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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Removal Sorbents for High Temperature Gas Streams Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,767,000 entitled "Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a unique regenerable sorbent process that can remove contaminants from gas produced by the gasification of fossil fuels. Specifically, the process removes hydrogen chloride by using the regenerable sorbent and simultaneously extracts hydrogen chloride compounds and hydrogen

2

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

3

Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

4

Removing Arsenic from Drinking Water  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

See how INL scientists are using nanotechnology to remove arsenic from drinking water. For more INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

5

Removing Arsenic from Drinking Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

See how INL scientists are using nanotechnology to remove arsenic from drinking water. For more INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperatures. The overall conclusion of this investigation is that water's hydrogen bond strength is poised centrally within a narrow window of its suitability for life.

Martin Chaplin

2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

7

Hydrogen Cars and Water Vapor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This cycle is currently under way with hydrogen fuel cells. As fuel cell cars are suggested as a solutionHydrogen Cars and Water Vapor D.W.KEITHANDA.E.FARRELL'S POLICY FORUM "Rethinking hydrogen cars" (18 misidentified as "zero-emissions vehicles." Fuel cell vehicles emit water vapor. A global fleet could have

Colorado at Boulder, University of

8

Turing Water into Hydrogen Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

so, coat with water, and add sunshine. What do you get? In theory, energy-rich hydrogen produced by photolysis-a process by which water molecules placed on a catalytic surface...

9

Turing Water into Hydrogen Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Turning Water into Turning Water into Hydrogen Fuel Turning Water into Hydrogen Fuel New method creates highly reactive catalytic surface, packed with hydroxyl species May 15, 2012 | Tags: Franklin, Materials Science NERSC Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 PNNL Contacts: Loel Kathmann, Loel.Kathmann@pnnl.gov, +1 509 371 6068 Artwork from this catalysis research graced the cover of Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics. Image reproduced by permission of Dr Igor Lyubinetsky and the PCCP Owner Societies from Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2012. Build a surface of titanium and oxygen atoms arranged just so, coat with water, and add sunshine. What do you get? In theory, energy-rich hydrogen produced by photolysis-a process by which water molecules placed on a catalytic surface and exposed to sunlight (electromagnetic radiation) are

10

Hydrogen production by the decomposition of water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

How to produce hydrogen from water was a problem addressed by this invention. The solution employs a combined electrolytical-thermochemical sulfuric acid process. Additionally, high purity sulfuric acid can be produced in the process. Water and SO.sub.2 react in electrolyzer (12) so that hydrogen is produced at the cathode and sulfuric acid is produced at the anode. Then the sulfuric acid is reacted with a particular compound M.sub.r X.sub.s so as to form at least one water insoluble sulfate and at least one water insoluble oxide of molybdenum, tungsten, or boron. Water is removed by filtration; and the sulfate is decomposed in the presence of the oxide in sulfate decomposition zone (21), thus forming SO.sub.3 and reforming M.sub.r X.sub.s. The M.sub.r X.sub.s is recycled to sulfate formation zone (16). If desired, the SO.sub.3 can be decomposed to SO.sub.2 and O.sub.2 ; and the SO.sub.2 can be recycled to electrolyzer (12) to provide a cycle for producing hydrogen.

Hollabaugh, Charles M. (Los Alamos, NM); Bowman, Melvin G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Hydrogen and Water: An Engineering, Economic and Environmental Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multi-year program plan for the Department of Energy's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Technology Program (USDOE, 2007a) calls for the development of system models to determine economic, environmental and cross-cutting impacts of the transition to a hydrogen economy. One component of the hydrogen production and delivery chain is water; water's use and disposal can incur costs and environmental consequences for almost any industrial product. It has become increasingly clear that due to factors such as competing water demands and climate change, the potential for a water-constrained world is real. Thus, any future hydrogen economy will need to be constructed so that any associated water impacts are minimized. This, in turn, requires the analysis and comparison of specific hydrogen production schemes in terms of their water use. Broadly speaking, two types of water are used in hydrogen production: process water and cooling water. In the production plant, process water is used as a direct input for the conversion processes (e.g. steam for Steam Methane Reforming {l_brace}SMR{r_brace}, water for electrolysis). Cooling water, by distinction, is used indirectly to cool related fluids or equipment, and is an important factor in making plant processes efficient and reliable. Hydrogen production further relies on water used indirectly to generate other feedstocks required by a hydrogen plant. This second order indirect water is referred to here as 'embedded' water. For example, electricity production uses significant quantities of water; this 'thermoelectric cooling' contributes significantly to the total water footprint of the hydrogen production chain. A comprehensive systems analysis of the hydrogen economy includes the aggregate of the water intensities from every step in the production chain including direct, indirect, and embedded water. Process and cooling waters have distinct technical quality requirements. Process water, which is typically high purity (limited dissolved solids) is used inside boilers, reactors or electrolyzers because as it changes phase or is consumed, it leaves very little residue behind. Pre-treatment of 'raw' source water to remove impurities not only enables efficient hydrogen production, but also reduces maintenance costs associated with component degradation due to those impurities. Cooling water has lower overall quality specifications, though it is required in larger volumes. Cooling water has distinct quality requirements aimed at preserving the cooling equipment by reducing scaling and fouling from untreated water. At least as important as the quantity, quality and cost of water inputs to a process are the quantity, quality and cost of water discharge. In many parts of the world, contamination from wastewater streams is a far greater threat to water supply than scarcity or drought (Brooks, 2002). Wastewater can be produced during the pre-treatment processes for process and cooling water, and is also sometimes generated during the hydrogen production and cooling operations themselves. Wastewater is, by definition, lower quality than supply water. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities can handle some industrial wastewaters; others must be treated on-site or recycled. Any of these options can incur additional cost and/or complexity. DOE's 'H2A' studies have developed cost and energy intensity estimates for a variety of hydrogen production pathways. These assessments, however, have not focused on the details of water use, treatment and disposal. As a result, relatively coarse consumption numbers have been used to estimate water intensities. The water intensity for hydrogen production ranges between 1.5-40 gallons per kilogram of hydrogen, including the embedded water due to electricity consumption and considering the wide variety of hydrogen production, water treatment, and cooling options. Understanding the consequences of water management choices enables stakeholders to make informed decisions regarding water use. Water is a fundamentally regional commodity. Water resources vary in quality and qu

Simon, A J; Daily, W; White, R G

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

12

Norm removal from frac water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treating low barium frac water includes contacting a frac water stream with a radium selective complexing resin to produce a low radium stream, passing the low radium stream through a thermal brine concentrator to produce a concentrated brine; and passing the concentrated brine through a thermal crystallizer to yield road salt.

Silva, James Manio; Matis, Hope; Kostedt, IV, William Leonard

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

Oil removal from water via adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WILLIAM EDWARD JACOBS 1974 OIL REMOVAL FROM WATER VIA ADSORPTION A Thesis by WILLIAM EDWARD JACOBS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1973 Major Subject: Civil Engineering OIL REMOVAL FROM WATER VIA ADSORPTION A Thesis by WILLIAM EDWARD JACOBS Approved as to style and content by: C airman of Committee ea o Department m er Member Memb December 1973 ABSTRACT Oil...

Jacobs, William Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

14

Process for removing metals from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions. 2 tabs.

Napier, J.M.; Hancher, C.M.; Hackett, G.D.

1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

15

Nitrate removal from drinking water -- Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitrate concentrations in surface water and especially in ground water have increased in Canada, the US, Europe, and other areas of the world. This trend has raised concern because nitrates cause methemoglobiinemia in infants. Several treatment processes including ion exchange, biological denitrification, chemical denitrification, reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, and catalytic denitrification can remove nitrates from water with varying degrees of efficiency, cost, and ease of operation. Available technical data, experience, and economics indicate that ion exchange and biological denitrification are more acceptable for nitrate removal than reverse osmosis. Ion exchange is more viable for ground water while biological denitrification is the preferred alternative for surface water. This paper reviews the developments in the field of nitrate removal processes.

Kapoor, A.; Viraraghavan, T. [Univ. of Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Advanced Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction Advanced Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction advwaterremovalmse.pdf More Documents & Publications Advance Patent Waiver...

17

Method for simultaneous recovery of hydrogen from water and from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for simultaneous recovery of hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes from water and from hydrocarbons. A palladium membrane, when utilized in cooperation with a nickel catalyst in a reactor, has been found to drive reactions such as water gas shift, steam reforming and methane cracking to substantial completion by removing the product hydrogen from the reacting mixture. In addition, ultrapure hydrogen is produced, thereby eliminating the need for an additional processing step.

Willms, R. Scott (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Removing dissolved inorganic contaminants from water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the physicochemical treatment processes typically used to remove the more common inorganic contaminants from water and wastewater. These are precipitation, coprecipitation, adsorption, ion exchange, membrane separations by reverse osmosis and electrodialysis, and combinations of these processes. The general criteria for process selection are discussed, and the processes and their typical applications are described.

Clifford, D.; Subramonian, S.; Sorg, T.J.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Water Electrolysis and Solar Hydrogen Demonstration Projects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, nearly all conventional and newly developed processes for water electrolysis will be considered, and an overview of ... After a brief historical description of hydrogen, water electrolysis, and s...

Gerd Sandstede; Reinhold Wurster

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Hanford Begins New Campaign to Remove Excess Water from Double...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Hanford Begins New Campaign to Remove Excess Water from Double-Shell Tanks Hanford Begins New Campaign to Remove Excess Water from Double-Shell Tanks September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes - annual report for FY 2010.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation without using an external power supply or circuitry. This project grew from an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen production by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen using OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, Y.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J. (Energy Systems)

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

22

Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes - annual report for FY 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that, without using an external power supply or circuitry, can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation. This project grew from an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen production by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen by means of OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, Y.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J.; Energy Systems

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

23

Neutron Reflection Method for the Fast Estimation of Neutron Removal Cross Section in Hydrogenous Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neutron reflection method was used for the fast estimation of the neutron removal cross section in hydrogenous materials of ... to hydrogenous materials with a low concentration of neutron absorbing elements.

L. Desdin; C. Ceballos

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

25

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and

27

Nanomaterials for Extracting Hydrogen from Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to catalyze water oxidation. K E Y A C C O M P L I S H M E N T S Produced highly active iron oxide (hematiteNanomaterials for Extracting Hydrogen from Water P R O J E C T L E A D E R : Veronika Szalai (NIST water. R E F E R E N C E Effect of tin doping on -Fe2 O3 photoanodes for water splitting, C. D. Bohn, A

28

6 - Hydrogen production by water electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: An electrolyzer combines an oxidation and a reduction reaction, driven by electricity, to produce separate streams of hydrogen gas and oxygen gas by a process called electrolysis. The hydrogen contains a portion of the electrical energy, and it can be used to generate electricity in a fuel cell by a process that is the reverse of electrolysis. If water electrolysis is driven by renewable electricity, it can be used in fuel-cell electric vehicles to displace petroleum, increase vehicle efficiency, and reduce the environmental impact of vehicles. The fundamental aspects of electrolytic hydrogen and its use as energy carrier are discussed.

N.A. Kelly

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

HYDROGEN DISTILLATION AT THE DEUTERIUM REMOVAL UNIT OF MuCap EXPERIMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

321 HYDROGEN DISTILLATION AT THE DEUTERIUM REMOVAL UNIT OF MuCap EXPERIMENT I.A. Alekseev, E hydrogen gas (so- called protium) must be used. It is necessary to avoid transfers of - to impurities imposes strict and critical requirements on the hydrogen gas system supporting the detector. Desirable

Titov, Anatoly

30

Fuel from Water: The Photochemical Generation of Hydrogen from Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fuel from Water: The Photochemical Generation of Hydrogen from Water ... Hydrogen can be generated from fossil fuels using well established industrial scale chem.; while this is clearly not green, it can provide the transitional capacity as infrastructure is developed and alternate ways of generating hydrogen using solar, nuclear, hydro, wind, or wave energy come to the fore. ... Our renewed interest in alternative energy has fuelled research in understanding this simplest, in terms of active site organization, of the known hydrogenases over the last two decades. ...

Zhiji Han; Richard Eisenberg

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

31

NETL: Releases & Briefs - Producing hydrogen from water, without  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Producing Hydrogen from Water, without Electrolysis Producing Hydrogen from Water, without Electrolysis Electrochemical potential difference drives the reaction Electrochemical potential difference drives the reaction Researchers at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have patented a "Method of Generating Hydrogen by Catalytic Decomposition of Water." The invention potentially leapfrogs current capital and energy intensive processes that produce hydrogen from fossil fuels or through the electrolysis of water. According to co-inventor Arun Bose, "Hydrogen can be produced by electrolysis, but the high voltage requirements are a commercial barrier. The invention provides a new route for producing hydrogen from water by using mixed proton-electron conducting membranes." Water is

32

Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes. Annual report for FY 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that, without using an external power supply or circuitry, can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation. This project grew out of an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions [1]. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen to be produced by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting [1, 2]. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen by means of OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

Balachandran, U.; Chen, L.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J.; Song, S. J.; Energy Systems

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

33

Electrochemical Removal of Carbon Monoxide in Reformate Hydrogen for Fueling Proton Exchange Membrane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrochemical Removal of Carbon Monoxide in Reformate Hydrogen for Fueling Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Sivagaminathan Balasubramanian, Charles E. Holland,* and John W. Weidner*,z Center in reformate hydrogen. In this design, the potential and gas flow are switched between the two filter cells so

Weidner, John W.

34

Electrokinetic Hydrogen Generation from Liquid Water Microjets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrochemical hydrogen production methods are quiteonly causative hydrogen production method. Although the massa method for the production of molecular hydrogen from

Duffin, Andrew M.; Saykally, Richard J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Electrokinetic Hydrogen Generation from Liquid Water Microjets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

currents and hydrogen production rates are shown to followmolecules. The hydrogen production efficiency is currentlycurrently available hydrogen production routes that can be

Duffin, Andrew M.; Saykally, Richard J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Vibrational Signature of Water Molecules in Asymmetric Hydrogen Bonding Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vibrational Signature of Water Molecules in Asymmetric Hydrogen Bonding Environments Chao Zhang contributions of each of the two hydrogen atoms to the vibrational modes 1 and 3 of water molecules the early works on the molecular structure of water, it has been accepted that a water molecule

Guidoni, Leonardo

37

Author's personal copy Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from water/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal and gasoline [3]. Moreover, hydrogen can be used in fuel cells to generate electricity, or directly as a transportation fuel [4]. Hydrogen can be generated from hydrocarbons and water resourcesAuthor's personal copy Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production from water/ methanol decomposition

Wood, Thomas K.

38

Effects of thermal pretreatment (removal of steric hindrance) on subsequent nuclear hydrogenation of heavy alkylaromatics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The changes in structures by thermal pretreatment of heavy alkylaromatics, which are very difficult to nuclear hydrogenate, and the effects of the pretreatment on subsequent nuclear hydrogenation were investigated in comparison with catalytic pretreatment of the same feedstock. The following results were obtained: (1) the structures of the thermally pretreated products are quite different from those of the catalytically pretreated ones; (2) subsequent nuclear hydrogenation of the thermally pretreated products becomes much easier because the steric hindrance is removed; (3) in the case where the same feedstock was catalytically pretreated, the products were difficult to nuclear hydrogenate. These results suggest various applications, including heavy oil hydrotreating.

Kubo, Junichi [Nippon Oil Co., Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Central Technical Research Lab.] [Nippon Oil Co., Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Central Technical Research Lab.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Reverse osmosis treatment to remove inorganic contaminants from drinking water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the research project was to determine the removal of inorganic contaminants from drinking water using several state-of-the-art reverse osmosis membrane elements. A small 5-KGPD reverse osmosis system was utilized and five different membrane elements were studied individually with the specific inorganic contaminants added to several natural Florida ground waters. Removal data were also collected on naturally occurring substances.

Huxstep, M.R.; Sorg, T.J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperatures to improve reaction kinetics and permeation. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H{sub 2} removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2}-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. The first-year screening studies of WGS catalysts identified Cu-ceria as the most promising high-temperature shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}, and were thus eliminated from further consideration. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. Several catalyst formulations were prepared, characterized and tested in the first year of study. Details from the catalyst development and testing work were given in our first annual technical report. Hydrogen permeation through Pd and Pd-alloy foils was investigated in a small membrane reactor constructed during the first year of the project. The effect of temperature on the hydrogen flux through pure Pd, Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} and Pd{sub 75}Ag{sub 25} alloy membranes, each 25 {micro}m thick, was evaluated in the temperature range from 250 C to 500 C at upstream pressure of 4.4 atm and permeate hydrogen pressure of 1 atm. Flux decay was observed for the Pd-Cu membrane above 500 C. From 350-450 C, an average hydrogen flux value of 0.2 mol H{sub 2}/m{sup 2}/s was measured over this Pd-alloy membrane. These results are in good agreement with literature data. In this year's report, we discuss reaction rate measurements, optimization of catalyst kinetics by proper choice of dopant oxide (lanthana) in ceria, long-term stability studies, and H{sub 2} permeation data collected with unsupported flat, 10 {micro}m-thick Pd-Cu membranes over a wide temperature window and in various gas mixtures. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was further improved, by proper selection of dopant type and amount. The formulation 10 at%Cu-Ce(30 at%La)Ox was the best; this was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The stability of catalyst performance was examined in 40-hr long tests. A series of hydrogen permeation tests were conducted in a small flat-membrane reactor using the 10 m{micro}-thick Pd-Cu membranes. Small inhibitory effects of CO and CO{sub 2} were found at temperatures above 350 C, while H{sub 2}O vapor had no effect on hydrogen permeation. No carbon deposition took place during many hours of membrane operation. The reaction extent on the blank (catalyst-free) membrane was also negligible. A larger flat-membrane reactor will be used next year with the catalyst wash coated on screens close coupled with the Pd-Cu membrane.

Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, PI; Jerry Meldon, Co-PI; Xiaomei Qi

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Materials for Hydrogen Generation via Water Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review is presented of materials that could be utilized as electrolytes (and their associated electrodes and interconnect materials) in solid-state electrolysis cells to convert water (or steam) into hydrogen and oxygen. Electrolytes that function as oxygen ion conductors or proton conductors are considered for various operating temperatures from approximately 80 °C to 1000 °C. The fundamental electrochemical reactions are reviewed with some discussion of special sources of steam and DC electricity (advanced nuclear) to drive the reactions at the higher temperatures.

Paul A. Lessing

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel May 5, 2011 - 1:27pm Addthis Tiny silicon pillars, used to absorb light. When dotted with a catalyst of molybdenum sulfide and exposed to sunlight, these pillars generate hydrogen gas from the hydrogen ions liberated by splitting water. Each pillar is approximately two micrometers in diameter. | Photo courtesy of Christian D. Damsgaard, Thomas Pedersen and Ole Hansen, Technical University of Denmark Tiny silicon pillars, used to absorb light. When dotted with a catalyst of molybdenum sulfide and exposed to sunlight, these pillars generate hydrogen gas from the hydrogen ions liberated by splitting water. Each pillar is approximately two micrometers in diameter. | Photo courtesy of Christian D.

43

Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel Turning Sun and Water Into Hydrogen Fuel May 5, 2011 - 1:27pm Addthis Tiny silicon pillars, used to absorb light. When dotted with a catalyst of molybdenum sulfide and exposed to sunlight, these pillars generate hydrogen gas from the hydrogen ions liberated by splitting water. Each pillar is approximately two micrometers in diameter. | Photo courtesy of Christian D. Damsgaard, Thomas Pedersen and Ole Hansen, Technical University of Denmark Tiny silicon pillars, used to absorb light. When dotted with a catalyst of molybdenum sulfide and exposed to sunlight, these pillars generate hydrogen gas from the hydrogen ions liberated by splitting water. Each pillar is approximately two micrometers in diameter. | Photo courtesy of Christian D.

44

Process for the production of hydrogen from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and device for the production of hydrogen from water and electricity using an active metal alloy. The active metal alloy reacts with water producing hydrogen and a metal hydroxide. The metal hydroxide is consumed, restoring the active metal alloy, by applying a voltage between the active metal alloy and the metal hydroxide. As the process is sustainable, only water and electricity is required to sustain the reaction generating hydrogen.

Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL); Willit, James L. (Batavia, IL)

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

45

Water Recycling removal using temperature-sensitive hydronen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to study the proposed Water Recycling/Removal Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogels. The main element of this technology is the design of a suitable hydrogel that can perform needed water separation for pulp and paper industry. The specific topics studied are to answer following questions: (a) Can water be removed using hydrogel from large molecules such as lignin? (b) Can the rate of separation be made faster? (c) What are the molecular interactions with hydrogel surface? (d) Can a hydrogel be designed for a high ionic strength and high temperature? Summary of the specific results are given.

Rana B. Gupta

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

Carbon promoted water electrolysis to produce hydrogen at room temperature.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of the work was to conduct water electrolysis at room temperature with reduced energy costs for hydrogen production. The electrochemical gasification of carbons… (more)

Ranganathan, Sukanya.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Sonoelectrochemical production of hydrogen via alkaline water electrolysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Alkaline water electrolysis is a promising technology to produce clean and pure hydrogen. This technology coupled with the ultrasound results in an enhanced rate of… (more)

Hassan Zadeh, Salman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Process for removing sulfate anions from waste water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid emulsion membrane process for removing sulfate anions from waste water is disclosed. The liquid emulsion membrane process includes the steps of: (a) providing a liquid emulsion formed from an aqueous strip solution and an organic phase that contains an extractant capable of removing sulfate anions from waste water; (b) dispersing the liquid emulsion in globule form into a quantity of waste water containing sulfate anions to allow the organic phase in each globule of the emulsion to extract and absorb sulfate anions from the waste water and (c) separating the emulsion including its organic phase and absorbed sulfate anions from the waste water to provide waste water containing substantially no sulfate anions.

Nilsen, David N. (Lebanon, OR); Galvan, Gloria J. (Albany, OR); Hundley, Gary L. (Corvallis, OR); Wright, John B. (Albany, OR)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results & Policy Implications Title Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results & Policy Implications Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2009 Authors Mathieu, Johanna L., Ashok J. Gadgil, Kristin Kowolik, and Susan E. Addy Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate-bottom ash from coal fired power plants-is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more thanhalf of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing anarsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages

50

Biological Water Gas Shift DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cell, and Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological Water Gas Shift DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cell, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Review was produced from water in a linked cyanobacterial- hydrogenase hybrid system Isolated mutants and cloned 2

51

Efficiency of partial water removal during transmission of steam-water mixture on geothermal fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The partial water removal from a steam-water mixture before transmission to prevent a pipeline from entering pulsation mode and to increase the flow of the heat carrier coming to the geothermal power plant is ...

A. N. Shulyupin

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Metals removal during estuarine mixing of Arvand River water with the Persian Gulf water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, the removal of dissolved and colloidal Cd, Co, Cu, Ni and Zn in Arvand River water during estuarine mixing with the Persian Gulf water is investigated. The flocculation process was...

Abdolreza Karbassi; Gholam Reza Nabi Bidhendi…

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

The Integration of a Structural Water-Gas-Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 The InTegraTIon of a STrucTural WaTer- gaS-ShIfT caTalyST WITh a VanadIum alloy hydrogen TranSporT deVIce Description The purpose of this project is to produce a scalable device that simultaneously performs both water-gas-shift (WGS) and hydrogen separation from a coal-derived synthesis gas stream. The justification of such a system is the improved efficiency for the overall production of hydrogen. Removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas (syngas) stream allows the WGS reaction to convert more carbon monoxide (CO) to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and maximizes the total hydrogen produced. An additional benefit is the reduction in capital cost of plant construction due to the removal of one step in the process by integrating WGS with the membrane separation device.

54

Evaluation of Technologies to Remove Suspended Solids from Waste Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at the Savannah River Site utilizes pH adjustment, submicron filtration, Hg removal resin, activated carbon, reverse osmosis, cationic exchange, and evaporation to remove contaminants from radioactive waste water. After startup, the ETF had difficulty achieving design capacity. The primary problem was fouling of the ceramic microfilters. Typical filter flow rates were only 20 percent of design capacity.A research program was conducted to identify and evaluate technologies for improving suspended solids removal from radioactive wastewater at the Savannah River Site. Technolgies investigated were a ceramic microfilter, a tubular polymeric ultrafilter, two porous metal filters, a polymeric centrifugal ultrafilter, a deep bed filter, a backwashable cartridge filter, a fabric filter, and a centriguge.

Poirier, M.R.

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Parametric study of solar hydrogen production from saline water electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to study the electrolysis of water for the production of hydrogen. A number of parameters, including salinity, voltage, current density and quantity of electricity, were investigated, and their effect on hydrogen production using a modified simple Hoffman electrolysis cell is reported.

S.M. El-Haggar; M. Khalil

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen A Study of Issues Related to the Use of Aluminum for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage U.S. Department of Energy Version 1.0 - 2008 Page 1 Promoters Oxide Promoters Salt Promoters Combined Oxide and Salt Promoters Aluminum Pretreatment Molten

57

Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen A Study of Issues Related to the Use of Aluminum for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage U.S. Department of Energy Version 2 - 2010 1 #12 Promoters Oxide Promoters Salt Promoters Combined Oxide and Salt Promoters Aluminum Pretreatment Molten

58

Geometry, Heat Removal and Kinetics Scoping Models for Hydrogen Storage Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WSRC-TR-2007-00439, REVISION 0 WSRC-TR-2007-00439, REVISION 0 Keywords: Hydrogen Kinetics, Hydrogen Storage Vessel Metal Hydride Retention: Permanent Geometry, Heat Removal and Kinetics Scoping Models for Hydrogen Storage Systems Bruce J. Hardy November 16, 2007 Washington Savannah River Company Savannah River Site Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Under Contract Number DEAC09-96-SR18500 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared for the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC09-96SR18500 and is an account of work performed under that contract. Neither the United States Department of Energy, nor WSRC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for accuracy, completeness, or

59

THE INFRARED SPECTRA OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS WITH SOME OR ALL HYDROGEN ATOMS REMOVED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The loss of one hydrogen from C{sub 96}H{sub 24} does not significantly affect the infrared spectra of the neutral, cation, or anion. Excluding a very weak C-C stretching band at 5.1 ?m, the loss of two adjacent duo hydrogens does not significantly affect the spectra compared with the parent. Removing all of the hydrogen atoms significantly increases the intensity of the new C-C stretching band, and, for the cation, shifts it to a longer (5.2 ?m) wavelength. Observations show a feature near 5.25 ?m, which has been attributed to overtone and combination bands from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This current work suggests that dehydrogenated PAHs might also contribute to this band, but its weakness implies that fully dehydrogenated cationic or dicationic species are very rare.

Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr. [Entry Systems and Technology Division, Mail Stop 230-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Ricca, Alessandra, E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov, E-mail: Alessandra.Ricca-1@nasa.gov [Carl Sagan Center, SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

60

Water inertial reorientation: Hydrogen bond strength and the angular potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water inertial reorientation: Hydrogen bond strength and the angular potential David E. Moilanen) The short-time orientational relaxation of water is studied by ultrafast infrared pump-probe spectroscopy with recent molecular dynamics simulations employing the simple point charge-extended water model at room

Fayer, Michael D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Ultrafast structural fluctuations and rearrangements of water's hydrogen bonded network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aqueous chemistry is strongly influenced by water's ability to form an extended network of hydrogen bonds. It is the fluctuations and rearrangements of this network that stabilize reaction products and drive the transport ...

Loparo, Joseph J. (Joseph John)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Production of hydrogen from water using biophotolytic methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen gas has been produced on a continuous basis using two immobilized microorganisms. One organism, the cyanobacteria it(Anacystis nidulans), oxidizes water, producing molecular oxygen, and reduces exogen...

Howard H. Weetall; Lester O. Krampitz

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Hydrogen peroxide production by water electrolysis: Application to disinfection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen peroxide was produced by direct current electrolysis using only two electrodes, a carbon felt...2...coated titanium anode. The required oxygen was supplied by oxidation of water and by transfer from the ...

P. Drogui; S. Elmaleh; M. Rumeau; C. Bernard…

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Hydrogen production from water: Recent advances in photosynthesis research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of the algae`s hydrogen-producing capability, which is based on the following: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the potential for research advances using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. ORNL has shown that sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen can be performed with mutants of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack a detectable level of the Photosystem I light reaction. This result is surprising in view of the standard two-light reaction model of photosynthesis and has interesting scientific and technological implications. This ORNL discovery also has potentially important implications for maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into chemical energy by green plant photosynthesis. Hydrogen production performed by a single light reaction, as opposed to two, implies a doubling of the theoretically maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency from {approx}10% to {approx}20%.

Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print The unique chemical and physical properties of liquid water are thought to result from the highly directional hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structure and its associated dynamics. However, despite intense experimental and theoretical scrutiny, a complete description of this structure has been elusive. Recently, with the help of their novel liquid microjet apparatus, a University of California, Berkeley, group derived a new energy criterion for H-bonds based on experimental data. With this new criterion based on analysis of the temperature dependence of the x-ray absorption spectra of normal and supercooled liquid water, they concluded that the traditional structural model of water is valid.

66

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print The unique chemical and physical properties of liquid water are thought to result from the highly directional hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structure and its associated dynamics. However, despite intense experimental and theoretical scrutiny, a complete description of this structure has been elusive. Recently, with the help of their novel liquid microjet apparatus, a University of California, Berkeley, group derived a new energy criterion for H-bonds based on experimental data. With this new criterion based on analysis of the temperature dependence of the x-ray absorption spectra of normal and supercooled liquid water, they concluded that the traditional structural model of water is valid.

67

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print The unique chemical and physical properties of liquid water are thought to result from the highly directional hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structure and its associated dynamics. However, despite intense experimental and theoretical scrutiny, a complete description of this structure has been elusive. Recently, with the help of their novel liquid microjet apparatus, a University of California, Berkeley, group derived a new energy criterion for H-bonds based on experimental data. With this new criterion based on analysis of the temperature dependence of the x-ray absorption spectra of normal and supercooled liquid water, they concluded that the traditional structural model of water is valid.

68

REMOVAL OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS FROM SUBCRITICAL WATER WITH ACTIVATED CARBON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has demonstrated that controlling the temperature (and to a lesser extent, the pressure) of water can dramatically change its ability to extract organics and inorganics from matrices ranging from soils and sediments to waste sludges and coal. The dielectric constant of water can be changed from about 80 (a very polar solvent) to <5 (similar to a nonpolar organic solvent) by controlling the temperature (from ambient to about 400 C) and pressure (from about 5 to 350 bar). The EERC has shown that hazardous organic pollutants such as pesticides, PACS (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) can be completely removed from soils, sludges, and sediments at temperatures (250 C) and pressures (<50 atm) that are much milder than typically used for supercritical water processes (temperature >374 C, pressure >221 atm). In addition, the process has been demonstrated to be particularly effective for samples containing very high levels of contaminants (e.g., part per thousand). Current projects include demonstrating the subcritical water remediation process at the pilot scale using an 8-liter system constructed under separate funding during 1997. To date, subcritical water has been shown to be an effective extraction fluid for removing a variety of organic pollutants from soils and sludges contaminated with fossil fuel products and waste products, including PACS from soil (e.g., town gas sites), refining catalysts, and petroleum tank bottom sludges; PCBs from soil and sediments; toxic gasoline components (e.g., benzene) from soil and waste sludge; and phenols from petroleum refinery sludges. The obvious need to clean the wastewater from subcritical water processes led to preliminary experiments with activated carbon placed in line after the extractor. Initial experiments were performed before and after cooling the extractant water (e.g., with water at 200 C and with water cooled to 25 C). Surprisingly, the ability of activated carbon to remove organics from the water is better at a high temperature than at room temperature. These initial results are opposite to those expected from chromatographic theory, since the solubility of the organics is about 100,000-fold higher in the hot water than in ambient water. At present, the physicochemical mechanism accounting for these results is unknown; however, it is possible that the lower surface tension and lower viscosity of subcritical water (compared to water at ambient conditions) greatly increases the available area of the carbon by several orders of magnitude. Regardless of the mechanism involved, the optimal use of activated carbon to clean the wastewater generated from subcritical water remediation will depend on obtaining a better understanding of the controlling parameters. While these investigations focused on the cleanup of wastewater generated from subcritical water remediation, the results also apply to cleanup of any wastewater contaminated with nonpolar and moderately polar organics such as wastewaters from coal and petroleum processing.

Steven B. Hawthorne; Arnaud J. Lagadec

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Removal of Oil from Water by Inverse Fluidization of Aerogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the contrary, filtration carried out using packed beds of granular materials has the following disadvantages: pressure drop increases proportionally to the flow rate, and the bed voidage reduces as the filter saturates with the contaminants. ... The water flow exits from the bottom of the column and passes through a Keystone Sediment Filter (model 2323N) in order to remove any entrained aerogel granules before being discarded. ... the emulsion was passed through the filters until satn. of the filter was indicated by the appearance of oil in the filtrate (breakthrough). ...

Jose A. Quevedo; Gaurav Patel; Robert Pfeffer

2008-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

70

Process for removing an organic compound from water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing organic compounds from water is disclosed. The process involves gas stripping followed by membrane separation treatment of the stripping gas. The stripping step can be carried out using one or multiple gas strippers and using air or any other gas as stripping gas. The membrane separation step can be carried out using a single-stage membrane unit or a multistage unit. Apparatus for carrying out the process is also disclosed. The process is particularly suited for treatment of contaminated groundwater or industrial wastewater.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaschemekat, Jurgen (Palo Alto, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Kamaruddin, Henky D. (San Francisco, CA)

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

71

Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V. (Morgantown, WV)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Durable regenerable sorbent pellets for removal of hydrogen sulfide coal gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from a coal gasification stream at an elevated temperature are prepared in durable form, usable over repeated cycles of absorption and regeneration. The pellets include a material reactive with hydrogen sulfide, in particular zinc oxide, a binder, and an inert material, in particular calcium sulfate (drierite), having a particle size substantially larger than other components of the pellets. A second inert material and a promoter may also be included. Preparation of the pellets may be carried out by dry, solid-state mixing of components, moistening the mixture, and agglomerating it into pellets, followed by drying and calcining. Pellet size is selected, depending on the type of reaction bed for which the pellets are intended. The use of inert material with a large particle size provides a stable pellet structure with increased porosity, enabling effective gas contact and prolonged mechanical durability.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V. (Morgantown, WV)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Coagulation chemistries for silica removal from cooling tower water.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of silica scale is a problem for thermoelectric power generating facilities, and this study investigated the potential for removal of silica by means of chemical coagulation from source water before it is subjected to mineral concentration in cooling towers. In Phase I, a screening of many typical as well as novel coagulants was carried out using concentrated cooling tower water, with and without flocculation aids, at concentrations typical for water purification with limited results. In Phase II, it was decided that treatment of source or make up water was more appropriate, and that higher dosing with coagulants delivered promising results. In fact, the less exotic coagulants proved to be more efficacious for reasons not yet fully determined. Some analysis was made of the molecular nature of the precipitated floc, which may aid in process improvements. In Phase III, more detailed study of process conditions for aluminum chloride coagulation was undertaken. Lime-soda water softening and the precipitation of magnesium hydroxide were shown to be too limited in terms of effectiveness, speed, and energy consumption to be considered further for the present application. In Phase IV, sodium aluminate emerged as an effective coagulant for silica, and the most attractive of those tested to date because of its availability, ease of use, and low requirement for additional chemicals. Some process optimization was performed for coagulant concentration and operational pH. It is concluded that silica coagulation with simple aluminum-based agents is effective, simple, and compatible with other industrial processes.

