Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Centrifugal accelerator, system and method for removing unwanted layers from a surface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryoblasting process having a centrifugal accelerator for accelerating frozen pellets of argon or carbon dioxide toward a target area utilizes an accelerator throw wheel designed to induce, during operation, the creation of a low-friction gas bearing within internal passages of the wheel which would otherwise retard acceleration of the pellets as they move through the passages. An associated system and method for removing paint from a surface with cryoblasting techniques involves the treating, such as a preheating, of the painted surface to soften the paint prior to the impacting of frozen pellets thereagainst to increase the rate of paint removal. A system and method for producing large quantities of frozen pellets from a liquid material, such as liquid argon or carbon dioxide, for use in a cryoblasting process utilizes a chamber into which the liquid material is introduced in the form of a jet which disintegrates into droplets. A non-condensible gas, such as inert helium or air, is injected into the chamber at a controlled rate so that the droplets freeze into bodies of relatively high density.

Foster, Christopher A. (Clinton, TN); Fisher, Paul W. (Heiskell, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Turning unwanted carbon dioxide into electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and use it as a tool to boost electric power. Turning unwanted carbon dioxide into electricity Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov High Resolution Image The...

3

(DOE/EIS-0285-126): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program 2/19/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KEP-4 KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-126- Alvey Fairview Benjamin Tilley - TFE/Alvey Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Alvey Fairview 230kV transmission line from structure 1/1 through structure 64/7. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region in Coos, Douglas, and Lane Counties, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, along access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently

4

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-11)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-10)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-13)  

SciTech Connect

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

7

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-12)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-141- SalemAlbany #2)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1- SalemAlbany #2) 1- SalemAlbany #2) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Salem Albany #2 115 kV transmission line from Salem Substation to Albany Substation. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, within Marion, Polk, and Benton Counties, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, switch platforms, microwave beam paths, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission

9

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-140- SalemAlbany1)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0- SalemAlbany1) 0- SalemAlbany1) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Salem Albany #1 115 kV transmission line from Salem Substation to Albany Substation. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, Marion, Linn, and Benton County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, switch platforms, microwave beam paths, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission

10

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-22)(8/17/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 17, 2001 August 17, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-22) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Chief Joseph - Snohomish No.3 and 4 Transmission Line ROW. From STR 94/1 to STR 113/1 Location: The ROW is located in King and Snohomish Counties, WA, in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is

11

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-26)(9/11/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11, 2001 11, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-26) Ben Tilley - TFE/Alvey Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on Reedsport-Fairview #1 Transmission Line Structure 1/5 to 39/4. Location: All ROW are located in Coos and Douglas Counties, OR, all being in the Eugene Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Eugene Region. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently

12

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-28)(9/5/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 5, 2001 September 5, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-28) James Jellison - TFO/Olympia Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Port Angeles - Sappo No.1 Transmission Line ROW, from struture 1/1 to structure 42/10. Location: The ROW is located in Clallum County, WA, all in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Olympia Region. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is

13

DOE/EIS-0285-SA-137: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS - Chemawa-Salem 1&2 (4/1/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7- Chemawa-Salem1&2) 7- Chemawa-Salem1&2) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Chemawa-Salem #1 115 kV and #2 230 kV transmission lines from Chemawa Substation to Salem Substation. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, Marion County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, switch platforms, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-

14

DOE/EIS-0285-SA-136: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS - Oregon City-Chemawal 1&2 (4/1/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6- Oregon City-Chemawa1&2) 6- Oregon City-Chemawa1&2) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Oregon City-Chemawa #1 and #2 115 kV transmission lines from Oregon City Substation to Chemawa Substation. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, Washington and Marion Counties, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, switch platforms, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that

15

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-10): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 5/15/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0) 0) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Covington-Duwamish No. 1 ROW from the Covington Substation to tower 10/4. Location: The ROW is located in King County, WA, being in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to

16

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-12): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 5/15/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2) 2) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1 Transmission Line ROW. Location: The ROW is located in Pierce and King Counties, WA, being in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the

17

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-148- McNary Wildlife (McNary-Santiam #2))  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-148- McNary Wildlife (McNary-Santiam #2)) Mark Newbill - TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Joint project with US Forest Service for vegetation control for the McNary- Santiam #2 230 kV transmission line that enhances wildlife habitat under powerlines. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region within Marion County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in cooperation with US Forest Service. Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way by hand cutting or machine mowing. The overall goal is to remove small fir trees, brushy

18

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA 84): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS Monroe-Custer No.1 7/1/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July July 1, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 84 Monroe-Custer No.l Don Atkinson -- - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Monroe-Custer No. 1500kV transmission line from structure 61/1 through structure 88/4. This project includes contemporaneous vegetation management along the Monroe-Custer No. 2 500kV and the Arlington-Bellingham 230kV transmission line corridors which run parallel to the subject transmission line. Corridor width varies from 140 to 825 feet. (All structure locations referenced in this SA refer to the Monroe-Custer No. 1.) The project area is located within Whatcom County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the

19

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-99): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS -Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1 8/29/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 9, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-99-Olympia-Grand Coulee No. 1 Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Olympia-Grand Coulee No. 1, 287 kV transmission line from structure 53/4 through structure 64/1. Corridor width is 125 feet. Location: The project area is located within King County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. Approximately 163 acres will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Vegetation management is required for unimpeded

20

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-105): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (08/22/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 105 Elbe Tap to Alder-LaGrande No. 1 James Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Elbe Tap to Alder-LaGrande No.1 and 115kV transmission line from structure 1/1 through structure 7/17. Corridor width varies. The project area is located within Whatcom County, Washington. Location: Transmission line is located at and west of Elbe, Pierce County Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. The right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-119): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 1/29/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2003 9, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-119 Snohomish-Murray No. 1 Transmission Line Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Snohomish-Murray No. 1 Transmission Line from structure 2/6 through structure 18/6. Right of way width is 95 feet. Location: The project area is located within Snohomish County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. Total right-of-way acreage is approximately 182.8 acres. Approximately 17 miles of access roads will

22

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-122): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/19/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CSB-2 CSB-2 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-122- Bonneville-Alcoa Ed Tompkins, TFO/LMT Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Bonneville-Alcoa 115kV transmission line Location: The project is located in the BPA Olympia Region in Skamania and Clark Counties, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, along access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans

23

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-127): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/19/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KEP/4 KEP/4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-127- Eugene-Alvey#2 Benjamin Tilley - TFE/Alvey Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Eugene-Alvey 115 kV transmission line from structure 7/1 through structure 12/2m, and along portions of the following adjacent transmission lines: Hawkins-Alvey 115KV and Alvey-Lane 115KV. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region in Lane County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to

24

(DOE/EIS-0285//SA-80): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (07/01/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SA80 SA80 Rocky Reach - Maple Valley Don Atkinson -- - TFN/Snohomish Bill Erickson -- - TFP/Walla Walla Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for USDA Forest Service Lands Along the Rocky Reach - Maple Valley Transmission Line. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along access roads and around tower structures on USDA Forest Service lands that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See Section 1of the attached checklist for a complete description of the proposal. Analysis: Please see the attached checklist for the resources present. Applicable findings and mitigation measures are discussed below. Planning Steps: 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. Access roads (only) and tower sites (only) will be treated using non-selective methods

25

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-75): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (06/21/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June June 21, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/Z-992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA- 75-Ross-Lexington. Jim Jellison -- - TFO/Olympia Ed Tompkins -- - TFO/Ross Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Ross Lexington Transmission Line. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove danger trees as well as unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways, along access roads and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See Section 1.4 of the attached checklist for a complete description of the proposed action. Analysis: Please see the attached checklist for the resources present. Applicable findings and mitigation measures are discussed below. Planning Steps: 1. Identify facility and

26

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-07)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation Management on section of three ROWs. The ROWs include selected sections of the McNary Powerhouse, the present and proposed new sections of the McNary-Roundup and the McNary Switchyard South Transmission lines. BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for pertinent information on each section of referenced transmission line. BPA would conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way and to clear vegetation from new rights-of-way corridors. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

N /A

2001-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

27

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-15)  

SciTech Connect

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. Work also includes clearing of a small (<1/4 mile) section of access road. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for detailed information on each section of the referenced transmission lines. BPA will conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and where possible to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The vegetation needing control is mainly Douglas Fir, Alder, and blackberries as indicated in Section 1.2 of the attached checklist. The work involved in the ROW includes: clearing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon pose a hazard to the lines; treating the associated stumps and re-sprouts with herbicide to ensure that the roots are killed preventing new sprouts; and selectively eliminating tall growing vegetation before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing vegetation. All work will take place in existing rights-of-ways and around transmission structures. All work will be accomplished by selective vegetation control methods to assure that there is little potential harm to non-target vegetation and to low-growing plants. The work will provide system reliability and fire protection. Also, all off right-of-way trees that are potentially unstable and will fall within a minimum distance or into the zone where the conductors swing will be removed. Access roads will be treated using mowing and herbicide applications. The work will provide system reliability. The subject transmission lines range from 115kV to 230kV and are made up of accompanying access roads, steel and wooden transmission line structures and associated switching platforms. The minimum clearance ranges from 21 feet for 115kV lines to 23 feet for 230kV lines. ROW easement widths vary along the length of the project. Vegetation control for this project is designed to provide a 3 year maintenance free interval. In summary, the overall vegetation management scheme will be to selectively remove tall growing vegetation then apply selective herbicide treatment using cut stump applications.

N /A

2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

28

(DOE/EIS-0285-SA-104): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS - Lynch Creek Tap to LaGrande-Cowlitz No.1 8/21/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 1, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-104-Lynch Creek Tap to LaGrande-Cowlitz No. 1 James A. Jellison - TFO/Olympia Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Lynch Creek to LaGrande-Cowlitz No. 1 Location: Near the town of Eatonville, Pierce County Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. The right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Approximately 29 miles of access roads and corridor will be treated. Vegetation management is required

29

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA 118): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program EIS, Holcomb-Naselle 115kV)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2003 7, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-SA 118, Holcomb - Naselle 115 kV. James A. Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Holcomb Naselle 115kV transmission line corridor from structure 1/1 through structure 21/10. Right of way width averages 100 feet. Location: The project area is located in Pacific County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. Approximately 21 miles of right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective

30

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-130- Keeler-Tillamook)(3/10/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2003 0, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-130- Keeler-Tillamook) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Keeler Tillamook 115 kV transmission line from structure 1/7 through structure 58/2, and along adjacent portions of the Keeler-Forest Grove #2 115KV transmission line. In addition the project includes 11miles of the 115KV Timber Tap. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, Tillamook and Washington Counties, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-

31

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-142- KeelerOregon City #2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2- KeelerOregon City #2) 2- KeelerOregon City #2) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Keeler-Oregon City #2 115 kV transmission line from Keeler Substation to Oregon City Substation. Includes 5 miles of the St. Johns- Oregon City #2 69 kV transmission line. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, Washington County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation via hand cutting along the right-of-way, access roads, switch platforms, microwave beam paths, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with

32

(DOE/EIS-0285-SA-115): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS, Shelton-Fairmount # 1-4 12/20/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 0, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 115, Shelton- Fairmount # 1-4. James A. Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Shelton Fairmount # 1-4 230kV & 115kV transmission lines corridor from structure 34/3 through structure 60/2 (reference line ADNO 8354). Right of way width averages 258 feet. Location: The project area is located in Jefferson County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridors. Approximately 26 miles of right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and

33

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-121): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-121): 2/12/03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2003 2, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-121 Murry-Custer No. 1 Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Murry-Custer No.1 transmission line from structure 1/1 through structure 6/2. Corridor width is 125 feet. Location: The project area is located within Snohomish County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. Approximately 77.5 acres of right-of-way, 6 miles of access road, and 48 structure sites will be

34

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIT (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-95) Chehalis-Olympia No. 1 and Chehalis-Centralia No. 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5) 5) Chehalis-Olympia No.l and Chehalis-Centralia No. 2 James A. Jellison - TFO/Olympia Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation management along the Chehalis-Olympia No. 1 and Chehalis-Centralia No. 2, 230kV transmission line. The project area is located within Lewis and Thurston Counties, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. The right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Approximately 29 miles of access roads and corridor will be treated. Vegetation management is required for unimpeded operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See

35

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-110): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS-Covington-Columbia No. 3) 10/2/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS DOE/EIS-0285/SA-110-Covington-Columbia No. 3 Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Covington-Columbia No. 3, 230kV transmission lines from structure 1/1 through structure 12/1. Corridor width varies from 150 feet to 537.5 feet. The project area is located within King County, Washington. Location: The project area is located within King County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. Approximately 568.4 acres of the right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include

36

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA- 129) Ashe-Marion #2 [Mile 150-157]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2003 7, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA- 129 Ashe-Marion #2 [Mile 150-157] Elizabeth Johnson Natural Resource Specialist- TFR/The Dalles Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Ashe-Marion #2 500 kV transmission line from structure 150/2 through structure 157/7 (reference line). The Buckley-Marion #1 transmission line is also present within the proposed corridor. Right of way width averages 135 feet. Location: The project location is within Wasco County, Oregon near the city of Pine Grove, and is within the Redmond Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-

37

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-149-Captain Jack-Malin #1)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2003 8, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-149-Captain Jack-Malin #1) Elizabeth Johnson Natural Resource Specialist - TFR/The Dalles Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Captain Jack-Malin #1 500 kV transmission line from structure 2/4 to Malin Substation (reference line). Right of way width averages 150 feet. Location: The project location is within Klamath County, Oregon near the city of Malin, and is within the Redmond Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridors.

38

Unwanted Fertility, Contraceptive Technology and Crime: Exploiting a Natural Experiment in Access to The Pill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contraceptive Technology and Crime: Exploiting a Naturalthe recent decline in U.S. crime rates with the legalization¤ect of unwanted fertility on crime. Preliminary results are

Pantano, Juan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-15)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. Work also includes clearing of a small (tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and where possible to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The vegetation needing control is mainly Douglas Fir, Alder, and blackberries as indicated in Section 1.2 of the attached checklist. The work involved in the ROW includes: clearing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon pose a hazard to the lines; treating the associated stumps and re-sprouts with herbicide to ensure that the roots are killed preventing new sprouts; and selectively eliminating tall growing vegetation before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing vegetation. All work will take place in existing rights-of-ways and around transmission structures. All work will be accomplished by selective vegetation control methods to assure that there is little potential harm to non-target vegetation and to low-growing plants. The work will provide system reliability and fire protection. Also, all off right-of-way trees that are potentially unstable and will fall within a minimum distance or into the zone where the conductors swing will be removed. Access roads will be treated using mowing and herbicide applications. The work will provide system reliability. The subject transmission lines range from 115kV to 230kV and are made up of accompanying access roads, steel and wooden transmission line structures and associated switching platforms. The minimum clearance ranges from 21 feet for 115kV lines to 23 feet for 230kV lines. ROW easement widths vary along the length of the project. Vegetation control for this project is designed to provide a 3 year maintenance free interval. In summary, the overall vegetation management scheme will be to selectively remove tall growing vegetation then apply selective herbicide treatment using cut stump applications.

N /A

2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

40

Removing Unwanted Fluctuations in the AVHRR Thermal Calibration Data Using Robust Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study deals with analysis of thermal calibration of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aboard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spacecrafts. In particular, the effects caused by various types of ...

A. P. Trishchenko

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

DOE/EIS-0285/SA-133: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS Hanford-Ostrander [Mile 126/1-146/4] (3/20/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2003 0, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-133 Hanford-Ostrander [Mile 126/1-146/4] Elizabeth Johnson Natural Resource Specialist- TFR/The Dalles Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Hanford-Ostrander Corridor from structure 126/1 through structure 146/4. Right of way width averages 312 feet. Location: The project location is within Skamania County, Washington. The project commences to the west of the White Salmon River and proceeds in a westerly directly for approximately 20 miles. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-

42

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 106 SnoKing Tap to Monroe-Samamish Line 9/30/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30, 30, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 106 SnoKing Tap to Monroe-Samamish Line Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the SnoKing Tap to the Monroe-Samamish transmission line from structure 8/1 through structure 20/6. Right of way width is 150 feet. Location: The project area is located within Snohomish County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. The right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Approximately 12 miles of access roads

43

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA 108): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS Satsop-Aberdeen #2 9/5/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 8, Satsop-Aberdeen #2. James A. Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Satsop-Aberdeen #2 230kV transmission line corridor from structure 1/1 through structure 11/5 (reference line). Other lines which are present in the proposed corridor are the Satsop-Aberdeen #3 230 kV, South Elma-Cosmopolis 115kV, and Aberdeen tap to South Elma-Cosmospolis 115kV. Right of way width averages 238 feet. Location: The project area is located in Grays Harbor County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridors. Approximately 11 miles of right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide

44

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA 107): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS, Elma-Cosmopolis #1 9/5/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 7, Elma-Cosmopolis #1. James A. Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Elma-Cosmopolis #1 115kV transmission line corridor from structure 11/7 through structure 20/3. Right of way width averages 100 feet. Location: The project area is located in Grays Harbor County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridors. Approximately 8 miles of right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Approximately 2.8 miles of access roads will be cleared using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Tower sites

45

Paper Prepared for International Conference on the Siting of Locally Unwanted Facilities: Challenges and Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 This paper is based on studies undertaken with my colleagues involved in the dialog associated with siting a high level radioactive waste repository in Nevada as well as related papers on siting locally unwanted land use (LULU) facilities. The ideas also reflect many discussions on siting issues over the

Howard Kunreuther; Hayden Lesbirel; Daigee Shaw; Larry Susskind; Paul Slovic

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Laser removal of sludge from steam generators  

SciTech Connect

A method of removing unwanted chemical deposits known as sludge from the metal surfaces of steam generators with laser energy is provided. Laser energy of a certain power density, of a critical wavelength and frequency, is intermittently focused on the sludge deposits to vaporize them so that the surfaces are cleaned without affecting the metal surface (sludge substrate). Fiberoptic tubes are utilized for laser beam transmission and beam direction. Fiberoptics are also utilized to monitor laser operation and sludge removal.

Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

EIS-0285-SA-75: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-75: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program BPA proposes to remove danger trees as well as unwanted vegetation in...

48

Vegetation Collections Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vegetation Collections Vegetation Collections Vegetation Collections Overview Vegetation regulates the flow of numerous biogeochemical cycles, most critically those of water, carbon, and nitrogen; it is also of great importance in local and global energy balances. Vegetation collections data include: Biomass Biome Characteristics Litter Chemistry and Decomposition Geoecology Nutrient Concentration, Profiles, and Turnover Global Fire Emissions, Vegetation, and Leaf Area Index (LAI) Ecosystem Structure and Function Phenoregions Carbon Flux Vegetation Resources The following resources related to Vegetation Collections are maintained by the ORNL DAAC: Global Leaf Area Index Data Net Primary Production Project Get Vegetation Data Find and order data sets: See list of data sets and download data

49

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-41): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/27/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 27, 2002 February 27, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-41) William Erickson - TPF/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management around wood poles in Transmission Line ROW's in the Walla Walla Region (see attached checklist for identification). The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridors with the easement width ranging from 0 to 200 feet. Location: The ROWs are located in Walla Walla Region (see checklist). Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation around

50

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils offers new insights into these important (and growing) products of vegetable oils, while also covering developments in biodegradable grease, vegetable oils-based polyols, and the synthesis of surfactants from vegetable oil

51

Ion Removal  

INL’s ion removal technology leverages the ability of phosphazene polymers discriminate between water and metal ions, which allows water to pass ...

52

Minimizing the production of unwanted activation products in the AR40/AR39 dating method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fast flux irradiation device (FFID) was developed for the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center's one-megawatt (I-MW) TRIGA reactor, primarily to service the fields of geochronology and thermochronology with unprecedented irradiation characteristics for the Ar40/Ar39 dating technique. The FFID consisted of a dry vertical tube port that extended from the reactor core to the reactor support bridge. A boron-shielded rotisserie, inserted into the vertical tube port, was used to house the samples in the core region, being stabilized radially from below the rotisserie by a bayonet and above the rotisserie by polyethylene plugs. The polyethylene plugs also served as shields to minimize the gamma and neutron dose rates at the reactor bridge level. The rotisserie employs a 0.71 rpm motor for continual rotation during irradiation. The FFID was intended to be operated at full reactor power (one-megawatt thermal). The first four irradiations revealed that the FFID provided nearly ideal irradiation characteristics for the dating technique. The extent of the thermal neutron interference reaction K40(n,p)Ar4O was reduced to levels too small to be measured by the existing standards (K salts and K glass) used by the experimenters. Additionally, the boron shield reduced the quantities of thermal neutron-induced activation products by two to three order s of magnitude. This reduction allowed decay periods to be decreased from several weeks to as little as three days. The radial stability provided by the FFID reduced circumferential flux gradients to below 0.4%, far less than the 2.4% to 3.4% observed at other reactor facilities. The one major drawback in the FFID design was the evidence of temperatures in the sample region in excess of 600' F, indicated by the melting of cadmium metal during characterization. This problem could be reduced by either decreasing the reaction rate (operating at a lower reactor power), or instituting a heat removal system involving the continual flow of a gas that does not easily activate.

Brightwell, Michael Shane

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-35)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14, 2001 14, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-35) James Jellison - TFO/Olympia Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Chehalis-Mayfield No. 1 230 kV Transmission Line ROW and the Mossy Rock-Chehalis Transmission Line ROW, between 7/1 to 27/10. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor with an average corridor width of 162 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Lewis County, WA, being in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

54

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-40)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2002 9, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-40) William T. Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Allston-Keeler 500 kV Transmission Line ROW exclusive to BLM lands between 8/4 through 27/4. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor with an average corridor width of 150 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Washington and Columbia County, in the State of Oregon, Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

55

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-04): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 3/27/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 27, 2001 March 27, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-04) Elizabeth Johnson - TFR/The Dalles Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on Ponderosa - Pilot Butte 18/2 to 18/4 Relocation Location: The project area is in the City of Bend, OR, in Deschutes County. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from a section of BPA's Ponderosa - Pilot Butte Transmission Line Right-of-way to facilitate relocation of structure 18/3. Work would begin in mid-March and end in April, 2001. Analysis: 1. Description of right-of-way and vegetation management needed: The project involves

56

Observed local and remote influences of vegetation on the atmosphere across North America using a model-validated statistical technique that first excludes oceanic forcings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observed local and non-local influences of vegetation on the atmosphere across North America are quantified after first removing the ocean’s impact. The interaction between vegetation and the atmosphere is dominated by forcing from the ...

Fuyao Wang; Michael Notaro; Zhengyu Liu; Guangshan Chen

57

Mercury removal in utility wet scrubber using a chelating agent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for capturing and reducing the mercury content of an industrial flue gas such as that produced in the combustion of a fossil fuel or solid waste adds a chelating agent, such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or other similar compounds like HEDTA, DTPA and/or NTA, to the flue gas being scrubbed in a wet scrubber used in the industrial process. The chelating agent prevents the reduction of oxidized mercury to elemental mercury, thereby increasing the mercury removal efficiency of the wet scrubber. Exemplary tests on inlet and outlet mercury concentration in an industrial flue gas were performed without and with EDTA addition. Without EDTA, mercury removal totaled 42%. With EDTA, mercury removal increased to 71%. The invention may be readily adapted to known wet scrubber systems and it specifically provides for the removal of unwanted mercury both by supplying S.sup.2- ions to convert Hg.sup.2+ ions into mercuric sulfide (HgS) and by supplying a chelating agent to sequester other ions, including but not limited to Fe.sup.2+ ions, which could otherwise induce the unwanted reduction of Hg.sup.2+ to the form, Hg.sup.0.

