Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

2

A Multi-Factor Analysis of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have significant potential as a near term source of cellulosic biomass for bioenergy production, but sustainable removal of agricultural residues requires consideration of the critical roles that residues play in the agronomic system. Previous work has developed an integrated model to evaluate sustainable agricultural residue removal potential considering soil erosion, soil organic carbon, greenhouse gas emission, and long-term yield impacts of residue removal practices. The integrated model couples the environmental process models WEPS, RUSLE2, SCI, and DAYCENT. This study uses the integrated model to investigate the impact of interval removal practices in Boone County, Iowa, US. Residue removal of 4.5 Mg/ha was performed annually, bi-annually, and tri-annually and were compared to no residue removal. The study is performed at the soil type scale using a national soil survey database assuming a continuous corn rotation with reduced tillage. Results are aggregated across soil types to provide county level estimates of soil organic carbon changes and individual soil type soil organic matter content if interval residue removal were implemented. Results show interval residue removal is possible while improving soil organic matter. Implementation of interval removal practices provide greater increases in soil organic matter while still providing substantial residue for bioenergy production.

Jared Abodeely; David Muth; Paul Adler; Eleanor Campbell; Kenneth Mark Bryden

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Sustainable agricultural residue removal for bioenergy: A spatially comprehensive US national assessment  

SciTech Connect

This study provides a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal potential across the United States for bioenergy production. Earlier assessments determining the quantity of agricultural residue that could be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at the regional and national scale faced a number of computational limitations. These limitations included the number of environmental factors, the number of land management scenarios, and the spatial fidelity and spatial extent of the assessment. This study utilizes integrated multi-factor environmental process modeling and high fidelity land use datasets to perform the sustainable agricultural residue removal assessment. Soil type represents the base spatial unit for this study and is modeled using a national soil survey database at the 10–100 m scale. Current crop rotation practices are identified by processing land cover data available from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer database. Land management and residue removal scenarios are identified for each unique crop rotation and crop management zone. Estimates of county averages and state totals of sustainably available agricultural residues are provided. The results of the assessment show that in 2011 over 150 million metric tons of agricultural residues could have been sustainably removed across the United States. Projecting crop yields and land management practices to 2030, the assessment determines that over 207 million metric tons of agricultural residues will be able to be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at that time. This biomass resource has the potential for producing over 68 billion liters of cellulosic biofuels.

Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory; Bryden, Kenneth Mark [Ames L; Nelson, R. G. [Kansas State University

2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

4

Removal of aqueous rinsable flux residues in a batch spray dishwater  

SciTech Connect

An alkaline detergent solution used in an industrial dishwasher was evaluated to remove aqueous rinsable flux residues on printed wiring boards (PWBs) after hot air solder leveling and hot oil solder dip and leveling. The dishwasher, a batch cleaning process, was compared to an existing conveyorized aqueous cleaning process. The aqueous soluble flux residues from both soldering processes were removed with a solution of a mild alkaline detergent dissolved in hot deionized (DI) water.

Slanina, J.T.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Soil fertility and soil loss constraints on crop residue removal for energy production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of the methodologies used to estimate the soil fertility and soil loss constraints on crop residue removal for energy production is presented. Estimates of excess residue are developed for wheat in north-central Oklahoma and for corn and soybeans in central Iowa. These sample farming situations are analyzed in other research in the Analysis Division of the Solar Energy Research Institute.

Flaim, S.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path. 2 figures.

Corletti, M.M.; Schulz, T.L.

1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

7

Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path.

Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Removing Odors from Refrigerators and Freezers after Food has Spoiled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If food has spoiled in a refrigerator or freezer because of a power outage or some other reason, undesirable odors can result. This publication explains how to eliminate odors from these appliances.