Nyman, May Devan; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Stewart, Tom

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project involved fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2} -separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams were examined in the project. Cu-cerium oxide was identified as the most promising high-temperature water-gas shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was optimized by proper selection of dopant type and amount in ceria. The formulation 10at%Cu-Ce(30at%La)O{sub x} showed the best performance, and was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The apparent activation energy, measured over aged catalysts, was equal to 70.2 kJ/mol. Reaction orders in CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were found to be 0.8, 0.2, -0.3, and -0.3, respectively. This shows that H{sub 2}O has very little effect on the reaction rate, and that both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} weakly inhibit the reaction. Good stability of catalyst performance was found in 40-hr long tests. A flat (38 cm{sup 2}) Pd-Cu alloy membrane reactor was used with the catalyst washcoated on oxidized aluminum screens close coupled with the membrane. To achieve higher loadings, catalyst granules were layered on the membrane itself to test the combined HTS activity/ H{sub 2} -separation efficiency of the composite. Simulated coal gas mixtures were used and the effect of membrane on the conversion of CO over the catalyst was evidenced at high space velocities. Equilibrium CO conversion at 400 C was measured at a space velocity of 30,000 h{sup -1} with the 10{micro}m- thick Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} membrane operating under a pressure differential of 100 psi. No carbon deposition took place during operation. The performance of the coupled Cu-ceria catalyst/membrane system at 400 C was stable in {approx} 30 h of continuous operation. The overall conclusion from this project is that Cu-doped ceria catalysts are suitable for use in high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactors. CO{sub 2}-rich operation does not affect the catalyst activity or stability; neither does it affect hydrogen permeation through the Pd-Cu membrane. Operation in the temperature range of 400-430 C is recommended.

Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Xiaomei Qi; Scott Kronewitter

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Formation of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Hydrogen Peroxide in Electron Irradiated Crystalline Water Ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water ice is abundant both astrophysically, for example in molecular clouds, and in planetary systems. The Kuiper belt objects, many satellites of the outer solar system, the nuclei of comets and some planetary rings are all known to be water-rich. Processing of water ice by energetic particles and ultraviolet photons plays an important role in astrochemistry. To explore the detailed nature of this processing, we have conducted a systematic laboratory study of the irradiation of crystalline water ice in an ultrahigh vacuum setup by energetic electrons holding a linear energy transfer of 4.3 +/- 0.1 keV mm-1. The irradiated samples were monitored during the experiment both on line and in situ via mass spectrometry (gas phase) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (solid state). We observed the production of hydrogen and oxygen, both molecular and atomic, and of hydrogen peroxide. The likely reaction mechanisms responsible for these species are discussed. Additional formation routes were derived from the sublimation profiles of molecular hydrogen (90-140 K), molecular oxygen (147 -151 K) and hydrogen peroxide (170 K). We also present evidence on the involvement of hydroxyl radicals and possibly oxygen atoms as building blocks to yield hydrogen peroxide at low temperatures (12 K) and via a diffusion-controlled mechanism in the warming up phase of the irradiated sample.

Weijun Zheng; David Jewitt; Ralf I. Kaiser

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hydrogen Generation through Static Feed Water Electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Systems’ Static Feed Water Electrolysis System (SFWES) concept, developed under NASA...2...) production. The SFWES concept uses (1) an alkaline electrolyte to minimize power requirements and materials compat...

F. C. Jensen; F. H. Schubert

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Application of Artificially Immobilized Microorganisms to Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Nitrate Removal from Drinking Water By Sean X. Liu andFor biological treatment of drinking water, several crucialalginate gel beads to drinking water treatment has proved to

Liu, Sean X; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

HYDROGEN ISOTOPE RECOVERY USING PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE ELECTROLYSIS OF WATER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A critical component of tritium glovebox operations is the recovery of high value tritium from the water vapor in the glove box atmosphere. One proposed method to improve existing tritium recovery systems is to replace the disposable hot magnesium beds used to separate the hydrogen and oxygen in water with continuous use Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzers (PEMEs). This study examines radiation exposure to the membrane of a PEME and examines the sizing difference that would be needed if the electrolyzer were operated with a cathode water vapor feed instead of an anode liquid water feed.

Fox, E; Scott Greenway, S; Amy Ekechukwu, A

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

79

Carbon dioxide hydrogenation to form methanol via a reverse-water-gas-shift reaction (the CAMERE process)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CAMERE process (carbon dioxide hydrogenation to form methanol via a reverse-water-gas-shift reaction) was developed and evaluated. The reverse-water-gas-shift reactor and the methanol synthesis reactor were serially aligned to form methanol from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. Carbon dioxide was converted to CO and water by the reverse-water-gas-shift reaction (RWReaction) to remove water before methanol was synthesized. With the elimination of water by RWReaction, the purge gas volume was minimized as the recycle gas volume decreased. Because of the minimum purge gas loss by the pretreatment of RWReactor, the overall methanol yield increased up to 89% from 69%. An active and stable catalyst with the composition of Cu/ZnO/ZrO{sub 2}/Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} (5:3:1:1) was developed. The system was optimized and compared with the commercial methanol synthesis processes from natural gas and coal.

Joo, O.S.; Jung, K.D.; Han, S.H.; Uhm, S.J. [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Catalysis Lab.] [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Catalysis Lab.; Moon, I. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Rozovskii, A.Y.; Lin, G.I. [A.V. Topchiev Inst. of Petrochemical Synthesis, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [A.V. Topchiev Inst. of Petrochemical Synthesis, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Effects of Woody Vegetation Removal on Soil Water Dynamics in a South Texas Shrubland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

removal on various soil textures we studied changes in soil water, rooting depth, and the role of water redistribution by woody vegetation. Woody vegetation was removed using common methods of cut-stump and roller chop across three soil types. Soil water...

Mattox, April Marie

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Removal of Emerging Contaminants in Water Treatment by Nanofiltration and Reverse Osmosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The general rules established in abundant studies on removal of conventional pollutants from waters by reverse osmosis and nanofiltration were reconsidered in this contribution...

Branko Kunst; Krešimir Košuti?

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Removal of sulphates from South African mine water using coal fly ash .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study evaluated SO4 2- removal from circumneutral mine water (CMW) collected from Middleburg coal mine using coal FA collected from Hendrina power station. The… (more)

Madzivire, Godfrey

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Current (2009) State-of-the-Art Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Water Electrolysis: Independent Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This independent review examines DOE cost targets for state-of-the art hydrogen production using water electrolysis.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Hydrogen Production by Noncatalytic Autothermal Reformation of Aviation Fuel Using Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production by Noncatalytic Autothermal Reformation of Aviation Fuel Using Supercritical Water ... Energy Fuels, 2009, 23 (12), ...

Jason W. Picou; Jonathan E. Wenzel; H. Brian Lanterman; Sunggyu Lee

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas, which method comprises: (a) contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate of the formula: ##STR1## wherein the water-soluble organic compound is selected from compounds of the formula: ##STR2## wherein: R is selected from hydrogen or an organic moiety having at least one polar functional group; Z is selected from oxygen, sulfur, or --N--A wherein N is nitrogen and A is hydrogen or lower alkyl having from one to four carbon atoms; and M is selected from hydrogen, sodium or potassium; and n is 1 or 2, in a contacting zone for a time and at a temperature effective to reduce the nitrogen monoxide. These mixtures are useful to provide an unexpensive method of removing NO from gases, thus reducing atmospheric pollution from flue gases.

Liu, David K. (San Pablo, CA); Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of their high rates of chemical consumption. Additionally, chemical scrubbers are ineffective for the removalACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH _______ ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT of biofilters for sequential removal of H2S and VOCs from wastewater treatment plant waste air. The biofilter

87

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5040: 2005 Hydrogen Cost from Water Electrolysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

40 Date: December 12, 2008 40 Date: December 12, 2008 Title: 2005 Hydrogen Cost from Water Electrolysis Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: December 19, 2008 Item: The 2005 cost status for hydrogen produced from distributed water electrolysis is $5.90 / gge. Assumptions and References: The H2A analysis used to determine the projected cost of $5.88/gge (rounded up to $5.90/gge) was performed by Directed Technologies, Inc. and can be found in Record 5040a. The increase in cost compared to the 2004 analysis ($5.45/gge) is due to two assumptions changed in the model: (a) an increase in the industrial electricity price from 5¢/kWh to 5.5¢/kWh from the EIA Annual Energy Outlook, and (b) an increase in the capital cost estimate of the electrolyzer. The other assumptions in the analysis used standard values

88

Oil removal for produced water treatment and micellar cleaning of ultrafiltration membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a research project that evaluated the treatment of brine generated in oil fields (produced water) with ultrafiltration membranes. The characteristics of various ultrafiltration membranes for oil and suspended solids removal from produced water were...

Beech, Scott Jay

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Hedgehog(tm) Water Contaminant Removal System - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

recirculating treatment system reduces the levels of contaminants in water storage tanks. A recirculation pump continually sends water though a treatment in order to reduce...

90

Hydrogen-on-Demand Using Metallic Alloy Nanoparticles in Water Kohei Shimamura,,,,,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy to regenerate metal fuel.1-3 One potential application of this technology is on-board hydrogenHydrogen-on-Demand Using Metallic Alloy Nanoparticles in Water Kohei Shimamura,,,�,, Fuyuki Shimojo Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Hydrogen production from water using Al particles could provide a renewable

Southern California, University of

91

Rapid hydrogen production from water using aluminum nanoclusters: A quantum molecular dynamics simulation study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rapid hydrogen production from water using aluminum nanoclusters: A quantum molecular dynamics Available online 31 December 2013 Keywords: Hydrogen production Water Aluminum nanoclusters Quantum molecular dynamics simulation It is hoped that a hydrogen-on-demand generator may one day start with just

Southern California, University of

92

Removal of water from a shallow bath under laser pulse irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental investigation was made of water removal from a shallow bath under the action of a CO{sub 2}-laser radiation pulse focused to a spot of size substantially smaller than the bath length. We showed that the specific expenditure of energy is determined by the intensity of laser radiation at the water surface for different values of the focal spot area and pulse duration. The removal dynamics was studied by single-frame photography technique. It was determined that the water is removed layerwise only from the walls of the cavern, which expands in the horizontal direction upon cessation of the radiation pulse. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were made of the water removal, and a mechanism was proposed to explain the experimentally observed removal pattern. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

Antonova, L I; Gladush, G G; Glova, A F; Drobyazko, S V; Krasyukov, A G; Mainashev, V S; Rerikh, V L; Taran, M D [State Research Center of Russian Federation 'Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research', Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Investigating the Use of Biosorbents to Remove Arsenic from Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,2,3 ?...........................................................................?36? Table?9?Arsenic?removal?and?its?adsorption?capacity?for?various?adsorbents?.....?37? ? ? ? ? 1? ? ? ? 1. INTRODUCTION 1 ? Arsenic?is?a?colorless?and?odorless?Group?V?element?discovered?in?1250?AD.? Arsenic?has?an?atomic?number?of?33?and?is?the?20...?present?an?oxidant?must?be?added?to?oxidize?As(III)? to?As(V)?and?form?anions?in?solutions?[27].? 1.5.5.?Adsorption?? Arsenic?removal?is?also?achieved?through?adsorption?on?commercial? adsorbents...

Erapalli, Shreyas

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Drinking Water: Sources, Fate and Removal C. Eschauzier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Drinking Water: Sources, Fate and Removal C. Eschauzier #12;Resumé thesis for the production of drinking water, if PFAAs are present in the groundwater they will most certainly pass through the treatment. More monitoring of groundwater abstraction areas is therefore recommended for the drinking water

van Rooij, Robert

95

Arsenic Removal Technologies and the Effect of Source Water Quality on Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arsenic removal technologies that are effective at the tens of ppb level include coagulation, followed by settling/microfiltration, ion exchange by mineral surfaces,and pressure-driven membrane processes (reverse osmosis, nanofiltration and ultrafiltration). This report describes the fundamental mechanisms of operation of the arsenic removal systems and addresses the critical issues of arsenic speciation, source water quality on the performance of the arsenic removal systems and costs associated with the different treatment technology categories.

KHANDAKER, NADIM R.; BRADY, PATRICK V.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Liquid-Water Uptake and Removal in PEM Fuel-Cell Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uptake and Removal in PEM Fuel-Cell Components Prodip K. DasWater management in PEM fuel cells is critical for optimumof droplet dynamics in PEM fuel-cell gas flow channels has

Das, Prodip K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Removal of inorganic anions from drinking water supplies by membrane bio/processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is designed to provide an overview of the main membrane-assisted processes that can be used for the removal of toxic inorganic anions from drinking water supplies. The emphasis has been placed on in...

Svetlozar Velizarov; João G. Crespo…

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Water treatment process and system for metals removal using Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and a system for removal of metals from ground water or from soil by bioreducing or bioaccumulating the metals using metal tolerant microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tolerant to the metals, able to bioreduce the metals to the less toxic state and to accumulate them. The process and the system is useful for removal or substantial reduction of levels of chromium, molybdenum, cobalt, zinc, nickel, calcium, strontium, mercury and copper in water.

Krauter, Paula A. W. (Livermore, CA); Krauter, Gordon W. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Removal of Hydrogen Sulfide from Landfill Gas Using a Solar Regenerable Adsorbent.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Landfill gas is a complex mix of gases, containing methane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and hydrogen sulfide, created by the action of microorganisms within the landfill.… (more)

Kalapala, Sreevani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Hydrogen production via carbon-assisted water electrolysis at room temperature.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of the work was to conduct carbon-assisted water electrolysis at room temperature with reduced energy costs for hydrogen production and to improve upon… (more)

Bollineni, Shilpa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path.

Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Removal of phenol and chlorophenols from water by new ozone generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Presence of phenol in river water occasionally disturbs the production of drinking water. Phenol often originated from coal power plants or pesticides. New ozone generator [Kuraica et al., Vacuum, 73 (2004) 705] was used for removal of phenol and chlorophenols from water. The ozone generator was based on coaxial dielectricbarrier-discharge and operated in the air at an atmospheric pressure. Flowing water was one of dielectric layers. Ozone and ozonized water were generated in the same volume of the discharge. This type of ozone generator has considerable advantages in comparison with the classical ones. In this paper five experiments were described, three with bidistilled water and two with different water samples from river Danube. In all cases, 5L of water containing 6mg/L of corresponding phenol was passed once through the ozonizer. The concentration of dissolved ozone in water was 7–40mg/L. The ozonization lasted 1 h, but the total contact time was up to 94 h. In all cases, before and after the treatment of water with ozone, the concentration of corresponding phenol [Standard Methods for Examination of Water and Wastewater, method 510 B, Chloroform Extraction Method, American Public Health Association, Washington, 1985, p. 558], dissolved and residual ozone [Standard Methods for Examination of Water and Wastewater, Methods 2-41, 2-42 (dissolved ozone) Iodometric Method; method 4-104 (ozone residual) Indigo Colorimetric Method, American Public Health Association, Washington, 1995] were determined by standard methods. In experiments with distilled water most of the phenol was removed during ozonization (89.5%). After 24 and 96 h the percentage of removed phenol increased to 93.3 and 98.9%, respectively. With 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol, 99.8 and 98.9% of corresponding phenols were removed. In experiments with two different water samples from Danube, the phenol was also mostly removed during ozonization, 76.7 and 80.0%, respectively.

D. Manojlovic; D.R. Ostojic; B.M. Obradovic; M.M. Kuraica; V.D. Krsmanovic; J. Puric

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Treatment and remediation methods for arsenic removal from the ground water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Globally, ground water is contaminating by arsenic continously, which needs economic treatment and remediation technologies. Physical, chemical and biological treatment methods have been developed, that include different kinds of filters, bucket type units, fill and draw, kalshi etc. The remediation methods discussed are air oxidation, reactive barriers, utilisation of deeper aquifers and sanitary protected dug wells. To the best of our knowledge no technology is available capable to remove arsenic from water at efficient, economic and commercial levels. Therefore, fast, efficient and economic arsenic removal technologies are required. Attempts have been made to suggest the future technologies of arsenic removal.

Imran Ali; Tabrez A. Khan; Iqbal Hussain

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of heavy metals from water using the process outlined above. U.S. Patent No.: 7,153,435 (DOE S-100,646) Patent Application Filing Date: July 22, 2003 Patent Issue Date: December 26...

105

Polymer system for gettering hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

Shepodd, Timothy Jon (330 Thrasher Ave., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Whinnery, LeRoy L. (4929 Julie St., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon-carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces. Organic polymers molecules containing carbon-carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble catalyst composition, comprising a hydrogenation catalyst and a catalyst support, preferably Pd supported on carbon, provide a hydrogen getter composition useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces even in the presence of contaminants such as common atmospheric gases, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ammonia, oil mists, and water. The hydrogen getter composition disclosed herein is particularly useful for removing hydrogen from enclosed spaces containing potentially explosive mixtures of hydrogen and oxygen.

Shepodd, Timothy Jon (Livermore, CA); Whinnery, LeRoy L. (Livermore, CA)

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

107

A Broad Spectrum Catalytic System for Removal of Toxic Organics from Water by Deep Oxidation - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A most pressing need for the DOE environmental management program is the removal of toxic organic compounds present in groundwater and soil at specific DOE sites. While several remediation procedures have been proposed, they suffer from one or more drawbacks. The objective of the present research was to develop new catalytic procedures for the removal of toxic organic compounds from the environment through their deep oxidation to harmless products. In water, metallic palladium was found to catalyze the deep oxidation of a wide variety of toxic organic compounds by dioxygen at 80-90 C in the presence of carbon monoxide or dihydrogen. Several classes of organic compounds were examined: benzene, phenol and substituted phenols, nitro and halo organics, organophosphorus, and organosulfur compounds. In every case, deep oxidation to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water occurred in high yields, resulting in up to several hundred turnovers over a 24 hour period. For substrates susceptible to hydrogenation, the conversions were generally high with dihydrogen than with carbon monoxide. It is clear from the results obtained that we have discovered an exceptionally versatile catalytic system for the deep oxidation of toxic organic compounds in water. This system possesses several attractive features not found simultaneously in other reported systems. These are (a) the ability to directly utilize dioxygen as the oxidant, (b) the ability to carry out the deep oxidation of a particularly wide range of functional organics, and (c) the ease of recovery of the catalyst by simple filtration.

Sen, Ayusman

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) has proven effective at removing high concentrations of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate--bottom ash from coal fired power plants--is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing an arsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Addy, Susan E.A.

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

109

Apparatus and method for simultaneous recovery of hydrogen from water and from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method for simultaneous recovery of hydrogen from water and from hydrocarbon feed material. The feed material is caused to flow over a heated catalyst which fosters the water-gas shift reaction (H.sub.2 O+COH.sub.2 +CO.sub.2) and the methane steam reforming reaction (CH.sub.4 +H.sub.2 O3 H.sub.2 +CO). Both of these reactions proceed only to partial completion. However, by use of a Pd/Ag membrane which is exclusively permeable to hydrogen isotopes in the vicinity of the above reactions and by maintaining a vacuum on the permeate side of the membrane, product hydrogen isotopes are removed and the reactions are caused to proceed further toward completion. A two-stage palladium membrane reactor was tested with a feed composition of 28% CQ.sub.4, 35% Q.sub.2 O (where Q=H, D, or T), and 31% Ar in 31 hours of continuous operation during which 4.5 g of tritium were processed. Decontamination factors were found to increase with decreasing inlet rate. The first stage was observed to have a decontamination factor of approximately 200, while the second stage had a decontamination factor of 2.9.times.10.sup.6. The overall decontamination factor was 5.8.times.10.sup.8. When a Pt/.alpha.-Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 catalyst is employed, decoking could be performed without catalyst degradation. However, by adjusting the carbon to oxygen ratio of the feed material with the addition of oxygen, coking could be altogether avoided.

Willms, R. Scott (Los Alamos, NM); Birdsell, Stephen A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Removal of ammonia from tarry water using a tubular furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An ammonia-processing system without the use of live steam from OAO Alchevskkoks plant's supply network is considered. Steam obtained from the wastewater that leaves the ammonia column is used to process the excess tarry water, with the release of volatile ammonia.

V.V. Grabko; V.A. Kofanova; V.M. Li; M.A. Solov'ev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Isotopic Effects of Hydrogen During the Decomposition of Water in Electrolysis with a Solid Polymer Electrolyte  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The partition coefficients of hydrogen isotopes in the decomposition of water in electrolyzers with a solid polymer electrolyte are measured in a wide range of deuterium content in the initial water (from the ...

O. M. Ivanchuk; V. G. Goryanina; M. B. Rozenkevich

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Effectiveness of AOC removal by advanced water treatment systems: a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, the appearance of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in the water treatment system and effluent of the treatment plant has brought more attention to the environmental engineers. In this study, AOC removal efficiency at the Cheng-Ching Lake water treatment plant (CCLWTP) was evaluated. The main objectives of this study were to: (1) evaluate the treatability of AOC by the advanced treatment system at the CCLWTP, (2) assess the relativity of AOC and the variations of other water quality indicators, (3) evaluate the effects of sodium thiosulfate on AOC analysis, and (4) evaluate the efficiency of biofiltration process using granular activated carbon (GAC) and anthracite as the fillers. Results show that the averaged influent and final effluent AOC concentrations at the CCLWTP were approximately 124 and 30 ?g acetate-C/L, respectively. Thus, the treatment plant had an AOC removal efficiency of about 76%, and the AOC concentrations in the final effluent met the criteria established by the CCLWTP (50 ?g acetate-C/L). Results indicate that the biofiltration process might contribute to the removal of the trace AOC in the GAC filtration process. Moreover, the removal of AOC had a correlation with the decrease in concentrations of other drinking water indicators. Results from a column test show that GAC was a more appropriate material than anthracite for the AOC removal. Results from this study provide us insight into the mechanisms of AOC removal by advanced water treatment processes. These findings would be helpful in designing a modified water treatment system for AOC removal and water quality improvement.

C.C. Chien; C.M. Kao; C.D. Dong; T.Y. Chen; J.Y. Chen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

114

Silica coated magnetite nanoparticles for removal of heavy metal ions from polluted waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic removal of Hg2+ and other heavy metal ions like Cd2+, Pb2+ etc. using silica coated magnetite particles from polluted waters is a current topic of active research to provide efficient water recycling and long term high quality water. The technique used to study the bonding characteristics of such kind of nanoparticles with the heavy metal ions is a very sensitive hyperfine specroscopy technique called the perturbed angular correlation technique (PAC).

Dash, Monika

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Removal of Sediment and Bacteria from Water Using Green Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This natural material not only displays water purification abilities, but it is also affordable, renewable and readily available. ... The bacteria were washed once in PBS using a mini vortexer and a cell pellet collected using a centripetal force of 2522 ×g for 5 min. ... Transition Electron Microscope (TEM) images were obtained using a Morgagni 268D TEM with Formvar/Carbon 150 Mesh Copper grids from Electron Microscopy Sciences (FCF150-Cu-50) and were used to study mucilage structure, kaolin particle size, and flocs observed in kaolin columns. ...

Audrey L. Buttice; Joyce M. Stroot; Daniel V. Lim; Peter G. Stroot; Norma A. Alcantar

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

116

Pilot scale test of a produced water-treatment system for initial removal of organic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot-scale test to remove polar and non-polar organics from produced water was performed at a disposal facility in Farmington NM. We used surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorbent beds and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) in combination to reduce the organic carbon content of produced water prior to reverse osmosis (RO). Reduction of total influent organic carbon (TOC) to 5 mg/L or less is desirable for efficient RO system operation. Most water disposed at the facility is from coal-bed gas production, with oil production waters intermixed. Up to 20 gal/d of produced water was cycled through two SMZ adsorbent units to remove volatile organic compounds (BTEX, acetone) and semivolatile organic compounds (e.g., napthalene). Output water from the SMZ units was sent to the MBR for removal of the organic acid component of TOC. Removal of inorganic (Mn and Fe oxide) particulates by the SMZ system was observed. The SMZ columns removed up to 40% of the influent TOC (600 mg/L). BTEX concentrations were reduced from the initial input of 70 mg/L to 5 mg/L by the SMZ and to an average of 2 mg/L after the MBR. Removal rates of acetate (input 120-170 mg/L) and TOC (input up to 45 mg/L) were up to 100% and 92%, respectively. The water pH rose from 8.5 to 8.8 following organic acid removal in the MBR; this relatively high pH was likely responsible for observed scaling of the MBR internal membrane. Additional laboratory studies showed the scaling can be reduced by metered addition of acid to reduce the pH. Significantly, organic removal in the MBR was accomplished with a very low biomass concentration of 1 g/L throughout the field trial. An earlier engineering evaluation shows produced water treatment by the SMZ/MBR/RO system would cost from $0.13 to $0.20 per bbl at up to 40 gpm. Current estimated disposal costs for produced water are $1.75 to $4.91 per bbl when transportation costs are included, with even higher rates in some regions. Our results suggest that treatment by an SMZ/MBR/RO system may be a feasible alternative to current methods for produced water treatment and disposal.

Sullivan, Enid J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwon, Soondong [UT-AUSTIN; Katz, Lynn [UT-AUSTIN; Kinney, Kerry [UT-AUSTIN

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Ultrafast conversions between hydrogen bonded structures in liquid water observed by femtosecond x-ray spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first femtosecond soft x-ray spectroscopy in liquids, enabling the observation of changes in hydrogen bond structures in water via core-hole excitation. The oxygen K-edge of vibrationally excited water is probed with femtosecond soft x-ray pulses, exploiting the relation between different water structures and distinct x-ray spectral features. After excitation of the intramolecular OH stretching vibration, characteristic x-ray absorption changes monitor the conversion of strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures to more disordered structures with weaker hydrogen-bonding described by a single subpicosecond time constant. The latter describes the thermalization time of vibrational excitations and defines the characteristic maximum rate with which nonequilibrium populations of more strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures convert to less-bonded ones. On short time scales, the relaxation of vibrational excitations leads to a transient high-pressure state and a transient absorption spectrum different from that of statically heated water.

Wen, Haidan; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of molecular hydrogen dissolved in water at pressures up to 200 MPa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the Raman Q-branch of hydrogen in a solution with water at a temperature of about 280 K and at pressures from 20 to 200 MPa. From a least-mean-square fitting analysis of the broad Raman Q-branch, we isolated the contributions from the four lowest individual roto-vibrational lines. The vibrational lines were narrower than the pure rotational Raman lines of hydrogen dissolved in water measured previously, but significantly larger than in the gas. The separations between these lines were found to be significantly smaller than in gaseous hydrogen and their widths were slightly increasing with pressure. The lines were narrowing with increasing rotational quantum number. The Raman frequencies of all roto-vibrational lines were approaching the values of gas phase hydrogen with increasing pressure. Additionally, from the comparison of the integrated intensity signal of Q-branch of hydrogen to the integrated Raman signal of the water bending mode, we have obtained the concentration of hydrogen in a solution with water along the 280 K isotherm. Hydrogen solubility increases slowly with pressure, and no deviation from a smooth behaviour was observed, even reaching thermodynamic conditions very close to the transition to the stable hydrogen hydrate. The analysis of the relative hydrogen concentration in solution on the basis of a simple thermodynamic model has allowed us to obtain the molar volume for the hydrogen gas/water solution. Interestingly, the volume relative to one hydrogen molecule in solution does not decrease with pressure and, at high pressure, is larger than the volume pertinent to one molecule of water. This is in favour of the theory of hydrophobic solvation, for which a larger and more stable structure of the water molecules is expected around a solute molecule.

Borysow, Jacek, E-mail: jborysow@mtu.edu; Rosso, Leonardo del; Celli, Milva; Ulivi, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.ulivi@isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Via Madonna del piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)] [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Via Madonna del piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Moraldi, Massimo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

119

Hydrogen Ingress in Steels During High-Temperature Oxidation in Water Vapor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well established that hydrogen derived from water vapour can penetrate oxidizing alloys with detrimental effect. However, the complexities of tracking hydrogen in these materials have prevented the direct profiling of hydrogen ingress needed to understand these phenomena. Here we report hydrogen profiles in industrially-relevant alumina- and chromia- forming steels correlated with the local oxide-metal nano/microstructure by use of SIMS D2O tracer studies and experimental protocols to optimize D retention. The D profiles unexpectedly varied markedly among the alloys examined, which indicates mechanistic complexity but also the potential to mitigate detrimental water vapour effects by manipulation of alloy chemistry.

Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Fayek, Mostafa [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Depletion of heavy isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in tissue water of intertidal plants: implications for water economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf and thallus water of the intertidal seagrasses Phyllospadix scouleri and P. torreyi and the marine algae Egregia menziesii, Gelidium coulteri, and Corallina vanco...

L. W. Cooper; M. J. DeNiro

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Improvements and optimisation of water electrolysis for hydrogen production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??[Truncated abstract] Hydrogen as an important energy carrier has wide applications and great potentials. With ever increasing energy costs and concerns with climate change associated… (more)

Zeng, Kai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Removal of bisphenol A (BPA) from water by various nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The removal of an endocrine disrupting compound, bisphenol A (BPA), from model solutions by selected nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes was studied. The commercially available membranes NF 90, NF 270, XLE BWRO, BW 30 (Dow FilmTech), CE BWRO and AD SWRO (GE Osmonics) were used to compare their performances for BPA removal. The water permeability coefficients, rejection of BPA and permeate flux values were calculated for all membranes used. No significant changes in their BPA removal were observed for all tight polyamide based NF and RO membranes tested except for loose NF 270 membrane. The polyamide based membranes exhibited much better performance than cellulose acetate membrane for BPA removal. Almost a complete rejection (?98%) for BPA was obtained with three polyamide based RO membranes (BW 30, XLE BWRO and AD SWRO). But cellulose acetate based CE BWRO membrane offered a low and variable (10–40%) rejection for BPA.

Suna Yüksel; Nalan Kabay; Mithat Yüksel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hydrogen from Water in a Novel Recombinant Cyanobacterial System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photobiological processes are attractive routes to renewable H2 production. With the input of solar energy, photosynthetic microbes such as cyanobacteria and green algae carry out oxygenic photosynthesis, using sunlight energy to extract protons and high energy electrons from water. These protons and high energy electrons can be fed to a hydrogenase system yielding H2. However, most hydrogen-evolving hydrogenases are inhibited by O2, which is an inherent byproduct of oxygenic photosynthesis. The rate of H2 production is thus limited. Certain photosynthetic bacteria are reported to have an O2-tolerant evolving hydrogenase, yet these microbes do not split water, and require other more expensive feedstocks. To overcome these difficulties, the goal of this work has been to construct novel microbial hybrids by genetically transferring O2-tolerant hydrogenases from other bacteria into a class of photosynthetic bacteria called cyanobacteria. These hybrid organisms will use the photosynthetic machinery of the cyanobacterial hosts to perform the water-oxidation reaction with the input of solar energy, and couple the resulting protons and high energy electrons to the O2-tolerant bacterial hydrogenase, all within the same microbe (Fig. 1). The ultimate goal of this work has been to overcome the sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme to O2 and address one of the key technological hurdles to cost-effective photobiological H2 production which currently limits the production of hydrogen in algal systems. In pursuit of this goal, work on this project has successfully completed many subtasks leading to a greatly increased understanding of the complicated [NiFe]-hydrogenase enzymes. At the beginning of this project, [NiFe] hydrogenases had never been successfully moved across wide species barriers and had never been heterologously expressed in cyanobacteria. Furthermore, the idea that whole, functional genes could be extracted from complicated, mixed-sequence meta-genomes was not established. In the course of this work, we identified a new hydrogenase from environmental DNA sequence and successfully expressed it in a variety of hosts including cyanobacteria. This was one of the first examples of these complicated enzymes being moved across vastly different bacterial species and is the first example of a hydrogenase being “brought to life” from no other information than a DNA sequence from metagenomic data. The hydrogenase we identified had the molecular signature of other O2-tolerant hydrogenases, and we discovered that the resulting enzyme had exceptionally high oxygen- and thermo-tolerance. The new enzyme retained 80% of its activity after incubation at 80° C for 2 hours and retained 20% activity in 1% O2. We performed detailed analysis on the maturation genes required for construction of a functional enzyme of this class of hydrogenase, and found that seven additional maturation genes were required for minimal activity and a total of nine genes besides the hydrogenase were required for optimal maturation efficiency. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the maturation genes are functional on closely-related hydrogenase enzymes such as those from Alteromonas macleodii and Thiocapsa roseopersicina. Finally, we have extensively modified the hydrogenase to engineer new traits including higher H2 production and better interaction with electron donors. For example, combining two strategies increased hydrogenase activity in cyanobacteria by at least 20-fold over our initial expression level. The activity of this combined strain is almost twice that of the native hydrogenase activity in S. elongatus. This work validates the idea that these enzymes are broadly tolerant to modifications that may help integrate them into a successful photobiological H2 production system. While we did not achieve our ultimate goal of integrating the functional hydrogenase with the cyanobacterial photosynthetic apparatus, the work on this project has led to significant advances in the understanding of these complicated enzymes. This work will greatly benefit future

Weyman, Philip D [J. Craig Venter Institute; Smith, Hamillton O.

2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

124

The ultra-high lime with aluminum process for removing chloride from recirculating cooling water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, reverse osmosis, ion exchange, and electrodialysis (Matson and Harris 1979). With the exception of the high lime softening process, these technologies 3 are very expensive and have many operating problems. The unit price of water treatment... with reverse osmosis is about three times the price of lime softening (You et al. 1999). The conventional lime soda process is used in cooling water systems to minimize or eliminate scale formation by removing calcium and magnesium hardness...