Amrhein, Gerald T. (Louisville, OH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications.

Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Derzon, Dora K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nelson, Jill S. (Albuquerque, NM); Rand, Peter B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications. 1 fig.

Arnold, C. Jr.; Derzon, D.K.; Nelson, J.S.; Rand, P.B.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

60

(DOE/EIS-0285-SA-100): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 8/15/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 5, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-100) Joe Johnson Natural Resource Specialist TFS/Kalispell Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Libby-Conkelly, 1/2 to 26/4 Transmission Line ROW. The line is a 230kV Double Circuit Transmission Line having an easement width of 125 feet to 250 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in both Lincoln and Flathead County, MT, being in the Spokane Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-59): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/19/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 19, 2002 April 19, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-59) James Jellison - TFO/Olympia Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Chehalis Covington/ Raver Paul / Paul Alston 230 and 500 kV Transmission line Corridor ROW 48/2 to 70/6 and 1/1 to 13/4. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor with a corridor width of 250 to 442 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Thurston County, WA, being in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

62

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-13): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 6/6/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3) 3) James Jellison - TFO/Olympia Region - Natural Resource Specialist Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Region - Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Naselle Tarlett #1 and #2 transmission line Right of Way (ROW). Location: The ROW is located in Pacific County, WA, Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of

63

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-23)(8/17/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DATE: August 17, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-23) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Schultz - Raver No.1 and 2 from 60/3 to 75/5 and the Olympia - Grand Coulee from 70/2 to 70/5 Transmission Line ROW's. Location: The ROW is located in King County, WA, in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways, around tower structures, and along access roads that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be executed in accordance with the National Electrical Safety

64

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-07): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/18/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

18, 2001 18, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-07) Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on section of three ROWs. The ROWs include selected sections of the McNary Powerhouse, the present and proposed new sections of the McNary-Roundup and the McNary Switchyard South Transmission lines. Location: All ROW are located east Umatilla, OR., all being in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject

65

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-17)(7/24/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DATE: July 24, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-17) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along selected sections of the Schulz - Raver No.1, 2, 3 & 4, Olymplia - Grand Coulee NO. 1 Transmission Line ROW's. Location: The ROW's are located in Pierce and King Counties, WA, in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be executed in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA

66

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-55): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/12/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2002 2, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Covington SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-55) Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Raver - Paul No. 1 Transmission Line ROW from structure 15/5 to 29/3. The transmission line is a 500 kV line. Location: The ROW is located Pierce County, WA. Proposed by: Snohomish Regional Headquarters, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line, including both Reclaim and Danger Trees. Also, access road clearing will be

67

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-27): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 10/22/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 22, 2001 October 22, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-27) Ben Tilley - TFE/Alvey Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Marion-Alvey #1 from structure 14/5 to 64/3 and the Marion-Lane #1 from structure 14/5 to 70/2. Both lines describe the same segment of ROW between structures 14/5 and 45/2. Location: All ROW are located in Marion, Linn, and Lane Counties, OR, all being in the Eugene Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Eugene Region. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways, around tower structures, and associated access roads that may impede the operation and

68

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-36): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (01/22/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 2002 24, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-38) Benjamin J. Tilley - TFE/Alvey Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Wendson-Tahkenith #1 & #2 1/1-20/4, Tahkenitch-Gardiner #1/1-2/3 and Tahkenitch-Reedsport #1/1-4/2 Transmission Line ROW's. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor with and average corridor width of 100 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Douglas and Lane County, OR, being in the Eugene Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

69

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-43): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/27/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 27, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-43) William T. Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Lower Monumental - McNary 57/2 to 63/5, and Radar Tap 0/4 to 0/10 Transmission Line ROW's. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor with and average corridor width of 165 and 80 feet respectively. Location: The ROW is located in Umatilla and Franklin County, OR, being in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

70

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 150 East Ellensburg Tap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2003 5, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 150 East Ellensburg Tap Tom Murphy Natural Resource Specialist - TFS/Bell-1 Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the East Ellensburg Tap, 1/6 to 3/19 Transmission Line ROW. The line is a 115 kV Single Circuit Transmission Line with no easement width. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in Kittatas County, WA being in the Spokane Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around transmission line structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the

71

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-25)(9/5/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2001 5, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/Z992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-25) Elizabeth Johnson - TFR/The Dalles Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along selected ROW sections of the Ostrander-Pearl transmission line. The ROWs include sections of the Ostrander-Pearl 500 kV line; the Ostrander-McLoughlin 500 kV line; the Big Eddy-Chemawa 230 kV line and the Big Eddy- McLoughlin 230 kV line. Location: The ROW is located in Clackamas County, Oregon, within the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights- of-way and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the

72

DOE/EIS-0285-SA-50: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission Vegetation Management Program FEIS (3/15/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2/27/01 1 2/27/01 1 United States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration DATE: March 15, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-50) Elizabeth Johnson - TFR/The Dalles Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on Grizzly-Summerlake (Structures 102/1-104/2) and Grizzly-Captain Jack (Structures 103/1-140/4) Transmission Line Corridors. Location: The project area lies east and northeast Klamath Falls, OR, and is located in Lake and Klamath Counties, Redmond Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from the rights of

73

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-52): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (03/22/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 2002 22, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-52) Elizabeth Johnson - TFR/The Dalles Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management on the Ashe-Marion #2 (138/1-150/2), Buckley- Marion (12/1-24/2), McNary-Santiam (109/1-119/3), and John Day-Marion (49/4-50/5) Transmission Line Corridors. Location: The project area lies between Maupin and Pine Grove Oregon, and is in the Redmond Region. The project area begins at on the Ashe-Marion at structure 138/1 and terminates at Wapinitia Road, Pine Grove. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from the

74

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-57): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/10/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2002 0, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/Z992 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-57) Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Trojan-Allston Transmission Lines 1 & 2 ROW between 1/1 and 9/1. The lines are 230 kV Single Circuit Transmission Lines having an easement width of 125 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in Columbia County, OR, being in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject

75

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-20)(8/2/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2001 2, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-20) Bill Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla - Natural Resource Specialist Jim Jellison - TFO/Olympia - Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the McNary-Ross 161/1 to 166/5+346 Transmission Line ROW. The line is a 345kV Single Circuit Transmission Line having an easement width of 175 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in Clark County, WA, being in the Olympia Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways

76

Inspection Technologies for Vegetation Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent regulatory changes and budgetary pressures have prompted utilities to seek a more in-depth understanding of the terrain along their transmission line corridor rights-of-way (ROW) and the vegetation on that terrain. Vegetation inspections play an important role in acquiring this information and in avoiding costly vegetation-related outages. While the methods by which the inspections are conducted vary from utility to utility, some form of periodic inspections of transmission ROWs are ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

77

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-11): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 5/15/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1) 1) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Covington-Maple Valley No. 2 Transmission Line ROW. The line is a 345kV Single Circuit Transmission Line having an easement width of 150 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in selected sections along the entire transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in King County, WA, being in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with

78

EIS(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-61) Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/15/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 15, 2002 April 15, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-61 Tom Murphy - TFS/Bell-1 - Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Bell-Boundary No.3, 84/4 to 96/1 Transmission Line ROW. The line is a 230kV Double Circuit Transmission Line having an easement width of 100 feet. The proposed work will be accomplished in the indicated sections of the transmission line corridor. Location: The ROW is located in both Stevens and Pend Oreille County, WA, being in the Spokane Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-

79

Introduction Aphids, or plant lice, feed on most vegetable crops, many houseplants and many ornamentals grown in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and vegetable crops. Horticultural oil sprays can help to control some aphids on fruit trees and ornamentalsAphids Introduction Aphids, or plant lice, feed on most vegetable crops, many houseplants and many tissue and remove the sap. Aphids can easily be distinguished by the two tube like appendages (cornicles

New Hampshire, University of

80

EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transmission System Vegetation Management Program June 23, 2000 EIS-0285: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Transmission System Vegetation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Longitudinal dispersion in vegetated flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vegetation is ubiquitous in rivers, estuaries and wetlands, strongly influencing both water conveyance and mass transport. The plant canopy affects both mean and turbulent flow structure, and thus both advection and ...

Murphy, Enda

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Turbomachinery debris remover  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for removing debris from a turbomachine. The apparatus includes housing and remotely operable viewing and grappling mechanisms for the purpose of locating and removing debris lodged between adjacent blades in a turbomachine.

Krawiec, Donald F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kraf, Robert J. (North Huntingdon, PA); Houser, Robert J. (Monroeville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Graphitic packing removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 8 Vegetable Oils in Paint and Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 8 Vegetable Oils in Paint and Coatings Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Vegetable Oils in Paint and Coatings from the book ...

85

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 6 Vegetable Oils-Based Polyols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 6 Vegetable Oils-Based Polyols Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Vegetable Oils-Based Polyols from the book ...

86

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 10 Synthesis of Surfactants from Vegetable Oil Feedstocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 10 Synthesis of Surfactants from Vegetable Oil Feedstocks Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Synthesis of Surfactants from Vegetable Oil

87

Sky Vegetables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vegetables Vegetables Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky Vegetables Address 45 Rosemary Street, Suite F Place Needham, MA Zip 02494 Sector Solar Website http://www.skyvegetables.com/i Coordinates 42.2882945°, -71.2335259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.2882945,"lon":-71.2335259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

88

NDVI-based vegetation rendering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The area of terrain rendering has seen great improvements both in rendering performance and image quality. The latest terrain rendering algorithms efficiently utilize the capabilities of actual programmable graphics hardware in order to achieve real-time ... Keywords: continuous level of detail, terrain rendering, texture splatting, vegetation rendering

Stefan Roettger

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Vegetation Change Analysis User's Manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Diagnostic techniques are needed to identify thresholds of sustainable military use. A cooperative effort among U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on developing new techniques for monitoring and mitigating military impacts in arid lands. This manual focuses on the development of new monitoring techniques that have been implemented at Fort Irwin, California. New mitigation techniques are described in a separate companion manual. This User's Manual is designed to address diagnostic capabilities needed to distinguish between various degrees of sustainable and nonsustainable impacts due to military training and testing and habitat-disturbing activities in desert ecosystems. Techniques described here focus on the use of high-resolution imagery and the application of image-processing techniques developed primarily for medical research. A discussion is provided about the measurement of plant biomass and shrub canopy cover in arid. lands using conventional methods. Both semiquantitative methods and quantitative methods are discussed and reference to current literature is provided. A background about the use of digital imagery to measure vegetation is presented.

D. J. Hansen; W. K. Ostler

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal...

91

NPP and Vegetation Data Sets Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vegetation Data Sets Available The ORNL DAAC announces the availability of three new net primary production (NPP) and two vegetation data sets. The NPP data sets contain data for...

92

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION: PHYSIOLOGY, LIFE HISTORY, AND ECOSYSTEM many ecosystem services, including carbon storage, soil retention, and water cycling. One in dominant vegetation, often termed state change, will occur. The complex nature of state change requires

93

VEGETABLE LIPIDS AS COMPONENTS OF FUNCTIONAL FOODS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nutritionally beneficial compounds naturally present in vegetable lipids will be subject of this minireview. This article will discuss lipidic compounds from less known vegetable sources and potential advantages of its incorporation into human diet as a functional ingredient.

M. Stuchlík; S. Žák; Milan Stuchlík; Stanislav Žák

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Global Vegetation Root Distribution for Land Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation root distribution is one of the factors that determine the overall water holding capacity of the land surface and the relative rates of water extraction from different soil layers for vegetation transpiration. Despite its importance, ...

Xubin Zeng

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Microsoft Word - Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello df.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site Linda Sheader and Marilyn Kastens The Monticello Disposal Site, located just south of the town of Monticello, Utah, contains a uranium mill tailings disposal cell with a vegetated cover. Successful long-term performance of the cover is in part dependent upon the success of the cover's plantings. The plants remove moisture from the cover's soil layer, thus minimizing percolation through the tailings and preventing leaching of contaminants from the tailings into groundwater. Since 2000, when revegetation was complete, annual monitoring has been conducted at the site to track the development of the plant communities and to compare them to final success criteria. This paper summarizes changes in vegetation across the site over seven growing seasons.

96

Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two-page fact sheet discussing the pitfalls of using straight vegetable oil (SVO) as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Device for removing blackheads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for removing blackheads from pores in the skin having a elongated handle with a spoon shaped portion mounted on one end thereof, the spoon having multiple small holes piercing therethrough. Also covered is method for using the device to remove blackheads.

Berkovich, Tamara (116 N. Wetherly Dr., Suite 115, Los Angeles, CA)

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

98

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal silica using small gel particles. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Silica Scaling Removal Process Applications: Cooling tower systems Water treatment systems Water evaporation systems Potential mining applications (produced water) Industry applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits: Reduces scaling in cooling towers by up to 50% Increases the number of cycles of concentration substantially Reduces the amount of antiscaling chemical additives needed Decreases the amount of makeup water and subsequent discharged water (blowdown) Enables considerable cost savings derived from reductions in

99

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-45): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/27/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5) 5) William T. Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Benton County noxious weed management along BPA rights-of-ways, transmission structures, roads, and switches listed in Attachment 1. Attachment 1 identifies the ROW, ROW width, and ROW length of the proposed action. Includes all BPA 115kV, 230kV, 345kV and 500 kV ROWs in Benton County, Washington. Location: The ROWs are all located in Benton County, Washington, Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear noxious and/or unwanted low-growing vegetation in all BPA ROWs in Benton County, Washington. In a cooperative effort, BPA, through landowners and the Benton County Weed Control Board, plan to eradicate noxious plants and other

100

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-46): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 2/27/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6) 6) William T. Erickson - TFP/Walla Walla Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Franklin County noxious weed management along BPA rights-of-ways, transmission structures, roads, and switches listed in Attachment 1. Attachment 1 identifies the ROW, ROW width, and ROW length of the proposed action. Includes all BPA 115kV, 230kV, and 500 kV ROWs in Franklin County, Washington. Location: The ROWs are all located in Franklin County, Washington in the Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear noxious and/or unwanted low-growing vegetation in all BPA ROWs in Franklin County, Washington. In a cooperative effort, BPA, through landowners and the Franklin County Weed Control Board, plan to eradicate noxious plants and other

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Reactive glass and vegetation patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of vegetation patterns in the arid and the semi-arid climatic zones is studied. Threshold for the biomass of the perennial flora is shown to be a relevant factor, leading to a frozen disordered patterns in the arid zone. In this ``glassy'' state, vegetation appears as a singular plant spots separated by irregular distances, and an indirect repulsive interaction among shrubs is induced by the competition for water. At higher precipitation rates, the diminish of hydrological losses in the presence of flora becomes important and yields spatial attraction and clustering of biomass. Turing-like patterns with characteristic length scale may emerge from the disordered structure due to this positive feedback instability.

N. M. Shnerb; P. Sara; H. Lavee; S. Solomon

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

MAPSS Vegetation Modeling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MAPSS Vegetation Modeling MAPSS Vegetation Modeling Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MAPSS Vegetation Modeling Agency/Company /Organization: United States Forest Service Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Biomass, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.fs.fed.us/pnw/mdr/mapss/ MAPSS Vegetation Modeling Screenshot References: MAPSS[1] Applications "A landscape- to global-scale vegetation distribution model that was developed to simulate the potential biosphere impacts and biosphere-atmosphere feedbacks from climatic change. Model output from MAPSS has been used extensively in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate

103

Environmental Impacts of Stover Removal in the Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When considering the market for biomass from corn stover resources erosion and soil quality issues are important to consider. Removal of stover can be beneficial in some areas, especially when coordinated with other conservation practices, such as vegetative barrier strips and cover crops. However, benefits are highly dependent on several factors, namely if farmers see costs and benefits associated with erosion and the tradeoffs with the removal of biomass. This paper uses results from an integrated RUSLE2/WEPS model to incorporate six different regime choices, covering management, harvest and conservation, into simple profit maximization model to show these tradeoffs.

Alicia English; Wallace E. Tyner; Juan Sesmero; Phillip Owens; David Muth

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Continuous sulfur removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream using a membrane comprising a metal oxide deposited on a porous support is disclosed. 4 figures.

Jalan, V.; Ryu, J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

105

ORNL DAAC, Vegetation Data, March 10, 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data pertaining to terrain and soils, water resources, forestry, vegetation, agriculture, land use, wildlife, air quality, climate, natural areas, and endangered species at...

106

Removable feedwater sparger assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A removable feedwater sparger assembly includes a sparger having an inlet pipe disposed in flow communication with the outlet end of a supply pipe. A tubular coupling includes an annular band fixedly joined to the sparger inlet pipe and a plurality of fingers extending from the band which are removably joined to a retention flange extending from the supply pipe for maintaining the sparger inlet pipe in flow communication with the supply pipe. The fingers are elastically deflectable for allowing engagement of the sparger inlet pipe with the supply pipe and for disengagement therewith. 8 figs.

Challberg, R.C.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

107

Monte Carlo simulation model for electromagnetic scattering from vegetation and inversion of vegetation parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis research, a coherent scattering model for microwave remote sensing of vegetation canopy is developed on the basis of Monte Carlo simulations. An accurate model of vegetation structure is essential for the ...

Wang, Li-Fang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book is a must-have for vegetable oil processing and maintenance personnel, as well as equipment manufacturers. Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Processing Hardback Books Processing 02C0292F90CD6AE7B6963975D2B0BF64 1st Edition, 2008

109

DOE Removes Brookhaven Contractor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Removes DOE Removes Brookhaven Contractor Peña sends a message to DOE facilities nationwide INSIDE 2 Accelerator Rx 4 FermiKids 6 Spring at Fermilab Photos courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory by Judy Jackson, Office of Public Affairs Secretary of Energy Federico Peña announced on Thursday, May 1, that the Department of Energy would immediately terminate the current management contract with Associated Universities, Inc. at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York. Peña said that he made the decision after receiving the results of a laboratory safety management review conducted by the independent oversight arm of DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. In addition, the Secretary said he found unacceptable "the continued on page 8 Volume 20 Friday, May 16, 1997

110

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

Neuhaus, J.E.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

112

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-42)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2002 5, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-42) Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Bob Sweet - TFNF/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Snohomish - Murray #1 from str 1\4 to str 18\5. The proposed work will be to remove both danger and reclaim trees outside and inside the right-of-way, respectively. Right-of-way width varies from 125 to 300 feet. Location: The ROW is located in Snohomish County, WA, being in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to remove both reclaim and danger trees inside and outside the transmission line right of way. BPA crews or contract crews will cut only trees that have

113

World Conference and Exhibition on Oilseed and Vegetable Oil Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archive of the World Conference and Exhibition on Oilseed and Vegetable Oil Utilization World Conference and Exhibition on Oilseed and Vegetable Oil Utilization Istanbul, Turkey World Conference and Exhibition on Oilseed and Vegetable Oil U

114

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practical?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practical? Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 3 Vegetable Oil-Based Engine Oils: Are They Practi

115

FT Duplication Coordinates Reproductive and Vegetative Growth  

SciTech Connect

Annual plants grow vegetatively at early developmental stages and then transition to the reproductive stage, followed by senescence in the same year. In contrast, after successive years of vegetative growth at early ages, woody perennial shoot meristems begin repeated transitions between vegetative and reproductive growth at sexual maturity. However, it is unknown how these repeated transitions occur without a developmental conflict between vegetative and reproductive growth. We report that functionally diverged paralogs FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (FT1) and FLOWERING LOCUS T2 (FT2), products of whole-genome duplication and homologs of Arabidopsis thaliana gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), coordinate the repeated cycles of vegetative and reproductive growth in woody perennial poplar (Populus spp.). Our manipulative physiological and genetic experiments coupled with field studies, expression profiling, and network analysis reveal that reproductive onset is determined by FT1 in response to winter temperatures, whereas vegetative growth and inhibition of bud set are promoted by FT2 in response to warm temperatures and long days in the growing season. The basis for functional differentiation between FT1 and FT2 appears to be expression pattern shifts, changes in proteins, and divergence in gene regulatory networks. Thus, temporal separation of reproductive onset and vegetative growth into different seasons via FT1 and FT2 provides seasonality and demonstrates the evolution of a complex perennial adaptive trait after genome duplication.

Hsu, Chuan-Yu [Mississippi State University (MSU); Adams, Joshua P. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Kim, Hyejin [Mississippi State University (MSU); No, Kyoungok [Mississippi State University (MSU); Ma, Caiping [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Strauss, Steven [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Drnevich, Jenny [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Wickett, Norman [Pennsylvania State University; Vandervelde, Lindsay [Mississippi State University (MSU); Ellis, Jeffrey D. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Rice, Brandon [Mississippi State University (MSU); Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Brunner, Amy M. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Page, Grier P. [RTI International; Carlson, John E. [Pennsylvania State University; DePamphilis, Claude [Pennsylvania State University; Luthe, Dawn S. [Pennsylvania State University; Yuceer, Cetin [Mississippi State University (MSU)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona...

117

Use of a vegetative filter zone to control fine-grained sediments from surface mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of a vegetative filter zone in trapping fine-grained sediments from surface mining operations. The area selected for study was located in Whitley County, Kentucky, directly below an active surface mining operation. The outslope above the filter was the primary drainage area monitored during the study. This project was initiated with the specific purpose of conducting a field test on vegetation as a viable sediment trapping medium. From the onset, the project was wholly designed for a field evaluation under typical mining conditions. The filter area was constructed directly below an abandoned surface mine bench, on typical soil types found in mined areas of Eastern Kentucky. The outslope located above the filter was the primary source area for sediment flow. Sediment-laden water samples were collected at the inlet flume for comparison with samples collected at the outlet flume to permit evaluation of the sediment removal capability of the vegetative filter. Results of the monitoring efforts revealed that a dramatic reduction in sediment load was achieved by vegetative filtration with trapping efficiencies ranging from 70 to 99% for the storms monitored. Based on results of this study, it is concluded that vegetative filters are an effective method for reducing the quantity of sediment transported into surface streams and rivers from disturbed mined lands.

Barfield, B.J.; Albrecht, S.C.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Special study on vegetative covers. [UMTRA Project  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions. 28 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

System and method for characterizing voiced excitations of speech and acoustic signals, removing acoustic noise from speech, and synthesizing speech  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

Burnett, Greg C. (Livermore, CA); Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Ng, Lawrence C. (Danville, CA)

2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

120

System And Method For Characterizing Voiced Excitations Of Speech And Acoustic Signals, Removing Acoustic Noise From Speech, And Synthesizi  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a system and method for characterizing human (or animate) speech voiced excitation functions and acoustic signals, for removing unwanted acoustic noise which often occurs when a speaker uses a microphone in common environments, and for synthesizing personalized or modified human (or other animate) speech upon command from a controller. A low power EM sensor is used to detect the motions of windpipe tissues in the glottal region of the human speech system before, during, and after voiced speech is produced by a user. From these tissue motion measurements, a voiced excitation function can be derived. Further, the excitation function provides speech production information to enhance noise removal from human speech and it enables accurate transfer functions of speech to be obtained. Previously stored excitation and transfer functions can be used for synthesizing personalized or modified human speech. Configurations of EM sensor and acoustic microphone systems are described to enhance noise cancellation and to enable multiple articulator measurements.

