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1

Inactive Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inactive Content. This page is in the process of being created or has temporarily been inactivated. If you have any questions ...

2

Physical inactivity among adolescents with physical disabilities attending high schools in Kenya.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Physical inactivity together with overweight and obesity has emerged as a major health risk factor for chronic disease of lifestyle as coronary heart disease,… (more)

Matheri, Joseph Mwangi.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Mrowka, Stanley (Richmond, CA)

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

4

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact laser system is disclosed that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1,000 ft{sup 2}/hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, D.L.; Celliers, P.M.; Hackel, L.; Da Silva, L.B.; Dane, C.B.; Mrowka, S.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

5

Tritium Removal Facility High Tritium Distillation Simulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A dynamic model was developed for the distillation mechanism of the Darlington Tritium Removal Facility. The model was created using the commercial software package MATLAB/Simulink.… (more)

Zahedi, Polad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored pulse designed for high transmission through the atmosphere, as well as efficient ablative coupling to the target. The main amplifier would use either diode-pumped or flashlamp-pumped solid state gain media, depending on budget constraints of the project. A continuously operating system would use the gas-cooled amplifier technology developed for Mercury, while a burst-mode option would use the heat capacity laser technology. The ground-based system that we propose is capable of rapid engagement of targets whose orbits cross over the site, with potential for kill on a single pass. Very little target mass is ablated per pulse so the potential to create additional hazardous orbiting debris is minimal. Our cost estimates range from $2500 to $5000 per J depending on choices for laser gain medium, amplifier pump source, and thermal management method. A flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass heat-capacity laser operating in the burst mode would have costs at the lower end of this spectrum and would suffice to demonstrate the efficacy of this approach as a prototype system. A diode-pumped, gas-cooled laser would have higher costs but could be operated continuously, and might be desirable for more demanding mission needs. Maneuverability can be incorporated in the system design if the additional cost is deemed acceptable. The laser system would need to be coupled with a target pointing and tracking telescope with guide-star-like wavefront correction capability.

Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored pulse designed for high transmission through the atmosphere, as well as efficient ablative coupling to the target. The main amplifier would use either diode-pumped or flashlamp-pumped solid state gain media, depending on budget constraints of the project. A continuously operating system would use the gas-cooled amplifier technology developed for Mercury, while a burst-mode option would use the heat capacity laser technology. The ground-based system that we propose is capable of rapid engagement of targets whose orbits cross over the site, with potential for kill on a single pass. Very little target mass is ablated per pulse so the potential to create additional hazardous orbiting debris is minimal. Our cost estimates range from $2500 to $5000 per J depending on choices for laser gain medium, amplifier pump source, and thermal management method. A flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass heat-capacity laser operating in the burst mode would have costs at the lower end of this spectrum and would suffice to demonstrate the efficacy of this approach as a prototype system. A diode-pumped, gas-cooled laser would have higher costs but could be operated continuously, and might be desirable for more demanding mission needs. Maneuverability can be incorporated in the system design if the additional cost is deemed acceptable. The laser system would need to be coupled with a target pointing and tracking telescope with guide-star-like wavefront correction capability.

Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

8

HIGH SO2 REMOVAL EFFICIENCY TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of performance tests at six full-scale wet lime- and limestone-reagent flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The objective of these tests was to evaluate the effectiveness of low capital cost sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal upgrades for existing FGD systems as an option for complying with the provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The upgrade options tested at the limestone-reagent systems included the use of organic acid additives (dibasic acid (DBA) and/or sodium formate) as well as increased reagent ratio (higher excess limestone levels in the recirculating slurry solids) and absorber liquid-to-gas ratio. One system also tested operating at higher flue gas velocities to allow the existing FGD system to treat flue gas from an adjacent, unscrubbed unit. Upgrade options for the one lime-based system tested included increased absorber venturi pressure drop and increased sulfite concentration in the recirculating slurry liquor.

Gary M. Blythe; James L. Phillips

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Press Release High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Nov 15, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

10

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Press Release High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Nov 15, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

11

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Salony, DOE Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov 509-376-0402 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Dee_Millikin@rl.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) announced today the removal of the first phase of highly radioactive sludge from under water storage in the K West Basin about 400 yards away from the Columbia River. "This is a major step forward in protecting the river and a historic

12

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Salony, DOE Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov 509-376-0402 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Dee_Millikin@rl.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) announced today the removal of the first phase of highly radioactive sludge from under water storage in the K West Basin about 400 yards away from the Columbia River. "This is a major step forward in protecting the river and a historic

13

NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston Press Release NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston Nov 22, 2013

14

TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

15

High-resolution lithography based on selective removal of atoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method of high-resolution lithography based on selective removal of atoms is described. Drawbacks of lift-off lithography in comparison with the method proposed are pointed out and test structures of metal (Mo) stripes with a thickness of 50 nm are obtained.

Domantovskii, A. G.; Gurovich, B. A.; Maslakov, K. I. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Removal Sorbents for High Temperature Gas Streams Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,767,000 entitled "Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a unique regenerable sorbent process that can remove contaminants from gas produced by the gasification of fossil fuels. Specifically, the process removes hydrogen chloride by using the regenerable sorbent and simultaneously extracts hydrogen chloride compounds and hydrogen

17

DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly...

18

Application of Feed and Bleed Operations to Remove High Level ...  

Cleaning Method Phase Date. 5 Process Identification • After Mechanical Sludge Removal and Chemical Cleaning: ... Block Diagram Filtrate Solids Separation Solids Slurry

19

Alternatives Generation and Analysis for Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document addresses the preferred combination of design and operational configurations to provide heat removal from high-level waste tanks during Phase 1 waste feed delivery to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding tank safety requirement limits. An interim decision for the preferred method to remove the heat from the high-level waste tanks during waste feed delivery operations is presented herein.

WILLIS, W.L.

2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

NNSA Highly Enriched Uranium Removal Featured on The Rachel Maddow Show |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Enriched Uranium Removal Featured on The Rachel Maddow Highly Enriched Uranium Removal Featured on The Rachel Maddow Show NNSA Highly Enriched Uranium Removal Featured on The Rachel Maddow Show March 22, 2012 - 11:37am Addthis NNSA Administrator Thomas D’Agostino appeared live last night to break the news with Rachel Maddow that all remaining weapons-usable material has been successfully removed from Mexico. | Photo courtesy of the NNSA. NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino appeared live last night to break the news with Rachel Maddow that all remaining weapons-usable material has been successfully removed from Mexico. | Photo courtesy of the NNSA. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What's the difference between HEU and LEU? Highly enriched uranium (HEU) has a greater than 20 percent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Measurement accuracy and Cerenkov removal for high performance, high spatial resolution scintillation dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With highly conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, radiosurgery, and tomotherapy becoming more common in clinical practice, the use of these narrow beams requires a higher level of precision in quality assurance and dosimetry. Plastic scintillators with their water equivalence, energy independence, and dose rate linearity have been shown to possess excellent qualities that suit the most complex and demanding radiation therapy treatment plans. The primary disadvantage of plastic scintillators is the presence of Cerenkov radiation generated in the light guide, which results in an undesired stem effect. Several techniques have been proposed to minimize this effect. In this study, we compared three such techniques--background subtraction, simple filtering, and chromatic removal--in terms of reproducibility and dose accuracy as gauges of their ability to remove the Cerenkov stem effect from the dose signal. The dosimeter used in this study comprised a 6-mm{sup 3} plastic scintillating fiber probe, an optical fiber, and a color charge-coupled device camera. The whole system was shown to be linear and the total light collected by the camera was reproducible to within 0.31% for 5-s integration time. Background subtraction and chromatic removal were both found to be suitable for precise dose evaluation, with average absolute dose discrepancies of 0.52% and 0.67%, respectively, from ion chamber values. Background subtraction required two optical fibers, but chromatic removal used only one, thereby preventing possible measurement artifacts when a strong dose gradient was perpendicular to the optical fiber. Our findings showed that a plastic scintillation dosimeter could be made free of the effect of Cerenkov radiation.

Archambault, Louis; Beddar, A. Sam; Gingras, Luc [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, QC G1R 2J6 (Canada)] (and others)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile November 7, 2005 - 12:38pm Addthis Will Be Redirected to Naval Reactors, Down-blended or Used for Space Programs WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove up to 200 metric tons (MT) of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU), in the coming decades, from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons and prepare this material for other uses. Secretary Bodman made this announcement while addressing the 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference in Washington, DC.

23

The ultra-high lime with aluminum process for removing chloride from recirculating cooling water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chloride is a deleterious ionic species in cooling water systems because it is important in promoting corrosion. Chloride can be removed from cooling water by precipitation as calcium chloroaluminate using ultra-high lime with aluminum process (UHLA). The research program was conducted to study equilibrium characteristics and kinetics of chloride removal by UHLA process, study interactions between chloride and sulfate or silica, and develop a model for multicomponent removal by UHLA. Kinetics of chloride removal with UHLA was investigated. Chloride removal was found to be fast and therefore, removal kinetics should not be a limitation to applying the UHLA process. Equilibrium characteristics of chloride removal with UHLA were characterized. Good chloride removal was obtained at reasonable ranges of lime and aluminum doses. However, the stoichiometry of chloride removal with UHLA deviated from the theoretical stoichiometry of calcium chloroaluminate precipitation. Equilibrium modeling of experimental data and XRD analysis of precipitated solids indicated that this deviation was due to the formation of other solid phases such as tricalcium hydroxyaluminate and tetracalcium hydroxyaluminate. Effect of pH on chloride removal was characterized. Optimum pH for maximum chloride removal was pH 12 ± 0.2. Results of equilibrium experiments at different temperatures indicated that final chloride concentrations slightly increased when water temperature increased at temperatures below 40oC. However, at temperatures above 40oC, chloride concentration substantially increased with increasing water temperature. An equilibrium model was developed to describe chemical behavior of chloride removal from recycled cooling water using UHLA. Formation of a solid solution of calcium chloroaluminate, tricalcium hydroxyaluminate, and tetracalcium hydroxyaluminate was found to be the best mechanism to describe the chemical behavior of chloride removal with UHLA. Results of experiments that studied interactions between chloride and sulfate indicated that sulfate is preferentially removed over chloride. Final chloride concentration increased with increasing initial sulfate concentration. Silica was found to have only a small effect on chloride removal. The equilibrium model was modified in order to include sulfate and silica reactions along with chloride in UHLA process and it was able to accurately predict the chemical behavior of simultaneous removal of chloride, sulfate, and silica with UHLA.

Abdel-wahab, Ahmed Ibraheem Ali

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

25

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL); Jalan, Vinod M. (Concord, MA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Ceramic heat pipes for high temperature heat removal  

SciTech Connect

Difficulties in finding metal or protected metal components that exhibit both strength and corrosion resistance at high temperature have severely restricted the application of effective heat recovery techniques to process heat furnaces. A potential method of overcoming this restriction is to use heat pipes fabricated from ceramic materials to construct counterflow recuperators. A development program has been initiated to demonstrate the technical and eventually the economical feasibility of ceramic heat pipes and ceramic heat pipe recuperators. The prime candidate for heat pipe construction is SiC. Closed-end tubes of this material have been prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). These tubes were lined internally with tungsten by a subsequent CVD operation, partially filled with sodium, and sealed by brazing a tungsten lined SiC plug into the open-end with a palladium--cobalt alloy. Heat pipes constructed in this manner have been successfully operated in vacuum at temperatures of 1225/sup 0/K and in air at a temperature of 1125/sup 0/K. The heat source used initially for the air testing was an induction heated metallic sleeve in thermal contact with the test unit. Subsequent testing has shown that a silicon carbide heat pipe can be successfully operated with natural gas burners providing the input heat. Methods of fabricating and testing these devices are described.

Keddy, E.S.; Ranken, W.A.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

Yunker, Wayne H. (Richland, WA); Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

ARM - NSA Atqasuk Facility-Inactive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atqasuk Facility-Inactive Atqasuk Facility-Inactive NSA Related Links Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts NSA Atqasuk Facility-Inactive Location: 70° 28' 19.11" N, 157° 24' 28.99" W Altitude: 20 meters The Atqasuk facility, which was part of the larger ARM Climate Research Facility (ARM) North Slope of Alaska site, was installed the summer of 1999 off of a road near the Atqasuk Airport and operated through 2010. Located approximately 70 miles south of Barrow, Atqasuk is adjacent to the Meade River. Its climate is much more continental than that of Barrow. Atqasuk (population 225) has an economy that is largely based on subsistence fishing and caribou hunting. The Atqasuk community

29

Development of Disposable Sorbents for Chloride Removal from High-Temperature Coal-Derived Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The integrated coal-gasification combined-cycle approach is an efficient process for producing electric power from coal by gasification, followed by high-temperature removal of gaseous impurities, then electricity generation by gas turbines. Alternatively, molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) may be used instead of gas turbine generators. The coal gas must be treated to remove impurities such as hydrogen chloride (HCl), a reactive, corrosive, and toxic gas, which is produced during gasification from chloride species in the coal. HCl vapor must be removed to meet environmental regulations, to protect power generation equipments such as fuel cells or gas turbines, and to minimize deterioration of hot coal gas desulfurization sorbents. The objectives of this study are to: (1) investigate methods to fabricate reactive sorbent pellets or granules that are capable of reducing HCl vapor in high-temperature coal gas streams to less than 1 ppm in the temperature range 400{degrees}C to 650{degrees}C and the pressure range 1 to 20 atm; (2) testing their suitability in bench-scale fixed- or fluidized-bed reactors; (3) testing a superior sorbent in a circulating fluidized- bed reactor using a gas stream from an operating coal gasifier; and (4) updating the economics of high temperature HCl removal.

Krishnan, G.N.; Canizales, A. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gupta, R. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Ayala, R. [General Electric Co., Schenectady, NY (United States). Corporate Research and Development Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Inactive tanks remediation program strategy and plans for Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report presents plans and strategies for remediation of the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service (also known as inactive tanks) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These plans and strategies will be carried out by the Environmental Restoration Program`s Inactive LLLW Tank Program at ORNL. These tanks are defined as Category D tanks because they are existing tank systems without secondary containment that are removed from service. The approach to remediation of each tank or tank farm must be adapted in response to the specific circumstances of individual tank sites. The approach will be tailored to accommodate feedback on lessons learned from previous tank remediation activities and will not be a rigid step-by-step approach that must be conducted identically for every tank system. However, the approach will follow a multistep decision process. The overall objective of the Inactive Tank Program is to remediate all LLLW tanks that have been removed from service to the extent practicable in accordance with the FFA requirements. The Inactive Tank Program will focus on the remediation of the tank residues (i.e., contents after tank has been emptied) and tank shell. This strategy is discussed in detail in this report.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent discloses a method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

Yunker, W.H.; Christiansen, D.W.

1983-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

32

Cathode Performance as a Function of Inactive Materials and Void Fractions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cathode Performance as a Function of Inactive Materials and Void Fractions Cathode Performance as a Function of Inactive Materials and Void Fractions Title Cathode Performance as a Function of Inactive Materials and Void Fractions Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Zheng, Honghe, Gao Liu, Xiangyun Song, Paul L. Ridgway, Shidi Xun, and Vincent S. Battaglia Journal Journal of Electrochemical Society Abstract Li[Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3]O2 -based laminates of approximately the same loading and of varying levels of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) binder and acetylene black (ratio held constant) were fabricated and calendered to different porosities, with the objective to investigate performance on a volume basis. The electronic conductivity of the laminates depends strongly on the inactive material content but not significantly on porosity. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies found that charge-transfer resistance with calendering varied greatly with inactive material content. When the electrode contains low levels of inactive material (2% PVDF and 1.6% carbon), calendering significantly reduced the bulk resistance of the electrode. With high levels of inactive material (8% PVDF and 6.4% carbon), charge-transfer resistance increased with increased calendering. Above a certain level, depending on the overall composition, the inactive material reduces ionic transport to the active material surface. For a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle required to go 40 miles at an average rate of 20 miles/h with a 38 kW 10 s power-pulse capability, the cell chemistry studied is energy-limited. Therefore, based on the results of this study, the cathode should be compressed to 10% porosity with a minimal amount of inactive material

33

Inactive tanks remediation program strategy and plans for Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This report presents plans and strategies for remediation of the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service (also known as inactive tanks) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These plans and strategies will be carried out by the Environmental Restoration Program`s Inactive LLLW Tank Program at ORNL. The approach to remediation of each tank or tank farm must be adapted in response to the specific circumstances of individual tank sites. The approach will be tailored to accommodate feedback on lessons learned from previous tank remediation activities and will not be a rigid step-by-step approach that must be conducted identically for every tank system. However, the approach will follow a multistep decision process. The overall objective of the Inactive Tank Program is to remediate all LLLW tanks that have been removed from service to the extent practicable in accordance with the FFA requirements. The Inactive Tank Program will focus on the remediation of the tank residues and tank shell. This strategy is discussed in detail in this report.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Inactive Tanks Remediation Program strategy and plans for Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Inactive Tank Remediation Program is to remediate all LLLW tanks that have been removed fimn service to the extent practicable in accordance with the FFA and CERCLA requirements. Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) will be addressed in choosing a remediation alternative. Preference will be given to remedies that are highly reliable and provide long-term protection. Efforts will be directed toward permanently and significantly reducing the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous substances, pollutants, and contaminants associated with the tank systems. Where indicated by operational or other restraints, interim measures short of full and complete remediation may be taken to maintain human health and ecological risks at acceptable levels until full remediation can be accomplished.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Highly Selective Nuclide Removal from the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at SRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a deployment of highly selective ion-exchange resin technologies for the in-situ removal of Cs-137 and Sr-90 from the Savannah River Site (SRS) R-Reactor Disassembly Basin. The deployment was supported by the DOE Office of Science and Technology's (OST, EM-50) National Engineering Technology Laboratory (NETL), as a part of an Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) project. The Facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning (FDD) Program at the SRS conducted this deployment as a part of an overall program to deactivate three of the site's five reactor disassembly basins

Pickett, J.B.

2002-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

36

Highly Selective Nuclide Removal from the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the SRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a deployment of highly selective ion-exchange resin technologies for the in-situ removal of Cs-137 and Sr-90 from the Savannah River Site (SRS) R-Reactor Disassembly Basin. The deployment was supported by the DOE Office of Science and Technology's (OST, EM-50) National Engineering Technology Laboratory (NETL), as a part of an Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) project. The Facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning (FDD) Program at the SRS conducted this deployment as a part of an overall program to deactivate three of the site's five reactor disassembly basins.

Pickett, J. B.; Austin, W. E.; Dukes, H. H.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

DEVELOPMENT OF DISPOSABLE SORBENTS FOR CHLORIDE REMOVAL FROM HIGH TEMPERATURE COAL-DERIVED GASES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) and integrated-gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems require the development of high temperature sorbents for the removal of hydrogen chloride (HCl) vapor to less than 1 parts-per-million (ppm) levels. HCl is a highly reactive, corrosive, and toxic gas which must be removed to meet environmental regulations, to protect power generation equipment, and to minimize deterioration of hot gas desulfurization sorbents. The objective of this program was to develop disposable, alkali-based sorbents capable of reducing HCl vapor levels to less than 1 ppm in the temperature range from 400 to 750 C and pressures in the range from 1 to 20 atm. The primary areas of focus of this program were to investigate different methods of sorbent fabrication, testing their suitability for different reactor configurations, obtaining reaction kinetics data, and conducting a preliminary economic feasibility assessment. This program was a joint effort between SRI International (SRI), Research Triangle Institute (RTI), and General Electric Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD). SRI, the prime contractor and RTI, a major subcontractor, performed most of the work in this program. Thermochemical calculations indicated that sodium-based sorbents were capable of reducing HCl vapor levels to less than 1 ppm at temperatures up to 650 C, but the regeneration of spent sorbents would require complex process steps. Nahcolite (NaHCO{sub 3}), a naturally-occurring mineral, could be used as an inexpensive sorbent to remove HCl vapor in hot coal gas streams. In the current program, nahcolite powder was used to fabricate pellets suitable for fixed-bed reactors and granules suitable for fluidized-bed reactors. Pilot-scale equipment were used to prepare sorbents in large batches: pellets by disk pelletization and extrusion techniques, and granules by granulation and spray-drying techniques. Bench-scale fixed- and fluidized-bed reactors were assembled at SRI and RTI to conduct tests at high-temperature, high-pressure conditions (HTHP). The HTHP tests confirmed the ability of nahcolite pellets and granules to reduce the HCl vapor levels to less than 1 ppm levels with a very high sorbent utilization for chloride capture. The effect of several operating variables such as temperature, pressure, presence of hydrogen sulfide, and sorbent preparation methods was studied on the efficacy of HCl removal by the sorbent. Pilot-scale tests were performed in the fluidized-bed mode at the gasifier facility at the GE-CRD. Sorbent exposure tests were also conducted using a hot coal gas stream from the DOE/FETC's fluidized-bed gasifier at Morgantown, WV. These tests confirmed the results obtained at SRI and RTI. A preliminary economic assessment showed that the cost of HCl removal in a commercial IGCC system will be about $0.001/kWh (1 mills/kWh).

Gopala Krishnan; Raghubir Gupta

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

On the behaviour of the nuclear spectral function at high momentum and removal energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extrapolation of the nuclear spectral function at large nucleon three-momentum and removal energy is suggested.

O. Benhar; S. Fantoni; G. I. Lykasov

1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

39

Mechanistic study of chlorine removal from coal by high-temperature leaching  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research were to: (1) continue the experimental investigation of removal of chlorine from coal using high-temperature leaching techniques, (2) understand the mechanisms involved in the leaching of chlorine from coal, and (3) develop a mathematical model which can be used to correlate the data and to describe the performance of the process. Efforts involved developing procedures for estimation of effective pore volumes of coal samples and measurement of surface areas of coal samples by use of carbon dioxide rather than nitrogen. Different mesh sizes of Illinois No. 6 seam and Illinois No. 5 seam coals were evaluated. Based on the pore volume and CO{sub 2} surface areas obtained, average pore diameters were calculated for the samples examined. This information was compared to the chlorine removal of the coal samples that occurred during hot water leaching. A second aspect of this research involved study of chloride evolution rates from coal and model chlorine compounds heated in a tube furnace under continuous nitrogen flow. Kinetic parameters were determined. 3 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Chen, Han Lin (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (USA). Dept. of Technology); Muchmore, C.B. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes)

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Sorbents for High Temperature Removal of Arsenic from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gokhan O. Alptekin, PhD Robert Copeland, PhD Gokhan O. Alptekin, PhD Robert Copeland, PhD (Primary Contact) TDA Research, Inc TDA Research, Inc 12345 W. 52 nd Avenue 12345 W. 52 nd Avenue Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 Email: copeland@tda.com Email: galptekin@tda.com Tel: (303) 940-2323 Tel: (303) 940-2349 Fax: (303) 422-7763 Fax: (303) 422-7763 Margarita Dubovik Yevgenia Gershanovich TDA Research, Inc TDA Research, Inc 12345 W. 52 nd Avenue 12345 W. 52 nd Avenue Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 Email: dubovik@tda.com Email: ygershan@tda.com Tel: (303) 940-2316 Tel: (303) 940-2346 Fax: (303) 422-7763 Fax: (303) 422-7763 Sorbents for High Temperature Removal of Arsenic from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas

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41

High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing. Technical progress report, [1 July--30 September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a discussion of the technical progress on DOE/PETC project number DE-AC22-92PC91338, {open_quotes}High Efficiency SO{sub 2} Removal Testing{close_quotes}, for the time period 1 July through 30 September, 1993. The project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, to evaluate low capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency. The upgrades to be evaluated primarily involve the addition of organic acid buffers to the FGD systems. The {open_quotes}base{close_quotes} project involved testing at the Tampa Electric Company Big Bend station. As of September 1993, all five potential options to the base program had been exercised by DOE, involving testing at the Hoosier Energy Merom Station (Option I), the Southwestern Electric Power Company Pirkey Station (Option II), the PSI Energy Gibson Station (Option III), the Duquesne Light Elrama Station (Option IV), and the New York State Electric and Gas Company Kintigh Station (Option V). As of September 1993, testing has been completed for the base project and for Options 1 and 2, has begun but not been completed for Options III and IV, and has not yet begun for Option V. This document is divided into five sections. After a brief introduction (Section 1), Section 2 (Project Summary) provides a brief overview of the status of technical efforts on this project. Section 3 (Results) summarizes the outcome from these technical efforts during the quarter. Results for each site for which there were significant technical efforts or for which there are updated technical results are discussed in separate subsections. In Section 4 (Plans for the Next Reporting Period) an overview is provided of the technical progress that is anticipated for the fourth quarter of calendar year 1993. Section 5 includes a brief acknowledgement.

Blythe, G.

1993-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

42

High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing. Quarterly status report, October 1994--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a discussion of the technical progress on DOE/PETC project number DE-AC22-92PC91338, {open_quotes}High Efficiency SO{sub 2} Removal Testing{close_quotes}, for the time period 1 October through 31 December 1994. The project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, to evaluate low-capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency. The upgrades to be evaluated primAllily involve using additives in the FGD systems. The {open_quotes}base{close_quotes} project involved testing at the Tampa Electric Company Big Bend station. AR five potential options to the base program have been exercised by DOE, involving testing at the Hoosier Energy Merom Station (Option I), the Southwestern Electric Power Company Pirkey Station (Option II), the PSI Energy Gibson Station (Option III), the Duquesne Light Elrama Station (Option IV), and the New York State Electric and Gas Corporation (NYSEG) Kintigh Station (Option V). By the beginning of the fourth quarter of 1994, testing had been completed for the base project and for all options. The remainder of this document is divided into four sections. Section 2, Project Summary, provides a brief overview of the status of technical efforts on this project. Section 3, Results, summarizes the outcome from these technical efforts during the quarter. In Section 4, Plans for the Next Reporting Period, an overview is provided of the technical efforts that are anticipated for the first quarter of calendar year 1995. Section 5 contains a brief acknowledgement.

Blythe, G.

1995-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

43

Removal of phosphorus from high-phosphorus iron ores by selective ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The selective HCl leaching method was used to remove .... Preparation of Iridium Fine Particle by the Effect of Grinding Additive, Nacl.

44

HIGH LEVEL WASTE MECHANCIAL SLUDGE REMOVAL AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site F-Tank Farm Closure project has successfully performed Mechanical Sludge Removal (MSR) using the Waste on Wheels (WOW) system for the first time within one of its storage tanks. The WOW system is designed to be relatively mobile with the ability for many components to be redeployed to multiple waste tanks. It is primarily comprised of Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs), Submersible Transfer Pumps (STPs), and a mobile control room with a control panel and variable speed drives. In addition, the project is currently preparing another waste tank for MSR utilizing lessons learned from this previous operational activity. These tanks, designated as Tank 6 and Tank 5 respectively, are Type I waste tanks located in F-Tank Farm (FTF) with a capacity of 2,840 cubic meters (750,000 gallons) each. The construction of these tanks was completed in 1953, and they were placed into waste storage service in 1959. The tank's primary shell is 23 meters (75 feet) in diameter, and 7.5 meters (24.5 feet) in height. Type I tanks have 34 vertically oriented cooling coils and two horizontal cooling coil circuits along the tank floor. Both Tank 5 and Tank 6 received and stored F-PUREX waste during their operating service time before sludge removal was performed. DOE intends to remove from service and operationally close (fill with grout) Tank 5 and Tank 6 and other HLW tanks that do not meet current containment standards. Mechanical Sludge Removal, the first step in the tank closure process, will be followed by chemical cleaning. After obtaining regulatory approval, the tanks will be isolated and filled with grout for long-term stabilization. Mechanical Sludge Removal operations within Tank 6 removed approximately 75% of the original 95,000 liters (25,000 gallons). This sludge material was transferred in batches to an interim storage tank to prepare for vitrification. This operation consisted of eleven (11) Submersible Mixer Pump(s) mixing campaigns and multiple intraarea transfers utilizing STPs from July 2006 to August 2007. This operation and successful removal of sludge material meets requirement of approximately 19,000 to 28,000 liters (5,000 to 7,500 gallons) remaining prior to the Chemical Cleaning process. Removal of the last 35% of sludge was exponentially more difficult, as less and less sludge was available to mobilize and the lighter sludge particles were likely removed during the early mixing campaigns. The removal of the 72,000 liters (19,000 gallons) of sludge was challenging due to a number factors. One primary factor was the complex internal cooling coil array within Tank 6 that obstructed mixer discharge jets and impacted the Effective Cleaning Radius (ECR) of the Submersible Mixer Pumps. Minimal access locations into the tank through tank openings (risers) presented a challenge because the available options for equipment locations were very limited. Mechanical Sludge Removal activities using SMPs caused the sludge to migrate to areas of the tank that were outside of the SMP ECR. Various SMP operational strategies were used to address the challenge of moving sludge from remote areas of the tank to the transfer pump. This paper describes in detail the Mechanical Sludge Removal activities and mitigative solutions to cooling coil obstructions and other challenges. The performance of the WOW system and SMP operational strategies were evaluated and the resulting lessons learned are described for application to future Mechanical Sludge Removal operations.