Abdel-wahab, Ahmed Ibraheem Ali

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Reverse osmosis for removing synthetic organics from drinking water: a cost and performance evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reverse osmosis for removing organic compounds from drinking water has considerable promise. Bench and pilot plant studies on actual waters have shown that several organics proposed for regulation can be removed by reverse osmosis. As membrane technology improves, rejection of more difficult to remove compounds is expected to improve. Also, smaller volumes of concentrate are expected to be produced that can be handled more cost-effectively. One major concern with the use of reverse osmosis is concentrate disposal, which may increase the overall cost of treatment and disposal. The cost of reverse osmosis is very sensitive to such factors as recovery, economies of scale, systems configuration, membrane type, and electric power cost. In certain situations, reverse osmosis is a viable treatment option that is not cost-prohibitive.

Lykins, B.W.; Clark, R.M.; Fronk, C.A.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Removing Radium-226 Contamination From Ion Exchange Resins Used in Drinking Water Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removing Radium-226 Contamination From Ion Exchange Resins Used in Drinking Water Treatment P r o b of groundwater containing high levels of radium-226 activity (Objective 1) were regenerated with prescribed brine that the concentration of salt in the brine cleaning solution was the most influential factor in the resin regeneration

127

DOE NSF Partnership to Address Critical Challenges in Hydrogen Production from Solar Water Splitting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

EERE and the National Science Foundation (NSF) announce a funding opportunity in the area of renewable hydrogen technology research and development, specifically addressing discovery and development of advanced materials systems and chemical proceesses for direct photochemical and/or thermochemical water splitting for application in the solar production of hydrogen fuel.

128

Removal of hydrogen sulphide on sewage sludge/industrial sludge based carbonaceous adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The adsorbents were prepared for sewage sludge, waste oil sludge and metal oil sludge. On the materials obtained dynamic adsorption of H2S was measured. The initial and exhausted adsorbents were characterised using sorption of nitrogen, thermal analysis, and XRF, XRD and surface pH measurements. The adsorbents have high capacity for H2S (10% wt) The high volume of mesopores contributes significantly to reactive adsorption and provides space to store sulphur as the oxidation product. The highly dispersed mineral-like phase formed during pyrolysis provides basicity and catalytic centres for hydrogen sulphide dissociation and its oxidation to sulphur.

Teresa J. Bandosz

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Removal of hydrogen sulfide as ammonium sulfate from hydropyrolysis product vapors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system and method for processing biomass into hydrocarbon fuels that includes processing a biomass in a hydropyrolysis reactor resulting in hydrocarbon fuels and a process vapor stream and cooling the process vapor stream to a condensation temperature resulting in an aqueous stream. The aqueous stream is sent to a catalytic reactor where it is oxidized to obtain a product stream containing ammonia and ammonium sulfate. A resulting cooled product vapor stream includes non-condensable process vapors comprising H.sub.2, CH.sub.4, CO, CO.sub.2, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide.

Marker, Terry L; Felix, Larry G; Linck, Martin B; Roberts, Michael J

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

130

Hydrogen production from the reaction of solvated electrons with benzene in water-ammonia mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Product analysis data for the reaction of the ammoniated electron with benzene-water mixtures in liquid ammonia show that the dominant product is evolved hydrogen and not 1,4-cyclohexadiene.

Dewald, R.R.; Jones, S.R.; Schwartz, B.S.

1980-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

131

Collective Hydrogen Bond Reorganization in Water Studied with Temperature-Dependent Ultrafast Infrared Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use temperature-dependent ultrafast infrared spectroscopy of dilute HOD in H2O to study the picosecond reorganization of the hydrogen bond network of liquid water. Temperature-dependent two-dimensional infrared (2D IR), ...

Nicodemus, Rebecca A.

132

Hydrogen Bond Rearrangements in Water Probed with Temperature-Dependent 2D IR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use temperature-dependent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) of dilute HOD in H2O to investigate hydrogen bond rearrangements in water. The OD stretching frequency is sensitive to its environment, and loss ...

Nicodemus, Rebecca A.

133

Water Dynamics in Nafion Fuel Cell Membranes: The Effects of Confinement and Structural Changes on the Hydrogen Bond Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions energy source is hydrogen. Hydrogen powered vehicles using polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells and hydrophilic aggregates.1-4 Hydrogen fuel cells operate through the oxidation of hydrogen gas at the anodeWater Dynamics in Nafion Fuel Cell Membranes: The Effects of Confinement and Structural Changes

Fayer, Michael D.

134

Hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen energy is a clean or inexhaustible energy like renewable energy and nuclear energy. Today’s energy supply has a considerable impact on the environment. Hydrogen energy is a promising alternative solut...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Hydrogen Bonds, Water Rotation and Proton Mobility Liaisons Hydrog`ene, Rotation de l'eau et Mobilit'e du  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Bonds, Water Rotation and Proton Mobility Liaisons Hydrog`ene, Rotation de l'eau et H 3 O + est presque immo­ bilis'e par des liaisons hydrog`ene extrâ??emement fortes. Ces derni liaisons hydrog`ene de l'eau pure. Dans l'eau en dessous de 20 0 C, la rotation des mol'ecules est plus

Agmon, Noam

136

Quaternised biomass as anion exchanger for the removal of fluoride from water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dried Chinese Reed, a fast growing plant, was used as a model biomass for the development of anion exchangers using a quaternisation agent, N-(3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl) trimethylammonium chloride (CHMAC), for the removal of fluoride from water. Parameters investigated in the adsorption studies include F? concentration, agitation time, adsorbent dose and pH. Equilibrium adsorption data followed both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Presence of chloride, nitrate and sulfate decreased the adsorption significantly. Quaternised Hanf sativa and coconut coir pith (solid waste from coconut coir fibre industry) were also tested for the removal of fluoride with and without cross linking.

C. Namasivayam; W.H. Hoell

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Solar-Powered Production of Molecular Hydrogen from Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the present time, the majority of industrial-scale hydrogen is produced by steam?methane reformation (SMR), even though the high-temperature conversion of methane to hydrogen results in the concomitant production of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. ... 7-9 The PV arrays are used to convert solar light to electricity in order to power alkaline (e.g., 27% KOH at pH 14.7) electrolyzers for producing hydrogen gas. ... Narayanan et al. describe a DC-powered hybrid system that drives a methanol fuel cell in reverse,10 while Soler et al. report on a solar-powered photo-Fenton process that produces hydrogen noncatalytically under severe conditions with a limited number of organic substrates. ...

Hyunwoong Park; Chad D. Vecitis; Wonyong Choi; Oleh Weres; Michael R. Hoffmann

2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

138

Mpemba paradox: Hydrogen bond memory and water-skin supersolidity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical reproduction of measurements, experimental evidence for skin super-solidity and hydrogen-bond memory clarified that Mpemba paradox integrates the heat emission-conduction-dissipation dynamics in the source-path-drain cycle system.

Chang Q Sun

2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

139

Methods for producing hydrogen (BI) sulfide and/or removing metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a process wherein sulfide production by bacteria is efficiently turned on and off, using pH adjustment. The adjustment of pH impacts sulfide production by bacteria by altering the relative amounts of H.sub.2 S and HS-- in solution and thereby control the inhibition of the bacterial metabolism that produces sulfide. This process can be used to make a bioreactor produce sulfide "on-demand" so that the production of sulfide can be matched to its use as a metal precipitation reagent. The present invention is of significance because it enables the use of a biological reactor, a cost effective sulfide production system, by making the biological reactor produce hydrogen sulfide "on demand", and therefore responsive to production schedules, waste stream generation rate, and health and safety requirements/goals.

Truex, Michael J [Richland, WA; Peyton, Brent M [Pullman, WA; Toth, James J [Kennewick, WA

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

140

Photolytic removal of \\{DBPs\\} by medium pressure UV in swimming pool water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Medium pressure UV is used for controlling the concentration of combined chlorine (chloramines) in many public swimming pools. Little is known about the fate of other disinfection by-products (DBPs) in UV treatment. Photolysis by medium pressure UV treatment was investigated for 12 \\{DBPs\\} reported to be found in swimming pool water: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, bromoform, dichloroacetonitrile, bromochloroacetonitrile, dibromoacetronitrile, trichloroacetonitrile, trichloronitromethane, dichloropropanone, trichloropropanone, and chloral hydrate. First order photolysis constants ranged 26-fold from 0.020 min? 1 for chloroform to 0.523 min? 1 for trichloronitromethane. The rate constants generally increased with bromine substitution. Using the UV removal of combined chlorine as an actinometer, the rate constants were recalculated to actual treatment doses of UV applied in a swimming pool. In an investigated public pool the UV dose was equivalent to an applied electrical energy of 1.34 kWh m? 3 d? 1 and the UV dose required to removed 90% of trichloronitromethane was 0.4 kWh m? 3 d? 1, while 2.6 kWh m? 3 d? 1 was required for chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes ranged from 0.6 to 3.1 kWh m? 3 d? 1. It was predicted thus that a beneficial side-effect of applying UV for removing combined chlorine from the pool water could be a significant removal of trichloronitromethane, chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes.

Kamilla M.S. Hansen; Raissa Zortea; Aurelia Piketty; Sergio Rodriguez Vega; Henrik Rasmus Andersen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Aluminum hydroxide and hydrogen produced by water electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic and kinetic peculiarities of the water electrolysis in a reactor with aluminum electrodes are...

R. R. Salem

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Bibliography of work on the photocatalytic removal of hazardous compounds from water and air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a bibliography of information in the open literature on work that has been done to date on the photocatalytic oxidation of compounds, principally organic compounds. The goal of the listing is removing hazardous oompounds from water or air. It contains lists of substances and literature citations. The bibliography includes information obtained through the middle of 1993 and some selected references for the balance of that year.

Blake, D.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Removal of radionuclides in drinking water by membrane treatment using ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis and electrodialysis reversal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pilot plant had been built to test the behaviour of ultrafiltration (UF), reverse osmosis (RO), and electrodialysis reversal (EDR) in order to improve the quality of the water supplied to Barcelona metropolitan area from the Llobregat River. This paper presents results from two studies to reduce natural radioactivity. The results from the pilot plant with four different scenarios were used to design the full-scale treatment plant built (SJD WTP). The samples taken at different steps of the treatment were analysed to determine gross alpha, gross beta and uranium activity. The results obtained revealed a significant improvement in the radiological water quality provided by both membrane techniques (RO and EDR showed removal rates higher than 60%). However, UF did not show any significant removal capacity for gross alpha, gross beta or uranium activities. RO was better at reducing the radiological parameters studied and this treatment was selected and applied at the full scale treatment plant. The RO treatment used at the SJD WTP reduced the concentration of both gross alpha and gross beta activities and also produced water of high quality with an average removal of 95% for gross alpha activity and almost 93% for gross beta activity at the treatment plant.

M. Montaña; A. Camacho; I. Serrano; R. Devesa; L. Matia; I. Vallés

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Electrolysis of Water and Recombination of Oxygen and Hydrogen Lecture-Demonstration Equipment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrolysis of water takes place in an ordinary Hoffman type apparatus. Hydrogen and oxygen are collected in an explosion chamber where the mixture is detonated using a high-voltage spark coil. The whole equipment operates under the water contained in a large tank.

V. Acosta; D. L. Nordling; K. V. Freed; C. L. Cowan

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Water Use for Power Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Use for Power Production Water Use for Power Production Project Summary Full Title: Consumptive Water Use for U.S. Power Production Project ID: 205 Principal Investigator: Paul Torcellini Keywords: Water, energy use, electricity generation Purpose Estimate the water consumption at power plants to provide a metric for determining water efficiency in building cooling systems. Performer Principal Investigator: Paul Torcellini Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Telephone: 303-384-7528 Email: paul_torcellini@nrel.gov Additional Performers: R. Judkoff, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; N. Long, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Period of Performance End: December 2003 Project Description Type of Project: Analysis

146

High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Solar Thermochemical Splitting of Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to identify economically feasible concepts for the production of hydrogen from water using solar energy. The ultimate project objective was to select one or more competitive concepts for pilot-scale demonstration using concentrated solar energy. Results of pilot scale plant performance would be used as foundation for seeking public and private resources for full-scale plant development and testing. Economical success in this venture would afford the public with a renewable and limitless source of energy carrier for use in electric power load-leveling and as a carbon-free transportation fuel. The Solar Hydrogen Generation Research (SHGR) project embraces technologies relevant to hydrogen research under the Office of Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology (HFCIT) as well as concentrated solar power under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Although the photoelectrochemical work is aligned with HFCIT, some of the technologies in this effort are also consistent with the skills and technologies found in concentrated solar power and photovoltaic technology under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Hydrogen production by thermo-chemical water-splitting is a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or a combination of heat and electrolysis instead of pure electrolysis and meets the goals for hydrogen production using only water and renewable solar energy as feed-stocks. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production also meets these goals by implementing photo-electrolysis at the surface of a semiconductor in contact with an electrolyte with bias provided by a photovoltaic source. Here, water splitting is a photo-electrolytic process in which hydrogen is produced using only solar photons and water as feed-stocks. The thermochemical hydrogen task engendered formal collaborations among two universities, three national laboratories and two private sector entities. The photoelectrochemical hydrogen task included formal collaborations with three universities and one national laboratory. The formal participants in these two tasks are listed above. Informal collaborations in both projects included one additional university (the University of Nevada, Reno) and two additional national laboratories (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory).

Heske, Clemens; Moujaes, Samir; Weimer, Alan; Wong, Bunsen; Siegal, Nathan; McFarland, Eric; Miller, Eric; Lewis, Michele; Bingham, Carl; Roth, Kurth; Sabacky, Bruce; Steinfeld, Aldo

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

147

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Water Implications of Biofuels Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Implications of Biofuels Production Water Implications of Biofuels Production Project Summary Full Title: Water Implications of Biofuels Production in the United States Project ID: 227 Principal Investigator: William S. Logan Brief Description: The National Research Council conducted a workshop and wrote a report examining the potential effects of biofuels production in the U.S. on water and related land resources. Purpose Examine the possible effects of biofuel development on water and related land resources. The central questions are how water use and water quality are expected to change as the U.S. agricultural portfolio shifts to include more energy crops and as overall agricultural production potentially increases. Such questions are considered within the context of U.S. policy and also the expected advances in technology and agricultural practices

148

Removal of oil from water using polyurethane foam modified with nanoclay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract To enhance the removal of oil contaminants from water, polyurethane foam structure was modified by integrating cloisite 20A nanoclay into it. Pure and modified polyurethane foams (nanocomposite adsorbents) were then characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy tests. Optimum weight fraction of the added cloisite 20A to the foam structure was 3 wt%, improving the sorption capacity up to 16% and oil removal efficiency up to 56% in water–oil system. The reusability feature of blank polyurethane and nanocomposites with 3 wt% and 4 wt% of cloisite 20A nanoclay was studied through chemical regeneration by toluene and petroleum ether. In the case of structurally modified polyurethane foams with nanoclay (nanocomposites), chemical regeneration reduced the oil removal efficiency, but improved the adsorption capacity in the range of low to medium oil initial concentration and reduced it in high oil initial concentrations. A comparison between the obtained adsorption data and adsorption isotherm models, including Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich–Peterson, showed a good agreement with Langmuir and Redlich–Peterson models.

Amir Ahmad Nikkhah; Hamid Zilouei; Ahmad Asadinezhad; Alireza Keshavarz

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Process for removal of ammonia and acid gases from contaminated waters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Contaminating basic gases, i.e., ammonia and acid gases, e.g., carbon dioxide, are removed from process waters or waste waters in a combined extraction and stripping process. Ammonia in the form of ammonium ion is extracted by an immiscible organic phase comprising a liquid cation exchange component, especially an organic phosphoric acid derivative, and preferably di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid, dissolved in an alkyl hydrocarbon, aryl hydrocarbon, higher alcohol, oxygenated hydrocarbon, halogenated hydrocarbon, and mixtures thereof. Concurrently, the acidic gaseous contaminants are stripped from the process or waste waters by stripping with stream, air, nitrogen, or the like. The liquid cation exchange component has the ammonia stripped therefrom by heating, and the component may be recycled to extract additional amounts of ammonia.

King, C.J.; Mackenzie, P.D.

1982-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

150

Process for removal of ammonia and acid gases from contaminated waters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Contaminating basic gases, i.e., ammonia, and acid gases, e.g., carbon dioxide, are removed from process waters or waste waters in a combined extraction and stripping process. Ammonia in the form of ammonium ion is extracted by an immiscible organic phase comprising a liquid cation exchange component, especially an organic phosphoric acid derivative, and preferably di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid, dissolved in an alkyl hydrocarbon, aryl hydrocarbon, higher alcohol, oxygenated hydrocarbon, halogenated hydrocarbon, and mixtures thereof. Concurrently, the acidic gaseous contaminants are stripped from the process or waste waters by stripping with steam, air, nitrogen, or the like. The liquid cation exchange component has the ammonia stripped therefrom by heating, and the component may be recycled to extract additional amounts of ammonia.

King, C. Judson (Kensington, CA); MacKenzie, Patricia D. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Experimental Study of Solar Hydrogen Production Performance by Water Electrolysis in the South of Algeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current environment problems require the uses of clean process and durable sources in industrial activities. Hydrogen, produced by water electrolysis, represents high clean energy source. In this process, a high electrical energy rate is needed which led to costly product. In order to remedy this issue, the uses of renewable energies are required. In this work, an experimental study of solar hydrogen production system by alkaline water electrolysis in Ouargla (Algeria) city is presented. The alkaline water electrolysis, with different NaOH concentrations, is feed by photovoltaic panels. The system is tested at different input conditions of voltages and currents. Effects of temperature and NaOH electrolyte concentration on hydrogen production are examined

N. Chennouf; N. Settou; B. Negrou; K. Bouziane; B. Dokkar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Liquid-Water Uptake and Removal in PEM Fuel-Cell Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management of liquid water is critical for optimal fuel-cell operation, especially at low temperatures. It is therefore important to understand the wetting properties and water holdup of the various fuel-cell layers. While the gas-diffusion layer is relatively hydrophobic and exhibits a strong intermediate wettability, the catalyst layer is predominantly hydrophilic. In addition, the water content of the ionomer in the catalyst layer is lower than that of the bulk membrane, and is affected by platinum surfaces. Liquid-water removal occurs through droplets on the surface of the gas-diffusion layer. In order to predict droplet instability and detachment, a force balance is used. While the pressure or drag force on the droplet can be derived, the adhesion or surface-tension force requires measurement using a sliding-angle approach. It is shown that droplets produced by forcing water through the gas-diffusion layer rather than placing them on top of it show much stronger adhesion forces owing to the contact to the subsurface water.

Das, Prodip K.; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Kwong, Anthony; Weber, Adam Z.

2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

153

CdSe-MoS2: A Quantum Size-Confined Photocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution from Water under Visible Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and for the conversion of carbon dioxides into methanol and hydrocarbons. Metal chalcogenides1­9 are promisingCdSe-MoS2: A Quantum Size-Confined Photocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution from Water under Visible driven pathway to hydrogen. Hydrogen is not only an environmentally benign fuel for the generation

Osterloh, Frank

154

The combined system for fuel supply of fuel cells on the basis of the aluminum-water hydrogen generator and the metal hybride hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The system for fuel supply of a hydrogen-air fuel cell on the basis of the aluminum-water hydrogen generator and hydride-forming alloy as an intermediate gas storage has been developed. For a series of...4.5 ? x ...

I. V. Yanilkin; Ye. I. Shkol’nikov; S. N. Klyamkin; M. S. Vlaskin…

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen: A Study of Issues Related to the Use of Aluminum for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage. Version 2, 2010.  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Produced in 2008 by DOE and updated in 2010, this report focuses on the key issues as well as advantages and disadvantages associated with using the reaction between aluminum metal and water for on-board vehicular hydrogen storage.

156

Hydrogen Generation by Solid Polymer Electrolyte Water Electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The General Electric Company -water electrolysis technology, which is based on a solid ... The inherent system advantages of the acid SPE electrolysis technology are explained. System performance predictions are....

L. J. Nuttall; A. P. Fickett; W. A. Titterington

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Allophane nanoclay for the removal of phosphorus in water and wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have assessed the capacity of an allophane nanoclay to take up phosphorus (P) from aqueous solutions and meatwork effluent. The data of adsorption in aqueous solutions were fitted to the Freundlich equation: q (g/kg)=5.620C(mg/L)0.264. The nanoclay effectively removed P from a wide range of concentrations at high solution/nanoclay ratios. This finding together with the low cost and environmentally friendly nature of allophane make this material a superior candidate for the remediation of eutrophic water and the treatment of P-rich effluent and sewage. An added advantage is that allophane does not disperse in water, and hence can be recovered after use.

Guodong Yuan; Longhua Wu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Governing factors for motor oil removal from water with different sorption materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper has been focused on the sorbent efficiency for motor oil removal from water. Two types of sorbents were investigated: organic and inorganic. Natural wool fibers (NWFs) and recycled-wool-based nonwoven material (RWNM)) were tested as organic type of sorbents. Sepiolite, bentonite and zeolite have been chosen as representative inorganic sorbents. Sorption was carried out in batch sorption system. Efficiency of oil removal was determined by measuring the oil concentration before and after the sorption process. Extractive-gravimetric method and refractive index determination have been applied as analytical methods for determination of oil concentration in water. Governing factors for sorbent efficiency were proposed, analysed and compared. It was concluded that sorption process is mostly affected by mass of sorbent, sorption time, temperature and pH value of water. NWFs, which were the most efficient sorbent showed maximal efficiency and maximal sorption capacity: 0.1 g of \\{NWFs\\} after 10 min at 20 °C and pH 8.00 sorbed 3.3 g of motor oil from 300 mL of water polluted with 4.5 g of motor oil. Maximal efficiency for all sorbents investigated was reached after 30 min of sorption processes, it was 95.0% for NWF, 43.0% for NRWM, 20.7% for sepiolite, 19.6% for bentonite and 21.2% for zeolite. Physical adsorption onto all sorbents is a favorable process (sorption efficiency decrease with increasing temperature) while sorption onto bentonite and zeolite is a result of both physical adsorption and chemisorption (sorption efficiency increase with increasing temperature, up to 80 °C).

V. Rajakovi?-Ognjanovi?; G. Aleksi?; Lj. Rajakovi?

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Use of once-through treat gas to remove the heat of reaction in solvent hydrogenation processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a coal liquefaction process wherein feed coal is contacted with molecular hydrogen and a hydrogen-donor solvent in a liquefaction zone to form coal liquids and vapors and coal liquids in the solvent boiling range are thereafter hydrogenated to produce recycle solvent and liquid products, the improvement which comprises separating the effluent from the liquefaction zone into a hot vapor stream and a liquid stream; cooling the entire hot vapor stream sufficiently to condense vaporized liquid hydrocarbons; separating condensed liquid hydrocarbons from the cooled vapor; fractionating the liquid stream to produce coal liquids in the solvent boiling range; dividing the cooled vapor into at least two streams; passing the cooling vapors from one of the streams, the coal liquids in the solvent boiling range, and makeup hydrogen to a solvent hydrogenation zone, catalytically hydrogenating the coal liquids in the solvent boiling range and quenching the hydrogenation zone with cooled vapors from the other cooled vapor stream.

Nizamoff, Alan J. (Convent Station, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Hydrogen production from inexhaustible supplies of fresh and salt water using microbial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen production from inexhaustible supplies of fresh and salt water using microbial reverse-electrodialysis, containing exoelectrogenic bacteria, and a cathode, forming a microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis overpotential, while the reverse electrodialysis stack contributed 0.5­0.6 V at a salinity ratio (seawater

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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161

Hydrogen Evolution at Activated Nisx-Cathodes in Water Electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NiSx-coated nickel cathodes are used for commercial water electrolysis in concentrated KOH solutions. Such electrodes have ... to 5 mol% during 16 days of electrolysis and to about 0.7 mol% after...1.00–1.03. The...

B. Børresen; A. Bjørgum; G. Hagen; R. Tunold…

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Watching Hydrogen Bonds Break: A Transient Absorption Study of Water Tobias Steinel, John B. Asbury, Junrong Zheng, and M. D. Fayer*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Watching Hydrogen Bonds Break: A Transient Absorption Study of Water Tobias Steinel, John B. Asbury of picoseconds, observe hydrogen bond breaking and monitor the equilibration of the hydrogen bond network in water. In addition, the vibrational lifetime, the time constant for hydrogen bond breaking, and the rate

Fayer, Michael D.

163

Removal of a liquid paraffin film from a water surface by short pulses from a CO{sub 2} laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of removal of a liquid paraffin film from a water surface irradiated by 40 - 270-{mu}s pulses from a CO{sub 2} laser is studied experimentally and theoretically. It is found for the first time that the mass of removed paraffin can exceed that of paraffin located in the region irradiated by the laser pulse. A theoretical model is proposed which explains the results obtained. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Antonova, L I; Drobyazko, S V; Evdokimov, I A; Krasyukov, A G; Likhanskii, V V; Loboiko, A I; Senatorov, Yu M [State Research Center of Russian Federation 'Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research', Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

164

Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

Lata

1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

165

Solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual bed photosystem. Task 2 report; Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is an investigation into the use of photocatalytic particles in a dual bed configuration, so as to effect the solar-driven decomposition of water to its constituent elements, particularly hydrogen. The system envisioned would consist of two modules, each consisting of a shallow, flat, sealed container, in which micron-sized photocatalytic particles are immobilized. An aqueous solution containing a redox mediator is pumped between the two chambers. Different photoparticles and catalysts are chosen for their respective modules so as to effect oxidative water-splitting in one vessel to evolve oxygen gas, and reductive water-splitting in the other to evolve hydrogen. This is a direct photoconversion scheme that breaks down the energetic requirement for water decomposition into a 2-photon process, and enables separate production of hydrogen and oxygen. Titanium dioxide, TiO{sub 2}, and indium phosphide, InP, were employed as photoparticles in the O{sub 2}- and H{sub 2}-evolving beds, respectively. Platinum catalysts were evaluated to prompt H{sub 2}-evolution. Calculations on the energy band structure of free and immobilized particles provided guidance as to how the microstructure of the particles should be configured. A series of redox mediators, spanning a range of redox potentials, were tested. While many electron donors facilitated H{sub 2}-evolution, only the most oxidizing ones enabled O{sub 2}-evolution. A single redox couple, capable of charge exchange in both modules, is desirable to avoid system design complexity.

Linkous, C.A.; McKaige, G.T.; Slattery, D.K.; Ouellette, A.J.A.; Austin, B.C.N.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

[Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 9, Removal action system design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Effect of water vapor/hydrogen environments on niobium, B-66 niobium alloy, tantalum, and Ta-10W alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the results of an experimental investigation of the effect of water vapor/hydrogen environments on the mechanical properties of niobium, B-66 niobium alloy, tantalum, and Ta-10W alloy are presented. Tensile tests were conducted on specimens of these materials in water vapor/hydrogen mixture ratios of 1 and 3. The water vapor/hydrogen environment caused strength reductions on tantalum and Ta-10W and ductility reductions on all four materials. The degree and causes of embrittlement were a complex function of temperature.

Walter, R.J.; Bentle, G.G.; Chandler, W.T. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.)

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Analysis and removal of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) from treated drinking water using a biological activated carbon filter system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study is focused on reducing the concentration of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in treated drinking water. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of AOC removal by biological activated carbon filters (BACF) in a pilot-scale system. The results show that BACF reduces the total concentration of AOC. The concentration of AOC primarily indicates microorganism growth in a water supply network, and the amount of AOC in water is significantly reduced after BACF treatment. The predicted and measured values of AOC in output water treated by the BACF system show linear relationships, and their correlation coefficients are high. An AOC empirical equation was established by determining the relationship between water quality parameters such as total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, UV254, ammonia nitrogen, and total phosphorous. These findings may be relevant to conventional water treatment plants or to water distribution systems to provide treated drinking water with a high level of biological stability.

Jie-Chung Lou; Chih-Yuan Yang; Che-Jung Chang; Wei-Hsiang Chen; Wei-Bin Tseng; Jia-Yun Han

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

To build a photoelectrochemical (PEC) system that produces hydrogen fuel directly from water using sunlight as the energy source.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 SS H2 O2 metaloxide GoalGoal To build a photoelectrochemical (PEC) system that produces hydrogen fuel directly from water using sunlight as the energy source. Approach: development of a multi provides voltage assist using lower-energy photons catalyst surface optimized for hydrogen evolution UH

170

Temperature and water vapor pressure effects on the friction coefficient of hydrogenated diamondlike carbon films.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microtribological measurements of a hydrogenated diamondlike carbon film in controlled gaseous environments show that water vapor plays a significant role in the friction coefficient. These experiments reveal an initial high friction transient behavior that does not reoccur even after extended periods of exposure to low partial pressures of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. Experiments varying both water vapor pressure and sample temperature show trends of a decreasing friction coefficient as a function of both the decreasing water vapor pressure and the increasing substrate temperature. Theses trends are examined with regard to first order gas-surface interactions. Model fits give activation energies on the order of 40 kJ/mol, which is consistent with water vapor desorption.

Dickrell, P. L.; Sawyer, W. G.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Florida

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Hydrogen bond rearrangements and the motion of charge defects in water viewed using multidimensional ultrafast infrared spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compared with other molecular liquids, water is highly structured due to its ability to form up to four hydrogen bonds to its nearest neighbors, resulting in a tetrahedral network of molecules. However, this network is ...

Roberts, Sean T. (Sean Thomas)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Hydrogen isotopic fractionation factor between brucite and water in the temperature range from 100° to 510° C  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrogen isotopic fractionation factor between brucite and water has been determined in the temperature range of 100°–510° C. Brucite is always depleted in deuterium relative to...3In?=8.72×106 ...

Hiroshi Satake; Sadao Matsuo

173

Effect of hydrogen bridge geometry on the vibrational spectra of water: Three-parameter potential of H bond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ability of water molecules to form a three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds basically determines both the intrinsic structure and unique properties of this liquid and also a character of interactions wit...

Yu. Ya. Efimov

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A novel method of hydrogen generation by water electrolysis using an ultra-short-pulse power supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel method of hydrogen generation by water electrolysis using ultra-short-pulse power supply is ... pulse with the width of 300 ns, electrolysis takes place with a mechanism dominated by ... from the conventi...

Naohiro Shimizu; Souzaburo Hotta; Takayuki Sekiya…

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench water from a slagging, fixed-bed coal-gasification pilot plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is part of an effort to assess the efficiency of activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot-plant quench waters. A sample of raw-gas quench water was obtained from the Grand Forks Energy and Technology Center's pilot plant, which employs the slagging, fixed-bed gasification process. The quench water generated in the processing of Indian Head lignite was pretreated to reduce ammonia and alkalinity, and then diluted and subjected to long-term biological treatment, followed by detailed characterization and analysis of organic constituents. The pretreated (influent) and treated (effluent) samples were extracted using a methylene chloride, pH-fractionation method to obtain acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Over 99% of the total extractable and chromatographable organic material in the influent acid fraction was composed of phenol and alkylated phenols. Biological treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Major components of the influent base fraction were alkylated pyridines, anilines, aminopyrroles, imidazoles and/or pyrazoles, diazines, and quinolines. Removal efficiency of these compounds ranged between 90 and 100%. The influent neutral fraction was composed mainly of cycloalkanes, cycloalkenes, naphthalene, indole, acetophenone, and benzonitrile. Alkylated benzenes were generally absent. Removal efficiencies of these compounds were generally very good, except for certain alkylated cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes. Results are compared with those of a similar study on HYGAS coal-gasification quench water.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Partially Sulfated Lime-Fly Ash Sorbents Activated by Water or Steam for SO2 Removal at a Medium Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Partially Sulfated Lime-Fly Ash Sorbents Activated by Water or Steam for SO2 Removal at a Medium Temperature ... The low utilization of calcium-based sorbent is caused by the formation of calcium sulfite or sulfate, which have larger molar volumes than CaO or Ca(OH)2. ... ignition?loss ...

Liming Shi; Xuchang Xu

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

177

Hydordesulfurization of dibenzothiophene using hydrogen generated in situ by the water-gas shift reaction in a trickle bed reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDRODESULFURIZATION OF DIBENZOTHIOPHENE USING HYDROGEN GENERATED IN SITU BY THE WATER ? GAS SHIFT REACTION IN A TRICKLE BED REACTOR A Thesis BRUCE DAVID HOOK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1984 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering HYDRODESULFURIZATION OF DIBENZOTHIOPHENE USING HYDROGEN GENERATED IN SITU BY THE WATER ? GAS SHIFT REACTION IN A TRICKLE BED REACTOR A Thesis by BRUCE...

Hook, Bruce David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

178

Metal-and hydrogen-bonding competition during water absorption on Pd(111) and Ru(0001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial stages of water adsorption on the Pd(111) and Ru(0001) surfaces have been investigated experimentally by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy in the temperature range between 40 K and 130 K, and theoretically with Density Functional Theory (DFT) total energy calculations and STM image simulations. Below 125 K water dissociation does not occur at any appreciable rate and only molecular films are formed. Film growth starts by the formation of flat hexamer clusters where the molecules bind to the metal substrate through the O-lone pair while making H-bonds with neighboring molecules. As coverage increases, larger networks of linked hexagons are formed with a honeycomb structure, which requires a fraction of the water molecules to have their molecular plane perpendicular to the metal surface with reduced water-metal interaction. Energy minimization favors the growth of networks with limited width. As additional water molecules adsorb on the surface they attach to the periphery of existing islands, where they interact only weakly with the metal substrate. These molecules hop along the periphery of the clusters at intermediate temperatures. At higher temperatures they bind to the metal to continue the honeycomb growth. The water-Ru interaction is significantly stronger than the water-Pd interaction, which is consistent with the greater degree of hydrogen-bonded network formation and reduced water-metal bonding observed on Pd relative to Ru.