Burnett, Greg C. (Livermore, CA); Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Ng, Lawrence C. (Danville, CA)

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Analysis of hydrocarbon removal methods for the management of oilfield brines and produced waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the Texas Railroad Commission (TRC), ????over 250 billion gallons of produced water is taken out of Texas Soil every year, and more than 35% of this water is not currently fit to use.?? Therefore, it can be assumed that domestically and globally, the petroleum industries challenge has been to develop a high-tech and cost effective method to purify the large volumes of oilfield brines and produced water. Currently, most of the produced water requires several pre- and post- treatment methods to aide in reducing fouling of membranes, separation of components, increasing influent and effluent quality, and preventing unwanted work stoppage during the desalination process. As a result, the pre- and post- treatment conditioning of the produced water affects the economics and scale-up (i.e. residence times, absorption capacity, etc??) of the varying processes parameters. Therefore, this research focuses on developing an economic analysis and determining the adsorption capacity of an organoclay system to remove oil.

Furrow, Brendan Eugene

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Engine Removal Projection Tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Navy has over 3500 gas turbine engines used throughout the surface fleet for propulsion and the generation of electrical power. Past data is used to forecast the number of engine removals for the next ten years and determine engine down times between removals. Currently this is done via a FORTRAN program created in the early 1970s. This paper presents results of R&D associated with creating a new algorithm and software program. We tested over 60 techniques on data spanning 20 years from over 3100 engines and 120 ships. Investigated techniques for the forecast basis including moving averages, empirical negative binomial, generalized linear models, Cox regression, and Kaplan Meier survival curves, most of which are documented in engineering, medical and scientific research literature. We applied those techniques to the data, and chose the best algorithm based on its performance on real-world data. The software uses the best algorithm in combination with user-friendly interfaces and intuitively understandable displays. The user can select a specific engine type, forecast time period, and op-tempo. Graphical displays and numerical tables present forecasts and uncertainty intervals. The technology developed for the project is applicable to other logistic forecasting challenges.

Ferryman, Thomas A.; Matzke, Brett D.; Wilson, John E.; Sharp, Julia L.; Greitzer, Frank L.

2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

123

Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate Area and Carbon Content of Sphagnum Since Last Glacial Maximum (2002) TDE Model Intercomparison Project Data Archive Presentations and abstracts from the recent DOE Terrestrial Science Team Meeting (Argonne National Laboratory, October 29-31, 2001) FACE (Free-Air CO2 Enrichment) Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth (2001), NDP-078A | PDF Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation and Ecosystems: 1990-1999 Literature (2000), CDIAC-129 Direct effects of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on plants and ecosystems: An updated bibliographic data base (1994), CDIAC-70 A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated

124

Green Vegetable Oil Processing, Revised First Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book addresses alternative green technologies at various stages of oilseed and vegetable oil processing. The Revised First Edition includes much of the content of the first edition, but incorporates updated data, details, images, figures, and captions

125

A Progressive Morphological Filter for Removing Nonground Measurements from Airborne LIDAR Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent advances in airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) technology allow rapid and inexpensive measurements of topography over large areas. This technology is becoming a primary method for generating high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) that are essential to numerous applications such as flood modeling and landslide prediction. Airborne LIDAR systems usually return a three-dimensional cloud of point measurements from reflective objects scanned by the laser beneath the flight path. In order to generate a DTM, measurements from nonground features such as buildings, vehicles, and vegetation have to be classified and removed. In this paper, a progressive morphological filter was developed to detect nongroundLIDARmeasurements.By gradually increasingthe window size of the filter andusing elevation difference thresholds, themeasurements of vehicles, vegetation, and buildings are removed, while ground data are preserved. Datasets from mountainous and flat urbanized areas were selected to test the progressive morphological filter. The results show that the filter can remove most of the nonground points effectively.

Keqi Zhang; Shu-ching Chen; Dean Whitman; Mei-ling Shyu; Jianhua Yan; Chengcui Zhang; Student Member

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

Urban, P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator value mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, J.F.

1991-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

128

Overview of Opportunities for Co-Location of Solar Energy Technologies and Vegetation  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale solar facilities have the potential to contribute significantly to national electricity production. Many solar installations are large-scale or utility-scale, with a capacity over 1 MW and connected directly to the electric grid. Large-scale solar facilities offer an opportunity to achieve economies of scale in solar deployment, yet there have been concerns about the amount of land required for solar projects and the impact of solar projects on local habitat. During the site preparation phase for utility-scale solar facilities, developers often grade land and remove all vegetation to minimize installation and operational costs, prevent plants from shading panels, and minimize potential fire or wildlife risks. However, the common site preparation practice of removing vegetation can be avoided in certain circumstances, and there have been successful examples where solar facilities have been co-located with agricultural operations or have native vegetation growing beneath the panels. In this study we outline some of the impacts that large-scale solar facilities can have on the local environment, provide examples of installations where impacts have been minimized through co-location with vegetation, characterize the types of co-location, and give an overview of the potential benefits from co-location of solar energy projects and vegetation. The varieties of co-location can be replicated or modified for site-specific use at other solar energy installations around the world. We conclude with opportunities to improve upon our understanding of ways to reduce the environmental impacts of large-scale solar installations.

Macknick, J.; Beatty, B.; Hill, G.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 19, 2002 July 19, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-96: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Snohomish District Substations July 19, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-70: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program July 9, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-81: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program July 1, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-84: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program July 1, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-80: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program July 1, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-78: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program June 21, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-75: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program May 31, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-58: Supplement Analysis

130

EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 20, 2003 February 20, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-123: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 19, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-126: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 18, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-125: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 18, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-124: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 12, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-121: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program February 10, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-120: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Benton County, Washington January 16, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-117: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program December 24, 2002

131

Removal to Maximum Extent Practical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary Notes from 1 November 2007 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Removal of Highly Radioactive Radionuclides/Key Radionuclides to the Maximum Extent Practical

132

Timing Affects Switchgrass Production, Forage Nutritive Value, and Nutrient Removal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) has potential for both bioenergy and forage. The objectives of this experiment were to: i) determine whether switchgrass could be harvested for greater nutritive value during the vegetative stage relative to early reproductive growth (boot stage); ii) compare biomass yields of switchgrass harvested once versus twice per year for bioenergy; and iii) examine effects of N fertilizer rates on harvest systems. The experiment was a randomized complete block design with a split-plot arrangement of harvest system treatments as main plot (harvest once per year after frost, harvest twice per year first at vegetative or boot stage and regrowth after frost) and nitrogen (N) fertilizer rate as subplots (0, 90, 180, and 270 kg N ha-1). Biomass yield was greatest and nutrient concentrations were least in the one-cut system. For the two-cut system, nutritive values and yields were similar. Total annual biomass increased linearly with N fertilization. Across N rates, CP concentration for the two-cut systems was 50 % greater (71 g kg-1) and ADF and NDF concentrations were 20 % lesser (465 and 856 g kg-1, respectively) than switchgrass in the one-cut system. Switchgrass harvested at vegetative through boot stage and its regrowth could provide forage of acceptable nutritive value to beef cows. However, greater nutrient removal requires appropriate soil fertility evaluation and fertilizer management for sustainable yields.

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

CRBRP decay heat removal systems  

SciTech Connect

The Decay Heat Removal Systems for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) are designed to adequately remove sensible and decay heat from the reactor following normal shutdown, operational occurrences, and postulated accidents on both a short term and a long term basis. The Decay Heat Removal Systems are composed of the Main Heat Transport System, the Main Condenser and Feedwater System, the Steam Generator Auxiliary Heat Removal System (SGAHRS), and the Direct Heat Removal Service (DHRS). The overall design of the CRBRP Decay Heat Removal Systems and the operation under normal and off-normal conditions is examined. The redundancies of the system design, such as the four decay heat removal paths, the emergency diesel power supplies, and the auxiliary feedwater pumps, and the diversities of the design such as forced circulation/natural circulation and AC Power/DC Power are presented. In addition to overall design and system capabilities, the detailed designs for the Protected Air Cooled Condensers (PACC) and the Air Blast Heat Exchangers (ABHX) are presented.

Hottel, R.E.; Louison, R.; Boardman, C.E.; Kiley, M.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

DOE/EIS-0285-SA-138: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (Raver-Echo Lake #1) (4/3/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 (Raver-Echo Lake #1 8 (Raver-Echo Lake #1 Don Atkinson Natural Resource Specialist - TFN/SNOHOMISH Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for portion of the Raver - Echo Lake #1 500 kV transmission line located from tower structure 4/1 to 13/1. Location: Project location is within King County, Washington and is within the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to clear targeted vegetation within the right-of- way. BPA proposes to clear along access roads and remove danger trees outside the right-of-way where appropriate. Project is to remove vegetation that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See Section 1.1 through 1.4 of the attached checklists for a complete description of the proposed action.

135

Vegetable Oil for Color Only Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Vegetable Oil for Color Only. Sample Includes soybean oil. Vegetable Oil for Color Only Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists Lab laborat

136

Momentum and scalar transport in vegetated shear flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental aquatic flows are seldom free of vegetative influence. However, the impact of submerged vegetation on the hydrodynamics and mixing processes in aquatic flows remains poorly understood. In this thesis, I present ...

Ghisalberti, Marco (Marco Andrea), 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Vegetation Feedbacks to Climate in the Global Monsoon Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation feedbacks on climate, on the subannual time scale, are examined across six monsoon regions with a fully coupled atmosphere–ocean–ice–land model with dynamic vegetation. Initial value ensemble experiments are run in which the total ...

Michael Notaro; Guangshan Chen; Zhengyu Liu

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

A Representation of Variable Root Distribution in Dynamic Vegetation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Root distribution is treated as a static component in most current dynamic vegetation models (DVMs). While changes in leaf and stem biomass are reflected in leaf area index (LAI) and vegetation height via specific leaf area (SLA) and allometric ...

Vivek K. Arora; George J. Boer

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Interactions between currents and the spatial structure of aquatic vegetation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vegetation is present in nearly all aquatic environments, ranging from meandering streams to constructed channels and rivers, as well as in lakes and coastal zones. This vegetation grows in a wide range of flow environments ...

Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Intraseasonal Interactions between Temperature and Vegetation over the Boreal Forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper uses statistical and analytical techniques to investigate intraseasonal interactions between temperature and vegetation [surrogated by the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI)] over the boreal forests. Results indicate that ...

Weile Wang; Bruce T. Anderson; Dara Entekhabi; Dong Huang; Yin Su; Robert K. Kaufmann; Ranga B. Myneni

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Vegetation Dynamics within the North American Monsoon Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American monsoon (NAM) leads to a large increase in summer rainfall and a seasonal change in vegetation in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Understanding the interactions between NAM rainfall and vegetation ...

Giovanni Forzieri; Fabio Castelli; Enrique R. Vivoni

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Production of Oil in Vegetative Tissues - Energy Innovation Portal  

Production of Oil in Vegetative Tissues Inventors: Christoph Benning, Changcheng Xu, Binbin Lu, Jinpeng Gao Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center

143

The Uranium Availability and Uptake in the Vegetables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research of a potted experiment ruling uranium availability and uptake by four kinds of vegetables (lettuce,carrot , potatoes , peas) are described. Four kinds of vegetables spiked with the different uranium concentration in the aqueous and different ... Keywords: vegetables, uranium, Soil-liquid distribution, Uptake, Soil-to-plant transfer

Zhang Jing; Chen Diyun; Liu Juan

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Herbicide Use Safety for Vegetation Management on Powerline Corridors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents original research on herbicide use safety in association with vegetation management on electric transmission line rights of way.BackgroundThe Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) conducted integrated vegetation management assessments for five electric utilities between 2006 and 2009, using EPRI-developed procedures and standards of integrated vegetation management performance. Observations during the assessments indicated that utility ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

145

Investigation of Soil Moisture - Vegetation Interactions in Oklahoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and-atmosphere interactions are an important component of climate, especially in semi-arid regions such as the Southern Great Plains. Interactions between soil moisture and vegetation modulate land-atmosphere coupling and thus represent a crucial, but not well understood climate factor. This study examines soil moisture-vegetation health interactions using both in situ observations and land surface model simulations. For the observational study, soil moisture is taken from 20 in situ Oklahoma Mesonet soil moisture observation sites, and vegetation health is represented by MODIS-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). For the modeling study, the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) hydrologic model is employed with two different vegetation parameterizations. The first is the model default vegetation parameter which is interannually-invariant leaf area index (LAI). This parameter is referred to as the control parameter. The second is MODIS-derived LAI, which captures interannual differences in vegetation health. Soil moisture simulations from both vegetation parameterizations are compared and the VIC-simulated soil moisture’s sensitivity to the vegetation parameters is also examined. Correlation results from the observation study suggest that soil moisture-vegetation interactions in Oklahoma are inconsistent, varying both in space and time. The modeling results show that using a vegetation parameterization that does not capture interannual vegetation health variability could potentially result in dry or wet biased soil moisture simulations.

Ford, Trenton W.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Simulating Future Changes in Arctic and Subarctic Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic is a sensitive system undergoing dramatic changes related to recent warming trends. Vegetation dynamics—increases in the quantity of green vegetation and a northward migration of trees into the arctic tundra—are a component of ... Keywords: Arctic, biogeography, boreal forest, climate change, forest migration, shrub encroachment, subarctic, tundra, vegetation dynamics models

Howard E. Epstein; Jed O. Kaplan; Heike Lischke; Qin Yu

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 4 Biodiesel: An Alternative Diesel Fuel from Vegetable Oils or Animal Fats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 4 Biodiesel: An Alternative Diesel Fuel from Vegetable Oils or Animal Fats Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 Biodiesel: An Alternative Di

148

Article removal device for glovebox  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article removal device for a glovebox is described comprising a conduit extending through a glovebox wall which may be closed by a plug within the glovebox, and a fire-resistant container closing the outer end of the conduit and housing a removable container for receiving pyrophoric or otherwise hazardous material without disturbing the interior environment of the glovebox or adversely affecting the environment outside of the glovebox. (Official Gazette)

Guyer, R.H.; Leebl, R.G.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Trying to make an unwanted facility palatable  

SciTech Connect

Finding suitable accommodations for the temporary storage and permanent disposal of this: nation`s low- and high-level radioactive waste is proving an ever more difficult task in this era of volatile technology and science debate over the merits of the nuclear fuel cycle. Local constituencies become deeply immersed in the complex debate whether the site is chosen through a technical site selection process or is a voluntary entry. Rural communities with candidate sites need to initially shift their focus away from this, often acrimonious, debate; instead, the first discussion priority for such rural communities should be to develop a dynamic vision of their own economic and environmental future. The second discussion priority should be to determine if the array of accompanying incentives and benefits hosting this facility would afford the community the opportunity for vision fulfillment. If so, total focus should, then, be given to understanding and resolving to the satisfaction of the constituents issues related to nuclear technology, isolation of radioactive materials, management of risk, storage and disposal facility need, perceived and actual risk, oversight and power sharing authority, engineered safety barriers, and public trust.

Metz, W.C.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Environmental Tradeoffs of Stover Removal and Erosion in Indiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When considering the market for biomass from corn stover resources erosion and soil quality issues are important to consider. Removal of stover can be beneficial in some areas, especially when coordinated with other conservation practices, such as vegetative barrier strips and cover crops. However, benefits are highly dependent on several factors, namely if farmers see costs and benefits associated with erosion and the tradeoffs with the removal of biomass. Although typically considered an internal cost, the implication is important to policy and contracting for biomass. This paper uses results from an integrated RUSLE2/WEPS model to incorporate six different regime choices, covering management, harvest and conservation, into a simple profit maximization model to show these tradeoffs explicitly. The results of this work show how different costs for erosion, biomass and conservation managements will affect behavior. If erosion prices are low and no conservation requirement exists, biomass removal will significantly increase erosion, but only in some areas. Alternatively, when erosion prices are high, farmers will parallel socially optimal levels of erosion and conservation management practices can be incentivized through access to a market for stover.

Alicia English; Wallace E. Tyner; Juan Sesmero; Phillip Owens; David J. Muth, Jr.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Mrowka, Stanley (Richmond, CA)

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

152

Removal - An alternative to clearance  

SciTech Connect

This presentation shows the differences between the application of clearance and removal, both being procedures for materials leaving radiation protection areas permanently. The differentiation will be done on the basis of the German legislation but may be also applicable for other national legislation. For clearance in Germany two basic requirements must be given, i.e. that the materials are activated or contaminated and that they result from the licensed use or can be assigned to the scope of the license. Clearance needs not to be applied to objects in Germany which are to be removed only temporarily from controlled areas with the purpose of repair or reuse in other controlled areas. In these cases only the requirements of contamination control apply. In the case of removal it must either be proved by measurements that the relevant materials are neither activated nor contaminated or that the materials result from areas where activation or contamination is impossible due to the operational history considering operational procedures and events. If the material is considered neither activated nor contaminated there is no need for a clearance procedure. Therefore, these materials can be removed from radiation protection areas and the removal is in the responsibility of the licensee. Nevertheless, the removal procedure and the measuring techniques to be applied for the different types of materials need an agreement from the competent authority. In Germany a maximum value of 10% of the clearance values has been established in different licenses as a criterion for the application of removal. As approximately 2/3 of the total mass of a nuclear power plant is not expected to be contaminated or activated there is a need for such a procedure of removal for this non contaminated material without any regulatory control especially in the case of decommissioning. A remarkable example is NPP Stade where in the last three years more than 8600 Mg were disposed of by removal and only 315 Mg were released by clearance, even before the decommissioning licensing procedure was finished. (authors)

Feinhals, J.; Kelch, A. [TUV NORD SysTec GmbH and Co. KG, Hamburg (Germany); Kunze, V. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Salzgitter (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Large Component Removal/Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

Wheeler, D. M.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

Multipollutant Removal with WOWClean® System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WOW Energy built and tested its multipollutant removal WOWClean® system in a development program with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). A 2,500 ACFM mobile unit was built to field test the removal of air pollution constituents from the flue gas of a power plant and demonstrate the technology. The system integrates proven emission reduction techniques into a single, multi-pollutant reduction system and is designed to remove Mercury, SOx, NOx, particulates, heavy metals and other pollutants from low temperature flue gases. Its advantages include robust operation, lower investment, lower operating cost and high removal rates. The WOWClean® system has been tested on flue gases resulting from the combustion of diverse fuels such as petcoke, coal, wood, diesel and natural gas. In addition to significant removal of CO2, test results demonstrate the capability to reduce 99.5% SOx (from levels as high as 2200 ppm), 90% reduction of NOx, and > 90% heavy metals. The paper will include details of the multi-pollutant system along with test results.

Romero, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removal NNSANews posted a photo: Vietnam HEU Removal A truck carrying the last highly enriched uranium in Vietnam winds through the Vietnamese countryside. Facebook Twitter Youtube...

156

Metals removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); Von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Actinide removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS DOE/EIS-0285/SA-08  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clearing C-trees along the south side of the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The project involves controlling all tall growing trees (C-Trees) within the right-of-way. All work is to be done on the south side of centerline. Target vegetation is the tall growing Firs along the edge of the ROW, all of which is located within the back yards of the property owners along the right-of-way. The density of vegetation is low and consists of C-Trees located within backyards, with the branches growing towards the lines. Due to lack of access and past verbal agreements with the landowners, permission/agreement has been difficult to obtain from the property owners. Permission has now been obtained to remove the C-Trees within their back yards which, will soon be a hazard to our transmission line facility. We are working with the landowners to get them to plant low growing scrubs and ornamentals within the right-of-way and adjacent to the right-of-way. A follow up herbicide treatment is not planned because the trees being cut will not re-sprout. This right-of-way or project area is on a three to four year maintenance schedule. Little or no treatment should be required in the immediate future.

N /A

2001-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

159

Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Membrane degumming of crude vegetable oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crude vegetable oils contain various minor substances like phospholipids, coloring pigments, and free fatty acids (FFA) that may affect quality of the oil. Reduction of energy costs and waste disposal are major concerns for many oil refiners who are looking for alternative methods to improve conventional refining methods. During the last decade, energy efficient membrane separation technology has evolved dramatically. This thesis reports a study on degumming crude vegetable oil using membrane separation. In the bench-scale study, two membranes were evaluated for their flux and rejection properties. Process parameters including pressure, temperature, feed velocity and volumetric concentration factor were examined. A 99.6% rejection of phospholipids and a flux of 22.4 LMH were achieved at pressure 300 psi, temperature 40'C and feed velocity 220 1/hr using DS-7 membrane, and significant reduction of the coloring pigments was observed as well. In the pilot-scale study, the spiral wound DS-7 membrane was found effective for 100% rejection of phospholipids with a permeate flux of 57.6 LMH. The rejection rates of phospholipids, Mg and Ca were 100%, 99.6% and 54.6%, respectively. Resistance-in-series model of the membrane system was also studied. The membrane resistance, the fouling resistance, and the polarization resistance for the pilotscale system were 0.29, 0.043, and 4.49, respectively. Evaluation on membrane fouling and cleaning showed that flux decreased rapidly during the first several hours and membrane cleaning presented no significant problem. The pilot-scale study confirmed results of the bench-scale system and provides useful data for commercializing membrane refining process in the near future. KEY WORDS: Membrane separation, crude vegetable oil, degumming, phospholipids.

Lin, Lan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals Forecasts A document describing how volume fellings and removals are handled in the 2011 Production Forecast system. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Felling and removals forecasts Background A fellings and removals

162

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact laser system is disclosed that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1,000 ft{sup 2}/hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, D.L.; Celliers, P.M.; Hackel, L.; Da Silva, L.B.; Dane, C.B.; Mrowka, S.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

163

EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program 285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program EIS-0285: Transmission System Vegetation Management Program SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations. This electric transmission system operates in seven states of the Pacific Northwest. (See Figure I-1). The seven states offer a great diversity of vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and neighboring members of the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to keep vegetation a safe distance away from our electric power facilities and control noxious weeds at our

164

Best Management Practices for Vegetation Management at Electric Utility Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlling vegetation inside key electric utility facilities is a necessary maintenance activity for a utility’s safe and reliable operation. Substations, switchyards, and other facilities require perpetual maintenance to maintain a vegetation-free environment. At a minimum, vegetation-maintenance treatment needs to be conducted annually; in some climatic regions, multiple treatments may be required. The objective of this research paper was to define current industry practices by means of a ...

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

165

Transmission Rights-of-Way Vegetation Management Plan Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) FAC-003-1 standards for vegetation management on electric transmission line rights-of-way (ROWs) have been in place since April 2006. These mandatory standards regulate electric transmission line vegetation management across the United States, and are narrowly focused on minimizing vegetation caused outages in electricity transmission. The NERC FAC-003-1 standards are potentially broadened by the voluntary American National Standards Institute (A...

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

166

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOEEIS-0285SA-21) Joe Johnson - TFSKalispell - Natural Resource...

167

Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: alocally...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Local Incentive-Based Policy...