Jolly, R; Bruce Martin, B

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5098-SR-04-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

46

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-05-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

A Low Cost and High Efficient Facility for Removal of $\\SO_{2}$ and $\\NO_{x}$ in the Flue Gas from Coal Fire Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Low Cost and High Efficient Facility for Removal of $\\SO_{2}$ and $\\NO_{x}$ in the Flue Gas from Coal Fire Power Plant

Pei, Y J; Dong, X; Feng, G Y; Fu, S; Gao, H; Hong, Y; Li, G; Li, Y X; Shang, L; Sheng, L S; Tian, Y C; Wang, X Q; Wang, Y; Wei, W; Zhang, Y W; Zhou, H J

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings  

SciTech Connect

The Grand Junction site has been reevaluated in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented herein range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $10,200,000 for stabilization in-place to about $39,500,000 for disposal in the DeBeque area, at a distance of about 35 mi, using transportation by rail. If transportation to DeBeque were by truck, the cost estimated to be about $41,900,000. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Grand Junction tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $150/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears not to be economically attractive.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Cesium Removal from High Conductivity Waste Using Selective Ion Exchange Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a low level liquid processing study conducted for Diablo Canyon Power Plant (DCPP). The researchers used column testing to evaluate the performance of selective ion exchange media in the removal of radioactive cesium contamination from spent condensate polisher regenerant solution. The report provides technical details and results of the study and discusses applicability of these materials to the waste processing system at the plant.

1997-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Process for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gases: high calcium fly-ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to improved processes for treating hot sulfur-containing flue gas to remove sulfur therefrom. Processes in accordance with the present invention include preparing an aqueous slurry composed of a calcium alkali source and a source of reactive silica and/or alumina, heating the slurry to above-ambient temperatures for a period of time in order to facilitate the formation of sulfur-absorbing calcium silicates or aluminates, and treating the gas with the heat-treated slurry components. Examples disclosed herein demonstrate the utility of these processes in achieving improved sulfur-absorbing capabilities. Additionally, disclosure is provided which illustrates preferred configurations for employing the present processes both as a dry sorbent injection and for use in conjunction with a spray dryer and/or bagfilter. Retrofit application to existing systems is also addressed.

Rochelle, Gary T. (Austin, TX); Chang, John C. S. (Cary, NC)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Apparatus and method for removing particulate deposits from high temperature filters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combustion of a fuel-air mixture is used to provide a high-temperature and high-pressure pulse of gaseous combustion products for the back-flush cleaning of ceramic filter elements contained in a barrier filter system and utilized to separate particulates from particulate-laden process gases at high temperature and high pressure. The volume of gaseous combustion products provided by the combustion of the fuel-air mixture is preferably divided into a plurality of streams each passing through a sonic orifice and conveyed to the open end of each filter element as a high pressure pulse which passes through the filter elements and dislodges dust cake supported on a surface of the filter element.

Nakaishi, Curtis V. (Morgantown, WV); Holcombe, Norman T. (McMurray, PA); Micheli, Paul L. (Morgantown, WV)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Apparatus and method for removing particulate deposits from high temperature filters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The combustion of a fuel-air mixture is used to provide a high-temperature and high-pressure pulse of gaseous combustion products for the back-flush cleaning of ceramic filter elements contained in a barrier filter system and utilized to separate particulates from particulate-laden process gases at high temperature and high pressure. The volume of gaseous combustion products provided by the combustion of the fuel-air mixture is preferably divided into a plurality of streams each passing through a sonic orifice and conveyed to the open end of each filter element as a high pressure pulse which passes through the filter elements and dislodges dust cake supported on a surface of the filter element.

Nakaishi, C.V.; Holcombe, N.T.; Micheli, P.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Naturita, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site a Naturita, Colorado, conducted in May 1976, are presented. The spread of tailings was detected in the area surrounding the site by means of direct above ground gamma measurements and analysis of surface and subsurface soil samples. Radiochemical analyses of water samples in the vicinity of the tailings pile indicate local surface water contamination immediately downstream from the pile, although the /sup 226/Ra concentration in the water at that point as well below the concentration guide for drinking water. The calculated subsoil distribution of /sup 226/Ra in onsite holes is presented graphically. The tailings at this site were removed and reprocessed at another location. This operation was completed and reclamation of the site was conducted in 1978. Consequently the information in this report documents radiological conditions that no longer exist.

Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.J.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Ellis, B.S.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

HIGH TEMPERATURE REMOVAL OF H{sub 2}S FROM COAL GASIFICATION PROCESS STREAMS USING AN ELECTROCHEMICAL MEMBRANE SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

A bench scale set-up was constructed to test the cell performance at 600-700 C and 1 atm. The typical fuel stream inlet proportions were 34% CO, 22% CO{sub 2}, 35% H{sub 2}, 8% H{sub 2}O, and 450-2000 ppm H{sub 2}S. The fundamental transport restrictions for sulfur species in an electrochemical cell were examined. Temperature and membrane thickness were varied to examine how these parameters affect the maximum flux of H{sub 2}S removal. It was found that higher temperature allows more sulfide species to enter the electrolyte, thus increasing the sulfide flux across the membrane and raising the maximum flux of H{sub 2}S removal. The results identify sulfide diffusion across the membrane as the rate-limiting step in H{sub 2}S removal. The maximum H{sub 2}S removal flux of 1.1 x 10-6 gmol H{sub 2}S min{sup -1} cm{sup -2} (or 3.5 mA cm{sup -2}) was obtained at 650 C, with a membrane that was 0.9 mm thick, 36% porous, and had an estimated tortuosity of 3.6. Another focus of this thesis was to examine the stability of cathode materials in full cell trials. A major hurdle that remains in process scale-up is cathode selection, as the lifetime of the cell will depend heavily on the lifetime of the cathode material, which is exposed to very sour gas. Materials that showed success in the past (i.e. cobalt sulfides and Y{sub 0.9}Ca{sub 0.1}FeO{sub 3}) were examined but were seen to have limitations in operating environment and temperature. Therefore, other novel metal oxide compounds were studied to find possible candidates for full cell trials. Gd{sub 2}TiMoO{sub 7} and La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}VO{sub 3} were the compounds that retained their structure best even when exposed to high H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O concentrations.

Jack Winnick; Meilin Liu

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

SUPPORTED LIQUID CATALYSTS FOR REMOVAL OF HIGH TEMPERATURE FUEL CELL CONTAMINANTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel catalytic synthesis gas oxidation process using molten carbonate salts supported on compatible fluidized iron oxide particles (supported-liquid-phase-catalyst (SLPC) fluidized bed process) was investigated. This process combines the advantages of large scale fluidized bed processing with molten salt bath oxidation. Molten salt catalysts can be supported within porous fluidized particles in order to improve mass transfer rates between the liquid catalysts and the reactant gases. Synthesis gas can be oxidized at reduced temperatures resulting in low NO{sub x} formation while trace sulfides and halides are captured in-situ. Hence, catalytic oxidation of synthesis gas can be carried out simultaneously with hot gas cleanup. Such SLPC fluidized bed processes are affected by inter-particle liquid capillary forces that may lead to agglomeration and de-fluidization of the bed. An understanding of the origin and strength of these forces is needed so that they can be overcome in practice. Process design is based on thermodynamic free energy minimization calculations that indicate the suitability of eutectic Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} mixtures for capturing trace impurities in-situ (< 1 ppm SO{sub x} released) while minimizing the formation of NO{sub x}(< 10 ppm). Iron oxide has been identified as a preferred support material since it is non-reactive with sodium, is inexpensive, has high density (i.e. inertia), and can be obtained in various particle sizes and porosities. Force balance modeling has been used to design a surrogate ambient temperature system that is hydrodynamically similar to the real system, thus allowing complementary investigation of the governing fluidization hydrodynamics. The primary objective of this research was to understand the origin of and to quantify the liquid capillary interparticle forces affecting the molten carbonate SLPC fluidized bed process. Substantial theoretical and experimental exploratory results indicate process feasibility. The potential environmental gain from success is enormous, impacting all areas of the world where coal is burned to supply steam or direct industrial heat. Project success may lead to an integrated combustion system providing for simultaneous catalytic oxidation and hot gas cleanup of raw synthesis gas from an upstream coal gasifier.

Alan W. Weimer (PI); Peter Czerpak; Patrick Hilbert

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Waste management plan for inactive LLLW tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, 3013, and T-30 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Project Waste Management Plan identifies the waste that is expected to be generated in connection with the removal and disposition of inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30, and grouting of tank 3013 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the isolation of these tanks` associated piping systems. The plan also identifies the organization, responsibilities, and administrative controls that will be followed to ensure proper handling of the waste.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Ion Removal  

INL’s ion removal technology leverages the ability of phosphazene polymers discriminate between water and metal ions, which allows water to pass ...

58

Assessment of the radiological impact of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah  

SciTech Connect

High surface soil concentrations of /sup 226/Ra and high above-ground measurements of gamma-ray intensity in the vicinity of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat show both wind and water erosion of the tailings. The former mill area, occupied by a trade school at the time of this survey, shows a comparatively high level of contamination, probably from unprocessed ore on the surface of the ore storage area near the location of the former mill buildings. However, the estimated health effect of exposure to gamma rays during a 2000-hr work year in the area represents an increase of 0.1% in the risk of death from cancer. Exposure of less than 600 persons within 1.6 km of the tailings to radon daughters results in an estimated 0.2%/year increase in risk of lung cancer.

Haywood, F.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Fox, W.F.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

IMPACT OF ELIMINATING MERCURY REMOVAL PRETREATMENT ON THE PERFORMANCE OF A HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE MELTER OFFGAS SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site processes high-level radioactive waste from the processing of nuclear materials that contains dissolved and precipitated metals and radionuclides. Vitrification of this waste into borosilicate glass for ultimate disposal at a geologic repository involves chemically modifying the waste to make it compatible with the glass melter system. Pretreatment steps include removal of excess aluminum by dissolution and washing, and processing with formic and nitric acids to: (1) adjust the reduction-oxidation (redox) potential in the glass melter to reduce radionuclide volatility and improve melt rate; (2) adjust feed rheology; and (3) reduce by steam stripping the amount of mercury that must be processed in the melter. Elimination of formic acid pretreatment has been proposed to eliminate the production of hydrogen in the pretreatment systems; alternative reductants would be used to control redox. However, elimination of formic acid would result in significantly more mercury in the melter feed; the current specification is no more than 0.45 wt%, while the maximum expected prior to pretreatment is about 2.5 wt%. An engineering study has been undertaken to estimate the effects of eliminating mercury removal on the melter offgas system performance. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model and an aqueous phase model were developed to study the speciation of mercury in the DWPF melter offgas system. The model was calibrated against available experimental data and then applied to DWPF conditions. The gas-phase model predicted the Hg{sub 2}{sup 2-}/Hg{sup 2+} ratio accurately, but some un-oxidized Hg{sup 0} remained. The aqueous model, with the addition of less than 1 mM Cl{sub 2} showed that this remaining Hg{sup 0} would be oxidized such that the final Hg{sub 2}{sup 2+}/Hg{sup 2+} ratios matched the experimental data. The results of applying the model to DWPF show that due to excessive shortage of chloride, only 6% of the mercury fed is expected to be chlorinated, mostly as Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, while the remaining mercury would exist either as elemental mercury (90%) or HgO (4%).

Zamecnik, J; Alexander Choi, A

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

60

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF No REMEDIAL ACTION AT THE INACTIVE URANIFEROUS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 206 7 206 REV. 0 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF No REMEDIAL ACTION AT THE INACTIVE URANIFEROUS LIGNITE ASHING SITES AT BELFIELD AND BOWMAN. NORTH DAKOTA United States Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project June 1997 INTENDED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE This report has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available in paper copy and microfiche Number of pages in this report: 5 8 DOE and DOE contractors can obtain copies of this report from: Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (61 5) 576-8401 This report is publicly available from: National Technical Information Service Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royai Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 DOE/EA-1206 REV. 0 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Guidelines for cleanup of uranium tailings from inactive mills  

SciTech Connect

Recent experiences in Grand Junction, Colorado, have indicated the significance of uranium tailings as sources of nonoccupational exposure and suggest that current methods for perpetual care and isolation of the large areas covered by tailings piles at inactive mill locations may be inadequate for minimizing human exposure. This paper presents the rationale and the procedures used in reviewing the adequacy of proposed criteria for remedial action at these sites. Exposures due to aquatic, terrestrial, airborne, and direct contamination pathways were compared to determine the most important radionuclides in the pile and their pathways to man. It is shown that the most hazardous components of the tailings are $sup 226$Ra and $sup 230$Th. The long half-lives of these radionuclides require the consideration of continuous occupancy of the vacated site at some future time, even if the immediately projected land use does not anticipate maximum exposure. (auth)

Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.G.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Prevalence of physical inactivity among school going adolescents in Nairobi, Kenya.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In developing economies and specifically Sub-Saharan Africa physical inactivity has been identified as a risk factor along with tobacco use, poor… (more)

Kibet, Jepkemoi Joanne

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Manganese and Ceria Sorbents for High Temperature Sulfur Removal from Biomass-Derived Syngas -- The Impact of Steam on Capacity and Sorption Mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Syngas derived from biomass and coal gasification for fuel synthesis or electricity generation contains sulfur species that are detrimental to downstream catalysts or turbine operation. Sulfur removal in high temperature, high steam conditions has been known to be challenging, but experimental reports on methods to tackle the problem are not often reported. We have developed sorbents that can remove hydrogen sulfide from syngas at high temperature (700 C), both in dry and high steam conditions. The syngas composition chosen for our experiments is derived from statistical analysis of the gasification products of wood under a large variety of conditions. The two sorbents, Cu-ceria and manganese-based, were tested in a variety of conditions. In syngas containing steam, the capacity of the sorbents is much lower, and the impact of the sorbent in lowering H{sub 2}S levels is only evident in low space velocities. Spectroscopic characterization and thermodynamic consideration of the experimental results suggest that in syngas containing 45% steam, the removal of H{sub 2}S is primarily via surface chemisorptions. For the Cu-ceria sorbent, analysis of the amount of H{sub 2}S retained by the sorbent in dry syngas suggests both copper and ceria play a role in H{sub 2}S removal. For the manganese-based sorbent, in dry conditions, there is a solid state transformation of the sorbent, primarily into the sulfide form.

Cheah, S.; Parent, Y. O.; Jablonski, W. S.; Vinzant, T.; Olstad, J. L.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Engineering study of 50 miscellaneous inactive underground radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This engineering study addresses 50 inactive underground radioactive waste tanks. The tanks were formerly used for the following functions associated with plutonium and uranium separations and waste management activities in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site: settling solids prior to disposal of supernatant in cribs and a reverse well; neutralizing acidic process wastes prior to crib disposal; receipt and processing of single-shell tank (SST) waste for uranium recovery operations; catch tanks to collect water that intruded into diversion boxes and transfer pipeline encasements and any leakage that occurred during waste transfer operations; and waste handling and process experimentation. Most of these tanks have not been in use for many years. Several projects have, been planned and implemented since the 1970`s and through 1985 to remove waste and interim isolate or interim stabilize many of the tanks. Some tanks have been filled with grout within the past several years. Responsibility for final closure and/or remediation of these tanks is currently assigned to several programs including Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Environmental Restoration and Remedial Action (ERRA), and Decommissioning and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure (D&RCP). Some are under facility landlord responsibility for maintenance and surveillance (i.e. Plutonium Uranium Extraction [PUREX]). However, most of the tanks are not currently included in any active monitoring or surveillance program.

Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

1994-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

65

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Durango, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Results of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site at Durango, Colorado, conducted in April 1976, in cooperation with a team from Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc., are presented together with descriptions of the instruments and techniques used to obtain the data. Direct above-ground gamma measurements and analysis of surface soil and sediment samples indicate movement of tailings from the piles toward Lightner Creek on the north and the Animas River on the east side of the piles. The concentration of /sup 226/Ra in the former raffinate pond area is only slightly above the background level. Two structures in Durango were found to contain high concentrations of airborne radon daughters, where tailings are known to have been utilized in construction. Near-background concentrations of radon daughters were found in a well-ventilated building close to the tailings.

Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Shinpaugh, W.H.; Ellis, B.S.; Chou, K.D.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removal NNSANews posted a photo: Vietnam HEU Removal A truck carrying the last highly enriched uranium in Vietnam winds through the Vietnamese countryside. Facebook Twitter Youtube...

67

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Task 2: SOx/Nox/Hg Removal for High Sulfur Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing PC (pulverized coal) power plants that are retrofitted with oxy-combustion technology. The objective of Task 2 of this project was to evaluate an alternative method of SOx, NOx and Hg removal from flue gas produced by burning high sulfur coal in oxy-combustion power plants. The goal of the program was not only to investigate a new method of flue gas purification but also to produce useful acid byproduct streams as an alternative to using a traditional FGD and SCR for flue gas processing. During the project two main constraints were identified that limit the ability of the process to achieve project goals. 1) Due to boiler island corrosion issues >60% of the sulfur must be removed in the boiler island with the use of an FGD. 2) A suitable method could not be found to remove NOx from the concentrated sulfuric acid product, which limits sale-ability of the acid, as well as the NOx removal efficiency of the process. Given the complexity and safety issues inherent in the cycle it is concluded that the acid product would not be directly saleable and, in this case, other flue gas purification schemes are better suited for SOx/NOx/Hg control when burning high sulfur coal, e.g. this project's Task 3 process or a traditional FGD and SCR.

Nick Degenstein; Minish Shah; Doughlas Louie

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Surveillance and maintenance plan for the inactive liquid low-level waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ORNL has a total of 54 inactive liquid low-level waste (ILLLW) tanks. In the past, these tanks were used to contain radioactive liquid wastes from various research programs, decontamination operations, and reactor operations. The tanks have since been removed from service for various reasons; the majority were retired because of their age, some due to integrity compromises, and others because they did not meet the current standards set by the Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA). Many of the tanks contain residual radioactive liquids and/or sludges. Plans are to remediate all tanks; however, until remediation of each tank, this Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan will be used to monitor the safety and inventory containment of these tanks.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Removal to Maximum Extent Practical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary Notes from 1 November 2007 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Removal of Highly Radioactive Radionuclides/Key Radionuclides to the Maximum Extent Practical

70

Inactive Period of Western North Pacific Tropical Cyclone Activity in 1998–2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical cyclone (TC) activity over the western North Pacific (WNP) exhibits a significant interdecadal variation during 1960–2011, with two distinct active and inactive periods each. This study examines changes in TC activity and atmospheric ...

Kin Sik Liu; Johnny C. L. Chan

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Slick Rock, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Results of a radiological survey of two inactive mill sites near Slick Rock, Colorado, in April 1976 are presented. One mill, referred to in this report as North Continent (NC), was operated primarily for recovery of radium and vanadium and, only briefly, uranium. The Union Carbide Corporation (UCC) mill produced a uranium concentrate for processing elsewhere and, although low-level contamination with /sup 226/Ra was widespread at this site, the concentration of this nuclide in tailings was much lower than at the NC site. The latter site also has an area with a high above-ground gamma dose rate (2700 ..mu..R/hr) and a high-surface /sup 226/Ra concentration (5800 pCi/g). This area, which is believed to have been a liquid disposal location during plant operations, is contained within a fence. A solid disposal area outside the present fence contains miscellaneous contaminated debris. The estimated concentration of /sup 226/Ra as a function of depth, based on gamma hole-logging data, is presented for 27 holes drilled at the two sites.

Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Chou, K.D.; Ellis, B.S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Report: Removal of EM Projects from the GAO High Risk List: Strategies for Improving the Effectiveness of Project and Contract Management in the Office of Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPORT TO THE REPORT TO THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD Removal of EM Projects from the GAO High Risk List: Strategies for Improving the Effectiveness of Project and Contract Management in the Office of Environmental Management Submitted by the EMAB Acquisition and Project Management Subcommittee December 5, 2011 Introduction: This report provides a comprehensive summary of the work performed by the Acquisition and Project Management Subcommittee (APMS) of the Environmental Management Advisory Board, since tasking in March 2010. In particular, this report includes the summary observations developed and recommendations previously approved by the EMAB on the Subcommittee's work and presented to the then Assistant Secretary of Environmental Management (EM). As the

73

Demonstration of the SREX process for the removal of {sup 90}Sr from actual highly radioactive solutions in centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SREX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of {sup 90}Sr from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the SREX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.995% was obtained for {sup 90}Sr. As a result, the activity of {sup 90}Sr was reduced from 201 Ci/m{sup 3} in the feed solution of 0.0089 Ci/m{sup 3} in the aqueous raffinate, which is below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW limit of 0.04 Ci/m{sup 3} for {sup 90}Sr. Lead was extracted by the SREX solvent and successfully partitioned from the {sup 90}Sr using an ammonium citrate strip solution. Additionally, 94% of the total alpha activity, 1.9% of the {sup 241}Am, 99.94% of the {sup 238}Pu, 99.97% of the {sup 239}Pu, 36.4% of the K, 64% of the Ba, and >83% of the Zr were extracted by the SREX solvent. Cs, B, Cd, Ca, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Na were essentially inextractable. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Simultaneous removal of COD and ammonia from high-strength wastewater in a three-phase fluidized bed reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A major challenge of environmental engineering is the efficient treatment of wastewater containing high concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia. This work addresses… (more)

Wan, Li

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Status report for inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks at Hanford Site 200 Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this status report is to summarize updated data and information from the FY 1994 strategy plan that is associated with inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (IMUSTs). Assumptions and processes to assess potential risks and operational concerns are documented in this report. Safety issue priorities are ranked based on a number of considerations. Sixty-three IMUSTs have been Identified and placed on the official IMUST list. All the tanks are associated with past Hanford Site operations. Of the 63 tanks., 19 are catch tanks, 20 are vault tanks, 3 are neutralization tanks, 8 are settling tanks, 2 are solvent makeup tanks used to store hexone, 2 are flush tanks, 3 are decontamination tanks, 1 is a diverter station, 1 is a receiver tank, 1 is an experimental tank, and 3 are waste handling tanks. It is important to proactively deal with the risks Imposed by these 63 tanks, and at the same time not jeopardize the existing commitments and schedules for mitigating and resolving identified safety issues related to the 177 SSTs and DSTS. Access controls and signs have been placed on all but the three official IMUSTs added most recently. An accelerated effort to identify authorization documents and perform unreviewed safety question (USQ) screening has been completed. According to a set of criteria consistent with the safety screening data quality objective (DQO) process, 6 IMUSTs are ranked high related to the hydrogen generation potential safety Issue, 1 is ranked high related to the ferrocyanide potential safety issue, 6 are ranked high related to the flammability potential safety issue, and 25 are ranked high related to the vapor emissions potential safety issue.

Powers, T.B.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3: TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-LR-02-0 SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3 TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Application of the Evacuated Canister System for Removing Residual Molten Glass From the West Valley Demonstration Project High-Level Waste Melter  

SciTech Connect

The principal mission of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is to meet a series of objectives defined in the West Valley Demonstration Project Act (Public Law 96-368). Chief among these is the objective to solidify liquid high-level waste (HLW) at the WVDP site into a form suitable for disposal in a federal geologic repository. In 1982, the Secretary of Energy formally selected vitrification as the technology to be used to solidify HLW at the WVDP. One of the first steps in meeting the HLW solidification objective involved designing, constructing and operating the Vitrification (Vit) Facility, the WVDP facility that houses the systems and subsystems used to process HLW into stainless steel canisters of borosilicate waste-glass that satisfy waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for disposal in a federal geologic repository. HLW processing and canister production began in 1996. The final step in meeting the HLW solidification objective involved ending Vit system operations and shut ting down the Vit Facility. This was accomplished by conducting a discrete series of activities to remove as much residual material as practical from the primary process vessels, components, and associated piping used in HLW canister production before declaring a formal end to Vit system operations. Flushing was the primary method used to remove residual radioactive material from the vitrification system. The inventory of radioactivity contained within the entire primary processing system diminished by conducting the flushing activities. At the completion of flushing activities, the composition of residual molten material remaining in the melter (the primary system component used in glass production) consisted of a small quantity of radioactive material and large quantities of glass former materials needed to produce borosilicate waste-glass. A special system developed during the pre-operational and testing phase of Vit Facility operation, the Evacuated Canister System (ECS), was deployed at the West Valley Demonstration Project to remove this radioactively dilute, residual molten material from the melter before Vit system operations were brought to a formal end. The ECS consists of a stainless steel canister of the same size and dimensions as a standard HLW canister that is equipped with a special L-shaped snorkel assembly made of 304L stainless steel. Both the canister and snorkel assembly fit into a stainless steel cage that allows the entire canister assembly to be positioned over the melter as molten glass is drawn out by a vacuum applied to the canister. This paper describes the process used to prepare and apply the ECS to complete molten glass removal before declaring a formal end to Vit system operations and placing the Vit Facility into a safe standby mode awaiting potential deactivation.

May, Joseph J.; Dombrowski, David J.; Valenti, Paul J.; Houston, Helene M.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

Thermal-hydraulic simulation of natural convection decay heat removal in the High Flux Isotope Reactor using RELAP5 and TEMPEST: Part 1, Models and simulation results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was conducted to examine decay heat removal requirements in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) following shutdown from 85 MW. The objective of the study was to determine when forced flow through the core could be terminated without causing the fuel to melt. This question is particularly relevant when a station blackout caused by an external event is considered. Analysis of natural circulation in the core, vessel upper plenum, and reactor pool indicates that 12 h of forced flow will permit a safe shutdown with some margin. However, uncertainties in the analysis preclude conclusive proof that 12 h is sufficient. As a result of the study, two seismically qualified diesel generators were installed in HFIR. 9 refs., 4 figs.

Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.; Chen, N.C.J.; Ruggles, A.E.; Cook, D.H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Graphene-Polypyrrole Nanocomposite as a Highly Efficient and Low Cost Electrically Switched Ion Exchanger for Removing ClO4- from Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perchlorate (ClO4-) contamination is now recognized as a widespread concern affecting many water utilities. In this report, graphene is employed as the scaffold to synthesize novel graphene-polypyrrole nanocomposite, which is demonstrated as excellent electrically switched ion exchanger for perchlorate removal. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical measurements showed that the 3D nanostructured graphene/Ppy nanocomposite exhibited the significantly improved uptake capacity for ClO4- compared with Ppy film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the uptake and release process of ClO4- in graphene/Ppy nanocomposite. In addition, the presence of graphene substrate resulted in high stability of graphene/Ppy nanocomposite during potential cycling. The present work provides a promising method for large scale water treatment.

Zhang, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Iihan A.; Lin, Yuehe

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

Sampling and analysis of the inactive waste tanks TH-2, WC-1, and WC-15  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirty-eight inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste tanks are currently managed by the Environmental Restoration Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The contents of these tanks are to be characterized in preparation for future corrective actions and remediation activities as part of compliance with the pending Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Twenty-nine of these tanks were sampled and analyzed in 1989. Three of the tanks (TH-2, WC-1, and WC-15) were not accessible from the surface and thus were not sampled until 1990. This report presents the sampling and analytical results of that campaign. All three tanks in this report had negligible regulatory organic compounds in the samples that were collected. There were no US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Target Compound List (TCL) constituents for volatile organics detected in any of the aqueous samples. The only semivolatile organics detected were 2-chlorophenol (52 {mu}g/L) in tank TH-2 and dichloroethane (14--15 {mu}g/L) and diethyl either (15--17 {mu}g/L) in tank WC-15. A thin oil layer was discovered floating on top of the aqueous contents in tank WC-15. The analysis of the oil layer detected no volatile organics and showed only one EPA TCL constituent, di-n-butylphthalate, at 1900 {mu}g/L. Low levels of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals were observed in the samples from tank TH-2, but only the mercury level exceeded the RCRA limit. Samples from tank WC-1 had elevated levels of the RCRA metals barium, chromium, and lead. There were also finely suspended particles in one of the samples from tank WC-1, which was filtered and analyzed separately. This solid fines have levels of transuranium elements {sup 238}Pu and {sup 241}Am high enough to classified as transuranic waste.

Autrey, J.W.; Keller, J.M.; Griest, W.H.; Botts, J.L.; Schenley, R.L.; Sipe, M.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSANews posted a photo: Vietnam HEU Removal A convoy escorting the last highly enriched uranium in Vietnam departs Dalat. Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr Headlines Jul 23,...

82

Turbomachinery debris remover  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for removing debris from a turbomachine. The apparatus includes housing and remotely operable viewing and grappling mechanisms for the purpose of locating and removing debris lodged between adjacent blades in a turbomachine.

Krawiec, Donald F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kraf, Robert J. (North Huntingdon, PA); Houser, Robert J. (Monroeville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

One of the Largest Pieces of Processing Equipment Removed from Plutonium Finishing Plant- Worker involvement led to safe completion of high-hazard work  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, WASH. – U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) announced today the successful removal of one of the largest, most complex pieces of equipment from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State.

84

Graphitic packing removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Multipollutant Removal with WOWClean® System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WOW Energy built and tested its multipollutant removal WOWClean® system in a development program with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). A 2,500 ACFM mobile unit was built to field test the removal of air pollution constituents from the flue gas of a power plant and demonstrate the technology. The system integrates proven emission reduction techniques into a single, multi-pollutant reduction system and is designed to remove Mercury, SOx, NOx, particulates, heavy metals and other pollutants from low temperature flue gases. Its advantages include robust operation, lower investment, lower operating cost and high removal rates. The WOWClean® system has been tested on flue gases resulting from the combustion of diverse fuels such as petcoke, coal, wood, diesel and natural gas. In addition to significant removal of CO2, test results demonstrate the capability to reduce 99.5% SOx (from levels as high as 2200 ppm), 90% reduction of NOx, and > 90% heavy metals. The paper will include details of the multi-pollutant system along with test results.