Tatarkhanov, Mouslim; Ogletree, D. Frank; Rose, Franck; Mitsui, Toshiyuki; Fomin, Evgeny; Rose, Mark; Cerda, Jorge I.; Salmeron, Miquel

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

179

Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen generation by no more than a factor of three while disodium phosphate increased the corrosion and hydrogen generation rates slightly. U(VI) showed some promise in attenuating hydrogen but only initial testing was completed. Uranium metal corrosion rates also were measured. Under many conditions showing high hydrogen gas attenuation, uranium metal continued to corrode at rates approaching those observed without additives. This combination of high hydrogen attenuation with relatively unabated uranium metal corrosion is significant as it provides a means to eliminate uranium metal by its corrosion in water without the accompanying hazards otherwise presented by hydrogen generation.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

180

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Arsenic-Free, Safe Drinking Water in Bangladesh. ” Worldburden from arsenic in drinking water in Bangladesh. ”Remediation of Bangladesh Drinking Water using Iron-oxide

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench waters from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies were initiated to assess the efficiency of bench-scale, activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from coal-gasification process effluents. Samples of pilot-plant, raw-gas quench waters were obtained from the HYGAS process of the Institute of Gas Technology and from the slagging, fixed-bed (SFB) process of the Grand Forks Energy Technology Center. The types of coal employed were Bituminous Illinois No. 6 for the HYGAS and Indian Head lignite for the SFB process. These pilot-plant quench waters, while not strictly representative of commercial condensates, were considered useful to evaluate the efficiency of biological oxidation for the removal of organics. Biological-reactor influent and effluent samples were extracted using a methylene chloride pH-fractionation method into acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry. Influent acid fractions of both HYGAS and SFB condensates showed that nearly 99% of extractable and chromatographable organic material comprised phenol and alkylated phenols. Activated-sludge treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Removal efficiency of base-fraction organics was generally good, except for certain alkylated pyridines. Removal of neutral-fraction organics was also good, except for certain alkylated benzenes, certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and certain cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes, especially at low influent concentrations.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Evolution of Water Reservoirs on Mars: Constraints from Hydrogen Isotopes in Martian Meteorites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Martian surface morphology implies that Mars was once warm enough to maintain persistent liquid water on its surface. While the high D/H ratios (~6 times the Earth's ocean water) of the current martian atmosphere suggest that significant water has been lost from the surface during martian history, the timing, processes, and the amount of the water loss have been poorly constrained. Recent technical developments of ion-microprobe analysis of martian meteorites have provided accurate estimation of hydrogen isotope compositions (D/H) of martian water reservoirs at the time when the meteorites formed. Based on the D/H data from the meteorites, this study demonstrates that the water loss during the pre-Noachian (>41-99 m global equivalent layers, GEL) was more significant than in the rest of martian history (>10-53 m GEL). Combining our results with geological and geomorphological evidence for ancient oceans, we propose that undetected subsurface water/ice (~100-1000 m GEL) should have existed, and it exceeds the ...

Kurokawa, Hiroyuki; Ushioda, Masashi; Matsuyama, Takeshi; Moriwaki, Ryota; Dohm, James M; Usui, Tomohiro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Pilot Scale Water Gas Shift - Membrane Device for Hydrogen from Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the project were to build pilot scale hydrogen separation systems for use in a gasification product stream. This device would demonstrate fabrication and manufacturing techniques for producing commercially ready facilities. The design was a 2 lb/day hydrogen device which included composite hydrogen separation membranes, a water gas shift monolith catalyst, and stainless steel structural components. Synkera Technologies was to prepare hydrogen separation membranes with metallic rims, and to adjust the alloy composition in their membranes to a palladium-gold composition which is sulfur resistant. Chart was to confirm their brazing technology for bonding the metallic rims of the composite membranes to their structural components and design and build the 2 lbs/day device incorporating membranes and catalysts. WRI prepared the catalysts and completed the testing of the membranes and devices on coal derived syngas. The reactor incorporated eighteen 2'' by 7'' composite palladium alloy membranes. These membranes were assembled with three stacks of three paired membranes. Initial vacuum testing and visual inspection indicated that some membranes were cracked, either in transportation or in testing. During replacement of the failed membranes, while pulling a vacuum on the back side of the membranes, folds were formed in the flexible composite membranes. In some instances these folds led to cracks, primarily at the interface between the alumina and the aluminum rim. The design of the 2 lb/day device was compromised by the lack of any membrane isolation. A leak in any membrane failed the entire device. A large number of tests were undertaken to bring the full 2 lb per day hydrogen capacity on line, but no single test lasted more than 48 hours. Subsequent tests to replace the mechanical seals with brazing have been promising, but the technology remains promising but not proven.

Barton, Tom

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Salt diffusion in interstitial waters and halite removal from sediments: Examples from the Red Sea and Illinois basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large thicknesses of bedded halite can be removed in subsiding sedimentary basins by verticla diffusion of dissolved salt in interstitial waters over geologic time scales. Calculations show that at least 10 m to 40 m of halite may have dissolved and diffused through the Red Sea sediments overlying the salt beds, since cessation of salt deposition approximatley 5.3 million years ago. The total amount of salt diffused out of the sediment column over geologic time is five to twenty times the amount of salt that currently exists in the porewater column. If upward flow in the past occurred at even small rates, 10{sup {minus}3} m/yr, the amount of halite removed could have been ten times as great, 500 m. Unlike the Red Sea Basin, no halite beds are known in the Illinois Basin in spite of the fact that interstitial waters with as much as 200{per thousand} TDS (approximately 220 g/L) occur. Calculations show that if a halite bed had been deposited at the base of the Illinois Basin in Cambrian time, it would have been completely removed from the stratigraphic record had it initially been less than 60 m to 130 m in thickness. A significant thickness of halite deposited in sedimentary basins may thus be removed during active burial of salt beds, and before exhumation and exposure of the salt beds to shallow meteoric waters.

Ranganathan, V. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Analysis of removal alternatives for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at the Savannah River Site. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This engineering study evaluates different alternatives for decontamination and decommissioning of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR). Cooled and moderated with pressurized heavy water, this uranium-fueled nuclear reactor was designed to test fuel assemblies for heavy water power reactors. It was operated for this purpose from march of 1962 until December of 1964. Four alternatives studied in detail include: (1) dismantlement, in which all radioactive and hazardous contaminants would be removed, the containment dome dismantled and the property restored to a condition similar to its original preconstruction state; (2) partial dismantlement and interim safe storage, where radioactive equipment except for the reactor vessel and steam generators would be removed, along with hazardous materials, and the building sealed with remote monitoring equipment in place to permit limited inspections at five-year intervals; (3) conversion for beneficial reuse, in which most radioactive equipment and hazardous materials would be removed and the containment building converted to another use such as a storage facility for radioactive materials, and (4) entombment, which involves removing hazardous materials, filling the below-ground structure with concrete, removing the containment dome and pouring a concrete cap on the tomb. Also considered was safe storage, but this approach, which has, in effect, been followed for the past 30 years, did not warrant detailed evaluation. The four other alternatives were evaluate, taking into account factors such as potential effects on the environment, risks, effectiveness, ease of implementation and cost. The preferred alternative was determined to be dismantlement. This approach is recommended because it ranks highest in the comparative analysis, would serve as the best prototype for the site reactor decommissioning program and would be most compatible with site property reuse plans for the future.

Owen, M.B.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Impacts of Beach Wrack Removal via Grooming on Surf Zone Water Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) are used to assess the microbial water quality of recreational waters. Increasingly, nonfecal sources of FIB have been implicated as causes of poor microbial water quality in the coastal environment. These sources are ...

Todd L. Russell; Lauren M. Sassoubre; Christina Zhou; Darien French-Owen; Abdulrahman Hassaballah; Alexandria B. Boehm

2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

187

Oil removal for produced water treatment and micellar cleaning of ultrafiltration membranes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Produced water is a major waste produced from oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source… (more)

Beech, Scott Jay

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

New Techniques to Characterize and Remove Water-Based Drilling Fluids Filter Cake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filter cake characterization is very important in drilling and completion operations. Heterogeneity of the filter cake plays a key role in the design of chemical treatments needed to remove the filter cake. The objectives of this study...

Elkatatny, Salaheldin Mahmoud

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

189

Modification of Polymer Flocculants for the Removal of Soluble Contaminants from Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contaminants in aqueous environments exist in phases that are sorbed to suspended or colloidal material and that are dissolved in solution. Polymer flocculants can be used to remove suspended or colloidal material along with sorbed contaminants...

Goebel, Timothy Steven O'Gara

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

190

Hydrogen Energy Technology Geoff Dutton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) Pyrolysis Water electrolysis Reversible fuel cell Hydrogen Hydrogen-fuelled internal combustion engines Hydrogen-fuelled turbines Fuel cells Hydrogen systems Overall expensive. Intermediate paths, employing hydrogen derived from fossil fuel sources, are already used

Watson, Andrew

191

Efficient, sustainable production of molecular hydrogen -a promising alternative to batteries in terms of energy storage -is still an unsolved problem. Implementation of direct water splitting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in terms of energy storage - is still an unsolved problem. Implementation of direct water splitting usingEfficient, sustainable production of molecular hydrogen - a promising alternative to batteries

KuÂ?el, Petr

192

X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of GaP{1-x}N(x) Photocorroded as a Result of Hydrogen Production through Water Electrolysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of GaP{1-x}N(x) Photocorroded as a Result of Hydrogen Production through Water Electrolysis

Mayer, Marie A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Removal of Radionuclides from Waste Water at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant: Desalination and Adsorption Methods - 13126  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste water containing high levels of radionuclides due to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, has been treated by the adsorption removal and reverse-osmosis (RO) desalination to allow water re-use for cooling the reactors. Radionuclides in the waste water are collected in the adsorbent medium and the RO concentrate (RO brine) in the water treatment system currently operated at the Fukushima Daiichi site. In this paper, we have studied the behavior of radionuclides in the presently applied RO desalination system and the removal of radionuclides in possible additional adsorption systems for the Fukushima Daiichi waste water treatment. Regarding the RO desalination system, decontamination factors (DFs) of the elements present in the waste water were obtained by lab-scale testing using an RO unit and simulated waste water with non-radioactive elements. The results of the lab-scale testing using representative elements showed that the DF for each element depended on its hydrated ionic radius: the larger the hydrated ionic radius of the element, the higher its DF is. Thus, the DF of each element in the waste water could be estimated based on its hydrated ionic radius. For the adsorption system to remove radionuclides more effectively, we studied adsorption behavior of typical elements, such as radioactive cesium and strontium, by various kinds of adsorbents using batch and column testing. We used batch testing to measure distribution coefficients (K{sub d}s) for cesium and strontium onto adsorbents under different brine concentrations that simulated waste water conditions at the Fukushima Daiichi site. For cesium adsorbents, K{sub d}s with different dependency on the brine concentration were observed based on the mechanism of cesium adsorption. As for strontium, K{sub d}s decreased as the brine concentration increased for any adsorbents which adsorbed strontium by intercalation and by ion exchange. The adsorbent titanium oxide had higher K{sub d}s and it was used for the column testing to obtain breakthrough curves under various conditions of pH and brine concentration. The breakthrough point had a dependency on pH and the brine concentration. We found that when the pH was higher or the brine concentration was lower, the longer it took to reach the breakthrough point. The inhibition of strontium adsorption by alkali earth metals would be diminished for conditions of higher pH and lower brine concentration. (authors)

Kani, Yuko; Kamosida, Mamoru; Watanabe, Daisuke [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 319-1221 (Japan)] [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 319-1221 (Japan); Asano, Takashi; Tamata, Shin [Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan)] [Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A review on sources, toxicity and remediation technologies for removing arsenic from drinking water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Arsenic is a natural element found in the environment in organic and inorganic forms. The inorganic form is much more toxic and is found in ground water, surface water and many foods. This form is responsible ...

Ankita Basu; Debabrata Saha; Rumpa Saha; Tuhin Ghosh…

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Inorganic Nitrogen Removal from Wastewater: Effect on Phytoplankton Growth in Coastal Marine Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...secondarily treated wastewater and controlling eutrophication...PRODUCTION FROM SEA BY RECYCLING HUMAN WASTES, BIOSCIENCE...nitrogen removal from wastewater: effect on phytoplankton...depending on the type of wastewater used, there may be...re-moval and waste recycling. JOEL C. GOLDMAN...

Joel C. Goldman; Kenneth R. Tenore; Helen I. Stanley

1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Using of produced water associated with oil and gas production as a source of hydrogen: solar electrolysis cell application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract In frame of the growing global concerns regarding to the high extent of environmental pollution and its serious consequences on the future of the planet. The seek out for a proper source of clean energy is considered to be a top priority. Where a substantial reduction in a present reliance on fossil fuels is achieved. This objective can not be factual without intensive efforts to find out the appropriate alternative, which are the sustainable and environmentally friendly energy alternatives. The use of hydrogen as an alternative fuel is gaining more and more acceptance as the environmental impact of hydrocarbons becomes more evident. The using of enormous amount of a polluted produced water associated oil and gas production activities to generate the hydrogen by solar hydrolysis cell, is considered to be a multi advantages alternative, where the volume of polluted and environmentally risky water been reduced and a significant volume of hydrogen been gained. This work is an attempt to design of a hydrogen generating station by water electrolysis whose energy resources are solar. The electricity supply is done by photovoltaic cells. The novelty of this work is the using of produced water to generate a clean energy (hydrogen), and in the same time reducing the threats caused by the disposal pits of the vast volume of the produced water at oilfields, which is the biggest challenge to the oil industry and the environment. In this work, the produced water has been electrolyzed by using solar energy. Standard chemical analyses methods have followed to determine the pollutants constitutes in this water. A pilot plant of

Maher A. R; Sadiq Al-baghdadi; Hashim R. Abdolhamid B; Omar A. Mkhatresh B

197

Water vapour and hydrogen in the terrestrial-planet-forming region of a protoplanetary disk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planetary systems, ours included, are formed in disks of dust and gas around young stars. Disks are an integral part of the star and planet formation process, and knowledge of the distribution and temperature of inner disk material is crucial for understanding terrestrial planet formation, giant planet migration, and accretion onto the central star. While the inner regions of protoplanetary disks in nearby star forming regions subtend only a few nano-radians, near-IR interferometry has recently enabled the spatial resolution of these terrestrial zones. Most observations have probed only dust, which typically dominates the near-IR emission. Here I report spectrally dispersed near-IR interferometric observations that probe gas (which dominates the mass and dynamics of the inner disk), in addition to dust, within one astronomical unit of the young star MWC 480. I resolve gas, including water vapor and atomic hydrogen, interior to the edge of the dust disk; this contrasts with results of previous spectrally dispersed interferometry observations. Interactions of this accreting gas with migrating planets may lead to short-period exoplanets like those detected around main-sequence stars. The observed water vapor is likely produced by the sublimation of migrating icy bodies, and provides a potential reservoir of water for terrestrial planets.

J. A. Eisner

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

198

Pt loaded carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report development and characterization of platinum doped carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas. The carbon aerogel with uniformly dispersed platinum nanoparticles was prepared by adding platinum precursor during the sol-gel process. Thereafter colloidal PTFE was mixed with the platinum doped carbon aerogel powder and coated on Dixon rings to obtain hydrophobic catalyst with required mechanical strength. Detailed studies have been carried out to observe the effect of physical characteristics of the catalyst powder (surface area and pore size of aerogels Pt cluster size and its valence state etc) and the different coating parameters (PTFE to Pt-CA ratio and Pt loading on Dixon ring) on volume transfer rate (Ky.a) for H/D reaction. Ky.a values of ?0.8 m3 (STP).s?1. m?3 were obtained for Pt loading of 7% and Pt cluster size of 3 nm at atmospheric pressure.

P. K. Gupta

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. ” In Arsenic Contaminationarsenic from drinking water: Coal ash coated with ferricwater per day. However, the coal ash required to treat that

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from reject water of municipal wastewater treatment plant.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Reject water, the liquid fraction produced after dewatering of anaerobically digested activated sludge on a municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP), contains from 750 to 1500… (more)

Guo, Chenghong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supply, flood control, hydropower, and recreation. However,as changes induced by hydropower, flood control, or waterFERC requires private hydropower dams to provide “equal

Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Application of electrochemical technology for removing petroleum hydrocarbons from produced water using lead dioxide and boron-doped diamond electrodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Although diverse methods exist for treating polluted water, the most promising and innovating technology is the electrochemical remediation process. This paper presents the anodic oxidation of real produced water (PW), generated by the petroleum exploration of the Petrobras plant-Tunisia. Experiments were conducted at different current densities (30, 50 and 100 mA cm?2) using the lead dioxide supported on tantalum (Ta/PbO2) and boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes in an electrolytic batch cell. The electrolytic process was monitored by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the residual total petroleum hydrocarbon [TPH] in order to know the feasibility of electrochemical treatment. The characterization and quantification of petroleum wastewater components were performed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The COD removal was approximately 85% and 96% using PbO2 and BDD reached after 11 and 7 h, respectively. Compared with PbO2, the BDD anode showed a better performance to remove petroleum hydrocarbons compounds from produced water. It provided a higher oxidation rate and it consumed lower energy. However, the energy consumption and process time make useless anodic oxidation for the complete elimination of pollutants from PW. Cytotoxicity has shown that electrochemical oxidation using BDD could be efficiently used to reduce more than 90% of hydrocarbons compounds. All results suggest that electrochemical oxidation could be an effective approach to treat highly concentrated organic pollutants present in the industrial petrochemical wastewater and significantly reduce the cost and time of treatment.

Boutheina Gargouri; Olfa Dridi Gargouri; Bochra Gargouri; Souhel Kallel Trabelsi; Ridha Abdelhedi; Mohamed Bouaziz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Experimental investigation of the effects of water electrolysis parameters on the amount of hydrogen damage in Pb(Zr,Ti)O3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water electrolysis technique has been used in this work...3 (PZT), and the effects of water electrolysis parameters on the amount of hydrogen damage ... investigations show that increasing the current density dur...

A. Shafiei; A. Alfantazi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Ab initio Equation of State data for hydrogen, helium, and water and the internal structure of Jupiter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The equation of state of hydrogen, helium, and water effects interior structure models of giant planets significantly. We present a new equation of state data table, LM-REOS, generated by large scale quantum molecular dynamics simulations for hydrogen, helium, and water in the warm dense matter regime, i.e.for megabar pressures and temperatures of several thousand Kelvin, and by advanced chemical methods in the complementary regions. The influence of LM-REOS on the structure of Jupiter is investigated and compared with state-of-the-art results within a standard three-layer model consistent with astrophysical observations of Jupiter. Our new Jupiter models predict an important impact of mixing effects of helium in hydrogen with respect to an altered compressibility and immiscibility.

N. Nettelmann; B. Holst; A. Kietzmann; M. French; R. Redmer; D. Blaschke

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

205

Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in surface water and ground water at selected sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relative stable isotopic ratios for hydrogen and oxygen compared to standard mean ocean water are presented for water from 4 surface-water sites and 38 ground-water sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The surface-water samples were collected monthly from March 1991 through April 1992 and after a storm event on June 18, 1992. The ground-water samples either were collected during 1991 or 1992. These data were collected as part of the US Geological Survey`s continuing hydrogeological investigations at the INEL. The relative isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen are reported as delta {sup 2}H ({delta}{sup 2}H) and as delta {sup 18}O ({delta}{sup 18}O), respectively. The values of {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O in water from the four surface-water sites ranged from -143.0 to -122 and from -18.75 to -15.55, respectively. The values of {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O in water from the 38 ground-water sites ranged from -141.0 to -120.0 and from -18.55 to -14.95, respectively.

Ott, D.S.; Cecil, L.D.; Knobel, L.L.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Polymer formulations for gettering hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel method for preparing a hydrogenation composition comprising organic polymer molecules having carbon--carbon double bonds, for removing hydrogen from the atmosphere within enclosed spaces and particularly from atmospheres within enclosed spaces that contain air, water vapor, oxygen, carbon dioxide or ammonia. The organic polymers molecules containing carbon--carbon double bonds throughout their structures, preferably polybutadiene, polyisoprene and derivatives thereof, intimately mixed with an insoluble noble metal catalyst composition. High molecular weight polymers may be added to the organic polymer/catalyst mixture in order to improve their high temperature performance. The hydrogenation composition is prepared by dispersing the polymers in a suitable solvent, forming thereby a solution suspension, flash-freezing droplets of the solution in a liquid cryogen, freeze-drying the frozen droplets to remove frozen solvent incorporated in the droplets, and recovering the dried powder thus formed.

Shepodd, Timothy J. (330 Thrasher Ave., Livermore, CA 94550); Even, Jr., William R. (4254 Drake Way, Livermore, CA 94550)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Analysis of hydrocarbon removal methods for the management of oilfield brines and produced waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and globally, the petroleum industries challenge has been to develop a high-tech and cost effective method to purify the large volumes of oilfield brines and produced water. Currently, most of the produced water requires several pre- and post- treatment methods...

Furrow, Brendan Eugene

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Evaluation of Selective Ion Exchange Resins for Removal of Mercury from the H-Area Water Treatment Unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigated the ability of seven ion exchange (IX) resins, some of which were mercury specific, to remove mercury in H-Area WTU waters from three sources (Reverse Osmosis (RO) Feed, RO Permeate from Train A, and a mercury ''hot spot'' extraction well HEX 18). Seven ion exchange resins, including ResinTech CG8 and Dowex 21K (the cation and anion exchange resins currently used at the H-Area WTU) were screened against five alternative ion exchange materials plus an experimental blank. Mercury decontamination factors (DFs), mercury breakthrough, and post-test contaminant concentrations of IX resins were determined for each IX material tested.

Serkiz, S.M.

2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

209

Membrane contactor assisted water extraction system for separating hydrogen peroxide from a working solution, and method thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a membrane contactor assisted extraction system and method for extracting a single phase species from multi-phase working solutions. More specifically one preferred embodiment of the invention relates to a method and system for membrane contactor assisted water (MCAWE) extraction of hydrogen peroxide (H.sub.2O.sub.2) from a working solution.

Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL); Lin, Yupo J. (Naperville, IL); Hestekin' Jamie A. (Fayetteville, AR); Henry, Michael P. (Batavia, IL); Pujado, Peter (Kildeer, IL); Oroskar, Anil (Oak Brook, IL); Kulprathipanja, Santi (Inverness, IL); Randhava, Sarabjit (Evanston, IL)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

210

Continuous sulfur removal process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A continuous process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream using a membrane comprising a metal oxide deposited on a porous support is disclosed. 4 figures.

Jalan, V.; Ryu, J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

211

Sunlight-Driven Hydrogen Formation by Membrane-Supported Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the significant advances in the development of the polymer-supported photoelectrochemical water-splitting system that was proposed under DOE grant number DE-FG02-05ER15754. We developed Si microwire-array photoelectrodes, demonstrated control over the material and light-absorption properties of the microwire-array photoelectrodes, developed inexpensive processes for synthesizing the arrays, and doped the arrays p-type for use as photocathodes. We also developed techniques for depositing metal-nanoparticle catalysts of the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) on the wire arrays, investigated the stability and catalytic performance of the nanoparticles, and demonstrated that Ni-Mo alloys are promising earth-abundant catalysts of the HER. We also developed methods that allow reuse of the single-crystalline Si substrates used for microwire growth and methods of embedding the microwire photocathodes in plastic to enable large-scale processing and deployment of the technology. Furthermore we developed techniques for controlling the structure of WO3 films, and demonstrated that structural control can improve the quantum yield of photoanodes. Thus, by the conclusion of this project, we demonstrated significant advances in the development of all components of a sunlight-driven membrane-supported photoelectrochemical water-splitting system. This final report provides descriptions of some of the scientific accomplishments that were achieved under the support of this project and also provides references to the peer-reviewed publications that resulted from this effort.

Lewis, Nathan S. [California Institute of Technology] [California Institute of Technology

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

212

Decoupled catalytic hydrogen evolution from a molecular metal oxide redox mediator in water splitting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...electacta.2007.11.027 37 Gahleitner G. , Hydrogen from renewable electricity: An international review of power-to-gas pilot plants for stationary applications . Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 38 , 2039 – 2061 ( 2013 ). 10.1016/j.ijhydene...

Benjamin Rausch; Mark D. Symes; Greig Chisholm; Leroy Cronin

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

Modelling Mixed Bed Ion Exchange Kinetics for Removal of Trace Levels of Divalent Cations in Ultrapure Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion exchanger resin fluid film mass transfer coefficients and the ionic diffusivities from which they are derived are often measured by use of ion exchange resin columns. Such tests, usually run dynamically using short resin beds, are often performed using relatively high (ppm) concentrations of ions to accurately measure output concentrations as a function of flow rate. The testing described herein was performed to determine fluid film ionic diffusivities for cationic concentrations typical of ultrapure water ({le}ppb levels) containing ppm levels of ammonia. Effective ionic diffusivities at these low ionic concentrations and high pHs were needed to complete a computer model (SIMIX) to be used in ion exchange simulations. SIMIX is a generalized multicomponent ion exchange model designed to simulate the removal of divalent cations from ultrapure water.

B. Widman

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Heavy oil fraction removal from sand using hydrotropes containing oil-in-water microemulsions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oil-in-water microemulsions were prepared with a nonionic surfactant and different cosurfactants using as the oil phase a hydrocarbon mixture of linear, cyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons. This organic mixture e...

M. C. K. Oliveira; E. F. Lucas; G. González; J. F. Oliveira

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Oxygen tolerance of an in silico-designed bioinspired hydrogen-evolving catalyst in water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...32 Zipoli F Car R Cohen MH...A ( 2009 ) Hydrogen production...reduction at a fuel-cell cathode . J Phys...current for hydrogen evolution...Reduction at a Fuel-Cell cathode...Current for Hydrogen Evolution...Zipoli, F., Car, R., Cohen...

Patrick H.-L. Sit; Roberto Car; Morrel H. Cohen; Annabella Selloni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Natural removal of added N-nutrients, reactive phosphorus, crude oil, and heavy metals from the water phase in a simulated water/sediment system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water/sediment simulation systems were constructed by using an aquarium (0.45 x 0.29 x 0.35 m{sup 3}), filled with suitable amounts of water and sediment collected from three selected locations: Lan Hau Shan (LHS), Tai Hu (TH), and Loong Yu Tao (LYT) of the Zhujiang (Pearl River) Estuary of China in November 1992 at low-tide period. The salinities of the water samples collected form LHS, TH, LYT were found to be 0.2, 4.6, 16.2 g L{sup -1}, respectively. Known amounts of ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, reactive phosphorous, crude oil, arsenate(III), cadmium (II), copper(II), and zinc(II) were added as pollutants into each of the water/sediment simulation systems. The rates of the natural removal of each added pollutant in all water/sediment simulation systems were studied by monitoring their concentrations at various intrevals in the investigation period. Except for Cr(III) and reactive phosphorous in the water/sediment systems of the LHS, TH, and LYT sites, and nitrate in the TH and LYT sites, the concentrations of the added pollutants in the water phase of the studied systems under a flow-condition simulation were reduced to 8% or less of the corresponding added amount on or before the 12th day by natural processes. The rate of self-purification and the estimated assimulative capacity of each added pollutant in all water/sediment simulation systems is discussed. 30 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Lam-Leung, S.Y.; Cheung, M.T. [Hong Kong Baptist Univ., Kowloon (Hong Kong)] [Hong Kong Baptist Univ., Kowloon (Hong Kong); He, Y.Q. [South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Guangzhou (China)] [and others] [South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Guangzhou (China); and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Demonstration of strontium removal from Hanford N-Area well water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study to demonstrate the efficiency of several ion-exchange materials in removing strontium-90 from actual groundwater from the Hanford N-Springs Pump and Treat Demonstration Facility. The objective of this experiment was to determine the strontium-loading distribution coefficients (Kds) for some titanate ion-exchange materials, modified minerals, and organic ion-exchange resins. The equilibrium uptake data presented in this report are useful for identifying potential materials that are capable of removing strontium from N-area groundwaters. The data show the relative selectivities of the ion-exchange materials under similar operating conditions, and show that additional flow studies are needed to predict materials capacities and to develop complete ion-exchange process flow sheets. The materials investigated in this study include commercially available ion exchangers such as IONSIV IE-911 (manufactured by UOP) and SuperLig 644 (IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc.), and materials produced on an experimental basis by Allied Signal (nontitanates), Selion Inc. (titanates), and Pennsylvania State University (modified mica). In all, the performance of seven different ion-exchange materials was evaluated using actual N-Area groundwater. The evaluation consisted of the determining strontium batch distribution coefficients, loading, and decontamination factors. Tests were performed at two different solution-to-exchanger mass ratios (i.e., phase ratios) of 2000 and 4000 using actual N-Area groundwater samples from three different wells. Actual N-Area groundwater used in the present study was obtained from three monitoring wells in FY 1998. These samples were taken from wells with strontium-90 concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 3.9 pCi/L.

Carlson, C.D.; DesChane, J.R.; Corneillie, T.M.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Removal of Filter Cake Generated by Manganese Tetraoxide Water-based Drilling Fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three effective solutions to dissolve the filter cake created by water-based drilling fluids weighted with Mn3O4 particles were developed. Hydrochloric acid at concentration lower than 5 wt% can dissolve most of Mn3O4-based filter cake. Dissolving...

Al Mojil, Abdullah Mohammed A.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

219

Targeted removal of ant colonies in ecological experiments, using hot water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a large tank through a long coil of copper tubing within the kiln to produce 4 to 5 l. of hot water per colonies were formed, and mature colonies expanded into the plots. A third treatment was made in the spring

220

Application of metal oxide heterostructures in arsenic removal from contaminated water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has become one of the major environmental problems for people worldwide to be exposed to high arsenic concentrations through contaminated drinking water, and even the long-term intake of small doses of arsenic has a carcinogenic effect. As an efficient ...

Lei Chen, Hongchuan Xin, Yuan Fang, Cong Zhang, Feng Zhang, Xing Cao, Chunhui Zhang, Xuebing Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Filter-feeding bivalves can remove avian influenza viruses from water and reduce infectivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...birds were maintained under continuous lighting, and food and water were provided ad...394.40, p 0.0001 adjusted using Greenhouse-Geisser Epsilon). A block effect...4.16, p 0.0001 adjusted using Greenhouse-Geisser Epsilon). A profile analysis...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

CAN HYDROGEN WIN?: EXPLORING SCENARIOS FOR HYDROGEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as biofuel plug-in hybrids, but did well when biofuels were removed or priced excessively. Hydrogen fuel cells failed unless costs were assumed to descend independent of demand. However, hydrogen vehicles were; Hydrogen as fuel -- Economic aspects; Technological innovations -- Environmental aspects; Climatic changes

223

Technologies for Boron Removal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tests were performed to examine the removal of boron from aqueous solution either with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) alone or by both PVA and other inorganic additives under room temperature. ... Added calcium hydroxide increased the co-removal of borate with PVA, and this offers a polishing treatment after borate removal by liming. ... As boron removal can be achieved by chemical precipitation and coagulation, it is logical to assume that the EC could remove boron from water and industrial effluent. ...

Yonglan Xu; Jia-Qian Jiang

2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

224

Final Report - Energy Reduction and Advanced Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

3M and Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) collaborated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and demonstrate a novel membrane solvent extraction (MSE) process that can substantially reduce energy and water consumption in ethanol production, and accelerate the fermentation process. A cross-flow membrane module was developed, using porous membrane manufactured by 3M. A pilot process was developed that integrates fermentation, MSE and vacuum distillation. Extended experiments of 48-72 hours each were conducted to develop the process, verify its performance and begin establishing commercial viability.

Reed, John; Fanselow, Dan; Abbas, Charles; Sammons, Rhea; Kinchin, Christopher

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

225

Effect of Water Transport on the Production of Hydrogen and Sulfuric Acid in a PEM Electrolyzer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be developed that provides efficient production of clean hydrogen. The methods existing today for large-scale produc- tion of hydrogen typically involve hydrocarbon reforming of natural gas or coal gasification% , the overall efficiency is 40%.7 Two issues remain, however, that make the future of this technology un

Weidner, John W.

226

Decoupled catalytic hydrogen evolution from a molecular metal oxide redox mediator in water splitting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...system that uses a carbon cathode to reduce protons and a...SiW 12 O 40 ] at a carbon cathode. Alternatively, starting from the fully oxidized...Nanostructured nickel phosphide as an electrocatalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction . J...electrocatalysis to stack development . Int. J. Hydrogen Energy...

Benjamin Rausch; Mark D. Symes; Greig Chisholm; Leroy Cronin

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

227

Can we remove iodine-131 from tap water in Japan by boiling? – Experimental testing in response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iodine-131 concentrations in tap water higher than 100 Bq L?1 were reported by several local governments in Japan following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Some individuals in the emergency-response community recommended the boiling of tap water to remove iodine-131. However, the tap water boiling tests in this study showed no iodine-131 loss from the tap water with either short-term boiling (1–10 min) or prolonged boiling (up to 30 min) resulting in up to 3-fold volume reductions. In this situation, boiling was shown to be not effective in removing iodine-131 from tap water; indeed even higher concentrations may result from the liquid-volume reduction accompanying this process.

K. Tagami; S. Uchida

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Water molecules insert into N-HCl-M hydrogen bonds while M-ClX-C halogen bonds remain intact in dihydrates of halopyridinium hexachloroplatinates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crystals of the dihydrates of three halopyridinium hexachloroplatinate salts form networks that are propagated via N-HO and O-HCl-Pt hydrogen bonds and Pt-ClX-C halogen bonds. The water molecules can be considered to have been inserted into N-HCl-Pt hydrogen bonds anticipated in the anyhdrous form of such salts.

Zordan, F.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Characterization of a new magnesium hydrogen orthophosphate salt, Mg3.5H2(PO4)3, synthesized in supercritical water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of a new magnesium hydrogen orthophosphate salt, Mg3.5H2(PO4)3, synthesized 2007 Available online 31 March 2007 Abstract Beige crystals of a new magnesium hydrogen orthophosphate water; IR and Raman spectra; Magnesium; Orthophosphate; Nanomaterial 1. Introduction Inorganic

Ryan, Dominic

230

Solar energy: Hydrogen and oxygen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar energy: Hydrogen and oxygen ... Demonstrating the electrolysis of water with solar energy. ...

John J. Farrell

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Corrosion Behavior of 304 Stainless Steel in High Temperature, Hydrogenated Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The corrosion behavior of an austenitic stainless steel (UNS S30400) has been characterized in a 10,000 hour test conducted in hydrogenated, ammoniated water at 260 C. The corrosion kinetics were observed to follow a parabolic rate dependency, the parabolic rate constant being determined by chemical descaling to be 1.16 mg dm{sup -2} hr{sup -1/2}. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, in combination with argon ion milling and target factor analysis, was applied to provide an independent estimate of the rate constant that agreed with the gravimetric result. Based on the distribution of the three oxidized alloying constituents (Fe, Cr, Ni) with respect to depth and elemental state, it was found that: (a) corrosion occurs in a non-selective manner, and (b) the corrosion film consists of two spinel oxide layers--a ferrite-based outer layer (Ni{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8})(Fe{sub 0.95}Cr{sub 0.05}){sub 2}O{sub 4} on top of a chromite-based inner layer (Ni{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8})(Cr{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.3}){sub 2}O{sub 4}. These compositions agree closely with the solvi phases created by immiscibility in the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} binary, implying that immiscibility plays an important role in the phase separation process.

S.E. Ziemniak; M. Hanson

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

232

Water Molecules Hydrogen Bonding to Aromatic Acceptors of Amino Acids: the Structure of Tyr-Tyr-Phe Dihydrate and a Crystallographic Database Study on Peptides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the crystal structure of Tyr-Tyr-Phe dihydrate, one of the water molecules forms a hydrogen bond with the Phe side chain. In a database study four related examples in peptides are found.