168

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 9 Printing Inks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 9 Printing Inks Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 Printing Inks from the book ...

169

Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

methods, (2) the red-edge positioning (REP) methods, and (3) the use of machine learning regression trees. Although there are numerous vegetation indices, we evaluated...

170

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 4 Refining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 4 Refining Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 Refining from the book ...

171

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 5 Bleaching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 5 Bleaching Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 5 Bleaching from the book ...

172

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 6 Hydrogenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 6 Hydrogenation Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Hydrogenation from the book ...

173

Chloride removal from plutonium alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SRP is evaluating a program to recover plutonium from a metallic alloy that will contain chloride salt impurities. Removal of chloride to sufficiently low levels to prevent damaging corrosion to canyon equipment is feasible as a head-end step following dissolution. Silver nitrate and mercurous nitrate were each successfully used in laboratory tests to remove chloride from simulated alloy dissolver solution containing plutonium. Levels less than 10 ppM chloride were achieved in the supernates over the precipitated and centrifuged insoluble salts. Also, less than 0.05% loss of plutonium in the +3, +4, or +6 oxidation states was incurred via precipitate carrying. These results provide impetus for further study and development of a plant-scale process to recover plutonium from metal alloy at SRP.

Holcomb, H.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Removing Barriers to Interdisciplinary Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant amount of high-impact contemporary scientific research occurs where biology, computer science, engineering and chemistry converge. Although programmes have been put in place to support such work, the complex dynamics of interdisciplinarity are still poorly understood. In this paper we interrogate the nature of interdisciplinary research and how we might measure its "success", identify potential barriers to its implementation, and suggest possible mechanisms for removing these impediments.

Naomi Jacobs; Martyn Amos

2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

175

METHOD OF REMOVING STRONTIUM IONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for removing trace amounts of Sr/sup 90/ from solutions. Phosphate ion is added to the solution and it is then brought into contact with a solid salt such as calcium carbonate which will react methathetically with the phosphate ion to form a salt such as calcium phosphate. During this reaction, strontium will be absorbed to a high degree within the newly formed lattice. (AEC)

Rhodes, D.W.; McHenry, J.R.; Ames, L.L. Jr.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-14): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 6/6/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4) 4) Bill Erickson - TFP/ Walla Walla Region Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management at the Teakean Butte Microwave site. Location: Clearwater County, ID, Walla Walla Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to remove 28 danger trees and dense brush from the microwave site in order to provide a 75 -80 foot safety buffer for fire control and Microwave Beam path. The work will protect BPA's investment at the site and provide system reliability. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. Analysis: This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision

177

GIMS-based method for vegetation microwave monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is threefold: (1) To present a working methodology for the combined use of modeling technology and microwave remote-sensing measurements in the assessment of attenuation of electromagnetic waves by the vegetation cover; (2) ... Keywords: GIMS, Microwave, Remote sensing, Vegetative cover

Vladimir F. Krapivin; Anatolij M. Shutko; Alexander A. Chukhlantsev; Sergei P. Golovachev; Gary W. Phillips

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Soil and Vegetation Management: Keys to Water Conservation on Rangeland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The amount of water that soaks into the soil largely determines plant productivity. We can manage and conserve water where and when it falls, and by controlling the kind of vegetation we can make the fullest use of rain water. This publication illustrations the effects of vegetation management on water availability.

Schuster, Joseph L.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

December 2010 HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December 2010 HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDAL TREATMENT@nmsu.edu #12;i HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDAL TREATMENT OF BROOM both burning and spraying with herbicide. However, the broom snakeweed was not eradicated, and numbers

Johnson, Eric E.

180

Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, 28: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts from vegetation management in the "project area" of the Hanford Site. The project area excludes most of the Hanford Reach National Monument that is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) under permit from DOE. Vegetation managment under the EA would be consistent with and complement similar efforts currently being performed by the USFWS on the Monument. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA, and that preparation of

182

Vegetable and Melons Yearbook Data Tables | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vegetable and Melons Yearbook Data Tables Vegetable and Melons Yearbook Data Tables Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Vegetable and Melons Yearbook Data Tables Dataset Summary Description Production, acreage, value, prices, imports, exports, per capita use, and beginning stocks for major fresh market and processed vegetables, 1970 onward. Also includes data for potatoes, sweet potatoes, dry beans and peas, and fresh and processed mushrooms. Tags {"United States","Economic Research Service",prices,value,imports,exports,"per capita use","beginning stocks",vegetables,"fresh market",processed,potatoes,"sweet potatoes","dry beans",peas,"fresh muschrooms","processed mushrooms",mushrooms}

183

EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, 728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts from vegetation management in the "project area" of the Hanford Site. The project area excludes most of the Hanford Reach National Monument that is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) under permit from DOE. Vegetation managment under the EA would be consistent with and complement similar efforts currently being performed by the USFWS on the Monument. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA, and that preparation of

184

The vegetation of Yucca Mountain: Description and ecology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was monitored over a six-year period, from 1989 through 1994. Yucca Mountain is located at the northern limit of the Mojave Desert and is the only location being studied as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. Site characterization consists of a series of multidisciplinary, scientific investigations designed to provide detailed information necessary to assess the suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site as a repository. This vegetation description establishes a baseline for determining the ecological impact of site characterization activities; it porvides input for site characterization research and modeling; and it clarifies vegetation community dynamics and relationships to the physical environment. A companion study will describe the impact of site characterization of vegetation. Cover, density, production, and species composition of vascular plants were monitored at 48 Ecological Study Plots (ESPs) stratified in four vegetation associations. Precipitation, soil moisture, and maximum and minimum temperatures also were measured at each study plot.

NONE

1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

185

Natural gas: Removing the obstacles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defining and then figuring out how to remove whatever obstacles may be blocking the wider use of natural gas was the purpose of a conference held early last month in Phoenix, Arizona. The unique, three-day event was jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). It drew an overflow crowd of more than 500, with a registration list that read like a Who's Who of the natural gas industry. This article summarizes some of the main points of this conference.

Romo, C.

1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Material Removal and Disposition | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal and Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

187

Remote Sensing of Terrestrial and Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Fire Island National  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote Sensing of Terrestrial and Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Fire Island National Seashore Satellite Remote Sensing Data in FIIS Vegetation Mapping The vegetation communities and spatial patterns necessary. #12;Hyperspectral Remote Sensing in Seagrass Habitat Mapping Recent development of hyperspectral

Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

188

Predicting Regional Transpiration at Elevated Atmospheric CO2: Influence of the PBL–Vegetation Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled planetary boundary layer (PBL)–vegetation model is used to study the influence of the PBL–vegetation interaction and the ambient CO2 concentration on surface resistance rs and regional transpiration ?E. Vegetation is described using the ...

Cor M. J. Jacobs; Henk A. R. de Bruin

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Nonlinear Dynamics in a Coupled Vegetation–Atmosphere System and Implications for Desert–Forest Gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the global vegetation distribution is largely controlled by the large-scale climate pattern, the observed vegetation–rainfall relationship is also influenced by vegetation feedback and climate variability. Using a simplified coupled ...

Ning Zeng; Katrina Hales; J. David Neelin

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-109): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS - (Santiam-Alvey # 1 #2 access road and structure clearing) 9/9/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 9, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-109) - (Santiam-Alvey # 1 and #2 access road and structure clearing) Benjamin Tilley Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Santiam-Alvey # 1 and #2 transmission line. Location: Throughout the Santiam-Alvey # 1 and #2 corridor located within Linn and Lane counties in Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: Tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the line will be removed. Vegetation that will grow tall will be selectively eliminated before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing species. Cut-stump or follow- up herbicide treatments on re-sprouting-type species will be carried out to ensure

191

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-111) - (Fairview-Brandon #1, Fairview-Brandon #2 and Fairview-Rogue #1access road, danger tree and structure clearing) 9/25/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25, 25, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-111) - (Fairview-Bandon #1, Fairview-Bandon #2 and Fairview-Rogue #1access road, danger tree and structure clearing) Benjamin Tilley Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Fairview-Bandon #1and #2 and Fairview- Rogue #1 transmission lines. Location: Throughout the Fairview-Bandon #1, Fairview-Bandon #2 and Fairview-Rogue #1 corridors located within Coos and Curry counties in Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: Tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the line will be removed. Vegetation that will grow tall will be selectively eliminated before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing

192

Influence of woody plant on spring and riparian vegetation in central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increase in human population, water resources have become more and more precious. A comprehensive study of water yield characteristics is imperative, especially in water-limited semiarid regions. The objective of this study is to examine spring flow and vegetation cover in a first-order watershed and investigate the herbaceous community structure of upland riparian zones. This study consists of two major components: (1) the effects of environmental factors and vegetation cover on spring flow at Pedernales River upland catchments, and (2) the ecological responses of vegetation to altered flow regimes that result from brush management at the upland riparian zones. The study finds that an average of 3.67% of the monthly water budget of first-order catchments in central Texas is made up of spring flow. The influence of woody plant cover on streamflow was evaluated by comparing spring sites with different percentages of woody cover three times during 2003 and 2004. Our findings indicate that changes in woody plant cover had no influence on the amounts of streamflow from these catchments, and the surface catchment area had only a minor influence. This suggests that the real spring catchment area might be different from the surface watershed boundaries that have been delineated by topography. Plant species richness and diversity gradually decreased with increasing lateral distances from the stream bank. Herbaceous richness and diversity declined with increasing Ashe juniper cover in the riparian zone. Ashe juniper canopy cover had a larger effect on the understory composition than the cover of other woody species. Herbaceous diversity and production was greater in areas with sparse tree density than in areas with no trees, but was lowest at high tree densities. The complete removal of Ashe juniper in the riparian zones is not recommended because of the potential loss of grass cover. The recommended management would be to leave a sparse cover of canopy trees to maintain understory plants.

Shen, Li

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

THERMALLY SHIELDED MOISTURE REMOVAL DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is presented for removing moisture from the air within tanks by condensation upon a cartridge containing liquid air. An insulating shell made in two halves covers the cartridge within the evacuated system. The shell halves are hinged together and are operated by a system of levers from outside the tank with the motion translated through a sylphon bellows to cover and uncover the cartridge. When the condensation of moisture is in process, the insulative shell is moved away from the liquid air cartridge, and during that part of the process when there is no freezing out of moisture, the shell halves are closed on the cell so thnt the accumulated frost is not evaporated. This insulating shell greatly reduces the consumption of liquid air in this condensation process.

Miller, O.E.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

194

Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

Richardson, BS

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Nitrogen removal from natural gas  

SciTech Connect

According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Observed Vegetation–Climate Feedbacks in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observed vegetation feedbacks on temperature and precipitation are assessed across the United States using satellite-based fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) and monthly climate data for the period of 1982–2000. This study ...

M. Notaro; Z. Liu; J. W. Williams

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation 42: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah Summary This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Western's proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska. The EIS website is http://ww2.wapa.gov/sites/western/transmission/infrastruct/Pages/Western%20FS%20EIS.aspx.

199

Microsoft PowerPoint - Town Bluff Vegetation impact.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

's. In 1989 the used for the Lake constructed in the 1950's. In 1989 the 's. In 1989 the used for the Lake constructed in the 1950's. In 1989 the dam was modified for the installation of Robert D. Willis dam was modified for the installation of Robert D. Willis Power Plant. The plant has two S Power Plant. The plant has two S - - Tube type turbines Tube type turbines which operate generators nominally rated at 4Mwh each. which operate generators nominally rated at 4Mwh each. Actual power production has rarely exceeded 3.6Mwh Actual power production has rarely exceeded 3.6Mwh Invasive species of Vegetation has increased to the Invasive species of Vegetation has increased to the point that an aquatic vegetation control program is being point that an aquatic vegetation control program is being managed by Town Bluff in coordination with TPWD and managed by Town Bluff in coordination with TPWD and

200

Interpretation of Surface and Planetary Directional Albedos for Vegetated Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An atmospheric solar radiation model has been coupled with surface reflectance measurements for two vegetation types, pasture land and savannah, in order to address several issues associated with understanding the directional planetary albedo; ...

Inna L. Vulis; Robert D. Cess

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 12 Enzymatic Interesterfication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 12 Enzymatic Interesterfication Processing eChapters Processing 716316455FE47FB5D9A86E048BC2AE36 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 12 Enzymatic Interesterfication...

202

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 10 Hydrogenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 10 Hydrogenation Processing eChapters Processing 7672D25097D246FF512E7AB73F722C4B AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Hydrogenation from the book ...

203

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 6 Enzymatic Degumming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 6 Enzymatic Degumming Processing eChapters Processing 57ACA7723A9727237283ACEAD636027C AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Enzymatic Degumming from the book ...

204

How important is vegetation phenology for European climate and heatwaves?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been hypothesized that vegetation phenology may play an important role for the mid-latitude climate. In this study, we investigate the impact of interannual and intraseasonal variations in phenology on European climate using Regional ...

Ruth Lorenz; Edouard L. Davin; David M. Lawrence; Reto Stöckli; Sonia I. Seneviratne

205

Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aquatic plants convert mean kinetic energy into turbulent kinetic energy at the scale of the plant stems and branches. This energy transfer, linked to wake generation, affects vegetative drag and turbulence intensity. ...

Nepf, Heidi

206

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are discussed below. Planning Steps: 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. Work will take place along Custer-Intalco 1 230 kV transmission line. The...

207

Global Vegetation Indices from the NOAA-7 Meteorological Satellite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northern and Southern Hemisphere polar stereographic maps of “vegetation index” are now being produced by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The maps are derived from visible and near-infrared data from NOAA's operational polar ...

J. D. Tarpley; S. R. Schneider; R. L. Money

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Sensible Heat Transfer Parameterization for Surfaces with Anisothermal Dense Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scalar roughness for sensible beat can be directly formulated in terms of the surface temperature. Therefore, in the case of an anisothermal vegetation canopy, the concept of a scalar roughness is ill defined and it may vary greatly depending ...

Wilfried Brutsaert; Michiaki Sugita

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Removal of metal oxide defects through improved semi-anisotropic wet etching process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data recently collected from an industrial thin film manufacturer indicate that almost 8% of devices are rejected due to excess metal, or unwanted metal on the device surface. Experimentation and analysis suggest that ...

Dave, Neha H. (Neha Hemang)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Evaluating the effectiveness of vegetated buffers to remove nutrients, pathogens, and sediment transported in runoff from grazed, irrigated pastures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in reducing the pollution from land application areas.pollution abatement in response to installing buffers on crop land.

Tate, Kenneth W; van Kessel, Chris; Atwill, Edward R.; Dahlgren, Randy A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Part 3: Removal Action | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Removal Action 3: Removal Action Part 3: Removal Action Question: When may removal actions be initiated? Answer: Removal actions may be initiated when DOE determines that the action will prevent, minimize, stabilize, or eliminate a risk to health or the environment. The NCP specifies that the determination that a risk to health or the environment is appropriate for removal action should be based on: actual or potential exposure of humans, animals, or the food chain the presence of contained hazardous substances that pose a threat of release the threat of migration of the hazardous substances the threat of fire or explosion the availability of an appropriate Federal or State response capability [section 300.415(b)(2)]. In essence, where DOE identifies a threat of exposure to or migration of

212

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

1988-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

213

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (both Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (both Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

215

Process for particulate removal from coal liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Suspended solid particulates are removed from liquefied coal products by first subjecting such products to hydroclone action for removal in the underflow of the larger size particulates, and then subjecting the overflow from said hydroclone action, comprising the residual finer particulates, to an electrostatic field in an electrofilter wherein such finer particulates are deposited in the bed of beads of dielectric material on said filter. The beads are periodically cleaned by backwashing to remove the accumulated solids.

Rappe, Gerald C. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

217

Passive Core Decay Heat Removal Performance Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive decay heat removal systems operate without pumps when normal heat removal systems are not available. Safety is ensured by confirming that an adequate thermal margin is provided to accommodate various operating conditions, design uncertainties, and degradation. Guidelines to ensure adequate thermal performance are provided for three different system configurations.This report introduces utility systems engineers to the design and operation of passive decay heat removal systems and ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

218

Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSANews posted a photo: Vietnam HEU Removal A convoy escorting the last highly enriched uranium in Vietnam departs Dalat. Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr Headlines Jul 23,...

219

Metal Organic Clathrates for Carbon Dioxide Removal  

removal from coal-fired power plant flue gas streams.  Modified variations of the materials can be used in a variety of other fields as well, ...

220

System for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Improved sulfur removal processes evaluated for IGCC  

SciTech Connect

An inherent advantage of Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electric power generation is the ability to easily remove and recover sulfur. During the last several years, a number of new, improved sulfur removal and recovery processes have been commercialized. An assessment is given of alternative sulfur removal processes for IGCC based on the Texaco coal gasifier. The Selexol acid gas removal system, Claus sulfur recovery, and SCOT tail gas treating are currently used in Texaco-based IGCC. Other processes considered are: Purisol, Sulfinol-M, Selefning, 50% MDEA, Sulften, and LO-CAT. 2 tables.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel  

ORNL 2010-G00619/jcn UT-B ID 200902314 Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel Technology Summary At ORNL the application of ultrasonic energy, or ...

223

Internal Controls Over Classified Computersand Classified Removable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Classified Removable Media at theLawrence Livermore National Laboratory, IG-0628 Computers are used extensively in the full range of operations at Lawrence Livermore National...

224

Removal of radioisotopes from waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention comprises removing radioisotopes from waste liquids or solutions by passing these through filters and through a column containing a suitable salt of phosphoric acid. (Official Gazette)

Kirby, H.W.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Tritium Removal Facility High Tritium Distillation Simulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A dynamic model was developed for the distillation mechanism of the Darlington Tritium Removal Facility. The model was created using the commercial software package MATLAB/Simulink.… (more)

Zahedi, Polad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Global Vegetation and Climate Change due to Future Increases in CO2 as Projected by a Fully Coupled Model with Dynamic Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transient simulations are presented of future climate and vegetation associated with continued rising levels of CO2. The model is a fully coupled atmosphere–ocean–land–ice model with dynamic vegetation. The impacts of the radiative and ...

Michael Notaro; Steve Vavrus; Zhengyu Liu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

DISSOLUTION METHOD OF REMOVING BONDING AGENTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for removing residual aluminumsilicon bonding agents from uranium slugs after the removal of aluminum coatings. To accomplish this the slug is immersed in an aqueous solution about 0.75 N in hydrofluoric acid and about 7 N in nitric acid.

Hyman, H.H.

1960-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

228

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

229

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

231

Global Cut Framework for Removing Symmetries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a general technique for removing symmetries in CSPs during search. The idea is to record no-goods, during the exploration of the search tree, whose symmetric counterpart (if any) should be removed. The no-good, called Global ...

Filippo Focacci; Michela Milano

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

COST OF MERCURY REMOVAL IN IGCC PLANTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost of Mercury Removal Cost of Mercury Removal in an IGCC Plant Final Report September 2002 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory By: Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group Inc. Reading, Pennsylvania Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania DOE Product Manager: Gary J. Stiegel DOE Task Manager: James R. Longanbach Principal Investigators: Michael G. Klett Russell C. Maxwell Michael D. Rutkowski PARSONS The Cost of Mercury Removal in an IGCC Plant Final Report i September 2002 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page 1 Summary 1 2 Introduction 3 3 Background 4 3.1 Regulatory Initiatives 4 3.2 Mercury Removal for Conventional Coal-Fired Plants 4 3.3 Mercury Removal Experience in Gasification 5 3.4 Variability of Mercury Content in Coal 6 4 Design Considerations 7 4.1 Carbon Bed Location

233

Catalyst regeneration process including metal contaminants removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Spent catalysts removed from a catalytic hydrogenation process for hydrocarbon feedstocks, and containing undesired metals contaminants deposits, are regenerated. Following solvent washing to remove process oils, the catalyst is treated either with chemicals which form sulfate or oxysulfate compounds with the metals contaminants, or with acids which remove the metal contaminants, such as 5-50 W % sulfuric acid in aqueous solution and 0-10 W % ammonium ion solutions to substantially remove the metals deposits. The acid treating occurs within the temperature range of 60.degree.-250.degree. F. for 5-120 minutes at substantially atmospheric pressure. Carbon deposits are removed from the treated catalyst by carbon burnoff at 800.degree.-900.degree. F. temperature, using 1-6 V % oxygen in an inert gas mixture, after which the regenerated catalyst can be effectively reused in the catalytic process.

Ganguli, Partha S. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Dry deposition of pan to grassland vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Peroxyacetyl nitrate or PAN (CH{sub 3}C(O)OONO{sub 2}) is formed in the lower troposphere via photochemical reactions involving nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). PAN has a lifetime in the free troposphere of about three months and is removed by photolysis or reaction with OH. Dry deposition will decrease its lifetime, although the few measurements that have been made indicate that this process is slow. Measurements of the uptake of PAN by alfalfa in growth chambers indicated that the dry deposition velocity (downward flux divided by concentration at a specified height) was 0.75 cm s{sup {minus}1}. Garland and Penkett measured a dry deposition velocity of 0.25 cm s{sup {minus}1} for PAN to grass and soil in a return-flow wind tunnel. Shepson et al. (1992) analyzed trends of PAN and O{sub 3} concentrations in the stable nocturnal boundary layer over mixed deciduous/coniferous forests at night, when leaf stomata were closed, and concluded that the deposition velocity for PAN was at least 0.5 cm s{sup {minus}1}. We measured the dry deposition velocity of PAN to a grassland site in the midwestern United States with a modified Bowen ratio technique. Experiments were conducted on selected days during September, October, and November of 1990. An energy balance Bowen ratio station was used to observe the differences in air temperature and water vapor content between heights of 3.0 and 0.92 m and to evaluate the surface energy balance. Air samples collected at the same two heights in Teflon {reg_sign} bags were analyzed for PAN by a gas chromatographic technique. We present an example of the variations of PAN concentrations and gradients observed during the day and compare measurements of the dry deposition velocity to expectations based on the physicochemical properties of PAN.

Doskey, P.V.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Gao, W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Major role of marine vegetation on the oceanic carbon cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The carbon burial in vegetated sediments, ignored in past assessments of carbon burial in the ocean, was evaluated using a bottom-up approach derived from upscaling a compilation of published individual estimates of carbon burial in vegetated habitats (seagrass meadows, salt marshes and mangrove forests) to the global level and a top-down approach derived from considerations of global sediment balance and a compilation of the organic carbon content of vegeatated sediments. Up-scaling of individual burial estimates values yielded a total carbon burial in vegetated habitats of 111 Tmol C y ?1. The total burial in unvegetated sediments was estimated to be 126 Tg C y ?1, resulting in a bottom-up estimate of total burial in the ocean of about 244 Tg C y ?1, two-fold higher than estimates of oceanic carbon burial that presently enter global carbon budgets. The organic carbon

C. M. Duarte; J. J. Middelburg; N. Caraco

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Actinide removal from nitric acid waste streams  

SciTech Connect

Actinide separations research at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) has found ways to significantly improve plutonium secondary recovery and americium removal from nitric acid waste streams generated by plutonium purification operations. Capacity and breakthrough studies show anion exchange with Dowex 1x4 (50 to 100 mesh) to be superior for secondary recovery of plutonium. Extraction chromatography with TOPO(tri-n-octyl-phosphine oxide) on XAD-4 removes the final traces of plutonium, including hydrolytic polymer. Partial neutralization and solid supported liquid membrane transfer removes americium for sorption on discardable inorganic ion exchangers, potentially allowing for non-TRU waste disposal.