Romero, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

Urban, P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Safe, Cost Effective Management of Inactive Facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site is part of the U.S. Department of Energy complex. It was constructed during the early 1950s to produce basic materials (such as plutonium-239 and tritium) used in the production of nuclear weapons. The 310-square-mile site is located in South Carolina, about 12 miles south of Aiken, South Carolina, and about 15 miles southeast of Augusta, Georgia. Savannah River Site (SRS) has approximately 200 facilities identified as inactive. These facilities range in size and complexity from large nuclear reactors to small storage buildings. These facilities are located throughout the site including three reactor areas, the heavy water plant area, the manufacturing area, and other research and support areas. Unlike DOE Closure Sites such as Hanford and Rocky Flats, SRS is a Project Completion Site with continuing missions. As facilities complete their defined mission, they are shutdown and transferred from operations to the facility disposition program. At the SRS, Facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning (FDD) personnel manage the disposition phase of a inactive facility's life cycle in a manner that minimizes life cycle cost without compromising (1) the health or safety of workers and the public or (2) the quality of the environment. The disposition phase begins upon completion of operations shutdown and extends through establishing the final end-state. FDD has developed innovative programs to manage their responsibilities within a constrained budget.

Austin, W. E.; Yannitell, D. M.; Freeman, D. W.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

88

Circumnuclear Dust in Nearby Active and Inactive Galaxies. II. Bars, Nuclear Spirals, and the Fueling of Active Galactic Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridged) We present a detailed study of the relation between circumnuclear dust morphology, host galaxy properties, and nuclear activity in nearby galaxies. We use our sample of 123 nearby galaxies with visible--near-infrared colormaps from the Hubble Space Telescope to create well-matched, "paired" samples of 28 active and 28 inactive galaxies, as well as 19 barred and 19 unbarred galaxies, that have the same host galaxy properties. Comparison of the barred and unbarred galaxies shows that grand design nuclear dust spirals are only found in galaxies with a large-scale bar. Tightly wound nuclear dust spirals, in contrast, show a strong tendency to avoid galaxies with large-scale bars. Comparison of the AGN and inactive samples shows that nuclear dust spirals, which may trace shocks and angular momentum dissipation in the ISM, occur with comparable frequency in both active and inactive galaxies. The only difference between the active and inactive galaxies is that several inactive galaxies appear to completely lack dust structure in their circumnuclear region, while none of the AGN lack this structure. The comparable frequency of nuclear spirals in active and inactive galaxies, combined with previous work that finds no significant differences in the frequency of bars or interactions between well-matched active and inactive galaxies, suggests that no universal fueling mechanism for low-luminosity AGN operates at spatial scales greater than ~100 pc radius from the galactic nuclei. The similarities instead suggest that the lifetime of nuclear activity is less than the characteristic inflow time from these spatial scales. An order-of-magnitude estimate of this inflow time is the dynamical timescale. This sets an upper limit of several million years to the lifetime of an individual episode of nuclear activity.

Paul Martini; Michael W. Regan; John S. Mulchaey; Richard W. Pogge

2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

89

Comparison of NOx Removal Efficiencies in Compost Based Biofilters Using Four Different Compost Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1998, 3.6 trillion kilowatt-hours of electricity were generated in the United States. Over half of this was from coal-fired power plants, resulting in more than 8.3 million tons of nitrogen oxide (NOx) compounds being released into the environment. Over 95% of the NOx compounds produced during coal combustion are in the form of nitric oxide (NO). NOx emission regulations are becoming increasingly stringent, leading to the need for new, cost effective NOx treatment technologies. Biofiltration is such a technology. NO removal efficiencies were compared in compost based biofilters using four different composts. In previous experiments, removal efficiencies were typically highest at the beginning of the experiment, and decreased as the experiments proceeded. This work tested different types of compost in an effort to find a compost that could maintain NO removal efficiencies comparable to those seen early in the previous experiments. One of the composts was wood based with manure, two were wood based with high nitrogen content sludge, and one was dairy compost. The wood based with manure and one of the wood based with sludge composts were taken directly from an active compost pile while the other two composts were received in retail packaging which had been out of active piles for an indeterminate amount of time. A high temperature (55-60°C) off-gas stream was treated in biofilters operated under denitrifying conditions. Biofilters were operated at an empty bed residence time of 13 seconds with target inlet NO concentrations of 500 ppmv. Lactate was the carbon and energy source. Compost was sampled at 10-day intervals to determine aerobic and anaerobic microbial densities. Compost was mixed at a 1:1 ratio with lava rock and calcite was added at 100g/kg of compost. In each compost tested, the highest removal efficiencies occurred within the first 10 days of the experiment. The wood based with manure peaked at day 3 (77.14%), the dairy compost at day 1 (80.74%), the active wood based with sludge at day 5 (68.15%) and the inactive wood based with sludge at day 9 (63.64%, this compost was frozen when received). These levels gradually decreased throughout the remainder of the experiment until they fell between 40% and 60%. Decreasing removal efficiency was characteristic of all the composts tested, regardless of their makeup or activity state prior to testing. Although microbial densities and composition between composts may have differed, there was little change in densities within each experiment.

Lacey, Jeffrey Alan; Lee, Brady Douglas; Apel, William Arnold

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Rifle, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of radiological surveys of two inactive uranium-mill sites near Rifle, Colorado, in May 1976 are presented. These sites are referred to as Old Rifle and New Rifle. The calculated /sup 226/Ra inventory of the latter site is much higher than at the older mill location. Data on above-ground measurements of gamma exposure rates, surface and near-surface concentration of /sup 226/Ra in soil and sediment samples, concentration of /sup 226/Ra in water, calculated subsurface distribution of /sup 226/Ra, and particulate radionuclide concentrations in air samples are given. The data serve to define the extent of contamination in the vicinity of the mill sites and their immediate surrounding areas with tailings particles. Results of these measurements were utilized as technical input for an engineering assessment of these two sites.

Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.J.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Maybell, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings near Maybell, Colorado are presented. Measurements of external gamma exposure rate at 1 m above the tailings ranged 16 to 340 ..mu..R/hr with an average value of 65 ..mu..R/hr. Radionuclide analysis of offsite soil and sediment samples, as well as above-ground gamma exposure rate measurements defined the spread of contamination around the tailings pile. This spread is greatest toward the east, in the direction of surface water runoff. Calculated concentrations of /sup 226/Ra in all of the holes drilled in the tailngs, based on gamma monitoring data, showed maximum concentrations in the range 100 to 800 pCi/g.

Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Ellis, B.S.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Gunnison, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The findings of a radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site at Gunnison, Colorado, conducted in May 1976, are presented. Results of surface soil sample analyses and direct gamma radiation measurements indicate limited spread of tailings off the site. The only significant above background measurements off the site were obtained in an area previously covered by the tailings pile. There was little evidence of contamination of the surface or of unconfined groundwater in the vicinity of the tailings pile; however, the hydrologic conditions at the site indicate a potential for such contamination. The concentration of /sup 226/Ra in all water samples except one from the tailings pile was well below the concentration guide for drinking water. The subsurface distribution of /sup 226/Ra in 14 bore holes located on and around the tailings pile was calculated from gamma ray monitoring data obtained jointly with Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc.

Haywood, F.F.; Jacobs, D.G.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Ellis, B.S.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Sampling and Analysis Plan for Flammable Gases in Inactive Miscellaneous Underground Storage Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies the field measurements for a screening of flammable gases in the vapor space of the inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (IMUSTs) currently assigned to the River Protection Project (RPP). If a measurement exceeds 25% of the lower flammability limit (LFL), vapor grab samples will be collected for laboratory analysis. This SAP also specifies the sample collection, laboratory analysis, quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC), and reporting objectives for grab sampling. Technical bases for the sampling objectives are provided in the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objectives (Dukelow et al 1995). The screening data will be used to determine if additional data are needed to support closure of a flammable gas unreviewed safety question for these facilities.

NGUYEN, D.M.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Device for removing blackheads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for removing blackheads from pores in the skin having a elongated handle with a spoon shaped portion mounted on one end thereof, the spoon having multiple small holes piercing therethrough. Also covered is method for using the device to remove blackheads.

Berkovich, Tamara (116 N. Wetherly Dr., Suite 115, Los Angeles, CA)

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal silica using small gel particles. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Silica Scaling Removal Process Applications: Cooling tower systems Water treatment systems Water evaporation systems Potential mining applications (produced water) Industry applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits: Reduces scaling in cooling towers by up to 50% Increases the number of cycles of concentration substantially Reduces the amount of antiscaling chemical additives needed Decreases the amount of makeup water and subsequent discharged water (blowdown) Enables considerable cost savings derived from reductions in

96

Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LFG emissions are measured at an abandoned landfill with highly organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mean headspace and vent emissions are 0.240 and 0.074 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At sites with high food waste content, LFG generation drops rapidly after site closure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The viability of LFG recovery for CDMs in developing countries is doubtful. - Abstract: This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH{sub 4} flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 {+-} 0.014, 0.224 {+-} 0.012 and 0.237 {+-} 0.008 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m{sup 2} hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06-0.89 l/m{sup 2} hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42-2.46 l/m{sup 2} hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L{sub 0}) values in the range of 19.8-102.6 m{sup 3}/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

El-Fadel, Mutasem, E-mail: mfadel@aub.edu.lb [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon); Abi-Esber, Layale; Salhab, Samer [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Removing Barriers to Interdisciplinary Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant amount of high-impact contemporary scientific research occurs where biology, computer science, engineering and chemistry converge. Although programmes have been put in place to support such work, the complex dynamics of interdisciplinarity are still poorly understood. In this paper we interrogate the nature of interdisciplinary research and how we might measure its "success", identify potential barriers to its implementation, and suggest possible mechanisms for removing these impediments.

Naomi Jacobs; Martyn Amos

2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

98

METHOD OF REMOVING STRONTIUM IONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for removing trace amounts of Sr/sup 90/ from solutions. Phosphate ion is added to the solution and it is then brought into contact with a solid salt such as calcium carbonate which will react methathetically with the phosphate ion to form a salt such as calcium phosphate. During this reaction, strontium will be absorbed to a high degree within the newly formed lattice. (AEC)

Rhodes, D.W.; McHenry, J.R.; Ames, L.L. Jr.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Continuous sulfur removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream using a membrane comprising a metal oxide deposited on a porous support is disclosed. 4 figures.

Jalan, V.; Ryu, J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

100

Sampling and analysis of the inactive waste tanks TH-2, WC-1, and WC-15. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirty-eight inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste tanks are currently managed by the Environmental Restoration Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The contents of these tanks are to be characterized in preparation for future corrective actions and remediation activities as part of compliance with the pending Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Twenty-nine of these tanks were sampled and analyzed in 1989. Three of the tanks (TH-2, WC-1, and WC-15) were not accessible from the surface and thus were not sampled until 1990. This report presents the sampling and analytical results of that campaign. All three tanks in this report had negligible regulatory organic compounds in the samples that were collected. There were no US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Target Compound List (TCL) constituents for volatile organics detected in any of the aqueous samples. The only semivolatile organics detected were 2-chlorophenol (52 {mu}g/L) in tank TH-2 and dichloroethane (14--15 {mu}g/L) and diethyl either (15--17 {mu}g/L) in tank WC-15. A thin oil layer was discovered floating on top of the aqueous contents in tank WC-15. The analysis of the oil layer detected no volatile organics and showed only one EPA TCL constituent, di-n-butylphthalate, at 1900 {mu}g/L. Low levels of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals were observed in the samples from tank TH-2, but only the mercury level exceeded the RCRA limit. Samples from tank WC-1 had elevated levels of the RCRA metals barium, chromium, and lead. There were also finely suspended particles in one of the samples from tank WC-1, which was filtered and analyzed separately. This solid fines have levels of transuranium elements {sup 238}Pu and {sup 241}Am high enough to classified as transuranic waste.

Autrey, J.W.; Keller, J.M.; Griest, W.H.; Botts, J.L.; Schenley, R.L.; Sipe, M.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Energy-saving tips for computers: Set computers to switch into "stand-by" mode after 15 minutes of inactivity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy-saving tips for computers: Set computers to switch into "stand-by" mode after 15 minutes of inactivity. Work with your department's information technology expert to determine when computers can be turned off or put into sleep mode. Consider turning off (`shutting down') computers at night when you

102

Radium-226 in vegetation and substrates at inactive uranium mill sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of a study of the content of radium-226 in plants growing on inactive uranium mill tailings sites in the Four Corners Region of the southwestern United States and in plants grown under greenhouse conditions with minimal surficial contamination are reported. Field plant samples and associated substrates were analyzed from two carbonate tailings sites in the Grants Mineral Belt of New Mexico. Radium activities in air-cleaned samples ranged from 5 to 368 pCi/g (dry weight) depending on species and location: activities in plants growing on local soils averaged 1.0 pCi/g. The talings and local soils contain 140 to 1400 pCi/g and 2.1 pCi/g, respectively. An evaluation of cleaning methods on selected samples showed that from 17 to 79% of the radium activity measured in air-cleaned samples was due to surficial contamination, which varied with species and location. A survey of 18 inactive uranium mill sites in the Four Corners Region was performed. Radium activity in plant tissues from nine species ranged from 2 to 210 pCi/g on bare tailings and from 0.3 to 30 pCi/g on covered tailings The radium content in most of the soil overburdens on the covered tailings piles was 10 to 17 pCi/g. An experiment was performed to measure radium-226 uptake by two species grown on tailings covered with a shallow (5 cm) soil layer. A grass, Sporobolus airoides (alkali sacaton) and a shrub, Atriplex canescens (four-wing saltbush), were studied. The tailings were a mixture of sands and slimes from a carbonate pile. The tailings treatments were plants grown in a soil cover over tailings; the controls were plants grown only in soil. Three soil types, dune sand, clay loam, and loam, were used. The radium activity of the plant tissue from the tailings treatment compared to that of the appropriate control was 1 to 19 times greater for the grass and 4 to 27 times greater for the shrub.

Marple, M.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Maintenance Action Readiness Assessment Plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 inactive Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Readiness Assessment Plan has been prepared to document operational readiness for the maintenance action consisting of remediation of four inactive liquid low-level radioactive tanks in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The four tanks to be remediated are Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013. Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30 will be removed from the ground. Because of logistical issues associated with excavation and site access, Tank 3013 will be grouted in place and permanently closed. This project is being performed as a maintenance action rather than an action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, because the risk to human health and environment is well below the US Environmental Protection Agency`s level of concern. The decision to proceed as a maintenance action was documented by an interim action proposed plan, which is included in the administrative record. A Readiness Assessment Team has been assembled to review the criteria deemed necessary to conduct the remediation tasks. These criteria include approval of all plans, acquisition of needed equipment, completion of personnel training, and coordination with plant health and safety personnel. Once the criteria have been met and documented, the task will begin. The readiness assessment is expected to be completed by late July 1995, and the task will begin thereafter.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inactive uranium-mill tailings pile at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, contains approximately 1520 Ci of /sup 226/Ra in 2.4 million metric tons of tailings covering an area of 43 hectares. All of the former mill buildings were intact and, at the time of this survey, several were in use. The tailings have not been stabilized, but the crusty surface is reported to be resistant to wind erosion. The average gamma-ray exposure rate 1 m above the tailings is 720 ..mu..R/h while the average rate in the former mill area is 150 ..mu..R/h. The adjacent area, between the mill site, ponds, and tailings pile, has an average exposure rate of 230 ..mu..R/h. Gamma radiation measurements outside these areas, as well as the results of analyses of surface or near-surface sediment and soil samples, show fairly wide dispersion of contamination around the site. The subsurface distribution of /sup 226/Ra in 18 holes drilled at the site, calculated from gamma-ray monitoring data, is presented graphically and compared with measured concentrations in two holes.

Haywood, F.F.; Christian, D.J.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Lorenzo, D.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Lakeview, Oregon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill site at Lakeview, Oregon, show that the average gamma-ray exposure rate 1 m above the tailings pile and the evaporation pond area (now dry) is close to the average background level for the area (11 ..mu..R/hr). The /sup 226/Ra concentration in most of the surface soil and sediment samples is also at or below the average background value for surface soil samples in the area (0.8 pCi/g). Calculated /sup 226/Ra concentrations, based on gamma radiation measurements in shallow (1-m-deep) holes, are in agreement with the results of surface soil and sediment analyses and with gamma-ray exposure rate measurements. The tailings at this site have been stabilized by the addition of 46 to 60 cm (18 to 24 in.) of soil that supports vigorous growth of vegetation. This treatment, coupled with a low-level inventory of /sup 226/Ra in the tailings (50 Ci), has resulted in limited spread of tailings by wind and water.

Haywood, F.F.; Burden, J.E.; Ellis, B.S.; Loy, E.T.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Removable feedwater sparger assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A removable feedwater sparger assembly includes a sparger having an inlet pipe disposed in flow communication with the outlet end of a supply pipe. A tubular coupling includes an annular band fixedly joined to the sparger inlet pipe and a plurality of fingers extending from the band which are removably joined to a retention flange extending from the supply pipe for maintaining the sparger inlet pipe in flow communication with the supply pipe. The fingers are elastically deflectable for allowing engagement of the sparger inlet pipe with the supply pipe and for disengagement therewith. 8 figs.

Challberg, R.C.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

107

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Performance evaluation of granular activated carbon system at Pantex: Rapid small-scale column tests to simulate removal of high explosives from contaminated groundwater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A granular activated carbon (GAC) system is now in operation at Pantex to treat groundwater from the perched aquifer that is contaminated with high explosives. The main chemicals of concern are RDX and HMX. The system consists of two GAC columns in series. Each column is charged with 10,000 pounds of Northwestern LB-830 GAC. At the design flow rate of 325 gpm, the hydraulic loading is 6.47 gpm/ft{sup 2}, and the empty bed contact time is 8.2 minutes per column. Currently, the system is operating at less than 10% of its design flow rate, although flow rate increases are expected in the relatively near future. This study had several objectives: Estimate the service life of the GAC now in use at Pantex; Screen several GACs to provide a recommendation on the best GAC for use at Pantex when the current GAC is exhausted and is replaced; Determine the extent to which natural organic matter in the Pantex groundwater fouls GAC adsorption sites, thereby decreasing the adsorption capacity for high explosives; and Determine if computer simulation models could match the experimental results, thereby providing another tool to follow system performance.

Henke, J.L.; Speitel, G.E. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas ...  

Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas ... required for sequestration, an area of research identified as a high priority

110

Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam - Time Lapse Video...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(MOST) and the Russian Federation successfully removed 11 kilograms of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute. This is the eleventh country...

111

DOE Removes Brookhaven Contractor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Removes DOE Removes Brookhaven Contractor Peña sends a message to DOE facilities nationwide INSIDE 2 Accelerator Rx 4 FermiKids 6 Spring at Fermilab Photos courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory by Judy Jackson, Office of Public Affairs Secretary of Energy Federico Peña announced on Thursday, May 1, that the Department of Energy would immediately terminate the current management contract with Associated Universities, Inc. at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York. Peña said that he made the decision after receiving the results of a laboratory safety management review conducted by the independent oversight arm of DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. In addition, the Secretary said he found unacceptable "the continued on page 8 Volume 20 Friday, May 16, 1997

112

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

Neuhaus, J.E.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

114

Comments and responses on the Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information concerning public comments and responses on the remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site in Grand Junction, Colorado.

NONE

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Engine Removal Projection Tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Navy has over 3500 gas turbine engines used throughout the surface fleet for propulsion and the generation of electrical power. Past data is used to forecast the number of engine removals for the next ten years and determine engine down times between removals. Currently this is done via a FORTRAN program created in the early 1970s. This paper presents results of R&D associated with creating a new algorithm and software program. We tested over 60 techniques on data spanning 20 years from over 3100 engines and 120 ships. Investigated techniques for the forecast basis including moving averages, empirical negative binomial, generalized linear models, Cox regression, and Kaplan Meier survival curves, most of which are documented in engineering, medical and scientific research literature. We applied those techniques to the data, and chose the best algorithm based on its performance on real-world data. The software uses the best algorithm in combination with user-friendly interfaces and intuitively understandable displays. The user can select a specific engine type, forecast time period, and op-tempo. Graphical displays and numerical tables present forecasts and uncertainty intervals. The technology developed for the project is applicable to other logistic forecasting challenges.

Ferryman, Thomas A.; Matzke, Brett D.; Wilson, John E.; Sharp, Julia L.; Greitzer, Frank L.

2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

116

Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

Richardson, BS

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Method for Noise Removal of LIDAR Point Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LiDAR can quickly and accurately obtain precision and high-density surface elevation data. In cooperation with high-precision GPS positioning technology and IMU attitude sensor, a typical noise removal algorithm of LIDAR point clouds based on FEA is ... Keywords: LIDAR, point clouds, noise removal, FEA

Huang Zuowei, Huang Yuanjiang, Huang Jie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Naturita Site, Naturita, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Naturita site in order to revise the November 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive contamination at the former uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado. This evaluation has included the preparation of topographic maps, the drilling of boreholes and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of contaminated materials and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, and the evaluation and costing of alternative remedial actions. Radon gas released from the estimated 344,000 tons of contaminated materials that remain at the Naturita site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although external gamma radiation also is a factor. The two alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment are stabilization of the site in its present location with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), and removal of residual radioactive materials to a disposal site and decontamination of the Naturita site (Option II). Cost estimates for the two options are about $7,200,000 for stabilization in-place, and about $8,200,000 for disposal at the Ranchers Exploration and Development Corporations's reprocessing site. Truck haulage would be used to transport the contaminated materials from the Naturita site to the selected disposal site.Ranchers Exploration and Development Corporation removed the tailings from the site, reprocessed them, and disposed of them from 1977 to 1979. There is no noteworthy mineral resource remaining at the former tailings site; therefore, recovery of residual mineral values was not considered in this assessment.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Naturita site, Naturita, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Naturita site in order to revise the November 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive contamination at the former uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado. This evaluation has included the preparation of topographic maps, the drilling of boreholes and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of contaminated materials and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, and the evaluation and costing of alternative remedial actions. Radon gas released from the estimated 344,000 tons of contaminated materials that remain at the Naturita site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although external gamma radiation also is a factor. The two alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment are stabilization of the site in its present location with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), and removal of residual radioactive materials to a disposal site and decontamination of the Naturita site (Option II). Cost estimates for the two options are about $7,200,000 for stabilization in-place, and about $8,200,000 for disposal at the Ranchers Exploration and Development Corporation's reprocessing site. Truck haulage would be used to transport the contaminated materials from the Naturita site to the selected disposal site.Ranchers Exploration and Development Corporation removed the tailings from the site, reprocessed them, and disposed of them from 1977 to 1979. There is no noteworthy mineral resource remaining at the former tailings site; therefore, recovery of residual mineral values was not considered in this assessment.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

EM Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge EM Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Testing and equipment simulations ensure first-of-a-kind technological processes for sludge removal can be conducted safely and efficiently. Testing and equipment simulations ensure first-of-a-kind technological processes for sludge removal can be conducted safely and efficiently. RICHLAND, Wash. - The Richland Operations Office and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company successfully removed a portion of a highly radioactive sludge from underwater storage in a large basin adjacent to the K West reactor at the Hanford site this month. In that milestone, workers removed sludge originating from knock-out pots,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NETL: Gasification Systems - Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Project Number: DE-SC00008243 TDA Research, Inc. is developing a high-capacity, low-cost sorbent that removes anhydrous ammonia (NH3), mercury (Hg), and trace contaminants from coal- and coal/biomass-derived syngas. The clean-up system will be used after the bulk warm gas sulfur removal step, and remove NH3 and Hg in a regenerable manner while irreversibly capturing all other trace metals (e.g., Arsenic, Selenium) reducing their concentrations to sub parts per million (ppm) levels. Current project plans include identifying optimum chemical composition and structure that provide the best sorbent performance for removing trace contaminants, determining the effect of operating parameters, conducting multiple-cycle experiments to test the life of the sorbent for NH3 and Hg removal, and conducting a preliminary design of the sorbent reactor.

122

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator value mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, J.F.

1991-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

123

Nitrogen removal from natural gas  

SciTech Connect

According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Method of removing cesium from steam  

SciTech Connect

Method for removal of radioactive cesium from a hot vapor, such as high temperature steam, including the steps of passing input hot vapor containing radioactive cesium into a bed of silicate glass particles and chemically incorporating radioactive cesium in the silicate glass particles at a temperature of at least about 700.degree. F.

Carson, Jr., Neill J. (Clarendon Hills, IL); Noland, Robert A. (Oak Park, IL); Ruther, Westly E. (Skokie, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Belfield Site, Belfield, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has evaluated the Belfield site in order to assess the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive ash at Belfield, South Dakota. This engineering assessment has included drilling of boreholes and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of ash and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 55,600 tons of ash and contaminated material at the Belfield site constitutes a significant environmental impact, although external gamma radiation also is a factor. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, to removal of the ash and contaminated materials to remote disposal sites, and decontamination of the Belfield site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $1,500,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $2,500,000 for disposal at a distance of about 17 mi from the Belfield site. Reprocessing the ash for uranium recovery is not feasible because of the extremely small amount of material available at the site and because of its low U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ content.

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Monument Valley Site, Monument Valley, Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevalated the Monument Valley site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Monument Valley, Arizona. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposure of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.1 million tons of tailings at the Monument Valley site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through IV). Cost estimates for the four options range from about $6,600,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $15,900,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for reprocessing the Monument Valley tailings were examined: heap leaching; Treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovery is economically unattractive.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Belfield Site, Belfield, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has evaluated the Belfield site in order to assess the problems resulting from the existence of radiactive ash at Belfield, South Dakota. This engineering assessment has included drilling of boreholes and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of ash and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actons. Radon gas released from the 55,600 tons of ash and contaminated material at the Belfield site constitutes a significant environmental impact, although external gamma radiation also is a factor. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, to removal of the ash and contaminated materials to remote disposal sites, and decontamination of the Belfield site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $1,500,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $2,500,000 for disposal at a distance of about 17 mi from the Belfield site. Reprocessing the ash for uranium recovery is not feasible because of the extremely small amount of material available at the site and because of its low U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ content.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Shiprock site, Shiprock, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Shiprock site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Shiprock, New Mexico. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.5 million dry tons of tailings at the Shiprock site constitutes the most significant environental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The eight alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $13,400,000 for stabilization in place to about $37,900,000 for disposal at a distance of about 16 miles. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Shiprock tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $230/lb by heap leach and $250/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium-mill tailings: Canonsburg Site, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has evaluated the Canonsburg site in order to assess the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive residues at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative remedial actions. Radon gas released from the approximately 300,000 tons of tailings and contaminated soil at the Canonsburg site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings and contaminated materials to a remote disposal site and decontamination of the Canonsburg site (Options II through IV). Cost estimates for the four options range from $23,244,000 for stabilization in-place, to $27,052,000 for disposal at a distance of about 17 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Canonsburg tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. As required by Public Law 95-604, under whose auspices this project is conducted, the US Department of Energy has solicited expressions of interest in reprocessing the tailings and residues at the Canonsburg site for uranium recovery. Since no such interest was demonstrated, no effort has been made to estimate the value of the residual uranium resource at the Canonsburg site.

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Phillips/United Nuclear site, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah, Inc., has reevaluated the Phillips/United Nuclear site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from 2.6 million dry tons of tailings at the Phillips/United Nuclear site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $21,500,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $45,200,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Phillips/United Nuclear tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing.The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $87/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ by either heap leach or conventional plant process. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Reprocessing the Phillips/United Nuclear tailings for uranium recovery does not appear to be economically attractive under present or foreseeable market conditions.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Continuous cryopump with a method for removal of solidified gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved cryopump for the removal of gases from a high vacuum, comprising a cryopanel incorporating honeycomb structure, refrigerant means thermally connected to the cryopanel, and a rotatable channel moving azimuthally around an axis located near the center of the cryopanel, removing gases adsorbed within the honeycomb structure by subliming them and conducting them outside the vacuum vessel. 4 figs.

Carlson, L.W.; Herman, H.

