unamended sorbent and a precursor to form powdered activated carbons (PACs) capable of removing waterborne viruses. Biochar was activated with KOH, ZnCl2, and H3PO4 and analyzed using the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) method, a combination of Kjeldahl digest and ICP-MS, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sorbents were tested in batch studies using phosphate buffered saline (PBS), surface water, and groundwater. Bacteriophages MS2 and thetaX174 served as viral surrogates. All activation treatments significantly increased surface area, up to 1495.5 m2/g (KOH-activated). While the non-activated biochar was not effective in virus removal, the KOH-activated PAC had tremendous removal in the PBS/MS2 batch (mean 98.7% removal, up to 6.2 x 109 particles/mL, as compared to the Darco S-51: 82.3%). As evidenced by this study, sorption efficiency will be governed by viral species, carbon type and concentration, and water quality. The results of this study indicate that biochar can serve as a precursor for a highly porous and effective PAC, capable of removing waterborne viruses from environmental waters.

Florey, James

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Chloride removal from plutonium alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SRP is evaluating a program to recover plutonium from a metallic alloy that will contain chloride salt impurities. Removal of chloride to sufficiently low levels to prevent damaging corrosion to canyon equipment is feasible as a head-end step following dissolution. Silver nitrate and mercurous nitrate were each successfully used in laboratory tests to remove chloride from simulated alloy dissolver solution containing plutonium. Levels less than 10 ppM chloride were achieved in the supernates over the precipitated and centrifuged insoluble salts. Also, less than 0.05% loss of plutonium in the +3, +4, or +6 oxidation states was incurred via precipitate carrying. These results provide impetus for further study and development of a plant-scale process to recover plutonium from metal alloy at SRP.

Holcomb, H.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

METHOD OF REMOVING STRONTIUM IONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for removing trace amounts of Sr/sup 90/ from solutions. Phosphate ion is added to the solution and it is then brought into contact with a solid salt such as calcium carbonate which will react methathetically with the phosphate ion to form a salt such as calcium phosphate. During this reaction, strontium will be absorbed to a high degree within the newly formed lattice. (AEC)

Rhodes, D.W.; McHenry, J.R.; Ames, L.L. Jr.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Reducing acid leaching of manganiferous ore: Effect of the iron removal operation on solid waste disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of reducing acid leaching of manganiferous ore is aimed at the extraction of manganese from low grade manganese ores. This work is focused on the iron removal operation. The following items have been considered in order to investigate the effect of the main operating conditions on solid waste disposal and on the process costs: (i) type and quantity of the base agent used for iron precipitation, (ii) effective need of leaching waste separation prior to the iron removal operation, (iii) presence of a second leaching stage with the roasted ore, which might also act as a preliminary iron removal step, and (iv) effect of tailings washing on the solid waste classification. Different base compounds have been tested, including CaO, CaCO{sub 3}, NaOH, and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. The latter gave the best results concerning both the precipitation process kinetics and the reagent consumption. The filtration of the liquor leach prior to iron removal was not necessary, implying significant savings in capital costs. A reduction of chemical consumption and an increase of manganese concentration in the solution were obtained by introducing secondary leaching tests with the previously roasted ore; this additional step was introduced without a significant decrease of global manganese extraction yield. Finally, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) tests carried out on the leaching solid waste showed: (i) a reduction of arsenic mobility in the presence of iron precipitates, and (ii) the need for a washing step in order to produce a waste that is classifiable as not dangerous, taking into consideration the existing Environmental National Laws.

De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco [University of L'Aquila, Department of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials, Monteluco di Roio, 67040 L'Aquila (Italy); Beolchini, Francesca [Polytechnic University of Marche, Department of Marine Sciences, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy)], E-mail: f.beolchini@univpm.it; Veglio, Francesco [University of L'Aquila, Department of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials, Monteluco di Roio, 67040 L'Aquila (Italy)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 OZONE REMOVAL BY RESIDENTIAL HVAC FILTERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 2366 OZONE REMOVAL BY RESIDENTIAL HVAC FILTERS P Zhao1,2 , JA Siegel1, Austin, Texas 78758, USA ABSTRACT HVAC filters have a significant influence on indoor air quality% for Filter #2 at a face velocity of 0.81 cm/s. The potential for HVAC filters to affect ozone concentrations

Siegel, Jeffrey

85

Natural gas: Removing the obstacles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defining and then figuring out how to remove whatever obstacles may be blocking the wider use of natural gas was the purpose of a conference held early last month in Phoenix, Arizona. The unique, three-day event was jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). It drew an overflow crowd of more than 500, with a registration list that read like a Who's Who of the natural gas industry. This article summarizes some of the main points of this conference.

Romo, C.

1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Material Removal and Disposition | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal and Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

87

Effect of sequential removal of organic matter on the surface morphology of humin  

SciTech Connect

Natural organic matter in soils interacts with surfaces of inorganic materials, primarily aluminosilicates or clay minerals, to form a strongly associated organo-mineral composite known as humin. Because of humin`s insolubility, it is recognized as the primary sorbent of many anthropogenic organic compounds (AOCs) introduced into soil systems. This recognition has significant implications for understanding the fate and transport of AOCs, the effective remediation of contaminated sites, and the formulation and application of various agrochemicals. Humin was isolated from four soil samples. Surface area, surface charge, porosity measurements, and fractal analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data were used to characterize changes in the surface properties resulting from selective removal of the various components of organic matter from humin. Organic matter was removed selectively from humin by Soxhlet extraction, disaggregation with the methylisobutylketone (MIBK) method, and bromine oxidation. The surface fractal dimensions decreased while surface area increased, and surface pore size decreased upon removal of organic matter. These results suggest that the mineral components of humin have smooth surfaces over length scales of {approximately}1 to 15 run, and that it is the organic matter coatings that are responsible for their surface roughness. The surfaces of all the components of humin were found to be dominated by micro and mesopores that could be responsible for humin`s high sorptive uptake of organic chemicals.

Malekani, K.; Rice, J.A. [South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States)] [South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States); Lin, Jar-Shyong [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

System for increasing corona inception voltage of insulating oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The Corona Inception Voltage of insulating oils is increased by repetitive cycles of prestressing the oil with a voltage greater than the corona inception voltage, and either simultaneously or serially removing byproducts of corona by evacuation and heating the oil.

Rohwein, Gerald J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Vehicle Technologies Office: ACEM Instrument Achieves Significant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACEM Instrument Achieves ACEM Instrument Achieves Significant Performance Milestone to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: ACEM Instrument Achieves Significant Performance Milestone on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: ACEM Instrument Achieves Significant Performance Milestone on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: ACEM Instrument Achieves Significant Performance Milestone on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: ACEM Instrument Achieves Significant Performance Milestone on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: ACEM Instrument Achieves Significant Performance Milestone on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: ACEM Instrument Achieves Significant Performance Milestone on AddThis.com... ACEM Instrument Achieves Significant Performance Milestone

90

Removal of beryllium from drinking water by chemical coagulation and lime softening  

SciTech Connect

The effectiveness of conventional drinking water treatment and lime softening was evaluated for beryllium removal from two drinking water sources. Jar test studies were conducted to determine how common coagulants (aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride) and lime softening performed in removing beryllium from spiked waters. Centrifugation was used to simulate filtration. The two source waters used were raw Ohio River water and groundwater from the Great Miami Aquifer. The impact of initial beryllium concentration, coagulant dose, turbidity and pH on beryllium removal was examined and optimum treatment conditions were determined. Jar tests using alum and ferric chloride coagulants were able to achieve 95% and 85% removal of beryllium respectively from surface water. Removal efficiency increased as the pH was increased. Based on the data collected in the study, coprecipitation and precipitation are the two likely mechanisms responsible for beryllium removal.

Lytle, D.A.; Summers, R.S.; Sorg, T.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

Olson, Edwin S. (Grand Forks, ND); Holmes, Michael J. (Thompson, ND); Pavlish, John H. (East Grand Forks, MN)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

Olson, Edwin S. (Grand Forks, ND); Holmes, Michael J. (Thompson, ND); Pavlish, John H. (East Grand Forks, MN)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

93

The ultra-high lime with aluminum process for removing chloride from recirculating cooling water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chloride is a deleterious ionic species in cooling water systems because it is important in promoting corrosion. Chloride can be removed from cooling water by precipitation as calcium chloroaluminate using ultra-high lime with aluminum process (UHLA). The research program was conducted to study equilibrium characteristics and kinetics of chloride removal by UHLA process, study interactions between chloride and sulfate or silica, and develop a model for multicomponent removal by UHLA. Kinetics of chloride removal with UHLA was investigated. Chloride removal was found to be fast and therefore, removal kinetics should not be a limitation to applying the UHLA process. Equilibrium characteristics of chloride removal with UHLA were characterized. Good chloride removal was obtained at reasonable ranges of lime and aluminum doses. However, the stoichiometry of chloride removal with UHLA deviated from the theoretical stoichiometry of calcium chloroaluminate precipitation. Equilibrium modeling of experimental data and XRD analysis of precipitated solids indicated that this deviation was due to the formation of other solid phases such as tricalcium hydroxyaluminate and tetracalcium hydroxyaluminate. Effect of pH on chloride removal was characterized. Optimum pH for maximum chloride removal was pH 12 ± 0.2. Results of equilibrium experiments at different temperatures indicated that final chloride concentrations slightly increased when water temperature increased at temperatures below 40oC. However, at temperatures above 40oC, chloride concentration substantially increased with increasing water temperature. An equilibrium model was developed to describe chemical behavior of chloride removal from recycled cooling water using UHLA. Formation of a solid solution of calcium chloroaluminate, tricalcium hydroxyaluminate, and tetracalcium hydroxyaluminate was found to be the best mechanism to describe the chemical behavior of chloride removal with UHLA. Results of experiments that studied interactions between chloride and sulfate indicated that sulfate is preferentially removed over chloride. Final chloride concentration increased with increasing initial sulfate concentration. Silica was found to have only a small effect on chloride removal. The equilibrium model was modified in order to include sulfate and silica reactions along with chloride in UHLA process and it was able to accurately predict the chemical behavior of simultaneous removal of chloride, sulfate, and silica with UHLA.

Abdel-wahab, Ahmed Ibraheem Ali

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

HIGH SO2 REMOVAL EFFICIENCY TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of performance tests at six full-scale wet lime- and limestone-reagent flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The objective of these tests was to evaluate the effectiveness of low capital cost sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal upgrades for existing FGD systems as an option for complying with the provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The upgrade options tested at the limestone-reagent systems included the use of organic acid additives (dibasic acid (DBA) and/or sodium formate) as well as increased reagent ratio (higher excess limestone levels in the recirculating slurry solids) and absorber liquid-to-gas ratio. One system also tested operating at higher flue gas velocities to allow the existing FGD system to treat flue gas from an adjacent, unscrubbed unit. Upgrade options for the one lime-based system tested included increased absorber venturi pressure drop and increased sulfite concentration in the recirculating slurry liquor.

Gary M. Blythe; James L. Phillips

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Polymers with increased order  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention features polymers with increased order, and methods of making them featuring a dense gas.

Sawan, Samuel P. (Tyngsborough, MA); Talhi, Abdelhafid (Rochester, MI); Taylor, Craig M. (Jemez Springs, NM)

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

96

THERMALLY SHIELDED MOISTURE REMOVAL DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is presented for removing moisture from the air within tanks by condensation upon a cartridge containing liquid air. An insulating shell made in two halves covers the cartridge within the evacuated system. The shell halves are hinged together and are operated by a system of levers from outside the tank with the motion translated through a sylphon bellows to cover and uncover the cartridge. When the condensation of moisture is in process, the insulative shell is moved away from the liquid air cartridge, and during that part of the process when there is no freezing out of moisture, the shell halves are closed on the cell so thnt the accumulated frost is not evaporated. This insulating shell greatly reduces the consumption of liquid air in this condensation process.

Miller, O.E.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

97

Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

Richardson, BS

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Nitrogen removal from natural gas  

SciTech Connect

According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

FEASIBILITY OF INCREASING THE ENERGY OF RHIC.  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we discuss the possibility of increasing the energy of beams in RHIC by as much as 30% with a modest trade-off in luminosity. The arc dipoles and quadrupoles were designed with considerable margin. For higher energies (>100 GeV/nucleon) the minimum {beta}* may be required to increase as the interaction region triplets saturate. The separator magnets (DX) have the least margin for increased field, so we consider three scenarios: allowing for a small crossing angle with the present DX magnets, upgrading the DX magnets to higher strength, and permitting a crossing angle of {approximately}1{degree} by removing the DX magnets altogether.

MACKAY,W.W.; JAIN,A.; LUCCIO,A.U.; PILAT,F.; ROSER,T.; TEPIKIAN,S.; TROBOJEVIC,D.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

100

Effect of filament power removal on a fluorescent lamp system  

SciTech Connect

Two techniques are used to measure the effects of removing the filament power from a two-lamp, F-40, rapid-start fluorescent lamp system. The changes are measured for a standard CBM core-coil ballast and for a solid-state ballast operating the lamp at high frequency. There is a 4 tp 6% increase in system efficacy when the filament power is removed. Removal of filament power also decreases filament temperature from 1000/sup 0/C to below 700/sup 0/C in lamps operated at 60 Hz, and from above 600/sup 0/C to 300/sup 0/C in lamps operated at high frequency. The study shows that the arc current and anode fall also determine filament temperature.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.; Rubinstein, F.M.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE  

SciTech Connect

Vacuum distillation of chloride salts from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) and simulant PuO{sub 2} has been previously demonstrated at Department of Energy (DOE) sites using kilogram quantities of chloride salt. The apparatus for vacuum distillation contains a zone heated using a furnace and a zone actively cooled using either recirculated water or compressed air. During a vacuum distillation operation, a sample boat containing the feed material is placed into the apparatus while it is cool, and the system is sealed. The system is evacuated using a vacuum pump. Once a sufficient vacuum is attained, heating begins. Volatile salts distill from the heated zone to the cooled zone where they condense, leaving behind the non-volatile materials in the feed boat. The application of vacuum salt distillation (VSD) is of interest to the HB-Line Facility and the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Both facilities are involved in efforts to disposition excess fissile materials. Many of these materials contain chloride and fluoride salt concentrations which make them unsuitable for dissolution without prior removal of the chloride and fluoride salts. Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and HB-Line designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a system for the distillation of chloride salts. Subsequent efforts are attempting to adapt the technology for the removal of fluoride. Fluoride salts of interest are less-volatile than the corresponding chloride salts. Consequently, an alternate approach is required for the removal of fluoride without significantly increasing the operating temperature. HB-Line Engineering requested SRNL to evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of an alternate approach using both non-radioactive simulants and plutonium-bearing materials. Whereas the earlier developments targeted the removal of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl), the current activities are concerned with the removal of the halide ions associated with plutonium trifluoride (PuF{sub 3}), plutonium tetrafluoride (PuF{sub 4}), calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), and calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}). This report discusses non-radioactive testing of small-scale and pilot-scale systems and radioactive testing of a small-scale system. Experiments focused on demonstrating the chemistry for halide removal and addressing the primary engineering questions associated with a change in the process chemistry.

Pierce, R.; Pak, D.

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

102

Treatment Facility F: Accelerated Removal and Validation Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Accelerated Removal and Validation (ARV) phase of remediation at the Treatment Facility F (TFF) site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was designed to accelerate removal of gasoline from the site when compared to normal, single shift, pump-and-treat operations. The intent was to take advantage of the in-place infrastructure plus the increased underground temperatures resulting from the Dynamic Underground Stripping Demonstration Project (DUSDP). Operations continued 24-hours (h) per day between October 4 and December 12, 1993. Three contaminant removal rate enhancement approaches were explored during the period of continuous operation. First, we tried several configurations of the vapor pumping system to maximize the contaminant removal rate. Second, we conducted two brief trials of air injection into the lower steam zone. Results were compared with computer models, and the process was assessed for contaminant removal rate enhancement. Third, we installed equipment to provide additional electrical heating of contaminated low-permeability soil. Four new electrodes were connected into the power system. Diagnostic capabilities at the TFF site were upgraded so that we could safely monitor electrical currents, soil temperatures, and water treatment system processes while approximately 300 kW of electrical energy was being applied to the subsurface.

Sweeney, J.J.; Buettner, M.H.; Carrigan, C.R. [and others

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Method for removal of explosives from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells was also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Torres, deceased, Agapito P. (late of Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Giralang, AU)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Method for removal of metal atoms from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells were also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Torres, deceased, Agapito P. (late of Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Kaleen, AU)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Increased efficiency of topping cycle PCFB power plants  

SciTech Connect

Pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) power plants offer the power industry significantly increased efficiencies with reduced costs of electricity and lower emissions. When topping combustion is incorporated in the plant, these advantages are enhanced. In the plant, coal is fed to a pressurized carbonizer that produces a low-Btu fuel gas and char. After passing through a cyclone and ceramic barrier filter to remove gas-entrained particulates and a packed bed of emathelite pellets to remove alkali vapors. the fuel gas is burned in a topping combustor to produce the energy required to drive a gas turbine. The gas turbine drives a generator combustor, and a fluidized bed heat exchanger (FBHE). The carbonizer char is burned in the PCFB and the exhaust gas passes through its own cyclone, ceramic barrier filter, and alkali getter and supports combustion of the fuel gas in the topping combustor. Steam generated in a heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG) downstream of the gas turbine and in the FBHE associated with the PCFB drives the steam turbine generator that furnishes the balance of electric power delivered by the plant.

Robertson, A.; Domeracki, W.; Horazak, D. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Dynamical overlap fermions with increased topological tunnelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present two improvements to our previous dynamical overlap HMC algorithm. We introduce a new method of differentiating the eigenvectors of the Kernel operator, which removes an instability in the fermionic force. Secondly, by simulating part of the fermion determinant exactly, without pseudo-fermions, we are able to increase the rate of topological tunnelling by a factor of more than ten, reducing the auto-correlation.

N. Cundy; S. Krieg; T. Lippert; A Schaefer

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

107

Additional appliance standards could significantly reduce ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... their aggregated consumption is significant, making them a target for efficiency standards. In the Reference scenario, ...

108

Metal Cutting for Large Component Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of large components mainly consisting of the reactor vessel, steam generators and pressurizer. In order to remove and package these large components nozzles must be cut from the reactor vessel to precise tolerances. In some cases steam generators must be segmented for size and weight reduction. One innovative technology that has been used successfully at several commercial nuclear plant decommissioning is diamond wire sawing. Diamond wire sawing is performed by rotating a cable with diamond segments attached using a flywheel approximately 24 inches in diameter driven remotely by a hydraulic pump. Tension is provided using a gear rack drive which also takes up the slack in the wire. The wire is guided through the use of pulleys keeps the wire in a precise location. The diamond wire consists of 1/4 inch aircraft cable with diamond beads strung over the cable separated by springs and brass crimps. Standard wire contains 40 diamond beads per meter and can be made to any length. Cooling the wire and controlling the spread of contamination presents significant challenges. Under normal circumstances the wire is cooled and the cutting kerf cleaned by using water. In some cases of reactor nozzle cuts the use of water is prohibited because it cannot be controlled. This challenge was solved by using liquid Carbon Dioxide as the cooling agent. The liquid CO{sub 2} is passed through a special nozzle which atomizes the liquid into snowflakes which is introduced under pressure to the wire. The snowflakes attach to the wire keeping it cool and to the metal shavings. As the CO{sub 2} and metal shavings are released from the wire due to its fast rotation, the snowflakes evaporate leaving only the fine metal shavings as waste. Secondary waste produced is simply the small volume of fine metal shavings removed from the cut surface. Diamond wire sawing using CO{sub 2} cooling has been employed for cutting the reactor nozzles at San Onofre Unit 1 and at Connecticut Yankee. These carbon steel nozzles ranged up to 54 inch diameter with a 15 inch thick wall and an interior stainless cladding. Diamond wire sawing using traditional water cooling has been used to segment the reactor head at Rancho Seco and for cutting reactor nozzles and control rod drive tubes at Dairyland Power's Lacrosse BWR project. Advantages: - ALARA: All cutting is preformed remotely significantly reducing dose. Stringing of wires is accomplished using long handle tools. - Secondary waste is reduced to just the volume of material cut with the diamond wire. - The potential for airborne contamination is eliminated. Due to the flexibility of the wire, any access restrictions and interferences can be accommodated using pulleys and long handle tools. - The operation is quiet. Disadvantages: - With Liquid Carbon Dioxide cooling and cleaning, delivery of the material must be carefully planned. The longer the distance from the source to the cut area, the greater the chance for pressure drop and subsequent problems with line freezing. - Proper shrouding and ventilation are required for environmental reasons. In each case, the metal structures were cut at a precise location. Radiation dose was reduced significantly by operating the equipment from a remote location. The cuts were very smooth and completed on schedule. Each project must be analyzed individually and take into account many factors including access, radiological conditions, environmental conditions, schedule requirements, packaging requirements and size of cuts.

Hulick, Robert M. [Bluegrass Concrete Cutting Inc., 107 Mildred Street PO Box 427, Greenville, Alabama 36037 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Part 3: Removal Action | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Removal Action 3: Removal Action Part 3: Removal Action Question: When may removal actions be initiated? Answer: Removal actions may be initiated when DOE determines that the action will prevent, minimize, stabilize, or eliminate a risk to health or the environment. The NCP specifies that the determination that a risk to health or the environment is appropriate for removal action should be based on: actual or potential exposure of humans, animals, or the food chain the presence of contained hazardous substances that pose a threat of release the threat of migration of the hazardous substances the threat of fire or explosion the availability of an appropriate Federal or State response capability [section 300.415(b)(2)]. In essence, where DOE identifies a threat of exposure to or migration of

110

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

1988-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (both Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (both Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

113

Enhancing As sup 5+ removal by a Fe sup 2+ -treated activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

The effectiveness of pretreating an activated carbon with iron-salt solution to improve its arsenic removal capacity was studied. Various factors such as type and concentration of salt, pH, and treating time were thoroughly investigated for their effects on the improvement of removal capacity. An effort was made to identify the optimal pretreatment conditions. A ten-fold increase, over the untreated activated carbon, in removal can be achieved under the optimal pretreatment procedure. The enhancement in removal by treatment occurs by adsorption of ferrous ions and formation of arsenate complexes. Ferrous salts can also be used to regenerate the activated carbon.