Muscatello, A.C.; Navratil, J.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

In situ removal of contamination from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination, and further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed.

Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Method for changing removable bearing for a wind turbine generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY), Gadre; Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

239

Vegetable oils: liquid coolants for solar heating and cooling applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been proposed that vegetable oils, renewable byproducts of agriculture processes, be investigated for possible use as liquid coolants. The major thrust of the project was to investigate several thermophysical properties of the four vegetable oils selected. Vapor pressures, specific heat, viscosity, density, and thermal conductivity were determined over a range of temperatures for corn, soybean, peanut, and cottonseed oil. ASTM standard methods were used for these determinations. In addition, chemical analyses were performed on samples of each oil. The samples were collected before and after each experiment so that any changes in composition could be noted. The tests included iodine number, fatty acid, and moisture content determination. (MHR)

Ingley, H A

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Novel Bioplastics and biocomposites from Vegetable Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polymeric materials have been prevalent in our everyday lives for quite a long time. Most of today's polymeric materials are derived from nonrenewable petroleum-based feedstocks. Instabilities in the regions where petroleum is drilled, along with an increased demand in petroleum, have driven the price of crude oil to record high prices. This, in effect, increases the price of petroleum-based polymeric materials, which has caused a heightened awareness of renewable alternatives for polymeric feedstocks. Cellulose, starch, proteins and natural oils have all been examined as possible polymeric feedstocks. Natural oils are commercially available on a large scale and are relatively cheap. It is projected that the U.S. alone will produce 21 billion pounds of soybean oil in the period 2008/2009. Natural oils also have the advantages of inherent biodegradability, low toxicity, high purity and ready availability. Most natural oils possess a triglyceride structure as shown in Figure 1. Most natural oils have a unique distribution of fatty acid side chains, along with varying degrees of unsaturation per triglyceride. Common fatty acid side chains in naturally occurring oils are palmitic acid (C16:0), a 16 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; stearic acid (C18:0), an 18 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; oleic acid (C18:1), an 18 carbon fatty acid with one double bond; linoleic acid (C18:2), an 18 carbon fatty acid with two double bonds; and linolenic acid (C18:3), an 18 carbon fatty acid with three double bonds. Of course, there are other fatty acids with varying degrees of unsaturation, but their abundance is usually minimal. All of the unsaturated fatty acids mentioned have naturally occurring cis double bonds, which is common for most unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the afore mentioned fatty acids have the first double bond at the position of carbon 9 (C9), followed by carbon 12 (C12), if there are two degrees of unsaturation, then at carbon 15 (C15), if there are three degrees of unsaturation. In addition, the double bonds are not in conjugation. Table 1 gives the fatty acid make-up of linseed oil. It can be seen that linseed oil has an average of 6.0 double bonds per triglyceride. Its fatty acid content consists of 5.4% palmitic acid (C16:0), 3.5% stearic acid (C18:0), 19% oleic acid (C18:1), 24 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 47% linolenic (C18:3). Table 1 also gives the fatty acid composition and varying degrees of unsaturation for various other naturally-occurring natural vegetable oils. The regions of unsaturation in natural oils allow for interesting polymer chemistry to take place. Some of this interesting polymer science, however, involves chemical modification of the regions of unsaturation. Acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is prepared by epoxidation of the double bonds, followed by ring opening with acrylic acid. The resulting oil has both acrylate groups and hydroxyl groups. Wool and colleagues have further reacted the hydroxyl groups within the oil with maleic anhydride to produce maleated acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (MAESO). The MAESO has been copolymerized with styrene free radically to produce promising thermosetting sheet molding resins. Petrovi? and co-workers have directly ring opened the epoxidized oil to produce polyols that produce promising polyurethanes through condensation polymerization with diisocyanates. Our group's work initially focused on direct cationic copolymerization of the double bonds or conjugated double bonds of natural oils with monomers, such as styrene and divinylbenzene, to produce promising thermosetting resins. The only modification of the oils that was carried out in these studies was conjugation of the double bonds to enhance the reactivity of the oil. This work has been expanded recently with the incorporation of glass fiber to produce promising composites. We have also explored thermal polymerization techniques to make novel thermosets. This dissertation is divided into four chapters. The first chapter discusses the synthesis and characterization of biobased

Phillip H. Henna

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Novel Bioplastics and biocomposites from Vegetable Oils  

SciTech Connect

Polymeric materials have been prevalent in our everyday lives for quite a long time. Most of today's polymeric materials are derived from nonrenewable petroleum-based feedstocks. Instabilities in the regions where petroleum is drilled, along with an increased demand in petroleum, have driven the price of crude oil to record high prices. This, in effect, increases the price of petroleum-based polymeric materials, which has caused a heightened awareness of renewable alternatives for polymeric feedstocks. Cellulose, starch, proteins and natural oils have all been examined as possible polymeric feedstocks. Natural oils are commercially available on a large scale and are relatively cheap. It is projected that the U.S. alone will produce 21 billion pounds of soybean oil in the period 2008/2009. Natural oils also have the advantages of inherent biodegradability, low toxicity, high purity and ready availability. Most natural oils possess a triglyceride structure as shown in Figure 1. Most natural oils have a unique distribution of fatty acid side chains, along with varying degrees of unsaturation per triglyceride. Common fatty acid side chains in naturally occurring oils are palmitic acid (C16:0), a 16 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; stearic acid (C18:0), an 18 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; oleic acid (C18:1), an 18 carbon fatty acid with one double bond; linoleic acid (C18:2), an 18 carbon fatty acid with two double bonds; and linolenic acid (C18:3), an 18 carbon fatty acid with three double bonds. Of course, there are other fatty acids with varying degrees of unsaturation, but their abundance is usually minimal. All of the unsaturated fatty acids mentioned have naturally occurring cis double bonds, which is common for most unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the afore mentioned fatty acids have the first double bond at the position of carbon 9 (C9), followed by carbon 12 (C12), if there are two degrees of unsaturation, then at carbon 15 (C15), if there are three degrees of unsaturation. In addition, the double bonds are not in conjugation. Table 1 gives the fatty acid make-up of linseed oil. It can be seen that linseed oil has an average of 6.0 double bonds per triglyceride. Its fatty acid content consists of 5.4% palmitic acid (C16:0), 3.5% stearic acid (C18:0), 19% oleic acid (C18:1), 24 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 47% linolenic (C18:3). Table 1 also gives the fatty acid composition and varying degrees of unsaturation for various other naturally-occurring natural vegetable oils. The regions of unsaturation in natural oils allow for interesting polymer chemistry to take place. Some of this interesting polymer science, however, involves chemical modification of the regions of unsaturation. Acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is prepared by epoxidation of the double bonds, followed by ring opening with acrylic acid. The resulting oil has both acrylate groups and hydroxyl groups. Wool and colleagues have further reacted the hydroxyl groups within the oil with maleic anhydride to produce maleated acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (MAESO). The MAESO has been copolymerized with styrene free radically to produce promising thermosetting sheet molding resins. Petrovi? and co-workers have directly ring opened the epoxidized oil to produce polyols that produce promising polyurethanes through condensation polymerization with diisocyanates. Our group's work initially focused on direct cationic copolymerization of the double bonds or conjugated double bonds of natural oils with monomers, such as styrene and divinylbenzene, to produce promising thermosetting resins. The only modification of the oils that was carried out in these studies was conjugation of the double bonds to enhance the reactivity of the oil. This work has been expanded recently with the incorporation of glass fiber to produce promising composites. We have also explored thermal polymerization techniques to make novel thermosets. This dissertation is divided into four chapters. The first chapter discusses the synthesis and characterization of biobased

Phillip H. Henna

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

242

EIS-0285-SA-141: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Supplement Analysis 1: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-141: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the Salem Albany #2 115 kV transmission line from Salem Substation to Albany Substation. BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads, switch platforms, microwave beam paths, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation.

243

EIS-0285-SA-137: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Supplement Analysis 7: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-137: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management for the Chemawa-Salem #1 115 kV and #2 230 kV transmission lines from Chemawa Substation to Salem Substation. BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads, switch platforms, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have lowgrowing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation.

244

EIS-0285-SA-140: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40: Supplement Analysis 40: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-140: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Salem-Albany Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, switch platforms, microwave beam paths, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management

245

EIS-0285-SA-122: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Supplement Analysis 2: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-122: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, along access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management

246

Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Kazakhstan HEU Removal Kazakhstan HEU Removal Location Kazakhstan United States 48° 59' 44.1492" N, 67° 3' 37.9692" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

247

Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Sweden Plutonium Removal Sweden Plutonium Removal Location Sweden United States 62° 24' 4.4136" N, 15° 22' 51.096" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

248

Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Turkey HEU Removal Turkey HEU Removal Location Turkey United States 38° 26' 50.2044" N, 40° 15' 14.0616" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

249

Hungary HEU removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

removal | National Nuclear Security Administration removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Hungary HEU removal Hungary HEU removal Location Hungary United States 47° 11' 51.6336" N, 19° 41' 15" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view this map.

250

Mexico HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Mexico HEU Removal Mexico HEU Removal Location Mexico United States 24° 24' 35.298" N, 102° 49' 55.3116" W See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view this map.

251

Removal of volatile materials from forepump oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of clearing condensable vapors from forepump oil is described. Air is bubbled though the oil reservoir removing volatile material from the oil and allowing continuous pumping of materials by non?vented pumps.

Paul P. Nicole

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

Cook, Gus T. (Paducah, KY); Holshouser, Stephen K. (Boaz, KY); Coleman, Richard M. (Paducah, KY); Harless, Charles E. (Smithland, KY); Whinnery, III, Walter N. (Paducah, KY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

Cook, G.T.; Holshouser, S.K.; Coleman, R.M.; Harless, C.E.; Whinnery, W.N. III

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

254

Chile HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Removal Location United States 25 28' 1.4916" S, 69 33' 55.548" W See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view...

255

France HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Removal Location United States 45 44' 20.0544" N, 2 17' 6.5616" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view...

256

Libya HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal Location Libya United States 27 34' 9.5448" N, 17 24' 8.4384" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view...

257

Install Removable Insulation on Valves and Fittings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This revised ITP tip sheet on installing removable insulation on valves and fittings provides how-to advice for improving the system using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Reliability Based Vegetation Management Through Intelligent System Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

number of recorded events which could be reliably tied to known outages. The project involved two years costly, and prolonged outages can have crippling effects. According #12;2 to some estimates, the U year to year. Vegetation-related outages not caused by hazard trees also remain relatively constant

259

Changes in Vegetation Condition and Surface Fluxes during NAME 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vegetation in the core region of the North American monsoon (NAM) system changes dramatically after the onset of the summer rains so that large changes may be expected in the surface fluxes of radiation, heat, and moisture. Most of this ...

Christopher J. Watts; Russell L. Scott; Jaime Garatuza-Payan; Julio C. Rodriguez; John H. Prueger; William P. Kustas; Michael Douglas

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 8 Nano-neutralization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 8 Nano-neutralization Processing eChapters Processing 11583F09728A04038E6F4D332D58B26A AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Nano-neutralization from the book ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Green Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 9 Physical Refining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 9 Physical Refining Processing eChapters Processing 7E84B6524348AB59C4DF2B6D388E2582 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 Physical Refining from the book ...

262

24 Animal, Vegetable, Mineral Did you read chapter 24  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chicken Fat & Marbling in Meat Solid Fat Shortening (Crisco) Solid Fat Butter Solid Fat Margarine Liquid CHEMISTRY Atomic-Level Structure of Complex Materials Determines Properties Animals & Vegetables Fats: Margarine and Olive oil Fats and oils at room temperature ­ What observations can we make? Butter Easy

Hart, Gus

263

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 7 Deodorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 7 Deodorization Processing eChapters Processing AOCS B581B45B54FDB5F113096DE186B3B999 Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Deodorization from the book ...

264

The Roughness Length for Heat of Sparse Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dual-source model that solves the energy balance over vegetation and soil separately can be inverted to obtain the roughness length for heat z0h of a single-source model. Model parameters for the dual-source model were taken from previous ...

E. M. Blyth; A. J. Dolman

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Differential Removal of Copper and Iron from Acidic Polymetallic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production of Rock Wool from Ornamental Rock Wastes · Purification of Vegetable Oils Post-Consumption Residential and Commercial Clay with Two Brazilian.

266

Evaluation of Vegetation Effects on the Generation and Modification of Mesoscale Circulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the present study is to evaluate (i) the effect of vegetated surfaces on modifying sea breeze and daytime thermally induced upslope flows, and (ii) the generation of thermally induced flow by vegetated areas contrasted by bare soil ...

M. Segal; R. Avissar; M. C. McCumber; R. A. Pielke

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Studies on the Bulk Transfer Coefficients over a Vegetated Surface with a Multilayer Energy Budget Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multilayer energy budget model for vegetation canopy is developed to describe the fluxes of sensible and latent heat exchanged between the vegetated surface and the atmosphere. The model gives satisfactory results when the calculated radiative ...

Junsei Kondo; Tsutomu Watanabe

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Validation and Sensitivity Analysis of a New Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes details, validation, and sensitivity analysis of a new atmosphere–soil–vegetation model. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer submodels for atmosphere, soil, and vegetation and radiation schemes for the ...

Haruyasu Nagai

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Climate and Vegetation in the Middle East: Interannual Variability and Drought Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Euphrates Plain (EP) experiences large interannual variability in vegetation cover, especially in areas of marginal rain-fed agriculture. Vegetation in this region is primarily limited by available soil moisture, as determined by winter ...

Benjamin F. Zaitchik; Jason P. Evans; Roland A. Geerken; Ronald B. Smith

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Feedbacks of Vegetation on Summertime Climate Variability over the North American Grasslands. Part I: Statistical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feedbacks of vegetation on summertime climate variability over the North American Grasslands are analyzed using the statistical technique of Granger causality. Results indicate that normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) anomalies early in ...

Weile Wang; Bruce T. Anderson; Nathan Phillips; Robert K. Kaufmann; Christopher Potter; Ranga B. Myneni

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A Sensitivity Study of Convective Cloud Formation by Vegetation Forcing with Different Atmospheric Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variable vegetation cover is a possible trigger for convection, especially in semiarid areas due to differential surface forcing. A two-dimensional numerical model with explicit cloud physics and a detailed vegetation parameterization scheme is ...

Xiaodong Hong; Martin J. Leach; Sethu Raman

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Simulating Competition and Coexistence between Plant Functional Types in a Dynamic Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global distribution of vegetation is broadly determined by climate, and where bioclimatic parameters are favorable for several plant functional types (PFTs), by the competition between them. Most current dynamic global vegetation models (...

Vivek K. Arora; George J. Boer

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Large-Scale Vegetation Feedbacks on a Doubled CO2 Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in vegetation cover are known to influence the climate system by modifying the radiative, momentum, and hydrologic balance of the land surface. To explore the interactions between terrestrial vegetation and the atmosphere for doubled ...

Samuel Levis; Jonathan A. Foley; David Pollard

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Intraseasonal Variability of Satellite-Derived Rainfall and Vegetation over Southern Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-derived rainfall and vegetation [normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI)] data for the period 1981–2000 are used to reveal spatial and temporal interrelationships via principal component analysis. The unimodal seasonal cycle peaks ...

Hector Chikoore; Mark R. Jury

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Influence of MODIS-derived dynamic vegetation on VIC-simulated soil moisture in Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil moisture-vegetation interactions are an important component of land-atmosphere coupling, especially in semi-arid regions such as the North American Great Plains. However, many land surface models parameterize vegetation using an interannually-...

Trent W. Ford; Steven M. Quiring

276

CHANGES IN 137 CS CONCENTRATIONS IN SOIL AND VEGETATION ON THE FLOODPLAIN OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER OVER A 30 YEAR PERIOD  

SciTech Connect

{sup 137}Cs released during 1954-1974 from nuclear production reactors on the Savannah River Site, a US Department of Energy nuclear materials production site in South Carolina, contaminated a portion of the Savannah River floodplain known as Creek Plantation. {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations have been measured in Creek Plantation since 1974 making it possible to calculate effective half-lives for {sup 137}Cs in soil and vegetation and assess the spatial distribution of contaminants on the floodplain. Activity concentrations in soil and vegetation were higher near the center of the floodplain than near the edges as a result of frequent inundation coupled with the presence of low areas that trapped contaminated sediments. {sup 137}Cs activity was highest near the soil surface, but depth related differences diminished with time as a likely result of downward diffusion or leaching. Activity concentrations in vegetation were significantly related to concentrations in soil. The plant to soil concentration ratio (dry weight) averaged 0.49 and exhibited a slight but significant tendency to decrease with time. The effective half-lives for {sup 137}Cs in shallow (0-7.6 cm) soil and in vegetation were 14.9 (95% CI = 12.5-17.3) years and 11.6 (95% CI = 9.1-14.1) years, respectively, and rates of {sup 137}Cs removal from shallow soil and vegetation did not differ significantly among sampling locations. Potential health risks on the Creek Plantation floodplain have declined more rapidly than expected on the basis of radioactive decay alone because of the relatively short effective half-life of {sup 137}Cs.

Paller, M.; Jannik, T.; Fledderman, P.

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

277

Trunnion Collar Removal Machine - Gap Analysis Table  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to review the existing the trunnion collar removal machine against the ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (NSDB) [Ref. 10] requirements and to identify codes and standards and supplemental requirements to meet these requirements. If these codes and standards can not fully meet these requirements then a ''gap'' is identified. These gaps will be identified here and addressed using the ''Trunnion Collar Removal Machine Design Development Plan'' [Ref. 15]. The codes and standards, supplemental requirements, and design development requirements for the trunnion collar removal machine are provided in the gap analysis table (Appendix A, Table 1). Because the trunnion collar removal machine is credited with performing functions important to safety (ITS) in the NSDB [Ref. 10], design basis requirements are applicable to ensure equipment is available and performs required safety functions when needed. The gap analysis table is used to identify design objectives and provide a means to satisfy safety requirements. To ensure that the trunnion collar removal machine performs required safety functions and meets performance criteria, this portion of the gap analysis tables supplies codes and standards sections and the supplemental requirements and identifies design development requirements, if needed.

M. Johnson

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hydrogen Removal From Heating Oil of a Parabolic Trough ...  

Hydrogen Removal From Heating Oil of a Parabolic Trough Increases the Life of the Trough and its Components A Method to Selectively Remove & Measure Hydrogen Gas from ...

279

An Experimental Study of Chemical Oxygen Demand Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental results showed that the refractory organics in coking wastewater can be effectively removed by this process, and COD removal efficiency was ...

280

Michigan Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Salt Fluxes for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2001... for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from Molten Aluminum ... Solid chloride salts containing MgC2 can be used to remove alkali ...

282

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

283

South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas...

284

Evolving Rights-of-Way Vegetation Management Standards and Practices: Update 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current regulations are shaping how transmission vegetation management is implemented in North America. Regulations are maturing and fines for violations of the NERC standard FAC-003-1 are becoming larger and more consistently assessed. Transmission vegetation managers must maintain a transmission system with no vegetation caused outages and do so cost effectively in an environmental acceptable manner that meets landowner and public approval.

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

285

What is a healthy A diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cup fat free milk + 1 tbsp vegetable oil 1 egg 2 egg whites 1 tbsp butter 3/4 tbsp liquid vegetableWhat is a healthy diet? A diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat or fat-free milk and milk products; Includes lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs, nuts; and Is low in saturated

Cantlon, Jessica F.

286

ForPeerReview From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to polyols and main industrial products Myriam and main industrial products Most of biobased polyols for polyurethanes are synthesized from vegetable oils literature; focus on the industrial synthetic routes. Keywords: vegetable oils; biobased polyols

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

287

Mercury removal from solid mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

The removal of mercury from mixed wastes is an essential step in eliminating the temporary storage of large inventories of mixed waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Currently thermal treatment has been identified as a baseline technology and is being developed as part of the DOE Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP). Since thermal treatment will not be applicable to all mercury containing mixed waste and the removal of mercury prior to thermal treatment may be desirable, laboratory studies have been initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop alternative remediation technologies capable of removing mercury from certain mixed waste. This paper describes laboratory investigations of the KI/I{sub 2} leaching processes to determine the applicability of this process to mercury containing solid mixed waste.

Gates, D.D.; Morrissey, M.; Chava, K.K.; Chao, K.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Technetium Removal Using Tc-Goethite Coprecipitation  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Low temperature waste forms coupled with technetium removal using an alternative immobilization process such as Fe(II) treated-goethite precipitation” to increase our understanding of 99Tc long-term stability in goethite mineral form and the process that controls the 99Tc(VII) reduction and removal by the final Fe (oxy)hydroxide forms. The overall objectives of this task were to 1) evaluate the transformation process of Fe (oxy)hydroxide solids to the more crystalline goethite (?-FeOOH) mineral for 99Tc removal and 2) determine the mechanism that limits 99Tc(IV) reoxidation in Fe(II)-treated 99Tc-goethite mineral and 3) evaluate whether there is a long-term 99Tcoxidation state change for Tc sequestered in the iron solids.

Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Jung, Hun Bok; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

289

Process for removing metals from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions. 2 tabs.

Napier, J.M.; Hancher, C.M.; Hackett, G.D.

1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

290

Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separting the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF.sub.2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium, without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

Pulley, Howard (West Paducah, KY); Seltzer, Steven F. (Paducah, KY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separating the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

Pulley, H.; Seltzer, S.F.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

292

Calibrating a Coupled SVAT–Vegetation Growth Model with Remotely Sensed Reflectance and Surface Temperature—A Case Study for the HAPEX-Sahel Grassland Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models simulating the seasonal growth of vegetation have been recently coupled to soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer schemes (SVATS). Such coupled vegetation–SVATS models (V–S) account for changes of the vegetation leaf area index (LAI) over ...

P. Cayrol; L. Kergoat; S. Moulin; G. Dedieu; A. Chehbouni

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Chain Transfer of Vegetable Oil Macromonomers in Acrylic Solution Copolymerization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of vegetable oil macromonomers (VOMMs) as comonomers in emulsion polymerization enables good film coalescence without the addition of solvents that constitute volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOMMs are derived from renewable resources and offer the potential of post-application crosslinking via auto-oxidation. However, chain transfer reactions of VOMMs with initiator and/or polymer radicals during emulsion polymerization reduce the amount of allylic hydrogen atoms available for primary auto-oxidation during drying. Vegetable oils and derivatives were reacted in combination with butyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate via solution polymerization. The copolymerization was monitored using in situ infrared spectroscopy to determine the extent of chain transfer. 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the loci of chain transfer and the molecular weight characteristics of the polymers were characterized by SEC. Solution polymerization was utilized to minimize temperature fluctuations and maintain polymer solubility during the initial characterization.