1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

132

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the inactive uraniferous lignite processing sites at Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota. [UMTRA Project  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), to clean up the Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, uraniferous lignite processing sites to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at these sites. Remedial action at these sites must be performed in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) standards promulgated for the remedial action and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of North Dakota. The inactive Belfield uraniferous lignite processing site is one mile southeast of Belfield, North Dakota. The inactive Bowman uraniferous lignite processing site at the former town of Griffin, is seven miles northwest of Bowman, North Dakota and 65 road miles south of Belfield. Lignite ash from the processing operations has contaminated the soils over the entire 10.7-acre designated Belfield site and the entire 12.1-acre designated Bowman site. Dispersion of the ash has contaminated an additional 20.6 acres surrounding the Belfield processing site and an additional 59.2 acres surrounding the Bowman processing site. The proposed remedial action is to relocate the contaminated materials at the Belfield processing site to the Bowman processing/disposal site for codisposal with the Bowman contaminated soils. The environmental impacts assessed in this EA were evaluated for the proposed remedial action and the no action alternative and demonstrate that the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment and would be performed in compliance with applicable environmental laws. The no action alternative would not be consistent with the intent of Public Law 95-604 and would not comply with the EPA standards. 48 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

Beranich, S.; Berger, N.; Bierley, D.; Bond, T.M.; Burt, C.; Caldwell, J.A.; Dery, V.A.; Dutcher, A.; Glover, W.A.; Heydenburg, R.J.; Larson, N.B.; Lindsey, G.; Longley, J.M.; Millard, J.B.; Miller, M.; Peel, R.C.; Persson-Reeves, C.H.; Titus, F.B.; Wagner, L.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the inactive uraniferous lignite processing sites at Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota. [UMTRA Project  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), to clean up the Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, uraniferous lignite processing sites to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at these sites. Remedial action at these sites must be performed in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) standards promulgated for the remedial action and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of North Dakota. The inactive Belfield uraniferous lignite processing site is one mile southeast of Belfield, North Dakota. The inactive Bowman uraniferous lignite processing site at the former town of Griffin, is seven miles northwest of Bowman, North Dakota and 65 road miles south of Belfield. Lignite ash from the processing operations has contaminated the soils over the entire 10.7-acre designated Belfield site and the entire 12.1-acre designated Bowman site. Dispersion of the ash has contaminated an additional 20.6 acres surrounding the Belfield processing site and an additional 59.2 acres surrounding the Bowman processing site. The proposed remedial action is to relocate the contaminated materials at the Belfield processing site to the Bowman processing/disposal site for codisposal with the Bowman contaminated soils. The environmental impacts assessed in this EA were evaluated for the proposed remedial action and the no action alternative and demonstrate that the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment and would be performed in compliance with applicable environmental laws. The no action alternative would not be consistent with the intent of Public Law 95-604 and would not comply with the EPA standards. 48 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

Beranich, S.; Berger, N.; Bierley, D.; Bond, T.M.; Burt, C.; Caldwell, J.A.; Dery, V.A.; Dutcher, A.; Glover, W.A.; Heydenburg, R.J.; Larson, N.B.; Lindsey, G.; Longley, J.M.; Millard, J.B.; Miller, M.; Peel, R.C.; Persson-Reeves, C.H.; Titus, F.B.; Wagner, L.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Transcription Factors Bind Thousands of Active and InactiveRegions in the Drosophila Blastoderm  

SciTech Connect

Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over forty well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs) transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly-bound regions are not involved in early-embryonic transcriptional regulation, and a significant proportion may be nonfunctional. Surprisingly, for five of the six factors, their recognition sites are not unambiguously more constrained evolutionarily than the immediate flanking DNA, even in more highly bound and presumably functional regions, indicating that comparative DNA sequence analysis is limited in its ability to identify functional transcription factor targets.

Li, Xiao-Yong; MacArthur, Stewart; Bourgon, Richard; Nix, David; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Stapleton, Mark; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Ogawa, Nobuo; Inwood, William; Sementchenko, Victor; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Celniker, Susan E.; Knowles, David W.; Gingeras, Tom; Speed, Terence P.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

CRBRP decay heat removal systems  

SciTech Connect

The Decay Heat Removal Systems for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) are designed to adequately remove sensible and decay heat from the reactor following normal shutdown, operational occurrences, and postulated accidents on both a short term and a long term basis. The Decay Heat Removal Systems are composed of the Main Heat Transport System, the Main Condenser and Feedwater System, the Steam Generator Auxiliary Heat Removal System (SGAHRS), and the Direct Heat Removal Service (DHRS). The overall design of the CRBRP Decay Heat Removal Systems and the operation under normal and off-normal conditions is examined. The redundancies of the system design, such as the four decay heat removal paths, the emergency diesel power supplies, and the auxiliary feedwater pumps, and the diversities of the design such as forced circulation/natural circulation and AC Power/DC Power are presented. In addition to overall design and system capabilities, the detailed designs for the Protected Air Cooled Condensers (PACC) and the Air Blast Heat Exchangers (ABHX) are presented.

Hottel, R.E.; Louison, R.; Boardman, C.E.; Kiley, M.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Acid treatment removes zinc sulfide scale restriction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that removal of zinc sulfide (ZnS) scale with acid restored an offshore Louisiana well's production to original rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near well bore area. The selected acid had been proven to control iron sulfide (FeS) scales in sour wells without causing harm to surface production equipment, tubing, and other downhole hardware. The successful removal of the blockage re-established previous production rates with a 105% increase in flowing tubing pressure. On production for a number of months, a high rate, high-pressure offshore well was experiencing unusually rapid pressure and rate declines. A small sample of the restrictive material was obtained during the wire line operations. The well was subsequently shut in while a laboratory analysis determined that zinc sulfide was the major component of the obstruction.

Biggs, K. (Kerr McGee Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Allison, D. (Otis Engineering Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Ford, W.G.F. (Halliburton Co., Duncan, OK (United States))

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

US, International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and eliminating weapons-usable nuclear materials," said U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz. "Today, with the complete removal of all highly enriched uranium from Vietnam, we can...

138

Article removal device for glovebox  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article removal device for a glovebox is described comprising a conduit extending through a glovebox wall which may be closed by a plug within the glovebox, and a fire-resistant container closing the outer end of the conduit and housing a removable container for receiving pyrophoric or otherwise hazardous material without disturbing the interior environment of the glovebox or adversely affecting the environment outside of the glovebox. (Official Gazette)

Guyer, R.H.; Leebl, R.G.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Selection of liquid-level monitoring method for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory inactive liquid low-level waste tanks, remedial investigation/feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

Several of the inactive liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contain residual wastes in liquid or solid (sludge) form or both. A plan of action has been developed to ensure that potential environmental impacts from the waste remaining in the inactive LLLW tank systems are minimized. This document describes the evaluation and selection of a methodology for monitoring the level of the liquid in inactive LLLW tanks. Criteria are established for comparison of existing level monitoring and leak testing methods; a preferred method is selected and a decision methodology for monitoring the level of the liquid in the tanks is presented for implementation. The methodology selected can be used to continuously monitor the tanks pending disposition of the wastes for treatment and disposal. Tanks that are empty, are scheduled to be emptied in the near future, or have liquid contents that are very low risk to the environment were not considered to be candidates for installing level monitoring. Tanks requiring new monitoring equipment were provided with conductivity probes; tanks with existing level monitoring instrumentation were not modified. The resulting data will be analyzed to determine inactive LLLW tank liquid level trends as a function of time.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone United States, International Partners Remove Last Remaining Weapons-Usable Highly Enriched Uranium from Hungary, Set Nuclear Security Milestone November 4, 2013 - 2:09pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced under a multi-year international effort coordinated between Hungary, the United States, the Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the successful removal of all remaining highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Hungary. This makes Hungary the twelfth country to completely eliminate HEU from its borders since President Obama's 2009 announcement

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Method of arsenic removal from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

142

US Department of Energy response to standards for remedial actions at inactive uranium processing sites: Proposed rule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Title I groundwater standards for inactive uranium mill tailings sites, which were promulgated on January 5, 1983, by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, were remanded to the EPA on September 3, 1985, by the US Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. The Court instructed the EPA to compile general groundwater standards for all Title I sites. On September 24, 1987, the EPA published proposed standards (52FR36000-36008) in response to the remand. This report includes an evaluation of the potential effects of the proposed EPA groundwater standards on the UMTRA Project, as well as a discussion of the DOE's position on the proposed standards. The report also contains and appendix which provides supporting information and cost analyses. In order to assess the impacts of the proposed EPA standards, this report summarizes the proposed EPA standards in Section 2.0. The next three sections assess the impacts of the three parts of the EPA standards: Subpart A considers disposal sites; Subpart B is concerned with restoration at processing sites; and Subpart C addresses supplemental standards. Section 6.0 integrates previous sections into a recommendations section. Section 7.0 contains the DOE response to questions posed by the EPA in the preamble to the proposed standards. 6 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

143

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota, evaluates the potential impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site. This contamination is a result of the uraniferous lignite ashing process, when coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified only for constituents introduced by the processing activities and not for the constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Background ground water, separate from any site-related contamination, imposes a percentage of the overall risk from ground water ingestion in the Bowman site vicinity. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to address soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project involves the determination of the extent of soil contamination and design of an engineered disposal cell for long-term storage of contaminated materials. The UMTRA Ground Water Project evaluates ground water contamination. Based on results from future site monitoring activities as defined in the site observational work plan and results from this risk assessment, the DOE will propose an approach for managing contaminated ground water at the Bowman site.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Environmental assessment of remedial action at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing sites at Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform remedial actions at Belfield and Bowman inactive lignite ashing sites in southwestern North Dakota to reduce the potential public health impacts from the residual radioactivity remaining at the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards (40 CFR 192) that contain measures to control the residual radioactive materials and other contaminated materials, and proposed standards to protect the groundwater from further degradation. Remedial action at the Belfield and Bowman sites must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of North Dakota. The Belfield and Bowman designated sites were used by Union Carbide and Kerr-McGee, respectively, to process uraniferous lignite in the 1960s. Uranium-rich ash from rotary kiln processing of the lignite was loaded into rail cars and transported to uranium mills in Rifle, Colorado, and Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, respectively. As a result of the ashing process, there is a total of 158,400 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) [121,100 cubic meters (m{sup 3})] of radioactive ash-contaminated soils at the two sites. Windblown ash-contaminated soil covers an additional 21 acres (8.5 ha) around the site, which includes grazing land, wetlands, and a wooded habitat.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Inactive Uraniferous Lignite Ashing Site Near Belfield, North Dakota, evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the site where coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. The US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is evaluating plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. Phase I of the UMTRA Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination. Phase II of the UMTRA Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under Phase II, results of this risk assessment will help determine what remedial actions may be necessary for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health and the environment resulting from exposure to contaminated ground water as it relates to historic processing activities at the site. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities, and not for those constituents naturally occurring in water quality in the site vicinity. Background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking. Any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background ground water quality. This incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Removal - An alternative to clearance  

SciTech Connect

This presentation shows the differences between the application of clearance and removal, both being procedures for materials leaving radiation protection areas permanently. The differentiation will be done on the basis of the German legislation but may be also applicable for other national legislation. For clearance in Germany two basic requirements must be given, i.e. that the materials are activated or contaminated and that they result from the licensed use or can be assigned to the scope of the license. Clearance needs not to be applied to objects in Germany which are to be removed only temporarily from controlled areas with the purpose of repair or reuse in other controlled areas. In these cases only the requirements of contamination control apply. In the case of removal it must either be proved by measurements that the relevant materials are neither activated nor contaminated or that the materials result from areas where activation or contamination is impossible due to the operational history considering operational procedures and events. If the material is considered neither activated nor contaminated there is no need for a clearance procedure. Therefore, these materials can be removed from radiation protection areas and the removal is in the responsibility of the licensee. Nevertheless, the removal procedure and the measuring techniques to be applied for the different types of materials need an agreement from the competent authority. In Germany a maximum value of 10% of the clearance values has been established in different licenses as a criterion for the application of removal. As approximately 2/3 of the total mass of a nuclear power plant is not expected to be contaminated or activated there is a need for such a procedure of removal for this non contaminated material without any regulatory control especially in the case of decommissioning. A remarkable example is NPP Stade where in the last three years more than 8600 Mg were disposed of by removal and only 315 Mg were released by clearance, even before the decommissioning licensing procedure was finished. (authors)

Feinhals, J.; Kelch, A. [TUV NORD SysTec GmbH and Co. KG, Hamburg (Germany); Kunze, V. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Salzgitter (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Large Component Removal/Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

Wheeler, D. M.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

148

Project management plan for Waste Area Grouping 5 Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks contents removal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

On January 1, 1992, the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) signed a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) concerning the Oak Ridge Reservation. The FFA requires that inactive liquid low-level (radioactive) waste (LLLW) tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) be remediated in accordance with requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This revision is to update the schedule and designation of responsibilities for the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) tanks contents removal project. The scope of this project is to transfer inventory from the five inactive LLLW tanks at the OHF into the active LLLW system.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Metals removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); Von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Actinide removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Status of activities on the inactive uranium mill tailings sites remedial action program. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment  

SciTech Connect

This report on the status of the Office of Environment's program for inactive uranium mill tailings sites is an analysis of the current status and a forecast of future activities of the Office of Environment. The termination date for receipt of information was September 30, 1980. Aerial radiological surveys and detailed ground radiological assessments of properties within the communities in the vicinity of the designated processing sites in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Boise, Idaho led to the designation of an initial group of vicinity properties for remedial action. The potential health effects of the residual radioactive materials on or near these properties were estimated, and the Assistant Secretary for Environment recommended priorities for performing remedial action to the Department's Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy. In designating these properties and establishing recommended priorities for performing remedial action, the Office of Environment consulted with the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, representatives from the affected State and local governments, and individual property owners. After notifying the Governors of each of the affected States and the Navajo Nation of the Secretary of Energy's designation of processing sites within their areas of jurisdiction and establishment of remedial action priorities, a Sample Cooperative Agreement was developed by the Department in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and provided to the affected States and the Navajo Nation for comments. During September 1980, a Cooperative Agreement with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for the designated Canonsburg processing site was executed by the Department. It is anticipated that a Cooperative Agreement between the State of Utah and the Department to perform remedial actions at the designated Salt Lake City site will be executed in the near future.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Disposable Absorbent Material for the Removal of Arsenic from Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils and groundwater at many substation sites are contaminated with arsenic-containing compounds. Cost effective water treatment technologies are needed to remove arsenic and other trace metals from underlying aquifers, especially now that drinking water standard for arsenic has been lowered to 10 g/L from the previous value of 50 g/L. The current project tested a disposable ferric oxide adsorbent material, Bayoxide E33, which has been reported to have a high capacity for arsenic removal.

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

153

Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals Forecasts A document describing how volume fellings and removals are handled in the 2011 Production Forecast system. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Felling and removals forecasts Background A fellings and removals

154

Remedial action plan for the inactive Uranium Processing Site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial action plan: Attachment 2, Geology report, Attachment 3, Ground water hydrology report: Working draft  

SciTech Connect

The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), 42 USC {section}7901 et seq. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This RAP serves two purposes. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Second, this RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the state of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the cooperative agreement between the DOE and the state of Colorado.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Durango, Colorado: Attachment 3, Groundwater hydrology report. Revised final report  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established health and environmental protection regulations to correct and prevent groundwater contamination resulting from processing activities at inactive uranium milling sites. According to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, (UMTRCA) the US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for assessing the inactive uranium processing sites. The DOE has determined this assessment shall include information on hydrogeologic site characterization. The water resources protection strategy that describes how the proposed action will comply with the EPA groundwater protection standards is presented in Attachment 4. Site characterization activities discussed in this section include: Characterization of the hydrogeologic environment; characterization of existing groundwater quality; definition of physical and chemical characteristics of the potential contaminant source; and description of local water resources.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix D. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix is an assessment of the present conditions of the inactive uranium mill site near Mexican Hat, Utah. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan. Plan is to characterize the conditions at the mill and tailings site so that the Remedial Action Contractor may complete final designs of the remedial action.

NONE

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Volume 2, Appendices D and E: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Chloride removal from plutonium alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SRP is evaluating a program to recover plutonium from a metallic alloy that will contain chloride salt impurities. Removal of chloride to sufficiently low levels to prevent damaging corrosion to canyon equipment is feasible as a head-end step following dissolution. Silver nitrate and mercurous nitrate were each successfully used in laboratory tests to remove chloride from simulated alloy dissolver solution containing plutonium. Levels less than 10 ppM chloride were achieved in the supernates over the precipitated and centrifuged insoluble salts. Also, less than 0.05% loss of plutonium in the +3, +4, or +6 oxidation states was incurred via precipitate carrying. These results provide impetus for further study and development of a plant-scale process to recover plutonium from metal alloy at SRP.

Holcomb, H.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron and Heterogeneous Photocatalysis with TiO2 Speaker(s): Marta Litter Date: November 19, 2010 - 11:00am Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Hugo Destaillats Arsenic in groundwater is a dramatic global problem due to the high incidence of arsenicosis or HACRE (Chronic Endemic Regional Hydro-arsenicism, Hidroarsenicismo Crónico Regional Endémico in Spanish), a severe illness causing skin lesions and cancer in extended regions of the world. For this reason, research on low-cost technologies for As removal to be applied in isolated, poor, rural locations is mandatory. This seminar will present a brief overview of arsenic pollution issues and mitigation needs in Latin America. It will also present results on As(V) removal using

160

Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites In January 2013, the Department of Energy issued the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste. Among the elements contained in this strategy is an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites. This focus is consistent with the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future, which identified removal of stranded used nuclear fuel at shutdown sites as a priority so that these sites may be completely decommissioned and put to other beneficial uses. Shutdown sites are defined as those commercial nuclear power reactor sites where the

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161

CX-000868: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-000868: Categorical Exclusion Determination Project 1616 - Remove Inactive High Voltage Polychlorinated Biphenyl Line Behind Barn Area CX(s) Applied: B1.17 Date: 02...

162

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Download CX-000868: Categorical Exclusion Determination Project 1616 - Remove Inactive High Voltage Polychlorinated Biphenyl Line Behind Barn Area CX(s) Applied: B1.17 Date: 02...

163

Nitrogen Removal From Low Quality Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. It is especially important in the residential sector, where it supplies nearly half of all the energy consumed in U.S. homes. However, significant quantities of natural gas cannot be produced economically because its quality is too low to enter the pipeline transportation system without some type of processing, other than dehydration, to remove the undesired gas fraction. Such low-quality natural gas (LQNG) contains significant concentration or quantities of gas other than methane. These non- hydrocarbons are predominantly nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide, but may also include other gaseous components. The nitrogen concentrations usually exceeds 4%. Nitrogen rejection is presently an expensive operation which can present uneconomic scenarios in the potential development of natural gas fields containing high nitrogen concentrations. The most reliable and widely used process for nitrogen rejection from natural gas consists of liquefying the feed stream using temperatures in the order of - 300{degrees}F and separating the nitrogen via fractionation. In order to reduce the gas temperature to this level, the gas is compressed, cooled by mullet-stream heat exchangers, and expanded to low pressure. Significant energy for compression and expensive materials of construction are required. Water and carbon dioxide concentrations must be reduced to levels required to prevent freezing. SRI`s proposed research involves screening new nitrogen selective absorbents and developing a more cost effective nitrogen removal process from natural gas using those compounds. The long-term objective of this project is to determine the technical and economical feasibility of a N{sub 2}2 removal concept based on complexation of molecular N{sub 2} with novel complexing agents. Successful development of a selective, reversible, and stable reagent with an appropriate combination of capacity and N{sub 2} absorption/desorption characteristics will allow selective separation of N{sub 2} from LQNG.

Alvarado, D.B.; Asaro, M.F.; Bomben, J.L.; Damle, A.S.; Bhown, A.S.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Water Recycling removal using temperature-sensitive hydronen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to study the proposed Water Recycling/Removal Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogels. The main element of this technology is the design of a suitable hydrogel that can perform needed water separation for pulp and paper industry. The specific topics studied are to answer following questions: (a) Can water be removed using hydrogel from large molecules such as lignin? (b) Can the rate of separation be made faster? (c) What are the molecular interactions with hydrogel surface? (d) Can a hydrogel be designed for a high ionic strength and high temperature? Summary of the specific results are given.

Rana B. Gupta

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

165

Thermal-hydraulic simulation of natural convection decay heat removal in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using RELAP5 and TEMPEST: Part 2, Interpretation and validation of results  

SciTech Connect

The RELAP5/MOD2 code was used to predict the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the HFIR core during decay heat removal through boiling natural circulation. The low system pressure and low mass flux values associated with boiling natural circulation are far from conditions for which RELAP5 is well exercised. Therefore, some simple hand calculations are used herein to establish the physics of the results. The interpretation and validation effort is divided between the time average flow conditions and the time varying flow conditions. The time average flow conditions are evaluated using a lumped parameter model and heat balance. The Martinelli-Nelson correlations are used to model the two-phase pressure drop and void fraction vs flow quality relationship within the core region. Systems of parallel channels are susceptible to both density wave oscillations and pressure drop oscillations. Periodic variations in the mass flux and exit flow quality of individual core channels are predicted by RELAP5. These oscillations are consistent with those observed experimentally and are of the density wave type. The impact of the time varying flow properties on local wall superheat is bounded herein. The conditions necessary for Ledinegg flow excursions are identified. These conditions do not fall within the envelope of decay heat levels relevant to HFIR in boiling natural circulation. 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Ruggles, A.E.; Morris, D.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Natural gas: Removing the obstacles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defining and then figuring out how to remove whatever obstacles may be blocking the wider use of natural gas was the purpose of a conference held early last month in Phoenix, Arizona. The unique, three-day event was jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). It drew an overflow crowd of more than 500, with a registration list that read like a Who's Who of the natural gas industry. This article summarizes some of the main points of this conference.

Romo, C.

1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

168

Material Removal and Disposition | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal and Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

169

Effect of filament power removal on a fluorescent lamp system  

SciTech Connect

Two techniques are used to measure the effects of removing the filament power from a two-lamp, F-40, rapid-start fluorescent lamp system. The changes are measured for a standard CBM core-coil ballast and for a solid-state ballast operating the lamp at high frequency. There is a 4 tp 6% increase in system efficacy when the filament power is removed. Removal of filament power also decreases filament temperature from 1000/sup 0/C to below 700/sup 0/C in lamps operated at 60 Hz, and from above 600/sup 0/C to 300/sup 0/C in lamps operated at high frequency. The study shows that the arc current and anode fall also determine filament temperature.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.; Rubinstein, F.M.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Remote plunger removal device for small-scale incremental pressing  

SciTech Connect

Small-scale pressing of high explosives (HE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and elsewhere is routinely performed using pneumatic presses. Blast shields provide protection to the operator during the pressing procedure, but safety of the operator is a concern during removal of the plunger, which is currently performed manually. To minimize this risk, very high tolerances between the plunger and the die are required. These tolerances are often very costly, especially in the case of long, relatively narrow dies. The safety issue is an even greater concern with incremental pressing in which cleaning the die between increments is difficult or impossible. To better protect press operators, a device has been designed and constructed to allow remote plunger removal in a standard HE press. In this report the authors describe this modified press that allows remote removal of the plunger.

Burnside, N.J.; Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Remedial Action Plan and final design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings at Green River, Utah. Volume 1, Text, Appendices A, B, and C: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a threefold purpose. It presents the series of activities that are proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site located near Green River, Utah. It provides a characterization of the present conditions of the site. It also serves to document the concurrence of the state of Utah and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the state of Utah, and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix 8 of the Cooperative Agreement.

Matthews, M.L. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States). Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office; Alkema, K. [Utah Dept. of Health, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Environmental Health Div.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Remedial action plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a dual purpose. It presents the series of activities that is proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to stabilize and control radioactive materials at the inactive Phillips/United Nuclear uranium processing site designated as the Ambrosia Lake site in McKinley County, New Mexico. It also serves to document the concurrence of both State of New Mexico and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the state and concurrence by NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement.

Matthews, M.L. (USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States). Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office); Mitzelfelt, R. (New Mexico Health and Environment Dept., Santa Fe, NM (United States). Environmental Improvement Div.)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Remedial action plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Appendix D, Final report  

SciTech Connect

This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two designated inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the proposed disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

NONE

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Final Removal Action Report of the CPP-603A Basin Facility  

SciTech Connect

This Final Removal Action Report describes the actions that were taken under the non-time-critical removal action recommended in the Action Memorandum for the Non-Time Critical Removal Action at the CPP-603A Basins, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as evaluated in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the CPP-603A Bason Non-Time Critical Removal Action, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The Removal Action implemented consolidation and recording the location of debris objects containing radioactive cobalt (cobalt-60), removal and management of a small high-activity debris object (SHADO 1), the removal, treatment, and disposal of the basin water at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) evaporation ponds, and filling the basins with grout/controlled low strength material.

D. V. Croson

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

175

Electrochemical removal of material from metallic work  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Deburring, polishing, surface forming and the like are carried out by electrochemical machining with conformable electrode means including an electrically conducting and an insulating web. The surface of the work to be processed is covered by a deformable electrically insulating web or cloth which is perforated and conforms with the work. The web is covered by a deformable perforated electrically conducting screen electrode which also conforms with, and is insulated from, the work by the insulating web. An electrolyte is conducted through the electrode and insulating web and along the work through a perforated elastic member which engages the electrode under pressure pressing the electrode and web against the work. High current under low voltage is conducted betwen the electrode and work through the insulator, removing material from the work. Under the pressure of the elastic member, the electrode and insulator continue to conform with the work and the spacing between the electrode and work is maintained constant.

Csakvary, Tibor (Wilkens Township, Allegheny County, PA); Fromson, Robert E. (Wilkens Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1980-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

176

The HMDS Coating Flaw Removal Tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many high energy laser systems, optics with HMDS sol gel antireflective coatings are placed in close proximity to each other making them particularly susceptible to certain types of strong optical interactions. During the coating process, halo shaped coating flaws develop around surface digs and particles. Depending on the shape and size of the flaw, the extent of laser light intensity modulation and consequent probability of damaging downstream optics may increase significantly. To prevent these defects from causing damage, a coating flaw removal tool was developed that deploys a spot of decane with a syringe and dissolves away the coating flaw. The residual liquid is evacuated leaving an uncoated circular spot approximately 1mm in diameter. The resulting uncoated region causes little light intensity modulation and thus has a low probability of causing damage in optics downstream from the mitigated flaw site.

Monticelli, M V; Nostrand, M C; Mehta, N; Kegelmeyer, L; Johnson, M A; Fair, J; Widmayer, C

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

177

THERMALLY SHIELDED MOISTURE REMOVAL DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is presented for removing moisture from the air within tanks by condensation upon a cartridge containing liquid air. An insulating shell made in two halves covers the cartridge within the evacuated system. The shell halves are hinged together and are operated by a system of levers from outside the tank with the motion translated through a sylphon bellows to cover and uncover the cartridge. When the condensation of moisture is in process, the insulative shell is moved away from the liquid air cartridge, and during that part of the process when there is no freezing out of moisture, the shell halves are closed on the cell so thnt the accumulated frost is not evaporated. This insulating shell greatly reduces the consumption of liquid air in this condensation process.

Miller, O.E.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

178

Arsenic removal and stabilization by synthesized pyrite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arsenic is ubiquitous whether it is naturally occurring or produced by humans. It is found at sites on the National Priority List and at sites operated by DOE, where it is the second most commonly found contaminant. More wastes containing arsenic will be produced due to the lowering of the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for arsenic in drinking water which will result in more treatment facilities for arsenic removal that will generate residuals. Furthermore, arsenic can be released from such wastes under the reduced conditions that are found in landfills. Pyrite (FeS2) is believed to be a compound that has a high affinity for arsenic and is stable under anoxic conditions. The first task of this research was to develop a method for making pyrite crystals of defined size with minimal reaction time and at high yield. Effects on the synthesis of pyrite particles of pH, the ratio of Fe/S, temperature and reaction time were investigated in batch reactor systems. Pyrite was synthesized within 24 hours at pH values ranging from pH 3.6 through pH 5.6, and at a ratio of Fe/S of 0.5. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to size and characterize the pyrite particles. Experimental and analytical procedures developed for this work, included a hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method for measuring arsenic species (As(III), As(V)). The synthesized pyrite was applied to remove arsenic and its maximum capacity for arsenic removal was measured in batch adsorption experiments to be 3.23 ?mol/g for As(III) and 113 ?mol/g for As(V). Information obtained on the characteristics of chemical species before and after the reaction with arsenic showed that iron and sulfur were oxidized. Last, how strongly arsenic was bound to pyrite was investigated and it was determined that release of arsenic from As(III)-pyrite is not affected by pH, but release from As(V)-pyrite is affected by pH with minimum release in the range pH 5 to pH 8.

Song, Jin Kun

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Removal of plutonium and americium from alkaline waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High salt content, alkaline waste solutions containing plutonium and americium are contacted with a sodium titanate compound to effect removal of the plutonium and americium from the alkaline waste solution onto the sodium titanate and provide an effluent having a radiation level of less than 10 nCi per gram alpha emitters.

Schulz, Wallace W. (Richland, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Falls City, Texas. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE's remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RAP, which includes this summary remedial action selection report (RAS), serves a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Texas, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Texas.

Chernoff, A.R. (USDOE Albuquerque Field Office, NM (United States). Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office); Lacker, D.K. (Texas State Dept. of Health, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Radiation Control)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial action selection report, Attachment 2, Geology report: Preliminary final  

SciTech Connect

The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which serves two purposes. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Second, this document and the rest of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the state of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the cooperative agreement between the DOE and the State of Colorado.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Environmental Impacts of Stover Removal in the Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When considering the market for biomass from corn stover resources erosion and soil quality issues are important to consider. Removal of stover can be beneficial in some areas, especially when coordinated with other conservation practices, such as vegetative barrier strips and cover crops. However, benefits are highly dependent on several factors, namely if farmers see costs and benefits associated with erosion and the tradeoffs with the removal of biomass. This paper uses results from an integrated RUSLE2/WEPS model to incorporate six different regime choices, covering management, harvest and conservation, into simple profit maximization model to show these tradeoffs.

Alicia English; Wallace E. Tyner; Juan Sesmero; Phillip Owens; David Muth

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

Olson, Edwin S. (Grand Forks, ND); Holmes, Michael J. (Thompson, ND); Pavlish, John H. (East Grand Forks, MN)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

Olson, Edwin S. (Grand Forks, ND); Holmes, Michael J. (Thompson, ND); Pavlish, John H. (East Grand Forks, MN)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

185

Non-oxidative conversion of methane with continuous hydorgen removal  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to overcome the restrictions of non-oxidative methane pyrolysis and oxidative coupling of methane by transferring hydrogen across a selective inorganic membrane between methane and air streams, without simultaneous transport of hydrocarbon reactants or products. This will make the overall reaction system exothermic, remove the thermodynamic barrier to high conversion, and eliminate the formation of carbon oxides. Our approach is to couple C-H bond activation and hydrogen removal by passage of hydrogen atoms through a dense ceramic membrane. In our membrane reactor, catalytic methane pyrolysis produces C2+ hydrogen carbons and aromatics on the one side of the membrane and hydrogen is removed through an oxide film and combusted with air on the opposite side. This process leads to a net reaction with the stoichiometry and thermodynamic properties of oxidative coupling, but without contact between the carbon atoms and oxygen species.