FCS Project Team - FDRM UNIT

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

Illinois biomass resources: annual crops and residues; canning and food-processing wastes. Preliminary assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Illinois, a major agricultural and food-processing state, produces vast amounts of renewable plant material having potential for energy production. This biomass, in the form of annual crops, crop residues, and food-processing wastes, can be converted to alternative fuels (such as ethanol) and industrial chemicals (such as furfural, ethylene, and xylene). The present study provides a preliminary assessment of these Illinois biomass resources, including (a) an appraisal of the effects of their use on both agriculture and industry; (b) an analysis of biomass conversion systems; and (c) an environmental and economic evaluation of products that could be generated from biomass. It is estimated that, of the 39 x 10/sup 6/ tons of residues generated in 1978 in Illinois from seven main crops, about 85% was collectible. The thermal energy equivalent of this material is 658 x 10/sup 6/ Btu, or 0.66 quad. And by fermenting 10% of the corn grain grown in Illinois, some 323 million gallons of ethanol could have been produced in 1978. Another 3 million gallons of ethanol could have been produced in the same year from wastes generated by the state's food-processing establishments. Clearly, Illinois can strengthen its economy substantially by the development of industries that produce biomass-derived fuels and chemicals. In addition, a thorough evaluation should be made of the potential for using the state's less-exploitable land for the growing of additional biomass.

Antonopoulos, A A

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

PKL experiments on loss of residual heat removal under shutdown conditions in PWRS  

SciTech Connect

When a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is shutdown for refueling, the main coolant inventory is reduced so that the level is at mid-loop elevation. Removal of the decay heat from the core is maintained by the residual heat removal system (RHRS), which under these conditions represents the only heat sink. Loss of RHRS under shutdown conditions has occurred several times worldwide and still plays an important role in risk studies for PWRs. The experimental investigation on loss of RHRS is one mayor topic in the current PKL test program which is included in an international project set up by the OECD. PKL is an integral test facility simulating a typical western-type 1300 MW PWR and is used to investigate the thermal-hydraulic system behavior of PWRs under accident situations. The PKL test facility is operated in the Technical Center of Framatome ANP in Erlangen, Germany. The tests on loss of RHRS have been performed with borated water and special measurement techniques for the determination of the boron concentration (online measurements). The PKL tests demonstrate that, as long as the primary circuit is closed, a failure of the residual heat removal system can be compensated by one or more steam generators, which remain filled with water on the secondary side and stay ready for use during refueling and other outages. However, the tests showed also that accumulations of large condensate inventories (with low boron concentration) can occur in the cold leg piping during mid-loop operation after loss of the RHRS. This paper summarizes the most important results of a PKL experiment dealing with loss of RHRS during mid-loop operation with closed primary circuit. Issues still open and needs for further investigations are also discussed. (authors)

Umminger, Klaus; Schoen, Bernhard; Mull, Thomas [Framatome ANP GmbH, Freyeslebenstrasse 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Developing an Integrated Model Framework for the Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have significant potential as a feedstock for bioenergy production, but removing these residues can have negative impacts on soil health. Models and datasets that can support decisions about sustainable agricultural residue removal are available; however, no tools currently exist capable of simultaneously addressing all environmental factors that can limit availability of residue. The VE-Suite model integration framework has been used to couple a set of environmental process models to support agricultural residue removal decisions. The RUSLE2, WEPS, and Soil Conditioning Index models have been integrated. A disparate set of databases providing the soils, climate, and management practice data required to run these models have also been integrated. The integrated system has been demonstrated for two example cases. First, an assessment using high spatial fidelity crop yield data has been run for a single farm. This analysis shows the significant variance in sustainably accessible residue across a single farm and crop year. A second example is an aggregate assessment of agricultural residues available in the state of Iowa. This implementation of the integrated systems model demonstrates the capability to run a vast range of scenarios required to represent a large geographic region.

David Muth, Jr.; Jared Abodeely; Richard Nelson; Douglas McCorkle; Joshua Koch; Kenneth Bryden

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran residue levels in food. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The chemical analysis of selected foods was conducted to provide an estimate of the residue levels of PCDDs and PCDFs. The foodstuffs included saltwater fish, freshwater fish, beef, chicken, pork, bovine milk, and eggs. The foodstuffs were collected from San Francisco and Los Angeles. Emphasis was placed on the collection of foodstuffs of California origin. Individual foods collected from multiple sites within San Francisco and Los Angeles were composited for analysis of the residue levels. Detectable levels of PCDDs and PCDFs were identified in all but the egg samples that were analyzed. Overall, the freshwater fish composites were found to have the highest incidence of detectable levels. The order of highest to lowest incidence of detection follows: freshwater fish > saltwater fish > pork and chicken > beef and milk > eggs. All data were generated from a sample size of approximately 10 g of extractable fatty materials. All data are presented to reflect lipid or fat concentrations such that extrapolation with other data bases can be achieved.