Huang, C.P.; Vane, L.M.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Evaluation of an Unsuccessful Brook Trout Electrofishing Removal Project in a Small Rocky Mountain Stream.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the western United States, exotic brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis frequently have a deleterious effect on native salmonids, and biologists often attempt to remove brook trout from streams by means of electrofishing. Although the success of such projects typically is low, few studies have assessed the underlying mechanisms of failure, especially in terms of compensatory responses. A multiagency watershed advisory group (WAG) conducted a 3-year removal project to reduce brook trout and enhance native salmonids in 7.8 km of a southwestern Idaho stream. We evaluated the costs and success of their project in suppressing brook trout and looked for brook trout compensatory responses, such as decreased natural mortality, increased growth, increased fecundity at length, and earlier maturation. The total number of brook trout removed was 1,401 in 1998, 1,241 in 1999, and 890 in 2000; removal constituted an estimated 88% of the total number of brook trout in the stream in 1999 and 79% in 2000. Although abundance of age-1 and older brook trout declined slightly during and after the removals, abundance of age-0 brook trout increased 789% in the entire stream 2 years after the removals ceased. Total annual survival rate for age-2 and older brook trout did not decrease during the removals, and the removals failed to produce an increase in the abundance of native redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri. Lack of a meaningful decline and unchanged total mortality for older brook trout during the removals suggest that a compensatory response occurred in the brook trout population via reduced natural mortality, which offset the removal of large numbers of brook trout. Although we applaud WAG personnel for their goal of enhancing native salmonids by suppressing brook trout via electrofishing removal, we conclude that their efforts were unsuccessful and suggest that similar future projects elsewhere over such large stream lengths would be costly, quixotic enterprises.

Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A.; Schill, Daniel J.

2006-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

115

Process for particulate removal from coal liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Suspended solid particulates are removed from liquefied coal products by first subjecting such products to hydroclone action for removal in the underflow of the larger size particulates, and then subjecting the overflow from said hydroclone action, comprising the residual finer particulates, to an electrostatic field in an electrofilter wherein such finer particulates are deposited in the bed of beads of dielectric material on said filter. The beads are periodically cleaned by backwashing to remove the accumulated solids.

Rappe, Gerald C. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

117

Passive Core Decay Heat Removal Performance Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive decay heat removal systems operate without pumps when normal heat removal systems are not available. Safety is ensured by confirming that an adequate thermal margin is provided to accommodate various operating conditions, design uncertainties, and degradation. Guidelines to ensure adequate thermal performance are provided for three different system configurations.This report introduces utility systems engineers to the design and operation of passive decay heat removal systems and ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

Amrhein, Gerald T. (Louisville, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Influence of attrition scrubbing, ultrasonic treatment, and oxidant additions on uranium removal from contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration Project being conducted by the US Department of Energy, bench-scale investigations of selective leaching of uranium from soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project site in Ohio were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Two soils (storage pad soil and incinerator soil), representing the major contaminant sources at the site, were extracted using carbonate- and citric acid-based lixiviants. Physical and chemical processes were used in combination with the two extractants to increase the rate of uranium release from these soils. Attrition scrubbing and ultrasonic dispersion were the two physical processes utilized. Potassium permanganate was used as an oxidizing agent to transform tetravalent uranium to the hexavalent state. Hexavalent uranium is easily complexed in solution by the carbonate radical. Attrition scrubbing increased the rate of uranium release from both soils when compared with rotary shaking. At equivalent extraction times and solids loadings, however, attrition scrubbing proved effective only on the incinerator soil. Ultrasonic treatments on the incinerator soil removed 71% of the uranium contamination in a single extraction. Multiple extractions of the same sample removed up to 90% of the uranium. Additions of potassium permanganate to the carbonate extractant resulted in significant changes in the extractability of uranium from the incinerator soil but had no effect on the storage pad soil.

Timpson, M.E.; Elless, M.P.; Francis, C.W.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A novel approach to the removal of CO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

The removal of CO{sub 2} from gas streams is becoming increasingly significant in the field of energy production. A porous monolithic activated carbon material (CFCMS) has been developed that is both strong and rigid, yet is permeable, and thus offers little resistance to the free-flow of fluids. The material has a unique combination of properties, including reasonable compressive strength, electrical conductivity, a large micropore volume, and a large CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity. At 30{degrees}C and atmospheric pressure, CFCMS has a CO{sub 2} uptake >100 mg/g. The uptake is reduced at elevated temperatures, dropping to {approximately}40 mg/g at 100{degrees}C. However, the CO{sub 2} uptake increases substantially with pressure, such that at 25{degrees}C and 58 bar the mass of CO{sub 2} adsorbed is >490 mg/g. The ability of CFCMS to selectively remove CO{sub 2} from a CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} gas mixture is demonstrated in a series of breakthrough experiments. The unique combination of properties of CFCMS has been exploited to effect the rapid desorption of CO{sub 2} under the influence of a low applied dc voltage.

Burchell, T.D.; Judkins, R.R.; Rogers, M.R.; Williams, A.M.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSANews posted a photo: Vietnam HEU Removal A convoy escorting the last highly enriched uranium in Vietnam departs Dalat. Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr Headlines Jul 23,...

122

Metal Organic Clathrates for Carbon Dioxide Removal  

removal from coal-fired power plant flue gas streams.  Modified variations of the materials can be used in a variety of other fields as well, ...

123

System for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

124

Improved sulfur removal processes evaluated for IGCC  

SciTech Connect

An inherent advantage of Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electric power generation is the ability to easily remove and recover sulfur. During the last several years, a number of new, improved sulfur removal and recovery processes have been commercialized. An assessment is given of alternative sulfur removal processes for IGCC based on the Texaco coal gasifier. The Selexol acid gas removal system, Claus sulfur recovery, and SCOT tail gas treating are currently used in Texaco-based IGCC. Other processes considered are: Purisol, Sulfinol-M, Selefning, 50% MDEA, Sulften, and LO-CAT. 2 tables.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel  

ORNL 2010-G00619/jcn UT-B ID 200902314 Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel Technology Summary At ORNL the application of ultrasonic energy, or ...

126

Internal Controls Over Classified Computersand Classified Removable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Classified Removable Media at theLawrence Livermore National Laboratory, IG-0628 Computers are used extensively in the full range of operations at Lawrence Livermore National...

127

Removal of radioisotopes from waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention comprises removing radioisotopes from waste liquids or solutions by passing these through filters and through a column containing a suitable salt of phosphoric acid. (Official Gazette)

Kirby, H.W.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Tritium Removal Facility High Tritium Distillation Simulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A dynamic model was developed for the distillation mechanism of the Darlington Tritium Removal Facility. The model was created using the commercial software package MATLAB/Simulink.… (more)

Zahedi, Polad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Increased Power Flow Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Increased Power Flow (IPF) Guidebook is a state-of-the-art and best practices guidebook on increasing power flow capacities of existing overhead transmission lines, underground cables, power transformers, and substation equipment without compromising safety and reliability. The Guidebook discusses power system concerns and limiting conditions to increasing capacity, reviews available technology options and methods, illustrates alternatives with case studies, and analyzes costs and benefits of differe...

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

130

Innovative Graphite Removal Technology for Graphite Moderated Reactor Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report defines a trial program to support the development of a new concept for the removal of reactor graphite by remote in-situ size reduction and vacuum transfer, known as nibble-and-vacuum. This new approach to graphite retrieval has significant potential for simplifying the decommissioning process of graphite moderated reactors. It produces graphite gravel, which has potential as feedstock for processes such as gasification/steam reforming. This report includes definition of the trial program, t...

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

Document Number Q0029500 Significant Activities  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Significant Activities Significant Activities 2.0 Significant Activities Since Preparation of the 1998 RI Document Since data collection for the purposes of preparing the 1998 RI report ended in 1996, several significant activities have occurred on the Millsite and surrounding peripheral properties. The following subsections provide a brief description of these activities. At the conclusion of each subsection, a summary indicates whether the described activity invalidates or results in significant changes to the assumptions used in the ground water model and the human health and ecological risk assessments presented in the 1998 RI. If significant changes have resulted, general statements describe how the new conditions are accounted for in the RI AddendumFFS. This information is also assembled in an overall summary (Section 2.9) that lists

132

Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low Temperatures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low Temperatures Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov October 2012 Significance * Energy mixing is maximized * Mobilizing of the particulates is complete * No "dead zones" exist * Packing of material is minimized * Eroding effects are significantly reduced Applications * Mixing nuclear waste at Hanford * Any similar industrial process involving heavy solids in a carrier fluid Opportunity Research is currently active on the patent-pending technology "Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from

133

Significant Improvement of Energy Efficiency at Alunorte's ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Significant Improvement of Energy Efficiency at Alunorte's Calcination Facility. Author(s), Michael Missalla, Hans-Werner Schmidt, Joaquim  ...

134

Investigating the Use of Biosorbents to Remove Arsenic from Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluating the ability of biosorbents to remove arsenic from water has global significance due to the widespread availability and low cost of biosorbent materials. In this study, the ability of coffee grounds and coconut substrate (two previously unreported biosorbents) to remove arsenic from water was compared against the performance of arsenic removal on rice husk (a recognized and widely tested biosorbent). The three biosorbents were individually screened for their ability to remove arsenite, As (III), and arsenate, As (V), from water. Batch reactors were employed to assess the percent removal, reaction kinetics, adsorption capacity, and desorption of each arsenic species onto/from biosorbents under pH buffered and non?buffered conditions. The resulting experimental data was statistically interpreted using analysis of variance and ttesting of the means. The experimental results were also fit to existing kinetic and isotherm models to provide kinetic rate constants, the maximum adsorption capacity, and to help interpret the nature of the reactions on the biosorbent surface. While all three biosorbents removed arsenic with similar initial reaction kinetics (pseudo 1st order reaction rate constant for As (III) was 0.13 hr^?1 for all three biosorbents and for As (V) was 0.17 hr^?1 for coffee grounds and rice husk and 0.15 hr^?1 for coconut substrate), the amount of arsenite and arsenate removed was highest for coffee grounds (84 and 91 percent, respectively), followed by rice husk (68 and 72 percent, respectively), and then coconut substrate (26 and 24 percent, respectively). The maximum adsorption capacity of arsenite and arsenate was determined for coffee grounds (0.66 and 0.70 mg/g, respectively) and rice husk (0.55 and 0.66 mg/g, respectively). While desorption was observed for both coffee grounds and rice husk, the total amount of desorption accounted for less than 15 percent of the total retained mass. The results of this thesis work reveal that coffee can be used as an effective biosorbent when compared to rice husk; however, coconut substrate is less effective than rice husk at removing As (III) and As (V).

Erapalli, Shreyas

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

DISSOLUTION METHOD OF REMOVING BONDING AGENTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for removing residual aluminumsilicon bonding agents from uranium slugs after the removal of aluminum coatings. To accomplish this the slug is immersed in an aqueous solution about 0.75 N in hydrofluoric acid and about 7 N in nitric acid.

Hyman, H.H.

1960-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

136

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

137

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

139

Global Cut Framework for Removing Symmetries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a general technique for removing symmetries in CSPs during search. The idea is to record no-goods, during the exploration of the search tree, whose symmetric counterpart (if any) should be removed. The no-good, called Global ...

Filippo Focacci; Michela Milano

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Impact of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) source zone architecture on mass removal mechanisms in strongly layered heterogeneous porous media during soil vapor extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An existing multiphase flow simulator was modified in order to determine the effects of four mechanisms on NAPL mass removal in a strongly layered heterogeneous vadose zone during soil vapor extraction (SVE): a) NAPL flow, b) diffusion and dispersion from low permeability zones, c) slow desorption from sediment grains, and d) rate-limited dissolution of trapped NAPL. The impact of water and NAPL saturation distribution, NAPL type (i.e., free, residual, or trapped) distribution, and spatial heterogeneity of the permeability field on these mechanisms were evaluated. Two different initial source zone architectures (one with and one without trapped NAPL) were considered and these architectures were used to evaluate seven different SVE scenarios. For all runs, slow diffusion from low permeability zones that gas flow bypassed was a dominant factor for diminished SVE effectiveness at later times. This effect was more significant at high water saturation due to the decrease of gas-phase relative permeability. Transverse dispersion contributed to fast NAPL mass removal from the low permeability layer in both source zone architectures, but longitudinal dispersion did not affect overall mass removal time. Both slow desorption from sediment grains and rate-limited mass transfer from trapped NAPL only marginally affected removal times. However, mass transfer from trapped NAPL did affect mass removal at late time, as well as the NAPL distribution. NAPL flow from low to high permeability zones contributed to faster mass removal from the low permeability layer, and this effect increased when water infiltration was eliminated. These simulations indicate that if trapped NAPL exists in heterogeneous porous media, mass transfer can be improved by delivering gas directly to zones with trapped NAPL and by lowering the water content, which increases the gas relative permeability and changes trapped NAPL to free NAPL.

Yoon, Hongkyu; Werth, Charlie; Valocchi, Albert J.; Oostrom, Martinus

2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Soil Hydraulic Properties Influenced by Corn Stover Removal from No-Till Corn in Ohio.  

SciTech Connect

Corn (Zea mays L.) stover removal for biofuel production and other uses may alter soil hydraulic properties, but site-specific information needed to determine the threshold levels of removal for the U.S. Corn Belt region is limited. We quantified impacts of systematic removal of corn stover on soil hydraulic parameters after one year of stover management under no-till (NT) systems in three soils in Ohio including Rayne silt loam (fine-loamy, mixed, mesic Typic Hapludult) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston. Interrelationships among soil properties and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) predictions were also studied. Earthworm middens, Ksat, bulk density (?b), soil-water retention (SWR), pore-size distribution, and air permeability (ka) were determined for six stover treatments including 0 (T0), 25 (T25), 50 (T50), 75 (T75), 100 (T100), and 200 (T200) % of corn stover corresponding to 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75, 5.00, and 10.00 Mg ha-1 of stover, respectively. Stover removal reduced the number of middens, Ksat, SWR, and ka at all sites (P<0.01). Complete stover removal reduced earthworm middens by 20-fold across sites, decreased geometric mean Ksat from 6.3 to 0.1 mm h-1 at Coshocton, 3.2 to 0.3 mm h-1 at Hoytville, and 5.8 to 0.6 mm h-1 at Charleston, and increased ?b in the 0- to 10-cm depth by about 15% relative to double stover plots. The SWR for T100 was 1.3 times higher than that for T0 at 0 to -6 kPa. The log ka for T200, T100, and T75 significantly exceeded that under T50, T25, and T0 at Coshocton and Charleston. Measured parameters were strongly correlated, and ka was a potential Ksat predictor. Stover harvesting at rates above 1.25 Mg ha-1 affects soil hydraulic properties and earthworm activity, but further monitoring is needed to ascertain the threshold levels of stover removal.Corn (Zea mays L.) stover removal for biofuel production and other uses may alter soil hydraulic properties, but site-specific information needed to determine the threshold levels of removal for the U.S. Corn Belt region is limited. We quantified impacts of systematic removal of corn stover on soil hydraulic parameters after one year of stover management under no-till (NT) systems in three soils in Ohio including Rayne silt loam (fine-loamy, mixed, mesic Typic Hapludult) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston. Interrelationships among soil properties and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) predictions were also studied. Earthworm middens, Ksat, bulk density (?b), soil-water retention (SWR), pore-size distribution, and air permeability (ka) were determined for six stover treatments including 0 (T0), 25 (T25), 50 (T50), 75 (T75), 100 (T100), and 200 (T200) % of corn stover corresponding to 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75, 5.00, and 10.00 Mg ha-1 of stover, respectively. Stover removal reduced the number of middens, Ksat, SWR, and ka at all sites (P<0.01). Complete stover removal reduced earthworm middens by 20-fold across sites, decreased geometric mean Ksat from 6.3 to 0.1 mm h-1 at Coshocton, 3.2 to 0.3 mm h-1 at Hoytville, and 5.8 to 0.6 mm h-1 at Charleston, and increased ?b in the 0- to 10-cm depth by about 15% relative to double stover plots. The SWR for T100 was 1.3 times higher than that for T0 at 0 to -6 kPa. The log ka for T200, T100, and T75 significantly exceeded that under T50, T25, and T0 at Coshocton and Charleston. Measured parameters were strongly correlated, and ka was a potential Ksat predictor. Stover harvesting at rates above 1.25 Mg ha-1 affects soil hydraulic properties and earthworm activity, but further monitoring is needed to ascertain the threshold levels of stover removal.

Blanco-Canqui, H.; Lal, Rattan; Post, W. M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Shipitalo, M. J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

COST OF MERCURY REMOVAL IN IGCC PLANTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost of Mercury Removal Cost of Mercury Removal in an IGCC Plant Final Report September 2002 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory By: Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group Inc. Reading, Pennsylvania Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania DOE Product Manager: Gary J. Stiegel DOE Task Manager: James R. Longanbach Principal Investigators: Michael G. Klett Russell C. Maxwell Michael D. Rutkowski PARSONS The Cost of Mercury Removal in an IGCC Plant Final Report i September 2002 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page 1 Summary 1 2 Introduction 3 3 Background 4 3.1 Regulatory Initiatives 4 3.2 Mercury Removal for Conventional Coal-Fired Plants 4 3.3 Mercury Removal Experience in Gasification 5 3.4 Variability of Mercury Content in Coal 6 4 Design Considerations 7 4.1 Carbon Bed Location

143

Catalyst regeneration process including metal contaminants removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Spent catalysts removed from a catalytic hydrogenation process for hydrocarbon feedstocks, and containing undesired metals contaminants deposits, are regenerated. Following solvent washing to remove process oils, the catalyst is treated either with chemicals which form sulfate or oxysulfate compounds with the metals contaminants, or with acids which remove the metal contaminants, such as 5-50 W % sulfuric acid in aqueous solution and 0-10 W % ammonium ion solutions to substantially remove the metals deposits. The acid treating occurs within the temperature range of 60.degree.-250.degree. F. for 5-120 minutes at substantially atmospheric pressure. Carbon deposits are removed from the treated catalyst by carbon burnoff at 800.degree.-900.degree. F. temperature, using 1-6 V % oxygen in an inert gas mixture, after which the regenerated catalyst can be effectively reused in the catalytic process.

Ganguli, Partha S. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)  

SciTech Connect

The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Coal Ash Carbon Removal Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market resistance to the use of ash containing elevated levels of carbon and/or ammonia has become a major concern for coal-fired facilities in recent years as a result of increased use of nitrogen oxide (NOx) reduction environmental control technologies. EPRI initiated this state of practice assessment to help power producers evaluate alternatives for ash beneficiation.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

EA-1301: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1301: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1301: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1301: Finding of No Significant Impact Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Department of Energy (DOE), is proposing to fund the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon Program (IDFG Program). The IDFG Program is a small-scale research and production initiative designed to increase numbers of three weak but recoverable populations of spring/summer chinook salmon in the Salmon River drainage. This would increase numbers of spring/summer chinook salmon within the Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU), and reduce population fragmentation within the ESU.

147

Diesel prices increase nationally  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices increase nationally The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.91 a gallon on Monday. That's up 1.3 cents from a week ago, based on the...

148

Diesel prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.84 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

149

Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these experienced cladding failures as operational capabilities of the different designs were being established. In addition, numerous spills of heavy water occurred within the facility. Currently, radiation and radioactive contamination levels are low within HWCTR with most of the radioactivity contained within the reactor vessel. There are no known insults to the environment, however with the increasing deterioration of the facility, the possibility exists that contamination could spread outside the facility if it is not decommissioned. An interior panoramic view of the ground floor elevation taken in August 2009 is shown in Figure 2. The foreground shows the transfer coffin followed by the reactor vessel and control rod drive platform in the center. Behind the reactor vessel is the fuel pool. Above the ground level are the polar crane and the emergency deluge tank at the top of the dome. Note the considerable rust and degradation of the components and the interior of the containment building. Alternative studies have concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning is to remove the reactor vessel, steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. Characterization studies along with transport models have concluded that the remaining below grade equipment that is left in place including the transfer coffin will not contribute any significant contamination to the environment in the future. The below grade space will be grouted in place. A concrete cover will be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater will be monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. The schedule for completion of decommissioning is late FY2011. This paper describes the concepts planned in order to remove the major components including the dome, the reactor vessel (RV), the two steam generators (SG), and relocating the transfer coffin (TC).

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

150

Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these experienced cladding failures as operational capabilities of the different designs were being established. In addition, numerous spills of heavy water occurred within the facility. Currently, radiation and radioactive contamination levels are low within HWCTR with most of the radioactivity contained within the reactor vessel. There are no known insults to the environment, however with the increasing deterioration of the facility, the possibility exists that contamination could spread outside the facility if it is not decommissioned. An interior panoramic view of the ground floor elevation taken in August 2009 is shown in Figure 2. The foreground shows the transfer coffin followed by the reactor vessel and control rod drive platform in the center. Behind the reactor vessel is the fuel pool. Above the ground level are the polar crane and the emergency deluge tank at the top of the dome. Note the considerable rust and degradation of the components and the interior of the containment building. Alternative studies have concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning is to remove the reactor vessel, steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. Characterization studies along with transport models have concluded that the remaining below grade equipment that is left in place including the transfer coffin will not contribute any significant contamination to the environment in the future. The below grade space will be grouted in place. A concrete cover will be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater will be monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. The schedule for completion of decommissioning is late FY2011. This paper describes the concepts planned in order to remove the major components including the dome, the reactor vessel (RV), the two steam generators (SG), and relocating the transfer coffin (TC).