Borry, R.W. III [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Iglesia, E. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Lawrence Berkeley Lab.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Part 3: Removal Action | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Removal Action 3: Removal Action Part 3: Removal Action Question: When may removal actions be initiated? Answer: Removal actions may be initiated when DOE determines that the action will prevent, minimize, stabilize, or eliminate a risk to health or the environment. The NCP specifies that the determination that a risk to health or the environment is appropriate for removal action should be based on: actual or potential exposure of humans, animals, or the food chain the presence of contained hazardous substances that pose a threat of release the threat of migration of the hazardous substances the threat of fire or explosion the availability of an appropriate Federal or State response capability [section 300.415(b)(2)]. In essence, where DOE identifies a threat of exposure to or migration of

187

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

1988-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

188

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (both Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (both Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

190

Process for particulate removal from coal liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Suspended solid particulates are removed from liquefied coal products by first subjecting such products to hydroclone action for removal in the underflow of the larger size particulates, and then subjecting the overflow from said hydroclone action, comprising the residual finer particulates, to an electrostatic field in an electrofilter wherein such finer particulates are deposited in the bed of beads of dielectric material on said filter. The beads are periodically cleaned by backwashing to remove the accumulated solids.

Rappe, Gerald C. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

192

Passive Core Decay Heat Removal Performance Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive decay heat removal systems operate without pumps when normal heat removal systems are not available. Safety is ensured by confirming that an adequate thermal margin is provided to accommodate various operating conditions, design uncertainties, and degradation. Guidelines to ensure adequate thermal performance are provided for three different system configurations.This report introduces utility systems engineers to the design and operation of passive decay heat removal systems and ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

193

Condensate Removal by Drain Orifice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Originally the Drain Orifice Assembly was developed to solve serious steam trap maintenance problems in Navy ship's high pressure systems. Installation was between two ANSI B16.5 Flanges. The high pressure systems operate at pressures between 150 psig and 1200 psig. Based on the initial test results, a program was adopted by the U.S. Navy to replace all conventional steam traps with the Drain Orifice in all high pressure drain systems on ships in the U.S. Fleet.

Guzick, L. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Metal Organic Clathrates for Carbon Dioxide Removal  

removal from coal-fired power plant flue gas streams.  Modified variations of the materials can be used in a variety of other fields as well, ...

195

System for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

196

Improved sulfur removal processes evaluated for IGCC  

SciTech Connect

An inherent advantage of Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electric power generation is the ability to easily remove and recover sulfur. During the last several years, a number of new, improved sulfur removal and recovery processes have been commercialized. An assessment is given of alternative sulfur removal processes for IGCC based on the Texaco coal gasifier. The Selexol acid gas removal system, Claus sulfur recovery, and SCOT tail gas treating are currently used in Texaco-based IGCC. Other processes considered are: Purisol, Sulfinol-M, Selefning, 50% MDEA, Sulften, and LO-CAT. 2 tables.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel  

ORNL 2010-G00619/jcn UT-B ID 200902314 Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel Technology Summary At ORNL the application of ultrasonic energy, or ...

198

Internal Controls Over Classified Computersand Classified Removable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Classified Removable Media at theLawrence Livermore National Laboratory, IG-0628 Computers are used extensively in the full range of operations at Lawrence Livermore National...

199

Removal of radioisotopes from waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention comprises removing radioisotopes from waste liquids or solutions by passing these through filters and through a column containing a suitable salt of phosphoric acid. (Official Gazette)

Kirby, H.W.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Phillips/United Nuclear site, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah, Inc., has reevaluated the Phillips/United Nuclear site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.6 million dry tons of tailings at the Phillips/United Nuclear site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $21,500,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $45,200,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Phillips/United Nuclear tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $87/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ by either heap leach or conventional plant process. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Reprocessing the Phillips/United Nuclear tailings for uranium recovery does not appear to be economically attractive under present or foreseeable market conditions.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Summary Our short-term outlook for a wide array of energy prices has been adjusted upward as international and domestic energy supply conditions have tightened. We think that crude oil prices are as likely as not to end the year $2 to $3 per barrel higher than our previous projections. Thus, we think that the probability of West Texas Intermediate costing an average of $30 per barrel or more at midwinter is about 50 percent. On their current track, heating oil prices are likely to be about 30 percent above year-ago levels in the fourth quarter. Prices for Q1 2001 seem more likely now to match or exceed the high level seen in Q1 2000. Tight oil markets this year and an inherent propensity for high gas utilization in incremental power supply have resulted in rising North American natural gas

202

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results & Policy Implications Title Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results & Policy Implications Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2009 Authors Mathieu, Johanna L., Ashok J. Gadgil, Kristin Kowolik, and Susan E. Addy Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate-bottom ash from coal fired power plants-is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more thanhalf of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing anarsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages

203

USE OF AN EQUILIBRIUM MODEL TO FORECAST DISSOLUTION EFFECTIVENESS, SAFETY IMPACTS, AND DOWNSTREAM PROCESSABILITY FROM OXALIC ACID AIDED SLUDGE REMOVAL IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS 1-15  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This thesis details a graduate research effort written to fulfill the Magister of Technologiae in Chemical Engineering requirements at the University of South Africa. The research evaluates the ability of equilibrium based software to forecast dissolution, evaluate safety impacts, and determine downstream processability changes associated with using oxalic acid solutions to dissolve sludge heels in Savannah River Site High Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 1-15. First, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Coupled with a model, a material balance determines the fate of hypothetical worst-case sludge in the treatment and neutralization tanks during each chemical adjustment. Although sludge is dissolved, after neutralization more is created within HLW. An energy balance determines overpressurization and overheating to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen may overwhelm the purge ventilation. Limiting the heel volume treated/acid added and processing the solids through vitrification is preferred and should not significantly increase the number of glass canisters.

KETUSKY, EDWARD

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

Chloride removal from vitrification offgas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study identified and investigated techniques of selectively purging chlorides from the low-level waste (LLW) vitrification process with the purge stream acceptable for burial on the Hanford Site. Chlorides will be present in high concentration in several individual feeds to the LLW Vitrification Plant. The chlorides are highly volatile in combustion type melters and are readily absorbed by wet scrubbing of the melter offgas. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flow sheets show that the resulting chloride rich scrub solution is recycled back to the melter. The chlorides must be purged from the recycle loop to prevent the buildup of excessively high chloride concentrations.

Slaathaug, E.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

DISSOLUTION METHOD OF REMOVING BONDING AGENTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for removing residual aluminumsilicon bonding agents from uranium slugs after the removal of aluminum coatings. To accomplish this the slug is immersed in an aqueous solution about 0.75 N in hydrofluoric acid and about 7 N in nitric acid.

Hyman, H.H.

1960-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

206

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

207

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

Global Cut Framework for Removing Symmetries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a general technique for removing symmetries in CSPs during search. The idea is to record no-goods, during the exploration of the search tree, whose symmetric counterpart (if any) should be removed. The no-good, called Global ...

Filippo Focacci; Michela Milano

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Highlights International Oil Markets Prices. We have raised our world oil price projection by about $2 per barrel for this month because of assumed greater compliance by OPEC to targeted cuts, especially for the second quarter of 2000 (Figure 1). The expected decline in world petroleum inventories continues (Figure 2), and, given the generally stiff resolve of OPEC members to maintain production cuts, any sign of a turnaround in stocks may be postponed until later this year than previously assumed (Q3 instead of Q2). Our current estimate for the average import cost this past January is now $25 per barrel, a nearly $15-per-barrel increase from January 1999. Crude oil prices are expected to remain at relatively high levels for the first half of 2000, but

211

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable Gases from Flashed-Steam Geothermal Power Plants:April 1999 - March 2000 Dataset Summary Description This dataset corresponds to the final report on a screening study to compare six methods of removing noncondensable gases from direct-use geo-thermal steam power plants. This report defines the study methodologies and compares the performance and economics of selected gas-removal systems. Recommendations are presented for follow-up investigations and implementation of some of the technologies discussed. The specific gas-removal methods include five vacuum system configurations using the conventional approach of evacuating gas/vapor mixtures from the power plant condenser system and a system for physical separation of steam and gases upstream of the power turbine. The study focused on flashed-steam applications, but the results apply equally well to flashed-steam and dry-steam geothermal power plant configurations. Two gas-removal options appear to offer profitable economic potential. The hybrid vacuum system configurations and the reboiler process yield positive net present value results over wide-ranging gas concentrations. The hybrid options look favorable for both low-temperature and high-temperature resource applications. The reboiler looks profitable for low-temperature resource applications for gas levels above about 20,000 parts per million by volume. A vacuum system configuration using a three-stage turbocompressor battery may be profitable for low-temperature resources, but results show that the hybrid system is more profitable. The biphase eductor alternative cannot be recommended for commercialization at this time. The report is available from NREL's publication database.

212

Risk characterization data manual for Category D inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual reports the results of a risk characterization of Category D inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) underground storage tanks (Uses) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The risk characterization is required by the Federal Facility Agreement between the Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office, the Environmental Protection Agency-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The intent of the risk characterization is to determine relative priorities for assessment and remediation. A total of 55 FFA Category D inactive LLLW tanks are discussed in this manual. Of the 39 tanks at ORNL that have been accepted into the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program, all have been sampled for preliminary characterization, except for 5 tanks that were found to be empty plus I that was found not to exist. The remaining 16 tanks are in the Waste Management (WM) Program. Twelve were sampled for preliminary characterization, and four were found empty. Each sampled tank was scored on a scale of I to 5 on the basis of three criteria: (1) leak characteristics, (2) location, and (3) toxicological characteristics of residual sludges and liquids. Each criterion was assigned a weighing factor based on perceived importance. The criterion score multiplied by the weighting factor equaled the tank`s total score for that criterion. The three weighted criterion scores for each tank were then summed for a total score for that tank. When the scores for all tanks had been weighted and summed, the tanks were ranked in descending order on the basis of their total scores. The highest possible score for a tank is 30. The descending rank order represents the recommended priorities for evaluation: the higher the score, the higher the priority for evaluation. Of the 54 tanks sampled in the risk characterization, 23 tanks scored 16 or higher, 11 scored between 10 and 15, 5 scored between 4 and 9, and 15 scored 3 or less.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Risk characterization data manual for Category D inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual reports the results of a risk characterization of Category D inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) underground storage tanks (USTs) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The risk characterization is required by the Federal Facility Agreement between the Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations Office, the Environmental Protection Agency-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The intent of the risk characterization is to determine relative priorities for assessment and remediation. A total of 55 FFA Category D inactive LLLW tanks are discussed in this manual. Of the 39 tanks at ORNL that have been accepted into the Environmental Restoration (ER) Pregrain, all have been sampled for preliminary characterization, except for 5 tanks that were found to be empty plus 1 that was found not to exist. The remaining 16 tanks are in the Waste Management (WM) Program. Twelve were sampled for preliminary characterization, and four were found empty. Each sampled tank was scored on a scale of I to 5 on the basis of three criteria: (1) leak characteristics, (2) location, and (3) toxicological characteristics of residual sludges and liquids. Each criterion was assigned a weighing factor based on perceived importance. The criterion score multiplied by the weighting factor equaled the tank`s total score for that criterion. The three weighted criterion scores for each tank were then summed for a total score for that tank. When the scores for all tanks had been weighted and summed, the tanks were ranked in descending order on the basis of their total scores. The highest possible score for a tank is 30. The descending rank order represents the recommended priorities for evaluation: the higher the score, the higher the priority for evaluation. Of the 54 tanks sampled in the risk characterization, 23 tanks scored 16 or higher, 11 scored between 10 and 15, 5 scored between 4 and 9, and 15 scored 3 or less.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Non-Canonical NF-kB Activation and Abnormal B Cell Accumulation in Mice Expressing Ubiquitin Protein Ligase-Inactive c-IAP2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chromosomal translocations between loci encoding MALT1 and c-IAP2 are common in MALT lymphomas. The resulting fusion proteins lack the c-IAP2 RING domain, the region responsible for its ubiquitin protein ligase (E3) activity. Ectopic expression of the fusion protein activates the canonical NF-kB signaling cascade, but how it does so is controversial and how it promotes MALT lymphoma is unknown. Considering recent reports implicating c-IAP1 and c-IAP2 E3 activity in repression of non-canonical NF-kB signaling, we asked if the c-IAP2/MALT fusion protein can initiate non-canonical NF-kB activation. Here we show that in addition to canonical activation, the fusion protein stabilizes NIK and activates noncanonical NF-kB. Canonical but not non-canonical activation depended on MALT1 paracaspase activity, and expression of E3-inactive c-IAP2 activated non-canonical NF-kB. Mice in which endogenous c-IAP2 was replaced with an E3-inactive mutant accumulated abnormal B cells with elevated non-canonical NF-kB and had increased numbers of B cells with a marginal zone phenotype, gut-associated lymphoid hyperplasia, and other features of MALT lymphoma. Thus, the c-IAP2/ MALT1 fusion protein activates NF-kB by two distinct mechanisms, and loss of c-IAP2 E3 activity in vivo is sufficient to induce abnormalities common to MALT lymphoma.

Dietrich B. Conze; Yongge Zhao; Jonathan D. Ashwell

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Project management plan for Waste Area Grouping 5 Old Hydrofracture Facility tanks contents removal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This revision (Rev. 1) updates the schedule and designation of responsibilities for the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) tanks contents removal project. Ongoing and planned future activities include: cold testing of the sluicing and pumping system; readiness assessment; equipment relocation and assembly; isotopic dilution of fissile radionuclides; sluicing and transfer of the tanks contents; and preparation of the Removal Action Completion Report. The most significant change is that the sluicing and pumping system has been configured by and will be operated by CDM Federal Programs Corporation. In addition, a new technical lead and a new project analyst have been designated within Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. and Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. The schedule for tanks contents removal has been accelerated, with transfer of the final batch of tank slurry now scheduled for March 31, 1998 (instead of November 10, 1998). The OHF sluicing and pumping project is proceeding as a non-time-critical removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. The purpose of the project is to remove the contents from five inactive underground storage tanks, designated T-1, T-2, T-3, T-4, and T-9. The tanks contain an estimated 52,700 gal of liquid and sludge, together comprising a radioactive inventory of approximately 30,000 Ci.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

COST OF MERCURY REMOVAL IN IGCC PLANTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost of Mercury Removal Cost of Mercury Removal in an IGCC Plant Final Report September 2002 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory By: Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group Inc. Reading, Pennsylvania Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania DOE Product Manager: Gary J. Stiegel DOE Task Manager: James R. Longanbach Principal Investigators: Michael G. Klett Russell C. Maxwell Michael D. Rutkowski PARSONS The Cost of Mercury Removal in an IGCC Plant Final Report i September 2002 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page 1 Summary 1 2 Introduction 3 3 Background 4 3.1 Regulatory Initiatives 4 3.2 Mercury Removal for Conventional Coal-Fired Plants 4 3.3 Mercury Removal Experience in Gasification 5 3.4 Variability of Mercury Content in Coal 6 4 Design Considerations 7 4.1 Carbon Bed Location

217

Catalyst regeneration process including metal contaminants removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Spent catalysts removed from a catalytic hydrogenation process for hydrocarbon feedstocks, and containing undesired metals contaminants deposits, are regenerated. Following solvent washing to remove process oils, the catalyst is treated either with chemicals which form sulfate or oxysulfate compounds with the metals contaminants, or with acids which remove the metal contaminants, such as 5-50 W % sulfuric acid in aqueous solution and 0-10 W % ammonium ion solutions to substantially remove the metals deposits. The acid treating occurs within the temperature range of 60.degree.-250.degree. F. for 5-120 minutes at substantially atmospheric pressure. Carbon deposits are removed from the treated catalyst by carbon burnoff at 800.degree.-900.degree. F. temperature, using 1-6 V % oxygen in an inert gas mixture, after which the regenerated catalyst can be effectively reused in the catalytic process.

Ganguli, Partha S. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Enhanced removal of radioactive particles by fluorocarbon surfactant solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed research addressed the application of ESI`s particle removal process to the non-destructive decontamination of nuclear equipment. The cleaning medium used in this process is a solution of a high molecular weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid which results in enhanced particle removal. The perfluorinated liquids of interest, which are recycled in the process, are nontoxic, nonflammable, and environmentally compatible, and do not present a hazard to the ozone layer. The information obtained in the Phase 1 program indicated that the proposed ESI process is technically effective and economically attractive. The fluorocarbon surfactant solutions used as working media in the ESI process survived exposure of up to 10 Mrad doses of gamma rays, and are considered sufficiently radiation resistant for the proposed process. Ultrasonic cleaning in perfluorinated surfactant solutions was found to be an effective method of removing radioactive iron (Fe 59) oxide particles from contaminated test pieces. Radioactive particles suspended in the process liquids could be quantitatively removed by filtration through a 0.1 um membrane filter. Projected economics indicate a pre-tax pay back time of 1 month for a commercial scale system.

Kaiser, R.; Harling, O.K. [Entropic Systems, Inc., Winchester, MA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Actinide removal from nitric acid waste streams  

SciTech Connect

Actinide separations research at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) has found ways to significantly improve plutonium secondary recovery and americium removal from nitric acid waste streams generated by plutonium purification operations. Capacity and breakthrough studies show anion exchange with Dowex 1x4 (50 to 100 mesh) to be superior for secondary recovery of plutonium. Extraction chromatography with TOPO(tri-n-octyl-phosphine oxide) on XAD-4 removes the final traces of plutonium, including hydrolytic polymer. Partial neutralization and solid supported liquid membrane transfer removes americium for sorption on discardable inorganic ion exchangers, potentially allowing for non-TRU waste disposal.

Muscatello, A.C.; Navratil, J.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

In situ removal of contamination from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination, and further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed.

Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Method for changing removable bearing for a wind turbine generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY), Gadre; Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

222

Parametric Analyses of Heat Removal from High Level Waste Tanks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general thermal hydraulics program GOTH-SNF was used to predict the thermal response of the waste in tanks 241-AY-102 and 241-AZ-102 when mixed by two 300 horsepower mixer pumps. This mixing was defined in terms of a specific waste retrieval scenario. Both dome and annulus ventilation system flow are necessary to maintain the waste within temperature control limits during the mixing operation and later during the sludge-settling portion of the scenario are defined.

TRUITT, J.B.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

223

Asymmetric Removal of Temperature Inversions in a High Mountain Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During July 1985 the transition from nighttime to daytime wind regimes was studied in a steep-sided, broad mountain valley at about 2200 m MSL, in southeastern Wyoming. An array of surface weather stations and plot balloon releases from several ...

Robert D. Kelly

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Kazakhstan HEU Removal Kazakhstan HEU Removal Location Kazakhstan United States 48° 59' 44.1492" N, 67° 3' 37.9692" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

225

Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Sweden Plutonium Removal Sweden Plutonium Removal Location Sweden United States 62° 24' 4.4136" N, 15° 22' 51.096" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

226

Hungary HEU removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

removal | National Nuclear Security Administration removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Hungary HEU removal Hungary HEU removal Location Hungary United States 47° 11' 51.6336" N, 19° 41' 15" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view this map.

227

Mexico HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Mexico HEU Removal Mexico HEU Removal Location Mexico United States 24° 24' 35.298" N, 102° 49' 55.3116" W See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view this map.

228

Removal of volatile materials from forepump oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of clearing condensable vapors from forepump oil is described. Air is bubbled though the oil reservoir removing volatile material from the oil and allowing continuous pumping of materials by non?vented pumps.

Paul P. Nicole

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

Cook, Gus T. (Paducah, KY); Holshouser, Stephen K. (Boaz, KY); Coleman, Richard M. (Paducah, KY); Harless, Charles E. (Smithland, KY); Whinnery, III, Walter N. (Paducah, KY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

Cook, G.T.; Holshouser, S.K.; Coleman, R.M.; Harless, C.E.; Whinnery, W.N. III

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

231

Chile HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Removal Location United States 25 28' 1.4916" S, 69 33' 55.548" W See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view...

232

France HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Removal Location United States 45 44' 20.0544" N, 2 17' 6.5616" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view...

233

Libya HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal Location Libya United States 27 34' 9.5448" N, 17 24' 8.4384" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view...

234

Install Removable Insulation on Valves and Fittings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This revised ITP tip sheet on installing removable insulation on valves and fittings provides how-to advice for improving the system using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Turkey HEU Removal Turkey HEU Removal Location Turkey United States 38° 26' 50.2044" N, 40° 15' 14.0616" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

236

Laser removal of sludge from steam generators  

SciTech Connect

A method of removing unwanted chemical deposits known as sludge from the metal surfaces of steam generators with laser energy is provided. Laser energy of a certain power density, of a critical wavelength and frequency, is intermittently focused on the sludge deposits to vaporize them so that the surfaces are cleaned without affecting the metal surface (sludge substrate). Fiberoptic tubes are utilized for laser beam transmission and beam direction. Fiberoptics are also utilized to monitor laser operation and sludge removal.

Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Remedial action plan for the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. DOE responses to comments from U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment  

SciTech Connect

This report contains responses by the US Department of Energy to comments from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment on the Naturita remedial action plan. This was done in an attempt to clarify information. The site is an inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado.

NONE

1998-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

238

Synthesis and development of processes for the recovery of sulfur from acid gases. Part 1, Development of a high-temperature process for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas using limestone -- thermodynamic and kinetic considerations; Part 2, Development of a zero-emissions process for recovery of sulfur from acid gas streams  

SciTech Connect

Limestone can be used more effectively as a sorbent for H{sub 2}S in high-temperature gas-cleaning applications if it is prevented from undergoing calcination. Sorption of H{sub 2}S by limestone is impeded by sintering of the product CaS layer. Sintering of CaS is catalyzed by CO{sub 2}, but is not affected by N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}. The kinetics of CaS sintering was determined for the temperature range 750--900{degrees}C. When hydrogen sulfide is heated above 600{degrees}C in the presence of carbon dioxide elemental sulfur is formed. The rate-limiting step of elemental sulfur formation is thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}S. Part of the hydrogen thereby produced reacts with CO{sub 2}, forming CO via the water-gas-shift reaction. The equilibrium of H{sub 2}S decomposition is therefore shifted to favor the formation of elemental sulfur. The main byproduct is COS, formed by a reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S that is analogous to the water-gas-shift reaction. Smaller amounts of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} also form. Molybdenum disulfide is a strong catalyst for H{sub 2}S decomposition in the presence of CO{sub 2}. A process for recovery of sulfur from H{sub 2}S using this chemistry is as follows: Hydrogen sulfide is heated in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of CO{sub 2} and a suitable catalyst. The primary products of the overall reaction are S{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture to roughly 600{degrees}C prevents loss Of S{sub 2} during cooling. Carbonyl sulfide is removed from the product gas by hydrolysis back to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Unreacted CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H{sub 2} and CO, which recovers the hydrogen value from the H{sub 2}S. This process is economically favorable compared to the existing sulfur-recovery technology and allows emissions of sulfur-containing gases to be controlled to very low levels.

Towler, G.P.; Lynn, S.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Environmental Tradeoffs of Stover Removal and Erosion in Indiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When considering the market for biomass from corn stover resources erosion and soil quality issues are important to consider. Removal of stover can be beneficial in some areas, especially when coordinated with other conservation practices, such as vegetative barrier strips and cover crops. However, benefits are highly dependent on several factors, namely if farmers see costs and benefits associated with erosion and the tradeoffs with the removal of biomass. Although typically considered an internal cost, the implication is important to policy and contracting for biomass. This paper uses results from an integrated RUSLE2/WEPS model to incorporate six different regime choices, covering management, harvest and conservation, into a simple profit maximization model to show these tradeoffs explicitly. The results of this work show how different costs for erosion, biomass and conservation managements will affect behavior. If erosion prices are low and no conservation requirement exists, biomass removal will significantly increase erosion, but only in some areas. Alternatively, when erosion prices are high, farmers will parallel socially optimal levels of erosion and conservation management practices can be incentivized through access to a market for stover.

Alicia English; Wallace E. Tyner; Juan Sesmero; Phillip Owens; David J. Muth, Jr.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Reductive dissolution approaches to removal of uranium from contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Traditional approaches to uranium recovery from ores have employed oxidation of U(IV) minerals to form the uranyl cation which is subsequently complexed by carbonate or maintained in solution by strong acids. Reductive approaches for uranium decontamination have been limited to removing soluble uranium from solutions by formation of U{sup 4+} which readily hydrolyses and precipitates. As part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration, we have developed a reductive approach to solubilization of uranium from contaminated soils which employs reduction to destabilize U(VI) solid and sorbed species, and strong chelators for U(IV) to prevent hydrolysis and solubilize the reduced from. This strategy has particular application to sites where the uranium is present primarily as intractable U(VI) phases and where high fractions of the contamination must be removed to meet regulatory requirements.

Brainard, J.R.; Iams, H.D.; Strietelmeier, B.A.; Del-Rio Garcia, M.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Removing Barriers to Innovations: Related Codes and Standards CSI Team  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Removing Barriers to Innovation Removing Barriers to Innovation Related Codes and Standards CSI Team PAM COLE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Building America Technical Update Meeting, April 29-30, 2013, Denver, CO PNNL-SA-95120 Background/History Transformation of U.S. housing markets to favor high- performance homes faces significant challenges, from education to technology to infrastructure and cost barriers. Some of the most difficult challenges involve industry codes and standards that may prevent or slow the innovation process. Building America Research has a history of: Successful market innovations and transformation and overcoming codes and standards barriers. Top 3 Existing Innovations C/S Challenges Thermal Bypass Air Barrier Requirements: Building America research teams effectively

242

Regenerable Sorbent Development for Sulfur, Chloride and Ammonia Removal from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large number of components in coal form corrosive and toxic compounds during coal gasification processes. DOE’s NETL aims to reduce contaminants to parts per billion in order to utilize gasification gas streams in fuel cell applications. Even more stringent requirements are expected if the fuel is to be utilized in chemical production applications. Regenerable hydrogen sulfide removal sorbents have been developed at NETL. These sorbents can remove the hydrogen sulfide to ppb range at 316 °C and at 20 atmospheres. The sorbent can be regenerated with oxygen. Reactivity and physical durability of the sorbent did not change during the multi-cycle tests. The sorbent development work has been extended to include the removal of other major impurities, such as HCl and NH3. The sorbents for HCl removal that are available today are not regenerable. Regenerable HCl removal sorbents have been developed at NETL. These sorbents can remove HCl to ppb range at 300 °C to 500 °C. The sorbent can be regenerated with oxygen. Results of TGA and bench-scale flow reactor tests with both regenerable and non-regenerable HCl removal sorbents will be discussed in the paper. Bench-scale reactor tests were also conducted with NH3 removal sorbents. The results indicated that the sorbents have a high removal capacity and good regenerability during the multi-cycle tests. Future emphasis of the NETL coal gasification/cleanup program is to develop multi-functional sorbents to remove multiple impurities in order to minimize the steps involved in the cleanup systems. To accomplish this goal, a regenerable sorbent capable of removing both HCl and H2S was developed. The results of the TGA conducted with the sorbent to evaluate the feasibility of both H2S and HCl sorption will be discussed in this paper.

Siriwardane, R.V.; Tian, H.; Simonyi, T.; Webster, T.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Trunnion Collar Removal Machine - Gap Analysis Table  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to review the existing the trunnion collar removal machine against the ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (NSDB) [Ref. 10] requirements and to identify codes and standards and supplemental requirements to meet these requirements. If these codes and standards can not fully meet these requirements then a ''gap'' is identified. These gaps will be identified here and addressed using the ''Trunnion Collar Removal Machine Design Development Plan'' [Ref. 15]. The codes and standards, supplemental requirements, and design development requirements for the trunnion collar removal machine are provided in the gap analysis table (Appendix A, Table 1). Because the trunnion collar removal machine is credited with performing functions important to safety (ITS) in the NSDB [Ref. 10], design basis requirements are applicable to ensure equipment is available and performs required safety functions when needed. The gap analysis table is used to identify design objectives and provide a means to satisfy safety requirements. To ensure that the trunnion collar removal machine performs required safety functions and meets performance criteria, this portion of the gap analysis tables supplies codes and standards sections and the supplemental requirements and identifies design development requirements, if needed.

M. Johnson

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

244

Hydrogen Removal From Heating Oil of a Parabolic Trough ...  

Hydrogen Removal From Heating Oil of a Parabolic Trough Increases the Life of the Trough and its Components A Method to Selectively Remove & Measure Hydrogen Gas from ...

245

An Experimental Study of Chemical Oxygen Demand Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental results showed that the refractory organics in coking wastewater can be effectively removed by this process, and COD removal efficiency was ...

246

Michigan Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from...

247

Salt Fluxes for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2001... for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from Molten Aluminum ... Solid chloride salts containing MgC2 can be used to remove alkali ...

248

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

249

South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas...

250

Mercury removal from solid mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

The removal of mercury from mixed wastes is an essential step in eliminating the temporary storage of large inventories of mixed waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Currently thermal treatment has been identified as a baseline technology and is being developed as part of the DOE Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP). Since thermal treatment will not be applicable to all mercury containing mixed waste and the removal of mercury prior to thermal treatment may be desirable, laboratory studies have been initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop alternative remediation technologies capable of removing mercury from certain mixed waste. This paper describes laboratory investigations of the KI/I{sub 2} leaching processes to determine the applicability of this process to mercury containing solid mixed waste.