Black, Micah [University of Southern Mississippi, The; Messman, Jamie M [ORNL; Rawlins, James [University of Southern Mississippi, The

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions in protective barriers: Experimental design, construction, and initial conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to measure the interactive effects of gravel admix and greater precipitation on soil water storage and plant abundance. The study is one of many tasks in the Protective Barrier Development Program for the disposal of Hanford defense waste. A factorial field-plot experiment was set up at the site selected as the borrow area for barrier topsoil. Gravel admix, vegetation, and enhanced precipitation treatments were randomly assigned to the plots using a split-split plot design structure. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover were monitored using neutron probe and point intercept methods, respectively. The first-year results suggest that water extraction by plants will offset gravel-caused increases in soil water storage. Near-surface soil water contents were much lower in graveled plots with plants than in nongraveled plots without plants. Large inherent variability in deep soil water storage masked any effects gravel may have had on water content below the root zone. In the future, this source of variation will be removed by differencing monthly data series and testing for changes in soil water storage. Tests of the effects of greater precipitation on soil water storage were inconclusive. A telling test will be possible in the spring of 1988, following the first wet season during which normal precipitation is doubled. 26 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

Waugh, W.J.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Sigma Mesa: Background elemental concentrations in soil and vegetation, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1979, soil and vegetation samples were collected on Sigma Mesa to provide background data before construction on the mesa. Elemental data are presented for soil, grass, juniper, pinon pine, and oak. None of the data looks out of the ordinary. The purpose of the sampling program was to acquire, before any disturbance, a set of data to be used as background for future impact analysis. 6 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Gladney, E.S.; Brooks, G.H. Jr.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Prediction of leaf area index in almonds by vegetation indexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three levels of scale for determining leaf area index (LAI) were explored within an almond orchard of alternating rows of Nonpareil and Monterey varieties using hemispherical photography and mule lightbar (MLB) at ground level up to airborne and satellite ... Keywords: Canopy light interception, EVI, GMI, LADP, LAI, Leaf area index, MASTER, MCARI, MLB, Multispectral indices, NDVI, NDWI, RMSE, SR, VI, Vegetation indices, fPAR

Jose L. Zarate-Valdez; Michael L. Whiting; Bruce D. Lampinen; Samuel Metcalf; Susan L. Ustin; Patrick H. Brown

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

SciTech Connect

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Agency/Company /Organization: World Agroforestry Centre Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Adaptation, Background analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.worldagroforestrycentre.org/sea/Publications/files/policybrief/PB0 Country: Philippines South-Eastern Asia Coordinates: 12.879721°, 121.774017° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":12.879721,"lon":121.774017,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

300

Method of removing cesium from steam  

SciTech Connect

Method for removal of radioactive cesium from a hot vapor, such as high temperature steam, including the steps of passing input hot vapor containing radioactive cesium into a bed of silicate glass particles and chemically incorporating radioactive cesium in the silicate glass particles at a temperature of at least about 700.degree. F.

Carson, Jr., Neill J. (Clarendon Hills, IL); Noland, Robert A. (Oak Park, IL); Ruther, Westly E. (Skokie, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report  

SciTech Connect

The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

ASBESTOS PIPE-INSULATION REMOVAL ROBOT SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

This final topical report details the development, experimentation and field-testing activities for a robotic asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system developed for use within the DOE's weapon complex as part of their ER and WM program, as well as in industrial abatement. The engineering development, regulatory compliance, cost-benefit and field-trial experiences gathered through this program are summarized.

Unknown

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Process for removing carbon from uranium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon contamination is removed from uranium and uranium alloys by heating in inert atmosphere to 700.degree.-1900.degree.C in effective contact with yttrium to cause carbon in the uranium to react with the yttrium. The yttrium is either in direct contact with the contaminated uranium or in indirect contact by means of an intermediate transport medium.

Powell, George L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Heat exchanger with a removable tube section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is described in which the tube sheet is secured against primary liquid pressure, but which allows for easy removal of the tube section. The tube section is supported by a flange which is secured by a number of shear blocks, each of which extends into a slot which is immovable with respect to the outer shell of the heat exchanger. (auth)

Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.

1975-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

305

REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The removal of chlorides from aqueons solutions is described. The process involves contacting the aqueous chloride containing solution with a benzene solution about 0.005 M in phenyl mercuric acetate whereby the chloride anions are taken up by the organic phase and separating the organic phase from the aqueous solutions.

Schulz, W.W.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Improved Cobalt Removal: Field Testing Phase: Effects of Normally Encountered Plant Impurities on Removal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined the effects of plant impurities on cobalt removal from liquid radioactive waste. Improved process knowledge is critical to utilities that are continually working to increase the performance of their low-level waste (LLW) treatment systems. This report provides predictive chemistry information for improved cobalt removal obtained from test work at Catawba Nuclear Station. It also provides test methodologies for performing similar evaluations at other member plants.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

307

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids Final Technical Report (From October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2005) Principle Authors Aihua Zhang, Qisheng Ma, Kangshi Wang, Yongchun Tang (co-PI), William A. Goddard (PI), Date Report was issued: December 9, 2005 DOE Award number: DE-FC26-02NT15383 Name and Address of Submitting Organization California Institute of Technology 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA91125 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

308

Categorical Exclusion 4568, Crane Removal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

l)eterminationFornl l)eterminationFornl Project Title: Crane Removal Project (4568) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is to remove an old legacy crane trolley and old crane operated cab. General Administration/Management DA I - Routine business actions DA2 - Administrative contract amendments DA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations DA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect DA6 - Procedural rulemakings upgrade DA7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged DA8 - Award of technical support/M&O/personal service contracts DA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training DAIO - Reports on non-DOE legislation DA II - Technical advice and planning assistance

309

Method of arsenic removal from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

310

Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: a. treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10 and, b. separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (a) and (b) are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Photoacoustic removal of occlusions from blood vessels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Partial or total occlusions of fluid passages within the human body are removed by positioning an array of optical fibers in the passage and directing treatment radiation pulses along the fibers, one at a time, to generate a shock wave and hydrodynamics flows that strike and emulsify the occlusions. A preferred application is the removal of blood clots (thrombin and embolic) from small cerebral vessels to reverse the effects of an ischemic stroke. The operating parameters and techniques are chosen to minimize the amount of heating of the fragile cerebral vessel walls occurring during this photo acoustic treatment. One such technique is the optical monitoring of the existence of hydrodynamics flow generating vapor bubbles when they are expected to occur and stopping the heat generating pulses propagated along an optical fiber that is not generating such bubbles.

Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Maitland, IV, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA); Esch, Victor C. (San Francisco, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Method of removing cesium from steam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The foregoing objects of the present invention are achieved by a method for removing radioactive cesium from a hot vapor, such as steam, by a technique wherein the cesium chemically reacts with a filtering material which retains the cesium without causing degradation of the filtering material. The method is carried out at temperatures in the range of from about 700{degree}F to about 1000{degree}F, and even higher, but it preferably is utilized at a temperature of at least about 800{degree}F. The method uses a silica glass which is preferably in the form of spheres as the filter material. The preferred material is a borosilicate glass (Pyrex). The degree of removal of the radioactive cesium from the hot steam or other vapor approaches 90 to 100%.

Carson, N.J. Jr.; Noland, R.A.; Ruther, W.E.

1990-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

313

Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

314

Acid treatment removes zinc sulfide scale restriction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that removal of zinc sulfide (ZnS) scale with acid restored an offshore Louisiana well's production to original rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near well bore area. The selected acid had been proven to control iron sulfide (FeS) scales in sour wells without causing harm to surface production equipment, tubing, and other downhole hardware. The successful removal of the blockage re-established previous production rates with a 105% increase in flowing tubing pressure. On production for a number of months, a high rate, high-pressure offshore well was experiencing unusually rapid pressure and rate declines. A small sample of the restrictive material was obtained during the wire line operations. The well was subsequently shut in while a laboratory analysis determined that zinc sulfide was the major component of the obstruction.

Biggs, K. (Kerr McGee Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Allison, D. (Otis Engineering Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Ford, W.G.F. (Halliburton Co., Duncan, OK (United States))

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the second year of this project, we continued our effort to develop low temperature decarboxylation catalysts and investigate the behavior of these catalysts at different reaction conditions. We conducted a large number of dynamic measurements with crude oil and model compounds to obtain the information at different reaction stages, which was scheduled as the Task2 in our work plan. We developed a novel adsorption method to remove naphthenic acid from crude oil using naturally occurring materials such as clays. Our results show promise as an industrial application. The theoretical modeling proposed several possible reaction pathways and predicted the reactivity depending on the catalysts employed. From all of these studies, we obtained more comprehensive understanding about catalytic decarboxylation and oil upgrading based on the naphthenic acid removal concept.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang, William A. Goddard, Yongchun Tang

2005-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

316

EIS-0285-SA-12: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0285-SA-12: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-12: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-12: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-ofways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management

317

EIS-0285-SA-28: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Supplement Analysis 8: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-28: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management along the Port Angeles - Sappo No.1 Transmission Line ROW, from struture 1/1 to structure 42/10. BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. All work will be executed in accordance with the National

318

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Makarewicz, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Meredith, Paul F. (Knoxville, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Makarewicz, M.A.; Meredith, P.F.

1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

320

Trojan PWR Decommissioning: Large Component Removal Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the decommissioning of large commercial nuclear plants in the United States is in its infancy, the technical challenges with associated radioactive waste management are clear. This report describes the removal and disposal of four steam generators and one pressurizer from the Trojan nuclear power plant, the first large PWR to be decommissioned in the United States. The report chronicles the problems, successes, and lessons learned in this project, which was completed on schedule and under budget in...

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Removal of iron from impure graphites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Iron-impregnated and ash-rich graphites have been purified by leaching with gaseous I/sub 2/ at 900/sup 0/C. With addition of H/sub 2/, the rate of removal of impurity iron can be markedly increased and becomes comparable to that obtained with Cl/sub 2/. I/sub 2/ has an advantage in that it can also volatilize Ca and perhaps Ba and Sr.

Growcock, F.B.; Heiser, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

1987-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Process for removing sulfur from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

Aida, T.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.

1983-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

325

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, Milton (12833 S. 82nd Ct., Palos Park, IL 60464); Sinha, Shome N. (5748 Drexel, 2A, Chicago, IL 60637)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Does Policy Matter? On Governments' Attempts to Control Unwanted Migration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of California, San Diego CCIS Does Policy Matter? OnPaper 112 December 2004 Does Policy Matter? On Governments’geographic proximity does not guarantee the establishment of

Thielemann, Eiko

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Potential of arid zone vegetation as a source of substrates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three aspects of the potential of vegetation in arid zones as a source of substrates are discussed. The first includes the limitations on efficiency of conversion of solar energy to the stored chemical energy of biomass in green plants, and the subsequent biochemical pathways of carbon dioxide fixation and biosynthesis. Second is the potential of plants endogenous to arid zones. Finally, the use of covered agriculture or controlled environmental agriculture (CEA) is considered both in its present form and in terms of possible extenion to the large scale production of stable crops. (JGB)

Bassham, J.A.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Electric Transmission Line Right-of-Way Post-Blackout Vegetation Management Strategies: 2008 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of the federal government in regulating vegetation management on power line corridors changed significantly after the August 2003 blackout that affected more than 50 million people in the eastern United States and Canada. In 2004, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) released a series of reports on vegetation management associated with the blackout, with a respondent sequence of draft standards for vegetation management released from 2005-2006. These standards are being promulgated an...

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

329

488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Potential of vegetable oils as a domestic heating fuel  

SciTech Connect

The dependence on imported oil for domestic heating has led to the examination of other potential fuel substitutes. One potential fuel is some form of vegetable oil, which could be a yearly-renewable fuel. In Western Canada, canola has become a major oilseed crop; in Eastern Canada, sunflowers increasingly are becoming a source for a similar oil; for this reason, the Canadian Combustion Research Laboratory (CCRL) has chosen these oils for experimentation. Trials have been conducted in a conventional warm air oil furnace, fitted with a flame retention head burner. Performance has been measured with pure vegetable oils as well as a series of blends with conventional No. 2 oil. The effects of increased fuel pressure and fuel preheating are established. Emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned hydrocarbons and particulates are given for both steady state and cyclic operation. Canola oil cannot be fired in cyclic operation above 50:50 blends with No. 2 oil. At any level above a 10% blend, canola is difficult to burn, even with significant increased pressure and temperature. Sunflower oil is much easier to burn and can be fired as a pure fuel, but with high emissions of incomplete combustion products. An optimum blend of 50:50 sunflower in No. 2 oil yields emissions and performance similar to No. 2 oil. This blend offers potential as a means of reducing demand of imported crude oil for domestic heating systems.

Hayden, A.C.S.; Begin, E.; Palmer, C.E.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 1 Basic Oil Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 1 Basic Oil Chemistry Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1 Basic Oil Chemistry from the book ...

332

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 14 Process Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 14 Process Equipment Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 14 Process Equipment from the book ...

333

Simulation of vegetation and hydrology for climate change analysis of a mountain watershed.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Climate change is expected to have both direct and indirect effects on water resources. Hydrologic impacts of two indirect effects, vegetation density and stomata! conductance,… (more)

[No author

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Assessing the impacts of carbohydrate information on the market demand of US meats, vegetables, and fruits.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the impacts of low carbohydrate information on the market demand of US meats, vegetables, and fruits. The study further explores the combined… (more)

Paudel, Laxmi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 10 Winterization and Fractionation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 10 Winterization and Fractionation Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Winterization and Fractionation from the book ...

336

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 9 Fat Crystallization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 9 Fat Crystallization Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 Fat Crystallization from the book ...

337

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 15 Plant Safety Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 15 Plant Safety Procedures Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 15 Plant Safety Procedures from the book ...

338

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 12 Loss Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 12 Loss Management Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 12 Loss Management from the book ...

339

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 11 Oil Quality Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 11 Oil Quality Management Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 11 Oil Quality Management from the book ...

340

Nitrogen Removal From Low Quality Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. It is especially important in the residential sector, where it supplies nearly half of all the energy consumed in U.S. homes. However, significant quantities of natural gas cannot be produced economically because its quality is too low to enter the pipeline transportation system without some type of processing, other than dehydration, to remove the undesired gas fraction. Such low-quality natural gas (LQNG) contains significant concentration or quantities of gas other than methane. These non- hydrocarbons are predominantly nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide, but may also include other gaseous components. The nitrogen concentrations usually exceeds 4%. Nitrogen rejection is presently an expensive operation which can present uneconomic scenarios in the potential development of natural gas fields containing high nitrogen concentrations. The most reliable and widely used process for nitrogen rejection from natural gas consists of liquefying the feed stream using temperatures in the order of - 300{degrees}F and separating the nitrogen via fractionation. In order to reduce the gas temperature to this level, the gas is compressed, cooled by mullet-stream heat exchangers, and expanded to low pressure. Significant energy for compression and expensive materials of construction are required. Water and carbon dioxide concentrations must be reduced to levels required to prevent freezing. SRI`s proposed research involves screening new nitrogen selective absorbents and developing a more cost effective nitrogen removal process from natural gas using those compounds. The long-term objective of this project is to determine the technical and economical feasibility of a N{sub 2}2 removal concept based on complexation of molecular N{sub 2} with novel complexing agents. Successful development of a selective, reversible, and stable reagent with an appropriate combination of capacity and N{sub 2} absorption/desorption characteristics will allow selective separation of N{sub 2} from LQNG.

Alvarado, D.B.; Asaro, M.F.; Bomben, J.L.; Damle, A.S.; Bhown, A.S.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Method for removal of methane from coalbeds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing methane gas from underground coalbeds prior to mining the coal which comprises drilling at least one borehole from the surface into the coalbed. The borehole is started at a slant rather than directly vertically, and as it descends, a gradual curve is followed until a horizontal position is reached where the desired portion of the coalbed is intersected. Approaching the coalbed in this manner and fracturing the coalbed in the major natural fraction direction cause release of large amounts of the trapped methane gas.

Pasini, III, Joseph (Morgantown, WV); Overbey, Jr., William K. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

Cha, Chang Y. (3807 Reynolds St., Laramie, WY 82070)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

344

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag.

Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN); Trowbridge, Lee D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stories Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time The Lab's 1,000th shipment of transuranic waste recently left Los Alamos,...

346

DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary DOE removes all remaining HEU...

347

TECHNICAL POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE FOR THE FRUIT AND VEGETABLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water. The samples were first centri- fuged (Centrifuge 5415C, Eppendorf AG, Ham- burg, Germany) at 9 water were tested without centrifugation. The samples were analyzed for ammonium-nitrogen (NH4 + -N, Removal of natural steroid hormones from wastewater using membrane contactor processes, Environ. Sci

348

Removal of Fluoride from Waste Water of Aluminium Smelter by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , General Abstracts: Light Metals Division. Presentation Title, Removal of ...

349

Method for removing fluoride contamination from nitric acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fluoride ions are removed from nitric acid solution by contacting the vaporized solution with alumina or zirconium.

Pruett, David J. (Knoxville, TN); Howerton, William B. (Kingston, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Removing Pollutants from Water, Solar Energy - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 5, 2013 ... B. Materials for the Environment: Removing Pollutants from Water, Solar Energy Program Organizers: Fernand Marquis, Naval Postgraduate ...

351

Powder Removal from Complex Structures Produced Using Electron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Additive Manufacturing of Metals. Presentation Title, Powder Removal from ...

352

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

353

Removal of Inclusions from Solar Grade Silicon Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polysilicon in Photovoltaics: Market Conditions & Competing PV Technologies ... Removal of Inclusions from Solar Grade Silicon Using Electromagnetic Field.

354

Modified Bayer Process for Alumina Removal from Hanford Waste  

AREVA NC Inc. Modified Bayer Process for Alumina Removal from Hanford Waste January 24, 2007 Don Geniesse AREVA NC Inc.

355

Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention in one aspect comprises a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous-derived liquids by contacting said liquid with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene polymer (i.e. PS-DVB) having catechol ligands anchored to said polymer, said contacting being at an elevated temperature. In another aspect, the invention is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene polymer by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid in accordance with the aspect described above which regenerating process comprises: (a) treating said spent catecholated polystyrene polymer with an aqueous solution of at least one member selected from the group consisting of carbonates and bicarbonates of ammonium, alkali metals, and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10, and said treating being at a temperature in the range of about 20/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/C; (b) separating the solids and liquids from each other. In a preferred embodiment the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step: (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution which includes at least one lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (c) and (d) are added. Steps (c) and (d) comprise: (c) treating the solids with an aqueous alcoholic solution of at least one ammonium, alkali or alkaline earth metal bicarbonate at a temperature in the range of about 20 to 100/sup 0/C; and (d) separating the solids from the liquids.

Fish, R.H.

1984-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

356

Process for removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permitting the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Hancher, C.W.; Saunders, M.B.; Googin, J.M.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

357

TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

358

Global and Seasonal Assessment of Interactions between Climate and Vegetation Biophysical Processes: A GCM Study with Different Land–Vegetation Representations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global and seasonal assessment of regions of the earth with strong climate–vegetation biophysical process (VBP) interactions is provided. The presence of VBP and degree of VBP effects on climate were assessed based on the skill of simulations ...

Yongkang Xue; Fernando De Sales; Ratko Vasic; C. Roberto Mechoso; Akio Arakawa; Stephen Prince

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed- Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanford’s 300 Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, WA – Hanford’s River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has met a significant cleanup challenge on the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site by removing a 1,082-ton nuclear test reactor from the 300 Area.

360

Arsenic removal and stabilization by synthesized pyrite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arsenic is ubiquitous whether it is naturally occurring or produced by humans. It is found at sites on the National Priority List and at sites operated by DOE, where it is the second most commonly found contaminant. More wastes containing arsenic will be produced due to the lowering of the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for arsenic in drinking water which will result in more treatment facilities for arsenic removal that will generate residuals. Furthermore, arsenic can be released from such wastes under the reduced conditions that are found in landfills. Pyrite (FeS2) is believed to be a compound that has a high affinity for arsenic and is stable under anoxic conditions. The first task of this research was to develop a method for making pyrite crystals of defined size with minimal reaction time and at high yield. Effects on the synthesis of pyrite particles of pH, the ratio of Fe/S, temperature and reaction time were investigated in batch reactor systems. Pyrite was synthesized within 24 hours at pH values ranging from pH 3.6 through pH 5.6, and at a ratio of Fe/S of 0.5. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to size and characterize the pyrite particles. Experimental and analytical procedures developed for this work, included a hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method for measuring arsenic species (As(III), As(V)). The synthesized pyrite was applied to remove arsenic and its maximum capacity for arsenic removal was measured in batch adsorption experiments to be 3.23 ?mol/g for As(III) and 113 ?mol/g for As(V). Information obtained on the characteristics of chemical species before and after the reaction with arsenic showed that iron and sulfur were oxidized. Last, how strongly arsenic was bound to pyrite was investigated and it was determined that release of arsenic from As(III)-pyrite is not affected by pH, but release from As(V)-pyrite is affected by pH with minimum release in the range pH 5 to pH 8.

Song, Jin Kun

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Vegetation Management by Electric Utilities: Use of Herbicides and Other Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the essential elements and principles comprising electric utility vegetation management programs, defines management problems, and discusses possible research on vegetation management issues. The report particularly focuses on the use of herbicides and their effects on wildlife and human health. Legal and regulatory aspects and cost control issues are also covered.

1995-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

362

Vegetation Feedbacks to Climate in the Global Monsoon Regions Michael Notaro *, Guangshan Chen, Zhengyu Liu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Vegetation Feedbacks to Climate in the Global Monsoon Regions Michael Notaro *, Guangshan across six monsoon regions with a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice-land model with dynamic vegetation monsoon regions is reduced and the climatic response assessed. Consistent responses among the regions

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

363

A Coupled Soil-Vegetation Scheme: Description, Parameters, Validation, and, Sensitivity Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled soil-vegetation scheme is presented. A one-layer canopy and a three-layer soil representation is used. The impact of canopy morphological properties on radiation and momentum transfer in the vegetation is modeled as simply as possible. ...

Ferenc Ács

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Bound 3-MCPD in Foods, Vegetable Oils and Fats (3-MCPD Esters)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reference papers for bound 3-MCPD (3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol and 3-MCPD esters)in foods, vegetable oils, and fats. Bound 3-MCPD in Foods, Vegetable Oils and Fats (3-MCPD Esters) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis ao

365

Classification of floodplain vegetation by data fusion of spectral (CASI) and LiDAR data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To safeguard the goals of flood protection and nature development, a river manager requires detailed and up-to-date information on vegetation structures in floodplains. In this study, remote-sensing data on the vegetation of a semi-natural floodplain ...

G. W. Geerling; M. Labrador-Garcia; J. G. P. W. Clevers; A. M. J. Ragas; A. J. M. Smits

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

367

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

368

EM Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge EM Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Testing and equipment simulations ensure first-of-a-kind technological processes for sludge removal can be conducted safely and efficiently. Testing and equipment simulations ensure first-of-a-kind technological processes for sludge removal can be conducted safely and efficiently. RICHLAND, Wash. - The Richland Operations Office and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company successfully removed a portion of a highly radioactive sludge from underwater storage in a large basin adjacent to the K West reactor at the Hanford site this month. In that milestone, workers removed sludge originating from knock-out pots,

369

NETL: Gasification Systems - Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Project Number: DE-SC00008243 TDA Research, Inc. is developing a high-capacity, low-cost sorbent that removes anhydrous ammonia (NH3), mercury (Hg), and trace contaminants from coal- and coal/biomass-derived syngas. The clean-up system will be used after the bulk warm gas sulfur removal step, and remove NH3 and Hg in a regenerable manner while irreversibly capturing all other trace metals (e.g., Arsenic, Selenium) reducing their concentrations to sub parts per million (ppm) levels. Current project plans include identifying optimum chemical composition and structure that provide the best sorbent performance for removing trace contaminants, determining the effect of operating parameters, conducting multiple-cycle experiments to test the life of the sorbent for NH3 and Hg removal, and conducting a preliminary design of the sorbent reactor.