Steiner, T.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The Behaviour of Electrolytes in Mixed Solvents. Part I. The Free Energies and Heat Contents of Hydrogen Chloride in Water-Ethyl Alcohol Solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 November 1929 research-article The Behaviour of Electrolytes in Mixed Solvents. Part I. The Free Energies and Heat Contents of Hydrogen Chloride in Water-Ethyl Alcohol Solutions J. A. V. Butler C. M. Robertson The Royal Society...

1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Zinc Treatment Effects on Corrosion Behavior of 304 Stainless Steel in High Temperature, Hydrogenated Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trace levels of soluble zinc(II) ions (30 ppb) maintained in mildly alkaline, hydrogenated water at 260 C were found to lower the corrosion rate of austenitic stainless steel (UNS S30400) by about a factor of five, relative to a non-zinc baseline test after 10,000 hr. Characterizations of the corrosion oxide layer via grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in combination with argon ion milling and target factor analysis, confirmed the presence of two spinel oxide phases and minor amounts of recrystallized nickel. Based on the distribution of the three oxidized alloying constituents (Fe, Cr, Ni) with respect to depth and oxidation state, it was concluded that: (a) corrosion occurs in a non-selective manner, but approximately 30% of the oxidized iron is released to the water, and (b) the two spinel oxides exist as a ferrite-based outer layer (Ni{sub 0.1}Zn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.3})(Fe{sub 0.95}Cr{sub 0.05}){sub 2}O{sub 4} on top of a chromite-based inner layer (Ni{sub 0.1}Zn{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.7})(Fe{sub 0.4}Cr{sub 0.6}){sub 2}O{sub 4}. These results suggest that immiscibility in the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} binary may play a role in controlling the zinc content of the outer layer. On the other hand, the lower corrosion rate caused by zinc additions is believed to be a consequence of corrosion oxide film stabilization due to the substitution reaction equilibrium: z Zn{sup 2+}(aq) + FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}(s) {approx} z Fe{sup 2+}(aq) + (Zn{sub z}Fe{sub 1-z})Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4}(s). The liquid-solid distribution coefficient for the reaction, defined by the ratio of total zinc to iron ion concentrations in solution divided by the Zn(II)/Fe(II) ratio in the solid, z/(1-z), was found to be 0.184. This interpretation is consistent with the benefits of zinc treatment being concentration dependent.

S.E. Ziemniak; M. Hanson

2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

235

Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Proceedings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

including water or oil pipelines for hydrogen transport Assess viability of natural gas safety systems when hydrogen is introduced Conduct field demonstra- tion of hydrogen...

236

On Methods for the Large-Scale Production of Hydrogen from Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Off-peak power would give sufficiently cheap hydrogen with classical electrolyzers. Emerging technology could produce it at between $0.85 and $2.90 (106 Btu)-1 for electricity costs (bulk purchase) between 2 and ...

J. O’M. Bockris

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Treatment of sludge containing nitro-aromatic compounds in reed-bed mesocosms - Water, BOD, carbon and nutrient removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is necessary to improve existing and develop new sludge management techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One method is dewatering and biodegradation of compounds in constructed wetlands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result showed high reduction of all tested parameters after treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plants improve degradation and Phragmites australis is tolerant to xenobiotics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amount of sludge could be reduced by 50-70%. - Abstract: Since the mid-1970s, Sweden has been depositing 1 million ton d.w sludge/year, produced at waste water treatment plants. Due to recent legislation this practice is no longer a viable method of waste management. It is necessary to improve existing and develop new sludge management techniques and one promising alternative is the dewatering and treatment of sludge in constructed wetlands. The aim of this study was to follow reduction of organic carbon, BOD and nutrients in an industrial sludge containing nitro-aromatic compounds passing through constructed small-scale wetlands, and to investigate any toxic effect such as growth inhibition of the common reed Phragmites australis. The result showed high reduction of all tested parameters in all the outgoing water samples, which shows that constructed wetlands are suitable for carbon and nutrient removal. The results also showed that P. australis is tolerant to xenobiotics and did not appear to be affected by the toxic compounds in the sludge. The sludge residual on the top of the beds contained low levels of organic carbon and is considered non-organic and could therefore be landfilled. Using this type of secondary treatment method, the amount of sludge could be reduced by 50-70%, mainly by dewatering and biodegradation of organic compounds.

Gustavsson, L., E-mail: Lillemor.Gustavsson@karlskogaenergi.se [Karlskoga Environment and Energy Company, Karlskoga (Sweden); Engwall, M. [Karlskoga Environment and Energy Company, Karlskoga (Sweden); School of Science and Technology, MTM - Man-Technology-Environment, Oerebro University, 701 82 Oerebro (Sweden)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Hydrogen Production and Delivery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production and Delivery Hydrogen Production and Delivery Most of the hydrogen in the United States is produced by steam reforming of natural gas. For the near term, this production method will continue to dominate. Researchers at NREL are developing advanced processes to produce hydrogen economically from sustainable resources. NREL's hydrogen production and delivery R&D efforts, which are led by Huyen Dinh, focus on the following topics: Biological Water Splitting Fermentation Conversion of Biomass and Wastes Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Solar Thermal Water Splitting Renewable Electrolysis Hydrogen Dispenser Hose Reliability Hydrogen Production and Delivery Pathway Analysis. Biological Water Splitting Certain photosynthetic microbes use light energy to produce hydrogen from

239

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO RECOVER HEAVY HYDROCARBONS AND TO REMOVE WATER FROM NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a 3-MMscfd membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions is required to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system will be designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and then installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and Btu value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

K.A. Lokhandwala; T. Hofmann; J. Kaschemekat; C. Bailey; M. Jacobs; R. Baker; Membrane Group

2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

240

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO RECOVER HEAVY HYDROCARBONS AND TO REMOVE WATER FROM NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a 3-MMscfd membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions is required to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system will be designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and then installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and Btu value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; T. Hofmann; J. Kaschemekat; K.A. Lokhandwala; Membrane Group; Module Group; Systems Group

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal silica using small gel particles. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Silica Scaling Removal Process Applications: Cooling tower systems Water treatment systems Water evaporation systems Potential mining applications (produced water) Industry applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits: Reduces scaling in cooling towers by up to 50% Increases the number of cycles of concentration substantially Reduces the amount of antiscaling chemical additives needed Decreases the amount of makeup water and subsequent discharged water (blowdown) Enables considerable cost savings derived from reductions in

242

The role of hydrogen in methane formation from carbon and water over metal catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in air at 300 C for 2 h and at 400 C for 2 h. Calcination was followed by reduction under hydrogen at 300oC for 2 h, then at 425oC for 2 h. Before the catalyst was used, it was crushed using a mortar and pestle, and sieved to between 10 and 20 mesh... OR Figure 1. Diagram of On-line Gas Chromatograph 11 Rt the termination of an analysis, both hydrogen and carbon containing products of each reaction were compared to assure reproducibility. The detector unit for the on-line gas chromatograph...

Moore, Stanley Edwin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

243

Removal of organic compounds and trace metals from oil sands process-affected water using zero valent iron enhanced by petroleum coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The oil production generates large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), referring to the water that has been in contact with oil sands or released from tailings deposits. There are concerns about the environmental impacts of the release of OSPW because of its toxicity. Zero valent iron alone (ZVI) and in combination with petroleum coke (CZVI) were investigated as environmentally friendly treatment processes for the removal of naphthenic acids (NAs), acid-extractable fraction (AEF), fluorophore organic compounds, and trace metals from OSPW. While the application of 25 g/L ZVI to OSPW resulted in 58.4% removal of \\{NAs\\} in the presence of oxygen, the addition of 25 g petroleum coke (PC) as an electron conductor enhanced the \\{NAs\\} removal up to 90.9%. The increase in ZVI concentration enhanced the removals of NAs, AEF, and fluorophore compounds from OSPW. It was suggested that the electrons generated from the oxidation of ZVI were transferred to oxygen, resulting in the production of hydroxyl radicals and oxidation of NAs. When OSPW was de-oxygenated, the \\{NAs\\} removal decreased to 17.5% and 65.4% during treatment with ZVI and CZVI, respectively. The removal of metals in ZVI samples was similar to that obtained during CZVI treatment. Although an increase in ZVI concentration did not enhance the removal of metals, their concentrations effectively decreased at all ZVI loadings. The Microtox® bioassay with Vibrio fischeri showed a decrease in the toxicity of ZVI- and CZVI-treated OSPW. The results obtained in this study showed that the application of ZVI in combination with PC is a promising technology for OSPW treatment.

Parastoo Pourrezaei; Alla Alpatova; Kambiz Khosravi; Przemys?aw Drzewicz; Yuan Chen; Pamela Chelme-Ayala; Mohamed Gamal El-Din

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Kinetic study of hydrogen sulfide absorption in aqueous chlorine solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). This technique involves H2S mass transfer in an aqueous phase using a gas-liquid contactor. Since H2S is poorly. This scrubbing liquid is just drained when the salt accumulation due to H2S oxidation into sulfate anions becomes Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is currently removed from gaseous effluents by chemical scrubbing using water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

245

Formation of Hydrogen Peroxide in Water Irradiated with X- and Alpha-Rays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of very different ionic density, namely, 0·9 A. X-rays and polonium or radon?-rays. Methods. The irradiation with X-rays and the titration of hydrogen peroxide ... x-rays. The ionic yield, in the case of X-rays, suggests that the radon (3-rays probably account for less than 5 per cent of the total effect ...

P. BONET-MAURY; M. LEFORT

1948-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

246

Redox cycle stability of mixed oxides used for hydrogen generation in the cyclic water gas shift process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} modified with CaO, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was studied in cyclic water gas shift reactor. • For the first time stability of such oxides were tested for 100 redox cycles. • Optimally added oxides significantly improved the activity and the stability of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Increased stability was attributed to the impediment of neck formation. - Abstract: Repeated cycles of the reduction of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} with reductive gas, e.g. hydrogen and subsequent oxidation of the reduced iron material with water vapor can be harnessed as a process for the production of pure hydrogen. The redox behavior of iron oxide modified with various amounts of SiO{sub 2}, CaO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was investigated in the present study. The total amount of the additional metal oxides was always below 15 wt%. The samples were prepared by co-precipitation using urea hydrolysis method. The influence of various metal oxides on the hydrogen production capacity and the material stability was studied in detail in terms of temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET analysis. Furthermore, the activity and the stability of the samples were tested in repeated reduction with diluted H{sub 2} and re-oxidation cycles with H{sub 2}O. The results indicate that combination of several oxides as promoter increases the stability of the iron oxide material by mitigating the sintering process. The positive influence of the oxides in stabilizing the iron oxide material is attributed to the impediment of neck formation responsible for sintering.

Datta, Pradyot, E-mail: pradyot.datta@gmail.com

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Probing the hydrogen-bond network of water via time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report time-resolved studies of hydrogen bonding in liquid H2O, in response to direct excitation of the O-H stretch mode at 3 mu m, probed via soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the oxygen K-edge. This approach employs a newly developed nanofluidic cell for transient soft x-ray spectroscopy in liquid phase. Distinct changes in the near-edge spectral region (XANES) are observed, and are indicative of a transient temperature rise of 10K following transient laser excitation and rapid thermalization of vibrational energy. The rapid heating occurs at constant volume and the associated increase in internal pressure, estimated to be 8MPa, is manifest by distinct spectral changes that differ from those induced by temperature alone. We conclude that the near-edge spectral shape of the oxygen K-edge is a sensitive probe of internal pressure, opening new possibilities for testing the validity of water models and providing new insight into the nature of hydrogen bonding in water.

Huse, Nils; Wen, Haidan; Nordlund, Dennis; Szilagyi, Erzsi; Daranciang, Dan; Miller, Timothy A.; Nilsson, Anders; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

248

Hydrogen production by supercritical water gasification of biomass. Phase 1 -- Technical and business feasibility study, technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nine-month Phase 1 feasibility study was directed toward the application of supercritical water gasification (SCWG) for the economical production and end use of hydrogen from renewable energy sources such as sewage sludge, pulp waste, agricultural wastes, and ultimately the combustible portion of municipal solid waste. Unique in comparison to other gasifier systems, the properties of supercritical water (SCW) are ideal for processing biowastes with high moisture content or contain toxic or hazardous contaminants. During Phase I, an end-to-end SCWG system was evaluated. A range of process options was initially considered for each of the key subsystems. This was followed by tests of sewage sludge feed preparation, pumping and gasification in the SCW pilot plant facility. Based on the initial process review and successful pilot-scale testing, engineering evaluations were performed that defined a baseline system for the production, storage and end use of hydrogen. The results compare favorably with alternative biomass gasifiers currently being developed. The results were then discussed with regional wastewater treatment facility operators to gain their perspective on the proposed commercial SCWG systems and to help define the potential market. Finally, the technical and business plans were developed based on perceived market needs and the projected capital and operating costs of SCWG units. The result is a three-year plan for further development, culminating in a follow-on demonstration test of a 5 MT/day system at a local wastewater treatment plant.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Preparation of sorbents containing ettringite phase from concrete sludge and their performance in removing borate and fluoride ions from waste water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concrete sludge is an industrial waste slurry containing hydrated cement, aggregates and water. Solid sorbents containing ettringite, Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12·26H2O, were prepared from concrete sludge by adding various amounts of aluminum sulfate to enhance ettringite formation. Anion exchange performance of the sorbents was examined using model waste waters containing boron or fluoride ions. The removal behavior depended on the calcium/aluminum ratio and the heat treatment temperature after drying. For the same Ca/Al ratio, improved removal performance was observed for sorbents treated at higher temperatures. The highest removal capacity was found when the sorbent was prepared with a molar ratio of Ca/Al of 3.2 and heat treatment at 175 °C. The final concentrations of boron and fluoride were 6.3 mg-B/L, and less than 4 mg-F/L for initial concentrations of 100 mg-B/L and 300 mg-F/L. Treatment of the sorbents at higher temperature dehydrated the ettringite phase to form metaettringite phase. The sorbents prepared in the present study can be used in a boron and fluoride removal process that meets the effluent standard in Japan.

Yusuke Tsunashima; Atsushi Iizuka; Junichiro Akimoto; Teruhisa Hongo; Akihiro Yamasaki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Coproduction of sulphuric acid and hydrogen by sulphur-assisted water electrolysis process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The addition of sulphur powder to the anode compartment of the sulphuric acid-water electrolysis cell resulted in the suppression of oxygen... 4 2? ...) by the ...

Y. S. Shih; M. J. Jong

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Elevated critical micelle concentration in soil–water system and its implication on PAH removal and surfactant selecting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Triton X-100 (TX100) and Brij 35 (B35) were used to investigate the elevated critical micelle concentration (CMC) induced by surfactant sorption and its influence on PAH removal in soil washing systems. The surfa...

Helian Li; Jiajun Chen; Lin Jiang

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Ion Hydration and Associated Defects in Hydrogen Bond Network of Water: Observation of Reorientationally Slow Water Molecules Beyond First Hydration Shell in Aqueous Solutions of MgCl$_2$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of presence of ions, at moderate to high concentrations, on dynamical properties of water molecules are investigated through classical molecular dynamics simulations using two well known non-polarizable water models. Simulations reveal that the presence of magnesium chloride (MgCl$_2$) induces perturbations in the hydrogen bond network of water leading to the formation of bulk-like domains with \\textquoteleft defect sites\\textquoteright~on boundaries of such domains: water molecules at such defect sites have less number of hydrogen bonds than those in bulk water. Reorientational autocorrelation functions for dipole vectors of such defect water molecules are computed at different concentrations of ions and compared with system of pure water. Earlier experimental and simulation studies indicate significant differences in reorientational dynamics for water molecules in the first hydration shell of many dissolved ions. Results of this study suggest that defect water molecules, which are beyond the first hydration shells of ions, also experience significant slowing down of reorientation times as a function of concentration in the case of MgCl$_2$. However, addition of cesium chloride(CsCl) to water does not perturb the hydrogen bond network of water significantly even at higher concentrations. This difference in behavior between MgCl$_2$ and CsCl is consistent with the well-known Hofmeister series.

Upayan Baul; Satyavani Vemparala

2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

253

Influence of physisorbed water on the conductivity of hydrogen terminated silicon-on-insulator surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the water layer is displaced by inert gas purging, heating, or pumping. The observed conductivity changes active defects as the surface oxidizes. Surprisingly, physisorbed water via adsorption from ambient.1063/1.2822417 On semiconductor surfaces adsorption or reaction events which result in charge redistribution give rise to changes

254

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen dispenser Reverse osmosis and deionizer waterAlkaline Electrolyzer Reverse osmosis and deionizer water

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen dispenser Reverse osmosis and deionizer waterAlkaline Electrolyzer Reverse osmosis and deionizer water

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Proceedings of the workshop on the impact of hydrogen on water reactor safety. Volume II of IV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers presented in the subject area: hydrogen sources and detection.

Berman, M. (ed.)

1981-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

Soluble Hydrogen-bonding Interpolymer Complexes in Water: A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hydrogen-bonding interpolymer complexation between poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and the poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (PDMAM) side chains of the negatively charged graft copolymer poly(acrylic acid-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane sulfonic acid)-graft-poly(N, N dimethylacrylamide) (P(AA-co-AMPSA)-g-PDMAM), containing 48 wt % of PDMAM, and shortly designated as G48, has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering in aqueous solution. Complexation occurs at low pH (pH < 3.75), resulting in the formation of negatively charged colloidal particles, consisting of PAA/PDMAM hydrogen-bonding interpolymer complexes, whose radius is estimated to be around 165 A. As these particles involve more than five graft copolymer chains, they act as stickers between the anionic chains of the graft copolymer backbone. This can explain the characteristic thickening observed in past rheological measurements with these mixtures in the semidilute solution, with decreasing pH. We have also examined the influence of pH and PAA molecular weight on the formation of these nanoparticles.

Maria Sotiropoulou; Julian Oberdisse; Georgios Staikos

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

258

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen dispenser Water Reverse osmosis and deionizer waterAlkaline Electrolyzer Reverse osmosis and deionizer water

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Lipman, Timothy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Effectiveness of purification processes in removing algae from Vaal Dam water at the Rand Water Zuikerbosch treatment plant in Vereeniging / H. Ewerts.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of purification processes at the Rand Water Zuikerbosch treatment plant near Vereeniging. Raw water is… (more)

Ewerts, Hendrik

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Hydrogen Economy: The Role of Nano-scaled Support Material for Electrocatalysts Aimed for Water Electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The role and importance of support materials for electrocatalysts aimed for water electrolysis is given. Besides their superior support characteristics...2, (iii) multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and (iv) Ma...

Perica Paunovi?; Orce Popovski…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Comparing removal of trace organic compounds and assimilable organic carbon (AOC) at advanced and traditional water treatment plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stability of drinking water can be indicated by the assimilable organic carbon (AOC). This AOC value represents the regrowth capacity of microorganisms...254, and AOC) from water, experimental results indicate th...

Jie-Chung Lou; Chung-Yi Lin; Jia-Yun Han…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

The Potential Cardioprotective Effects of Hydrogen in Irradiated Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......we investigated whether hydrogen-rich water exerted cardiopro...We demonstrated here that hydrogen treatment has a cardioprotective effect. MATERIALS AND METHODS Hydrogen-rich water production Hydrogen was dissolved in......

Liren Qian; Fei Cao; Jianguo Cui; Yicun Wang; Yuecheng Huang; Yunhai Chuai; Luqian Zaho; Hao Jiang; Jianming Cai

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Electrodeposited Cobalt-Sulfide Catalyst for Electrochemical and Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Generation from Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the use of strong acids and bases, thus reducing their environmental impact and increasing Generation from Water Yujie Sun,,,, Chong Liu,, David C. Grauer,, Junko Yano, Jeffrey R. Long,*,, Peidong, and long-term aqueous stability, offer promising features for potential use in solar energy applications

264

Oxygen- and Hydrogen-Isotopic Ratios of Water in Precipitation: Beyond Paleothermometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of water can be used to test Earth-system models focused on the hydrologic cycle...of the hydrologic cycles of Earth-system models that include appropriate isotopic...testing hydrologic cycles in Earth system models; this direction will be most...

Richard B. Alley; Kurt M. Cuffey

265

Treatment of produced water by simultaneous removal of heavy metals and dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a photoelectrochemical cell.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Early produced water treatment technologies were developed before carbon dioxide emissions and hazardous waste discharge were recognised as operational priority. These technologies are deficient in… (more)

Igunnu, Ebenezer Temitope

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Adsorption of Water Dimer on Platinum(111): Identification of the ?OH···Pt Hydrogen Bond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

‡ Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561, Japan ... ? Faculty of Physical Sciences, VR-III, University of Iceland, 107 Reykjavík, Iceland ... In the decade and a half, the increased capability of surface scientists to probe at the mol.-level has resulted in more detailed information of the properties of water on progressively more complicated materials and under more stringent conditions. ...

Kenta Motobayashi; Líney Árnadóttir; Chikako Matsumoto; Eric M. Stuve; Hannes Jónsson; Yousoo Kim; Maki Kawai

2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

267

Neutron structure of human carbonic anhydrase II: A hydrogen bonded water network switch is observed between pH 7.8 and 10.0.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutron structure of wild type human carbonic anhydrase II at pH 7.8 has been determined to 2.0 resolution. Detailed analysis and comparison to the previous determined structure at pH 10.0 shows important differences in protonation of key catalytic residues in the active site as well as a rearrangement of the hydrogen bonded water network. For the first time, a completed hydrogen bonded network stretching from the Zn-bound solvent to the proton shuttling residue His64 has been directed observed.

Fisher, Zoe [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Langan, Paul [ORNL; Mustyakimov, Marat [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kovalevsky, Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Solar Photo Catalytic Hydrogen Production from water using a dual bed photosystem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A body of work was performed in which the feasibility of photocatalytically decomposing water into its constituent elements using a dual bed, or modular photosystem, under solar radiation was investigated. The system envisioned consists of two modules, each consisting of a shallow, flat, sealed container, in which microscopic photocatalytic particles are immobilized. The photocatalysts absorb light, generating free electrons and lattice vacancy holes, which are capable of performing reductive and oxidative chemistry, respectively. The photocatalysts would be chosen as to whether they specifically promote H{sub 2} or O{sub 2} evolution in their respective containers. An aqueous solution containing a redox mediator is pumped between the two chambers in order to transfer electron equivalents from one reaction to the other.

Florida Solar Energy Center

2003-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Preparation of water-soluble ?-cyclodextrin/poly(acrylic acid)/graphene oxide nanocomposites as new adsorbents to remove cationic dyes from aqueous solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Novel nanocomposites of ?-cyclodextrin/poly(acrylic acid) grafted onto graphene oxide (?-CD/PAA/GO) were successfully synthesized for the first time using an esterification reaction, and they were used to remove the cationic dyes methylene blue (MB) and safranine T (ST) from aqueous solutions. The as-prepared ?-CD/PAA/GO nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The ?-CD/PAA/GO nanocomposites showed excellent water dispersibility because of the hydrophilicity of the polymer. The adsorption isotherms fitted the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacities were 247.99 mg g?1 for MB and 175.49 mg g?1 for ST, and these are much higher than those of other carbon-based adsorbents that have been described in the literature. This was attributed to the high concentration of functional groups in the nanocomposites. Repeated MB and ST adsorption and desorption cycles showed that the ?-CD/PAA/GO nanocomposites could be used repeatedly, and their adsorption capacities did not change significantly after five cycles. The fast and efficient adsorption of MB and ST by the ?-CD/PAA/GO nanocomposites from aqueous solutions suggested that these novel nanocomposites may be ideal candidates for removing dyes during water treatment.

Jinshui Liu; Guoning Liu; Wenxiu Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal corrosion rates in water alone and in simulated sludge were near or slightly below the metal-in-water rate while nitrate-free sludge/Aquaset II decreased rates by about a factor of 3. Addition of 1 M nitrate to simulated sludge decreased the corrosion rate by a factor of ~5 while 1 M nitrate in sludge/Aquaset II mixtures decreased the corrosion rate by ~2.5 compared with the nitrate-free analogues. Mixtures of simulated sludge with Aquaset II treated with 1 M nitrate had uranium corrosion rates about a factor of 8 to 10 lower than the water-only rate law. Nitrate was found to provide substantial hydrogen mitigation for immobilized simulant sludge waste forms containing Aquaset II or Aquaset II G clay. Hydrogen attenuation factors of 1000 or greater were determined at 60°C for sludge-clay mixtures at 1 M nitrate. Hydrogen mitigation for tests with PC and Aquaset II H (which contains PC) were inconclusive because of suspected failure to overcome induction times and fully enter into anoxic corrosion. Lessening of hydrogen attenuation at ~80°C and ~95°C for simulated sludge and Aquaset II was observed with attenuation factors around 100 to 200 at 1 M nitrate. Valuable additional information has been obtained on the ability of nitrate to attenuate hydrogen gas generation from solution, simulant K Basin sludge, and simulant sludge with immobilization agents. Details on characteristics of the associated reactions were also obtained. The present testing confirms prior work which indicates that nitrate is an effective agent to attenuate hydrogen from uranium metal corrosion in water and simulated K Basin sludge to show that it is also effective in potential candidate solidified K Basin waste forms for WIPP disposal. The hydrogen mitigation afforded by nitrate appears to be sufficient to meet the hydrogen generation limits for shipping various sludge waste streams based on uranium metal concentrations and assumed waste form loadings.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

271

Air gasification of dried sewage sludge in a two-stage gasifier: Part 1. The effects and reusability of additives on the removal of tar and hydrogen production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air gasification of dried sewage sludge was conducted in a two-stage gasifier. In the experiments, natural occurring materials, such as natural zeolite, olivine and dolomite, as well as biomass-based and coal-based activated carbons, were applied to the upper reactor of a two-stage gasifier, while sand and calcined dolomite were used as the fluidized bed material in the lower reactor. The reusability of the spent coal-based activated carbon and spent calcined dolomite was also investigated. The combination of calcined dolomite as the bed material and coal-based activated carbon in the upper reactor produced the highest H2 (28 vol.%) and CO (21 vol.%) contents. Furthermore, total amount of tar generated with the combination was 91% less than that generated with no additive in the upper reactor and sand in the lower reactor. The H2 content and tar removal efficiencies in the experiments with the spent activated carbons and spent calcined dolomites were shown to be better than those without additives in the upper reactor.

Tae-Young Mun; Jin-Won Kim; Joo-Sik Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Hydrogen Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Manufacturing Fuel Cells Applications/Technology Validation Safety Codes and Standards Education Basic Research Systems Analysis Systems Integration U.S. Department of Energy Search help Home > Hydrogen Production Printable Version Hydrogen Production Hydrogen can be produced from diverse domestic feedstocks using a variety of process technologies. Hydrogen-containing compounds such as fossil fuels, biomass or even water can be a source of hydrogen. Thermochemical processes can be used to produce hydrogen from biomass and from fossil fuels such as coal, natural gas and petroleum. Power generated from sunlight, wind and nuclear sources can be used to produce hydrogen electrolytically. Sunlight alone can also drive photolytic production of

273

Partially sulfated lime-fly ash sorbents activated by water or steam for SO{sub 2} removal at a medium temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the reactivity of partially sulfated lime-fly ash sorbents activated by water or steam for SO{sub 2} removal. Sulfation tests were performed at 550{sup o}C using a fixed bed reactor under conditions simulating economizer zone injection flue gas desulfurization. Activation experiments were conducted with water or steam using a range of temperatures between 100 and 550{sup o}C. The results showed that the reactivity of the sorbents was closely related to the content of Ca(OH){sub 2} formed in the activation process, which varied with the water or steam temperature. The sulfur dioxide capture capacity of Ca(OH){sub 2} in the sorbent is higher than that of CaO at a medium temperature. Water or steam temperatures in the range of 100-200{sup o}C are favorable to the formation of Ca(OH){sub 2} from CaO. 15 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Liming Shi; Xuchang Xu [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Department of Thermal Engineering

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Design of a photochemical water electrolysis system based on a W-typed dye-sensitized serial solar module for high hydrogen production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A W-typed dye-sensitized serial solar module (W-typed DSSM) was designed for hydrogen production from water electrolysis. The optimal thickness and width of the TiO2 electrode film were 12 ?m and 5 mm, and the optimal thickness of Pt counter electrode film was 4 nm, respectively. The photocurrent density, open circuit voltage, and fill factor were 2.13 mA cm?2, 3.51 V, and 0.61, respectively, for a serial module assembled from five unit cells, which resulted in an overall conversion efficiency of 4.56%. The obtained voltage increased with increasing number of unit cells connected, and was 3.51 V in the five column fabricated W-typed DSSM. 2.1 mL h?1 of hydrogen gas was emitted when a W-typed DSSM assembled from five columns was connected to carbon electrodes in a water electrolysis system. The rate of hydrogen evolution in the five columned W-typed DSSM was 0.00213 L h?1. Therefore, the actual light-hydrogen conversion was calculated to be 2.02%.

Byeong Sub Kwak; Jinho Chae; Misook Kang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Energetics of Hydrogen Bond Network Rearrangements in Liquid Water Print Wednesday, 25 May 2005 00:00 The unique...

276

Optimized Hydrogen and Electricity Generation from Wind  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Several optimizations can be employed to create hydrogen and electricity from a wind energy source. The key element in hydrogen production from an electrical source is an electrolyzer to convert water and electricity into hydrogen and oxygen.

277

Hydrogen Highways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adequate on-board hydrogen storage is essential, and remainsjustify their costs. Hydrogen storage remains an importantto 10,000 psi, liquid hydrogen storage, and other solid and

Lipman, Timothy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Bibliography of work on the heterogeneous photocatalytic removal of hazardous compounds from water and air, Update Number 2 to October 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solar Industrial Program has developed processes that destroy hazardous substances in or remove them from water and air. The processes of interest in this report are based on the application of heterogeneous photocatalysts, principally titanium dioxide or modifications thereof, but work on other heterogeneous catalysts is included in this compilation. This report continues bibliographies that were published in May, 1994, and October, 1995. The previous reports included 663 and 574 citations, respectively. This update contains an additional 518 references. These were published during the period from June 1995 to October 1996, or are references from prior years that were not included in the previous reports. The work generally focuses on removing hazardous contaminants from air or water to meet environmental or health regulations. This report also references work on properties of semiconductor photocatalysts and applications of photocatalytic chemistry in organic synthesis. This report follows the same organization as the previous publications. The first part provides citations for work done in a few broad categories that are generic to the process. Three tables provide references to work on specific substances. The first table lists organic compounds that are included in various lists of hazardous substances identified by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The second table lists compounds not included in those categories, but which have been treated in a photocatalytic process. The third table covers inorganic compounds that are on EPA lists of hazardous materials or that have been treated by a photocatalytic process. A short update on companies that are active in providing products or services based on photocatalytic processes is provided.

Blake, D.M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen dispenser Reverse osmosis and deionizer waterAlkaline Electrolyzer Reverse osmosis and deionizer water

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Hydrogen from Water in a Novel Recombinant Oxygen-Tolerant Cyanobacterial System - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Philip D. Weyman (Primary Contact), Isaac T. Yonemoto, Hamilton O. Smith J. Craig Venter Institute 10355 Science Center Dr. San Diego, CA 92121 Phone: (858) 200-1815 Email: pweyman@jcvi.org DOE Managers HQ: Eric Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@hq.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-05GO15027 National Laboratory Collaborators: * Karen Wawrousek, Scott Noble, Jianping Yu, and Pin-Ching Maness * National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO Project Start Date: May 1, 2005 Project End Date: January 30, 2014

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Effect of the hydrogen bridge geometry on the vibrational spectra of water: Two-parameter H-bonding potentials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A principle to design the multi-parameter potentials of hydrogen bonding is proposed and developed. Based on fluctuation theory, they provide the description of temperature evolution of the shape of OH vibrati...

Yu. Ya. Efimov

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

Elangovan, S.

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis Project Summary Full Title: H2 Production Infrastructure Analysis - Task 1: Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis Project ID: 78 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Hydrogen infrastructure; costs; methanol; hydrogen fueling Purpose As the DOE considers both direct hydrogen and reformer-based fuel cell vehicles, it is vital to have a clear perspective of the relative infrastructure costs to supply each prospective fuel (gasoline, methanol, or hydrogen). Consequently, this analysis compares these infrastructure costs as well as the cost to remove sulfur from gasoline (as will most likely be required for use in fuel cell systems) and the cost implications for several hydrogen tank filling options. This analysis supports Analysis

284

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Hydrogen Delivery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 #12;This.................................................................................. 13 6. Hydrogen Storage). The Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team is one of 12 U.S. DRIVE technical teams ("tech teams") whose mission

285

Hydrogen, Fuel Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results of using hydrogen power, of course, will be energy independence for this nation... think about between hydrogen and oxygen generates energy, which can be used to power a car producing only water to taking these cars from laboratory to showroom so that the first car driven by a child born today could

286

Hydrogen Delivery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mark Paster Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology Program Hydrogen Production and Delivery Team Hydrogen Delivery Goal Hydrogen Delivery Goal Liquid H 2 & Chem. Carriers Gaseous Pipeline Truck Hydrides Liquid H 2 - Truck - Rail Other Carriers Onsite reforming Develop Develop hydrogen fuel hydrogen fuel delivery delivery technologies that technologies that enable the introduction and enable the introduction and long long - - term viability of term viability of hydrogen as an energy hydrogen as an energy carrier for transportation carrier for transportation and stationary power. and stationary power. Delivery Options * End Game - Pipelines - Other as needed * Breakthrough Hydrogen Carriers * Truck: HP Gas & Liquid Hydrogen

287

The Performance of Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cells using Hydrogen-depleted Coal Syngas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Since solid oxide fuel cells can operate on fuel containing both hydrogen and carbon monoxide, it may prove possible to remove hydrogen from syngas streams… (more)

Burnette, David D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Hydrogen separation process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

Mundschau, Michael (Longmont, CO); Xie, Xiaobing (Foster City, CA); Evenson, IV, Carl (Lafayette, CO); Grimmer, Paul (Longmont, CO); Wright, Harold (Longmont, CO)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

289

Water Electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production of ammonium sulfate fertilizer via synthetic ammonia was a national project in Japan just after World War II, and water electrolysis as the source of hydrogen was active....3 of hydrogen and 700 Nm3 of...

Fumio Hine

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Water, water everywhere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... available water resources, either locally or globally, are by no means exhausted. At present desalination -- the removal of salt from sea water or brackish water -- is very ... or brackish water -- is very expensive, mainly because it consumes so much energy. Desalination provides less than 0.2 per cent of all the water used in the world ...