Gates, D.D.; Morrissey, M.; Chava, K.K.; Chao, K.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Technetium Removal Using Tc-Goethite Coprecipitation  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Low temperature waste forms coupled with technetium removal using an alternative immobilization process such as Fe(II) treated-goethite precipitation” to increase our understanding of 99Tc long-term stability in goethite mineral form and the process that controls the 99Tc(VII) reduction and removal by the final Fe (oxy)hydroxide forms. The overall objectives of this task were to 1) evaluate the transformation process of Fe (oxy)hydroxide solids to the more crystalline goethite (?-FeOOH) mineral for 99Tc removal and 2) determine the mechanism that limits 99Tc(IV) reoxidation in Fe(II)-treated 99Tc-goethite mineral and 3) evaluate whether there is a long-term 99Tcoxidation state change for Tc sequestered in the iron solids.

Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Jung, Hun Bok; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

252

Process for removing metals from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions. 2 tabs.

Napier, J.M.; Hancher, C.M.; Hackett, G.D.

1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

253

Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separting the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF.sub.2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium, without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

Pulley, Howard (West Paducah, KY); Seltzer, Steven F. (Paducah, KY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separating the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

Pulley, H.; Seltzer, S.F.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Allegheny Power Service Constructed Wetland at Springdale: The Role of Plants in the Removal of Trace Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constructed wetlands are proving an effective technology for the removal of many aqueous contaminants. The ability of wetlands to remove contaminants such as trace elements appears to be a function of both the physical trapping of suspended materials and the biological and chemical processes occurring within the wetlands. Thus, wetlands are commonly described as "biogeochemical reactors." This report details a study of trace element removal and sequestration within a highly engineered wetland designed to...

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

256

Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel from Shutdown Sites  

SciTech Connect

This report fulfills the M2 milestone M2FT-13PN0912022, “Stranded Sites De-Inventorying Report.” In January 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste (DOE 2013). Among the elements contained in this strategy is an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites. This focus is consistent with the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future, which identified removal of stranded used nuclear fuel at shutdown sites as a priority so that these sites may be completely decommissioned and put to other beneficial uses (BRC 2012). Shutdown sites are defined as those commercial nuclear power reactor sites where the nuclear power reactors have been shut down and the site has been decommissioned or is undergoing decommissioning. In this report, a preliminary evaluation of removing used nuclear fuel from 12 shutdown sites was conducted. The shutdown sites were Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, Zion, Crystal River, Kewaunee, and San Onofre. These sites have no other operating nuclear power reactors at their sites and have also notified the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission that their reactors have permanently ceased power operations and that nuclear fuel has been permanently removed from their reactor vessels. Shutdown reactors at sites having other operating reactors are not included in this evaluation.

Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph E.; Ross, Steven B.; Buxton, Kenneth A.; England, Jeffery L.; McConnell, Paul E.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report  

SciTech Connect

The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

ASBESTOS PIPE-INSULATION REMOVAL ROBOT SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

This final topical report details the development, experimentation and field-testing activities for a robotic asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system developed for use within the DOE's weapon complex as part of their ER and WM program, as well as in industrial abatement. The engineering development, regulatory compliance, cost-benefit and field-trial experiences gathered through this program are summarized.

Unknown

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications.

Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Derzon, Dora K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nelson, Jill S. (Albuquerque, NM); Rand, Peter B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Process for removing carbon from uranium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon contamination is removed from uranium and uranium alloys by heating in inert atmosphere to 700.degree.-1900.degree.C in effective contact with yttrium to cause carbon in the uranium to react with the yttrium. The yttrium is either in direct contact with the contaminated uranium or in indirect contact by means of an intermediate transport medium.

Powell, George L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Heat exchanger with a removable tube section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is described in which the tube sheet is secured against primary liquid pressure, but which allows for easy removal of the tube section. The tube section is supported by a flange which is secured by a number of shear blocks, each of which extends into a slot which is immovable with respect to the outer shell of the heat exchanger. (auth)

Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.

1975-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

262

REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The removal of chlorides from aqueons solutions is described. The process involves contacting the aqueous chloride containing solution with a benzene solution about 0.005 M in phenyl mercuric acetate whereby the chloride anions are taken up by the organic phase and separating the organic phase from the aqueous solutions.

Schulz, W.W.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications. 1 fig.

Arnold, C. Jr.; Derzon, D.K.; Nelson, J.S.; Rand, P.B.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

264

Article Removal of Mercury by Foam Fractionation Using Surfactin,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The separation of mercury ions from artificially contaminated water by the foam fractionation process using a biosurfactant (surfactin) and chemical surfactants (SDS and Tween-80) was investigated in this study. Parameters such as surfactant and mercury concentration, pH, foam volume, and digestion time were varied and their effects on the efficiency of mercury removal were investigated. The recovery efficiency of mercury ionsInt. J. Mol. Sci. 2011, 12 8246 was highly sensitive to the concentration of the surfactant. The highest mercury ion recovery by surfactin was obtained using a surfactin concentration of 10 × CMC, while recovery using SDS required 10 × CMC. However, the enrichment of mercury

A Biosurfactant; Hau-ren Chen; Chien-cheng Chen; A. Satyanarayana Reddy; Chien-yen Chen; Wun Rong Li; Min-jen Tseng; Hung-tsan Liu; Wei Pan; Jyoti Prakash Maity; Shashi B. Atla

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Method of dye removal for the textile industry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention comprises a method of processing a waste stream containing dyes, such as a dye bath used in the textile industry. The invention comprises using an inorganic-based polymer, such as polyphosphazene, to separate dyes and/or other chemicals from the waste stream. Membranes comprising polyphosphazene have the chemical and thermal stability to survive the harsh, high temperature environment of dye waste streams, and have been shown to completely separate dyes from the waste stream. Several polyphosplhazene membranes having a variety of organic substituent have been shown effective in removing color from waste streams.

Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Removal of sulfur and nitrogen containing pollutants from discharge gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Oxides of sulfur and of nitrogen are removed from waste gases by reaction with an unsupported copper oxide powder to form copper sulfate. The resulting copper sulfate is dissolved in water to effect separation from insoluble mineral ash and dried to form solid copper sulfate pentahydrate. This solid sulfate is thermally decomposed to finely divided copper oxide powder with high specific surface area. The copper oxide powder is recycled into contact with the waste gases requiring cleanup. A reducing gas can be introduced to convert the oxide of nitrogen pollutants to nitrogen.

Joubert, James I. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Improved Cobalt Removal: Field Testing Phase: Effects of Normally Encountered Plant Impurities on Removal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined the effects of plant impurities on cobalt removal from liquid radioactive waste. Improved process knowledge is critical to utilities that are continually working to increase the performance of their low-level waste (LLW) treatment systems. This report provides predictive chemistry information for improved cobalt removal obtained from test work at Catawba Nuclear Station. It also provides test methodologies for performing similar evaluations at other member plants.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

268

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids Final Technical Report (From October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2005) Principle Authors Aihua Zhang, Qisheng Ma, Kangshi Wang, Yongchun Tang (co-PI), William A. Goddard (PI), Date Report was issued: December 9, 2005 DOE Award number: DE-FC26-02NT15383 Name and Address of Submitting Organization California Institute of Technology 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA91125 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

269

Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: a. treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10 and, b. separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (a) and (b) are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Photoacoustic removal of occlusions from blood vessels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Partial or total occlusions of fluid passages within the human body are removed by positioning an array of optical fibers in the passage and directing treatment radiation pulses along the fibers, one at a time, to generate a shock wave and hydrodynamics flows that strike and emulsify the occlusions. A preferred application is the removal of blood clots (thrombin and embolic) from small cerebral vessels to reverse the effects of an ischemic stroke. The operating parameters and techniques are chosen to minimize the amount of heating of the fragile cerebral vessel walls occurring during this photo acoustic treatment. One such technique is the optical monitoring of the existence of hydrodynamics flow generating vapor bubbles when they are expected to occur and stopping the heat generating pulses propagated along an optical fiber that is not generating such bubbles.

Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Maitland, IV, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA); Esch, Victor C. (San Francisco, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Method of removing cesium from steam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The foregoing objects of the present invention are achieved by a method for removing radioactive cesium from a hot vapor, such as steam, by a technique wherein the cesium chemically reacts with a filtering material which retains the cesium without causing degradation of the filtering material. The method is carried out at temperatures in the range of from about 700{degree}F to about 1000{degree}F, and even higher, but it preferably is utilized at a temperature of at least about 800{degree}F. The method uses a silica glass which is preferably in the form of spheres as the filter material. The preferred material is a borosilicate glass (Pyrex). The degree of removal of the radioactive cesium from the hot steam or other vapor approaches 90 to 100%.

Carson, N.J. Jr.; Noland, R.A.; Ruther, W.E.

1990-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

272

Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

273

Categorical Exclusion 4568, Crane Removal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

l)eterminationFornl l)eterminationFornl Project Title: Crane Removal Project (4568) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is to remove an old legacy crane trolley and old crane operated cab. General Administration/Management DA I - Routine business actions DA2 - Administrative contract amendments DA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations DA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect DA6 - Procedural rulemakings upgrade DA7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged DA8 - Award of technical support/M&O/personal service contracts DA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training DAIO - Reports on non-DOE legislation DA II - Technical advice and planning assistance

274

IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the second year of this project, we continued our effort to develop low temperature decarboxylation catalysts and investigate the behavior of these catalysts at different reaction conditions. We conducted a large number of dynamic measurements with crude oil and model compounds to obtain the information at different reaction stages, which was scheduled as the Task2 in our work plan. We developed a novel adsorption method to remove naphthenic acid from crude oil using naturally occurring materials such as clays. Our results show promise as an industrial application. The theoretical modeling proposed several possible reaction pathways and predicted the reactivity depending on the catalysts employed. From all of these studies, we obtained more comprehensive understanding about catalytic decarboxylation and oil upgrading based on the naphthenic acid removal concept.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang, William A. Goddard, Yongchun Tang

2005-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

275

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Makarewicz, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Meredith, Paul F. (Knoxville, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Makarewicz, M.A.; Meredith, P.F.

1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

277

Trojan PWR Decommissioning: Large Component Removal Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the decommissioning of large commercial nuclear plants in the United States is in its infancy, the technical challenges with associated radioactive waste management are clear. This report describes the removal and disposal of four steam generators and one pressurizer from the Trojan nuclear power plant, the first large PWR to be decommissioned in the United States. The report chronicles the problems, successes, and lessons learned in this project, which was completed on schedule and under budget in...

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

278

Removal of iron from impure graphites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Iron-impregnated and ash-rich graphites have been purified by leaching with gaseous I/sub 2/ at 900/sup 0/C. With addition of H/sub 2/, the rate of removal of impurity iron can be markedly increased and becomes comparable to that obtained with Cl/sub 2/. I/sub 2/ has an advantage in that it can also volatilize Ca and perhaps Ba and Sr.

Growcock, F.B.; Heiser, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

1987-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Process for removing sulfur from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

Aida, T.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.

1983-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

282

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, Milton (12833 S. 82nd Ct., Palos Park, IL 60464); Sinha, Shome N. (5748 Drexel, 2A, Chicago, IL 60637)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications  

SciTech Connect

ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) has proven effective at removing high concentrations of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate--bottom ash from coal fired power plants--is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing an arsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Addy, Susan E.A.

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

284

Removal of the Solar Component in AVHRR 3.7-µm Radiances for the Retrieval of Cirrus Cloud Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical scheme has been developed to remove the solar component in the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) 3.7-µm channel for the retrieval of cirrus parameters during daytime. This method uses a number of prescribed threshold ...

N. X. Rao; S. C. Ou; K. N. Liou

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

File Code: IH88 SHSD ARAF Form Revision: 12/20/11 ASBESTOS REMOVAL ASSESSMENT FORM (ARAF) IH Job #  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

____________ ESHR Blanda Ferrone Martino Rankine Zanoni TYPE OF ABATEMENT ____ Remove ACM ____ Encapsulate ACM ____ Other: _______________________________ AIR SAMPLING ____ Pre-test, Background ____ Area Sample __ High with HEPA ____ Supplied Air ____ SCBA ____ Tyvek Suit _____ Double Suit ____ Boots ____ Gloves ____ Goggles

Homes, Christopher C.

286

Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

Cha, Chang Y. (3807 Reynolds St., Laramie, WY 82070)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

288

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag.

Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN); Trowbridge, Lee D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stories Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time The Lab's 1,000th shipment of transuranic waste recently left Los Alamos,...

290

DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary DOE removes all remaining HEU...

291

Method for removal of methane from coalbeds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing methane gas from underground coalbeds prior to mining the coal which comprises drilling at least one borehole from the surface into the coalbed. The borehole is started at a slant rather than directly vertically, and as it descends, a gradual curve is followed until a horizontal position is reached where the desired portion of the coalbed is intersected. Approaching the coalbed in this manner and fracturing the coalbed in the major natural fraction direction cause release of large amounts of the trapped methane gas.

Pasini, III, Joseph (Morgantown, WV); Overbey, Jr., William K. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Waste Characterization Data Manual for the inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Waste Characterization Data Manual contains the results of an analysis of the contents of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service in accordance with the requirements of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), Section IX.G.1. Section IX.G.1 of the FFA requires waste characterizations be conducted and provided to EPA and TDEC for all LLLW tanks that are removed from service. These waste characterizations shall include the results of sampling and analysis of the tank contents, including wastes, liquids, and sludges. This manual was first issued as ORNL/ER-80 in June 1992. The waste characterization data were extracted from ORNL reports that described tank sampling and analysis conducted in 1988 for 32 out-of-service tanks. This revision of the manual contains waste characterization data for 54 tanks, including the 32 tanks from the 1988 sampling campaign (Sects. 2.1 through 2.32) and the 22 additional tanks from a subsequent sampling campaign in 1992 and 1993 (Sects. 2.33 through 2.54). Data are presented from analyses of volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, radiochemical compounds, and inorganic compounds. As additional data resulting from analyses of out-of-service tank samples become available, they will be added to this manual.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Sustainable agricultural residue removal for bioenergy: A spatially comprehensive US national assessment  

SciTech Connect

This study provides a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal potential across the United States for bioenergy production. Earlier assessments determining the quantity of agricultural residue that could be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at the regional and national scale faced a number of computational limitations. These limitations included the number of environmental factors, the number of land management scenarios, and the spatial fidelity and spatial extent of the assessment. This study utilizes integrated multi-factor environmental process modeling and high fidelity land use datasets to perform the sustainable agricultural residue removal assessment. Soil type represents the base spatial unit for this study and is modeled using a national soil survey database at the 10–100 m scale. Current crop rotation practices are identified by processing land cover data available from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer database. Land management and residue removal scenarios are identified for each unique crop rotation and crop management zone. Estimates of county averages and state totals of sustainably available agricultural residues are provided. The results of the assessment show that in 2011 over 150 million metric tons of agricultural residues could have been sustainably removed across the United States. Projecting crop yields and land management practices to 2030, the assessment determines that over 207 million metric tons of agricultural residues will be able to be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at that time. This biomass resource has the potential for producing over 68 billion liters of cellulosic biofuels.

Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory; Bryden, Kenneth Mark [Ames L; Nelson, R. G. [Kansas State University

2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

294

Removal of Fluoride from Waste Water of Aluminium Smelter by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , General Abstracts: Light Metals Division. Presentation Title, Removal of ...

295

Method for removing fluoride contamination from nitric acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fluoride ions are removed from nitric acid solution by contacting the vaporized solution with alumina or zirconium.

Pruett, David J. (Knoxville, TN); Howerton, William B. (Kingston, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Removing Pollutants from Water, Solar Energy - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 5, 2013 ... B. Materials for the Environment: Removing Pollutants from Water, Solar Energy Program Organizers: Fernand Marquis, Naval Postgraduate ...

297

Powder Removal from Complex Structures Produced Using Electron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Additive Manufacturing of Metals. Presentation Title, Powder Removal from ...

298

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

299

Removal of Inclusions from Solar Grade Silicon Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polysilicon in Photovoltaics: Market Conditions & Competing PV Technologies ... Removal of Inclusions from Solar Grade Silicon Using Electromagnetic Field.

300

Modified Bayer Process for Alumina Removal from Hanford Waste  

AREVA NC Inc. Modified Bayer Process for Alumina Removal from Hanford Waste January 24, 2007 Don Geniesse AREVA NC Inc.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) Decay Heat Removal Concepts  

SciTech Connect

Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with an outlet temperature of 850şC at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GFR. These are Euratom (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, Euratom (including the United Kingdom), France, and Japan have active research activities with respect to the GFR. The research includes GFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This report is a compilation of work performed on decay heat removal systems for a 2400 MWt GFR during this fiscal year (FY05).

K. D. Weaver; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Removal design report for the 108-F Biological Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the 100-F facilities were deactivated with the reactor and have since been demolished. Of the dozen or so reactor-related structures, only the 105-F Reactor Building and the 108-F Biology Laboratory remain standing today. The 108-F Biology Laboratory was intended to be used as a facility for the mixing and addition of chemicals used in the treatment of the reactor cooling water. Shortly after F Reactor began operation, it was determined that the facility was not needed for this purpose. In 1949, the building was converted for use as a biological laboratory. In 1962, the lab was expanded by adding a three-story annex to the original four-story structure. The resulting lab had a floor area of approximately 2,883 m{sup 2} (main building and annex) that operated until 1973. The building contained 47 laboratories, a number of small offices, a conference room, administrative section, lunch and locker rooms, and a heavily shielded, high-energy exposure cell. The purpose of this removal design report is to establish the methods of decontamination and decommissioning and the supporting functions associated with facility removal and disposal.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention in one aspect comprises a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous-derived liquids by contacting said liquid with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene polymer (i.e. PS-DVB) having catechol ligands anchored to said polymer, said contacting being at an elevated temperature. In another aspect, the invention is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene polymer by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid in accordance with the aspect described above which regenerating process comprises: (a) treating said spent catecholated polystyrene polymer with an aqueous solution of at least one member selected from the group consisting of carbonates and bicarbonates of ammonium, alkali metals, and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10, and said treating being at a temperature in the range of about 20/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/C; (b) separating the solids and liquids from each other. In a preferred embodiment the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step: (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution which includes at least one lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (c) and (d) are added. Steps (c) and (d) comprise: (c) treating the solids with an aqueous alcoholic solution of at least one ammonium, alkali or alkaline earth metal bicarbonate at a temperature in the range of about 20 to 100/sup 0/C; and (d) separating the solids from the liquids.

Fish, R.H.

1984-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

304

Process for removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permitting the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Hancher, C.W.; Saunders, M.B.; Googin, J.M.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

305

HAPs-Rx: Precombustion Removal of Hazardous Air Pollutant Precursors  

SciTech Connect

CQ Inc. and its project team members--Howard University, PrepTech Inc., Fossil Fuel Sciences, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and industry advisors--are applying mature coal cleaning and scientific principles to the new purpose of removing potentially hazardous air pollutants from coal. The team uniquely combines mineral processing, chemical engineering, and geochemical expertise. This project meets more than 11 goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Energy Strategy, and the 1993 Climate Change Action Plan. During this project: (1) Equations were developed to predict the concentration of trace elements in as-mined and cleaned coals. These equations, which address both conventional and advanced cleaning processes, can be used to increase the removal of hazardous air pollutant precursors (HAPs) by existing cleaning plants and to improve the design of new cleaning plants. (2) A promising chemical method of removing mercury and other HAPs was developed. At bench-scale, mercury reductions of over 50 percent were achieved on coal that had already been cleaned by froth flotation. The processing cost of this technology is projected to be less than $3.00 per ton ($3.30 per tonne). (3) Projections were made of the average trace element concentration in cleaning plant solid waste streams from individual states. Average concentrations were found to be highly variable. (4) A significantly improved understanding of how trace elements occur in coal was gained, primarily through work at the USGS during the first systematic development of semiquantitative data for mode of occurrence. In addition, significant improvement was made in the laboratory protocol for mode of occurrence determination. (5) Team members developed a high-quality trace element washability database. For example, the poorest mass balance closure for the uncrushed size and washability data for mercury on all four coals is 8.44 percent and the best is 0.46 percent. This indicates an extremely high level of reproducibility of the data. In addition, a series of ''round-robin'' tests involving various laboratories was performed to assure analytical accuracy. (6) A comparison of the cost of lowering mercury emissions through the use of coal cleaning technologies versus the use of post-combustion control methods such as activated carbon injection indicates that, in many cases, coal cleaning may prove to be the lower-cost option. The most significant disadvantage for using coal cleaning for control of mercury emissions is that a reduction of 90 percent or greater from as-fired coal has not yet been demonstrated, even at laboratory-scale.

David J. Akers; Clifford E. Raleigh

1998-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

306

Removal of Textile Dye using Electrocoagulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effluent from these processes includes suspended particles, strong color, high pH and high chemical oxygen demand (COD) that are extremely toxic and ...

307

Remedial action plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. Volume 1, Text, Appendices A, B, and C: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a dual purpose. It presents the series of activities that is proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to stabilize and control radioactive materials at the inactive Phillips/United Nuclear uranium processing site designated as the Ambrosia Lake site in McKinley County, New Mexico. It also serves to document the concurrence of both State of New Mexico and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the state and concurrence by NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement.

Matthews, M.L. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States). Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office; Mitzelfelt, R. [New Mexico Health and Environment Dept., Santa Fe, NM (United States). Environmental Improvement Div.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed- Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanford’s 300 Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, WA – Hanford’s River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has met a significant cleanup challenge on the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site by removing a 1,082-ton nuclear test reactor from the 300 Area.

309

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

310

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

311

CLEANSPACE 'Small Debris Removal By Laser Illumination And Complementary Technologies'  

SciTech Connect

Studies show that the number of debris in Low Earth Orbit is exponentially growing despite future debris release mitigation measures considered. Especially, the already existing population of small and medium debris (between 1 cm and several dozens of cm) is today a concrete threat to operational satellites. A ground based laser solution which can remove at low expense and in a non-destructive way hazardous debris of decimetric size around selected space assets appears as one highly promising answer. This solution will be studied in the frame of CLEANSPACE project which is a part of the FP7 space theme. The overall CLEANSPACE objective is threefold: to propose an efficient and affordable global system architecture, to tackle safety regulation aspects, political implications and future collaborations, to develop affordable technological bricks and to establish roadmap for the development and the future implantation of a fully functional laser protection system. This paper will present the CLEANSPACE project.

Esmiller, Bruno [Astrium Space Transportation, 66 route de Verneuil, 78133 Les Mureaux (France); Jacquelard, Christophe [CILAS, 8 avenue Buffon - ZI La Source - BP 6319, 45063 Orleans (France)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

312

Spectral Line Removal in the LIGO Data Analysis System (LDAS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High power in narrow frequency bands, spectral lines, are a feature of an interferometric gravitational wave detector's output. Some lines are coherent between interferometers, in particular, the 2 km and 4 km LIGO Hanford instruments. This is of concern to data analysis techniques, such as the stochastic background search, that use correlations between instruments to detect gravitational radiation. Several techniques of `line removal' have been proposed. Where a line is attributable to a measurable environmental disturbance, a simple linear model may be fitted to predict, and subsequently subtract away, that line. This technique has been implemented (as the command oelslr) in the LIGO Data Analysis System (LDAS). We demonstrate its application to LIGO S1 data.

Antony C. Searle; Susan M. Scott; David E. McClelland

2003-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

313

Removal of Dioxin Contamination for Gas Turbine Generator Set Repair  

SciTech Connect

Decontamination projects are typically undertaken in the interest of reducing disposal costs. This goal can be achieved because decontamination concentrates the contaminant into a smaller volume or changes its form so that a lower cost disposal technology becomes available. Less frequently, decontamination adds value back to the fouled structure or contaminated piece of equipment. This removal of dioxins from a gas turbine generator set is one of the latter cases. A multi-million dollar piece of equipment could have been destined for the scrap pile. Instead, an innovative, non-destructive decontamination technology, developed under EPA and DOE demonstration programs has was employed so that the set could repaired and put back into service. The TechXtractchemical decontamination technology reduced surface dioxin / furan concentrations from as high as 24,000 ng / m2 to less than 25 ng / m2 and below detection limits.

Fay, W. S.; Borah, R.E.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

314

Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste sludge: Status Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the status of process development for pretreating Hanford neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge, of which [approximately] 3.3 [times] 10[sup 6] L is stored in Tanks 103-AW and 105-AW at the Hanford Site. The initial baseline process chosen for pretreating NCRW sludge is to dissolve the sludge in nitric acid and extract the -transuranic (MU) elements from the dissolved sludge solution with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl methyl phosphine oxide (CNWO). This process converts the NCRW sludge into a relatively large volume of low-level waste (LLW) to be disposed of as grout, leaving only a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) requiring vitrification in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP).

Lumetta, G J; Swanson, J L

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Categorical Exclusion 4566, Ash Removal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOrnI FOrnI Project Title: Ash Removal Project (4566) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is to split, containerize, package, transport and disposition one hundred and two (102) cans of mixed waste. General Administration/Management OA I - Routine business actions OA2 * Administrative contract amendments OA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations OA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect OA6 - Procedural rule makings upgrade OA 7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged OA8 . Award of technical supportlM&O/personal service contracts OA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training OA 10 - Reports on non-DOE legislation OA II -

316

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

SciTech Connect

This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

317

IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS  

SciTech Connect

In the first year of this project, we have established our experimental and theoretical methodologies for studies of the catalytic decarboxylation process. We have developed both glass and stainless steel micro batch type reactors for the fast screening of various catalysts with reaction substrates of model carboxylic acid compounds and crude oil samples. We also developed novel product analysis methods such as GC analyses for organic acids and gaseous products; and TAN measurements for crude oil. Our research revealed the effectiveness of several solid catalysts such as NA-Cat-1 and NA-Cat-2 for the catalytic decarboxylation of model compounds; and NA-Cat-5{approx}NA-Cat-9 for the acid removal from crude oil. Our theoretical calculations propose a three-step concerted oxidative decarboxylation mechanism for the NA-Cat-1 catalyst.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang

2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

318

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

319

Novel methods for respirable dust removal. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Two novel devices with potential for controlling emissions of dust particles in the respirable size range (0.3 to 3 microns) are the electrostatically enhanced cyclone (or electrocyclone) and acoustic agglomeration. The electrocyclone combines electrostatic, inertial forces and larger unit size compared to conventional cyclones to achieve improved performance. The acoustic agglomerator uses an oscillating acoustic flow field to cause particle collision and agglomeration. The resulting large particles are then more readily separable by conventional methods. The application of these novel methods to respirable dust control in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and conventional pulverized coal combustion for electric power generation is explored in this study. In a PFBC power plant, dust particles entrained in the combustion gases must be removed at high temperature and pressure in order to protect a gas turbine from erosion. A key technical issue in this application is whether the hot gas cleanup equipment can satisfy the NSPS, or whether supplementary stack gas cleanup, such as a baghouse, is required downstream of the gas turbine. The potential of both the electrocyclone and the acoustic agglomerator for achieving NSPS ahead of the gas turbine has been assessed. In conventional PC power plants, particulate cleanup is normally accomplished with electrostatic precipitators. However, plants burning low sulfur western coals have experienced difficulty achieving adequate particulate emissions control with electrostatic precipitators, due to the high resistivity of the coal ash. For these applications the electrocyclone or an acoustic agglomerator coupled with either an electrocyclone or more conventional removal technique, might prove attractive. The principal conclusions drawn from the work performed and the recommendations based on the results are detailed. (LTN)

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Using Magnetically Responsive Tea Waste to Remove Lead in Waters under Environmentally Relevant Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the use of a simple yet highly effective magnetite-waste tea composite to remove lead(II) (Pb[superscript 2+]) ions from water. Magnetite-waste tea composites were dispersed in four different types of water–deionized ...

Yeo, Siang Yee

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Process for removal of hydrogen halides or halogens from incinerator gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for reducing the amount of halogens and halogen acids in high temperature combustion gases and through their removal, the formation of halogenated organics at lower temperatures, with the reduction being carried out electrochemically by contacting the combustion gas with the negative electrode of an electrochemical cell and with the halogen and/or halogen acid being recovered at the positive electrode.

Huang, Hann S. (Darien, IL); Sather, Norman F. (Naperville, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Acid Gas Removal by Customized Sorbents for Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to reduce exergy losses, gas cleaning at high temperatures is favored in IGFC systems. As shown by thermodynamic data, separation efficiencies of common sorbents decrease with increasing temperature. Therefore, acid gas removal systems have to be developed for IGFC applications considering sorbent capacity, operation temperature, gasification feedstock composition and fuel cell threshold values.

Kapfenberger, J.; Sohnemann, J.; Schleitzer, D.; Loewen, A.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

323

Precipitation process for the removal of technetium values from nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High efficiency removal of techetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

Walker, D.D.; Ebra, M.A.

1985-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

324

Process for removal of hydrogen halides or halogens from incinerator gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for reducing the amount of halogens and halogen acids in high temperature combustion gas and through their removal, the formation of halogenated organics at lower temperatures, with the reduction being carried out electrochemically by contacting the combustion gas with the negative electrode of an electrochemical cell and with the halogen and/or halogen acid being recovered at the positive electrode.

Huang, H.S.; Sather, N.F.

1987-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

325

Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Falls City, Texas. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, Geology report; Attachment 3, Groundwater hydrology report; Attachment 4, Water resources protection strategy: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RAP, which includes this summary remedial action selection report (RAS), serves a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Texas, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Texas.