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

151

Microsoft Word - INFLUENCE OF SULFUR REMOVAL ON IGCC PERFORMANCE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

results in a moderate increase in the power plant total investment, and a lower power plant thermal efficiency leading to an overall significant increase in the kW...

152

The effects of moderate coal cleaning on the microbial removal of organic sulfur. [Rhodococcuc rhodochrous  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to investigate the possibilities of developing an integrated physical/chemical/microbial process for the precombustion removal of sulfur from coal. An effective pre- combustion coal desulfurization process should ideally be capable of removing both organic and inorganic sulfur. A variety of techniques exist for the removal of inorganic sulfur from coal, but there is currently no cost-effective method for the pre-combustion removal of organic sulfur. Recent developments have demonstrated that microorganisms are capable of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds and removing substantial amounts of organic sulfur from coal. However, lengthy treatment times are required. Moreover, the removal of organic sulfur form coal by microorganisms is hampered by the fact that, as a solid substrate, it is difficult to bring microorganisms in contact with the entirety of a coal sample. This study will examine the suitability of physically/chemically treated coal sample for subsequent biodesulfurization. Physical/chemical processes primarily designed for the removal of pyritic sulfur may also cause substantial increases in the porosity and surface area of the coal which may facilitate the subsequent removal of organic sulfur by microoganisms. During the current quarter, coal samples that have been chemically pretreated with methanol, ammonia, and isopropanol were examined for the removal of organic sulfur by the microbial culture IGTS8, an assay for the presence of protein in coal samples was developed, and a laboratory-scale device for the explosive comminution of coal was designed and constructed.

Srivastava, V.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Significance Tests for Regression Model Hierarchies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods of estimating the significance of optimal regression models selected from a model hierarchy proposed by Barnett and Hasselmann (1979) are reexamined allowing for the multiple-candidate nature of the selection criteria. It is found that ...

T. P. Barnett; R. W. Preisendorfer; L. M. Goldstein; K. Hasselmann

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 March 2002 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT TRANSURANIC WASTE RETRIEVAL FROM THE 218-W-4B AND 218-W-4C LOW-LEVEL BURIAL GROUNDS HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY March 2002 U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact 2 March 2002 This page intentionally left blank. U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact 3 March 2002 AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1405, for retrieval of transuranic waste from the 218-W-4B and 218-W-4C low-level burial grounds located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Based on the

155

Organic and nitrogen removal from landfill leachate in aerobic granular sludge sequencing batch reactors  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aerobic granular sludge SBR was used to treat real landfill leachate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer COD removal was analyzed kinetically using a modified model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristics of nitrogen removal at different ammonium inputs were explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DO variations were consistent with the GSBR performances at low ammonium inputs. - Abstract: Granule sequencing batch reactors (GSBR) were established for landfill leachate treatment, and the COD removal was analyzed kinetically using a modified model. Results showed that COD removal rate decreased as influent ammonium concentration increasing. Characteristics of nitrogen removal at different influent ammonium levels were also studied. When the ammonium concentration in the landfill leachate was 366 mg L{sup -1}, the dominant nitrogen removal process in the GSBR was simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND). Under the ammonium concentration of 788 mg L{sup -1}, nitrite accumulation occurred and the accumulated nitrite was reduced to nitrogen gas by the shortcut denitrification process. When the influent ammonium increased to a higher level of 1105 mg L{sup -1}, accumulation of nitrite and nitrate lasted in the whole cycle, and the removal efficiencies of total nitrogen and ammonium decreased to only 35.0% and 39.3%, respectively. Results also showed that DO was a useful process controlling parameter for the organics and nitrogen removal at low ammonium input.

Wei Yanjie [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection in Water Transport Engineering Ministry of Communications, Tianjin Research Institute of Water Transport Engineering, Tianjin 300456 (China); Ji Min, E-mail: jmtju@yahoo.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li Ruying [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Qin Feifei [Tianjin Tanggu Sino French Water Supply Co. Ltd., Tianjin 300450 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

In situ removal of contamination from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination, and further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed.

Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Method for changing removable bearing for a wind turbine generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY), Gadre; Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

158

EA-1146: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

46: Finding of No Significant Impact 46: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1146: Finding of No Significant Impact Radioactive Waste Storage at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado Based on the information and analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed increase in, and operation of, radioactive waste storage capacity at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 as amended. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact for the proposed action. EA-1146-FONSI-1996.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1146: Final Environmental Assessment

159

Removal of field and embedded metal by spin spray etching  

SciTech Connect

A process of removing both the field metal, such as copper, and a metal, such as copper, embedded into a dielectric or substrate at substantially the same rate by dripping or spraying a suitable metal etchant onto a spinning wafer to etch the metal evenly on the entire surface of the wafer. By this process the field metal is etched away completely while etching of the metal inside patterned features in the dielectric at the same or a lesser rate. This process is dependent on the type of chemical etchant used, the concentration and the temperature of the solution, and also the rate of spin speed of the wafer during the etching. The process substantially reduces the metal removal time compared to mechanical polishing, for example, and can be carried out using significantly less expensive equipment.

Contolini, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA); Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Tarte, Lisa A. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Removing Barriers to Innovations: Related Codes and Standards CSI Team  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Removing Barriers to Innovation Removing Barriers to Innovation Related Codes and Standards CSI Team PAM COLE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Building America Technical Update Meeting, April 29-30, 2013, Denver, CO PNNL-SA-95120 Background/History Transformation of U.S. housing markets to favor high- performance homes faces significant challenges, from education to technology to infrastructure and cost barriers. Some of the most difficult challenges involve industry codes and standards that may prevent or slow the innovation process. Building America Research has a history of: Successful market innovations and transformation and overcoming codes and standards barriers. Top 3 Existing Innovations C/S Challenges Thermal Bypass Air Barrier Requirements: Building America research teams effectively

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A Taulation oÂŁ Significant Changes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Taulation oÂŁ Significant Changes Taulation oÂŁ Significant Changes Made to the Design oÂŁ the Advanced photon Source CAPS) Between February 1986 and March 1987 Martin Knott LS-92 5/4/87 NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION FOR REFERENCE ONLY LS-92 5/4/87 A Taulation oÂŁ Significant Changes Made to the Design of the Advanced photon Source (APS) Between February 1986 and March 1987 Martin Knott 1.0 Introduction The purpose of this note is to document and enumerate the major design changes to the APS made during the period between February 1986 when the first Conceptual Design Report (CDR) was issued (ANL-86-8) and March 1987 as the final design changes are being made in preparation for the issuance of the 1987 version of the CDR. While the material which follows is by no means exhaustive, it represents the principal features affected by the redesign

162

Office of Legacy Management Significant Environmental Aspects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9/2013 9/2013 Office of Legacy Management Significant Environmental Aspects The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is to safely manage DOE's postclosure responsibilities and ensure the future protection of human health and the environment. We have evaluated all of our activities for their potential impact on the environment, and we have identified those aspects that could have a significant impact if they were not controlled. This information is used to develop programs to prevent or mitigate potential impacts and to establish prioritized goals, objectives, and targets for continually improving performance. Our significant environmental aspects fall into four categories: * Waste generation and minimization

163

Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers by Dry Removal with Lime and Limestone Sorbants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past decade increasing concern over the potential environmental impact associated with the emissions of both gaseous and particulate pollutants has resulted in the promulgation of strict regulatory standards governing such emissions. In this regard, particular attention has been placed upon the control of sulfur dioxide (SO2) from major fuel burning installations. The provisions of the 1977 Amendments to the Clean Air Act which relate to the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) have made consideration of this problem of significant additional importance in the context of increased coal utilization. There exist three general methods for the control of sulfur dioxide emissions from pulverized coal-fired boiler equipment. These are: (1) coal cleaning to remove pyritic sulfur, (2) conventional wet, nonregenerable scrubbing with alkaline slurry and solution processes, and (3) dry processes which involve direct introduction of lime or limestone into the firebox, or a spray dryer operated with nonregenerable alkaline sorbents coupled with a fabric filter collector. Equipment requirements, SO2 removal criteria, general economics, and potential applications of these latter two approaches within category (3) will be discussed.

Schwartz, M. H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Kazakhstan HEU Removal Kazakhstan HEU Removal Location Kazakhstan United States 48° 59' 44.1492" N, 67° 3' 37.9692" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

165

Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Sweden Plutonium Removal Sweden Plutonium Removal Location Sweden United States 62° 24' 4.4136" N, 15° 22' 51.096" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

166

Hungary HEU removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

removal | National Nuclear Security Administration removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Hungary HEU removal Hungary HEU removal Location Hungary United States 47° 11' 51.6336" N, 19° 41' 15" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view this map.

167

Mexico HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Mexico HEU Removal Mexico HEU Removal Location Mexico United States 24° 24' 35.298" N, 102° 49' 55.3116" W See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view this map.

168

Removal of volatile materials from forepump oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of clearing condensable vapors from forepump oil is described. Air is bubbled though the oil reservoir removing volatile material from the oil and allowing continuous pumping of materials by non?vented pumps.

Paul P. Nicole

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

Cook, Gus T. (Paducah, KY); Holshouser, Stephen K. (Boaz, KY); Coleman, Richard M. (Paducah, KY); Harless, Charles E. (Smithland, KY); Whinnery, III, Walter N. (Paducah, KY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

Cook, G.T.; Holshouser, S.K.; Coleman, R.M.; Harless, C.E.; Whinnery, W.N. III

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

171

Chile HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Removal Location United States 25 28' 1.4916" S, 69 33' 55.548" W See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view...

172

France HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Removal Location United States 45 44' 20.0544" N, 2 17' 6.5616" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view...

173

Libya HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal Location Libya United States 27 34' 9.5448" N, 17 24' 8.4384" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view...

174

Install Removable Insulation on Valves and Fittings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This revised ITP tip sheet on installing removable insulation on valves and fittings provides how-to advice for improving the system using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Turkey HEU Removal Turkey HEU Removal Location Turkey United States 38° 26' 50.2044" N, 40° 15' 14.0616" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

176

Laser removal of sludge from steam generators  

SciTech Connect

A method of removing unwanted chemical deposits known as sludge from the metal surfaces of steam generators with laser energy is provided. Laser energy of a certain power density, of a critical wavelength and frequency, is intermittently focused on the sludge deposits to vaporize them so that the surfaces are cleaned without affecting the metal surface (sludge substrate). Fiberoptic tubes are utilized for laser beam transmission and beam direction. Fiberoptics are also utilized to monitor laser operation and sludge removal.

Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Statistical Significance of the Sequence Repeats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to approximate the distribution of the number of repeats in biological sequences modelled by Markov chains. Because of the inaccessibility of this distribution, we approximate it thanks to the Chen-Stein method using the poisson distribution. The goal of the application is to find the statistical significance of the repeats in the genome of a biological species.

Narjiss Touyar Helene; Helene Dauchel; Dominique Cellier; Sophie Schbath

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

III. Finding of No Significant Impact On  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the basis of the environmental assessment, the NRC concludes that the proposed action will not have a significant effect on the quality of the human environment. Accordingly, the NRC has determined not to prepare an environmental impact statement for the proposed action. IV. Further Information Documents related to this action are available electronically at the NRC Library at

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Disk Quota Increase Request  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disk Disk Quota Increase Disk Quota Increase Request NERSC will consider reasonable requests for changes in disk space and inode limits. Please submit a request through the "Request Forms" section at the NERSC help portal. If you select "Hopper scratch directory" from the "File System" menu below, the quota value requested applies to the combined contents of $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2. Please ask for the least amount of resources you need, since the sum of disk space and inodes allocated to users already exceeds system capacity. In other words, system resources would be exhausted before all users could use their existing quotas. You can find out the current quotas and usage of disk space and inodes for your home and scratch file systems with the myquota command. You can find

180

Pemex increasing offshore activity  

SciTech Connect

Although austere by boom-year standards, Mexico's National Energy Program for 1984-1988 calls for forty wildcats and 90 to 144 development wells off the coast, primarily in the prolific Campeche Bay area. Platform additions will include nine drilling platforms, each for twelve wells, and eight eight platforms to drill injection wells. Additionally, 7 production, 6 accomodation, 6 linkage and 8 compression platforms and 13 tetrapods will be installed. The main objectives of the plan are energy self-sufficiency through the turn of the century, and energy diversification, savings and productivity. The most controversial portion of Mexico's energy program is that calling for nuclear energy development. The energy program lists three basic goals in hydrocarbon production: continuing research on better techniques of secondary recovery; increasing capacity for refining primary and secondary crude products and improving production of heavy crudes; and increasing storage capacity and installing pipelines capable of carrying a greater volume of crude.

Beachy, D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Microsoft Word - Significant Environmental Aspects_2010.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is to safely manage DOE's post-closure responsibilities and ensure the future protection of human health and the environment. We have evaluated all of our activities for their potential impact on the environment, and we have identified those aspects that could have a significant impact if they were not controlled. This information is used to develop programs to prevent or mitigate potential impacts and to establish prioritized goals, objectives, and targets for continually improving performance. Our significant environmental aspects fall into four categories: * Waste generation and minimization * Resource consumption, use, and storage * Releases to the environment * Land use (including cell construction and maintenance, and structure erection or

182

M.: Data Without Meaning: Establishing the Significant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is well recognised that the time period in which digital research may remain accessible is likely to be short in comparison to the period in which it will have intellectual value. Although many digital preservation strategies are effective for simple resources, it is not always possible to confirm that all of the significant properties – the characteristics that contribute to the intended meaning – have been maintained when stored in different formats and software environments. The paper outlines methodologies being developed by InterPARES, PLANETS and other projects in the international research community to support the decision-making process and highlights the work of four recent JISC-funded studies to specify the significant properties of vector images, moving images, software and learning objects.

Gareth Knight; Maureen Pennock

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Polymer formulation for removing hydrogen and liquid water from an enclosed space  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a solution to the particular problem of liquid water formation in hydrogen getters exposed to quantities of oxygen. Water formation is usually desired because the recombination reaction removes hydrogen without affecting gettering capacity and the oxygen removal reduces the chances for a hydrogen explosion once free oxygen is essentially removed. The present invention describes a getter incorporating a polyacrylate compound that can absorb up to 500% of its own weight in liquid water without significantly affecting its hydrogen gettering/recombination properties, but that also is insensitive to water vapor.

Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA)

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

184

Reported Significant Observation (RSO) studies. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Reported Significant Observation (RSO) study used in the field of safety is an information-gathering technique where employee-participants describe situations they have personally witnessed involving good and bad practices and safe and unsafe conditions. This information is useful in the risk assessment process because it focuses on hazards and thereby facilitates their elimination. However, RSO cannot be the only component in a risk assessment program. Used by the Air Force in their aviation psychology program and further developed by John C. Flanagan, RSO is more commonly known as the ``Critical Incident Technique.`` However, the words ``Critical`` and ``Incident`` had other connotations in nuclear safety, prompting early users within the Aerojet Nuclear Company to coin the more fitting title of ``Reported Significant Observations.`` The technique spread slowly in the safety field primarily because the majority of users were researchers interested in after-the-fact data, with application to everyday problems and behavioral factors. RSO was formally recognized as a significant hazard reduction tool during the development of the Management Oversight and Risk Tree (MORT) program for the US Atomic Energy Commission. The Department of Energy (DOE) has, in turn, adopted MORT for its system safety program, and this has resulted in RSO being a modern and viable technique for DOE contractor safety programs.

Eicher, R.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

EA-1717: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17: Finding of No Significant Impact 17: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1717: Finding of No Significant Impact BASF Catalysts, LLC Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Project, Elyria, Ohio The overall purpose and need for DOE action pursuant to the Vehicle Technologies Program and the funding opportunity under the Recovery Act are to accelerate the development and production of various electric drive vehicle systems by building or increasing domestic manufacturing capacity for advanced automotive batteries, their components, recycling facilities, and electric drive vehicle components in addition to stimulating the U.S. economy. DOE/EA-1717, Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Finding of No Significant Impact, Environmental

186

EA-1717: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Finding of No Significant Impact 7: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1717: Finding of No Significant Impact BASF Catalysts, LLC Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Project, Elyria, Ohio The overall purpose and need for DOE action pursuant to the Vehicle Technologies Program and the funding opportunity under the Recovery Act are to accelerate the development and production of various electric drive vehicle systems by building or increasing domestic manufacturing capacity for advanced automotive batteries, their components, recycling facilities, and electric drive vehicle components in addition to stimulating the U.S. economy. DOE/EA-1717, Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Finding of No Significant Impact, Environmental

187

EA-1719: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19: Finding of No Significant Impact 19: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1719: Finding of No Significant Impact Novolyte Technologies, Inc. Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Project, Zachary, Louisiana DOE determined that there would be no significant adverse impacts from DOE's proposed action of awarding a grant to Novolyte Technologies, Inc. to partially fund its expansion of a plant in Zachary, Louisiana, thereby increasing the plant's capacity to manufacture lithium electrolytes. This expansion would support the anticipated growth in the lithium-ion battery industry and, more specifically, the electric drive vehicle industry and hybrid-electric vehicle industry. DOe further determined that there could be beneficial impacts to the local economy and reduction in greenhouse gas

188

Apparatus and method for loading and unloading multiple digital tape cassettes utilizing a removable magazine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method to automate the handling of multiple digital tape cassettes for processing by commercially available cassette tape readers and recorders. A removable magazine rack stores a plurality of tape cassettes, and cooperates with a shuttle device that automatically inserts and removes cassettes from the magazine to the reader and vice-versa. Photocells are used to identify and index to the desired tape cassette. The apparatus allows digital information stored on multiple cassettes to be processed without significant operator intervention.

Lindenmeyer, C.W.

1993-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

189

Trunnion Collar Removal Machine - Gap Analysis Table  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to review the existing the trunnion collar removal machine against the ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (NSDB) [Ref. 10] requirements and to identify codes and standards and supplemental requirements to meet these requirements. If these codes and standards can not fully meet these requirements then a ''gap'' is identified. These gaps will be identified here and addressed using the ''Trunnion Collar Removal Machine Design Development Plan'' [Ref. 15]. The codes and standards, supplemental requirements, and design development requirements for the trunnion collar removal machine are provided in the gap analysis table (Appendix A, Table 1). Because the trunnion collar removal machine is credited with performing functions important to safety (ITS) in the NSDB [Ref. 10], design basis requirements are applicable to ensure equipment is available and performs required safety functions when needed. The gap analysis table is used to identify design objectives and provide a means to satisfy safety requirements. To ensure that the trunnion collar removal machine performs required safety functions and meets performance criteria, this portion of the gap analysis tables supplies codes and standards sections and the supplemental requirements and identifies design development requirements, if needed.

M. Johnson

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

190

An Experimental Study of Chemical Oxygen Demand Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental results showed that the refractory organics in coking wastewater can be effectively removed by this process, and COD removal efficiency was ...

191

Michigan Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from...

192

Salt Fluxes for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2001... for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from Molten Aluminum ... Solid chloride salts containing MgC2 can be used to remove alkali ...

193

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

194

South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas...

195

Ceramic filters for removal of particulates from hot gas streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal is to demonstrate the performance of a new ceramic filter in removing particulate matter from hot gas streams produced in advanced coal conversion processes. The specific objectives are threefold: (1) Development of full size ceramic filters suitable for hot gas filtration; (2) Demonstration of ceramic filters in long term (ca. 1000 hrs) field trials; and (3) Development of full-scale hot gas filter system designs and costs. To date, field tests of the ceramic filter for particulate removal have been conducted at seven sites on a variety of gas streams and under a variety of test conditions. In general, the following performance characteristics have been observed: 1. Filtration face velocity (equivalent to an ``air to cloth ratio``) for flue gas tests is comparable to that for pulse jet bags operating at the same pressure drop. In hot gas tests, flow-pressure drop characteristics have been observed to be comparable to those for other ceramic filters. 2. Complete regeneration by a simple backpulse technique is achieved; i.e., no increase in clean filter resistance over repetitive cycles is observed. 3. No plugging of the filter passageways by badly caking particulates is observed. 4. Essentially complete particulate removal, including submicron particulate matter, is achieved.

Goldsmith, R.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Ceramic filters for removal of particulates from hot gas streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal is to demonstrate the performance of a new ceramic filter in removing particulate matter from hot gas streams produced in advanced coal conversion processes. The specific objectives are threefold: (1) Development of full size ceramic filters suitable for hot gas filtration; (2) Demonstration of ceramic filters in long term (ca. 1000 hrs) field trials; and (3) Development of full-scale hot gas filter system designs and costs. To date, field tests of the ceramic filter for particulate removal have been conducted at seven sites on a variety of gas streams and under a variety of test conditions. In general, the following performance characteristics have been observed: 1. Filtration face velocity (equivalent to an air to cloth ratio'') for flue gas tests is comparable to that for pulse jet bags operating at the same pressure drop. In hot gas tests, flow-pressure drop characteristics have been observed to be comparable to those for other ceramic filters. 2. Complete regeneration by a simple backpulse technique is achieved; i.e., no increase in clean filter resistance over repetitive cycles is observed. 3. No plugging of the filter passageways by badly caking particulates is observed. 4. Essentially complete particulate removal, including submicron particulate matter, is achieved.

Goldsmith, R.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Mercury removal from solid mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

The removal of mercury from mixed wastes is an essential step in eliminating the temporary storage of large inventories of mixed waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Currently thermal treatment has been identified as a baseline technology and is being developed as part of the DOE Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP). Since thermal treatment will not be applicable to all mercury containing mixed waste and the removal of mercury prior to thermal treatment may be desirable, laboratory studies have been initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop alternative remediation technologies capable of removing mercury from certain mixed waste. This paper describes laboratory investigations of the KI/I{sub 2} leaching processes to determine the applicability of this process to mercury containing solid mixed waste.