Philip Ball

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

291

Grain boundary depletion and migration during selective oxidation of Cr in a Ni-5Cr binary alloy exposed to high-temperature hydrogenated water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-resolution microscopy of a high-purity Ni-5Cr alloy exposed to 360°C hydrogenated water reveals intergranular selective oxidation of Cr accompanied by local Cr depletion and diffusion-induced grain boundary migration (DIGM). The corrosion-product oxide consists of a porous, interconnected network of Cr2O3 platelets with no further O ingress into the metal ahead. Extensive grain boundary depletion of Cr (to <0.05at.%) is observed typically 20–100 nm wide as a result of DIGM and reaching depths of many micrometers beyond the oxidation front.

Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Angular and energy dependence of cross sections for ejection of electrons from water vapor. III. 20–150-keV neutral-hydrogen impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Absolute values of cross sections for electron production in collisions of neutral hydrogen atoms of 20–150 keV energy with water vapor molecules have been measured as a function of the ejection energy and angle. The range of angles was 10° to 160° and the electron energy range was 1–300 eV. The doubly differential cross sections were integrated over angle and/or energy to obtain singly differential cross sections, total electron production cross sections, and average energies of ejection. The angular distribution of the electron loss peak was found to have some features in common with the cross section for elastic scattering of electrons.

M. A. Bolorizadeh and M. E. Rudd

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Water Electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, water electrolysis technology and its applications for nuclear hydrogen ... of the chapter, a general classification of water electrolysis systems is given, the fundamentals of water electrolysis

Greg F. Naterer; Ibrahim Dincer…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Process and apparatus for coal hydrogenation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a coal liquefaction process an aqueous slurry of coal is prepared containing a dissolved liquefaction catalyst. A small quantity of oil is added to the slurry and then coal-oil agglomerates are prepared by agitation of the slurry at atmospheric pressure. The resulting mixture of agglomerates, excess water, dissolved catalyst, and unagglomerated solids is pumped to reaction pressure and then passed through a drainage device where all but a small amount of surface water is removed from the agglomerates. Sufficient catalyst for the reaction is contained in surface water remaining on the agglomerates. The agglomerates fall into the liquefaction reactor countercurrently to a stream of hot gas which is utilized to dry and preheat the agglomerates as well as deposit catalyst on the agglomerates before they enter the reactor where they are converted to primarily liquid products under hydrogen pressure.

Ruether, John A. (McMurray, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

In 2004, DOE has selected TIAX to evaluate the lifecycle cost and WTW energy use and GHG emissions of various hydrogen storage options. Water Electrolyzer Water Electrolyzer...

296

Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in the System Brucite-Water at 3 GPa Dept of Geological Science,University of Michigan; * now at Dept of Geology & Geophysics,University of Minnesota.Email:anthony.c.withers-1@umn.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in the System Brucite-Water at 3 GPa Dept of Geological Science apparatus, we have made measurements in the chemically simple brucite-water system, which has beenCl pressure medium Experiments quenched at >200 °C/s Starting material:fine grained brucite (D = -100

Chikamoto, Megumi

297

Hydrogen’s Potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estimates of future demand for non-fossil produced hydrogen and of its potential are oriented toward ... to the environment as the present fossil energy economy [10.4, 10.9].

J. Nitsch; C. Voigt

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Photochemical generation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reduction of carbon dioxide and water under visible light irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...energy conversion with consumption of a pollutant, CO2...energy conversion with consumption of a pollutant, CO...energy conversion with consumption of a pollutant, CO2...energy by producing fuels (hydrogen, carbon...M) in the reaction vessel; the gas contained...

Jean-Marie Lehn; Raymond Ziessel

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Hydrogen production from inexhaustible supplies of fresh and salt water using microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...renewable source of energy, such as solar (5), wind, or waste organic...collection for MREC operation. The pump and effluent reservoirs...9] where {delta}H is the heat of combustion (J/mol...BE ( 2005 ) Electrochemically assisted microbial production of hydrogen...

Younggy Kim; Bruce E. Logan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

First demonstration of CdSe as a photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution from water under UV and visible lightw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­10 but can produce H2 from aqueous solutions containing sacrificial electrons donors, such as Na2S and Na2SO3% aqueous methanol, a known sacrificial electron donor,21 the hydrogen evolution rate was about three to four times higher, producing a total H2 amount of 18.4 mmol after 5 h. The increase in the H2 rate

Osterloh, Frank

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Mercury and tritium removal from DOE waste oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work covers the investigation of vacuum extraction as a means to remove tritiated contamination as well as the removal via sorption of dissolved mercury from contaminated oils. The radiation damage in oils from tritium causes production of hydrogen, methane, and low-molecular-weight hydrocarbons. When tritium gas is present in the oil, the tritium atom is incorporated into the formed hydrocarbons. The transformer industry measures gas content/composition of transformer oils as a diagnostic tool for the transformers` condition. The analytical approach (ASTM D3612-90) used for these measurements is vacuum extraction of all gases (H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, etc.) followed by analysis of the evolved gas mixture. This extraction method will be adapted to remove dissolved gases (including tritium) from the SRS vacuum pump oil. It may be necessary to heat (60{degrees}C to 70{degrees}C) the oil during vacuum extraction to remove tritiated water. A method described in the procedures is a stripper column extraction, in which a carrier gas (argon) is used to remove dissolved gases from oil that is dispersed on high surface area beads. This method appears promising for scale-up as a treatment process, and a modified process is also being used as a dewatering technique by SD Myers, Inc. (a transformer consulting company) for transformers in the field by a mobile unit. Although some mercury may be removed during the vacuum extraction, the most common technique for removing mercury from oil is by using sulfur-impregnated activated carbon (SIAC). SIAC is currently being used by the petroleum industry to remove mercury from hydrocarbon mixtures, but the sorbent has not been previously tested on DOE vacuum oil waste. It is anticipated that a final process will be similar to technologies used by the petroleum industry and is comparable to ion exchange operations in large column-type reactors.

Klasson, E.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Hydrogenation of carbonaceous materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reacting pulverized coal with heated hydrogen-rich gas to form hydrocarbon liquids suitable for conversion to fuels wherein the reaction involves injection of pulverized coal entrained in a minimum amount of gas and mixing the entrained coal at ambient temperature with a separate source of heated hydrogen. In accordance with the present invention, the hydrogen is heated by reacting a small portion of the hydrogen-rich gas with oxygen in a first reaction zone to form a gas stream having a temperature in excess of about 1000.degree. C. and comprising a major amount of hydrogen and a minor amount of water vapor. The coal particles then are reacted with the hydrogen in a second reaction zone downstream of the first reaction zone. The products of reaction may be rapidly quenched as they exit the second reaction zone and are subsequently collected.

Friedman, Joseph (Encino, CA); Oberg, Carl L. (Canoga Park, CA); Russell, Larry H. (Agoura, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Alarming Oxygen Depletion Caused by Hydrogen Combustion and Fuel Cells and their Resolution by Magnegas$^{TM}$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We recall that hydrogen combustion does resolve the environmental problems of fossil fuels due to excessive emission of carcinogenic substances and carbon dioxide. However, hydrogen combustion implies the permanent removal from our atmosphere of directly usable oxygen, a serious environmental problem called oxygen depletion, since the combustion turns oxygen into water whose separation to restore the original oxygen is prohibitive due to cost. We then show that a conceivable global use of hydrogen in complete replacement of fossil fuels would imply the permanent removal from our atmosphere of 2.8875x10^7 metric tons O_2/day. Fuel cells are briefly discussed to point out similarly serious environmental problems, again, for large uses. We propose the possibility of resolving these problems by upgrading hydrogen to the new combustible fuel called magnegas^TM, whose chemical structure is composed by the new chemical species of magnecules, whose energy content and other features are beyond the descriptive capaciti...

Santilli, R M

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Production of Hydrogen from Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production of Hydrogen from Coal Production of Hydrogen from Coal Project Summary Full Title: Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies Project ID: 265 Principal Investigator: Kristin Gerdes Brief Description: This report assesses the improvements in cost and performance of hydrogen production from domestic coal when employing emerging technologies funded by DOE. Keywords: Hydrogen production; Coal Purpose This analysis specifically evaluates replacing conventional acid gas removal (AGR) and hydrogen purification with warm gas cleanup (WGCU) and a high-temperature hydrogen membrane (HTHM) that meets DOE's 2010 and 2015 performance and cost research and development (R&D) targets. Performer Principal Investigator: Kristin Gerdes

305

Kinetic Studies on the Hydrogen Peroxide-Enhanced In Situ Biodegradation of Hydrocarbons in Water-Saturated Ground Zone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Techniques are rapidly developing for aerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons in lower water-bearing formations. It is well known that...

Dr. E. R. Barenschee; Dr. O. Helmling; S. Dahmer; B. Del Grosso…

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Estimating Hydrogen Production Potential in Biorefineries Using Microbial Electrolysis Cell Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are devices that use a hybrid biocatalysis-electrolysis process for production of hydrogen from organic matter. Future biofuel and bioproducts industries are expected to generate significant volumes of waste streams containing easily degradable organic matter. The emerging MEC technology has potential to derive added- value from these waste streams via production of hydrogen. Biorefinery process streams, particularly the stillage or distillation bottoms contain underutilized sugars as well as fermentation and pretreatment byproducts. In a lignocellulosic biorefinery designed for producing 70 million gallons of ethanol per year, up to 7200 m3/hr of hydrogen can be generated. The hydrogen can either be used as an energy source or a chemical reagent for upgrading and other reactions. The energy content of the hydrogen generated is sufficient to meet 57% of the distillation energy needs. We also report on the potential for hydrogen production in existing corn mills and sugar-based biorefineries. Removal of the organics from stillage has potential to facilitate water recycle. Pretreatment and fermentation byproducts generated in lignocellulosic biorefinery processes can accumulate to highly inhibitory levels in the process streams, if water is recycled. The byproducts of concern including sugar- and lignin- degradation products such as furans and phenolics can also be converted to hydrogen in MECs. We evaluate hydrogen production from various inhibitory byproducts generated during pretreatment of various types of biomass. Finally, the research needs for development of the MEC technology and aspects particularly relevant to the biorefineries are discussed.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Applicability of Henry's law to hydrogen, helium, and nitrogen solubilities in water and olive oil at 37 °C and pressures up to 300 atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The solubilities of pure hydrogen, helium, and nitrogen in water and olive oil were measured at 37 °C at gas-saturation pressures from 25 to 300 atmospheres. Rigorous thermodynamic criteria were used to assess the applicability of Henry's law to the pressure dependence of the gas solubility in each system. The solubilities of the three gases in water and helium in olive oil followed Henry's law as given by the Krichevsky-Kasarnovsky equation. In contrast, hydrogen and nitrogen in olive oil each attained concentrations high enough to cause significant concentration-dependent variations of the dissolved gas activity coefficient and/or partial molal volume. The consequent deviations from Henry's law were greatest in the nitrogen-oil system, where mole fraction nitrogen solubilities calculated from the Krichevsky-Kasarnovsky equation exceeded measured values by 8, 14, and 23% at 50, 100, and 250 atm, respectively. Incorporation of results into the critical volume model of nitrogen anesthesia, using olive oil as a model of the physiological anesthetic site and literature data for the anesthetic potency of nitrogen in mice breathing high-pressure He-N2-O2 atmospheres, shows that nonideal solution behavior may become important for gases dissolved in physiological hydrophobic regions at biologically active concentrations, even if dissolved gas binding to proteins or other macromolecules is not involved.

Wayne A. Gerth

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Enhanced Hydrogen Production Integrated with CO2 Separation in a Single-Stage Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High purity hydrogen is commercially produced from syngas by the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR) in high and low temperature shift reactors using iron oxide and copper catalysts respectively. However, the WGSR is thermodynamically limited at high temperatures towards hydrogen production necessitating excess steam addition and catalytic operation. In the calcium looping process, the equilibrium limited WGSR is driven forward by the incessant removal of CO{sub 2} by-product through the carbonation of calcium oxide. At high pressures, this process obviates the need for a catalyst and excess steam requirement, thereby removing the costs related to the procurement and deactivation of the catalyst and steam generation. Thermodynamic analysis for the combined WGS and carbonation reaction was conducted. The combined WGS and carbonation reaction was investigated at varying pressures, temperatures and S/C ratios using a bench scale reactor system. It was found that the purity of hydrogen increases with the increase in pressure and at a pressure of 300 psig, almost 100% hydrogen is produced. It was also found that at high pressures, high purity hydrogen can be produced using stoichiometric quantities of steam. On comparing the catalytic and non catalytic modes of operation in the presence of calcium oxide, it was found that there was no difference in the purity of hydrogen produced at elevated pressures. Multicyclic reaction and regeneration experiments were also conducted and it was found that the purity of hydrogen remains almost constant after a few cycles.

Shwetha Ramkumar; Mahesh Iyer; Danny Wong; Himanshu Gupta; Bartev Sakadjian; Liang-Lhih Fan

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Hydrogen sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

310

Nuclear Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Error Error Nuclear Hydrogen - RCC cannot be displayed due to a timeout error. We recommend: * Refresh Nuclear Hydrogen - RCC * Increasing your portlet timeout setting. *...

311

Sequential precipitation of a new goethite-calcite nanocomposite and its1 possible application in the removal of toxic ions from polluted water2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

neutralise acidic wastewater by slight calcite dissolution, enhancing the removal of heavy20 metals (e.g. Cu: Goethite; Calcite; Nanocomposite; Precipitation; Removal; Metalloids;1 Heavy metals2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 a major role in the fate and transport of several6 metalloids and heavy metal trace elements and organic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

312

Development and Parametric Testing of Alkaline Water Electrolysis Cells for Hydrogen Production Based on Inorganic-Membrane-Electrolyte Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A research programme aiming at the development of a new advanced concept in alkaline water electrolysis has been demonstrated at S.C.K....

H. Vandenborre; L. H. Baetsle; W. Hebel; R. Leysen…

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Hydrogen Storage Workshop Argonne National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen, fuel cells, and distribution..." #12;1. Hydrogen Storage 2. Hydrogen Production 3. Fuel Cell Cost Energy & Water Appropriations #12;FY 2002 Budget = $47.425M Transportation Fuel Cell Stack Subsystem Rossmeissl Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

314

Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alternatives and assess economics and life cycle analysis of borohydride/water to hydrogen · Millennium CellChemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage William Tumas proprietary or confidential information #12;2 Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Overview Project Start Date: FY

Carver, Jeffrey C.

315

A Comparative Study of Ozone and Ultraviolet Light/Hydrogen Peroxide for Decolorizing Textile Dyeing Waste Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generates free radicals and oxygen as shown below. (2) Figure 2 Laboratory ozone contactor OJ + HOO. ---> HO. + 2 O 2 Color Measurements (3) A Bausch and Lomb color spectrophotometer was used in conjunction with The hydroxyl radicals react with dyes... constants depend on the conditions of the experiment. Conditions affecting rate of color removal with ozone include input rate for ozone, mass transfer efficiency of ozone in the contactor, and concentration of dye. 168 ESL-IE-94-04-39 Proceedings from...

Namboodri, C. G.; Perkins, W. S.; Walsh, W. K.

316

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen Quality Issues for Fuel Cell Vehicles Introduction Developing and implementing fuel quality specifications for hydrogen are prerequisites to the widespread deployment of hydrogen-fueled fuel cell vehicles. Several organizations are addressing this fuel quality issue, including the International Standards Organization (ISO), the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the California Fuel Cell Partnership (CaFCP), and the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO)/Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI). All of their activities, however, have focused on the deleterious effects of specific contaminants on the automotive fuel cell or on-board hydrogen storage systems. While it is possible for the energy industry to provide extremely pure hydrogen, such hydrogen could entail excessive costs. The objective of our task is to develop a process whereby the hydrogen quality requirements may be determined based on life-cycle costs of the complete hydrogen fuel cell vehicle "system." To accomplish this objective, the influence of different contaminants and their concentrations in fuel hydrogen on the life-cycle costs of hydrogen production, purification, use in fuel cells, and hydrogen analysis and quality verification are being assessed.

317

Relationship of Hydrogen Bioavailability to Chromate Reduction in Aquifer Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Media Ecosystem Fresh Water microbiology Geologic...Oxidation-Reduction Water Supply georef;2010007932...studies geochemistry ground water hydrogen laboratory studies...Oklahoma pollution reduction remediation sediments United States...

Tamara L. Marsh; Michael J. McInerney

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Florida Hydrogen Initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J. Politano, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL This project developed a hydrogen and fuel cel

Block, David L

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

319

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Production Production The simplest and most common element, hydrogen is all around us, but always as a compound with other elements. To make it usable in fuel cells or otherwise provide energy, we must expend energy or modify another energy source to extract it from the fossil fuel, biomass, water, or other compound in which it is found. Nearly all hydrogen production in the United States today is by steam reformation of natural gas. This, however, releases carbon dioxide in the process and trades one relatively clean fuel for another, with associated energy loss, so it does little to meet national energy needs. Hydrogen can also be produced by electrolysis-passing an electrical current through water to break it into hydrogen and oxygen-but electrolysis is inefficient and is only as clean

320

Investigation of Water Droplet Interaction with the Sidewalls of the Gas Channel in a PEM Fuel Cell in the Presence of Gas Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forms of hydrogen powered technologies exist and have been well-researched, fuel cells is considered efficiently in the fuel cells (4). Inefficient water removal results in flooding of the catalyst layerInvestigation of Water Droplet Interaction with the Sidewalls of the Gas Channel in a PEM Fuel Cell

Kandlikar, Satish

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal...

322

Experimental and theoretical study of pressure effects on hydrogen isotope fractionation in the system brucite-water at elevated temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A detailed, systematic experimental and theoretical study was conducted to investigate the effect of pressure on equilibrium D/H fractionation between brucite (Mg(OH)2) and water at temperatures from 200 to 600°C and pressures up to 800 MPa. A fine-grained brucite was isotopically exchanged with excess amounts of water, and equilibrium D/H fractionation factors were calculated by means of the partial isotope exchange method. Our experiments unambiguously demonstrated that the D/H fractionation factor between brucite and water increased by 4.4 to 12.4‰ with increasing pressure to 300 or 800 \\{MPa\\} at all the temperatures investigated. The observed increases are linear with the density of water under experimental conditions. We calculated the pressure effects on the reduced partition function ratios (?-factor) of brucite (300–800 K and P ? 800 MPa) and water (400–600°C and P ? 100 MPa), employing a statistical-mechanical method similar to that developed by Kieffer (1982) and a simple thermodynamic method based on the molar volumes of normal and heavy waters, respectively. Our theoretical calculations showed that the reduced partition function ratio of brucite increases linearly with pressure at a given temperature (as much as 12.6‰ at 300 K and 800 MPa). The magnitude of the pressure effects rapidly decreases with increasing temperature. On the other hand, the ?-factor of water decreases 4 to 5‰ with increasing pressure to 100 \\{MPa\\} at 400 to 600°C. Overall D/H isotope pressure effects combined from the separate calculations on brucite and water are in excellent agreement with the experimental results under the same temperature-pressure range. Our calculations also suggest that under the current experimental conditions, the magnitude of the isotope pressure effects is much larger on water than brucite. Thus, the observed pressure effects on D/H fractionation are common to other systems involving water. It is very likely that under some geologic conditions, pressure is an important variable in controlling D/H partitioning.

Juske Horita; David R. Cole; Veniamin B. Polyakov; Thomas Driesner

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

A Continuous Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Plant Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11]. One method for hydrogen production is a water-splittingof various methods of hydrogen production, the Department ofOne method of reducing the cost of hydrogen production is to

Luc, Wesley Wai

324

Electrolysis of Sea Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In implementation of the hydrogen economy, the electrolysis of sea water as the source of hydrogen has been ... . Two options exist for performance of this electrolysis. The first option is to subject the water t...

L. O. Williams

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Report on the effectiveness of flocculation for removal of {sup 239}Pu at concentrations of 1 pCi/L and 0.1 pCi/L. RFP Pond Water Characterization and Treatment (LATO-EG&G-91-022): Task C deliverables: 5.1.2 and 5.2.2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to assess the effectiveness of flocculation for the removal of Pu from Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) pond waters spiked with {sup 239}Pu at the 1.0 and 0.1 pCi/L level. The flocculation treatment procedure is described in detail. Results are presented for treatment studies for the removal of Pu from C-2 pond water spiked with {sup 239}Pu and from distilled water spiked with {sup 239}Pu.

Triay, I.R.; Bayhurst, G.K.; Mitchell, A.J.; Cisneros, M.R.; Efurd, D.W.; Roensch, F.R.; Rokop, D.J.; Aguilar, R.D.; Attrep, M.; Nuttall, H.E. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Process analysis and economics of biophotolysis of water. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a preliminary cost analysis of the biophotolysis of water and was prepared as part of the work of Annex 10 of the IEA Hydrogen agreement. Biophotolysis is the conversion of water and solar energy to hydrogen and oxygen using microalgae. In laboratory experiments at low light intensities, algal photosynthesis and some biophotolysis reactions exhibit highlight conversion efficiencies that could be extrapolated to about 10% solar efficiencies if photosynthesis were to saturate at full sunlight intensities. The most promising approach to achieving the critical goal of high conversion efficiencies at full sunlight intensities, one that appears within the capabilities of modern biotechnology, is to genetically control the pigment content of algal cells such that the photosynthetic apparatus does not capture more photons than it can utilize. A two-stage indirect biophotolysis system was conceptualized and general design parameters extrapolated. The process comprises open ponds for the CO{sub 2}fixation stage, an algal concentration step, a dark adaptation and fermentation stage, and a closed tubular photobioreactor in which hydrogen production would take place. A preliminary cost analysis for a 200 hectare (ha) system, including 140 ha of open algal ponds and 14 ha of photobioreactors was carried out. The cost analysis was based on prior studies for algal mass cultures for fuels production and a conceptual analysis of a hypothetical photochemical processes, as well as the assumption that the photobioreactors would cost about $100/m(sup 2). Assuming a very favorable location, with 21 megajoules (MJ)/m{sup 2} total insolation, and a solar conversion efficiency of 10% based on CO{sub 2} fixation in the large algal ponds, an overall cost of $10/gigajoule (GJ) is projected. Of this, almost half is due to the photobioreactors, one fourth to the open pond system, and the remainder to the H{sub 2} handling and general support systems. It must be cautioned that these are highly preliminary, incomplete, and optimistic estimates. Biophotolysis processes, indirect or direct, clearly require considerable basic and applied R and D before a more detailed evaluation of their potential and plausible economics can be carried out. For example, it is not yet clear which type of algae, green algae, or cyanobacteria, would be preferred in biophotolysis. If lower-cost photobioreactors can be developed, then small-scale (<1 ha) single-stage biophotolysis processes may become economically feasible. A major basic and applied R and D effort will be required to develop such biophotolysis processes.

Benemann, J.R.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Renewable Hydrogen: Integration, Validation, and Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is about producing hydrogen through the electrolysis of water and using the hydrogen in a fuel cell or internal combustion engine generator to produce electricity during times of peak demand, or as a transportation fuel.

Harrison, K. W.; Martin, G. D.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Liquid Hydrogen Delivery - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Liquid Hydrogen Delivery - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Liquid Hydrogen Delivery - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Targets, barriers and...

329

Nitrogen Removal From Low Quality Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. It is especially important in the residential sector, where it supplies nearly half of all the energy consumed in U.S. homes. However, significant quantities of natural gas cannot be produced economically because its quality is too low to enter the pipeline transportation system without some type of processing, other than dehydration, to remove the undesired gas fraction. Such low-quality natural gas (LQNG) contains significant concentration or quantities of gas other than methane. These non- hydrocarbons are predominantly nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide, but may also include other gaseous components. The nitrogen concentrations usually exceeds 4%. Nitrogen rejection is presently an expensive operation which can present uneconomic scenarios in the potential development of natural gas fields containing high nitrogen concentrations. The most reliable and widely used process for nitrogen rejection from natural gas consists of liquefying the feed stream using temperatures in the order of - 300{degrees}F and separating the nitrogen via fractionation. In order to reduce the gas temperature to this level, the gas is compressed, cooled by mullet-stream heat exchangers, and expanded to low pressure. Significant energy for compression and expensive materials of construction are required. Water and carbon dioxide concentrations must be reduced to levels required to prevent freezing. SRI`s proposed research involves screening new nitrogen selective absorbents and developing a more cost effective nitrogen removal process from natural gas using those compounds. The long-term objective of this project is to determine the technical and economical feasibility of a N{sub 2}2 removal concept based on complexation of molecular N{sub 2} with novel complexing agents. Successful development of a selective, reversible, and stable reagent with an appropriate combination of capacity and N{sub 2} absorption/desorption characteristics will allow selective separation of N{sub 2} from LQNG.

Alvarado, D.B.; Asaro, M.F.; Bomben, J.L.; Damle, A.S.; Bhown, A.S.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

An Overview of Hydrogen Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, hydrogen is primarily used in the chemical industry, but in the near future it will become a significant fuel. There are many processes for hydrogen production. This paper reviews reforming (steam, partial oxidation, autothermal, plasma, and aqueous phase), pyrolysis, hydrogen from biomass, electrolysis and other methods for generating hydrogen from water, and hydrogen storage. In addition, desulfurization, water-gas-shift, and hydrogen purification methods are discussed. Basics of these processes are presented with a large number of references for the interested reader to learn more.

Holladay, Jamie D.; Hu, Jianli; King, David L.; Wang, Yong

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for Hydrogen Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase I was a technoeconomic feasibility study that defined the process scheme for the integrated ceramic membrane system for hydrogen production and determined the plan for Phase II. The hydrogen production system is comprised of an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) and a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM). Two process options were evaluated: 1) Integrated OTM-HTM reactor – in this configuration, the HTM was a ceramic proton conductor operating at temperatures up to 900°C, and 2) Sequential OTM and HTM reactors – in this configuration, the HTM was assumed to be a Pd alloy operating at less than 600°C. The analysis suggested that there are no technical issues related to either system that cannot be managed. The process with the sequential reactors was found to be more efficient, less expensive, and more likely to be commercialized in a shorter time than the single reactor. Therefore, Phase II focused on the sequential reactor system, specifically, the second stage, or the HTM portion. Work on the OTM portion was conducted in a separate program. Phase IIA began in February 2003. Candidate substrate materials and alloys were identified and porous ceramic tubes were produced and coated with Pd. Much effort was made to develop porous substrates with reasonable pore sizes suitable for Pd alloy coating. The second generation of tubes showed some improvement in pore size control, but this was not enough to get a viable membrane. Further improvements were made to the porous ceramic tube manufacturing process. When a support tube was successfully coated, the membrane was tested to determine the hydrogen flux. The results from all these tests were used to update the technoeconomic analysis from Phase I to confirm that the sequential membrane reactor system can potentially be a low-cost hydrogen supply option when using an existing membrane on a larger scale. Phase IIB began in October 2004 and focused on demonstrating an integrated HTM/water gas shift (WGS) reactor to increase CO conversion and produce more hydrogen than a standard water gas shift reactor would. Substantial improvements in substrate and membrane performance were achieved in another DOE project (DE-FC26-07NT43054). These improved membranes were used for testing in a water gas shift environment in this program. The amount of net H2 generated (defined as the difference of hydrogen produced and fed) was greater than would be produced at equilibrium using conventional water gas shift reactors up to 75 psig because of the shift in equilibrium caused by continuous hydrogen removal. However, methanation happened at higher pressures, 100 and 125 psig, and resulted in less net H2 generated than would be expected by equilibrium conversion alone. An effort to avoid methanation by testing in more oxidizing conditions (by increasing CO2/CO ratio in a feed gas) was successful and net H2 generated was higher (40-60%) than a conventional reactor at equilibrium at all pressures tested (up to 125 psig). A model was developed to predict reactor performance in both cases with and without methanation. The required membrane area depends on conditions, but the required membrane area is about 10 ft2 to produce about 2000 scfh of hydrogen. The maximum amount of hydrogen that can be produced in a membrane reactor decreased significantly due to methanation from about 2600 scfh to about 2400 scfh. Therefore, it is critical to eliminate methanation to fully benefit from the use of a membrane in the reaction. Other modeling work showed that operating a membrane reactor at higher temperature provides an opportunity to make the reactor smaller and potentially provides a significant capital cost savings compared to a shift reactor/PSA combination.

Schwartz, Joseph; Lim, Hankwon; Drnevich, Raymond

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hydrogen Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation on Hydrogen Analysis to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

333

Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications continues to be one of the most technically challenging barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen-fueled vehicles. The EERE...

334

Hydrogen Safety  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet, intended for a non-technical audience, explains the basic properties of hydrogen and provides an overview of issues related to the safe use of hydrogen as an energy carrier.

335

Removal of ?-naphthol and other phenolic compounds from polluted water by white radish (Raphanus sativus) peroxidase in the presence of an additive, polyethylene glycol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Role of white radish peroxidase has been investigated in the treatment of water contaminated with phenols, particularly ?-naphthol. Water polluted with ?-naphthol was treated with white radish peroxidase under va...

Humaira Ashraf; Qayyum Husain

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Investigation of oil adsorption capacity of granular organoclay media and the kinetics of oil removal from oil-in-water emulsions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Produced water, a byproduct of oil and gas production, includes almost 98% of all waste generated by oil and gas exploration and their production activities. This oil contaminated waste water has a great impact on our environment and is considered...

Islam, Sonia

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

337

Hydrogen Cryomagnetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% cryogenics (inc. MRI) 29% pressurisation and purging 11%controlled atmospheres (inc. breathing) 6% 4     Figure 5. Simplified price-cost, supply-demand relationship that is central to the helium market model developed during the Helium Resources... of hydrogen large amounts of hydrogen must be available for liquefaction. This poses problems for the production of liquid hydrogen via intermittent wind energy and via microwave plasma reactors that are not scalable as a result of low hydrogen production...

Glowacki, B. A.; Hanely, E.; Nuttall, W. J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Removal of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) pollutants from water by novel TiO2–Coconut Shell Powder (TCNSP) composite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Photocatlytic removal of three pharmaceutical and personal care products pollutants using novel TiO2–Coconut Shell Powder (TCNSP) composite was investigated. The photocatalytic degradation rate of \\{PPCPs\\} generally increased with increasing light intensity and dissolved oxygen concentration. The degradation rate decreased with increasing initial concentration of PPCPs. The \\{PPCPs\\} concentration decreased substantially under irradiation of UVC when used in conjunction with the TCNSP composite. A number of composite/radiation types and intensities were tested. The concentration rate decrease trend was as: UVC/TCNSP > UVA/TCNSP > UVC > UVA. Under the UVC/TCNP combination, 99% removal was achieved compared to 30% for TiO2.

Majeda Khraisheh; Jongkyu Kim; Luiza Campos; Ala’a H. Al-Muhtaseb; Alaa Al-Hawari; Mohammad Al Ghouti; Gavin M. Walker

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

DOE HydrogenDOE Hydrogen Fuel CellsFuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between hydrogen and oxygen generates energy, which can be used to power a car producing only water that America can lead the world in developing clean, hydrogen-powered automobiles. "A simple chemical reaction to taking these cars from laboratory to showroom so that the first car driven by a child born today could

340

The hydrogen economy: Its history  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept leading to a hydrogen economy lay in the work of a Nazi engineer, Lawaceck, 1968. I heard his suggestion of cheaper transfer of energy in hydrogen through pipes at a dinner in that year. A paper was published with Appleby in 1972 which was the first published document concerning that title and involving the title of A Hydrogen Economy. The first meeting was in Cornell University in 1973. In 1974 T. Nejat Veziroglu organized the first big meeting on hydrogen (900 attendees). At this meeting I presented privately to Veziroglu the possibilities of a world development and he told me that he was ready to put his organizing ability to use in spreading the ideas worldwide. However, he not only proceeded to do this but he, also a professor at the University of Miami, contributed several papers of notes, particularly the one with Awad of 1974 about the cost of pollution. Gregory worked at the Gas Research Institute from 1971 and confirmed the expectations put down by Lawaceck. Veziroglu founded the International Journal of Hydrogen Energy in 1974. Research in hydrogen was relatively low cost and therefore was taken up most eagerly by those from the newer countries. The National Science Foundation awarded Texas A&M University in 1982 a five year support for hydrogen as a fuel with the condition that half the costs be borne by at least five industrial companies. I was appointed director of the research under the grant and chose to concentrate upon the decomposition of water by solar light via an electrochemical photo fuel cell. We were able to obtain considerable increases in efficiency of decomposition of water by solar light, and at the time the work was interrupted we had 9.6 percent efficiency for decomposition. S.U.M. Khan and R. Kainthla were the principal contributors to the theory of using light via electrochemical cells for this purpose. The Texas A&M University work on hydrogen was interrupted in 1989 by the arrival of claims that one of my former students had carried out electrolysis of deuterium oxide saying that an extra unexplained heat had been observed and he suggested this heat was nuclear in origin. Later, seeking to reduce the cost of hydrogen as a fuel I involved Sol Zaromb in discussions and we came across the idea that if one included a carbon dioxide molecule obtained by removing it from the atmosphere in the structure of methanolAT, no increase in global warming would occur from the use of methanol with that condition, (published in 2008). By this condition methanol took on the largest advantage of gaseous hydrogen: That it did not cause global warming. The estimated cost of the new (anti-global warming) fuel, methanolAT was less than $30/GJ. This estimated cost could be compared with the $48/GJ which is now being supported by a French Canadian group who published an attractive book with six pages of calculations of costs. The difference between the cost estimated by this group and the costs which have been assumed by hydrogen enthusiasts in earlier times was that they took into account the auxiliary expenses which would come with the use of hydrogen, in particular the storage at high pressure. The characteristics of the new methanol to cause no global warming put that aspect of it on an equal footing to the gaseous hydrogen. The CO2 which was an essential part of the structure of methanolAT was necessary to be created in a stream, rather than directly from the atmosphere, but it was easily shown that this could be done by the use of biomass and by carbonaceous wastes. A German team under Weiderman and Grob appeared in 2008 and proceeded to suggest some extensions of the ideas which had been undergoing publication for some time. The aim of the German work was to reduce costs of a compound which they called Methasyn. The present situation is that the claim of methanolAT as a world fuel to be used without any concerns of exhaustion or pollution depends on the commercial point of view of the costs being less than that of obtaining oil from the tar sands.

John O'.M. Bockris

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hydrogenation apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogenation reaction apparatus is described comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1,100 to 1,900 C, while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products. 2 figs.

Friedman, J.; Oberg, C. L.; Russell, L. H.

1981-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

342

Hydrogen gas sensor and method of manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sensor for measuring the pressure of hydrogen gas in a nuclear reactor, and method of manufacturing the same. The sensor comprises an elongated tube of hydrogen permeable material which is connected to a pressure transducer through a feedthrough tube which passes through a wall at the boundary of the region in which hydrogen is present. The tube is pressurized and flushed with hydrogen gas at an elevated temperature during the manufacture of the sensor in order to remove all gasses other than hydrogen from the device.