Chernoff, A.R. [USDOE Albuquerque Field Office, NM (United States). Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office; Lacker, D.K. [Texas State Dept. of Health, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Radiation Control

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Attachment 3, Groundwater hydrology report, Attachment 4, Water resources protection strategy: Preliminary final  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established health and environmental protection regulations to correct and prevent groundwater contamination resulting from processing activities at inactive uranium milling sites (40 CFR 192). The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 designated responsibility to the US Department of Energy (DOE) for assessing the inactive uranium milling sites. The DOE has determined that each assessment shall include information on site characterization, a description of the proposed action, and a summary of the water resources protection strategy that describes how the proposed action will comply with the EPA groundwater protection standards. To achieve compliance with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater protection standards, the US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes that supplemental standards be applied at the Dry Flats disposal site because of Class III (limited use) groundwater in the uppermost aquifer (the basal sandstone of the Cretaceous Burro Canyon Formation) based on low yield. The proposed remedial action will ensure protection of human health and the environment.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Remedial action plan for the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, geology report; Attachment 3, ground water hydrology report; Attachment 4, supplemental information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), 42 USC {section} 7901 et seq. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This RAP serves two purposes. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Second, this RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the state of Colorado, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the cooperative agreement between the DOE and the state of Colorado.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Apparatus and method for removing particle species from fusion-plasma-confinement devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a mirror fusion plasma confinement apparatus, method and apparatus are provided for selectively removing (pumping) trapped low energy (thermal) particle species from the end cell region, without removing the still useful high energy particle species, and without requiring large power input to accomplish the pumping. Perturbation magnets are placed in the thermal barrier region of the end cell region at the turning point characteristic of trapped thermal particles, thus deflecting the thermal particles from their closed trajectory, causing them to drift sufficiently to exit the thermal barrier.

Hamilton, G.W.

1981-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

329

Upstream H/sub 2/S removal from geothermal steam. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to evaluate a new heat exchanger process as a method for removing hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) gas from geothermal steam upstream of a power plant turbine. The process utilizes a heat exchanger to condense geothermal steam so that noncondensable gases (including H/sub 2/S) can be removed in the form of a concentrated vent stream. Ultimate disposal of the removed H/sub 2/S gas may then be accomplished by use of other processes such as the commercially available Stretford process. The clean condensate is reevaporated on the other side of the heat exchanger using the heat removed from the condensing geothermal steam. The necessary heat transfer is induced by maintaining a slight pressure difference, and consequently a slight temperature difference, between the two sides of the heat exchanger. Evaluation of this condensing and reboiling process was performed primarily through the testing of a small-scale 14 m/sup 2/ (150 ft/sup 2/) vertical tube evaporator heat exchanger at The Geysers Power Plant in northern California. The field test results demonstrated H/sub 2/S removal rates consistently better than 90 percent, with an average removal rate of 94 percent. In addition, the removal rate for all noncondensable gases is about 98 percent. Heat transfer rates were high enough to indicate acceptable economics for application of the process on a commercial scale. The report also includes an evaluation of the cost and performance of various configurations of the system, and presents design and cost estimates for a 2.5 MWe and a 55 MWe unit.

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Metal Cutting for Large Component Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of large components mainly consisting of the reactor vessel, steam generators and pressurizer. In order to remove and package these large components nozzles must be cut from the reactor vessel to precise tolerances. In some cases steam generators must be segmented for size and weight reduction. One innovative technology that has been used successfully at several commercial nuclear plant decommissioning is diamond wire sawing. Diamond wire sawing is performed by rotating a cable with diamond segments attached using a flywheel approximately 24 inches in diameter driven remotely by a hydraulic pump. Tension is provided using a gear rack drive which also takes up the slack in the wire. The wire is guided through the use of pulleys keeps the wire in a precise location. The diamond wire consists of 1/4 inch aircraft cable with diamond beads strung over the cable separated by springs and brass crimps. Standard wire contains 40 diamond beads per meter and can be made to any length. Cooling the wire and controlling the spread of contamination presents significant challenges. Under normal circumstances the wire is cooled and the cutting kerf cleaned by using water. In some cases of reactor nozzle cuts the use of water is prohibited because it cannot be controlled. This challenge was solved by using liquid Carbon Dioxide as the cooling agent. The liquid CO{sub 2} is passed through a special nozzle which atomizes the liquid into snowflakes which is introduced under pressure to the wire. The snowflakes attach to the wire keeping it cool and to the metal shavings. As the CO{sub 2} and metal shavings are released from the wire due to its fast rotation, the snowflakes evaporate leaving only the fine metal shavings as waste. Secondary waste produced is simply the small volume of fine metal shavings removed from the cut surface. Diamond wire sawing using CO{sub 2} cooling has been employed for cutting the reactor nozzles at San Onofre Unit 1 and at Connecticut Yankee. These carbon steel nozzles ranged up to 54 inch diameter with a 15 inch thick wall and an interior stainless cladding. Diamond wire sawing using traditional water cooling has been used to segment the reactor head at Rancho Seco and for cutting reactor nozzles and control rod drive tubes at Dairyland Power's Lacrosse BWR project. Advantages: - ALARA: All cutting is preformed remotely significantly reducing dose. Stringing of wires is accomplished using long handle tools. - Secondary waste is reduced to just the volume of material cut with the diamond wire. - The potential for airborne contamination is eliminated. Due to the flexibility of the wire, any access restrictions and interferences can be accommodated using pulleys and long handle tools. - The operation is quiet. Disadvantages: - With Liquid Carbon Dioxide cooling and cleaning, delivery of the material must be carefully planned. The longer the distance from the source to the cut area, the greater the chance for pressure drop and subsequent problems with line freezing. - Proper shrouding and ventilation are required for environmental reasons. In each case, the metal structures were cut at a precise location. Radiation dose was reduced significantly by operating the equipment from a remote location. The cuts were very smooth and completed on schedule. Each project must be analyzed individually and take into account many factors including access, radiological conditions, environmental conditions, schedule requirements, packaging requirements and size of cuts.

Hulick, Robert M. [Bluegrass Concrete Cutting Inc., 107 Mildred Street PO Box 427, Greenville, Alabama 36037 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Mercury Removal from Aqueous Systems Using Commercial and Laboratory Prepared Metal Oxide Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Five commercial metal oxide nanoparticles (CuO, SiO2, Fe2O3, TiO2 and Al2O3) have been individually screened for mercury removal in a batch reactor under bicarbonate buffered and non-buffered aqueous solutions (DI water). Copper oxide was then selected for surface modification to enhance mercury removal. The surfaces of both laboratory prepared and commercially available copper oxide nanoparticles were treated with 1-octanethiol to produce copper sulfide and/or copper alkanethiol nanoparticles. The resulting particles were characterized using X-Ray Fluorescence(XRF), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The novel nanoparticles demonstrated very high mercury removal (> 99%) from both the buffered and non-buffered aqueous solutions.

Desai, Ishan

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Three dimensional electrode for the electrolytic removal of contaminants from aqueous waste streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Efficient and cost-effective electrochemical devices and processes for the remediation of aqueous waste streams. The invention provides electrolytic cells having a high surface area spouted electrode for removal of heavy metals and oxidation of organics from aqueous environments. Heavy metal ions are reduced, deposited on cathode particles of a spouted bed cathode and removed from solution. Organics are efficiently oxidized at anode particles of a spouted bed anode and removed from solution. The method of this inventions employs an electrochemical cell having an anolyte compartment and a catholyte compartment, separated by a microporous membrane, in and through which compartments anolyte and catholyte, respectively, are circulated. A spouted-bed electrode is employed as the cathode for metal deposition from contaminated aqueous media introduced as catholyte and as the anode for oxidation of organics from contaminated aqueous media introduced as anolyte.

Spiegel, Ella F. (Louisville, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

A Progressive Morphological Filter for Removing Nonground Measurements from Airborne LIDAR Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent advances in airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) technology allow rapid and inexpensive measurements of topography over large areas. This technology is becoming a primary method for generating high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) that are essential to numerous applications such as flood modeling and landslide prediction. Airborne LIDAR systems usually return a three-dimensional cloud of point measurements from reflective objects scanned by the laser beneath the flight path. In order to generate a DTM, measurements from nonground features such as buildings, vehicles, and vegetation have to be classified and removed. In this paper, a progressive morphological filter was developed to detect nongroundLIDARmeasurements.By gradually increasingthe window size of the filter andusing elevation difference thresholds, themeasurements of vehicles, vegetation, and buildings are removed, while ground data are preserved. Datasets from mountainous and flat urbanized areas were selected to test the progressive morphological filter. The results show that the filter can remove most of the nonground points effectively.

Keqi Zhang; Shu-ching Chen; Dean Whitman; Mei-ling Shyu; Jianhua Yan; Chengcui Zhang; Student Member

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

ADVANCES IN HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for conversion to the new resin. This paper will describe the results of the testing, performance in the facilities, continued optimization in the pump and treat facilities, and the estimated savings and non-tangible benefits of the conversion.

NESHEM DO; RIDDELLE J

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

335

Feasibility study for early removal of HEU from CPP-651-Phase II  

SciTech Connect

A two-phase feasibility study was initiated in late 1996 to identify a way to expedite the removal of SNM from the CPP-651 vault. The first phase of this study provided preliminary information that appeared promising, but needed additional detailed planning and evaluate to validate the concepts and conclusions. The focus of Phase 2 was to provide the validation via resource-loaded schedules and more detailed cost estimates. Section 1 describes the purpose and objectives of the Phase 2 tasks and the programmatic drivers that influence related CPP-651 high-enriched uranium (HEU) management issues. Section 2 identifies the evaluation criteria and methodology and the transfer issues and barriers preventing shipment. Section 3 provides site-specific background information for the CPP-651 facility and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and describes the development of the basic material removal schedule, the proposed base case plan for removal of SNM, and the proposed HEU material management/shipping issues and strategies. Section 4 identifies the proposed options for accelerated removal of SNM and how they were evaluated via detailed scheduling, resource histograms, and cost analysis. Section 5 summarizes principal tasks for implementing this plan and other related HEU CPP-651 management issues that require continued planning efforts to assure successful implementation of this proposed early removal strategy.

Smith, C.V.; Henry, R.; Milligan, C.; Harmon, B.; Peterson, J.; Thom, M.A.; Campbell, R.; Hendrix, B.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Regulatory compliance issues related to the White Oak Creek Embayment time-critical removal action  

SciTech Connect

In September 1990, Martin Marietta Energy Systems (Energy Systems) discovered high levels of Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) in surface sedimenus near the mouth of White Oak Creek Embayment (WOCE). White Oak Creek (WOC) receives surface water drainage from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Since this discovery, the Department of Energy (DOE) and Energy Systems have pursued actions designed to stabilize the contaminated WOCE sediments under provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the implementing regulations in the National Contingency Plan (NCP) (40 CFR Part 300), as a time-critical removal action. By definition, a time-critical removal is an action where onsite activities are initiated within six months of the determination that a removal action is appropriate. Time-critical removal actions allow comparatively rapid mobilization to protect human health and the environment without going through the lengthy and extensive CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study/Record of Decision process. Many aspects of the project, in terms of compliance with the substantive requirements of the NCP and ARARs, have exceeded the regulatory requirements, despite the fact that there is no apparent authority on conducting removal actions at Federal facilities. Much of the interpretation of the NCP was groundbreaking in nature for both EPA and DOE. 4 refs., 2 figs.

Leslie, M. (CDM Federal Programs Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Kimmel, B.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path. 2 figures.

Corletti, M.M.; Schulz, T.L.

1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

338

Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path.

Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

FLOWSHEET FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM SLUDGE BATCH 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of Tank 12 sludge slurry show a substantially larger fraction of aluminum than originally identified in sludge batch planning. The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to formulate Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with about one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 12 and one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 4. LWO identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days and dissolved nearly 80% of the aluminum in the sludge slurry. In 2008, LWO successfully dissolved 64% of the aluminum at approximately 60 C in 46 days with minimal tank modifications and using only slurry pumps as a heat source. This report establishes the technical basis and flowsheet for performing an aluminum removal process in Tank 51 for SB6 that incorporates the lessons learned from previous aluminum dissolution evolutions. For SB6, aluminum dissolution process temperature will be held at a minimum of 65 C for at least 24 days, but as long as practical or until as much as 80% of the aluminum is dissolved. As planned, an aluminum removal process can reduce the aluminum in SB6 from about 84,500 kg to as little as 17,900 kg with a corresponding reduction of total insoluble solids in the batch from 246,000 kg to 131,000 kg. The extent of the reduction may be limited by the time available to maintain Tank 51 at dissolution temperature. The range of dissolution in four weeks based on the known variability in dissolution kinetics can range from 44 to more than 80%. At 44% of the aluminum dissolved, the mass reduction is approximately 1/2 of the mass noted above, i.e., 33,300 kg of aluminum instead of 66,600 kg. Planning to reach 80% of the aluminum dissolved should allow a maximum of 81 days for dissolution and reduce the allowance if test data shows faster kinetics. 47,800 kg of the dissolved aluminum will be stored in Tank 8 and 21,000 kg will be stored in saltcake via evaporation. Up to 77% of the total aluminum planned for SB6 may be removed via aluminum dissolution. Storage of the aluminum-laden supernate in Tank 8 will require routine evaluation of the free hydroxide concentration in order to maintain aluminum in solution. Periodic evaluation will be established on concurrent frequency with corrosion program samples as previously established for aluminum-laden supernate from SB5 that is stored in Tank 11.

Pike, J; Jeffrey Gillam, J

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

340

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL’s greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A.

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341

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and

342

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL’s greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A.

343

NETL: News Release - Innovative Mercury Removal Technique Shows Early  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 5, 2003 August 5, 2003 Innovative Mercury Removal Technique Shows Early Promise Photochemical Process Developed in Federal Lab Removes Mercury from Flue Gas - NETL scientist Evan Granite prepares a lab test of the UV mercury removal process. - NETL scientist Evan Granite prepares for a lab test of the UV mercury removal process. MORGANTOWN, WV - A promising technology to remove mercury from coal-fired power plants -- dubbed the "GP-254 Process" -- has been developed and is currently being tested at the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Newly patented, the GP-254 Process enhances mercury removal using ultraviolet light to induce various components of power plant stack gas to react with the mercury, and changes the

344

Insulating shade assembly with removable cover  

SciTech Connect

An insulating window shade assembly is described which consists of: bracket means adapted to be mounted on the frame of a window; a first roller carrying an insulating shade and being disposed within the bracket means on the inside of the window, the shade being adapted to be drawn from the roller to cover the inside of the window and to be wound upon the roller to expose the window, a second roller carrying a removable cover fabric on the inside of the shade and being supported by the bracket means, the second roller being spaced from and disposed independently of the first roller, means disposed adjacent only the bottom edge of the insulating shade for connecting only the bottom edge of the cover fabric to the bottom only of the insulating shade so that the insulating shade and cover fabric may be drawn together over the inside of the window; guide means disposed adjacent the second roller and between the second roller and the insulating shade, the cover fabric passing over the guide means, for causing the cover fabric to hang closely adjacent the front of the insulating shade when the insulating shade is drawn over the window and when the insulating shade and cover fabric are connected together by the connecting means, and means for continually tensioning the cover fabric when the insulating shade is drawn and when the cover fabric is connected thereto so that the cover fabric lies smoothly over the shade.

Hausmann, S.; McLane, A. Jr.

1986-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

345

Metagenomic analysis of phosphorus removing sludgecommunities  

SciTech Connect

Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) is not wellunderstood at the metabolic level despite being one of the best-studiedmicrobially-mediated industrial processes due to its ecological andeconomic relevance. Here we present a metagenomic analysis of twolab-scale EBPR sludges dominated by the uncultured bacterium, "CandidatusAccumulibacter phosphatis." This analysis resolves several controversiesin EBPR metabolic models and provides hypotheses explaining the dominanceof A. phosphatis in this habitat, its lifestyle outside EBPR and probablecultivation requirements. Comparison of the same species from differentEBPR sludges highlights recent evolutionary dynamics in the A. phosphatisgenome that could be linked to mechanisms for environmental adaptation.In spite of an apparent lack of phylogenetic overlap in the flankingcommunities of the two sludges studied, common functional themes werefound, at least one of them complementary to the inferred metabolism ofthe dominant organism. The present study provides a much-needed blueprintfor a systems-level understanding of EBPR and illustrates thatmetagenomics enables detailed, often novel, insights into evenwell-studied biological systems.

Garcia Martin, Hector; Ivanova, Natalia; Kunin, Victor; Warnecke,Falk; Barry, Kerrie; McHardy, Alice C.; Yeates, Christine; He, Shaomei; Salamov, Asaf; Szeto, Ernest; Dalin, Eileen; Putnam, Nik; Shapiro, HarrisJ.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Blackall, Linda Louise; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

347

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past three years, we followed the work plan as we suggested in the proposal and made every efforts to fulfill the project objectives. Based on our large amount of creative and productive work, including both of experimental and theoretic aspects, we received important technical breakthrough on naphthenic acid removal process and obtained deep insight on catalytic decarboxylation chemistry. In detail, we established an integrated methodology to serve for all of the experimental and theoretical work. Our experimental investigation results in discovery of four type effective catalysts to the reaction of decarboxylation of model carboxylic acid compounds. The adsorption experiment revealed the effectiveness of several solid materials to naphthenic acid adsorption and acidity reduction of crude oil, which can be either natural minerals or synthesized materials. The test with crude oil also received promising results, which can be potentially developed into a practical process for oil industry. The theoretical work predicted several possible catalytic decarboxylation mechanisms that would govern the decarboxylation pathways depending on the type of catalysts being used. The calculation for reaction activation energy was in good agreement with our experimental measurements.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang; Yongchun Tang; William A. Goddard

2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

349

Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

350

Thiacrown polymers for removal of mercury from waste streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thiacrown polymers immobilized to a polystyrene-divinylbenzene matrix react with Hg.sup.2+ under a variety of conditions to efficiently and selectively remove Hg.sup.2+ ions from acidic aqueous solutions, even in the presence of a variety of other metal ions. The mercury can be recovered and the polymer regenerated. This mercury removal method has utility in the treatment of industrial wastewater, where a selective and cost-effective removal process is required.

Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA); Fox, Glenn A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Heat recirculating cooler for fluid stream pollutant removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process by which heat is removed from a reactant fluid to reach the operating temperature of a known pollutant removal method and said heat is recirculated to raise the temperature of the product fluid. The process can be utilized whenever an intermediate step reaction requires a lower reaction temperature than the prior and next steps. The benefits of a heat-recirculating cooler include the ability to use known pollutant removal methods and increased thermal efficiency of the system.

Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Berry, David A. (Morgantown, WV)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

352

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

353

Heading Error Removal System for Tracking Devices - Energy ...  

Systems are able to reduce or remove slowly-varying drift errors, such as heading errors, rate of rotation errors, and direction of travel errors, to correct the ...

354

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

355

NETL: News Release - NETL Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power and Cost Savings DOE Laboratory Signs License Agreement Incorporating Sorbents in HVAC Add-on Technology Washington, DC - Carbon dioxide removal sorbents developed by the...

356

A New Method to Evaluate Hydrogen Sulfide Removal from Biogas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen sulfide in biogas fuel increases the speed at which the system utilizing the biogas corrodes. This corrosion may be prevented by separating and removing… (more)

Martin, Jerry H II

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Impurity Removal from Petroleum Coke - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Impurity Removal from Petroleum Coke. Author(s), Alexandre Gagnon, Hans Darmstadt, Nigel Backhouse, Esme Ryan, Laurence Dyer, David ...

358

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study to compare six methods of removing noncondensable gases from direct-use geo-thermal steam power plants. This report defines the study methodologies and compares the...

359

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; ... Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures United States Patent ...

360

Study of Alternative Approaches for Transite Panel Removal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) assembled an experienced team from both sites to evaluate both the manual and mechanical methods of transite panel removal.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Method of removal of sulfur from coal and petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the removal of sulfur from sulfur-bearing materials such as coal and petroleum products using organophosphine and organophosphite compounds is provided.

Verkade, John G. (Ames, IA); Mohan, Thyagarajan (Ames, IA); Angelici, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Using Microwave Radiation for Removing Heavy Metal Ions and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Using Microwave Radiation for Removing Heavy Metal Ions and Producing Biofuels. Author(s), Aharon Gedanken. On-Site Speaker (Planned ) ...

363

Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

364

Hydrogen Removal From Heating Oil of a Parabolic Trough ...  

A Method to Selectively Remove & Measure Hydrogen Gas from a Fluid Volume Parabolic trough power plants use concentrated solar thermal energy to ...

365

Selective Removal of Thiophene from Liquid Fuels over Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Selective Removal of Thiophene from Liquid Fuels over Nickel -Based Nanocrystalline Zinc Oxide. Author(s), Mohammad Rafiqul Islam, Jewel ...

366

REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF DEPOSITS FROM COAL GASIFICATION ...  

A method is provided for on-line removal and recovery of deposits from fossil fuel gasification systems to improve plant performance and recover a valuable metalloid.

367

Use, Maintenance, Removal, Inspections, and Safety of Dams (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes operating plans for dams with movable structures, as well as procedures for raising or lowering of impoundment levels, dam removal, and dam safety inspections.

368

Method for Removal of Mercury from Various Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 6,576,092 entitled "Method for Removal of Mercury from Various Gas Streams."...

369

Nitrogen removal from natural gas using two types of membranes ...  

A process for treating natural gas or other methane-rich gas to remove excess nitrogen. The invention relies on two-stage membrane separation, using ...

370

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

372

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants from syngas typically rely on chemical or physical absorption processes operating at low temperatures. When cooled...

373

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

375

Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

376

US, International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam, Set Nuclear Security Milestone | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile...

377

Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

commander gives instructions prior to departing in a convoy carrying highly enriched uranium. Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr Headlines Jul 23, 2013 US, New Zealand...

378

Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

employee Igor Bolshinsky measures radioactivity on an ISO container containing highly enriched uranium in Dalat, Vietnam. Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr Headlines Jul 23, 2013 US,...

379

Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

soldiers receive instructions prior to departing in a convoy carrying highly enriched uranium. Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr Headlines Jul 23, 2013 US, New Zealand...

380

Nuclear & Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

efforts result in permanent threat reduction. NNSA is returning Russian-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) fresh and spent fuel from Russian-designed research reactors worldwide...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Removal of RDX and HMX from an artificial groundwater by granular activated carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption was efficient at removing high explosive contaminants such as Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-tririne (RDX) and Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetrritro-1,3,5,7-tetruocine (HMX) from an artificial groundwater (AGW). A completely mixed batch reactor (CMBR) system was selected for all rate and isotherm experiments. A number of rate and isotherm experiments were conducted to measure performance in the removal of RDX and HMX using GAC depending on dissolved oxygen, natural organic matter (NOM) preloading and GAC pretreatment. The investigation of competitive adsorption of RDX and Cr(VI) on GAC was conducted. In addition, IAST model predictions were made for RDX and HMX bisolute isotherms. When oxygen was excluded in the experimental system, there was enhancement in the removal of RDX from AGW using Fe[] pretreated GAC. However, in spite of this enhancement, it was still lower than the level of removal using virgin GAC as discussed below. According to the screening experiment results, dissolved Fe[]alone could not chemically reduce RDX. Despite expectations to the contrary based on the screening results, there was indeed some increase in the removal of RDX by Fe[] pretreated GAC under anaerobic conditions. It was suspected that in regard to the removal of RDX using GAC, there may have been chemical reactions occurring between RDX and the chemically reduced GAC surface under anaerobic conditions. Overall, the sorption capacity of GAC for RDX and HMX decreased as preloaded humid acid concentration increased. GAC procreated with a strong reluctant such as Fe[] or dithionite did not result in the enhancement of RDX removal from AGW compared with isotherms of virgin GAC under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Experimental values showed that for RDX, the single-solute isotherm data, bisolute isotherm data in the presence of Cr(VI) exhibited similar results. This suggests that the presence of Cr(VI) had negligible effect on RDX removal by GAC, indicating that competitive effects between RDX and Cr(VI) were minimal. Also, Cr(VI) removal was not significantly affected by the presence of RDX. IAST model predicted that the presence of HMX would reduce the adsorption of RDX compared to the single-solute isotherm of RDX. In the same manner, similar effects were obtained for HMX.

Im, Jeong Ran

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

NDE Studies on CRDMs Removed From Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are focused on assessing the effectiveness of NDE inspections of control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of ultrasonic testing (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. In describing two CRDM assemblies removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE measurements, this paper will address the following questions: 1) What did each technique detect?, 2) What did each technique miss?, 3) How accurately did each technique characterize the detected flaws? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. One contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data; the other contained evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, but this was unconfirmed. The selected NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory based NDE methods will be employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper will also describe the NDE methods used and discus the NDE results. Future work will involve using the results from these NDE studies to guide the development of a destructive characterization plan to reveal the crack morphology, to be compared with NDE responses.

Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Schuster, George J.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Abrefah, John

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Advanced Techniques for Removal of Retrievable Inferior Vena Cava Filters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters have proven valuable for the prevention of primary or recurrent pulmonary embolism in selected patients with or at high risk for venous thromboembolic disease. Their use has become commonplace, and the numbers implanted increase annually. During the last 3 years, in the United States, the percentage of annually placed optional filters, i.e., filters than can remain as permanent filters or potentially be retrieved, has consistently exceeded that of permanent filters. In parallel, the complications of long- or short-term filtration have become increasingly evident to physicians, regulatory agencies, and the public. Most filter removals are uneventful, with a high degree of success. When routine filter-retrieval techniques prove unsuccessful, progressively more advanced tools and skill sets must be used to enhance filter-retrieval success. These techniques should be used with caution to avoid damage to the filter or cava during IVC retrieval. This review describes the complex techniques for filter retrieval, including use of additional snares, guidewires, angioplasty balloons, and mechanical and thermal approaches as well as illustrates their specific application.

Iliescu, Bogdan; Haskal, Ziv J., E-mail: ziv2@mac.com [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

How does this stack up for removing SO/sub 2/ and particles  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired boiler emissions are usually controlled by one of the following methods: (1) a high velocity spray tower for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) installed downstream of a dry electrostatic precipitator, or a baghouse which removes the fly ash. Lime or limestone is used for neutralization; (2) a high energy venturi scrubber for fly ash removal followed by a high velocity spray tower for FGD. The alkaline ash, with lime or limestone added is used for neutralization and saves alkali costs. Peabody Process Systems has been investigating an additional system comprising a low pressure drop gas quencher and an FRG spray tower with a Wet Tubular Precipitator (WTP) installed on top of the spray tower. The alkalinity in the ash, augmented with lime or limestone, can be used for neutralization if the full fly ash load goes into the tower.

Bakke, E.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Removal site evaluation report on the Tower Shielding Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This removal site evaluation report for the Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared to provide the Environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the Tower Shielding Facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment (i.e., a high probability of adverse effects) and if remedial site evaluations or removal actions are, therefore, required. The scope of the project included a review of historical evidence regarding operations and use of the facility; interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past operating practices; a site inspection; and identification of hazard areas requiring maintenance, removal, or remedial actions. Based an the findings of this removal site evaluation, adequate efforts are currently being made at the TSF to contain and control existing contamination and hazardous substances on site in order to protect human health and the environment No conditions requiring maintenance or removal actions to mitigate imminent or potential threats to human health and the environment were identified during this evaluation. Given the current conditions and status of the buildings associated with the TSF, this removal site evaluation is considered complete and terminated according to the requirements for removal site evaluation termination.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 31513160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 3151­3160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters P. Zhao, J.A. Siegel�, R May 2006; accepted 14 June 2006 Abstract Residential and commercial HVAC filters that have been loaded of the relative importance of HVAC filters as a removal mechanism for ozone in residential and commercial

Siegel, Jeffrey

387

Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

Janoski, Edward J. (Havertown, PA); Hollstein, Elmer J. (Wilmington, DE)

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. 1 figure.

Cha, C.Y.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

Process for removing pyritic sulfur from bituminous coals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for removing pyritic sulfur and lowering ash content of bituminous coals by grinding the feed coal, subjecting it to micro-agglomeration with a bridging liquid containing heavy oil, separating the microagglomerates and separating them to a water wash to remove suspended pyritic sulfur. In one embodiment the coal is subjected to a second micro-agglomeration step.

Pawlak, Wanda (Edmonton, CA); Janiak, Jerzy S. (Edmonton, CA); Turak, Ali A. (Edmonton, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw L. (Edmonton, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A Simple Rapid Method for the Removal of Leukocytes From  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Filtration of human blood cells through lamb's wool columns removed more than 96 % of all leukocytes in a series of experiments, while the retention of erythrocytes by the column averaged 6.4%. This method should prove extremely useful for obtaining pure erythrocyte preparations for use in biochemical and physiological studies, and for removing leukocytes from blood prior to transfusion.

Human Blood; Edward Palmer; Frederic Waldman; William Dewitt

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

Janoski, E.J.; Hollstein, E.J.