Gates, D.D.; Morrissey, M.; Chava, K.K.; Chao, K.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

EA-1869: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

69: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No 69: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1869: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact General Motors LLC, Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative White Marsh, Maryland (September 2011) DOE prepared this Supplemental EA to evaluate the potential environmental consequences of providing financial assistance in a cooperative agreement with General Motors Limited Liability Company (LLC) (General Motors Company or GM). A supplement to the April 2010 EA was necessary due to the proposed building size increasing three fold as well as the addition of a parking lot and widening of a truck dock area. This building size increase is necessary to accommodate more manufacturing

199

Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separting the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF.sub.2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium, without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

Pulley, Howard (West Paducah, KY); Seltzer, Steven F. (Paducah, KY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separating the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

Pulley, H.; Seltzer, S.F.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Perchlorate ion (C104) removal using an electrochemically induced catalytic reaction on modified activated carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perchlorate is known to adversely affect the thyroid gland functions including iodide take up, thus perchlorate should be removed from drinking water. Bituminous coal-based activated carbon (AC) has been used for perchlorate removal in past years. Virgin carbon and carbon modified by oxidation with HNO3, NaOH and H2O2 were examined in this study for their ability to remove perchlorate by reduction or adsorption mechanisms. Surface functional groups formed on the modified AC (MAC) were examined with diffuse reflectance infrared spectrometry. Inhibition of perchlorate removal onto MAC by various anions ( - Cl , - 3 NO , and - 2 4 SO ) and solution pH (4.5, 7.2 and 10.5) were examined to characterize the MACs before an electrochemical reaction was performed. Surface functional groups were increased by oxidation. Groups that were found on the carbon include, but are not limited to lactone, quinine, carboxylate, and nitrogenoxygen groups. The effect of pH on removal of perchlorate by MAC was greatly affected by the change in the zero point charge (ZPC) induced on the carbon by modification. Virgin carbon also experienced difficulty in removing perchlorate when solution pH was above the ZPC. Anion inhibition varied with the modification process. - 3 NO inhibited perchlorate removal only by the virgin carbon. The other anions showed no major effects on the removal efficiency of perchlorate by the carbons. Electrochemical processes did not show favorable results in removal of perchlorate. The dominant mechanism of perchlorate removal during desorption tests was adsorption onto the carbon surfaces via ion exchange.

Langille, Meredith Caitlyn

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

EA-1603: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1603: Finding of No Significant Impact Expansion of Permitted Land and Operations at the 9940 Complex and Thunder Range at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico The EA analyzes the potential effects of a proposal to increase testing and training activities and expansion of operations at the 9940 Complex and Thunder Range at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. Expansion of Permitted Land and Operations at the 9940 Complex and Thunder Range at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico More Documents & Publications EA-1603: Final Environmental Assessment Federal Register Notice: National Nuclear Security Administration Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

203

EA-1207: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1207: Finding of No Significant Impact 1207: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1207: Finding of No Significant Impact Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration Environmental Assessment and Research and Development Activities An environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action to test an integrated pit disassembly and conversion process on a relatively small sample of pits and plutonium metal at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico. The proposed action would involve performing work in a series of interconnected gloveboxes using remote handling, automation, and computerized control systems to minimize operator exposure where possible, increase safety, and minimize the amount

204

EA-1381: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1381: Finding of No Significant Impact Atlas Relocation and Operation at the Nevada Test Site The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOEIEA-1381) to analyze the proposed action to relocate the Atlas pulse power machine from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to the Nevada Test Site (NTS). At the NTS, Atlas would be reassembled in a newly constructed building within a designated Industrial, Research, and Support site in Area 6. After reassembly, Atlas would be commissioned to ensure proper operation and then used to conduct approximately 40 pulsed power experiments per year, with a potential to increase to approximately 100 experiments per year, should the Stockpile

205

EA-1354: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1354: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1354: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1354: Finding of No Significant Impact Fort Collins 115kV Transmission Line Upgrade Project Platte River is proposing to add additional generation at its Rawhide Energy Station, located approximately 18 miles north of Fort Collins, to serve increasing demands for electricity. In order to deliver the additional power generation to customers, the electric transmission system in the Fort Collins area needs to be upgraded. These upgrades require adding new wires to existing power poles or, in some areas, rebuilding the existing transmission line (see Figure 1-1). The proposed upgrades and rebuilds will be within the rights-of-way (ROW) of existing lines. The ROW width of the existing lines are 75-120 feet. The ROWs for the proposed

206

EA-1356: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Finding of No Significant Impact 6: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1356: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Sludge Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee The U.S. Department of Energy proposes to raise the biosolids land application radionuclide loading limits from the current, self-imposed 4 mrem/yr lifetime loading to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC)-approved level of 10 mrem/yr. The planning level increase is necessary for industrial development within the Oak Ridge community. In addition, DOE proposes to allow the discharge of treated wastewaters from the West End Treatment Facility (WETF) to the Y-12 Plant and City of Oak Ridge sanitary sewer systems, resulting in an operational

207

Significant Silica Solubility in Geothermal Steam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although it is widely believed that silica solubility in low pressure (5 to 10 bar) geothermal steam is negligible, when one takes into account steam flows exceeding 10 million tonnes a year--at Wairakei, for instance--it is found that the amount transmitted in the vapor has the potential to give significant deposits on turbine nozzles and blades. A 150 MWe power station, when based on flows from a hot water reservoir at (a) 250 C or (b) 315 C, and with separator pressures of 6 bar, is found to carry about 100 and 200 kg/year respectively in the steam phase. In the case of a similar sized station exploiting a dry steam reservoir such as The Geysers, equivalent silica flows are obtained, dissolved in steam and carried as dust--the latter as solid particles precipitating from the vapor en route from source to turbine, and not preexisting in the formations as is commonly considered. Choking or coating of subterranean rock near such dry steam wells due to exsolving silica, may be the principal cause of declining steam discharge under production. Silica from completely dry or superheated steam can also seal the cap and sides of steam reservoirs when expanding below the criticus temperature (236 C) in a way previously thought possible only by hot water or wet steam.

James, Russell

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

208

Ranking significant phenomena in physical systems  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of any physical system requires a thorough understanding of the principal phenomena affecting the behavior of that system. In a complex application such as a nuclear reactor, identifying the principal phenomena in an accident transient can be a formidable task. This paper describes the use of the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) to assimilate engineering judgments that relate and rank the thermal-hydraulic phenomena affecting the response of a nuclear reactor. The AHP is described in this paper to acquaint the reader with the methodology. It is used to structure and simplify the decision-making process used to identify the most important phenomena affecting a reactor transient. The methodology is applied to a loss-of-feedwater transient in a nuclear reactor as an example, the objective of the example being to determine the most significant processes and phenomena in the reactor plant based on their impact on the ability of a primary system feed-and-bleed recovery to maintain a liquid level above the core.

Dimenna, R.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (USA)); Larson, T.K. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

System for increasing corona inception voltage of insulating oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The Corona Inception Voltage of insulating oils is increased by repetitive cycles of prestressing the oil with a voltage greater than the corona inception voltage, and either simultaneously or serially removing byproducts of corona by evacuation and heating the oil. 5 figs.

Rohwein, G.J.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

210

Asbestos in sludge- a significant risk  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to consider the issue of asbestos in sludge applied to land, and to provide some perspective on the health risk conclusions drawn from research on which these stories were based. While this review cannot conclude there is no health risk due to the presence of asbestos in sludge, it does suggest that such risk is not appreciably greater than from the presence of asbestos in other environmental samples. As analytical techniques continue to improve, increasing numbers of potentially toxic chemicals will be found in all types of environmental samples, including sludge. However, it is essential that the mere presence of a chemical in such samples not be equated with toxicity, or a hazard to the general public. Although some of the contaminants that will be detected in sludges or other environmental samples will be new and exotic, many have been present in the environment for years, and, in the case of the asbestos, for millenia. Scientists and engineers must work vigorously to minimize such health risks due to environmental contamination. However, scientists have the responsibility to discuss risks within a framework that is understandable by the general public. To do otherwise so as to incite fear and apprehension borders on scientific irresponsibility, and neither solves the problem, nor does justice to the scientific method.

Naylor, L.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Method of removing cesium from steam  

SciTech Connect

Method for removal of radioactive cesium from a hot vapor, such as high temperature steam, including the steps of passing input hot vapor containing radioactive cesium into a bed of silicate glass particles and chemically incorporating radioactive cesium in the silicate glass particles at a temperature of at least about 700.degree. F.

Carson, Jr., Neill J. (Clarendon Hills, IL); Noland, Robert A. (Oak Park, IL); Ruther, Westly E. (Skokie, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

ASBESTOS PIPE-INSULATION REMOVAL ROBOT SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

This final topical report details the development, experimentation and field-testing activities for a robotic asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system developed for use within the DOE's weapon complex as part of their ER and WM program, as well as in industrial abatement. The engineering development, regulatory compliance, cost-benefit and field-trial experiences gathered through this program are summarized.

Unknown

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications.

Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Derzon, Dora K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nelson, Jill S. (Albuquerque, NM); Rand, Peter B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Process for removing carbon from uranium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon contamination is removed from uranium and uranium alloys by heating in inert atmosphere to 700.degree.-1900.degree.C in effective contact with yttrium to cause carbon in the uranium to react with the yttrium. The yttrium is either in direct contact with the contaminated uranium or in indirect contact by means of an intermediate transport medium.

Powell, George L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Heat exchanger with a removable tube section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is described in which the tube sheet is secured against primary liquid pressure, but which allows for easy removal of the tube section. The tube section is supported by a flange which is secured by a number of shear blocks, each of which extends into a slot which is immovable with respect to the outer shell of the heat exchanger. (auth)

Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.

1975-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

216

REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The removal of chlorides from aqueons solutions is described. The process involves contacting the aqueous chloride containing solution with a benzene solution about 0.005 M in phenyl mercuric acetate whereby the chloride anions are taken up by the organic phase and separating the organic phase from the aqueous solutions.

Schulz, W.W.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications. 1 fig.

Arnold, C. Jr.; Derzon, D.K.; Nelson, J.S.; Rand, P.B.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

218

Demonstrate the removal efficiency and capacity of MOF materials for krypton recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal organic framework materials (MOFs) were developed and tested in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle Technology Separations and Waste Forms Campaign. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal of xenon (Xe) and krypton (Kr) from gaseous products of nuclear fuel reprocessing unit operations. Two metal organic framework structures were investigated in greater detail to demonstrate the removal efficiency and capacity of MOF materials for krypton recovery. Our two bed breakthrough measurements on NiDOBDC and FMOFCu indicate these materials can capture and separate parts per million levels of Xe and Kr from air. The removal efficiency and adsorption capacity for Kr on these two MOFs were further increased upon removal of Xe upfront.

Thallapally, Praveen K.; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

219

Biochemical removal of HAP precursors from coal. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Shake flask tests were completed of microbial pyrite and HAP precursor removal from Rosebud subbituminous coal. Significant amounts of Ni, F, Mn, Cd, Co and Be were removed from this coal. Analyses in connection with leach column tests of Pittsburgh coal were completed and confirmed significant removal of Ni, F, Mn, Cd, Co and As from this coal. Although Hg was not removed from Pittsburgh coal by microbial attack, there was a correlation between HCl leaching of Hg from this coal and the extent of depyritization. Since HgS is soluble in HCl, the results suggest HgS is exposed by chemical and microbial dissolution of coal pyrite. Column tests with cleaned Indiana No. 5 coal are in progress and show significant early dissolution of Ni, Mn, Cd, Co and As. A final shake flask test with Kentucky No. 9 coal was begun. Pittsburgh coal with a low content of fines was shipped to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in preparation for slurry column tests of HAP precursor removal. Project results were presented at the PETC contractor`s conference held in Pittsburgh. A project progress review meeting was also held with the PETC technical project monitor.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids Final Technical Report (From October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2005) Principle Authors Aihua Zhang, Qisheng Ma, Kangshi Wang, Yongchun Tang (co-PI), William A. Goddard (PI), Date Report was issued: December 9, 2005 DOE Award number: DE-FC26-02NT15383 Name and Address of Submitting Organization California Institute of Technology 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA91125 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: a. treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10 and, b. separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (a) and (b) are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Photoacoustic removal of occlusions from blood vessels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Partial or total occlusions of fluid passages within the human body are removed by positioning an array of optical fibers in the passage and directing treatment radiation pulses along the fibers, one at a time, to generate a shock wave and hydrodynamics flows that strike and emulsify the occlusions. A preferred application is the removal of blood clots (thrombin and embolic) from small cerebral vessels to reverse the effects of an ischemic stroke. The operating parameters and techniques are chosen to minimize the amount of heating of the fragile cerebral vessel walls occurring during this photo acoustic treatment. One such technique is the optical monitoring of the existence of hydrodynamics flow generating vapor bubbles when they are expected to occur and stopping the heat generating pulses propagated along an optical fiber that is not generating such bubbles.

Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Maitland, IV, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA); Esch, Victor C. (San Francisco, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Method of removing cesium from steam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The foregoing objects of the present invention are achieved by a method for removing radioactive cesium from a hot vapor, such as steam, by a technique wherein the cesium chemically reacts with a filtering material which retains the cesium without causing degradation of the filtering material. The method is carried out at temperatures in the range of from about 700{degree}F to about 1000{degree}F, and even higher, but it preferably is utilized at a temperature of at least about 800{degree}F. The method uses a silica glass which is preferably in the form of spheres as the filter material. The preferred material is a borosilicate glass (Pyrex). The degree of removal of the radioactive cesium from the hot steam or other vapor approaches 90 to 100%.

Carson, N.J. Jr.; Noland, R.A.; Ruther, W.E.

1990-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

224

Categorical Exclusion 4568, Crane Removal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

l)eterminationFornl l)eterminationFornl Project Title: Crane Removal Project (4568) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is to remove an old legacy crane trolley and old crane operated cab. General Administration/Management DA I - Routine business actions DA2 - Administrative contract amendments DA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations DA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect DA6 - Procedural rulemakings upgrade DA7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged DA8 - Award of technical support/M&O/personal service contracts DA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training DAIO - Reports on non-DOE legislation DA II - Technical advice and planning assistance

225

IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the second year of this project, we continued our effort to develop low temperature decarboxylation catalysts and investigate the behavior of these catalysts at different reaction conditions. We conducted a large number of dynamic measurements with crude oil and model compounds to obtain the information at different reaction stages, which was scheduled as the Task2 in our work plan. We developed a novel adsorption method to remove naphthenic acid from crude oil using naturally occurring materials such as clays. Our results show promise as an industrial application. The theoretical modeling proposed several possible reaction pathways and predicted the reactivity depending on the catalysts employed. From all of these studies, we obtained more comprehensive understanding about catalytic decarboxylation and oil upgrading based on the naphthenic acid removal concept.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang, William A. Goddard, Yongchun Tang

2005-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

226

Assessment of asbestos removal carried out using EPA Purple Book guidance. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A statistical evaluation of airborne asbestos data collected before, during, and after removal of spray-applied asbestos-containing fireproofing at three university buildings is presented. Each abatement project was conducted in accordance with the work practices and procedures recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Guidance for Controlling Asbestos-Containing Materials in Buildings, (the Purple Book). Containment barriers should be designed to effectively prevent a significant increase in airborne concentrations outside the work area during and after abatement. An increase in asbestos concentration outside the work area could allow an abatement site to be cleared when the level inside the containment is similarly elevated. This holds true whether PCM or TEM is used for the clearance. This weakness in the guidance for location of sampling outside of the containment barrier is one of the major findings of the study. A requirement to monitor the concentration of asbestos outside the work area before and after abatement is recommended to be added to the clearance procedure.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Bourcier, William L. (Livermore, CA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

228

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Makarewicz, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Meredith, Paul F. (Knoxville, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Makarewicz, M.A.; Meredith, P.F.

1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

230

Trojan PWR Decommissioning: Large Component Removal Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the decommissioning of large commercial nuclear plants in the United States is in its infancy, the technical challenges with associated radioactive waste management are clear. This report describes the removal and disposal of four steam generators and one pressurizer from the Trojan nuclear power plant, the first large PWR to be decommissioned in the United States. The report chronicles the problems, successes, and lessons learned in this project, which was completed on schedule and under budget in...

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

231

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

1987-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Process for removing sulfur from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

Aida, T.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.

1983-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

234

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, Milton (12833 S. 82nd Ct., Palos Park, IL 60464); Sinha, Shome N. (5748 Drexel, 2A, Chicago, IL 60637)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

SLUDGE BATCH 7 (SB7) WASHING DEMONSTRATION TO DETERMINE SULFATE/OXALATE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY AND SETTLING BEHAVIOR  

SciTech Connect

To support Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) washing, a demonstration of the proposed Tank Farm washing operation was performed utilizing a real-waste test slurry generated from Tank 4, 7, and 12 samples. The purpose of the demonstration was twofold: (1) to determine the settling time requirements and washing strategy needed to bring the SB7 slurry to the desired endpoint; and (2) to determine the impact of washing on the chemical and physical characteristics of the sludge, particularly those of sulfur content, oxalate content, and rheology. Seven wash cycles were conducted over a four month period to reduce the supernatant sodium concentration to approximately one molar. The long washing duration was due to the slow settling of the sludge and the limited compaction. Approximately 90% of the sulfur was removed through washing, and the vast majority of the sulfur was determined to be soluble from the start. In contrast, only about half of the oxalate was removed through washing, as most of the oxalate was initially insoluble and did not partition to the liquid phase until the latter washes. The final sulfur concentration was 0.45 wt% of the total solids, and the final oxalate concentration was 9,900 mg/kg slurry. More oxalate could have been removed through additional washing, although the washing would have reduced the supernatant sodium concentration.The yield stress of the final washed sludge (35 Pa) was an order of magnitude higher than that of the unwashed sludge ({approx}4 Pa) and was deemed potentially problematic. The high yield stress was related to the significant increase in insoluble solids that occurred ({approx}8 wt% to {approx}18 wt%) as soluble solids and water were removed from the slurry. Reduction of the insoluble solids concentration to {approx}14 wt% was needed to reduce the yield stress to an acceptable level. However, depending on the manner that the insoluble solids adjustment was performed, the final sodium concentration and extent of oxalate removal would be prone to change. As such, the strategy for completing the final wash cycle is integral to maintaining the proper balance of chemical and physical requirements.

Reboul, S.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

236

The effects of moderate coal cleaning on the microbial removal of organic sulfur. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to investigate the possibilities of developing an integrated physical/chemical/microbial process for the precombustion removal of sulfur from coal. An effective pre- combustion coal desulfurization process should ideally be capable of removing both organic and inorganic sulfur. A variety of techniques exist for the removal of inorganic sulfur from coal, but there is currently no cost-effective method for the pre-combustion removal of organic sulfur. Recent developments have demonstrated that microorganisms are capable of specifically cleaving carbon-sulfur bonds and removing substantial amounts of organic sulfur from coal. However, lengthy treatment times are required. Moreover, the removal of organic sulfur form coal by microorganisms is hampered by the fact that, as a solid substrate, it is difficult to bring microorganisms in contact with the entirety of a coal sample. This study will examine the suitability of physically/chemically treated coal sample for subsequent biodesulfurization. Physical/chemical processes primarily designed for the removal of pyritic sulfur may also cause substantial increases in the porosity and surface area of the coal which may facilitate the subsequent removal of organic sulfur by microoganisms. During the current quarter, coal samples that have been chemically pretreated with methanol, ammonia, and isopropanol were examined for the removal of organic sulfur by the microbial culture IGTS8, an assay for the presence of protein in coal samples was developed, and a laboratory-scale device for the explosive comminution of coal was designed and constructed.

Srivastava, V.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

WNA Working Group Position Statement on Removal from Regulatory Control of Material Containing Radioactivity - Exemption and Clearance  

SciTech Connect

The removal from regulatory control of materials containing trace levels of radioactivity, often referred to as 'exemption' or 'clearance', is of considerable importance to the nuclear industry and is subject to ongoing international debate. Its significance is indeed increasing as some sites move towards decommissioning, with much material being capable of recovery, recycling and re-use or simple disposal while maintaining the highest levels of public safety. This Statement outlines the key issues under consideration within the regulatory framework. Moreover, it identifies those aspects necessary for the successful application of a practical system of control. In this regard, the recent IAEA safety guide called Application of the Concept of Exclusion, Exemption and Clearance (RS-G-1.7) is paving the way towards implementing greater international convergence and consistency. (authors)

Saint-Pierre, S.; Coates, R. [World Nuclear Association (WNA), 22a St. James's Square London SWIY 4JH (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

CO/sub 2/-removal reduces pipeline corrosion at two storage sites  

SciTech Connect

Installation of CO/sub 2/-removal plants on gathering systems at two Natural Gas Pipeline Co. of America (NGPL) storage fields has significantly reduced CO/sub 2/ content in the system gas despite plant-design conditions being exceeded.

Kresse, T.J.