McKee, John M. (Hinsdale, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric methane removal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from the U-trap, remove carbon and hydrogen impurities, oxidize the purified methane to CO2 and H2... . The helium gas was recycled through the U-trap (1) to remove and purify...

344

STILL CHASING THE HYDROGEN ECONOMY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water electrolysis firm aims to help meet 2015 global target for first commercial FUEL-CELL CARS ... IN HIS 2003 State of the Union address, President George W. Bush proclaimed that the time was ripe for the hydrogen economy, a world in which hydrogen is the primary energy currency instead of fossil fuels. ...

STEPHEN K. RITTER

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

345

Hydrogen,Fuel Cells & Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen generates energy, which can be used to power a car producing funding so that America can lead the world in developing clean, hydrogen-powered automobiles." "A simple only water, not exhaust fumes. With a new national commitment, our scientists and engineers

346

An Analysis of Near-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Rollout Scenarios for Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen via electrolysis using water as a feedstock. Forhydrogen via electrolysis using water as a feedstock. For

Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hydrogen Fuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen Fuel Basics Hydrogen Fuel Basics Hydrogen Fuel Basics August 14, 2013 - 2:06pm Addthis Hydrogen is a clean fuel that, when consumed, produces only water. Hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic sources, such as coal, natural gas, nuclear power, and renewable power. These qualities make it an attractive fuel option for transportation and electricity generation applications. Hydrogen is an energy carrier that can be used to store, move, and deliver energy produced from other sources. The energy in hydrogen fuel is derived from the fuels and processes used to produce the hydrogen. Today, hydrogen fuel can be produced through several methods. The most common methods are thermal, electrolytic, and photolytic processes. Thermal Processes Thermal processes for hydrogen production typically involve steam

348

Hydrogen Fuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen Fuel Basics Hydrogen Fuel Basics Hydrogen Fuel Basics August 14, 2013 - 2:06pm Addthis Hydrogen is a clean fuel that, when consumed, produces only water. Hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic sources, such as coal, natural gas, nuclear power, and renewable power. These qualities make it an attractive fuel option for transportation and electricity generation applications. Hydrogen is an energy carrier that can be used to store, move, and deliver energy produced from other sources. The energy in hydrogen fuel is derived from the fuels and processes used to produce the hydrogen. Today, hydrogen fuel can be produced through several methods. The most common methods are thermal, electrolytic, and photolytic processes. Thermal Processes Thermal processes for hydrogen production typically involve steam

349

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen August 19, 2013 - 5:45pm Addthis Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not widely used today as a transportation fuel, government and industry research and development are working toward the goal of clean, economical, and safe hydrogen production and hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles. Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the universe. However, it is rarely found alone in nature. Hydrogen is locked up in enormous quantities in water (H2O), hydrocarbons (such as methane, CH4), and other organic matter. Efficiently producing hydrogen from these compounds is one of the challenges of using hydrogen as a fuel. Currently,

350

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen August 19, 2013 - 5:45pm Addthis Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not widely used today as a transportation fuel, government and industry research and development are working toward the goal of clean, economical, and safe hydrogen production and hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles. Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the universe. However, it is rarely found alone in nature. Hydrogen is locked up in enormous quantities in water (H2O), hydrocarbons (such as methane, CH4), and other organic matter. Efficiently producing hydrogen from these compounds is one of the challenges of using hydrogen as a fuel. Currently,

351

Potential Carriers and Approaches for Hydrogen Delivery  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen Carriers Calculation Tools Truck Transport Available H 2 Carrier Solution (Oil or water) Additional Reactant H 2 Carrier 16 Storage and forecourt tabs have been...

352

Standard hydrogen monitoring system equipment installation instructions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the technical specifications for the equipment fabrication, installation, and sitework construction for the Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System. The Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System is designed to remove gases from waste tank vapor space and exhaust headers for continual monitoring and remote sample analysis.

Schneider, T.C.

1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

353

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Analysis Projects by Principal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Principal Investigator Principal Investigator Below are hydrogen analyses and analytical models grouped by principal investigator. | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | R | S | T | U | V | W A Portfolio of Power-Trains for Europe Review of FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Ahluwalia, Rajesh Fuel Cell Systems Analysis GCtool-ENG Ahluwalia, Rajesh K. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Ahmed, Shabbir Cost Implications of Hydrogen Quality Requirements Fuel Quality Effects on Stationary Fuel Cell Systems Fuel Quality in Fuel Cell Systems Quick Starting Fuel Processors - A Feasibility Study Amos, Wade Biological Water-Gas Shift Costs of Storing and Transporting Hydrogen Photobiological Hydrogen Production from Green Algae Cost Analysis Arif, Muhammad Fuel Cell Water Transport Mechanism

354

Study of electrodeposited nickel-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten, cobalt-molybdenum, and cobalt-tungsten as hydrogen electrodes in alkaline water electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrodeposited nickel-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten, cobalt-molybdenum, and cobalt-tungsten were characterized for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in the electrolysis of 30 w/o KOH alkaline water at 25 C. The rate-determining step (rds) of the HER was suggested based on the Tafel slope of polarization and the capacitance of electrode-solution interface determined by ac impedance measurement. The HER on the nickel- and cobalt-based codeposits was enhanced significantly compared with that o the electrolytic nickel and cobalt with comparable deposit loadings. The decrease in the HER overpotential was more pronounced on the molybdenum-containing codeposits, particularly on cobalt-molybdenum which also showed a high stability. The enhancement of the HER was attributed to both the synergetic composition and the increased active surface of the codeposits. The real electrocatalytic activity of te electrodes and the effect of their and the increased active surface of the codeposits. The real electrocatalytic activity of the electrodes and the effect of their surface increase were distinguished quantitatively. The linear relations between HER overpotential and surface roughness factor of the electrodes on a Y-log(X) plot were obtained experimentally and interpreted based on the Tafel law.

Fan, C.; Piron, D.L.; Sleb, A.; Paradis, P. (Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. de Metallurgie et de Genie des Materiaux)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

AC03CH05-Levinger ARI 11 February 2010 22:19 Analysis of Water in Confined  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hydrogen fuel cells. Water's unique properties can be traced to its formation of an extended hydrogen micelles, nanoscopically confined water, hydrogen bond dynamics, orientational dynamics Abstract The properties of water depend on its extended hydrogen bond network and thecontinualpicosecond

Fayer, Michael D.

356

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen is a versatile energy carrier that can be used to power nearly every end-use energy need. The fuel cell -- an energy conversion device that can efficiently capture and use the power of hydrogen the chemical energy in hydrogen to electricity, with pure water and potentially useful heat as the only

357

Producing hydrogen using nuclear energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The earliest means of separating hydrogen from water was by electrolysis using electrical energy that usually had been produced by low-efficiency thermodynamic processes. Substitution of thermal energy for electrical energy in high-temperature electrolysis gives a somewhat higher overall efficiency, but significantly complicates the process. Today, the vast majority of hydrogen is produced by steam methane reforming (SMR) followed by a water-shift reaction. A well-designed SMR plant will yield hydrogen having 75â??80% of the energy of the methane used. Recent work in Japan has demonstrated the feasibility of substituting high-temperature heat from a gas-cooled nuclear reactor to replace the heat supplied in SMR by the combustion of methane. Using high-temperature heat from nuclear plants to drive thermochemical processes for producing hydrogen has been studied extensively. Bench-scale tests have been carried out in Japan demonstrating the sulphur-iodine (SI) process to produce hydrogen.

Robert E. Uhrig

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Layered metal sulfides: Exceptionally selective agents for radioactive strontium removal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...07 mmol, 40 mg) in water (20 ml), an excess...washed several times with water, acetone, and...Complex Environmental Remediation Problems , ed Blacklick...removal from contaminated ground water and wastewater...

Manolis J. Manos; Nan Ding; Mercouri G. Kanatzidis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Effects of Fluorine-Containing Graft and Block Copolymer Additives on Removal Characteristics of Dilute Benzene in Water by Microphase-Separated Membranes Modified with These Additives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Add to ACS ChemWorx ... When larger amounts of the PFA-g-PDMS and PFA-b-PDMS were added to a PMMA/PDMS, the latter additive could keep the microphase-separated structures with a continuous PDMS phase, but the former did not. ... Thus, in this study the pervaporation characteristics for the removal of benzene from a dilute aqueous solution of benzene using PFA-g-PDMS/PMMA-g-PDMS and PFA-b-PDMS/PMMA-g-PDMS membranes, which were prepared by adding fluorine-containing graft and block copolymer additives to the PMMA-g-PDMS membrane, were investigated. ...

Tadashi Uragmi; Hiroshi Yamada; Takashi Miyata

2006-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

360

Water-splitting using photocatalytic porphyrin-nanotube composite devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for generating hydrogen by photocatalytic decomposition of water using porphyrin nanotube composites. In some embodiments, both hydrogen and oxygen are generated by photocatalytic decomposition of water.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Miller, James E. (Albuquerque, NM); Wang, Zhongchun (Albuquerque, NM); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA)

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hydrogen from renewable resources research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1986 the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) were contracted by the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) to conduct an assessment of hydrogen production technologies and economic feasibilities of the production and use of hydrogen from renewable resources. In the 1989/90 period all monies were directed toward research and development with an emphasis on integration of tasks, focusing on two important issues, production and storage. The current year's efforts consisted of four tasks, one task containing three subtasks: Hydrogen Production by Gasification of Glucose and Wet Biomass in Supercritical Water; Photoelectrochemical Production of Hydrogen; Photoemission and Photoluminescence Studies of Catalyzed Photoelectrode Surfaces for Hydrogen Production; Solar Energy Chemical Conversion by Means of Photoelectrochemical (PEC) Methods Using Coated Silicon Electrodes; Assessment of Impedance Spectroscopy Methods for Evaluation of Semiconductor-Electrolyte Interfaces; Solar Energy Conversion with Cyanobacteria; Nonclassical Polyhydride Metal Complexes as Hydrogen Storage Materials. 61 refs., 22 figs., 11 tabs.

Takahashi, P.K.; McKinley, K.R.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Hydrogen storage in aligned carbon nanotubes and David T. Shaw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen storage in aligned carbon nanotubes Yan Chena) and David T. Shaw Department of Electrical and thermogravimetric analysis show a hydrogen storage capacity of 5­7 wt% was achieved reproducibly at room temperature the samples to 300 °C and removing of the catalyst tips, can increase the hydrogen storage capacity up to 13

Chung, Deborah D.L.

363

Support of a pathway to a hydrogen future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper consists of viewgraphs which outline the content of the presentation. Subjects addressed include: hydrogen research program vision; electricity industry restructuring -- opportunities and challenges for hydrogen; transportation sector -- opportunities for hydrogen; near-term and mid-term opportunities for hydrogen; and hydrogen production technologies from water. It is concluded that the global climate change challenge is the potential driver for the development of hydrogen systems.

Hoffman, A.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

The Impact of Thermal Conductivity and Diffusion Rates on Water Vapor Transport through Gas Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water management in a hydrogen polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is critical for performance. The impact of thermal conductivity and water vapor diffusion coefficients in a gas diffusion layer (GDL) has been studied by a mathematical model. The fraction of product water that is removed in the vapour phase through the GDL as a function of GDL properties and operating conditions has been calculated and discussed. Furthermore, the current model enables identification of conditions when condensation occurs in each GDL component and calculation of temperature gradient across the interface between different layers, providing insight into the overall mechanism of water transport in a given cell design. Water transport mode and condensation conditions in the GDL components depend on the combination of water vapor diffusion coefficients and thermal conductivities of the GDL components. Different types of GDL and water removal scenarios have been identified and related to experimentally-determined GDL proper...

Burlatsky, S F; Gummallaa, M; Condita, D; Liua, F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 5. Accidental Releases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the course of fifty-three years, LLNL had six acute releases of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) and one acute release of tritiated water vapor (HTO) that were too large relative to the annual releases to be included as part of the annual releases from normal operations detailed in Parts 3 and 4 of the Tritium Dose Reconstruction (TDR). Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) had one such release of HT and one of HTO. Doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for these accidents have been modeled using an equation derived from the time-dependent tritium model, UFOTRI, and parameter values based on expert judgment. All of these acute releases are described in this report. Doses that could not have been exceeded from the large HT releases of 1965 and 1970 were calculated to be 43 {micro}Sv (4.3 mrem) and 120 {micro}Sv (12 mrem) to an adult, respectively. Two published sets of dose predictions for the accidental HT release in 1970 are compared with the dose predictions of this TDR. The highest predicted dose was for an acute release of HTO in 1954. For this release, the dose that could not have been exceeded was estimated to have been 2 mSv (200 mrem), although, because of the high uncertainty about the predictions, the likely dose may have been as low as 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem) or less. The estimated maximum exposures from the accidental releases were such that no adverse health effects would be expected. Appendix A lists all accidents and large routine puff releases that have occurred at LLNL and SNL/CA between 1953 and 2005. Appendix B describes the processes unique to tritium that must be modeled after an acute release, some of the time-dependent tritium models being used today, and the results of tests of these models.

Peterson, S

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Experimental Studies in Hydrogen Generation for Fuel Cell Applications using Aluminum Powder.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??One method of producing on-demand hydrogen for fuel cells is through the use of aluminum which reacts with water under certain conditions to produce hydrogen.… (more)

Ahmad, Faizan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Intrinsic Diffusion of Hydrogen on Rutile TiO2(110). | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

images demonstrate a complex behavior of hydrogen formed by water dissociation on BBO vacancies. Different diffusion rates are observed for the two hydrogens in the original...

368

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Hydrogen - Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis Several different approaches are being pursued to develop on-board hydrogen storage systems for light-duty vehicle applications. The different approaches have different characteristics, such as: the thermal energy and temperature of charge and discharge kinetics of the physical and chemical process steps involved requirements for the materials and energy interfaces between the storage system and the fuel supply system on one hand, and the fuel user on the other Other storage system design and operating parameters influence the projected system costs as well. Argonne researchers are developing thermodynamic, kinetic, and engineering models of the various hydrogen storage systems to understand the characteristics of storage systems based on these approaches and to evaluate their potential to meet the DOE targets for on-board applications. The DOE targets for 2015 include a system gravimetric capacity of 1.8 kWh/kg (5.5 wt%) and a system volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L (40 g/L). We then use these models to identify significant component and performance issues, and evaluate alternative system configurations and design and operating parameters.

369

FOCUS: HYDROGEN EXCHANGE AND COVALENT MODIFICATION ACCOUNT AND PERSPECTIVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen exchange behavior, understand the underlying chemistry and structural physics of hydrogen exchange-protected by their H-bonding interactions, they engage in continual ex- change with the hydrogens of solvent water of the underlying chemistry and structural phys- ics of protein HX processes. The study of protein hydrogen exchange

Englander, S. Walter

370

Drinking Water Problems: Benzene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their water. Activated charcoal or granular activated carbon Cellulose fibers Unfiltered water inlet Filtered water outlet Carbon granules Cellulose fibers Cellulose fibers Figure 2: Granular activated carbon (GAC) filter (adapted from Parrott et al...). filters used to improve the taste or remove odor of the water also can remove some contaminants in water supplies. These filters are effective in removing vola- tile organic compounds which easily vaporize into the atmosphere under normal conditions...

Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

371

Changes in hydrogen utilization with temperature during direct coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reliable means of monitoring the major pathways of hydrogen utilization, in contrast to only measuring net hydrogen comsumption, would be very useful for process optimization. The goal of this work was to develop an analytical approach for quantitatively distinguishing hydrogen consumed in hydrogenation from that utilized to stabilize thermolysis fragments. The approach outlined yields a rather detailed description of the net utilization of hydrogen during direct liquefaction, partitioning it into contributions from gas generation, heteroatom removal, hydrogenation, and matrix breakdown. Preliminary results indicate that internal hydrogen reorganization, with little consumption, predominates at low temperatures, with hydrogenation being compensated for by the hydrogen liberated in condensations. As the temperature is increased, bond cleavage reactions and aromatization reactions appear to become more important, and the net hydrogen consumption increases. (3 tables 1 figs., 11 refs.)

Finseth, D.H.; Bockrath, B.C.; Cillo, D.L.; Illig, E.G.; Sprecher, R.F., Retcofsky, H.L.; Lett, R.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Effects of catalysts and additives on fluorocarbon removal with surface discharge plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The decomposition of fluorocarbons (1%) in Ar was investigated using a surface discharge-type plasma reactor. To enhance the effectiveness of plasma chemical processing, we investigated the effects of catalysts and additives. The removal rate increased when the plasma reactor was packed with TiO2 pellets as a catalyst. The catalytic effect seems to be derived from the direct activation of the TiO2 surface by the plasma discharge, because significant UV emission and temperature increase were not observed in the plasma reactor. The removal rate was also enhanced when water vapor, oxygen, or hydrogen was added to the reactant. In addition, the presence of TiO2 or the additional gases or both depressed byproduct formation. Analysis of the reaction products suggested that the catalysts and additives enhanced the process by preventing the recombination of decomposed fragments.

Atsushi Ogata; Hyun-Ha Kim; Shigeru Futamura; Satoshi Kushiyama; Koichi Mizuno

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Hydrogen Liquefaction  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Liquid Hydrogen is 0.2% Ortho, 99.8% Para 3 Liquid Supply North America 250+ TPD Capacity Diverse Feedstocks Chlor-Alkali SMR Petro-chem Market...

374

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen is an important energy carrier, and when used as a fuel, can be considered as an alternate to the major fossil fuels, coal, crude oil, and natural gas, and their derivatives. It has the potential to b...

Prof. Dr. Robert A. Huggins

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Hydrogen energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...use of hydrogen as an energy carrier will depend significantly...its utilization and conversion to electricity/heat...becomes an alternative energy carrier. However, various...effectively with conventional energy conversion technologies. The...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

377

Hydrogen- and Oxygen from Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DUFFIE, J.A., SOLAR ENERGY THERMAL 178 ( 1974 ). FUNK...4, in which the thermal effects of operation...curve, QH, is the net solar heat flow into the...A. Beckman, in Solar Ener-gy Thermal Processes (Wiley...

Edward A. Fletcher; Roger L. Moen

1977-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

378

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Makarewicz, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Meredith, Paul F. (Knoxville, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Makarewicz, M.A.; Meredith, P.F.

1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

380

Extractive distribution of microamounts of europium and americium in the two phase water — HCl — nitrobenzene — N,N,N?,N?-tetraethyl-2,6-dipicolinamide — hydrogen dicarbollylcobaltate system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extraction of microamounts of europium and americium by a nitrobenzene solution of hydrogen dicarbollylcobaltate (H+B?) in the presence of N,N,N?,N?-tetraethyl-2,6-dipicolinamide (TEtDPA, L) has been investigated...

E. Makrlík; P. Va?ura; P. Selucký…

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Relation of the Water-Soluble Potash, the Replaceable and Acid-Soluble Potash to the Potash Removed by Crops in Pot Experiments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ammonia. This acid is 3.33 N. Digest 10 grams soil for 24 hours with 100 c.c. of the above hydrochloric acid at room temperature, shaking occasionally. Filter and wash with hot water. Add 1 c.c. nitric acid. Evaporate to dryness and heat on steam bath... of the soil with nitric acid become greater as the potash taken up by crops increases. Correlation coefficients for the factors studied show close relations between them. Correction of the 0.2N nitric acid for neutralization by the bases of the soil...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Roles of cocatalysts in semiconductor-based photocatalytic hydrogen production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cocatalyst|hydrogen production|water splitting...Photocatalytic hydrogen generation...promising way for H2 production. For water splitting...solid-state reaction method [12]. Y2O3...versus normal hydrogen electrode, negative...of CdS for H2 production could be increased...hydrothermal method through loading...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Monday, February 23, 2009 Cheap Hydrogen from Scraps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

because burning it creates only water as a waste product. MECs harness the electrons produced by certainMonday, February 23, 2009 Cheap Hydrogen from Scraps Turning organic waste into hydrogen now works scraps and waste water to generate clean hydrogen fuel. But over the past few years, researchers have

384

Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium by Means of Soil Vapor Extraction Enhanced by Desiccation and Water Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium...

385

Removal of carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium by means of soil vapor extraction enhanced by desiccation and water Removal of carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium...

386

Process for producing methane from gas streams containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst capable of catalyzing the disproportionation of carbon monoxide so as to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon on the catalyst essentially without formation of inactive coke thereon. The surface layer is contacted with steam and is thus converted to methane and CO.sub.2, from which a relatively pure methane product may be obtained. While carbon monoxide-containing gas streams having hydrogen or water present therein can be used only the carbon monoxide available after reaction with said hydrogen or water is decomposed to form said active surface carbon. Although hydrogen or water will be converted, partially or completely, to methane that can be utilized in a combustion zone to generate heat for steam production or other energy recovery purposes, said hydrogen is selectively removed from a CO--H.sub.2 -containing feed stream by partial oxidation thereof prior to disproportionation of the CO content of said stream.

Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing including fossil fuel use global warming and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end?users particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN?IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs HTR VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Turbomachinery debris remover  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for removing debris from a turbomachine. The apparatus includes housing and remotely operable viewing and grappling mechanisms for the purpose of locating and removing debris lodged between adjacent blades in a turbomachine.

Krawiec, Donald F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kraf, Robert J. (North Huntingdon, PA); Houser, Robert J. (Monroeville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

10 - Thermochemical production of hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The growing interest in hydrogen as a chemical reactant and energy carrier requires evaluation of all possible conversion processes for its production. This chapter analyses the different processes currently used for hydrogen production, together with the most promising approaches currently under development. Among the latter are thermochemical water-splitting cycles powered by renewable (sustainable) energy sources. A simplified description of the basic thermodynamic aspects of this process is presented, and some examples are presented.

A. Giaconia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Guide to using Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX v.1.1) for Removal of River Stage Effects from Well Water Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A software tool was created in Fiscal Year 2010 (FY11) that enables multiple-regression correction of well water levels for river-stage effects. This task was conducted as part of the Remediation Science and Technology project of CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). This document contains an overview of the correction methodology and a user’s manual for Multiple Regression in Excel (MRCX) v.1.1. It also contains a step-by-step tutorial that shows users how to use MRCX to correct river effects in two different wells. This report is accompanied by an enclosed CD that contains the MRCX installer application and files used in the tutorial exercises.

Mackley, Rob D.; Spane, Frank A.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Allwardt, Craig H.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Alarming Oxygen Depletion Caused by Hydrogen Combustion and Fuel Cells and their Resolution by Magnegas$^{TM}$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We recall that hydrogen combustion does resolve the environmental problems of fossil fuels due to excessive emission of carcinogenic substances and carbon dioxide. However, hydrogen combustion implies the permanent removal from our atmosphere of directly usable oxygen, a serious environmental problem called oxygen depletion, since the combustion turns oxygen into water whose separation to restore the original oxygen is prohibitive due to cost. We then show that a conceivable global use of hydrogen in complete replacement of fossil fuels would imply the permanent removal from our atmosphere of 2.8875x10^7 metric tons O_2/day. Fuel cells are briefly discussed to point out similarly serious environmental problems, again, for large uses. We propose the possibility of resolving these problems by upgrading hydrogen to the new combustible fuel called magnegas^TM, whose chemical structure is composed by the new chemical species of magnecules, whose energy content and other features are beyond the descriptive capacities of quantum chemistry. In fact, magnegas contains up to 50% hydrogen, while having combustion exhaust with: 1) a positive oxygen balance (releasing more oxygen in the exhaust than that used in the combustion); 2) no appreciable carcinogenic or toxic substances; 3) considerably reduced carbon dioxide as compared to fossil fuels; 4) considerably reduced nitrogen oxides; and 5) general reduction of pollutants in the exhaust up to 96% of current EPA standards.

R. M. Santilli

2000-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

392

Hydrogen sulfide spatial distribution and exposure in deep-pit swine housing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objectives of this research focus on investigating spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide gas associated with manure removal and agitation events in deep-pit swine production… (more)

Swestka, Randy John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Hydrogen program overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Active Hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry hydrogen can be activated in an electric discharge if the pressure and voltage are carefully regulated. Active hydrogen reduces metallic sulphides whose heat of formation is 22 000 cal. or less. The active gas is decomposed by 3 cm of well packed glass wool. A quantitative method is given for the determination of active hydrogen. Less of the active gas is formed in a tube coated with stearic acid or phosphoric acid than when no coating is employed. The decay reaction was found to follow the expression for a unimolecular reaction. The rate of decay appears to be independent of the wall surface. The period of half?life at room temperature and 40 mm pressure is 0.2 sec. approximately. The energy of formation of active hydrogen is approximately 18 000 cal. The energy of activation for the decay of the active constituent is approximately 17 800 cal. The properties of active hydrogen are considered in relation to the properties predicted for H3.

A. C. Grubb; A. B. Van Cleave

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Analysis of Ontario's hydrogen economy demands from hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ‘Hydrogen Economy’ is a proposed system where hydrogen is produced from carbon dioxide free energy sources and is used as an alternative fuel for transportation. The utilization of hydrogen to power fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can significantly decrease air pollutants and greenhouse gases emission from the transportation sector. In order to build the future hydrogen economy, there must be a significant development in the hydrogen infrastructure, and huge investments will be needed for the development of hydrogen production, storage, and distribution technologies. This paper focuses on the analysis of hydrogen demand from hydrogen \\{FCVs\\} in Ontario, Canada, and the related cost of hydrogen. Three potential hydrogen demand scenarios over a long period of time were projected to estimate hydrogen \\{FCVs\\} market penetration, and the costs associated with the hydrogen production, storage and distribution were also calculated. A sensitivity analysis was implemented to investigate the uncertainties of some parameters on the design of the future hydrogen infrastructure. It was found that the cost of hydrogen is very sensitive to electricity price, but other factors such as water price, energy efficiency of electrolysis, and plant life have insignificant impact on the total cost of hydrogen produced.

Hui Liu; Ali Almansoori; Michael Fowler; Ali Elkamel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Method and apparatus for removing ions from soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are presented for selectively removing species of ions from an area of soil. Permeable membranes 14 and 18 impregnated with an ion exchange resin that is specific to one or more species of chemical ions are inserted into ground 12 in close proximity to, and on opposing sides of, a soil area of interest 22. An electric potential is applied across electrodes 26 and 28 to cause the migration of ions out of soil area 22 toward the membranes 14 and 18. Preferably, the resin exchanges ions of sodium or hydrogen for ions of mercury that it captures from soil area 22. Once membranes 14 and 18 become substantially saturated with mercury ions, the potential applied across electrodes 26 and 28 is discontinued and membranes 14 and 18 are preferably removed from soil 12 for storage or recovery of the ions. The membranes are also preferably impregnated with a buffer to inhibit the effect of the hydrolysis of water by current from the electrodes.

Bibler, J.P.

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

397

Method and apparatus for removing ions from soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for selectively removing species of ions from an area of soil. Permeable membranes 14 and 18 impregnated with an ion exchange resin that is specific to one or more species of chemical ions are inserted into ground 12 in close proximity to, and on opposing sides of, a soil area of interest 22. An electric potential is applied across electrodes 26 and 28 to cause the migration of ions out of soil area 22 toward the membranes 14 and 18. Preferably, the resin exchanges ions of sodium or hydrogen for ions of mercury that it captures from soil area 22. Once membranes 14 and 18 become substantially saturated with mercury ions, the potential applied across electrodes 26 and 28 is discontinued and membranes 14 and 18 are preferably removed from soil 12 for storage or recovery of the ions. The membranes are also preferably impregnated with a buffer to inhibit the effect of the hydrolysis of water by current from the electrodes.

Bibler, Jane P. (813 E. Rollingwood Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Zirfon® as Separator Material for Water Electrolysis Under Specific Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen production through alkaline water electrolysis requires improvements to use renewable energy more...

María José Lavorante; Juan Isidro Franco…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Hydrogen Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A A H2A: Hydrogen Analysis Margaret K. Mann DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Systems Analysis Workshop July 28-29, 2004 Washington, D.C. H2A Charter * H2A mission: Improve the transparency and consistency of approach to analysis, improve the understanding of the differences among analyses, and seek better validation from industry. * H2A was supported by the HFCIT Program H2A History * First H2A meeting February 2003 * Primary goal: bring consistency & transparency to hydrogen analysis * Current effort is not designed to pick winners - R&D portfolio analysis - Tool for providing R&D direction * Current stage: production & delivery analysis - consistent cost methodology & critical cost analyses * Possible subsequent stages: transition analysis, end-point

400

Hydrogen Technologies Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hydrogen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector List of Hydrogen Incentives Hydrogen Energy Data Book Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleHydrogen&oldid271963...

402

The Hype About Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economy based on the hydrogen fuel cell, but this cannot beus to look toward hydrogen. Fuel cell basics, simplifiedthe path to fuel cell commercialization. Hydrogen production

Mirza, Umar Karim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Steam turbine: Alternative emergency drive for the secure removal of residual heat from the core of light water reactors in ultimate emergency situation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2011 the nuclear power generation has suffered an extreme probation. That could be the meaning of what happened in Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants. In those plants, an earthquake of 8.9 on the Richter scale was recorded. The quake intensity was above the trip point of shutting down the plants. Since heat still continued to be generated, the procedure to cooling the reactor was started. One hour after the earthquake, a tsunami rocked the Fukushima shore, degrading all cooling system of plants. Since the earthquake time, the plant had lost external electricity, impacting the pumping working, drive by electric engine. When operable, the BWR plants responded the management of steam. However, the lack of electricity had degraded the plant maneuvers. In this paper we have presented a scheme to use the steam as an alternative drive to maintain operable the cooling system of nuclear power plant. This scheme adds more reliability and robustness to the cooling systems. Additionally, we purposed a solution to the cooling in case of lacking water for the condenser system. In our approach, steam driven turbines substitute electric engines in the ultimate emergency cooling system. (authors)

Souza Dos Santos, R. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear CNEN/IEN, Cidade Universitaria, Rua Helio de Almeida, 75 - Ilha do Fundiao, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores / CNPq (Brazil)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Regenerable MgO-based sorbent for high temperature CO2 removal from syngas: 3. CO2 capture and sorbent enhanced water gas shift reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Regenerable MgO-based sorbent, which was prepared and evaluated in the thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) in part 1, was also evaluated in high-pressure packed-bed unit in CO2/N2/H2O mixture and simulated pre-combustion syngas environment. In CO2/N2/H2O environment, the CO2 absorption capacity of the sorbent increases with increasing temperatures from 6.7% at 350 °C to 9.5% 450 °C. The sorbent is capable of achieving over 95% CO2 capture and 40% conversion in the water gas shift (WGS) reaction, which should be attributed to positive effect of WGS reaction in producing CO2 during the process. The sorbent reactivity and absorption capacity toward CO2, as well as its WGS catalytic activity decreases with increasing temperature. The maximum pre-breakthrough WGS conversion occurs at 350 °C, which diminishes as the sorbent is carbonated. The variable diffusivity shrinking core reaction model coupled with the two-fluid computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was shown to accurately predict the break-through gas compositions at different operating conditions.

Emadoddin Abbasi; Armin Hassanzadeh; Shahin Zarghami; Hamid Arastoopour; Javad Abbasian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Water Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal bed methane (CBM) gas recovery techniques are unique compared to other production methods. Formation water must be removed, or “dewatered” as it holds the methane gas in the coal seam by hydrostatic pressure...

Alireza Bahadori; Malcolm Clark; Bill Boyd

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Basics Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Basics Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Basics August 14, 2013 - 2:01pm Addthis Photo of a woman scientist using a machine that is purifying biological catalysts for hydrogen production. Hydrogen is the simplest element on Earth. A hydrogen atom consists of only one proton and one electron. It is also the most plentiful element in the universe. Despite its simplicity and abundance, hydrogen doesn't occur naturally as a gas on Earth. It is always combined with other elements. Water, for example, is a combination of hydrogen and oxygen. Hydrogen is also found in many organic compounds, notably the "hydrocarbons" that make up fuels such as gasoline, natural gas, methanol, and propane. To generate electricity using hydrogen, pure hydrogen must first be

407

Hydrogen and Hydrogen-Storage Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Currently, neutron applications in the field of hydrogen and hydrogen-storage materials represent a large and promising research ... relevant topics from this subject area, including hydrogen bulk properties (con...

Milva Celli; Daniele Colognesi; Marco Zoppi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The OLYMPUS Internal Hydrogen Target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An internal hydrogen target system was developed for the OLYMPUS experiment at DESY, in Hamburg, Germany. The target consisted of a long, thin-walled, tubular cell within an aluminum scattering chamber. Hydrogen entered at the center of the cell and exited through the ends, where it was removed from the beamline by a multistage pumping system. A cryogenic coldhead cooled the target cell to counteract heating from the beam and increase the density of hydrogen in the target. A fixed collimator protected the cell from synchrotron radiation and the beam halo. A series of wakefield suppressors reduced heating from beam wakefields. The target system was installed within the DORIS storage ring and was successfully operated during the course of the OLYMPUS experiment in 2012. Information on the design, fabrication, and performance of the target system is reported.

Bernauer, J C; Ciullo, G; Henderson, B S; Ihloff, E; Kelsey, J; Lenisa, P; Milner, R; Schmidt, A; Statera, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

The OLYMPUS Internal Hydrogen Target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An internal hydrogen target system was developed for the OLYMPUS experiment at DESY, in Hamburg, Germany. The target consisted of a long, thin-walled, tubular cell within an aluminum scattering chamber. Hydrogen entered at the center of the cell and exited through the ends, where it was removed from the beamline by a multistage pumping system. A cryogenic coldhead cooled the target cell to counteract heating from the beam and increase the density of hydrogen in the target. A fixed collimator protected the cell from synchrotron radiation and the beam halo. A series of wakefield suppressors reduced heating from beam wakefields. The target system was installed within the DORIS storage ring and was successfully operated during the course of the OLYMPUS experiment in 2012. Information on the design, fabrication, and performance of the target system is reported.

J. C. Bernauer; V. Carassiti; G. Ciullo; B. S. Henderson; E. Ihloff; J. Kelsey; P. Lenisa; R. Milner; A. Schmidt; M. Statera

2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

410

DOE Hydrogen Program FY 2005 Progress Report IV.F Photoelectrochemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

barriers from the Hydrogen Production section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure TechnologiesDOE Hydrogen Program FY 2005 Progress Report 13 IV.F Photoelectrochemical IV.F.1 High-Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Using Solar Thermochemical Splitting of Water - UNLV: Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen

411

The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (CO + H2O = CO2+ H2) is an important reaction for hydrogen upgrading during fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-treatment units in practical low-temperature PEM fuel cell systems, whereby the deleterious CO should be totally for hydrogen upgrading during fuel gas processing. Emerging applications in fuel cells require active, non-pyrophoric, and cost-effective catalysts. Along with a new group of platinum catalysts with atomically dispersed Pt

Napp, Nils

412

Hydrogen Energy System and Hydrogen Production Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen is being considered as a synthetic fuel ... . This paper contains an overview of the hydrogen production methods, those being commercially available today as well...