370

Categorical Exclusion 4566, Ash Removal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOrnI FOrnI Project Title: Ash Removal Project (4566) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is to split, containerize, package, transport and disposition one hundred and two (102) cans of mixed waste. General Administration/Management OA I - Routine business actions OA2 * Administrative contract amendments OA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations OA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect OA6 - Procedural rule makings upgrade OA 7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged OA8 . Award of technical supportlM&O/personal service contracts OA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training OA 10 - Reports on non-DOE legislation OA II -

371

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

SciTech Connect

This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

372

Electrochemical removal of material from metallic work  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Deburring, polishing, surface forming and the like are carried out by electrochemical machining with conformable electrode means including an electrically conducting and an insulating web. The surface of the work to be processed is covered by a deformable electrically insulating web or cloth which is perforated and conforms with the work. The web is covered by a deformable perforated electrically conducting screen electrode which also conforms with, and is insulated from, the work by the insulating web. An electrolyte is conducted through the electrode and insulating web and along the work through a perforated elastic member which engages the electrode under pressure pressing the electrode and web against the work. High current under low voltage is conducted betwen the electrode and work through the insulator, removing material from the work. Under the pressure of the elastic member, the electrode and insulator continue to conform with the work and the spacing between the electrode and work is maintained constant.

Csakvary, Tibor (Wilkens Township, Allegheny County, PA); Fromson, Robert E. (Wilkens Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1980-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

373

The HMDS Coating Flaw Removal Tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many high energy laser systems, optics with HMDS sol gel antireflective coatings are placed in close proximity to each other making them particularly susceptible to certain types of strong optical interactions. During the coating process, halo shaped coating flaws develop around surface digs and particles. Depending on the shape and size of the flaw, the extent of laser light intensity modulation and consequent probability of damaging downstream optics may increase significantly. To prevent these defects from causing damage, a coating flaw removal tool was developed that deploys a spot of decane with a syringe and dissolves away the coating flaw. The residual liquid is evacuated leaving an uncoated circular spot approximately 1mm in diameter. The resulting uncoated region causes little light intensity modulation and thus has a low probability of causing damage in optics downstream from the mitigated flaw site.

Monticelli, M V; Nostrand, M C; Mehta, N; Kegelmeyer, L; Johnson, M A; Fair, J; Widmayer, C

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

374

IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS  

SciTech Connect

In the first year of this project, we have established our experimental and theoretical methodologies for studies of the catalytic decarboxylation process. We have developed both glass and stainless steel micro batch type reactors for the fast screening of various catalysts with reaction substrates of model carboxylic acid compounds and crude oil samples. We also developed novel product analysis methods such as GC analyses for organic acids and gaseous products; and TAN measurements for crude oil. Our research revealed the effectiveness of several solid catalysts such as NA-Cat-1 and NA-Cat-2 for the catalytic decarboxylation of model compounds; and NA-Cat-5{approx}NA-Cat-9 for the acid removal from crude oil. Our theoretical calculations propose a three-step concerted oxidative decarboxylation mechanism for the NA-Cat-1 catalyst.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang

2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

375

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

376

Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

Tagestad, Jerry D.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge. The two map products described in this report are 1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and 2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

Tagestad, Jerry D.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Removal Sorbents for High Temperature Gas Streams Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,767,000 entitled "Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a unique regenerable sorbent process that can remove contaminants from gas produced by the gasification of fossil fuels. Specifically, the process removes hydrogen chloride by using the regenerable sorbent and simultaneously extracts hydrogen chloride compounds and hydrogen

379

VEGETATION COVER ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES IN UTAH AND ARIZONA USING HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote sensing technology can provide a cost-effective tool for monitoring hazardous waste sites. This study investigated the usability of HyMap airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data (126 bands at 2.3 x 2.3 m spatial resolution) to characterize the vegetation at U.S. Department of Energy uranium processing sites near Monticello, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Grass and shrub species were mixed on an engineered disposal cell cover at the Monticello site while shrub species were dominant in the phytoremediation plantings at the Monument Valley site. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate leaf-area-index (LAI) of the vegetation using three different methods (i.e., vegetation indices, red-edge positioning (REP), and machine learning regression trees), and (2) map the vegetation cover using machine learning decision trees based on either the scaled reflectance data or mixture tuned matched filtering (MTMF)-derived metrics and vegetation indices. Regression trees resulted in the best calibration performance of LAI estimation (R{sup 2} > 0.80). The use of REPs failed to accurately predict LAI (R{sup 2} < 0.2). The use of the MTMF-derived metrics (matched filter scores and infeasibility) and a range of vegetation indices in decision trees improved the vegetation mapping when compared to the decision tree classification using just the scaled reflectance. Results suggest that hyperspectral imagery are useful for characterizing biophysical characteristics (LAI) and vegetation cover on capped hazardous waste sites. However, it is believed that the vegetation mapping would benefit from the use of 1 higher spatial resolution hyperspectral data due to the small size of many of the vegetation patches (< 1m) found on the sites.

Serrato, M.; Jungho, I.; Jensen, J.; Jensen, R.; Gladden, J.; Waugh, J.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

380

EIS-0285-SA-21: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0285-SA-21: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-21: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-21: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management along the Noxon-Hot Springs/Taft-Hot Springs 56/3 to 66/7+600 Transmission Line ROW. BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

EIS-0285-SA-27: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Supplement Analysis 7: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-27: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program, Eugene Region Vegetation Management along the Marion-Alvey #1 from structure 14/5 to 64/3 and the Marion-Lane #1 from structure 14/5 to 70/2. Both lines describe the same segment of ROW between structures 14/5 and 45/2. BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways, around tower structures, and associated access roads that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the

382

EIS-0285-SA-11: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0285-SA-11: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-11: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-11: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management along the Covington-Maple Valley No. 2 Transmission Line ROW. BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of- way to control the

383

EIS-0285-SA-43: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

85-SA-43: Supplement Analysis 85-SA-43: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-43: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines and access roads, including Reclaim and Danger Trees. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. All work will be executed in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. A follow-up

384

EIS-0285-SA-38: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0285-SA-38: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-38: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-38: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines and access roads, including Reclaim and Danger Trees. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. All work will be executed in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA

385

EIS-0285-SA-13: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0285-SA-13: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-13: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-13: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management along the Naselle Tarlett #1 and #2 transmission line Right of Way. BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening

386

The Effects of Satellite-Derived Vegetation Cover Variability on Simulated Land–Atmosphere Interactions in the NAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Substantial evolution of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NVDI)-derived vegetation cover (Fg) exists in the southwestern United States and Mexico. The intraseasonal and wet-/dry-year fluctuations of Fg are linked to observed precipitation ...

Toshihisa Matsui; Venkataraman Lakshmi; Eric E. Small

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Evaluating Aspects of the Community Land and Atmosphere Models (CLM3 and CAM3) Using a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3) Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (CLM–DGVM) is used diagnostically to identify land and atmospheric model biases that lead to biases in the simulated vegetation. The CLM–DGVM driven with observed ...

Gordon B. Bonan; Samuel Levis

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

REMOTE SENSING OF BURN SEVERITY AND THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BURN SEVERITY, TOPOGRAPHY AND VEGETATION IN INTERIOR ALASKA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING OF BURN SEVERITY AND THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BURN SEVERITY, TOPOGRAPHY likely to change vegetation type. Finally, vegetation recovery, estimated using a remotely-sensed................................................................................6 Chapter 2. Mapping Burn Severity Using Satellite Remote Sensing..........................8

Ruess, Roger W.

389

Diagnosing Seasonal Vegetation Impacts on Evapotranspiration and Its Partitioning at the Catchment Scale during SMEX04–NAME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fundamental problem in ecohydrology is diagnosing impacts of vegetation dynamics on the catchment response. This study uses a distributed hydrologic model and remote sensing data to evaluate the effects of seasonal vegetation greening on the ...

Enrique R. Vivoni

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Investigation of the effect of a circular patch of vegetation on turbulence generation and sediment deposition using four case studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study describes the spatial distribution of sediment deposition in the wake of a circular patch of model vegetation and the effect of the patch on turbulence and mean flow. Two difference types pf vegetation were used ...

Ortiz, Alejandra C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Thermal Remote Sensing of Surface Soil Water Content with Partial Vegetation Cover for Incorporation into Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study outlines a method for the estimation of regional patterns of surface moisture availability (M0) and fractional vegetation (Fr) in the presence of spatially variable vegetation cover. The method requires relating variations in satellite-...

Robert R. Gillies; Toby N. Carlson

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Synthetic Aperture Radar (L band) and Optical Vegetation Indices for Discriminating the Brazilian Savanna Physiognomies: A Comparative Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The all-weather capability, signal independence to the solar illumination angle, and response to 3D vegetation structures are the highlights of active radar systems for natural vegetation mapping and monitoring. However, they may present ...

Edson E. Sano; Laerte G. Ferreira; Alfredo R. Huete

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

A spatially-distributed model to simulate water, energy and vegetation dynamics using information from regional climate models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the strong interaction between vegetation and the terrestrial phase of the hydrologic cycle, the dynamics of vegetation needs to be taken into account in any study seeking to understand the impacts of management or changing atmospheric ...

M. P. Maneta; N. Silverman

394

The effect of school gardens on children's attitudes and related behaviors regarding fruits and vegetables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nutrition plays an important role in the life of a child because of the impact it has on growth and development. One part of proper nutrition is consumption of five servings of fruits and vegetables every day. American children fall short of reaching this recommended daily minimum, indicating a need for educational intervention. School gardens can serve as a tool to teach nutrition education related to fruits and vegetables. The purpose of this research study was to evaluate the effect gardening can have on nutritional attitudes and behaviors regarding fruits and vegetables. Three hundred and thirty two students, representing second through fifth grades from eight schools in Texas, participated in the study from the spring of 1998 to the spring of 1999. The sample consisted of-an experimental group that completed a pretest, participated in the curriculum and gardening and then completed a posttest, an experimental group that participated in the curriculum and gardening and then completed a posttest only, and a control group who was not currently gardening at school and completed a posttest. Students' nutritional attitudes regarding fruits and vegetables were measured with a fruit and vegetable preference questionnaire that investigated their vegetable, fruit and snack preferences. Their nutritional behaviors regarding fruits and vegetables were evaluated through 24-hour recall journals. Significant differences were found between the pretest and posttest scores of the children. After gardening, children had more positive attitudes toward vegetables and fruit and vegetable snacks. There was a greater improvement in vegetable preference by students who had lower scores initially. The greatest improvement in fruit and vegetable snack preferences was detected for female students and younger students. Attitudes toward fruits did not change significantly after gardening. However, preference scores indicated students possessed positive attitudes towards fruits. Fruit and vegetable consumption or behavior did not significantly improve due to gardening. Few differences were found between the preference scores and fruit and vegetable intake of the experimental versus the control group. The data may have been influenced by variations in teacher administration of-the testing, grade level, economic status, gender, ethnicity and previous gardening experience.

Lineberger, Sarah Elizabeth

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Metal Cutting for Large Component Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of large components mainly consisting of the reactor vessel, steam generators and pressurizer. In order to remove and package these large components nozzles must be cut from the reactor vessel to precise tolerances. In some cases steam generators must be segmented for size and weight reduction. One innovative technology that has been used successfully at several commercial nuclear plant decommissioning is diamond wire sawing. Diamond wire sawing is performed by rotating a cable with diamond segments attached using a flywheel approximately 24 inches in diameter driven remotely by a hydraulic pump. Tension is provided using a gear rack drive which also takes up the slack in the wire. The wire is guided through the use of pulleys keeps the wire in a precise location. The diamond wire consists of 1/4 inch aircraft cable with diamond beads strung over the cable separated by springs and brass crimps. Standard wire contains 40 diamond beads per meter and can be made to any length. Cooling the wire and controlling the spread of contamination presents significant challenges. Under normal circumstances the wire is cooled and the cutting kerf cleaned by using water. In some cases of reactor nozzle cuts the use of water is prohibited because it cannot be controlled. This challenge was solved by using liquid Carbon Dioxide as the cooling agent. The liquid CO{sub 2} is passed through a special nozzle which atomizes the liquid into snowflakes which is introduced under pressure to the wire. The snowflakes attach to the wire keeping it cool and to the metal shavings. As the CO{sub 2} and metal shavings are released from the wire due to its fast rotation, the snowflakes evaporate leaving only the fine metal shavings as waste. Secondary waste produced is simply the small volume of fine metal shavings removed from the cut surface. Diamond wire sawing using CO{sub 2} cooling has been employed for cutting the reactor nozzles at San Onofre Unit 1 and at Connecticut Yankee. These carbon steel nozzles ranged up to 54 inch diameter with a 15 inch thick wall and an interior stainless cladding. Diamond wire sawing using traditional water cooling has been used to segment the reactor head at Rancho Seco and for cutting reactor nozzles and control rod drive tubes at Dairyland Power's Lacrosse BWR project. Advantages: - ALARA: All cutting is preformed remotely significantly reducing dose. Stringing of wires is accomplished using long handle tools. - Secondary waste is reduced to just the volume of material cut with the diamond wire. - The potential for airborne contamination is eliminated. Due to the flexibility of the wire, any access restrictions and interferences can be accommodated using pulleys and long handle tools. - The operation is quiet. Disadvantages: - With Liquid Carbon Dioxide cooling and cleaning, delivery of the material must be carefully planned. The longer the distance from the source to the cut area, the greater the chance for pressure drop and subsequent problems with line freezing. - Proper shrouding and ventilation are required for environmental reasons. In each case, the metal structures were cut at a precise location. Radiation dose was reduced significantly by operating the equipment from a remote location. The cuts were very smooth and completed on schedule. Each project must be analyzed individually and take into account many factors including access, radiological conditions, environmental conditions, schedule requirements, packaging requirements and size of cuts.

Hulick, Robert M. [Bluegrass Concrete Cutting Inc., 107 Mildred Street PO Box 427, Greenville, Alabama 36037 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

ADVANCES IN HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for conversion to the new resin. This paper will describe the results of the testing, performance in the facilities, continued optimization in the pump and treat facilities, and the estimated savings and non-tangible benefits of the conversion.

NESHEM DO; RIDDELLE J

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

Record of Decision for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program (DOE/EIS-0285) (07/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SYSTEM VEGETATION SYSTEM VEGETATION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Record of Decision DOE/EIS-0285 Cooperating Agencies J U L Y 2 0 0 0 Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Record of Decision Table of Contents Summary of Decision .................................................................................................................................... 1 For Further Information .............................................................................................................................. 2 Background ................................................................................................................................................... 3 Decisions ........................................................................................................................................................

398

Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Salt Marsh Vegetation across Scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogeographic patterns across a landscape are developed by the interplay of environmental processes operating at different spatial and temporal scales. This research investigated dynamics of salt marsh vegetation on the Skallingen salt marsh in Denmark responding to environmental variations at large, medium, and fine scales along both spatial and temporal spectrums. At the broad scale, this research addressed the importance of wind-induced rise of the sea surface in such biogeographic changes. A new hypothetical chain was suggested: recent trends in the North Atlantic Oscillation index toward its positive phase have led to increased storminess and wind tides on the ocean surface, resulting in increased frequency, duration, and magnitude of submergence and, hence, waterlogging of marsh soils and plants, which has retarded ecological succession. At the mid-scale, spatial patterns of vegetation and environmental factors were examined across tidal creeks. Sites closer to tidal creeks, compared to marsh interiors, were characterized by the dominance of later-successional species, higher bulk density, and lower nutrient contents and electrical conductivity. This finding implies that locations near creeks have experienced a better drainage condition than the inner marshes, which eventually facilitated the establishment of later-successional plants that are intolerant to physical stress. At the micro-scale, this research examined how the extent and mode of facilitation and competition vary for different combinations of plant species along physical gradients. Both positive and negative relationships were spatially manifested to a greater degree on the low marsh than on the mid marsh. This insight extends our current knowledge of scale-dependent interactions beyond pioneer zones to higher zones. On the low marsh, different types of bivariate point pattern (i.e., clustered, random, and regular) were observed for different combinations of species even at similar spatial scales. This finding implies that it is difficult to generalize at which scales competition and facilitation occur. To conclude, this research stresses the need for a holistic approach in future investigations of salt marsh biogeography. For example, based on results of this current research, it would be meaningful to develop a comprehensive simulation model that incorporates salt marsh ecology, geomorphology, and hydrology observed across scales.

Kim, Daehyun

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL’s greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A.

400

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL’s greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A.

402

NETL: News Release - Innovative Mercury Removal Technique Shows Early  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 5, 2003 August 5, 2003 Innovative Mercury Removal Technique Shows Early Promise Photochemical Process Developed in Federal Lab Removes Mercury from Flue Gas - NETL scientist Evan Granite prepares a lab test of the UV mercury removal process. - NETL scientist Evan Granite prepares for a lab test of the UV mercury removal process. MORGANTOWN, WV - A promising technology to remove mercury from coal-fired power plants -- dubbed the "GP-254 Process" -- has been developed and is currently being tested at the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Newly patented, the GP-254 Process enhances mercury removal using ultraviolet light to induce various components of power plant stack gas to react with the mercury, and changes the

403

Insulating shade assembly with removable cover  

SciTech Connect

An insulating window shade assembly is described which consists of: bracket means adapted to be mounted on the frame of a window; a first roller carrying an insulating shade and being disposed within the bracket means on the inside of the window, the shade being adapted to be drawn from the roller to cover the inside of the window and to be wound upon the roller to expose the window, a second roller carrying a removable cover fabric on the inside of the shade and being supported by the bracket means, the second roller being spaced from and disposed independently of the first roller, means disposed adjacent only the bottom edge of the insulating shade for connecting only the bottom edge of the cover fabric to the bottom only of the insulating shade so that the insulating shade and cover fabric may be drawn together over the inside of the window; guide means disposed adjacent the second roller and between the second roller and the insulating shade, the cover fabric passing over the guide means, for causing the cover fabric to hang closely adjacent the front of the insulating shade when the insulating shade is drawn over the window and when the insulating shade and cover fabric are connected together by the connecting means, and means for continually tensioning the cover fabric when the insulating shade is drawn and when the cover fabric is connected thereto so that the cover fabric lies smoothly over the shade.

Hausmann, S.; McLane, A. Jr.

1986-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

404

Metagenomic analysis of phosphorus removing sludgecommunities  

SciTech Connect

Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) is not wellunderstood at the metabolic level despite being one of the best-studiedmicrobially-mediated industrial processes due to its ecological andeconomic relevance. Here we present a metagenomic analysis of twolab-scale EBPR sludges dominated by the uncultured bacterium, "CandidatusAccumulibacter phosphatis." This analysis resolves several controversiesin EBPR metabolic models and provides hypotheses explaining the dominanceof A. phosphatis in this habitat, its lifestyle outside EBPR and probablecultivation requirements. Comparison of the same species from differentEBPR sludges highlights recent evolutionary dynamics in the A. phosphatisgenome that could be linked to mechanisms for environmental adaptation.In spite of an apparent lack of phylogenetic overlap in the flankingcommunities of the two sludges studied, common functional themes werefound, at least one of them complementary to the inferred metabolism ofthe dominant organism. The present study provides a much-needed blueprintfor a systems-level understanding of EBPR and illustrates thatmetagenomics enables detailed, often novel, insights into evenwell-studied biological systems.

Garcia Martin, Hector; Ivanova, Natalia; Kunin, Victor; Warnecke,Falk; Barry, Kerrie; McHardy, Alice C.; Yeates, Christine; He, Shaomei; Salamov, Asaf; Szeto, Ernest; Dalin, Eileen; Putnam, Nik; Shapiro, HarrisJ.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Blackall, Linda Louise; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

406

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

HIGH SO2 REMOVAL EFFICIENCY TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of performance tests at six full-scale wet lime- and limestone-reagent flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The objective of these tests was to evaluate the effectiveness of low capital cost sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal upgrades for existing FGD systems as an option for complying with the provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The upgrade options tested at the limestone-reagent systems included the use of organic acid additives (dibasic acid (DBA) and/or sodium formate) as well as increased reagent ratio (higher excess limestone levels in the recirculating slurry solids) and absorber liquid-to-gas ratio. One system also tested operating at higher flue gas velocities to allow the existing FGD system to treat flue gas from an adjacent, unscrubbed unit. Upgrade options for the one lime-based system tested included increased absorber venturi pressure drop and increased sulfite concentration in the recirculating slurry liquor.

Gary M. Blythe; James L. Phillips

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past three years, we followed the work plan as we suggested in the proposal and made every efforts to fulfill the project objectives. Based on our large amount of creative and productive work, including both of experimental and theoretic aspects, we received important technical breakthrough on naphthenic acid removal process and obtained deep insight on catalytic decarboxylation chemistry. In detail, we established an integrated methodology to serve for all of the experimental and theoretical work. Our experimental investigation results in discovery of four type effective catalysts to the reaction of decarboxylation of model carboxylic acid compounds. The adsorption experiment revealed the effectiveness of several solid materials to naphthenic acid adsorption and acidity reduction of crude oil, which can be either natural minerals or synthesized materials. The test with crude oil also received promising results, which can be potentially developed into a practical process for oil industry. The theoretical work predicted several possible catalytic decarboxylation mechanisms that would govern the decarboxylation pathways depending on the type of catalysts being used. The calculation for reaction activation energy was in good agreement with our experimental measurements.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang; Yongchun Tang; William A. Goddard

2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

409

Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

410

Thiacrown polymers for removal of mercury from waste streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thiacrown polymers immobilized to a polystyrene-divinylbenzene matrix react with Hg.sup.2+ under a variety of conditions to efficiently and selectively remove Hg.sup.2+ ions from acidic aqueous solutions, even in the presence of a variety of other metal ions. The mercury can be recovered and the polymer regenerated. This mercury removal method has utility in the treatment of industrial wastewater, where a selective and cost-effective removal process is required.

Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA); Fox, Glenn A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Heat recirculating cooler for fluid stream pollutant removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process by which heat is removed from a reactant fluid to reach the operating temperature of a known pollutant removal method and said heat is recirculated to raise the temperature of the product fluid. The process can be utilized whenever an intermediate step reaction requires a lower reaction temperature than the prior and next steps. The benefits of a heat-recirculating cooler include the ability to use known pollutant removal methods and increased thermal efficiency of the system.

Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Berry, David A. (Morgantown, WV)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

412

Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

N /A

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

413

Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from the electric facilities; (2) increase the program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This DEIS establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this EIS). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed: manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 24 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, they consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would factor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

N /A

1999-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

414

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

415

Application of Feed and Bleed Operations to Remove High Level ...  

Cleaning Method Phase Date. 5 Process Identification • After Mechanical Sludge Removal and Chemical Cleaning: ... Block Diagram Filtrate Solids Separation Solids Slurry

416

Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas ...  

Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas ... required for sequestration, an area of research identified as a high priority

417

Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam - Time Lapse Video...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(MOST) and the Russian Federation successfully removed 11 kilograms of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute. This is the eleventh country...

418

Heading Error Removal System for Tracking Devices - Energy ...  

Systems are able to reduce or remove slowly-varying drift errors, such as heading errors, rate of rotation errors, and direction of travel errors, to correct the ...

419

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

420

NETL: News Release - NETL Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power and Cost Savings DOE Laboratory Signs License Agreement Incorporating Sorbents in HVAC Add-on Technology Washington, DC - Carbon dioxide removal sorbents developed by the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A New Method to Evaluate Hydrogen Sulfide Removal from Biogas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen sulfide in biogas fuel increases the speed at which the system utilizing the biogas corrodes. This corrosion may be prevented by separating and removing… (more)

Martin, Jerry H II

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Impurity Removal from Petroleum Coke - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Impurity Removal from Petroleum Coke. Author(s), Alexandre Gagnon, Hans Darmstadt, Nigel Backhouse, Esme Ryan, Laurence Dyer, David ...

423

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study to compare six methods of removing noncondensable gases from direct-use geo-thermal steam power plants. This report defines the study methodologies and compares the...

424

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; ... Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures United States Patent ...

425

Study of Alternative Approaches for Transite Panel Removal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) assembled an experienced team from both sites to evaluate both the manual and mechanical methods of transite panel removal.

426

Method of removal of sulfur from coal and petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the removal of sulfur from sulfur-bearing materials such as coal and petroleum products using organophosphine and organophosphite compounds is provided.

Verkade, John G. (Ames, IA); Mohan, Thyagarajan (Ames, IA); Angelici, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Using Microwave Radiation for Removing Heavy Metal Ions and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Using Microwave Radiation for Removing Heavy Metal Ions and Producing Biofuels. Author(s), Aharon Gedanken. On-Site Speaker (Planned ) ...

428

Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

429

Hydrogen Removal From Heating Oil of a Parabolic Trough ...  

A Method to Selectively Remove & Measure Hydrogen Gas from a Fluid Volume Parabolic trough power plants use concentrated solar thermal energy to ...

430

Selective Removal of Thiophene from Liquid Fuels over Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Selective Removal of Thiophene from Liquid Fuels over Nickel -Based Nanocrystalline Zinc Oxide. Author(s), Mohammad Rafiqul Islam, Jewel ...

431

REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF DEPOSITS FROM COAL GASIFICATION ...  

A method is provided for on-line removal and recovery of deposits from fossil fuel gasification systems to improve plant performance and recover a valuable metalloid.

432

Use, Maintenance, Removal, Inspections, and Safety of Dams (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes operating plans for dams with movable structures, as well as procedures for raising or lowering of impoundment levels, dam removal, and dam safety inspections.

433

Method for Removal of Mercury from Various Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 6,576,092 entitled "Method for Removal of Mercury from Various Gas Streams."...

434

Nitrogen removal from natural gas using two types of membranes ...  

A process for treating natural gas or other methane-rich gas to remove excess nitrogen. The invention relies on two-stage membrane separation, using ...

435

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

437

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants from syngas typically rely on chemical or physical absorption processes operating at low temperatures. When cooled...

438

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

440

Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

US, International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam, Set Nuclear Security Milestone | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile...

442

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-151-Big Eddy-Ostrander 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2003 8, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-151-Big Eddy-Ostrander 1 Ed Tompkins Natural Resource Specialist-TFO/LMT Proposed Action: Removal of danger trees along the Big Eddy-Ostrander-1 transmission line corridor. This corridor also includes segments of the Big Eddy-Troutdale, Ostrander-Troutdale, Big Eddy-McLoughlin and Bid Eddy-Chemawa transmission lines. Referencing the Big-Eddy- Ostrander-1 transmission line, the project extends from tower 39/3 to 72/2. The portion of the ROW extending from 39/3 west to 44/5+313 falls within the Zigzag Ranger District of the Mt. Hood National Forest, Clackamas County, Oregon. All work conducted

443

U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-- Microcosm tests and model development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microcosm tests were conducted to study U(VI) bioreduction in contaminated sediments with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor. In the microcosms, EVO was degraded by indigenous microorganisms and stimulated Fe, U, and sulfate bioreduction, and methanogenesis. Removal of aqueous U occurred concurrently with sulfate reduction, with more reduction of total U in the case of higher initial sulfate concentrations. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed U(VI) reduction to U(IV). As the acetate concentration peaked in 10~20 days in oleate microcosms, the maximum was reached in 100~120 days in the EVO microcosms, indicating that EVO hydrolysis was rate-limiting. The acetate accumulation was sustained over 50 days longer in the oleate and EVO than in the ethanol microcosms, suggesting that acetate-utilizing methanogenesis was slower in the cases of oleate and EVO. Both slow hydrolysis and methanogenesis could contribute to potential sustained bioreduction in field application. Biogeochemical models were developed to couple degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, glycerol, acetate, and hydrogen, reduction of Fe(III), U(VI) and sulfate, and methanogenesis with growth and decay of microbial functional groups. The models were used to simulate the coupled processes in a field test in a companion article.

Tang, Guoping [ORNL; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Watson, David B [ORNL; Parker, Jack C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Shi, Xiaoqing [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

NDE Studies on CRDMs Removed From Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are focused on assessing the effectiveness of NDE inspections of control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of ultrasonic testing (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. In describing two CRDM assemblies removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE measurements, this paper will address the following questions: 1) What did each technique detect?, 2) What did each technique miss?, 3) How accurately did each technique characterize the detected flaws? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. One contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data; the other contained evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, but this was unconfirmed. The selected NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory based NDE methods will be employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper will also describe the NDE methods used and discus the NDE results. Future work will involve using the results from these NDE studies to guide the development of a destructive characterization plan to reveal the crack morphology, to be compared with NDE responses.

Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Schuster, George J.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Abrefah, John

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 31513160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 3151­3160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters P. Zhao, J.A. Siegel�, R May 2006; accepted 14 June 2006 Abstract Residential and commercial HVAC filters that have been loaded of the relative importance of HVAC filters as a removal mechanism for ozone in residential and commercial

Siegel, Jeffrey

446

Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

Janoski, Edward J. (Havertown, PA); Hollstein, Elmer J. (Wilmington, DE)

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. 1 figure.

Cha, C.Y.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

448

Process for removing pyritic sulfur from bituminous coals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for removing pyritic sulfur and lowering ash content of bituminous coals by grinding the feed coal, subjecting it to micro-agglomeration with a bridging liquid containing heavy oil, separating the microagglomerates and separating them to a water wash to remove suspended pyritic sulfur. In one embodiment the coal is subjected to a second micro-agglomeration step.

Pawlak, Wanda (Edmonton, CA); Janiak, Jerzy S. (Edmonton, CA); Turak, Ali A. (Edmonton, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw L. (Edmonton, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

A Simple Rapid Method for the Removal of Leukocytes From  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Filtration of human blood cells through lamb's wool columns removed more than 96 % of all leukocytes in a series of experiments, while the retention of erythrocytes by the column averaged 6.4%. This method should prove extremely useful for obtaining pure erythrocyte preparations for use in biochemical and physiological studies, and for removing leukocytes from blood prior to transfusion.

Human Blood; Edward Palmer; Frederic Waldman; William Dewitt

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Continuous cryopump with a method for removal of solidified gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved cryopump for the removal of gases from a high vacuum, comprising a cryopanel incorporating honeycomb structure, refrigerant means thermally connected to the cryopanel, and a rotatable channel moving azimuthally around an axis located near the center of the cryopanel, removing gases adsorbed within the honeycomb structure by subliming them and conducting them outside the vacuum vessel. 4 figs.

Carlson, L.W.; Herman, H.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

451

Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

Janoski, E.J.; Hollstein, E.J.

1984-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

452

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Condenser Air Removal Equipment Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Condenser Air Removal Equipment Maintenance Guide provides power plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on this system. This guide will assist the plant maintenance personnel in improving reliability and reducing maintenance costs for the condenser air removal (CAR) equipment.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

453

A Method for Noise Removal of LIDAR Point Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LiDAR can quickly and accurately obtain precision and high-density surface elevation data. In cooperation with high-precision GPS positioning technology and IMU attitude sensor, a typical noise removal algorithm of LIDAR point clouds based on FEA is ... Keywords: LIDAR, point clouds, noise removal, FEA

Huang Zuowei, Huang Yuanjiang, Huang Jie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Research and Development Planning: Program 57 Siting, Vegetation Management, and Avian Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the outcome of two planning sessions conducted in 2006 and 2007 to support research and development planning for Program 57Rights of Way: Siting, Vegetation Management, and Avian Issues.

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

455

Hemispherical Reflectance Variations of Vegetation Canopies and Implications for Global and Regional Energy Budget Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variations of spectral hemispherical reflectance (albedo) in vegetation canopies were studied as a function of solar zenith angle, leaf area index, led orientation distribution, and leaf and soil optical, properties. A three dimensional ...

D. S. Kimes; P. J. Sellers; W. W. Newcomb

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Regional Climate Change in East Asia Simulated by an Interactive Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional coupled soil–vegetation–atmosphere model is used to study changes and interactions between climate and the ecosystem in East Asia due to increased atmospheric CO2. The largest simulated climate changes are due to the radiative ...

Ming Chen; David Pollard; Eric J. Barron

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

A Comparison of a Hierarchy of Models for Determining Energy Balance Components over Vegetation Canopies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several methods for estimating surface energy balance components over a vegetated surface are compared. These include Penman-Monteith, Deardorff, and multilayer canopy (CANWHT) models for evaporation. Measurements taken during the 1991 DOE-...

Christoph A. Vogel; Dennis D. Baldocchi; Ashok K. Luhar; K. Shankar Rao

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

17 17 Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: A Database (Revised November 2000) J. S. Olson, J. A. Watts, and L. J. Allison DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp017 In 1980, this data base and the corresponding map were completed after more than 20 years of field investigations, consultations, and analyses of published literature. They characterize the use and vegetative cover of the Earth's land surface with a 0.5° × 0.5° grid. This world-ecosystem-complex data set and the accompanying map provide a current reference base for interpreting the role of vegetation in the global cycling of CO2 and other gases and a basis for improved estimates of vegetation and soil carbon, of natural exchanges of CO2, and of net historic shifts of carbon between the biosphere and the atmosphere. The

459

EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak 63: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona Summary DOE's Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Western's Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona. For more information on this EA, contact: Ms. Linette King at: lking@wapa.gov. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

460

Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, Usa Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A survey of diffuse CO2 efflux, soil temperature and soil-gas chemistry over areas of localized vegetation-kill on and around the resurgent dome of Long Valley caldera California was performed to evaluate the premise that gaseous and thermal anomalies are related to renewed intrusion of magma. Some kill sites are long-lived features and others have developed in the past few years. Total anomalous CO2 emissions from the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak 3: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona Summary DOE's Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Western's Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona. For more information on this EA, contact: Ms. Linette King at: lking@wapa.gov. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

462

Modeling Potential Equilibrium States of Vegetation and Terrestrial Water Cycle of Mesoamerica under Climate Change Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The likelihood and magnitude of the impacts of climate change on potential vegetation and the water cycle in Mesoamerica is evaluated. Mesoamerica is a global biodiversity hotspot with highly diverse topographic and climatic conditions and is ...

Pablo Imbach; Luis Molina; Bruno Locatelli; Olivier Roupsard; Gil Mahé; Ronald Neilson; Lenin Corrales; Marko Scholze; Philippe Ciais

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The Role of Vegetation in the Dynamics of West African Monsoons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this paper is the role of meridional distribution of vegetation in the dynamics of monsoons and rainfall over West Africa. A moist zonally symmetric atmospheric model coupled with a simple land surface scheme is developed to ...

Xinyu Zheng; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 1 Genetic Modification of Seed Oils for Industrial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 1 Genetic Modification of Seed Oils for Industrial Applications Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1 Genetic Modification of Seed Oils for I

465

Global Vegetation and Land Use: New High-Resolution Data Bases for Climate Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global vegetation and land-use data bases (1° latitude by 1° longitude resolution), designed for use in studies of climate and climate change, were compiled in digital form drawing upon approximately 100 published sources complemented by a large ...

Elaine Matthews

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Evaluation of a Surface/Vegetation Parameterization Using Satellite Measurements of Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares surface sensible heat flux and soil moisture values derived by inverting two boundary layers models with a surface/vegetation formulation, using surface temperature measurements made from NOAA-7 satellite (the AVHRR) with ...

O. Taconet; T. Carlson; R. Bernard; D. Vidal-Madjar

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Fats and Oils Handbook (Nahrungsfette und Öle)Chapter 4 Vegetable Fats and Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fats and Oils Handbook (Nahrungsfette und Öle) Chapter 4 Vegetable Fats and Oils Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

468

Fats and Oils Handbook (Nahrungsfette und Öle)Chapter 5 Production of Vegetable Oils and Fats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fats and Oils Handbook (Nahrungsfette und Öle) Chapter 5 Production of Vegetable Oils and Fats Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Down

469

Incorporation of CO2 Exchange Processes into a Multilayer Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange processes were incorporated into a multilayer atmosphere–soil–vegetation model known as SOLVEG, and its performance was examined using measurements obtained from a grassland site. It was also applied for the CO2 ...

Haruyasu Nagai

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

A Phenomenological Model for Wind Speed and Shear Stress Profiles in Vegetation Cover Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A phenomenological model for the mean wind speed and Reynolds shear stress profiles with height in a vegetation cover layer is derived from forms suggested by truncation of the equations of turbulent fluid motion at second order in fluctuating ...

F. A. Albini

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 2 Crude Oil Receiving and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 2 Crude Oil Receiving and Storage Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 2 Crude Oil Receiving and Storage from the book ...

472

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed ProcessingChapter 9 Filtration Techniques in Vegetable Oil Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed Processing Chapter 9 Filtration Techniques in Vegetable Oil Processing Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 Filtration Techniques in Veg

473

The coupled development of terrain and vegetation : the case of semiarid grasslands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The distribution of vegetation in semiarid landscapes organizes as a function of moisture availability, which is often mediated by the form of the land surface. Simultaneously the processes that shape the land surface are ...

Flores Cervantes, Javier Homero, 1977-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 8 Finished Product Storage and Handling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 8 Finished Product Storage and Handling Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Finished Product Storage and Handling from the book ...

475

WILD RICE SALAD RECIPE 1 quart water, chicken stock or vegetable stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WILD RICE SALAD RECIPE 1 quart water, chicken stock or vegetable stock 1 cup wild rice, rinsed Sea ground pepper to taste 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons buttermilk or plain low-fat

Blanchette, Robert A.

476

Global Interannual Variations in Sea Surface Temperature and Land Surface Vegetation, Air Temperature, and Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anomalies in global vegetation greenness, SST, land surface air temperature, and precipitation exhibit linked, low-frequency interannual variations. These interannual variations were detected and analyzed for 1982–90 with a multivariate spectral ...

Sietse O. Los; G. James Collatz; Lahouari Bounoua; Piers J. Sellers; Compton J. Tucker

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Applicability of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) in Index-Based Crop Insurance Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Index insurance is becoming increasingly popular because of its ability to provide low-cost, relatively easy to implement agricultural insurance for vegetation types whose productivity has been notoriously difficult to measure and to farmers in ...

Calum G. Turvey; Megan K. Mclaurin

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Relations between Soil Moisture and Satellite Vegetation Indices in the U.S. Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-derived vegetation indices extracted over locations representative of midwestern U.S. cropland and forest for the period 1990–94 are analyzed to determine the sensitivity of the indices to neutron probe soil moisture measurements of the ...

Jimmy O. Adegoke; Andrew M. Carleton

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

A Green Planet versus a Desert World: Estimating the Effect of Vegetation Extremes on the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of vegetation extremes on the general circulation is estimated by two atmospheric GCM simulations using global desert and forest boundary conditions over land. The difference between the climates of a “green planet” and a “desert world”...

Klaus Fraedrich; Axel Kleidon; Frank Lunkeit

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 2 Current Developments of Biodegradable Grease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 2 Current Developments of Biodegradable Grease Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 2 Current Developments of Biodegradable Grease from the bo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove unwanted vegetation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Vegetation Dynamics Enhancing Long-Term Climate Variability Confirmed by Two Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two different coupled climate–vegetation models, the Community Climate Model version 3 coupled to the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (CCM3–IBIS) and the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique’s climate model coupled to the Organizing Carbon and ...

Christine Delire; Nathalie de Noblet-Ducoudré; Adriana Sima; Isabelle Gouirand

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

The use of oil shale ash in the production of biodiesel from waste vegetable oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil shale ash obtained from combustion of local oil shale deposits was used in this study as a heterogeneous catalyst to produce biodiesel from waste vegetable oil (WVO). Two alcohols with high and low boiling points

A. Al-Otoom; M. Allawzi; A. Ajlouni; F. Abu-Alrub; M. Kandah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Effects of dynamic vegetation and topography on hydrological processes in semi-arid areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecosystems of dry climates represent a particularly interesting object for ecohydrological studies, as water is generally considered to be the key limiting resource. This work focuses on vegetation-water-energy dynamics ...

Ivanov, Valeri Yuryevich, 1974-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Modeling Regional Vegetation NPP Variations and Their Relationships with Climatic Parameters in Wuhan, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Net primary productivity (NPP) is an important component of the carbon cycle and a key indicator of ecosystem performance. The aim of this study is to construct a more accurate regional vegetation NPP estimation model and explore the relationship ...

Lunche Wang; Wei Gong; Yingying Ma; Miao Zhang

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Integrated use of remote sensing and geographic information systems in riparian vegetation delineation and mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a pilot study on riparian vegetation delineation and mapping using remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) in the Hunter Region, Australia. The aim of the study was to develop appropriate and repeatable assessment ...

X. Yang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 7 Development of Soy Composites by Direct Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 7 Development of Soy Composites by Direct Deposition Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Development of Soy Composites by Direct Deposition

487

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 13 Trans Fat Alternatives and Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 13 Trans Fat Alternatives and Challenges Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 13 Trans Fat Alternatives and Challenges from the book

488

Advantages of a Topographically Controlled Runoff Simulation in a Soil–Vegetation–Atmosphere Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two methods to incorporate subgrid variability in soil moisture and runoff production into soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer (SVAT) models are compared: 1) the variable infiltration capacity model approach (VIC), and 2) a modified “TOPMODEL” ...

Kirsten Warrach; Marc Stieglitz; Heinz-Theo Mengelkamp; Ehrhard Raschke

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

The Potential of Vegetation in Reducing Summer Cooling Loads in Residential Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential of trees and other vegetation to reduce building cooling loads has been recorded in a number of studies but the meso- and microclimate changes producing such savings are not well understood. This paper describes a preliminary ...

Y. J. Huang; H. Akbari; H. Taha; A. H. Rosenfeld

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Industrial Uses of Vegetable OilsChapter 5 Biofuels for Home Heating Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial Uses of Vegetable Oils Chapter 5 Biofuels for Home Heating Oils Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 5 Biofuels for Home Heating Oils from the book ...

491

Estimation of foliar pigment concentration in floating macrophytes using hyperspectral vegetation indices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foliar pigment concentrations of chlorophylls and cartenoids are important indicators of plant physiological status, photosynthesis rate, and net primary productivity. Although the utility of hyperspectral derived vegetation indices for estimating foliar ...

Cameron Proctor; Yuhong He

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Terrestrial Vegetation Dynamics and Global Climate Controls in North America: 2001–05  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly composite data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensor was used to reconstruct vegetation dynamics in response to climate patterns over the period 2001–05 for North America. Results imply that plant ...

Christopher Potter; Shyam Boriah; Michael Steinbach; Vipin Kumar; Steven Klooster

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Predictability of Evapotranspiration Patterns Using Remotely Sensed Vegetation Dynamics during the North American Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The links between vegetation, evapotranspiration (ET), and soil moisture (SM) are prominent in western Mexico—a region characterized by an abrupt increase in rainfall and ecosystem greenup during the North American monsoon (NAM). Most regional-...

Qiuhong Tang; Enrique R. Vivoni; Francisco Muńoz-Arriola; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Intercomparison of Simulated Global Vegetation Distributions in Response to 6 kyr BP Orbital Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of ten atmospheric general circulation models to orbital forcing at 6 kyr BP has been investigated using the BIOME model, which predicts equilibrium vegetation distribution, as a diagnostic. Several common features emerge: (a) ...

S. P. Harrison; D. Jolly; F. Laarif; A. Abe-Ouchi; B. Dong; K. Herterich; C. Hewitt; S. Joussaume; J. E. Kutzbach; J. Mitchell; N. de Noblet; P. Valdes

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

The Influence of Vegetation on the Development and Structure of Mountain Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of vegetative cover on the development of mountain waves is analyzed using a two-dimensional meso-? model. The model includes a detailed representation of surface fluxes and friction that evolve in time as the incoming solar ...

Romualdo Romero; Sergio Alonso; Everett C. Nickerson; Clemente Ramis

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Enhancement of Convective Precipitation by Mesoscale Variations in Vegetative Covering in Semiarid Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is hypothesized that planting bands of vegetation with widths of the order of 50–100 km in semiarid regions could, under favorable large-scale atmospheric conditions, result in increases of convective precipitation. These increases, which ...

Richard A. Anthes

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet Mar 26, 2012 At the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit, the United States, Mexico and Canada announced the successful removal of HEU from Mexico and conversion of the

498

Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic Components Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic Components The invention is a combination of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic Components The invention is a combination of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier which can be used to contact substrates for electronic parts such as semiconductor wafers or chips to remove photoresist materials which are applied to the substrates during manufacture of the electronic parts. The dense phase fluid modifier is one

499

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Savannah River Site this month after they safely removed its rusty, orange, 75-foot-tall dome. With the help of a 660-ton crane and lifting lugs, the workers pulled the 174,000-pound dome off the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, capping more than 16 months of preparations. Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

500

Process analysis and optimization of biodiesel production from vegetable oils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dwindling resources of fossil fuels coupled with the steady increase in energy consumption have spurred research interest in alternative and renewable energy sources. Biodiesel is one of the most promising alternatives for fossil fuels. It can be made from various renewable sources, including recycled oil, and can be utilized in lieu of petroleum-based diesel. To foster market competitiveness for biodiesel, it is necessary to develop cost-effective and technically sound processing schemes, to identify related key design criteria, and optimize performance. The overall goal of this work was to design and optimize biodiesel (Fatty Acid Methyl Ester “FAME”) production from vegetable oil. To achieve this goal, several interconnected research activities were undertaken. First, a base-case flow sheet was developed for the process. The performance of this flow sheet along with the key design and operating criteria were identified by conducting computer-aided simulation using ASPEN Plus. Various scenarios were simulated to provide sufficient understanding and insights. Also, different thermodynamic databases were used for different sections of the process to account for the various characteristics of the streams throughout the process. Next, mass and energy integration studies were performed to reduce the consumption of material and energy utilities, improve environmental impact, and enhance profitability. Finally, capital cost estimation was carried out using the ICARUS Process Evaluator computer-aided tools linked to the results of the ASPEN simulation. The ope