1987-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

239

Methods of removing a constituent from a feed stream using adsorption media  

SciTech Connect

A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving and/or suspending at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mann, Nicholas R. (Rigby, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Herbst, Ronald S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

240

Tritium removal and separation technology developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent increased interest from regulators and the public has led more organizations to consider the environmental impact and safety considerations of tritium handling. Examples include the significance of the tritium isotope separation system on ITER licensing, remediation of ground water from power utilities and government facilities and concerns of high tritium concentrations within operational CANDU reactors. GE Healthcare, formerly Amersham pic, has been producing tritium-labelled chemicals since the late 1940's. GE's manufacturing site located near Cardiff, UK has installed a tritium waste treatment and enrichment facility to radically reduce tritium discharges to the environment. This facility employs a continuous processing plant that recovers tritium from a complex mixture of tritiated organic and aqueous waste compounds. Two isotope separation techniques are used to achieve a final pure tritium product, which is used in the manufacturing of labelled compounds. Building upon this experience, together with Special Separations Applications Inc. (SSAI), GE has developed a large-scale diffusion-based isotope separation process as an alternative to conventional cryogenic distillation. Having a tritium inventory an order of magnitude lower than conventional cryogenic distillation, this process is attractive for heavy water detritiation, applicable to single and multi-unit CANDU reactors and research reactors as well as fusion applications. Additionally, the new process has advantages of being cryogen-free, less complex, simple to operate and having improved conventional and radiological safety. (authors)

Bonnett, I. [General Electric, Hitachi Nuclear Energy Canada Inc., 1160 Monaghan Rd, Peterborough, ON K9J 7B5 (Canada); Busigin, A. [Special Separations Applications, Inc., 55 Water Street East, Brockville, ON K6V 1A3 (Canada); Shapiro, A. [General Electric GE, Global Research Center, 1 Research Circle, Niskayuna, NY 12309 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Electrokinetic removal of uranium from contaminated, unsaturated soils  

SciTech Connect

Electrokinetic remediation of uranium-contaminated soil was studied in a series of laboratory-scale experiments in test cells with identical geometry using quartz sand at approximately 10 percent moisture content. Uranium, when present in the soil system as an anionic complex, could be migrated through unsaturated soil using electrokinetics. The distance that the uranium migrated in the test cell was dependent upon the initial molar ratio of citrate to uranium used. Over 50 percent of the uranium was recovered from the test cells using the citrate and carbonate complexing agents over of period of 15 days. Soil analyses showed that the uranium remaining in the test cells had been mobilized and ultimately would have been extracted. Uranium extraction exceeded 90 percent in an experiment that was operated for 37 days. Over 70 percent of the uranium was removed from a Hanford waste sample over a 55 day operating period. Citrate and carbonate ligand utilization ratios required for removing 50 percent of the uranium from the uranium-contaminated sand systems were approximately 230 moles ligand per mole uranium and 1320 moles ligand per mole uranium for the waste. Modifying the operating conditions to increasing the residence time of the complexants is expected to improved the utilization efficiency of the complexing agent.

Booher, W.F. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lindgren, E.R.; Brady, P.V. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Mixed waste removal from a hazardous waste storage tank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spent fuel transfer canal at the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor was found to be leaking 400 gallons of water per day into the surrounding soil. Sampling of the sediment layer on the floor of the canal to determine the environmental impact of the leak identified significant radiological contamination and elevated levels of cadmium and lead which are hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Under RCRA regulations and Rules of Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, the canal was considered a hazardous waste storage tank. This paper describes elements of the radiological control program established in support of a fast-track RCRA closure plan that involved underwater mapping of the radiation fields, vacuuming, and ultra-filtration techniques that were successfully used to remove the mixed waste sediments and close the canal in a method compliant with state and federal regulations.

Geber, K.R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

Cha, Chang Y. (3807 Reynolds St., Laramie, WY 82070)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

245

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag.

Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN); Trowbridge, Lee D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stories Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time The Lab's 1,000th shipment of transuranic waste recently left Los Alamos,...

247

DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary DOE removes all remaining HEU...

248

Method for removal of methane from coalbeds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing methane gas from underground coalbeds prior to mining the coal which comprises drilling at least one borehole from the surface into the coalbed. The borehole is started at a slant rather than directly vertically, and as it descends, a gradual curve is followed until a horizontal position is reached where the desired portion of the coalbed is intersected. Approaching the coalbed in this manner and fracturing the coalbed in the major natural fraction direction cause release of large amounts of the trapped methane gas.

Pasini, III, Joseph (Morgantown, WV); Overbey, Jr., William K. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Removal of Fluoride from Waste Water of Aluminium Smelter by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , General Abstracts: Light Metals Division. Presentation Title, Removal of ...

250

Method for removing fluoride contamination from nitric acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fluoride ions are removed from nitric acid solution by contacting the vaporized solution with alumina or zirconium.

Pruett, David J. (Knoxville, TN); Howerton, William B. (Kingston, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Removing Pollutants from Water, Solar Energy - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 5, 2013 ... B. Materials for the Environment: Removing Pollutants from Water, Solar Energy Program Organizers: Fernand Marquis, Naval Postgraduate ...

252

Powder Removal from Complex Structures Produced Using Electron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Additive Manufacturing of Metals. Presentation Title, Powder Removal from ...

253

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

254

Removal of Inclusions from Solar Grade Silicon Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polysilicon in Photovoltaics: Market Conditions & Competing PV Technologies ... Removal of Inclusions from Solar Grade Silicon Using Electromagnetic Field.

255

Modified Bayer Process for Alumina Removal from Hanford Waste  

AREVA NC Inc. Modified Bayer Process for Alumina Removal from Hanford Waste January 24, 2007 Don Geniesse AREVA NC Inc.

256

Acid Gas Removal by Customized Sorbents for Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to reduce exergy losses, gas cleaning at high temperatures is favored in IGFC systems. As shown by thermodynamic data, separation efficiencies of common sorbents decrease with increasing temperature. Therefore, acid gas removal systems have to be developed for IGFC applications considering sorbent capacity, operation temperature, gasification feedstock composition and fuel cell threshold values.

Kapfenberger, J.; Sohnemann, J.; Schleitzer, D.; Loewen, A.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

257

The effect of moderate coal cleaning on microbial removal of organic sulfur. [Rhodococcus rhodochrous  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to provide data relevant to the development of an integrated physical, chemical, and microbiological process for the desulfurization of coal, utilizing existing technologies insofar as is possible. Specifically, the effect of increased surface area and porosity achieved by physical, chemical, and microbial treatments of coal on the subsequent microbiological removal of organic sulfur will be evaluated.

Srivastava, V.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention in one aspect comprises a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous-derived liquids by contacting said liquid with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene polymer (i.e. PS-DVB) having catechol ligands anchored to said polymer, said contacting being at an elevated temperature. In another aspect, the invention is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene polymer by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid in accordance with the aspect described above which regenerating process comprises: (a) treating said spent catecholated polystyrene polymer with an aqueous solution of at least one member selected from the group consisting of carbonates and bicarbonates of ammonium, alkali metals, and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10, and said treating being at a temperature in the range of about 20/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/C; (b) separating the solids and liquids from each other. In a preferred embodiment the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step: (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution which includes at least one lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (c) and (d) are added. Steps (c) and (d) comprise: (c) treating the solids with an aqueous alcoholic solution of at least one ammonium, alkali or alkaline earth metal bicarbonate at a temperature in the range of about 20 to 100/sup 0/C; and (d) separating the solids from the liquids.

Fish, R.H.

1984-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

259

Process for removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permitting the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Hancher, C.W.; Saunders, M.B.; Googin, J.M.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

260

Method for removing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved sulfur-ammonia process is disclosed for removing hydrogen sulfide from coke oven gases. In the improved process, a concentrator formerly used for standby operation is used at all normal times as an ammonia scrubber to improve the efficiency of gas separation during normal operation and is used as a concentrator for its intended standby functions during the alternative operations. In its normal function, the concentrator/scrubber functions as a scrubber to strip ammonia gas from recirculating liquid streams and to permit introduction of an ammonia-rich gas into a hydrogen sulfide scrubber to increase the separation efficiency of that unit. In the standby operation, the same concentrator/scrubber serves as a concentrator to concentrate hydrogen sulfide in a ''strong liquor'' stream for separate recovery as a strong liquor.

Ritter, H.

1982-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Method for removing cesium from a nuclear reactor coolant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of and system for removing cesium from a liquid metal reactor coolant including a carbon packing trap in the primary coolant system for absorbing a major portion of the radioactive cesium from the coolant flowing therethrough at a reduced temperature. A regeneration subloop system having a secondary carbon packing trap is selectively connected to the primary system for isolating the main trap therefrom and connecting it to the regeneration system. Increasing the temperature of the sodium flowing through the primary trap diffuses a portion of the cesium inventory thereof further into the carbon matrix while simultaneously redispersing a portion into the regeneration system for absorption at a reduced temperature by the secondary trap.

Colburn, R.P.

1983-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

262

Increasing coverage to improve detection of network and host anomalies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For intrusion detection, the LERAD algorithm learns a succinct set of comprehensible rules for detecting anomalies, which could be novel attacks. LERAD validates the learned rules on a separate held-out validation set and removes rules that cause false alarms. However, removing rules with possible high coverage can lead to missed detections. We propose three techniques for increasing coverage- Weighting, Replacement and Hybrid. Weighting retains previously pruned rules and associate weights to them. Replacement, on the other hand, substitutes pruned rules with other candidate rules to ensure high coverage. We also present a Hybrid approach that selects between the two techniques based on training data coverage. Empirical results from seven data sets indicate that, for LERAD, increasing coverage by Weighting, Replacement and Hybrid detects more attacks than Pruning with minimal computational overhead.

Gaurav Tandon; Philip K. Chan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

264

Compensatory Feeding Following a Predator Removal Program : Detection and Mechanisms, 1982-1996 Progress Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predator removal is one of the oldest management tools in existence, with evidence that ancient Greeks used a bounty reward for wolves over 3,000 years ago (Anonymous 1964). Efforts to control predators on fish have been documented in scientific journals for at least 60 years (Eschmeyer 1937; Lagler 1939; Foerster and Ricker 1941; Smith and Swingle 1941; Jeppson and Platts 1959), and has likely been attempted for much longer. Complete eradication of a target species from a body of water has rarely been the objective of predator removal programs, which instead have attempted to eliminate predators from specific areas, to reduce the density or standing stock of predators, or to kill the largest individuals in the population (Meronek et al. 1996). In evaluating management programs that remove only part of a predator population, the compensatory response(s) of the remaining predators must be considered. Some potential compensatory responses by remaining individuals include increased reproductive output, increased growth rate, or increased consumption of certain prey species (Jude et al. 1987). If compensation by predators that remain in the system following a removal effort occurs, it may reduce the effectiveness of the predator control program. Northern pike-minnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis (formerly called northern squawfish) consume juvenile salmon in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs in British Columbia, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and California. Northern pikeminnow have been estimated to consume about 11% of all juvenile salmon that migrate through John Day Reservoir on the Columbia River (Rieman et al. 1991). Modeling studies suggested that removal of 20% of the northern pikeminnow population in John Day Reservoir would result in a 50% decrease in predation-related mortality of juvenile salmon migrating through this reach (Beamesderfer et al. 1991). Since the early 1940's, other programs have been implemented to remove northern pikeminnow, with hopes of improving the survival of juvenile salmon (Ricker 1941; Jeppson and Platts 1959).

Petersen, James H.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

265

An investigation of urea decomposition and selective non-catalytic removal of nitric oxide with urea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of urea (NH2CONH2) to remove nitric oxide (NO) from exhaust streams was investigated using a laboratory laminar-flow reactor. The experiments used a number of gas compositions to simulate different combustion exhaust gases. The urea was injected into the gases as a urea-water solution. The decomposition processes of the urea-water solutions and urea powder were examined. For both the nitric oxide removal and the urea decomposition experiments, a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer was used to determine the concentrations of the product species. The products from the decomposition were examined every 50 K from 500 K to 800 K. The dominant products were ammonia (NH3), isocyanuric acid (HNCO) and carbon dioxide (CO2). In case of urea-water solution decomposition, for gas temperatures between 550 and 650 K, the highest concentrations were for NH3 and HNCO. On the other hand, the concentrations of CO2 were highest for gas temperatures of about 500 - 550 K. For temperatures above about 650 K, the amount of these three dominant prod-ucts slightly decreased as temperature increased. ivFor the nitric oxide removal (SNCR) experiments, the gas mixture was heated to temperatures between 800 K and 1350 K. Depending on the temperature, gas composition, residence time, and urea feed rate, removal levels of up to 95% were obtained. Other by-products such as N2O were detected and quantified. The effects of the urea/NO (beta) ratio were determined by varying the urea concentration for a constant NO con-centration of 330 ppm. The effects of the levels of oxygen (O2) in the exhaust gases and the residence time also were investigated. Increasing the urea/NO ratio and residence time resulted in higher NO removal and increased the temperature window of the nitric oxide removal.

Park, Yong Hun

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The significant human-animal bond: Pets with cancer  

SciTech Connect

Veterinarians have responsibilities to both the animal and its owner. In the past several years there has been an increased awareness and concern about human-animal bonds. As a result, we have begun to appreciate the nature, strength, and significance of bonds that develop between humans and companion animals. It is typical for a pet to be perceived as and treated as a member of the family and as a result, animals provide special and beneficial relationships for many years. It is partly because of this role of the pet in promoting human health and happiness that we as veterinarians have an obligation to assist both owner and animal. The mark of the good practitioner concerns not only the ability to diagnose and treat accurately, but also the ability to show understanding and compassionate judgement.

Weller, R.E.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Arsenic removal and stabilization by synthesized pyrite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arsenic is ubiquitous whether it is naturally occurring or produced by humans. It is found at sites on the National Priority List and at sites operated by DOE, where it is the second most commonly found contaminant. More wastes containing arsenic will be produced due to the lowering of the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for arsenic in drinking water which will result in more treatment facilities for arsenic removal that will generate residuals. Furthermore, arsenic can be released from such wastes under the reduced conditions that are found in landfills. Pyrite (FeS2) is believed to be a compound that has a high affinity for arsenic and is stable under anoxic conditions. The first task of this research was to develop a method for making pyrite crystals of defined size with minimal reaction time and at high yield. Effects on the synthesis of pyrite particles of pH, the ratio of Fe/S, temperature and reaction time were investigated in batch reactor systems. Pyrite was synthesized within 24 hours at pH values ranging from pH 3.6 through pH 5.6, and at a ratio of Fe/S of 0.5. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to size and characterize the pyrite particles. Experimental and analytical procedures developed for this work, included a hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method for measuring arsenic species (As(III), As(V)). The synthesized pyrite was applied to remove arsenic and its maximum capacity for arsenic removal was measured in batch adsorption experiments to be 3.23 ?mol/g for As(III) and 113 ?mol/g for As(V). Information obtained on the characteristics of chemical species before and after the reaction with arsenic showed that iron and sulfur were oxidized. Last, how strongly arsenic was bound to pyrite was investigated and it was determined that release of arsenic from As(III)-pyrite is not affected by pH, but release from As(V)-pyrite is affected by pH with minimum release in the range pH 5 to pH 8.

Song, Jin Kun

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Travaglini, Michael A. (Oliver Springs, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

270

Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A haul truck carrying a container is loaded with mill tailings at the Moab site. Once loaded and lidded, the container will be placed on a railcar for shipment by train to the Crescent Junction disposal site. A haul truck carrying a container is loaded with mill tailings at the Moab site. Once loaded and lidded, the container will be placed on a railcar for shipment by train to the Crescent Junction disposal site. MOAB, Utah - The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project had a productive year, despite continued budget constraints and a first-ever, three-month curtailment of shipping operations last winter. On June 18, the project reached a significant milestone of having shipped 6

271

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

272

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

273

EM Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge EM Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Testing and equipment simulations ensure first-of-a-kind technological processes for sludge removal can be conducted safely and efficiently. Testing and equipment simulations ensure first-of-a-kind technological processes for sludge removal can be conducted safely and efficiently. RICHLAND, Wash. - The Richland Operations Office and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company successfully removed a portion of a highly radioactive sludge from underwater storage in a large basin adjacent to the K West reactor at the Hanford site this month. In that milestone, workers removed sludge originating from knock-out pots,

274

NETL: Gasification Systems - Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Project Number: DE-SC00008243 TDA Research, Inc. is developing a high-capacity, low-cost sorbent that removes anhydrous ammonia (NH3), mercury (Hg), and trace contaminants from coal- and coal/biomass-derived syngas. The clean-up system will be used after the bulk warm gas sulfur removal step, and remove NH3 and Hg in a regenerable manner while irreversibly capturing all other trace metals (e.g., Arsenic, Selenium) reducing their concentrations to sub parts per million (ppm) levels. Current project plans include identifying optimum chemical composition and structure that provide the best sorbent performance for removing trace contaminants, determining the effect of operating parameters, conducting multiple-cycle experiments to test the life of the sorbent for NH3 and Hg removal, and conducting a preliminary design of the sorbent reactor.

275

Categorical Exclusion 4566, Ash Removal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOrnI FOrnI Project Title: Ash Removal Project (4566) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is to split, containerize, package, transport and disposition one hundred and two (102) cans of mixed waste. General Administration/Management OA I - Routine business actions OA2 * Administrative contract amendments OA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations OA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect OA6 - Procedural rule makings upgrade OA 7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged OA8 . Award of technical supportlM&O/personal service contracts OA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training OA 10 - Reports on non-DOE legislation OA II -

276

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

SciTech Connect

This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

277

Electrochemical removal of material from metallic work  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Deburring, polishing, surface forming and the like are carried out by electrochemical machining with conformable electrode means including an electrically conducting and an insulating web. The surface of the work to be processed is covered by a deformable electrically insulating web or cloth which is perforated and conforms with the work. The web is covered by a deformable perforated electrically conducting screen electrode which also conforms with, and is insulated from, the work by the insulating web. An electrolyte is conducted through the electrode and insulating web and along the work through a perforated elastic member which engages the electrode under pressure pressing the electrode and web against the work. High current under low voltage is conducted betwen the electrode and work through the insulator, removing material from the work. Under the pressure of the elastic member, the electrode and insulator continue to conform with the work and the spacing between the electrode and work is maintained constant.

Csakvary, Tibor (Wilkens Township, Allegheny County, PA); Fromson, Robert E. (Wilkens Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1980-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

278

IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS  

SciTech Connect

In the first year of this project, we have established our experimental and theoretical methodologies for studies of the catalytic decarboxylation process. We have developed both glass and stainless steel micro batch type reactors for the fast screening of various catalysts with reaction substrates of model carboxylic acid compounds and crude oil samples. We also developed novel product analysis methods such as GC analyses for organic acids and gaseous products; and TAN measurements for crude oil. Our research revealed the effectiveness of several solid catalysts such as NA-Cat-1 and NA-Cat-2 for the catalytic decarboxylation of model compounds; and NA-Cat-5{approx}NA-Cat-9 for the acid removal from crude oil. Our theoretical calculations propose a three-step concerted oxidative decarboxylation mechanism for the NA-Cat-1 catalyst.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang

2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

280

Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Removal Sorbents for High Temperature Gas Streams Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,767,000 entitled "Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a unique regenerable sorbent process that can remove contaminants from gas produced by the gasification of fossil fuels. Specifically, the process removes hydrogen chloride by using the regenerable sorbent and simultaneously extracts hydrogen chloride compounds and hydrogen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Instrumentation for Increased Power Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second Technical Update of the Instrumentation for Managing Increased Power Flow project, part of EPRI's Increased Power Flow (IPF) program. The project, initiated in 2006 and expected to continue for several years, studies the feasibility of new instrumentation to support increased power flow strategies. In 2007 the work focused on two primary developments: the Backscatter Sensor for the real-time measurement of transmission line temperature and current and the Emissivity Test Instrum...

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

282

Increased Power Flow Guidebook - 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Increased Power Flow (IPF) Guidebook is a state-of-the-art and best- practices reference and guidebook on increasing the power flow capacities of existing overhead transmission lines, underground cables, power transformers, and substation equipment, without compromising safety and reliability. The Guidebook discusses power system concerns and limiting conditions to increasing capacity, reviews available technology options and methods, illustrates the alternatives with case ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Increased Power Flow Guidebook - 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Increased Power Flow (IPF) Guidebook is a state-of-the-art and best- practices reference and guidebook on increasing the power flow capacities of existing overhead transmission lines, underground cables, power transformers, and substation equipment, without compromising safety and reliability. The Guidebook discusses power system concerns and limiting conditions to increasing capacity, reviews available technology options and methods, illustrates the alternatives with case ...

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

284

Increase Duct and Plenum Insulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

changes to the commercial provisions of the 2012 IECC: Increase Duct and Plenum Insulation R Hart Pacific Northwest National Laboratory December 2012 Proposal Description This...

285

Increasing State Capacity Through Clans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their role in increasing state capacity With the decline ofhere focus on state capacity and the associated discussionselements of state capacity during the transition from one

Doyle, Jr, Thomas Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Comparison of Three Bed Packings for the Biological Removal of Nitric Oxide from Gas Streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and health issues coupled with increasingly stringent nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission standards indicates a need for the development of alternative low-cost technologies for the removal of NOx from gas streams. Biological NOx conversion offers promise as a novel treatment method. Thermophilic denitrifying bacteria indigenous to composts and soils are capable of converting NOx to environmentally benign nitrogen via a dissimilatory reductive pathway. The present study compares the performance of three bioreactor packing materials (compost, perlite, and biofoam) for the removal of nitric oxide (NO) from a simulated wet-scrubbed combustion gas. Although all three materials performed well (>85% NO removal) at residence times of 70-80 seconds, the compost performed better than the other materials at shorter residence times (13-44 seconds). The perlite and biofoam materials, however, both offer long-term thermal stability and lower pressure drop compared with compost. The feasibility of biological NOx conversion processes will depend on the combined factors of NOx removal ability and pressure drop. The results presented here suggest that the compost, perlite and biofoam systems, subject to further optimization, offer potential for the biological removal of NOx from gas streams.

Lee, Brady Douglas; Flanagan, W. P.; Barnes, Charles Marshall; Barrett, Karen B.; Zaccardi, Larry Bryan; Apel, William Arnold

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

EA-0319: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0319: Finding of No Significant Impact Fuel Production Facility, Building 225-H Savannah River Plant The Department of Energy has prepared...