F. Barbir; T. N. Veziro?lu

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Hydrogen Production from Thermocatalytic Hydrogen Sulfide Decomposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental data on hydrogen production from hydrogen sulfide decomposition over various solid catalysts at ... The possibilities given by surface modification by vacuum methods (electron beam evaporation and ma...

O. K. Alexeeva

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Why Hydrogen? Hydrogen from Diverse Domestic Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Overview of the U.S. DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program, including technical targets and research and development needs for hydrogen storage and delivery.

415

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Biological Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Sciences Biological Sciences NREL's biological scientists conduct research on microorganisms-such as photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae-and are discovering new ways to produce hydrogen and valuable reduced-carbon compounds. We are studying how, through photosynthesis, green algae and cyanobacteria can split water to produce hydrogen, and how, through fermentation, bacteria can produce hydrogen from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. Photobiological Water Splitting Image of two green ovals with two yellow strands at the bottom of each oval. Microscopic view of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Microorganisms, like green algae and cyanobacteria, can produce hydrogen by splitting water through a process called "biophotolysis" or "photobiological hydrogen production." This photosynthetic pathway produces

416

Hydrogen Analysis Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL factsheet that describes the general activites of the Hydrogen Analysis Group within NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The Hype About Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

another promising solution for hydrogen storage. However,storage and delivery, and there are safety issues as well with hydrogen

Mirza, Umar Karim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Hydrogen Technology Validation  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This fact sheet provides a basic introduction to the DOE Hydrogen National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration for non-technical audiences.

419

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Centralized Hydrogen Production from Wind  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wind Wind Project Summary Full Title: Well-to-Wheels Case Study: Centralized Hydrogen Production from Wind Project ID: 214 Principal Investigator: Fred Joseck Keywords: Wind; hydrogen production; well-to-wheels (WTW); fuel cell vehicles (FCV); electrolysis Purpose Provide well-to-wheels energy use and emissions data on a potential pathway for producing hydrogen from wind via centralized water electrolysis. This data was used in developing the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Posture Plan. Performer Principal Investigator: Fred Joseck Organization: DOE/EERE/HFCIT Address: 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Telephone: 202-586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Additional Performers: Margaret Mann, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Michael Wang, Argonne National Laboratory

420

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Distributed Hydrogen Production from Wind  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from Wind from Wind Project Summary Full Title: Well-to-Wheels Case Study: Distributed Hydrogen Production from Wind Project ID: 216 Principal Investigator: Fred Joseck Keywords: Wind; hydrogen production; well-to-wheels (WTW); fuel cell vehicles (FCV); electrolysis Purpose Provide well-to-wheels energy use and emissions data on a potential pathway for producing hydrogen from wind via distributed water electrolysis. This data was used in developing the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Posture Plan. Performer Principal Investigator: Fred Joseck Organization: DOE/EERE/HFCIT Address: 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Telephone: 202-586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Additional Performers: Margaret Mann, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Michael Wang, Argonne National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Inland Wetlands and Water Courses Regulations (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Regulated activities in or near inland wetlands and water courses include the removal or depositing of material, land or water obstruction or alteration, construction, pollution, or water diversion...

422

New High Performance Water Vapor Membranes to Improve Fuel Cell Balance of Plant Efficiency and Lower Costs (SBIR Phase I) - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Earl H. Wagener (Primary Contact), Brad P. Morgan, Jeffrey R. DiMaio Tetramer Technologies L.L.C. 657 S. Mechanic St. Pendleton, SC 29670 Phone: (864) 646-6282 Email: earl.wagener@tetramertechnologies.com DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-SC0006172 Project Start Date: June 17, 2011 Project End Date: March 16, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Demonstrate water vapor transport membrane with * >18,000 gas permeation units (GPU) Water vapor membrane with less than 20% loss in * performance after stress tests Crossover leak rate: <150 GPU * Temperature Durability of 90°C with excursions to * 100°C Cost of <$10/m

423

Risk Removal | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Risk Removal Risk Removal Workers safely remove old mercury tanks from the Y-12 National Security Complex. Workers safely remove old mercury tanks from the Y-12 National Security...

424

8 - Photocatalytic production of hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The photocatalytic production of hydrogen represents a fascinating way to convert and store solar energy as chemical energy, in the form of renewable hydrogen, the ideal fuel for the future. Hydrogen can be produced either by direct water splitting or by photo-reforming of organics in either liquid or gas phase. Both methods are reviewed in this chapter. Starting with a brief historical background, the most recent achievements in the field of photocatalytic hydrogen production are discussed, concerning both the development of innovative materials able to exploit a larger portion of the solar spectrum compared to traditional photocatalytic materials, and the different set-ups and devices which have been developed and tested.

G.L. Chiarello; E. Selli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems - Pipeline Transmission...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems - Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems - Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen Hydrogen Delivery...

426

December 2006 HydrogenHydrogen PPostureosture PlanPlan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and improve the environment. The President urged the development of commercially viable fuel cells for cars in a fuel cell, it can power consumer products from computers to cell phones to cars that emit pure water obstacles...so that the first car driven by a child born today could be powered by hydrogen, and pollution

427

Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Nuclear Research Advanced Nuclear Research Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology FY 2003 Programmatic Overview Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology Henderson/2003 Hydrogen Initiative.ppt 2 Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative Program Goal * Demonstrate the economic commercial-scale production of hydrogen using nuclear energy by 2015 Need for Nuclear Hydrogen * Hydrogen offers significant promise for reduced environmental impact of energy use, specifically in the transportation sector * The use of domestic energy sources to produce hydrogen reduces U.S. dependence on foreign oil and enhances national security * Existing hydrogen production methods are either inefficient or produce

428

Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Closed loop hydrogen turbine & steam turbine, without atmospheric air, equals zero air pollution Heat Exchanger Electrolyzer produces H 2 & O 2 gases by water electrolysis...

429

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Barriers: Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water vapor?) hpwgwembrittlementsteelssofronis.pdf More Documents & Publications Webinar: I2CNER: An...

430

Hydrogenases and Hydrogen Metabolism of Cyanobacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...lowers the potential solar energy conversion efficiencies...molecular hydrogen from solar energy and water by using...several individual projects, two major international...International Energy Agency; http...direct conversion of solar energy (114...

Paula Tamagnini; Rikard Axelsson; Pia Lindberg; Fredrik Oxelfelt; Röbbe Wünschiers; Peter Lindblad

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Sandia National Laboratories: accelerate hydrogen infrastructure...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have been a major water- and air-pollution source in the U.S.-but remained ... Sandia, SRI International Sign Pact to Advance Hydrogen and Natural Gas Research for...

432

Sandia National Laboratories: hydrogen fuel systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

have been a major water- and air-pollution source in the U.S.-but remained ... Sandia, SRI International Sign Pact to Advance Hydrogen and Natural Gas Research for...

433

Hydrogenases and Hydrogen Metabolism of Cyanobacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...wastes into valuable, energy-rich compounds such...hydrogen from solar energy and water by using a renewable process. The present...IEA (International Energy Agency; http...the European program COST (European Cooperation...

Paula Tamagnini; Rikard Axelsson; Pia Lindberg; Fredrik Oxelfelt; Röbbe Wünschiers; Peter Lindblad

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Generating Potable Water from Fuel Cell Technology Juan E. Tibaquir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with hydrogen economy scenario. 4. Research Approach and Results Survey of fuel cell water ASU lab fuel cell Capacity (kW) 5 ­ 150 5 ­ 250 5 50 ­ 1100 100 ­ 2000 100 ­ 250 PEM Fuel cell Oxygen (From air) Hydrogen Implications of Using water from Fuel Cells in a Hydrogen Economy · Hydrogen as an energy and water carrier

Keller, Arturo A.

435

ENHANCED HYDROGEN PRODUCTION INTEGRATED WITH CO2 SEPARATION IN A SINGLE-STAGE REACTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The water gas shift reaction (WGSR) plays a major role in increasing the hydrogen production from fossil fuels. However, the enhanced hydrogen production is limited by thermodynamic constrains posed by equilibrium limitations of WGSR. This project aims at using a mesoporous, tailored, highly reactive calcium based sorbent system for incessantly removing the CO{sub 2} product which drives the equilibrium limited WGSR forward. In addition, a pure sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream is produced simultaneously. A detailed project vision with the description of integration of this concept with an existing coal gasification process for hydrogen production is presented. Conceptual reactor designs for investigating the simultaneous water gas shift and the CaO carbonation reactions are presented. In addition, the options for conducting in-situ sorbent regeneration under vacuum or steam are also reported. Preliminary, water gas shift reactions using high temperature shift catalyst and without any sorbent confirmed the equilibrium limitation beyond 600 C demonstrating a carbon monoxide conversion of about 80%. From detailed thermodynamic analyses performed for fuel gas streams from typical gasifiers the optimal operating temperature range to prevent CaO hydration and to effect its carbonation is between 575-830 C.

Himanshu Gupta; Mahesh Iyer; Bartev Sakadjian; Liang-Shih Fan

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

436

Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this process, hydrogen is produced from water using sunlight and specialized semiconductors called photoelectrochemical materials. In the photoelectrochemical (PEC) system, the semiconductor uses light energy to directly dissociate water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen. Different semiconductor materials work at particular wavelengths of light and energies.

437

Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop: Code for Hydrogen Pipelines...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pipeline Working Group Workshop: Code for Hydrogen Pipelines Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop: Code for Hydrogen Pipelines Code for Hydrogen Piping and Pipelines. B31...

438

Bulk Hydrogen Storage - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bulk Hydrogen Storage - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Bulk Hydrogen Storage - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Targets, barriers and...

439

Hydrogen Bonded Arrays: The Power of Multiple Hydrogen Bonds...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bonded Arrays: The Power of Multiple Hydrogen Bonds. Hydrogen Bonded Arrays: The Power of Multiple Hydrogen Bonds. Abstract: Hydrogen bond interactions in small covalent model...

440

Multistage Zeeman deceleration of hydrogen atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deceleration of beams of neutral particles possessing an electron spin with time-dependent inhomogeneous magnetic fields is demonstrated experimentally. Half the kinetic energy of a velocity-selected part of a pulsed supersonic beam of hydrogen atoms in the ground state is removed using six pulsed magnetic field stages.

Vanhaecke, Nicolas [Physical Chemistry, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Laboratoire Aime Cotton, batiment 505, Campus d'Orsay, 91405 Orsay (France); Meier, Urban; Andrist, Markus; Meier, Beat H.; Merkt, Frederic [Physical Chemistry, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation P. Sofronis, I. M. Robertson, D% · Contractor share: 25% · Barriers ­ Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water;Objectives · To come up with a mechanistic understanding of hydrogen embrittlement in pipeline steels

442

Hydrogen Bonding Penalty upon Ligand Binding Hongtao Zhao, Danzhi Huang*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Bonding Penalty upon Ligand Binding Hongtao Zhao, Danzhi Huang* Department of Biochemistry, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract Ligand binding involves breakage of hydrogen bonds with water molecules and formation of new hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand. In this work, the change

Caflisch, Amedeo

443

Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Tetrahymena thermophila  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis by Tetrahymena thermophila Sitindra S Accepted 7 September 2013 Available online 16 September 2013 a b s t r a c t Hydrogen isotope ratio values from recording the hydrogen isotope composition of ambient water, dD values of lipids also depend

444

Production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, and chemicals from catalytic processing of bio-oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a method of generating hydrogen from a bio-oil, comprising hydrogenating a water-soluble fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst, and reforming the water-soluble fraction by aqueous-phase reforming in the presence of a reforming catalyst, wherein hydrogen is generated by the reforming, and the amount of hydrogen generated is greater than that consumed by the hydrogenating. The method can further comprise hydrocracking or hydrotreating a lignin fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrocracking catalyst wherein the lignin fraction of bio-oil is obtained as a water-insoluble fraction from aqueous extraction of bio-oil. The hydrogen used in the hydrogenating and in the hydrocracking or hydrotreating can be generated by reforming the water-soluble fraction of bio-oil.

Huber, George W; Vispute, Tushar P; Routray, Kamalakanta

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

445

An Analysis of Near-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Rollout Scenarios for Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen dispenser Reverse osmosis and deionizer waterAlkaline Electrolyzer Reverse osmosis and deionizer waterhydrogen dispenser Reverse osmosis and deionizer water

Nicholas, Michael A; Ogden, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Photobiological Water Splitting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this process, hydrogen is produced from water using sunlight and specialized microorganisms, such as green algae and cyanobacteria. Just as plants produce oxygen during photosynthesis, these microorganisms consume water and produce hydrogen as a byproduct of their natural metabolic processes. Photobiological water splitting is a long-term technology. Currently, the microbes split water much too slowly to be used for efficient, commercial hydrogen production. But scientists are researching ways to modify the microorganisms and to identify other naturally occurring microbes that can produce hydrogen at higher rates. Photobiological water splitting is in the very early stages of research but offers long-term potential for sustainable hydrogen production with low environmental impact.

447

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) emit approximately the same amount of water per mile as vehicles...

448

Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Fuel Cells Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) emit approximately the same amount of water per...

449

Hydrogen from Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal Coal Edward Schmetz Office of Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels U.S. Department of Energy DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification Technologies September 8, 2004 Presentation Outline ƒ Hydrogen Initiatives ƒ Hydrogen from Coal Central Production Goal ƒ Why Coal ƒ Why Hydrogen Separation Membranes ƒ Coal-based Synthesis Gas Characteristics ƒ Technical Barriers ƒ Targets ƒ Future Plans 2 3 Hydrogen from Coal Program Hydrogen from Coal Program FutureGen FutureGen Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Carbon Capture & Sequestration Carbon Capture & Sequestration The Hydrogen from Coal Program Supports the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative and FutureGen * The Hydrogen Fuel Initiative is a $1.2 billion RD&D program to develop hydrogen

450

Process and apparatus for reducing the loss of hydrogen from Stirling engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Stirling engine assembly is described which defines a working gas volume therein, the Stirling engine assembly comprising: a working gas reservoir for storing a working gas at a pressure greater than pressure of the working gas in the working volume of the Stirling engine; a trap cell operatively connected between an outlet of the reservoir and the Stirling engine working volume. The trap cell includes an enclosure having porous windows at either end thereof and a sorbent with an affinity for water vapor therein, such that water vapor adsorbed on the sorbent diffuses into the hydrogen passing from the reservoir into the working engine; a compressor means for drawing working gas from the Stirling engine working volume, through the trap cell and pumping the working gas into the hydrogen reservoir. The sorbent in the trap cell at the reduced pressure caused by the compressor adsorbs water vapor from the working gas such that substantially dry working gas is pumped by the compressor into the reservoir. The working gas is doped with water vapor by the tank cell as it passes into the Stirling engine and is dried by the trap cell as it is removed from the working engine for storage in the reservoir to prevent condensation of water vapor in the reservoir.

Alger, D.L.

1987-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

451

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies ProgramHydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Hydrogen Codes &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies ProgramHydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure)DescriptionMilestone #12;Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies ProgramHydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Hydrogen Codes & Standards #12;Hydrogen Codes & Standards: Goal & Objectives Goal

452

HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to serve as "go-to" organization to catalyze PA Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Economy development #12;FundingHYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA HYDROGEN REGIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAM IN PENNSYLVANIA Melissa Klingenberg, PhDMelissa Klingenberg, PhD #12;Hydrogen ProgramHydrogen Program Air Products

453

Hydrogen Vehicles and Refueling Infrastructure in India  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HYDROGEN VEHICLES AND FUELLING HYDROGEN VEHICLES AND FUELLING INFRASTRUCTURE IN INDIA Prof. L. M. Das Centre for Energy Studies Indian Institute of Technology Delhi INDIA " The earth was not given to us by our parents , it has been loaned to us by our children" Kenyan Proverb Same feeling exists in all societies Our moral responsibility---to handover a safer earth to future generation IIT Delhi August 18, 2004 -:Hydrogen:- Not a Radically New Concept JULES VERNE Mysterious Island (1876) ...." I believe that water will one day be employed as fuel, that hydrogen and oxygen which constitute it, used singly or together will furnish an inexhaustible source of heat and light of an intensity of which coal is not capable.........water will be coal of the future" IIT Delhi August 18, 2004 Source: T. Nejat Veziroglu , Hydrogen Energy Technologies, UNIDO

454

Hydrogen Storage Experiments for an Undergraduate Laboratory Course—Clean Energy: Hydrogen/Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Storage Experiments for an Undergraduate Laboratory Course—Clean Energy: Hydrogen/Fuel Cells ... Global interest in both renewable energies and reduction in emission levels has placed increasing attention on hydrogen-based fuel cells that avoid harm to the environment by releasing only water as a byproduct. ... First-Year Undergraduate/General; Green Chemistry; Laboratory Instruction; Environmental Chemistry; Hands-On Learning/Manipulatives; Applications of Chemistry; Electrolytic/Galvanic Cells/Potentials ...

Alla Bailey; Lisa Andrews; Ameya Khot; Lea Rubin; Jun Young; Thomas D. Allston; Gerald A. Takacs

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

455

In-situ Removal of Hydrogen Sulphide from Landfill Gas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This project was compiled in co-operation with the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm and Veolia Environmental Services (Australia) at the Woodlawn Bioreactor in NSW,… (more)

Lazarevic, David Andrew

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Solar-hydrogen energy system for Pakistan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solar-hydrogen energy system has been proposed for Pakistan as the best replacement for the present fossil fuel based energy system. It has been suggested to produce hydrogen via photovoltaic-electrolysis, utilizing the available non-agricultural sunny terrain in Baluchistan region. There will be a desalination plant for sea water desalination. The area under the photovoltaic panels with the availability of water would provide suitable environment for growing some cash crops. This would change the cast useless desert land into green productive farms. In order to show the quantitative benefits of the proposed system, future trends of important energy and economical parameters have been studied with and without hydrogen introduction. The following parameters have been included: population, energy demand (fossil + hydrogen), energy production (fossil + hydrogen), gross national product, fossil energy imports, world energy prices, air pollution, quality of life, environmental savings due to hydrogen introduction, savings due to the higher utilization efficiency of hydrogen, by-product credit, agricultural income, income from hydrogen sale, photovoltaic cell area, total land area, water desalination plant capacity, capital investment, operating and maintenance cost, and total income from the system. The results indicate that adopting the solar-hydrogen energy system would eliminate the import dependency of fossil fuels, increase gross product per capita, reduce pollution, improve quality of life and establish a permanent and clean energy system. The total annual expenditure on the proposed system is less than the total income from the proposed system. The availability of water, the cash crop production, electricity and hydrogen would result in rapid development of Baluchistan, the largest province of Pakistan.

Lutfi, N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Process for removing polymer-forming impurities from naphtha fraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Polymer precursor materials are vaporized without polymerization or are removed from a raw naphtha fraction by passing the raw naphtha to a vaporization zone and vaporizing the naphtha in the presence of a wash oil while stripping with hot hydrogen to prevent polymer deposits in the equipment. 2 figs.

Kowalczyk, D.C.; Bricklemyer, B.A.; Svoboda, J.J.

1983-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

458

Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy via High Temperature Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the technical case for high-temperature nuclear hydrogen production. A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on high-temperature thermal water splitting processes is presented. Specific details of hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis are also provided, including results of recent experiments performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Based on these results, high-temperature electrolysis appears to be a promising technology for efficient large-scale hydrogen production.

James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Grant L. Hawkes

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on AddThis.com... Home Basics Central Versus Distributed Production Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Basics Photo of hydrogen production in photobioreactor Hydrogen, chemical symbol "H", is the simplest element on earth. An atom of hydrogen has only one proton and one electron. Hydrogen gas is a diatomic

460

The Transition to Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

above, not all hydrogen production methods are equal inrealize hydrogen’s bene- ?ts fully, production methods thathydrogen vary depending on which primary source produces it and which production method

Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The Hydrogen Economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrogen economy is a vision for a future in which hydrogen replaces fossil fuels. There are a variety ... of methods for generating, storing and delivering hydrogen since no single method has yet proven supe...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Hydrogen storage methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen exhibits the highest heating value per mass of all chemical fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen is regenerative and environmentally friendly. There are two reasons why hydrogen is not the major fuel of today’s ...

Andreas Züttel

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles UCD-ITS-RR-92-14 September byet al. , 1988,1989 HYDROGEN FUEL-CELL VEHICLES: TECHNICALIn the FCEV, the hydrogen fuel cell could supply the "net"

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the hydrogen refueling station. Compressor cost: inputcost) Compressor power requirement: input data 288.80 Initial temperature of hydrogen (Compressor cost per unit of output ($/hp/million standard ft [SCF] of hydrogen/

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Anti-reflective nanoporous silicon for efficient hydrogen production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Exemplary embodiments are disclosed of anti-reflective nanoporous silicon for efficient hydrogen production by photoelectrolysis of water. A nanoporous black Si is disclosed as an efficient photocathode for H.sub.2 production from water splitting half-reaction.

Oh, Jihun; Branz, Howard M

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

466

Hydrogen Production from Hydrogen Sulfide in IGCC Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IGCC power plants are the cleanest coal-based power generation facilities in the world. Technical improvements are needed to help make them cost competitive. Sulfur recovery is one procedure in which improvement is possible. This project has developed and demonstrated an electrochemical process that could provide such an improvement. IGCC power plants now in operation extract the sulfur from the synthesis gas as hydrogen sulfide. In this project H{sub 2}S has been electrolyzed to yield sulfur and hydrogen (instead of sulfur and water as is the present practice). The value of the byproduct hydrogen makes this process more cost effective. The electrolysis has exploited some recent developments in solid state electrolytes. The proof of principal for the project concept has been accomplished.

Elias Stefanakos; Burton Krakow; Jonathan Mbah

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

Microbial fuel cell treatment of ethanol fermentation process water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a method for removing inhibitor compounds from a cellulosic biomass-to-ethanol process which includes a pretreatment step of raw cellulosic biomass material and the production of fermentation process water after production and removal of ethanol from a fermentation step, the method comprising contacting said fermentation process water with an anode of a microbial fuel cell, said anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of said inhibitor compounds while producing electrical energy or hydrogen from said oxidative degradation, and wherein said anode is in electrical communication with a cathode, and a porous material (such as a porous or cation-permeable membrane) separates said anode and cathode.

Borole, Abhijeet P. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

468

Solar-Thermal ALD Ferrite-Based Water Splitting Cycle - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Alan W. Weimer (Primary Contact), Darwin Arifin, Xinhua Liang, Victoria Aston and Paul Lichty University of Colorado Campus Box 596 Boulder, CO 80309-0596 Phone: (303) 492-3759 Email: alan.weimer@colorado.edu DOE Manager HQ: Sara Dillich Phone: (202) 586-7925 Email: Sara.Dillich@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-05GO15044 Project Start Date: March 31, 2005 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Demonstrate the "hercynite cycle" feasibility for * carrying out redox. Initiate design, synthesis and testing of a nanostructured * active material for fast kinetics and transport.

469

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Genevieve Saur (Primary Contact), Chris Ainscough. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-3783 Email: genevieve.saur@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Corroborate recent wind electrolysis cost studies using a * more detailed hour-by-hour analysis. Examine consequences of different system configuration * and operation for four scenarios, at 42 sites in five

470

Solar High-Temperature Water Splitting Cycle with Quantum Boost - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Robin Taylor (Primary Contact), Roger Davenport, David Genders 1 , Peter Symons 1 , Lloyd Brown 2 , Jan Talbot 3 , Richard Herz 3 Science Applications International, Corp. (SAIC) 10210 Campus Point Drive San Diego, CA 92121 Phone: (858) 826-9124 Email: taylorro@saic.com 1 Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. (ESC) 2 Thermochemical Engineering Solutions (TCHEME) 3 University of California, San Diego (UCSD) DOE Managers HQ: Sara Dillich Phone: (202) 586-7925 Email: Sara.Dillich@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-07GO17002 Subcontractors: * Electrosynthesis Co., Inc., Lancaster, NY * Thermochemical Engineering Solutions, San Diego, CA

471

Hydrogen Permeation Barrier Coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gaseous hydrogen, H2, has many physical properties that allow it to move rapidly into and through materials, which causes problems in keeping hydrogen from materials that are sensitive to hydrogen-induced degradation. Hydrogen molecules are the smallest diatomic molecules, with a molecular radius of about 37 x 10-12 m and the hydrogen atom is smaller still. Since it is small and light it is easily transported within materials by diffusion processes. The process of hydrogen entering and transporting through a materials is generally known as permeation and this section reviews the development of hydrogen permeation barriers and barrier coatings for the upcoming hydrogen economy.

Henager, Charles H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Technology: Hydrogen and hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... . 2249–2258 (2004). US Department of Energy Hydrogen Posture Plan http://www.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/pdfs/hydrogen_posture_plan.pdf Kuhs, W. F. , Genov, ...

Ferdi Schüth

2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

473

Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group of research and industry experts focuses on issues related to the cost, safety, and reliability of hydrogen pipelines. Participants represent organizations...

474

Hydrogen and fuel taxation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The competitiveness of hydrogen depends on how it is integrated in the energy tax system in Europe. This paper addresses the competitiveness of hydrogen and… (more)

Hansen, Anders Chr.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Solar hydrogen production using Ce{sub 1-x}Li{sub x}O{sub 2-{delta}} solid solutions via a thermochemical, two-step water-splitting cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reactivity of Ce{sub 1-x}Li{sub x}O{sub 2-{delta}} (x=0.025, 0.05, 0.075 and 0.1) solid solutions during the redox and two-step water-splitting cycles has been investigated in this work. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicate that there are two reaction mechanisms in the O{sub 2}-releasing step and the shift in the reaction mechanisms occurs in the O{sub 2}-releasing step because of sintering at high temperatures, and a decrease in the concentration of lattice oxygen occurs as the O{sub 2}-releasing step proceeds. The reaction in the O{sub 2}-releasing step follows a second-order mechanism over a temperature range of 1000-1170 Degree-Sign C and a contracting-area model over a temperature range of 1170-1500 Degree-Sign C. According to direct gas mass spectroscopy (DGMS), ceria doped at 5 mol% Li exhibits the highest reactivity in the O{sub 2}-releasing step during both redox cycles in air and two-step water-splitting cycles, whereas ceria doped at 2.5 mol% Li yields the highest amount of hydrogen (4.79 ml/g) in the H{sub 2}-generation step during the two-step water-splitting cycles, which is higher than ceria doped with other metals. DGMS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) suggest that the average reaction rate in the H{sub 2}-generation step is influenced by the concentration of extrinsic oxygen vacancies, and thus, the reactivity in the H{sub 2}-generation step, to some degree, could be tuned by varying the concentration of extrinsic oxygen vacancies (Li content). - Graphical abstract: Average reduction fraction of Ce{sub 1-x}Li{sub x}O{sub 2-{delta}} (x=0.025, 0.05, 0.075 and 0.10) solid solutions versus Li content in the O{sub 2}-releasing step during the redox cycles in air and the two-step water-splitting cycles. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have investigated Li-doped ceria for hydrogen production using two-step water-splitting cycles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sintering effect on the reaction mechanisms was first clarified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The shift of reaction mechanisms occurs during the O{sub 2}-releasing step. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reaction-mechanism shift occurs because of sintering at high temperatures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doping at 2.5 mol% Li results in the highest H{sub 2} yield and cyclability for hydrogen production.

Meng, Qing-Long; Lee, Chong-il; Shigeta, Satoshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo 1528850 (Japan)] [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo 1528850 (Japan); Kaneko, Hiroshi [Solutions Research Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo 1528850 (Japan)] [Solutions Research Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo 1528850 (Japan); Tamaura, Yutaka, E-mail: ytamaura@chem.titech.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo 1528850 (Japan)] [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo 1528850 (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

Synthesis of Longtime Water/Air-Stable Ni Nanoparticles and Their High Catalytic Activity for Hydrolysis of Ammonia?Borane for Hydrogen Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soluble starch (amylose), a renewable polymer, is the main component of starch which is the main energy reserve of all higher plants, and can form a dispersion in water. ... The TEM samples were prepared by depositing one or two droplets of the nanoparticle suspensions onto the amorphous carbon coated copper grids, which were dried in argon atmosphere. ... Nitrogen sorption measurements were carried out on an automatic volumetric adsorption equipment (BEL mini, Japan) using the Brunauer?Emmett?Teller (BET) method to test the surface areas of the in situ synthesized catalysts with/without starch after washing with water and vacuum drying at 90 °C. ...

Jun-Min Yan; Xin-Bo Zhang; Song Han; Hiroshi Shioyama; Qiang Xu

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

477

Hydrogen Pipeline Discussion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

praxair.com praxair.com Copyright © 2003, Praxair Technology, Inc. All rights reserved. Hydrogen Pipeline Discussion BY Robert Zawierucha, Kang Xu and Gary Koeppel PRAXAIR TECHNOLOGY CENTER TONAWANDA, NEW YORK DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Workshop Augusta, GA August 2005 2 Introduction Regulatory and technical groups that impact hydrogen and hydrogen systems ASME, DOE, DOT etc, Compressed Gas Association activities ASTM TG G1.06.08 Hydrogen pipelines and CGA-5.6 Selected experience and guidance Summary and recommendations 3 CGA Publications Pertinent to Hydrogen G-5: Hydrogen G-5.3: Commodity Specification for Hydrogen G-5.4: Standard for Hydrogen Piping at Consumer Locations G-5.5: Hydrogen Vent Systems G-5.6: Hydrogen Pipeline Systems (IGC Doc 121/04/E) G-5.7: Carbon Monoxide and Syngas

478

Hydrogen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

<-- Back to Hydrogen Gateway <-- Back to Hydrogen Gateway Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials KIA FCEV SUNRISE MG 7955 6 7.jpg Guidance on materials selection for hydrogen service is needed to support the deployment of hydrogen as a fuel as well as the development of codes and standards for stationary hydrogen use, hydrogen vehicles, refueling stations, and hydrogen transportation. Materials property measurement is needed on deformation, fracture and fatigue of metals in environments relevant to this hydrogen economy infrastructure. The identification of hydrogen-affected material properties such as strength, fracture resistance and fatigue resistance are high priorities to ensure the safe design of load-bearing structures. To support the needs of the hydrogen community, Sandia National

479

Requirements for low cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multi-unit intertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen fuel by electrolysis meeting equal consumer costhydrogen fuel production by water electrolysis to provide lower fuel costFig. 2: Cost hydrogen bywater of (Coil) electrolysis as

Logan, B. Grant; Moir, Ralph; Hoffman, Myron A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Overview of interstate hydrogen pipeline systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of hydrogen in the energy sector of the United States is projected to increase significantly in the future. Current uses are predominantly in the petroleum refining sector, with hydrogen also being used in the manufacture of chemicals and other specialized products. Growth in hydrogen consumption is likely to appear in the refining sector, where greater quantities of hydrogen will be required as the quality of the raw crude decreases, and in the mining and processing of tar sands and other energy resources that are not currently used at a significant level. Furthermore, the use of hydrogen as a transportation fuel has been proposed both by automobile manufacturers and the federal government. Assuming that the use of hydrogen will significantly increase in the future, there would be a corresponding need to transport this material. A variety of production technologies are available for making hydrogen, and there are equally varied raw materials. Potential raw materials include natural gas, coal, nuclear fuel, and renewables such as solar, wind, or wave energy. As these raw materials are not uniformly distributed throughout the United States, it would be necessary to transport either the raw materials or the hydrogen long distances to the appropriate markets. While hydrogen may be transported in a number of possible forms, pipelines currently appear to be the most economical means of moving it in large quantities over great distances. One means of controlling hydrogen pipeline costs is to use common rights-of-way (ROWs) whenever feasible. For that reason, information on hydrogen pipelines is the focus of this document. Many of the features of hydrogen pipelines are similar to those of natural gas pipelines. Furthermore, as hydrogen pipeline networks expand, many of the same construction and operating features of natural gas networks would be replicated. As a result, the description of hydrogen pipelines will be very similar to that of natural gas pipelines. The following discussion will focus on the similarities and differences between the two pipeline networks. Hydrogen production is currently concentrated in refining centers along the Gulf Coast and in the Farm Belt. These locations have ready access to natural gas, which is used in the steam methane reduction process to make bulk hydrogen in this country. Production centers could possibly change to lie along coastlines, rivers, lakes, or rail lines, should nuclear power or coal become a significant energy source for hydrogen production processes. Should electrolysis become a dominant process for hydrogen production, water availability would be an additional factor in the location of production facilities. Once produced, hydrogen must be transported to markets. A key obstacle to making hydrogen fuel widely available is the scale of expansion needed to serve additional markets. Developing a hydrogen transmission and distribution infrastructure would be one of the challenges to be faced if the United States is to move toward a hydrogen economy. Initial uses of hydrogen are likely to involve a variety of transmission and distribution methods. Smaller users would probably use truck transport, with the hydrogen being in either the liquid or gaseous form. Larger users, however, would likely consider using pipelines. This option would require specially constructed pipelines and the associated infrastructure. Pipeline transmission of hydrogen dates back to late 1930s. These pipelines have generally operated at less than 1,000 pounds per square inch (psi), with a good safety record. Estimates of the existing hydrogen transmission system in the United States range from about 450 to 800 miles. Estimates for Europe range from about 700 to 1,100 miles (Mohipour et al. 2004; Amos 1998). These seemingly large ranges result from using differing criteria in determining pipeline distances. For example, some analysts consider only pipelines above a certain diameter as transmission lines. Others count only those pipelines that transport hydrogen from a producer to a customer (e.g., t

Gillette, J .L.; Kolpa, R. L

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove water hydrogen" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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481

Hydrogen energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...present-day petrol-driven car engines. When heat...combined heat and power (CHP) systems...most of their output power range. This scalability...decentralized stationary power generation. Fuel...fuel cells emit only water and have virtually...battery-driven electric cars, because the chemical...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Theoretical Design by First Principles Molecular Dynamics of a Bioinspired Electrode?Catalyst System for Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Production from Acidified Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our study is based on Car?Parrinello (CP)(26) FPMD simulations of the [FeFe]H cluster in a liquid-water environment with or without hydronium ions. ... To achieve these results, we have employed the first principles molecular dynamics method at an advanced level of system complexity and have illustrated thereby the utility and power of FPMD for molecular design. ...

Federico Zipoli; Roberto Car; Morrel H. Cohen; Annabella Selloni

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z