1984-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

392

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Condenser Air Removal Equipment Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Condenser Air Removal Equipment Maintenance Guide provides power plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on this system. This guide will assist the plant maintenance personnel in improving reliability and reducing maintenance costs for the condenser air removal (CAR) equipment.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

393

Surface impurity removal from DIII-D graphite tiles by boron carbide grit blasting  

SciTech Connect

During the latter half of 1992, the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics (GA) underwent several modifications of its interior. One of the major tasks involved the removal of accumulated metallic impurities from the surface of the graphite tiles used to line the plasma facing surfaces inside of the tokamak. Approximately 1500 graphite tiles and 100 boron nitride tiles from the tokamak were cleaned to remove the metallic impurities. The cleaning process consisted of several steps: the removed graphite tiles were permanently marked, surface blasted using boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) grit media (approximately 37 {mu}m. diam.), ultrasonically cleaned in ethanol to remove loose dust, and outgassed at 1000{degrees}C. Tests were done using, graphite samples and different grit blaster settings to determine the optimum propellant and abrasive media pressures to remove a graphite layer approximately 40-50 {mu}m deep and yet produce a reasonably smooth finish. EDX measurements revealed that the blasting technique reduced the surface Ni, Cr, and Fe impurity levels to those of virgin graphite. In addition to the surface impurity removal, tritium monitoring was performed throughout the cleaning process. A bubbler system was set up to monitor the tritium level in the exhaust gas from the grit blaster unit. Surface wipes were also performed on over 10% of the tiles. Typical surface tritium concentrations of the tiles were reduced from about 500 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} to less than 80 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} following the cleaning. This tile conditioning, and the installation of additional graphite tiles to cover a high fraction of the metallic plasma facing surfaces, has substantially reduced metallic impurities in the plasma discharges which has allowed rapid recovery from a seven-month machine opening and regimes of enhanced plasma energy confinement to be more readily obtained. Safety issues concerning blaster operator exposure to carcinogenic metals and radioactive tritium will also be addressed.

Lee, R.L.; Hollerbach, M.A.; Holtrop, K.L.; Kellman, A.G.; Taylor, P.L.; West, W.P.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet Mar 26, 2012 At the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit, the United States, Mexico and Canada announced the successful removal of HEU from Mexico and conversion of the

395

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers achieved a significant milestone in the decommissioning of a Cold War reactor at the Savannah River Site this month after they safely removed its rusty, orange, 75-foot-tall dome. With the help of a 660-ton crane and lifting lugs, the workers pulled the 174,000-pound dome off the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor, capping more than 16 months of preparations. Savannah River Site Removes Dome, Opening Reactor for Recovery Act Decommissioning More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

396

Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic Components Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic Components The invention is a combination of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Composition And Method For Removing Photoresist Materials From Electronic Components The invention is a combination of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier which can be used to contact substrates for electronic parts such as semiconductor wafers or chips to remove photoresist materials which are applied to the substrates during manufacture of the electronic parts. The dense phase fluid modifier is one

397

Magnetic mesoporous materials for removal of environmental wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have synthesized two different magnetic mesoporous materials that can be easily separated from aqueous solutions by applying a magnetic field. Synthesized magnetic mesoporous materials, Mag-SBA-15 (magnetic ordered mesoporous silica) and Mag-OMC (magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon), have a high loading capacity of contaminants due to high surface area of the supports and high magnetic activity due to the embedded iron oxide particles. Application of surface-modified Mag-SBA-15 was investigated for the collection of mercury from water. The mercury adsorption using Mag-SBA-15 was rapid during the initial contact time and reached a steady-state condition, with an uptake of approximately 97% after 7 hours. Application of Mag-OMC for collection of organics from water, using fluorescein as an easily trackable model analyte, was explored. The fluorescein was absorbed into Mag-OMC within minutes and the fluorescent intensity of solution was completely disappeared after an hour. In another application, Mag-SBA-15 was used as a host of tyrosinase, and employed as recyclable catalytic scaffolds for tyrosinase-catalyzed biodegradation of catechol. Tyrosinase aggregates in Mag-SBA-15, prepared in a two step process of tyrosinase adsorption and crosslinking, could be used repeatedly for catechol degradation with no serious loss of enzyme activity. Considering these results of cleaning up water from toxic inorganic, organic and biochemical contaminants, magnetic mesoporous materials have a great potential to be employed for the removal of environmental contaminants and potentially for the application in large-scale wastewater treatment plants.

Kim, Byoung Chan; Lee, Jinwoo; Um, Wooyong; Kim, Jaeyun; Joo, Jin; Lee, Jin Hyung; Kwak, Ja Hun; Kim, Jae Hyun; Lee, Changha; Lee, Hongshin; Addleman, Raymond S.; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Gu, Man Bock; Kim, Jungbae

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Plant experience using hydrogen peroxide for enhanced fat flotation and BOD removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen peroxide (H[sub 2]O[sub 2]), is known in the food processing industry to reduce COD, BOD, to prevent anaerobic conditions in pipes, tanks and lagoons and to remove malodorous sulfides in effluents from anaerobic wastewater treatment. It has recently been shown to also provide effective solids removal from food processing wastewater. The wastewater of food processing plants often contains a very high loading of organic material consisting of fat, oil and grease (FOG), resulting in unacceptable BOD and COD levels. Since many wastewater treatment systems are being pushed to the limit of their capacity or are already overloaded, the high FOG loading cannot be removed well by the conventional means of treating the wastewater with dissolved air flotation or grease traps. As a result, many food processors are paying surcharges for not being in compliance with the tight discharge limits. To overcome these problems, a process has been developed using H[sub 2]O[sub 2] for enhanced FOG recovery and BOD removal. The process is based on the formation of microbubbles which attach themselves to the FOG particles and float them to the surface where they can be easily skimmed off. In addition to meeting effluent standards, the process has been able to yield a material that is very renderable and suitable for reuse. Technical and operational data of several industrial applications in the US and Canada are presented, together with process costs. H[sub 2]O[sub 2] treatment will generally be most applicable when improvement of solids removal is required without major investment costs, e.g. emergency situations, during seasonal peaks or increased production. 12 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Steiner, N.; Gec, R. (Degussa Corp., Allendale, NJ (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

Scheitlin, Frank M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

NETL: News Release - DOE Seeks Cost-Shared Research Proposals to Remove  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 20, 2000 March 20, 2000 DOE Seeks Cost-Shared Research Proposals to Remove Mercury From Coal-Fired Power Plants With the Environmental Protection Agency expected to decide in December whether to regulate mercury emissions from coal-burning boilers, the U.S. Department of Energy has kicked off a new effort to develop more affordable pollution control technologies that can remove mercury from power plant flue gases. The Energy Department, through its National Energy Technology Laboratory, has issued a solicitation offering up to $13 million over three years for industry proposals on cost-cutting mercury-control methods for coal-based power systems. Currently no technology exists that can uniformly control mercury from power plant flue gas emissions. The effectiveness of existing flue gas emission controls in removing mercury can vary considerably from plant to plant, or even from boiler to boiler. With today's technologies, mercury removal can range from essentially no control to as high as 90 percent.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Uranium removal from soils: An overview from the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program  

SciTech Connect

An integrated approach to remove uranium from uranium-contaminated soils is being conducted by four of the US Department of Energy national laboratories. In this approach, managed through the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration program at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, these laboratories are developing processes that selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste that is difficult to manage or dispose of. These processes include traditional uranium extractions that use carbonate as well as some nontraditional extraction techniques that use citric acid and complex organic chelating agents such as naturally occurring microbial siderophores. A bench-scale engineering design for heap leaching; a process that uses carbonate leaching media shows that >90% of the uranium can be removed from the Fernald soils. Other work involves amending soils with cultures of sulfur and ferrous oxidizing microbes or cultures of fungi whose role is to generate mycorrhiza that excrete strong complexers for uranium. Aqueous biphasic extraction, a physical separation technology, is also being evaluated because of its ability to segregate fine particulate, a fundamental requirement for soils containing high levels of silt and clay. Interactions among participating scientists have produced some significant progress not only in evaluating the feasibility of uranium removal but also in understanding some important technical aspects of the task.

Francis, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Brainard, J.R.; York, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chaiko, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Matthern, G. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Comparative analysis of alternative means for removing noncondensable gases from flashed-steam geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a final report on a screening study to compare six methods of removing noncondensable gases from direct-use geothermal steam power plants. This report defines the study methodologies and compares the performance and economics of selected gas-removal systems. Recommendations are presented for follow-up investigations and implementation of some of the technologies discussed. The specific gas-removal methods include five vacuum system configurations using the conventional approach of evacuating gas/vapor mixtures from the power plant condenser system and a system for physical separation of steam and gases upstream of the power turbine. The study focused on flashed-steam applications, but the results apply equally well to flashed-steam and dry-steam geothermal power plant configurations. Two gas-removal options appear to offer profitable economic potential. The hybrid vacuum system configurations and the reboiler process yield positive net present value results over wide-ranging gas concentrations. The hybrid options look favorable for both low-temperature and high-temperature resource applications. The reboiler looks profitable for low-temperature resource applications for gas levels above about 20,000 parts per million by volume. A vacuum system configuration using a three-stage turbocompressor battery may be profitable for low-temperature resources, but results show that the hybrid system is more profitable. The biphase eductor alternative cannot be recommended for commercialization at this time.

Vorum, M.; Fitzler, E.

2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

403

Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these experienced cladding failures as operational capabilities of the different designs were being established. In addition, numerous spills of heavy water occurred within the facility. Currently, radiation and radioactive contamination levels are low within HWCTR with most of the radioactivity contained within the reactor vessel. There are no known insults to the environment, however with the increasing deterioration of the facility, the possibility exists that contamination could spread outside the facility if it is not decommissioned. An interior panoramic view of the ground floor elevation taken in August 2009 is shown in Figure 2. The foreground shows the transfer coffin followed by the reactor vessel and control rod drive platform in the center. Behind the reactor vessel is the fuel pool. Above the ground level are the polar crane and the emergency deluge tank at the top of the dome. Note the considerable rust and degradation of the components and the interior of the containment building. Alternative studies have concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning is to remove the reactor vessel, steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. Characterization studies along with transport models have concluded that the remaining below grade equipment that is left in place including the transfer coffin will not contribute any significant contamination to the environment in the future. The below grade space will be grouted in place. A concrete cover will be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater will be monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. The schedule for completion of decommissioning is late FY2011. This paper describes the concepts planned in order to remove the major components including the dome, the reactor vessel (RV), the two steam generators (SG), and relocating the transfer coffin (TC).

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

404

Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these experienced cladding failures as operational capabilities of the different designs were being established. In addition, numerous spills of heavy water occurred within the facility. Currently, radiation and radioactive contamination levels are low within HWCTR with most of the radioactivity contained within the reactor vessel. There are no known insults to the environment, however with the increasing deterioration of the facility, the possibility exists that contamination could spread outside the facility if it is not decommissioned. An interior panoramic view of the ground floor elevation taken in August 2009 is shown in Figure 2. The foreground shows the transfer coffin followed by the reactor vessel and control rod drive platform in the center. Behind the reactor vessel is the fuel pool. Above the ground level are the polar crane and the emergency deluge tank at the top of the dome. Note the considerable rust and degradation of the components and the interior of the containment building. Alternative studies have concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning is to remove the reactor vessel, steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. Characterization studies along with transport models have concluded that the remaining below grade equipment that is left in place including the transfer coffin will not contribute any significant contamination to the environment in the future. The below grade space will be grouted in place. A concrete cover will be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater will be monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. The schedule for completion of decommissioning is late FY2011. This paper describes the concepts planned in order to remove the major components including the dome, the reactor vessel (RV), the two steam generators (SG), and relocating the transfer coffin (TC).

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

405

Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet Mar 27, 2012 Sweden has been a global leader on nonproliferation, and was one of the

406

Building Removal Ongoing at DOE's Paducah Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Removal Ongoing at DOE's Paducah Site Building Removal Ongoing at DOE's Paducah Site Building Removal Ongoing at DOE's Paducah Site August 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Buz Smith Robert.Smith@lex.doe.gov 270-441-6821 PADUCAH, KY - Work is ongoing at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) to raze a 65,000-square-foot facility known as the C-340 Metals Plant, which was used to make uranium metal during the Cold War. Department of Energy (DOE) cleanup contractor LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky began removing more than 1,500 panels of cement-asbestos siding from the Metals Plant complex Wednesday in anticipation of New Jersey-based LVI Services starting demolition Sept. 19. Demolition work is projected to last through the end of calendar 2012. "This is an important milestone because the C-340 Metals Plant is the

407

Czech Republic HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Czech Republic HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Czech Republic HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Czech Republic HEU Removal Czech Republic HEU Removal Location Czech Republic United States 49° 35' 23.3628" N, 15° 4' 23.6712" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

408

South Africa HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

South Africa HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration South Africa HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > South Africa HEU Removal South Africa HEU Removal Location South Africa United States 30° 33' 35.0604" S, 22° 19' 27.1884" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

409

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Mar 26, 2012 For nearly two decades, the United States and Ukraine have cooperated on a

410

Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Transition Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Transition December 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Laborers place a disposable liner in a tailings container. Laborers place a disposable liner in a tailings container. MOAB, Utah - The Moab mill tailings removal project in Utah ended the year having shipped more than 35 percent of the total 16 million tons of uranium mill tailings off-site. The tailings are being transported by rail 30 miles north to a disposal cell for permanent storage. More than 1 million tons of tailings were shipped during fiscal year 2012, which closed at the end of September. The Moab Project also successfully transitioned both of its prime contracts

411

Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material ... Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima Posted By Office of Public Affairs

412

Thief Process Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process for the Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas Process for the Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 6,521,021 entitled "Thief Process for the Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas." Disclosed in this patent is a novel process in which partially combusted coal is removed from the combustion chamber of a power plant using a lance (called a "thief"). This partially combusted coal acts as a thermally activated adsorbent for mercury. When it is in- jected into the duct work of the power plant downstream from the exit port of the combustion chamber, mercury within the flue gas contacts and adsorbs onto the thermally activated sorbent. The sorbent-mercury

413

Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Transition Moab Project Continues Progress on Tailings Removal with Contract Transition December 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Laborers place a disposable liner in a tailings container. Laborers place a disposable liner in a tailings container. MOAB, Utah - The Moab mill tailings removal project in Utah ended the year having shipped more than 35 percent of the total 16 million tons of uranium mill tailings off-site. The tailings are being transported by rail 30 miles north to a disposal cell for permanent storage. More than 1 million tons of tailings were shipped during fiscal year 2012, which closed at the end of September. The Moab Project also successfully transitioned both of its prime contracts

414

Removal of Methylene Blue from Aqueous Solutions Using a Novel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition ... the removal of MB and the state balance of absorption capacity up to 86.89% and 2.6040 mg/g. ... New Development Model for Bauxite Deposits - Dedicated Compact Refinery.

415

Multi-component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,255,842 entitled "Multi-component Removal in Flue Gas by Aqua Ammonia." This patent discloses a method for the removal of potential environmental-impacting compounds from flue gas streams. The method oxidizes some or all of the acid precursors such as sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitric oxides (NO x ) into sulfur trioxide and nitrogen dioxide, respectively. Following this step, the gas stream is then treated with aqua ammonia or ammonium hydroxide to capture the compounds via chemical absorption through acid-base or neutralization reactions where a fertilizer is formed.

416

Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Convection Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility Scaling Basis Full Scale Half Scale NSTF Argonne National Laboratory's Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) - one of the world's largest facilities for ex-vessel passive decay heat removal testing-confirms the performance of reactor cavity cooling systems (RCCS) and similar passive confinement or containment decay heat removal systems in modern Small Modular Reactors. Originally built to aid in the development of General Electric's Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS), the NSTF has a long history of providing confirmatory data for the airside of the RVACS. Argonne National Laboratory's NSTF is a state-of-the-art, large-scale facility for evaluating performance

417

Oil and Gas- Leases to remove or recover (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act states that a lease or agreement conveying the right to remove or recover oil, natural gas or gas of any other designation from lessor to lessee shall not be valid if such lease does not...

418

Biosorption beads for removal of dissolved metals from aqueous streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process for removing heavy metals from aqueous waste streams 5 by contacting such streams with certain biological adsorbents, either living, dead or in fragments, that may be immobilized in gel beads. 1 tab.

Scott, C.D.

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

419

Considering removing "Show Preview" button on utility rate form...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rate Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(287) Contributor 22 April, 2013 - 14:55 Utility Rates I'm considering removing the "Show Preview" button, since it does not work...

420

Removal of mineral matter including pyrite from coal  

SciTech Connect

Mineral matter, including pyrite, is removed from coal by treatment of the coal with aqueous alkali at a temperature of about 175.degree. to 350.degree. C, followed by acidification with strong acid.

Reggel, Leslie (Pittsburgh, PA); Raymond, Raphael (Bethel Park, PA); Blaustein, Bernard D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

422

December 28, 2000, DOE letter regarding the removal of spent...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office (RL) associated with removing spent nuclear fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site as part of its Recommendation 94-1, which was recently combined into...

423

NETL: Releases & Briefs - Photochemical removal of mercury from...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photochemical Removal of Mercury from Flue Gas Scientist Evan Granite explains that UV-C light drives the reaction Scientist Evan Granite explains that UV-C light drives the...

424

User Oriented Climatic Information for Planning a Snow Removal Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many activities associated with the transportation sector are weather sensitive. This study is concerned with highway maintenance activities, specifically snow removal, and the budgeting of same by the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT)...

Stewart J. Cohen

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Plans to Resume Train Shipments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plans to Resume Train Shipments in March; All of the Laid Off Workers Will Return Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Plans to Resume Train Shipments in March; All of the Laid Off...

426

Effective Boron Removal by Calcium Silicate Slags Combined with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A New Centrifuge CVD Reactor that will Challenge the Siemens Process ... Boron Removal from Silicon Melts by H2O/H2 Gas Blowing – Gas-phase Mass ...

427

Removal of Phosphor in Metallurgical Silicon by Rare Earth Elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A New Centrifuge CVD Reactor that will Challenge the Siemens Process ... Boron Removal from Silicon Melts by H2O/H2 Gas Blowing – Gas-phase Mass ...

428

Research on the Forecast Model of the Boron Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A New Centrifuge CVD Reactor that will Challenge the Siemens Process ... Boron Removal from Silicon Melts by H2O/H2 Gas Blowing – Gas-phase Mass ...

429

Method to remove uranium/vanadium contamination from groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R. (DeBeque, CO); Morrison, Stanley (Grand Junction, CO)

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

430

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate Title Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6221E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Amrose, Susan, Ashok J. Gadgil, Venkat Srinivasan, Kristin Kowolik, Marc Muller, Jessica Huang, and Robert Kostecki Journal Joournal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering Volume 48 Issue 9 Pagination 1019-1030 Date Published 04/2013 Keywords arsenic, bangladesh, Cambodia, dosage rate, electrocoagulation, india, water treatment Abstract We demonstrate that electrocoagulation (EC) using iron electrodes can reduce arsenic below 10 ÎĽg/L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater and in real groundwater from Bangladesh and Cambodia while investigating the effect of operating parameters that are often overlooked, such as charge dosage rate. We measure arsenic removal performance

431

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Ukraine Fuel Removal: Fact Sheet Mar 26, 2012 For nearly two decades, the United States and Ukraine have cooperated on a

432

A process for off-gas particulate removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This paper describes an off-gas system for the removal of radioactive particulates from a melter for the vitrification of radioactive wastes to form glass waste forms. A diagram is provided.

Carl, D.E.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Operability test procedure [Tank] 241-SY-101 equipment removal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 241-SY-101 equipment removal system (ERS) consists of components, equipment, instrumentation and procedures that will provide the means to disconnect, retrieve, contain, load and transport the Mitigation Pump Assembly (MPA) from waste Tank 241-SY-101 to the Central Waste Complex (CWC). The Operability Test Procedure (OTP) will test the interfaces between ERS components and will rehearse the procedure for MPA removal and transportation to the extent they can be mocked-up at the CTF (Cold Test Facility). At the conclusion of the OTP, the ERS components and equipment will be removed from the CTF, entered into the Component Based Recall System (CBRS), and stored until needed for actual MPA removal and transportation.

Mast, J.C.

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

434

A novel multifunctional energy system (MES) for CO{sub 2} removal with zero energy penalty - article no. 021401  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel, multifunctional energy system (MES), in which hydrogen and electricity are cogenerated and about 90% of CO{sub 2} is removed. By integrating the methane steam reforming reaction and combustion of coal, the natural gas and coal are utilized synthetically, and coal is burned to provide high-temperature thermal energy to the methane steam reforming reaction. Afterwards, the resulting syngas enters a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit to separate about 70% of hydrogen, thereby significantly increasing the concentration of carbon dioxide from nearly 20% to 43% in the PSA tail gas. As a result, the overall efficiency of the new system becomes 63.2%. Compared to a conventional natural gas-based hydrogen plant and a coal-firing steam power plant without CO{sub 2} removal (the overall efficiency of the two systems is 63.0%), the energy penalty for CO{sub 2} removal in the new system is almost totally avoided. Based on the graphical exergy analysis, we propose that the integration of synthetic utilization of fossil fuel (natural gas and coal) and the CO{sub 2} removal process plays a significant role in zero energy penalty for CO{sub 2} removal and its liquefaction in the MES. The result obtained here provides a new approach for CO{sub 2} removal with zero or low thermal efficiency reduction (energy penalty) within an energy system.

Jin, H.G.; Han, W.; Gao, L. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. for Engineering Thermophysics

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Laser Systems for Orbital Debris Removal  

SciTech Connect

The use of a ground based laser for space debris cleaning was investigated by the ORION project in 1996. Since that study the greatest technological advance in the development of high energy pulsed laser systems has taken place within the NIF project at LLNL. The proposed next laser system to follow the NIF at LLNL will be a high rep rate version of the NIF based on diode-pumping rather than flashlamp excitation; the so called 'LIFE' laser system. Because a single 'LIFE' beamline could be built up in a few year time frame, and has performance characteristics relevant to the space debris clearing problem, such a beamline could enable a near term demonstration of space debris cleaning. Moreover, the specifics of debris cleaning make it possible to simplify the LIFE laser beyond what is required for a fusion drive laser, and so substantially reduce its cost. Starting with the requirements for laser intensity on the target, and then considering beam delivery, we will flow back the laser requirements needed for space debris cleaning. Using these derived requirements we will then optimize the pulse duration, the operational regime, and the output pulse energy of the laser with a focus of simplifying its overall design. Anticipated simplifications include operation in the heat capacity regime, eliminating cooling requirements on the laser gain slabs, and relaxing B-integral and birefrigence requirements.

Rubenchik, A M; Barty, C P; Beach, R J; Erlandson, A C; Caird, J A

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

436

Removal of sulfur compounds from combustion product exhaust  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device are disclosed for removing sulfur containing contaminents from a combustion product exhaust. The removal process is carried out in two stages wherein the combustion product exhaust is dissolved in water, the water being then heated to drive off the sulfur containing contaminents. The sulfur containing gases are then resolublized in a cold water trap to form a concentrated solution which can then be used as a commercial product.

Cheng, Dah Y. (Palo Alto, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

439

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

440

Solid materials for removing arsenic and method thereof  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid materials have been developed to remove arsenic compounds from aqueous media. The arsenic is removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the arsenic leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are aerogels or xerogels and aerogels or xerogels and solid support structure, e.g., granulated activated carbon (GAC), mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards arsenic.

Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Sabre J. (Oakland, CA); Sanner, Robert D. (Livermore, CA); Dias, Victoria L. (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove inactive high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Solid materials for removing arsenic and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid materials have been developed to remove arsenic compounds from aqueous media. The arsenic is removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the arsenic leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are aerogels or xerogels and aerogels or xerogels and solid support structure, e.g., granulated activated carbon (GAC), mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards arsenic.

Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Sabre J. (Oakland, CA); Sanner, Robert D. (Livermore, CA); Dias, Victoria L. (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Improved Antimony Removal Using a Chemical Treatment and Microfiltration Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Antimony removal can be a challenge because the species can exist in a number of valence states, in both soluble and insoluble forms. This report summarizes a test program conducted at Duke Power Company's Oconee plant, directed at removing antimony isotopes from the liquid radwaste stream. Treatments investigated included pH adjustment, use of oxidizing and reducing agents, application of seed materials, and addition of polyelectrolytes -- all combined with crossflow filtration. The report provides the ...

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

Radiator debris removing apparatus and work machine using same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiator assembly includes a finned radiator core and a debris removing apparatus having a compressed air inlet and at least one compressed air outlet configured to direct compressed air through the radiator core. A work machine such as a wheel loader includes a radiator and a debris removing apparatus coupled with on-board compressed air and having at least one pressurized gas outlet configured to direct a gas toward the face of the radiator.

Martin, Kevin L. (Washburn, IL); Elliott, Dwight E. (Chillicothe, IL)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

444

Apparatus for catalytic reforming with continuous sulfur removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparatus for continuously removing residual sulfur from a naptha stream has a primary manganous oxide absorber, a secondary parallel manganous oxide absorber and valve and duct means for by-passing the primary absorber and directing the naptha feed stream to the secondary absorber. The apparatus also includes means for removing manganous oxide from the primary absorber and nitrogen purge means for purging the same.

Novak, W. J.

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

445

The Potential for Activated Biochar to Remove Waterborne Viruses from Environmental Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need for clean potable water and sustainable energy are two current and pressing issues with implications affecting the global population. Renewed interests in alternative energy have prompted researchers to investigate the full capacity of biofuels. These interests have led to not only the examination of current method limitations, but also to the investigation of new conversion methods. One promising method for bioenergy production is pyrolysis of lignocellulosic feedstocks. Through pyrolysis, a single crop may produce ethanol, bio-oil, and/or gaseous energy (syngas). The remaining solid phase product is a black carbon dubbed 'biochar'. In the current study, biochar was used as a both an unamended sorbent and a precursor to form powdered activated carbons (PACs) capable of removing waterborne viruses. Biochar was activated with KOH, ZnCl2, and H3PO4 and analyzed using the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) method, a combination of Kjeldahl digest and ICP-MS, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sorbents were tested in batch studies using phosphate buffered saline (PBS), surface water, and groundwater. Bacteriophages MS2 and thetaX174 served as viral surrogates. All activation treatments significantly increased surface area, up to 1495.5 m2/g (KOH-activated). While the non-activated biochar was not effective in virus removal, the KOH-activated PAC had tremendous removal in the PBS/MS2 batch (mean 98.7% removal, up to 6.2 x 109 particles/mL, as compared to the Darco S-51: 82.3%). As evidenced by this study, sorption efficiency will be governed by viral species, carbon type and concentration, and water quality. The results of this study indicate that biochar can serve as a precursor for a highly porous and effective PAC, capable of removing waterborne viruses from environmental waters.

Florey, James

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Proton Delivery and Removal in [Ni(PR2NR?2)2]2+ Hydrogen Production and Oxidation Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

To examine the role of proton delivery and removal in the electrocatalytic oxidation and production of hydrogen by [Ni(PR2NR´)2]2+ (where PR2NR´2 is 1,5-R´-3,7-R-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane), we report experimental and theoretical studies of the intermolecular proton exchange reactions underlying the isomerization of [Ni(PCy2NBn2H)2]2+ (Cy = cyclohexyl, Bn = benzyl) species formed during the stochiometric oxidation of H2 by [NiII(PCy2NBn2)2]2+ or the protonation of [Ni0(PCy2NBn2)2]. The three isomers formed differ by the position of the N-H bond with respect to the nickel (endo-endo, endo-exo, or exo-exo) and only the endo-endo isomer is catalytically active. We have found that the rate of isomerization is limited by proton removal from and delivery to the complex. In particular, steric hindrance disfavors the catalytically active protonation site (endo to the metal) in favor of inactive protonation (exo to the metal). The ramifications to catalysis of poor accessibility of the endo site and protonation at the exo site are discussed. In hydrogen oxidation, deprotonation of the sterically hindered endo position by an external base may lead to slow catalytic turnover. As for hydrogen production, the limited accessibility of the endo position can result in the formation of exo protonated species, which must undergo one or more isomerization steps to generate the catalytically active endo protonated species. These studies highlight the importance of precise proton delivery, and the mechanistic details described herein will guide future catalyst design. This research was carried out in the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science. WJS was funded by the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Battelle. Computational resources were provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; and the Jaguar supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (INCITE 2008-2011 award supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC0500OR22725).

O'Hagan, Molly J.; Ho, Ming-Hsun; Yang, Jenny Y.; Appel, Aaron M.; Rakowski DuBois, Mary; Raugei, Simone; Shaw, Wendy J.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

447

Sludge Heel Removal Analysis for Slurry Pumps of Tank 11  

SciTech Connect

Computational fluid dynamics methods were used to develop and recommend a slurry pump operational strategy for sludge heel removal in Tank 11. Flow patterns calculated by the model were used to evaluate the performance of various combinations of operating pumps and their orientation. The models focused on removal of the sludge heel located at the edge of Tank 11 using the four existing slurry pumps. The models and calculations were based on prototypic tank geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Tank Closure Project (TCP) Engineering. Computational fluid dynamics models of Tank 11 with different operating conditions were developed using the FLUENT(tm) code. The modeling results were used to assess the efficiency of sludge suspension and removal operations in the 75-ft tank. The models employed a three-dimensional approach, a two-equation turbulence model, and an approximate representation of flow obstructions. The calculated local velocity was used as a measure of sludge removal and mixing capability. For the simulations, a series of the modeling calculations was performed with indexed pump orientations until an efficient flow pattern near the potential location of the sludge mound was established for sludge removal. The calculated results demonstrated that the existing slurry pumps running at 1600 rpm could remove the sludge mound from the tank with a 103 in. liquid level, based on a minimum sludge suspension velocity of 2.27 ft/sec. In this case, the only exception is the region within about 2 ft. from the tank wall. Further results showed that the capabilities of sludge removal were affected by the indexed pump orientation, the number of operating pumps, and the pump speed. A recommended operational strategy for an efficient flow pattern was developed to remove the sludge mound assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and removal. Sensitivity results showed that for a given pump speed, a higher tank level and a lower pump nozzle elevation would result in better performance in suspending and removing