288

EA-1607: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

No Significant Impact EA-1607: Finding of No Significant Impact Disposition of DOE Excess Depleted Uranium, Natural Uranium, and Low-Enriched Uranium DOE is proposing the...

289

EA-1625: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of No Significant Impact EA-1625: Finding of No Significant Impact Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Phase III Early Test The proposed action is for the DOE...

290

EA-1832: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1832: Finding of No Significant Impact Rainer Biogas LLC Community Anaerobic Manure Digester, Enumclaw, King County, Washington The U.S....

291

EA-0820: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of No Significant Impact EA-0820: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669 Based on the analysis in the...

292

EA-1588: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1588: Finding of No Significant Impact Sacramento Municipal Utility District 230-kV Folsom Dam Transmission Line Relocation SMUD's proposed...

293

EA-1747: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1747: Finding of No Significant Impact Rocky Flats Surface Water Configuration, Jefferson County, Colorado Surface Water Configuration...

294

EA-1457: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

No Significant Impact EA-1457: Finding of No Significant Impact Center for Integrated Nano Technologies at Sandia Laboratories, New Mexico The EA analyzes the potential effects...

295

EA-1810: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of No Significant Impact EA-1810: Finding of No Significant Impact San Emidio Geothermal Exploration Project, Washoe County, Nevada The U.S. Department of Energy proposed to...

296

EA-1733: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of No Significant Impact EA-1733: Finding of No Significant Impact Calpine Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project, Sonoma County, California DOE determined that providing funding to...

297

EA-1763: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1763: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1763: Finding of No Significant Impact Geothermal Expansion to Boise State University, City of Boise, Ada County, Idaho The Department...

298

EA-1190: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

90: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1190: Finding of No Significant Impact Wastewater Treatment Capability Upgrade Based on the information contained in the Environmental...

299

EA-1777: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

No Significant Impact EA-1777: Finding of No Significant Impact Lincoln Electric's Wind Energy Project in Euclid, OH DOE prepared an environmental assessment analyzing the...

300

EA-1698: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1698: Finding of No Significant Impact Baldwin Wind Energy Center Project Baldwin Wind, LLC has requested to interconnect their proposed new...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EA-1960: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of No Significant Impact EA-1960: Finding of No Significant Impact Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line, Clark County, Nevada The Bureau of Land Management, with Western Area...

302

EA-1404: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1404: Finding of No Significant Impact Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory Based on the analysis in the EA and after...

303

EA-1210: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

No Significant Impact EA-1210: Finding of No Significant Impact Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland,...

304

EA-1696: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

696: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1696: Finding of No Significant Impact Pantex Renewable Energy Project, Amarillo, Texas The NNSA has prepared an Environmental Assessment...

305

EM Makes Significant Progress on Dispositioning Transuranic Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Makes Significant Progress on Dispositioning Transuranic Waste at Idaho Site EM Makes Significant Progress on Dispositioning Transuranic Waste at Idaho Site December 24, 2013 -...

306

EA-1720: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1720: Finding of No Significant Impact Pyrotek, Inc., Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative, Sanborn, New York...

307

EA-1718: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1718: Finding of No Significant Impact EnerG2, Inc., Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Project, Albany,...

308

EA-0819: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0819: Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Conservation Standards for Eight Types of Consumer Products: Room Air Conditioners, Water...

309

EA-1762: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of No Significant Impact EA-1762: Finding of No Significant Impact Wellford Landfill Methane and Greenhouse Gas to Energy Project, Spartanburg County, South Carolina The...

310

EA-1539: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1539: Finding of No Significant Impact North Area Right-of-Way Maintenance, California Western Area Power Administration proposes to revise...

311

EA-1868: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1868: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1868: Finding of No Significant Impact Manhattan Project Sites (Hanford, Washington; Los Alamos, New Mexico, Oak Ridge,...

312

EA-1593: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of No Significant Impact EA-1593: Finding of No Significant Impact Y-12 Steam Plant Life Extension Project - Steam Plant Replacement Subproject, Oak Ridge, Tennessee The...

313

EA-1475: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of No Significant Impact EA-1475: Finding of No Significant Impact Chariton Valley Biomass Project, Colorado The Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment...

314

EA-1870: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of No Significant Impact EA-1870: Finding of No Significant Impact Utah Coal and Biomass Fueled Pilot Plant, Kanab, UT DOE completed the Final Environmental Assessment for...

315

EA-1875: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

No Significant Impact EA-1875: Finding of No Significant Impact The Jackson Laboratory Biomass Energy Center Project, Bar Harbor, Maine DOE's proposed action is to authorize the...

316

EA-1819: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1819: Finding of No Significant Impact Kilowatts for Kenston Wind Energy Project, Chagrin Falls, Geauga County, Ohio The Department of Energy's...

317

EA-1774: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1774: Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating Equipment, and Pool Heaters...

318

EA-1426: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of No Significant Impact EA-1426: Finding of No Significant Impact Linac Coherent Light Source Project, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, California The DOE...

319

EA-1434: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of No Significant Impact EA-1434: Finding of No Significant Impact Sunrise II Water Supply Line, Kern County, California Sunrise Power Company, LLC (Sunrise), has planned the...

320

EA-0931: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0931: Finding of No Significant Impact Center for Molecular Electronics University of Missouri, St. Louis Based on the analysis in the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EA-1116: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1116: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1116: Finding of No Significant Impact Kalina Geothermal Demonstration Project, Steamboat Springs, Nevada Based on the information...

322

EA-1345: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Significant Impact EA-1345: Finding of No Significant Impact Cleanup and Closure of the Energy Technology Engineering Center, Oakland, California DOE will use this EA, and other...

323

EA-0534: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of No Significant Impact EA-0534: Finding of No Significant Impact Radioisotope Heat Source Fuel Processing and Fabrication Based on the analysis in the EA, the proposed RTG...

324

EA-1904: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

No Significant Impact EA-1904: Finding of No Significant Impact Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, CA Based on the findings in...

325

EA-1083: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1083: Finding of No Significant Impact New SiltClay Source Development and Use at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental...

326

EA-1575: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1575: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1575: Finding of No Significant Impact Oak Ridge Science and Technology Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge,...

327

EA-1620: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1620: Finding of No Significant Impact Burbank Hydrogen Fueling Station Project, CA The Department of Energy, in coordination with the City of...

328

EA-0893: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0893: Finding of No Significant Impact Gazes Cardiac Research Institute Medical University of South Carolina Based on the analysis in the EA,...

329

EA-1767: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1767: Finding of No Significant Impact Virginia State Energy Program's Cephas C&D Wastes Biomass Project, Richmond, Virginia Based on the...

330

EA-1400: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

00: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1400: Finding of No Significant Impact Wind Turbine Project at Fairmont Reservoir, Lancaster, California The Department of Energy, through...

331

EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use I am requiring...

332

EA-1524: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Significant Impact EA-1524: Finding of No Significant Impact East Side Peaking Project, South Dakota Basin Electric Power Cooperative applied to the Department of Energy, Western...

333

Evaluation of two commercial bioaugmentation products for enhanced removal of petroleum from a wetland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proximity of petroleum producing and processing facilities to wetlands on the Texas Gulf Coast results in chronic exposure of these sensitive environments to petroleum. In addition, concern exists because of the possibility of exposure from large-scale accidental releases of petroleum. Low-impact repudiation strategies are preferred for wetlands, because traditional repudiation strategies may do more harm than good. This is the third phase in a program developed to evaluate bioremediation as an oil spill response tool. The research is conducted at a facility established following an accidental oil spill on the San Jacinto River in October 1994. Previous research evaluated the intrinsic repudiation of petroleum in a wetland, as well as the use of biostimulation for enhanced biodegradation of petroleum in a wetland. The primary goal of this research was to evaluate the performance of two commercial bioaugmentation products for their ability to enhance bioremediation of petroleum in a wetland. Additional treatments included inorganic nutrients, and an oiled control (intrinsic). The experiment used a controlled application of oil to reduce heterogeneity normally associated with spilled petroleum. The experimental design incorporated full replication and interspersion of treatments in a block design. The first-order biodegradation rate coefficients for the total target saturate and total target aromatic hydrocarbons showed no significant differences between treatments. Comparison of first-order biodegradation rate coefficients for individual hydrocarbon target analyses also showed no differences between the treatments. Although not statistically significant, one of the commercial bioaugmentation products did show consistently higher biodegradation rates for individual target analyses. Comparison of first-order biodegradation rate coefficients for the control treatment showed biodegradation rates comparable with those obtained in previous studies conducted at the site. This research study and the previous studies conducted at the site demonstrate bioremediation can be effective in removing petroleum from the environment. However, further research is necessary to optimize treatment strategies and to increase the understanding of the processes which contribute to bioremediation of petroleum in a wetland.

Simon, Mark Allen

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Backsurging perforations can increase production rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subjecting formations to a large pressure differential or underbalance is a common means of surging perforations to remove damage and increase flow from oil and gas wells. Underbalanced perforating, a standard industry completion technique, is normally used to obtain the pressure differentials intended to dislodge debris from perforations and flush the surrounding compacted zone. Gradually applied pressure underbalance can be achieved by swabbing or jetting to reduce hydrostatic head. Suddenly applied underbalance is achieved by evacuating the tubing in conjunction with a rupture disc, tubing-conveyed perforating systems or by using a new wireline-set, through-tubing backsurge tool. These techniques, except for the through-tubing method, are often utilized only during later workovers due to the expense and difficulty of achieving an adequate underbalance. Many operators prefer to perforate in balanced or overbalanced pressures conditions. This typically leaves perforations completely or partially plugged with gun debris, mud solids and shattered formation material that has been recompacted. Production logging shows that wells often produce from only 10 to 20% of the total interval apparently because of ineffective, plugged perforations.

Brieger, E.F.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL’s greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A.

336

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and

337

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL’s greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A.

338

NETL: News Release - Innovative Mercury Removal Technique Shows Early  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 5, 2003 August 5, 2003 Innovative Mercury Removal Technique Shows Early Promise Photochemical Process Developed in Federal Lab Removes Mercury from Flue Gas - NETL scientist Evan Granite prepares a lab test of the UV mercury removal process. - NETL scientist Evan Granite prepares for a lab test of the UV mercury removal process. MORGANTOWN, WV - A promising technology to remove mercury from coal-fired power plants -- dubbed the "GP-254 Process" -- has been developed and is currently being tested at the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Newly patented, the GP-254 Process enhances mercury removal using ultraviolet light to induce various components of power plant stack gas to react with the mercury, and changes the

339

Advanced Techniques for Removal of Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters have proven valuable for the prevention of primary or recurrent pulmonary embolism in selected patients with or at high risk for venous thromboembolic disease. Their use has become commonplace, and the numbers implanted increase annually. During the last 3 years, in the United States, the percentage of annually placed optional filters, i.e., filters than can remain as permanent filters or potentially be retrieved, has consistently exceeded that of permanent filters. In parallel, the complications of long- or short-term filtration have become increasingly evident to physicians, regulatory agencies, and the public. Most filter removals are uneventful, with a high degree of success. When routine filter-retrieval techniques prove unsuccessful, progressively more advanced tools and skill sets must be used to enhance filter-retrieval success. These techniques should be used with caution to avoid damage to the filter or cava during IVC retrieval. This review describes the complex techniques for filter retrieval, including use of additional snares, guidewires, angioplasty balloons, and mechanical and thermal approaches as well as illustrates their specific application.

Iliescu, Bogdan; Haskal, Ziv J., E-mail: ziv2@mac.com [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Insulating shade assembly with removable cover  

SciTech Connect

An insulating window shade assembly is described which consists of: bracket means adapted to be mounted on the frame of a window; a first roller carrying an insulating shade and being disposed within the bracket means on the inside of the window, the shade being adapted to be drawn from the roller to cover the inside of the window and to be wound upon the roller to expose the window, a second roller carrying a removable cover fabric on the inside of the shade and being supported by the bracket means, the second roller being spaced from and disposed independently of the first roller, means disposed adjacent only the bottom edge of the insulating shade for connecting only the bottom edge of the cover fabric to the bottom only of the insulating shade so that the insulating shade and cover fabric may be drawn together over the inside of the window; guide means disposed adjacent the second roller and between the second roller and the insulating shade, the cover fabric passing over the guide means, for causing the cover fabric to hang closely adjacent the front of the insulating shade when the insulating shade is drawn over the window and when the insulating shade and cover fabric are connected together by the connecting means, and means for continually tensioning the cover fabric when the insulating shade is drawn and when the cover fabric is connected thereto so that the cover fabric lies smoothly over the shade.

Hausmann, S.; McLane, A. Jr.

1986-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Metagenomic analysis of phosphorus removing sludgecommunities  

SciTech Connect

Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) is not wellunderstood at the metabolic level despite being one of the best-studiedmicrobially-mediated industrial processes due to its ecological andeconomic relevance. Here we present a metagenomic analysis of twolab-scale EBPR sludges dominated by the uncultured bacterium, "CandidatusAccumulibacter phosphatis." This analysis resolves several controversiesin EBPR metabolic models and provides hypotheses explaining the dominanceof A. phosphatis in this habitat, its lifestyle outside EBPR and probablecultivation requirements. Comparison of the same species from differentEBPR sludges highlights recent evolutionary dynamics in the A. phosphatisgenome that could be linked to mechanisms for environmental adaptation.In spite of an apparent lack of phylogenetic overlap in the flankingcommunities of the two sludges studied, common functional themes werefound, at least one of them complementary to the inferred metabolism ofthe dominant organism. The present study provides a much-needed blueprintfor a systems-level understanding of EBPR and illustrates thatmetagenomics enables detailed, often novel, insights into evenwell-studied biological systems.

Garcia Martin, Hector; Ivanova, Natalia; Kunin, Victor; Warnecke,Falk; Barry, Kerrie; McHardy, Alice C.; Yeates, Christine; He, Shaomei; Salamov, Asaf; Szeto, Ernest; Dalin, Eileen; Putnam, Nik; Shapiro, HarrisJ.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Blackall, Linda Louise; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

343

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past three years, we followed the work plan as we suggested in the proposal and made every efforts to fulfill the project objectives. Based on our large amount of creative and productive work, including both of experimental and theoretic aspects, we received important technical breakthrough on naphthenic acid removal process and obtained deep insight on catalytic decarboxylation chemistry. In detail, we established an integrated methodology to serve for all of the experimental and theoretical work. Our experimental investigation results in discovery of four type effective catalysts to the reaction of decarboxylation of model carboxylic acid compounds. The adsorption experiment revealed the effectiveness of several solid materials to naphthenic acid adsorption and acidity reduction of crude oil, which can be either natural minerals or synthesized materials. The test with crude oil also received promising results, which can be potentially developed into a practical process for oil industry. The theoretical work predicted several possible catalytic decarboxylation mechanisms that would govern the decarboxylation pathways depending on the type of catalysts being used. The calculation for reaction activation energy was in good agreement with our experimental measurements.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang; Yongchun Tang; William A. Goddard

2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

345

Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

346

Thiacrown polymers for removal of mercury from waste streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thiacrown polymers immobilized to a polystyrene-divinylbenzene matrix react with Hg.sup.2+ under a variety of conditions to efficiently and selectively remove Hg.sup.2+ ions from acidic aqueous solutions, even in the presence of a variety of other metal ions. The mercury can be recovered and the polymer regenerated. This mercury removal method has utility in the treatment of industrial wastewater, where a selective and cost-effective removal process is required.

Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA); Fox, Glenn A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.98 a gallon on Labor Day Monday. That's up 6.8 cents from a week ago, based...

348

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.90 a gallon on Monday. That's up 3.6 cents from a week ago, based on the...

349

Diesel prices slightly increase nationally  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices slightly increase nationally The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose slightly to 3.90 a gallon on Monday. That's up 4-tenths of a penny from a...

350

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.87 a gallon on Monday. That's up 3.9 cents from a week ago, based on the...

351

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.92 a gallon on Monday. That's up 1.2 cents from a week ago, based on the...

352

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.89 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2.4 cents from a week ago, based on the...

353

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.88 a gallon on Monday. That's up 3.9 cents from a week ago, based on the...

354

Gas utilities to increase outlays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite rising natural gas prices and falling consumer demand for gas, experts predict a 16% increase in US gas transmission and distribution expenditures for 1983. Production and storage outlays will probably decrease because of the current gas surplus. The demand for natural gas has been below production levels since 1981. Increases in residential and commercial requirements have been offset by a drop in industrial use, which represents 50% of total gas demand.

O'Donnell, J.P.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Economics of Increased Power Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report focuses on methodologies for evaluating the costs and benefits of the diverse technologies that can be used either individually or jointly to increase the flow of power through the transmission system. It begins by describing a broad slate of potential technologies and approaches for increasing transmission capacity and improving system efficiency and then provides an overall framework for assessing the benefits and costs of these technologies. Later sections cover the practical implementatio...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

356

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

357

Application of Feed and Bleed Operations to Remove High Level ...  

Cleaning Method Phase Date. 5 Process Identification • After Mechanical Sludge Removal and Chemical Cleaning: ... Block Diagram Filtrate Solids Separation Solids Slurry

358

Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas ...  

Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas ... required for sequestration, an area of research identified as a high priority

359

Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam - Time Lapse Video...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(MOST) and the Russian Federation successfully removed 11 kilograms of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute. This is the eleventh country...

360

Heading Error Removal System for Tracking Devices - Energy ...  

Systems are able to reduce or remove slowly-varying drift errors, such as heading errors, rate of rotation errors, and direction of travel errors, to correct the ...

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

362

NETL: News Release - NETL Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power and Cost Savings DOE Laboratory Signs License Agreement Incorporating Sorbents in HVAC Add-on Technology Washington, DC - Carbon dioxide removal sorbents developed by the...

363

Impurity Removal from Petroleum Coke - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Impurity Removal from Petroleum Coke. Author(s), Alexandre Gagnon, Hans Darmstadt, Nigel Backhouse, Esme Ryan, Laurence Dyer, David ...

364

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study to compare six methods of removing noncondensable gases from direct-use geo-thermal steam power plants. This report defines the study methodologies and compares the...

365

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; ... Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures United States Patent ...

366

Study of Alternative Approaches for Transite Panel Removal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) assembled an experienced team from both sites to evaluate both the manual and mechanical methods of transite panel removal.

367

Method of removal of sulfur from coal and petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the removal of sulfur from sulfur-bearing materials such as coal and petroleum products using organophosphine and organophosphite compounds is provided.

Verkade, John G. (Ames, IA); Mohan, Thyagarajan (Ames, IA); Angelici, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Using Microwave Radiation for Removing Heavy Metal Ions and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Using Microwave Radiation for Removing Heavy Metal Ions and Producing Biofuels. Author(s), Aharon Gedanken. On-Site Speaker (Planned ) ...

369

Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

370

Hydrogen Removal From Heating Oil of a Parabolic Trough ...  

A Method to Selectively Remove & Measure Hydrogen Gas from a Fluid Volume Parabolic trough power plants use concentrated solar thermal energy to ...

371

Selective Removal of Thiophene from Liquid Fuels over Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Selective Removal of Thiophene from Liquid Fuels over Nickel -Based Nanocrystalline Zinc Oxide. Author(s), Mohammad Rafiqul Islam, Jewel ...

372

REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF DEPOSITS FROM COAL GASIFICATION ...  

A method is provided for on-line removal and recovery of deposits from fossil fuel gasification systems to improve plant performance and recover a valuable metalloid.

373

Use, Maintenance, Removal, Inspections, and Safety of Dams (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes operating plans for dams with movable structures, as well as procedures for raising or lowering of impoundment levels, dam removal, and dam safety inspections.

374

Method for Removal of Mercury from Various Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 6,576,092 entitled "Method for Removal of Mercury from Various Gas Streams."...

375

Nitrogen removal from natural gas using two types of membranes ...  

A process for treating natural gas or other methane-rich gas to remove excess nitrogen. The invention relies on two-stage membrane separation, using ...

376

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

378

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants from syngas typically rely on chemical or physical absorption processes operating at low temperatures. When cooled...

379

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

382

US, International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam, Set Nuclear Security Milestone | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile...

383

Homogeneous production and removal of NO/sub x/ from combustion exhaust flows. First quarterly technical summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production and removal of No/sub x/ and other combustion products during fossil fuel combustion is a serious environmental problem for both stationary and mobile energy systems. Since stationary systems are faced with increased utilization of coal, oil shale, or synthetic fuel oils, all of which have significant levels of fuel-bound nitrogen, NO/sub x/ formation may become acute. Recent studies of the production of NO/sub x/ due to oxidation of fuel nitrogen indicate that a critical role is played by the interaction of NH/sub i/ (i = 1,2,3) species with NO, O/sub 2/, OH, and H. In fact, these reactions play a vital role in the homogeneous removal of NO/sub x/ from combustion exhaust streams upon addition of NH/sub 3/ or NH/sub 3/-like compounds. Over the past two years, there has been an increased understanding of the chemistry of the NH/sub i//NO/sub x/ system at combustor exhaust temperatures. For an ammonia addition system to be effective in reducing NO/sub x/ emissions, it must work successfully in the presence of a variety of sulfur-bearing compounds present in the products of combusted coal and oil shale. The work in progress has three major objectives. The first objective is to determine whether the reactions of SO/sub 2/ (the predominant sulfur-bearing compound present) + NH/sub i/ (i = 1,2,3) directly produce NO/sub x/ in the temperature range of 300 to 1500 K. Depending on the products and value of these rate constants, the effectiveness of NO removal by NH/sub 3/ could be dramatically affected. The second objective is to screen and evaluate various sulfur-containing scavenger precursors such as SO, SO/sub 2/, HS, and H/sub 2/S to assess their impact on the NH/sub i//NO/sub x/ chemical system.

Silver, J.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Electricity use by machine drives varies significantly by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The effects of increases in shipments and increases in energy efficiency are considered in EIA's long-term energy projections. For example, in ...

385

Program on Technology Innovation: Biotechnological Approaches to Removing Boron from Electric Utility Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-based electric power generation faces compliance difficulties with respect to boron (B) contamination. Concentrations of B in coal-combustion byproduct electric utility effluents commonly range from 30 to 120 ppm; there is a critical need for cost-effective technologies to treat and remove B from these effluents to levels around 1.7 ppm. Wetland treatment systems offer significant operational and maintenance cost savings over chemical treatment alternatives for wastewater discharges from ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

386

NDE Studies on CRDMs Removed From Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are focused on assessing the effectiveness of NDE inspections of control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of ultrasonic testing (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. In describing two CRDM assemblies removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE measurements, this paper will address the following questions: 1) What did each technique detect?, 2) What did each technique miss?, 3) How accurately did each technique characterize the detected flaws? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. One contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data; the other contained evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, but this was unconfirmed. The selected NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory based NDE methods will be employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper will also describe the NDE methods used and discus the NDE results. Future work will involve using the results from these NDE studies to guide the development of a destructive characterization plan to reveal the crack morphology, to be compared with NDE responses.

Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Schuster, George J.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Abrefah, John

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

EA-1712: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Finding of No Significant Impact 2: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1712: Finding of No Significant Impact Exide Technologies Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Bristol, Tennessee, and Columbus, Georgia Based on the analyses in the environmental assessment, DOE determined that its Proposed Action, awarding a federal grant to Exide Technologies to facilitate expansion of operations at two existing Exide facilities, would result in no significant adverse impacts. Finding of No Significant Impact for Exide Technoligies Electric Drive Vehicles Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Bristol, TN and Columbus, GA More Documents & Publications EA-1712: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1722: Finding of No Significant Impact

388

EA-1247: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

47: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1247: Finding of No Significant Impact Electrical Power System Upgrades at Los Alamos National Laboratory The US DOE finds that there would...

389

What Small Improvements Have Saved You Significant Energy and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

What Small Improvements Have Saved You Significant Energy and Money? What Small Improvements Have Saved You Significant Energy and Money? June 11, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis On Tuesday,...

390

EA-1183: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1183: Finding of No Significant Impact Coal-fired Diesel Generator University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska Based on analysis in the EA, DOE has...

391

On “Field Significance” and the False Discovery Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conventional approach to evaluating the joint statistical significance of multiple hypothesis tests (i.e., “field,” or “global,” significance) in meteorology and climatology is to count the number of individual (or “local”) tests yielding ...

D. S. Wilks

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

EA-1935: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of No Significant Impact EA-1935: Finding of No Significant Impact To'Hajiilee Solar Project Based on the review of the Bureau of Indian Affairs' EA, DOE has determined that...

393

EA-1465: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

65: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1465: Finding of No Significant Impact Wind Energy Center EdgeleyKulm Project, North Dakota Basin Electric Power Cooperative, on behalf of...

394

EA-1863: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

63: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1863: Finding of No Significant Impact Based on the Final EA, DOE has determined that the project (Proposed Action) would not constitute a...

395

EA-1189: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1189: Finding of No Significant Impact Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste Based on the analysis contained in the EA,...

396

EA-1135: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1135: Finding of No Significant Impact Offsite Thermal Treatment of Low-level Mixed Waste Based on the analysis contained in the EA, and...

397

EA-1897: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1897: Finding of No Significant Impact AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon Based on the information presented in...

398

EA-1897: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1897: Finding of No Significant Impact AltaRock's Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration near Bend, Oregon Based on the information presented in the...

399

EA-1739: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1739: Finding of No Significant Impact Bandon-Rogue Transmission Line Rebuild Project BPA needs to take action to ensure the integrity and...

400

EA-1086: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of No Significant Impact EA-1086: Finding of No Significant Impact Amendments to 10 CFR Part 835 (Revised Version - 698) Based on the analysis in the revised EA, the issuance...

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EA-1947: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

No Significant Impact EA-1947: Finding of No Significant Impact Transfer of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri Based on the results of the analysis reported in the EA,...

402

EA-0965: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

65: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0965: Finding of No Significant Impact Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE...

403

EA-1938: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1938: Finding of No Significant Impact Grieve Unit CO2 Enhanced Recovery Project, Natrona County, WY Western has reviewed BLM's EA "Grieve...

404

EA-0389: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

No Significant Impact EA-0389: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Based on the analysis in the EA and the comments received on the proposed...

405

EA-1726: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1726: Finding of No Significant Impact Kahuku Wind Power, LLC, Construction of the Kahuku Wind Power Facility in Kahuku, O'ahu, Hawaii The...

406

Locke, Chu Announce Significant Steps in Smart Grid Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Locke, Chu Announce Significant Steps in Smart Grid Development Locke, Chu Announce Significant Steps in Smart Grid Development May 18, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - U.S....

407

Increased Cytotoxicity of Oxidized Flame Soot  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increased Cytotoxicity of Oxidized Flame Soot Increased Cytotoxicity of Oxidized Flame Soot Title Increased Cytotoxicity of Oxidized Flame Soot Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Holder, Amara L., Brietta J. Carter, Regine Goth-Goldstein, Donald Lucas, and Catherine P. Koshland Journal Atmospheric Pollution Research Volume 3 Start Page 25 Issue 1 Pagination 25-31 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords health effects, ozone, soot, toxicity Abstract Combustion-generated particles released into the atmosphere undergo reactions with oxidants, which can change the particles' physiochemical characteristics. In this work, we compare the physical and chemical properties and cellular response of particles fresh from a flame with those oxidized by ozone and nitrogen dioxide. The reaction with ozone and nitrogen dioxide does not significantly modify the physical characteristics of the particles (primary particle size, fractal dimension, and surface area). However, oxidation affects the chemical characteristics of the particles, creating more oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups, and increases their hydrophilicity. In addition, oxidized soot generates more reactive oxygen species, as measured by the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Furthermore, oxidized soot is 1.5-2 times more toxic than soot that was not reacted with ozone, but the inflammatory response, measured by interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion, is unchanged. These results imply that combustion-generated particles released into the atmosphere will have an increased toxicity on or after high ozone days.

408

Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 31513160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 3151­3160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters P. Zhao, J.A. Siegel�, R May 2006; accepted 14 June 2006 Abstract Residential and commercial HVAC filters that have been loaded of the relative importance of HVAC filters as a removal mechanism for ozone in residential and commercial

Siegel, Jeffrey

409

Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

Janoski, Edward J. (Havertown, PA); Hollstein, Elmer J. (Wilmington, DE)

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. 1 figure.

Cha, C.Y.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

411

Process for removing pyritic sulfur from bituminous coals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for removing pyritic sulfur and lowering ash content of bituminous coals by grinding the feed coal, subjecting it to micro-agglomeration with a bridging liquid containing heavy oil, separating the microagglomerates and separating them to a water wash to remove suspended pyritic sulfur. In one embodiment the coal is subjected to a second micro-agglomeration step.

Pawlak, Wanda (Edmonton, CA); Janiak, Jerzy S. (Edmonton, CA); Turak, Ali A. (Edmonton, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw L. (Edmonton, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A Simple Rapid Method for the Removal of Leukocytes From  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Filtration of human blood cells through lamb's wool columns removed more than 96 % of all leukocytes in a series of experiments, while the retention of erythrocytes by the column averaged 6.4%. This method should prove extremely useful for obtaining pure erythrocyte preparations for use in biochemical and physiological studies, and for removing leukocytes from blood prior to transfusion.

Human Blood; Edward Palmer; Frederic Waldman; William Dewitt

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Continuous cryopump with a method for removal of solidified gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved cryopump for the removal of gases from a high vacuum, comprising a cryopanel incorporating honeycomb structure, refrigerant means thermally connected to the cryopanel, and a rotatable channel moving azimuthally around an axis located near the center of the cryopanel, removing gases adsorbed within the honeycomb structure by subliming them and conducting them outside the vacuum vessel. 4 figs.

Carlson, L.W.; Herman, H.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

414

Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

Janoski, E.J.; Hollstein, E.J.

1984-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

415

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Condenser Air Removal Equipment Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Condenser Air Removal Equipment Maintenance Guide provides power plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on this system. This guide will assist the plant maintenance personnel in improving reliability and reducing maintenance costs for the condenser air removal (CAR) equipment.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

416

A Method for Noise Removal of LIDAR Point Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LiDAR can quickly and accurately obtain precision and high-density surface elevation data. In cooperation with high-precision GPS positioning technology and IMU attitude sensor, a typical noise removal algorithm of LIDAR point clouds based on FEA is ... Keywords: LIDAR, point clouds, noise removal, FEA

Huang Zuowei, Huang Yuanjiang, Huang Jie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet Mar 26, 2012 At the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit, the United States, Mexico and Canada announced the successful removal of HEU from Mexico and conversion of the

418

Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic Components Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic Components The invention is a combination of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic Components The invention is a combination of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier which can be used to contact substrates for electronic parts such as semiconductor wafers or chips to remove photoresist materials which are applied to the substrates during manufacture of the electronic parts. The dense phase fluid modifier is one

419

A Heat Exchanger Process for Removal of H{sub2}S Gas  

SciTech Connect

A heat exchanger process has been developed for the removal of H{sub 2}S and other noncondensable gases from geothermal steam. The process utilizes a heat exchanger to condense water from geothermal steam while allowing H{sub 2}S and other noncondensable gases to pass through in the vapor phase. The condensed water is evaporated to form a clean steam from which over 90 percent of the H{sub 2}S and other noncondensable gases have been removed. Some of the important advantages of the heat exchanger process are shown in Table 1. The system can be located upstream of a power plant turbine which eliminates much of the potential for corrosion, as well as the requirement for removing H{sub 2}S from water collected in the main condenser. Since almost all noncondensables are removed, much less steam is needed for air ejector operation. The heat exchanger process is simple: it has no chemical addition requirements or sludge by-products and utilizes standard equipment found in many power plant applications. The regular power plant operators and maintenance crews can easily understand and run the system with minimal attention. Capital and operating costs are competitive with those for currently available H{sub 2}S-abatement technology, although significant economic advantages over downstream abatement processes may result due to the use of clean steam in the turbines.

Coury, Glenn E.; Babione, Robert A.; Gosik, Robert J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Uranium removal from soils: An overview from the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program  

SciTech Connect

An integrated approach to remove uranium from uranium-contaminated soils is being conducted by four of the US Department of Energy national laboratories. In this approach, managed through the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, these laboratories are developing processes that selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste that is difficult to manage or dispose of. These processes include traditional uranium extractions that use carbonate as well as some nontraditional extraction techniques that use citric acid and complex organic chelating agents such as naturally occurring microbial siderophores. A bench-scale engineering design for heap leaching; a process that uses carbonate leaching media shows that >90% of the uranium can be removed from the Fernald soils. Other work involves amending soils with cultures of sulfur and ferrous oxidizing microbes or cultures of fungi whose role is to generate mycorrhiza that excrete strong complexers for uranium. Aqueous biphasic extraction, a physical separation technology, is also being evaluated because of its ability to segregate fine particulate, a fundamental requirement for soils containing high levels of silt and clay. Interactions among participating scientists have produced some significant progress not only in evaluating the feasibility of uranium removal but also in understanding some important technical aspects of the task.

Francis, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Brainard, J.R.; York, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chaiko, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Matthern, G. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Steam Generator Management Program: Assessment of the Effect of Deposit Removal Frequency on Sludge Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a PWR steam generator, the buildup of deposits on the tubes near the tubesheet can increase the risk of tube degradation. To ensure the integrity of the tubes which are part of the primary-to-secondary side pressure boundary, various repair and/or mitigation techniques are available which have attendant benefits, risks, and costs. To mitigate deposit buildup, utilities employ a variety of deposit removal techniques, such as sludge lancing and chemical cleaning. This report addresses the effect of ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

422

EA-1837: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1837: Finding of No Significant Impact Performance Verification Laboratory, Morgantown, West Virginia Based on the analyses in the environmental assessment, DOE determined that its proposed action - to design, construct, and make operational a DOE Performance Verification Laboratory facility for verifying the energy performance pf appliances and equipment to facilitiate improved enforcement of energy conservation standards and ENERGY STAR programs - would result in no significant adverse impacts. Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for National Energy Technology Laboratory Performance Verification Laboratory, Morgantown, West Virginia More Documents & Publications EA-1837: Final Environmental Assessment

423

EA-1716: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1716: Finding of No Significant Impact Honeywell International, Inc., Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Project Massac County, Illinois Based on the analyses in the Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE determined that its proposed action-awarding a federal greant to Honeywell International Inc. (Honeywell) for the construction of a manufacturing plant to produce a critical battery material, lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6)- would result in no significant adverse impacts. FInding of No Significant Impact for Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Project, Honeywell International, Inc, Massac County, Illinois, DOE/EA-1716, September 2010 More Documents & Publications

424

EA-1664: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Finding of No Significant Impact 4: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1664: Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Conservation Standards: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps The U.S. Department of Energy has determined that the adoption of energy conservation standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps as described in the final rule titled the "energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector lamps," would not be a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. Finding of No Significant Impact for 10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Standards: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent and Incandescent

425

EA-1591: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1591: Finding of No Significant Impact Palisades - Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) announces its environmental findings on the Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project. The project involves rebuilding the existing Palisades-Goshen 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line, which extends from Palisades Dam in eastern Idaho approximately 52 miles west to the Goshen Substation south of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Palisades-Goshen Transmission Line Reconstruction Project Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings More Documents & Publications EA-1591: Final Environmental Assessment, Finding of No Significant Impact, and Mitigation Action Plan

426

EA-1506: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1506: Finding of No Significant Impact Changing World Technologies' Thermal Conversion Process Commercial Demonstration Plant, Weld County, Colorado This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental impacts of the Department of Energy's decision to support the Changing World Technologies' Thermal Conversion Process project in unincorporated Weld County, Colorado, including construction and operation of the plant, as well as a No Action Alternative. Finding of No Significant Impact for Changing World Technologies' Thermal Conversion Process Commercial Demonstration Plant, Weld County, Colorado, DOE/EA-1506 (November 2004) More Documents & Publications EA-1506: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1597: Finding of No Significant Impact

427

EA-1704: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1704: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi The Department of Energy completed an Environmental Assessment and Notice of Wetland Involvement that analyzed the potential environmental impacts associated with the design, construction, and operation of the BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC Cellulosic Biorefinery near the city of Fulton, Mississippi. Mitigated Finding of No Significant Impact BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC Cellulosic Biorefinery Project More Documents & Publications EA-1704: Mitigation Action Plan EA-1704: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1789: Finding of No Significant Impact

428

EA-1837: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1837: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1837: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1837: Finding of No Significant Impact Performance Verification Laboratory, Morgantown, West Virginia Based on the analyses in the environmental assessment, DOE determined that its proposed action - to design, construct, and make operational a DOE Performance Verification Laboratory facility for verifying the energy performance pf appliances and equipment to facilitiate improved enforcement of energy conservation standards and ENERGY STAR programs - would result in no significant adverse impacts. Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for National Energy Technology Laboratory Performance Verification Laboratory, Morgantown, West Virginia More Documents & Publications EA-1837: Final Environmental Assessment

429

EA-1700: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

700: Finding of No Significant Impact 700: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1700: Finding of No Significant Impact Computational Research and Theory Facility Project, Alameda County, California The action proposed by the Department of Energy is to relocate and consolidate Advanced Scientific Computing Research funded Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) programs with other LBNL/University of California Berkeley programs that focus on computational and computer science research in a new facility on the LBNL site. Finding of No Significant Impact for the Proposed Computational Research and Theory Facility Project at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California More Documents & Publications EA-1700: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1541: Finding of No Significant Impact

430

Timing Affects Switchgrass Production, Forage Nutritive Value, and Nutrient Removal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) has potential for both bioenergy and forage. The objectives of this experiment were to: i) determine whether switchgrass could be harvested for greater nutritive value during the vegetative stage relative to early reproductive growth (boot stage); ii) compare biomass yields of switchgrass harvested once versus twice per year for bioenergy; and iii) examine effects of N fertilizer rates on harvest systems. The experiment was a randomized complete block design with a split-plot arrangement of harvest system treatments as main plot (harvest once per year after frost, harvest twice per year first at vegetative or boot stage and regrowth after frost) and nitrogen (N) fertilizer rate as subplots (0, 90, 180, and 270 kg N ha-1). Biomass yield was greatest and nutrient concentrations were least in the one-cut system. For the two-cut system, nutritive values and yields were similar. Total annual biomass increased linearly with N fertilization. Across N rates, CP concentration for the two-cut systems was 50 % greater (71 g kg-1) and ADF and NDF concentrations were 20 % lesser (465 and 856 g kg-1, respectively) than switchgrass in the one-cut system. Switchgrass harvested at vegetative through boot stage and its regrowth could provide forage of acceptable nutritive value to beef cows. However, greater nutrient removal requires appropriate soil fertility evaluation and fertilizer management for sustainable yields.

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

EA-1714: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Finding of No Significant Impact 4: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1714: Finding of No Significant Impact Toda America, Incorporated, Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Project, Battle Creek, Michigan Based on the analyses in the Environmental Assessment, DOE determined that it;s proposed action, awarding a Federal grant to Toda America, Incorporated for the construction of a new manufacturing plant, would result in no significant adverse impacts. Finding of No Significant Impact for Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Project Toda America, Incorporated Battle Creek, Michigan More Documents & Publications EA 1714: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1711: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1709: Finding of No Significant Impact

432

Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » NEPA Documents » Findings of No Significant Impact Services » NEPA Documents » Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Findings of No Significant Impact are public documents issued by a Federal agency briefly presenting the reasons why an action for which the agency has prepared an environmental assessment will not have a significant effect on the human environment and, therefore, will not require preparation of an environmental impact statement. If you have any trouble finding a specific document, please contact AskNEPA@hq.doe.gov for assistance. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 9, 2002 EA-1434: Finding of No Significant Impact Sunrise II Water Supply Line, Kern County, California October 2, 2002 EA-1449: Finding of No Significant Impact Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing

433

EA-0476: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-0476: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0476: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0476: Finding of No Significant Impact Installation and Operation of the Plant-wide Fire Protection Systems and Related Domestic Water Supply Systems The Department of Energy prepared EA-0476 for the Installation and Operation of the Plantwide Fire Protection Systems and Related Domestic Drinking Water Systems at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. DOE determined it is not a major threat to the environment and is issuing a Finding of No Significant Impact. Finding of No Significant Impact for the Installation and Operation of the Plantwide Fire Protection Systems and Related Domestic Drinking Water Systems More Documents & Publications EA-0873: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0826: Revised Finding of No Significant Impact

434

EA-0923: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

923: Finding of No Significant Impact 923: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0923: Finding of No Significant Impact Winnett School District Boiler Replacement Project Based on the analysis in the Environmental Assessment, the Department has determined that the installation of a new coal-fired system at the Winnett School District Complex does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. EA-0923-FONSI-1993.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-0923: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1183: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0962: Finding of No Significant Impact

435

Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 29, 2010 July 29, 2010 EA-1698: Finding of No Significant Impact Baldwin Wind Energy Center Project July 23, 2010 EA-1740: Finding of No Significant Impact Thermal Energy Corporation Combined Heat and Power Project Houston, Texas July 23, 2010 EA-1801: Finding of No Significant Impact Granite Reliable Power Wind Project, Coos County, New Hampshire July 13, 2010 EA-1743: Finding of No Significant Impact Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Waste Energy Project at the AK Steel Corporation Middletown Works, Middletown, Ohio June 21, 2010 EA-1733: Finding of No Significant Impact Calpine Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project, Sonoma County, California June 15, 2010 EA-1539: Finding of No Significant Impact North Area Right-of-Way Maintenance, California June 15, 2010 EA-1685: Finding of No Significant Impact

436

EA-1714: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1714: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1714: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1714: Finding of No Significant Impact Toda America, Incorporated, Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Project, Battle Creek, Michigan Based on the analyses in the Environmental Assessment, DOE determined that it;s proposed action, awarding a Federal grant to Toda America, Incorporated for the construction of a new manufacturing plant, would result in no significant adverse impacts. Finding of No Significant Impact for Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Project Toda America, Incorporated Battle Creek, Michigan More Documents & Publications EA 1714: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1711: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1678: Finding of No Significant Impact

437

Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 22, 1999 July 22, 1999 EA-1238: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Construction and Operation of the Nonproliferation and International Security Center June 4, 1999 EA-1290: Finding of No Significant Impact Disposition of Russian Federation Titled Natural Uranium May 27, 1999 EA-1190: Finding of No Significant Impact Wastewater Treatment Capability Upgrade May 6, 1999 EA-1135: Finding of No Significant Impact Offsite Thermal Treatment of Low-level Mixed Waste March 22, 1999 EA-1292: Finding of No Significant Impact On-site Treatment of Low Level Mixed Waste February 22, 1999 EA-1116: Finding of No Significant Impact Kalina Geothermal Demonstration Project, Steamboat Springs, Nevada February 11, 1999 EA-1276: Finding of No Significant Impact Widening Trench 36 of the 218-E-12B Low-level Burial Ground, Hanford Site,

438

High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored pulse designed for high transmission through the atmosphere, as well as efficient ablative coupling to the target. The main amplifier would use either diode-pumped or flashlamp-pumped solid state gain media, depending on budget constraints of the project. A continuously operating system would use the gas-cooled amplifier technology developed for Mercury, while a burst-mode option would use the heat capacity laser technology. The ground-based system that we propose is capable of rapid engagement of targets whose orbits cross over the site, with potential for kill on a single pass. Very little target mass is ablated per pulse so the potential to create additional hazardous orbiting debris is minimal. Our cost estimates range from $2500 to $5000 per J depending on choices for laser gain medium, amplifier pump source, and thermal management method. A flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass heat-capacity laser operating in the burst mode would have costs at the lower end of this spectrum and would suffice to demonstrate the efficacy of this approach as a prototype system. A diode-pumped, gas-cooled laser would have higher costs but could be operated continuously, and might be desirable for more demanding mission needs. Maneuverability can be incorporated in the system design if the additional cost is deemed acceptable. The laser system would need to be coupled with a target pointing and tracking telescope with guide-star-like wavefront correction capability.

Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored pulse designed for high transmission through the atmosphere, as well as efficient ablative coupling to the target. The main amplifier would use either diode-pumped or flashlamp-pumped solid state gain media, depending on budget constraints of the project. A continuously operating system would use the gas-cooled amplifier technology developed for Mercury, while a burst-mode option would use the heat capacity laser technology. The ground-based system that we propose is capable of rapid engagement of targets whose orbits cross over the site, with potential for kill on a single pass. Very little target mass is ablated per pulse so the potential to create additional hazardous orbiting debris is minimal. Our cost estimates range from $2500 to $5000 per J depending on choices for laser gain medium, amplifier pump source, and thermal management method. A flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass heat-capacity laser operating in the burst mode would have costs at the lower end of this spectrum and would suffice to demonstrate the efficacy of this approach as a prototype system. A diode-pumped, gas-cooled laser would have higher costs but could be operated continuously, and might be desirable for more demanding mission needs. Maneuverability can be incorporated in the system design if the additional cost is deemed acceptable. The laser system would need to be coupled with a target pointing and tracking telescope with guide-star-like wavefront correction capability.

Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

RANGE INCREASER FOR PNEUMATIC GAUGES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved pneumatic gage is offered in which the linear range has been increased without excessive air consumption. This has been accomplished by providing an expansible antechamber connected to the nozzle of the gage so that the position of the nozzle with respect to the workpiece is varied automatically by variation in pressure within the antechamber. This arrangement ensures that the nozzle-to-workpiece clearance is maintained within certain limits, thus obtaining a linear relation of air flow to nozzle-to-workpiece clearance over a wider range.

Fowler, A.H.; Seaborn, G.B. Jr.

1960-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EA-1647: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Finding of No Significant Impact 7: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1647: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Range Fuels Soperton Plant, LLC (formerly Range Fuels Inc.), Treutlen County, Georgia The Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes the potential impacts associated with the construction and operation of a proposed cellulosic ethanol plant in Treutlen County, Georgia. The Department of Energy has issued this Finding of No Significant Impact. Finding of No Significant Impact for the Proposed Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Range Fuels Soperton Plant, LLC (formerly Range Fuels Inc.) Treutlen County, Georgia, DOE/EA 1647 (January 2009) More Documents & Publications EA-1597: Finding of No Significant Impact EA 1647: Supplemental Environmental Assessment

442

EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Finding of No Significant Impact 1: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site Based on the analysis and information provided in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed Federal action, to conduct air sparging at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site in Sweetwater County, Wyoming, does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. EA-1331-FONSI-2000.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1331: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1219: Finding of No Significant Impact

443

EA-0400: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

400: Finding of No Significant Impact 400: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0400: Finding of No Significant Impact Consolidated Incineration Facility at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0400) for the proposed construction and operation of the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analysis presented in the EA, DOE issued a proposed finding of no significant impact (FONSI) on June 24, 1992. Finding of No Significant Impact, Consolidated Incineration Facility at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC More Documents & Publications EIS-0217: Record of Decision EA-0179: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1308: Final Environmental Assessment

444

EA-1711: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1711: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1711: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1711: Finding of No Significant Impact Saft America, Inc. Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Jacksonville, Florida Based on the analyses in the environmental assessment, DOE determined that its proposed action, awarding a federal grant to Saft America, Inc to construct and operate a high-volume manufacturing plant to make advanced lithium-ion cells and batteries, would result in no significant adverse impacts. Finding of No Significant Impact for Saft America, Inc. Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Jacksonville, Florida More Documents & Publications EA-1711: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1709: Finding of No Significant Impact

445

EA-1131: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

131: Finding of No Significant Impact 131: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1131: Finding of No Significant Impact Relocation of Neutron Tube Target Loading Operation, Los Alamos Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico The United States Department of Energy finds that there would be no significant impact from proceeding with its proposal to relocate NTTL operations from TA-21 to TA-16 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. DOE makes this Finding of No Significant Impact pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), the Council on Environmental Quality regulations, and the DOE NEPA regulations. Based on the environmental assessment that analyzes the relocation of operations, the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action which would significantly affect the human environment

446

EA-1059: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1059: Finding of No Significant Impact 1059: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1059: Finding of No Significant Impact Radioactive Source Recovery Program The United States Department of Energy (DOE) finds that there would be no significant impact from proceeding with its proposal to establish a routine radioactive source recovery program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. DOE makes this Finding of No Significant Impact pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Council on Environmental Quality regulations, and the DOE NEPA regulations. Based on the environmental assessment that analyzes the source recovery program, the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action which would significantly affect the human environment within the meaning of NEPA.

447

EA-1605: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1605: Finding of No Significant Impact Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina The Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1605) to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction and operation of new biomass cogeneration and heating facilities located at the Savannah River Site (SRS). DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment . Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and DOE is issuing this finding of no significant impact (FONSI). Finding of No Significant Impact for Biomass Cogeneration and Heating

448

EA-1784: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1784: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1784: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1784: Finding of No Significant Impact Fotowatio Nevada Solar, LLC's APEX Solar Power Project in Clark County, Nevada The Department of Energy is adopting an environmental assessment completed by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management in August 2010 that analyzed the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and startup of Fotowatio Nevada Solar, LLC's Apex Solar Power Project located in Clark County, Nevada. Finding of No Significant Impact Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Fotowatio Nevada Solar, LLC's Apex Solar Power in Clark County, Nevada More Documents & Publications EA-1797: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1801: Finding of No Significant Impact

449

EA-1871: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1871: Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings Based on an DOE/EA-1871, DOE has determined that revising the Federal building energy efficiency standards to ASHRAE 90.1-2007 and IECC 2009 would not be a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, an EIS is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. EA-1871-FONSI-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1871: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1872: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1918: Finding of No Significant Impact

450

EA-1784: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Finding of No Significant Impact 4: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1784: Finding of No Significant Impact Fotowatio Nevada Solar, LLC's APEX Solar Power Project in Clark County, Nevada The Department of Energy is adopting an environmental assessment completed by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management in August 2010 that analyzed the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and startup of Fotowatio Nevada Solar, LLC's Apex Solar Power Project located in Clark County, Nevada. Finding of No Significant Impact Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Fotowatio Nevada Solar, LLC's Apex Solar Power in Clark County, Nevada More Documents & Publications EA-1797: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1801: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1848

451

Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 25, 2011 February 25, 2011 EA-1700: Finding of No Significant Impact Computational Research and Theory Facility Project, Alameda County, California February 23, 2011 EA-1815: Finding of No Significant Impact Cuyahoga County Agricultural Society Wind Energy Project, Berea, Cuyahoga County, Ohio February 23, 2011 EA-1819: Finding of No Significant Impact Kilowatts for Kenston Wind Energy Project, Chagrin Falls, Geauga County, Ohio February 23, 2011 EA-1816: Finding of No Significant Impact Town of Hempstead Wind to Hydrogen Project, Hempstead, New York February 22, 2011 EA-1796: Finding of No Significant Impact Mesquite Solar Energy Project near Gillespie, Arizona February 18, 2011 EA-1834: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Advanced Technologies Vehicles Manufacturing Project, Dearborn,

452

EA-1725: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Finding of No Significant Impact 5: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1725: Finding of No Significant Impact SBE, Inc. Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Power Ring Manufacturing Scale-up, Barre, Vermont Based on the analyses in the Environmental Assessment, DOE determined that its proposed action, awarding a federal grant to SBE Inc. to establish an advanced Direct Current Bus capacitor manufacturing facility, would result in no significant adverse impacts. Finding of No Significant Impact for SBE, Inc. Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application Barre, Vermont More Documents & Publications EA-1725: Final Environmental Assessment Vermont Recovery Act State Memo EA-1722: Finding of No Significant Impact

453

EA-0404: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Finding of No Significant Impact 4: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-0404: Finding of No Significant Impact Innovative Clean Coal Technology Program - Coke Oven Gas Cleaning Demonstration Project at the Bethlehem Steel Corp. Sparrows Point Plant, Baltimore County, Maryland The Department of Energy prepared EA-0404 for the Coke Oven Gas Cleaning Demonstration Project at the Bethlehem Steel Corporation Sparrows Point Plant and determined it does not significantly affect the quality of the environment, so a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) was issued. Finding of No Significant Impact for the Coke Oven Gas Cleaning Demonstration Project at the Bethlehem Steel Corporation Sparrows Point Plant More Documents & Publications EA-0404: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1091: Final Environmental Assessment

454

EA-1338: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

38: Finding of No Significant Impact 38: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1338: Finding of No Significant Impact Transfer of the Department of Energy Grand Junction Office to Non-DOE Ownership On the basis of the Environmental Assessment (EA), which analyzes the relevant environmental issues and the concerns of stakeholders, DOE finds that no significant impact would result from implementing the proposed action to transfer the facility to non-DOE ownership, or from the no action alternative. This Finding of No Significant Impact is pursuant to the NEPA of 1969, the CEQ's Regulations for Implementing NEPA, and the DOE NEPA Implementing Procedures. The proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the environment within the mandate of NEPA. Therefore, implementation of the proposed action does not

455

EA-1711: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Finding of No Significant Impact 1: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1711: Finding of No Significant Impact Saft America, Inc. Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Jacksonville, Florida Based on the analyses in the environmental assessment, DOE determined that its proposed action, awarding a federal grant to Saft America, Inc to construct and operate a high-volume manufacturing plant to make advanced lithium-ion cells and batteries, would result in no significant adverse impacts. Finding of No Significant Impact for Saft America, Inc. Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Jacksonville, Florida More Documents & Publications EA-1711: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1709: Finding of No Significant Impact

456

EA-1493: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1493: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1493: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1493: Finding of No Significant Impact Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project (December 2004) The U.S. Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental consequences of providing cost-shared funding support for the design, construction, and demonstration of an integrated multi-pollutant control system at AES's Greenidge Station in Dresden, New York. The results of the analyses provided in the EA are summarized in this Finding of No Significant Impact. Finding of No Significant Impact for the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project, DOE/EA-1493 (December 2004) More Documents & Publications EA-1476: Finding of No Significant Impact Department of Energy Technical Support Document National Environmental

457

EA-1120: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20: Finding of No Significant Impact 20: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1120: Finding of No Significant Impact Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Based on the information and analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed treatment, repackaging and storage of solid residues at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact for the proposed action. EA-1120-FONSI-1996.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1120: Final Environmental Assessment EA-0995: Finding of No Significant Impact

458

EA-1157: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

157: Finding of No Significant Impact 157: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1157: Finding of No Significant Impact Methyl Chloride via Oxyhydrochlorination of Methane: A Building Black for Chemicals and Fuels from Natural Gas The proposed Federal action, to provide cost-shared financial assistance for demonstration of the OHC process in an engineering scale facility, does not constitute a major Federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment as defined by NEPA. This conclusion is based on the analysis contained in the EA. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is issuing this FONSI. EA-1157-FONSI-1996.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1157: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1091: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1183: Finding of No Significant Impact

459

EA-1851: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1851: Finding of No Significant Impact Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application (December 2011) For more information, contact: Ms. Pierina Fayish U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 10940, MS 922-M217 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 Fax: (412) 386-4775 Email: Pierina.Fayish@netl.doe.gov Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not result in no significant adverse impacts and therefore has issued this Finding of No Significant Impact. EA-1851-FONSI-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1851: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1851: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1869: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant

460

Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 7, 2005 February 7, 2005 EA-1485: Finding of No Significant Impact Nisqually Transmission Line Relocation Project January 24, 2005 EA-1503: Finding of No Significant Impact Vermont Electric Power Company Proposed Northern Loop Project December 10, 2004 EA-1488: Finding of No Significant Impact U-233 Disposition, Medical Isotope Production, and Building 3019 Complex Shutdown at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee December 9, 2004 EA-1498: Finding of No Significant Impact Advanced Coal Utilization Byproduct Beneficiation Processing Plant Ghent Power Station, Carroll County, Kentucky December 3, 2004 EA-1493: Finding of No Significant Impact Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project, AES Greenidge Station, Dresden, New York November 23, 2004 EA-1506: Finding of No Significant Impact

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removed increased significantly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 5, 2010 October 5, 2010 EA-1827: Finding of No Significant Impact Suniva Inc's Artisun Project in Thomas Township, Saginaw, Michigan October 1, 2010 EA-1784: Finding of No Significant Impact Fotowatio Nevada Solar, LLC's APEX Solar Power Project in Clark County, Nevada September 30, 2010 EA-1790: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of a Heterogeneous Feed Biorefinery, Enerkem Corporation, Pontotoc, Mississippi September 30, 2010 EA-1832: Finding of No Significant Impact Rainer Biogas LLC Community Anaerobic Manure Digester, Enumclaw, King County, Washington September 30, 2010 EA-1762: Finding of No Significant Impact Wellford Landfill Methane and Greenhouse Gas to Energy Project, Spartanburg County, South Carolina September 23, 2010 EA-1761: Finding of No Significant Impact and Floodplain Statement of

462

Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » NEPA Documents » Findings of No Significant Impact Services » NEPA Documents » Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Findings of No Significant Impact are public documents issued by a Federal agency briefly presenting the reasons why an action for which the agency has prepared an environmental assessment will not have a significant effect on the human environment and, therefore, will not require preparation of an environmental impact statement. If you have any trouble finding a specific document, please contact AskNEPA@hq.doe.gov for assistance. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD November 13, 2013 EA-1965: Finding of No Significant Impact Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center's Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida

463

Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 1, 1996 April 1, 1996 EA-1120: Finding of No Significant Impact Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site April 1, 1996 EA-1147: Finding of No Significant Impact Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator Tech Area 53 February 9, 1996 EA-1110: Finding of No Significant Impact Use of Herbicide for Vegetation Control at VHF Stations, Microwave Stations, Electrical Substations, and Pole Yards February 1, 1996 EA-1117: Finding of No Significant Impact Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee December 26, 1995 EA-1132: Finding of No Significant Impact Protected Area Reconfiguration Project December 21, 1995 EA-1137: Finding of No Significant Impact Nonnuclear Consolidation Weapons Production Support Project for the Kansas

464

EA-1255: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1255: Finding of No Significant Impact 1255: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1255: Finding of No Significant Impact Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia Based on the analysis in the Environmental Assessment for Project Partnership, and based on the previous Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1006) and Finding of No Significant Impact for Project Sapphire, DOE has determined that the transportation of about 5 kilograms of enriched uranium nuclear fuel from the Republic of Georgia to the United Kingdom does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required. EA-1255-FONSI-1998.pdf More Documents & Publications EA- 1255: Finding of No Significant Impact

465

EA-1802: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1802: Finding of No Significant Impact Chicago View Wind Project Chicago Heights, Cook County, Illinois The Department of Energy's Proposed Action is to authorize the expenditure of Federal funding appropriated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to design, permit, and construct the Chicago View Wind Project, a 1.5-megawatt wind turbine that would be sited on top of a construction debris landfill in Chicago Heights, southern Cook County, Illinois. Finding of No Significant Impact Chicago View Wind Project, Chicago Heights, Cook County, Illinois, DOE/EA-1802 (February 2011) More Documents & Publications EA-1802: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1807: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1753: Finding of No Significant Impact

466

EA-1677: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1677: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1677: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1677: Finding of No Significant Impact Conveyance and Transfer of the Two Land Tracts Pursuant to Public Law 111-11, Section 13005, Albuquerque, New Mexico DOE/EA-1677: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Final Environmental Assessment Addressing the Conveyance and Transfer of the Two Land Tracts Pursuant to Public Law 111-11, Section 13005 (05/06/10) DOE/EA-1677: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Final Environmental Assessment Addressing the Conveyance and Transfer of the Two Land Tracts Pursuant to Public Law 111-11, Section 13005 (05/06/10) More Documents & Publications EA-1677: Final Environmental Assessment Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2010 EA-1375: Finding of No Significant Impact

467

EA-1087: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

87: Finding of No Significant Impact 87: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1087: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California Based on the information and analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposal to construct and operate the Induction Linac System Experiments project does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, a Finding of No Significant Impact is made and an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. EA-1087-FONSI-1995.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1087: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1065: Finding of No Significant Impact

468

EA-1065: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Finding of No Significant Impact 5: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1065: Finding of No Significant Impact Proposed Construction and Operation of a Genome Sequencing Facility in Building 64 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California Based on the information and analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposal to construct and operate the Genome Sequencing Facility does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, a Finding of No Significant Impact is made and an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. EA-1065-FONSI-1995.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1065: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1087: Finding of No Significant Impact

469

EA- 1255: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1255: Finding of No Significant Impact 1255: Finding of No Significant Impact EA- 1255: Finding of No Significant Impact Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia Based on the analysis in this EA for Project Partnership, and based on the previous EA and Finding of No Significant Impact for Project Sapphire, the DOE has determined that the transportation of about 5 kilograms of enriched uranium nuclear fuel from the Republic of Georgia to the United Kingdom does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. EA-1255-FONSI-1998.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1255: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1255: Final Environmental Assessment

470

EA-1638: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1638: Finding of No Significant Impact Loan Guarantee to Solyndra, Inc. for Construction of a Photovoltaic Manufacturing Facility and Leasing of an Existing Commercial Facility in Fremont, California The Department of Energy has conducted an environmental assessment that analyzed the potential environmental impacts associated with: 1) the proposed construction and operation of a photovoltaic manufacturing facility and accompanying administrative offices in Fremont, California; and 2) the leasing of an existing commercial facility for assembly and packaging of the photovoltaic panels. Finding of No Significant Impact Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Solyndra, Inc for Construction of a Photovoltaic Manufacturing Facility and

471

EA-1746: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1746: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1746: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1746: Finding of No Significant Impact Blue Mountain Geothermal Development Project, Humboldt and Pershing Counties, Nevada The Department of Energy is adopting an environmental assessment completed by the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management in December 2007 that analyzed the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and startup of Nevada Geothermal Power, Inc.'s Blue Mountain Geothermal Development Project located in Humboldt and Pershing Counties, Nevada. Finding of No SIgnificant Impact Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Nevada Geothermal Power's Blue Mountain Geothermal Development Project in Humboldt and Pershing Counties, Nevada More Documents & Publications

472

EA-1727: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1727: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Startup of their Phase 2 Polysilicon Production Facility in Fairless Hills, Pennsylvania The Department of Energy conducted an environmental assessment that analyzed the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and startup of a Phase 2 commercial polysilicon production unit to be developed by AE Polysilicon Corporation within the Keystone Industrial Port Complex in Fairless Hills, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Finding of No Significant Impact Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to AE Polysilicon Corporation for Construction and Startup of their Phase 2 Polysilicon Production Facility in Fairless Hills, Pennsylvania More Documents & Publications

473

EA-1658: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an innovative biomass boiler pilot project that would offset a significant percentage of the natural gas consumption used for steam generation at the Frito-Lay...

474

EA-1876: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact EA-1876: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Pennsylvania State Energy Program's Conergy Navy Yard Solar Project EA-1876-FEA-2011.pdf...

475

EA-1907: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact EA-1907: Finding of No Significant Impact Western Plains Energy, LLC Biogas Anaerobic Digester Facility, Oakley, Kansas Based on the analysis in the Final EA and...

476

EA-1530: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact Final Rule for Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Furnaces and Boilers The Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) have...

477

EA-1498: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

98: Finding of No Significant Impact 98: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1498: Finding of No Significant Impact Advanced Coal Utilization Byproduct Beneficiation Processing Plant Ghent Power Station, Carroll County, Kentucky The proposed Federal action is to provide funding, through a cooperative agreement with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation (UKRF), Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), for the design, construction, and operation of an advanced coal ash beneficiation processing plant at Kentucky Utilities (KU) Ghent Power Station in Carroll County, Kentucky. Finding of No Significant Impact for Advanced Coal Utilization Byproduct Beneficiation Processing Plant Ghent Power Station, Carroll County, Kentucky, DOE/EA-1498 (December 2004) More Documents & Publications

478

EA-1628: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

628: Finding of No Significant Impact 628: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1628: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of a Proposed Lignocellulosic Biorefinery, POET Project LIBERTY, LLC, Emmetsburg, Iowa The Department of Energy proposes to provide financial assistance (the Proposed Action) to POET Project LIBERTY, LLC (POET) for the construction and operation of the lignocellulosic ethanol production facility (Project LIBERTY) near the City of Emmetsburg, Iowa. Mitigation Action Plan for the Environmental Assessment, Notice of Wetlands Involvement and Finding of No Significant Impact for Construction and Operation of a Proposed Lignocellulosic Biorefinery, Emmetsburg, Iowa, DOE/EA-1628 (September 2008) More Documents & Publications EA-1628: Mitigation Action Plan

479

EA-1110: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

110: Finding of No Significant Impact 110: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1110: Finding of No Significant Impact Use of Herbicide for Vegetation Control at VHF Stations, Microwave Stations, Electrical Substations, and Pole Yards Southwestern Power Administration has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) that addressed vegetation control at Southwestern's substations, radio stations, and pole yards. Based on the analysis developed in the EA, Southwestern has concluded, that with proper herbicide application restrictions, there will be no significant environmental impact to the air quality, surface water quality, ground water quality, wetlands, wildlife, aquatic life, threatened and endangered species, cultural resources, human health effects, transportation, or disposal of waste materials.

480

EA-1829: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1829: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Phycal Algae Pilot Project, Wahiawa and Kalaeloa, HI (November 2011) For more information, contact:...