Stanley, J.S.; Bauer, K.M.

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

13

An integrated model for assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal limits for bioenergy systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion ... Keywords: Agricultural residues, Bioenergy, Model integration, Soil erosion, Soil organic carbon

D. J. Muth, Jr.; K. M. Bryden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Passive residual heat removal systems for current and future light water reactors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main problem with nuclear power during a shutdown is that decay heat is still present and needs to be removed to prevent a number… (more)

Treleaven, Ian James

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

PROJECT SHEET SUBCOMMITTEE: Food Residues Subcommittee PROJECT TITLE: Expansion, Development and Harmonization of Crop Groups With Specified Representative Crops for Field Crop Residues Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GOAL/OBJECTIVE: To further develop and implement Crop groups utilized by NAFTA and based on representative commodities to foster worldwide harmonization of Crop groups and commodity terminology which will help remove trade irritants due to differences in commodity tolerance levels or MRLs for minor and specialty crops. PROJECT DESCRIPTION/PROCEDURE The Chairperson (Hong Chen) of the International Crop Grouping Consulting Committee (ICGCC) forwards the Symposium proposal for a particular crop group to the appropriate workgroup of the ICGCC via emails and requests the workgroup members to provide input on crop information and maximum residue limit (MRL) information (includes U.S., NAFTA, Codex and EU) on the commodities. Growers and commodity experts also provide valuable input on commodities. International members provide specific information on the commodities grown in their countries and regions which provides perspectives on harmonization approaches. Based on the input, the ICGCC Chairperson will prepare commodity monographs, divide subgroups, select representative crops and draft new crop group petitions. The draft petitions will be forwarded to the workgroup for review and comments before being finalized, and the

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Effect of residual chips on the material removal process of the bulk metallic glass studied by in situ scratch testing inside the scanning electron microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on material removal mechanism is meaningful for precision and ultra-precision manufacturing. In this paper, a novel scratch device was proposed by integrating the parasitic motion principle linear actuator. The device has a compact structure and it can be installed on the stage of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to carry out in situ scratch testing. Effect of residual chips on the material removal process of the bulk metallic glass (BMG) was studied by in situ scratch testing inside the SEM. The whole removal process of the BMG during the scratch was captured in real time. Formation and growth of lamellar chips on the rake face of the Cube-Corner indenter were observed dynamically. Experimental results indicate that when lots of chips are accumulated on the rake face of the indenter and obstruct forward flow of materials, materials will flow laterally and downward to find new location and direction for formation of new chips. Due to similar material removal processes, in situ scratch testing is potential to be a powerful research tool for studying material removal mechanism of single point diamond turning, single grit grinding, mechanical polishing and grating fabrication.

Huang Hu; Zhao Hongwei; Shi Chengli; Wu Boda; Fan Zunqiang; Wan Shunguang; Geng Chunyang [College of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Renmin Street 5988, Changchun, Jilin 130025 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Application of the Evacuated Canister System for Removing Residual Molten Glass From the West Valley Demonstration Project High-Level Waste Melter  

SciTech Connect

The principal mission of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is to meet a series of objectives defined in the West Valley Demonstration Project Act (Public Law 96-368). Chief among these is the objective to solidify liquid high-level waste (HLW) at the WVDP site into a form suitable for disposal in a federal geologic repository. In 1982, the Secretary of Energy formally selected vitrification as the technology to be used to solidify HLW at the WVDP. One of the first steps in meeting the HLW solidification objective involved designing, constructing and operating the Vitrification (Vit) Facility, the WVDP facility that houses the systems and subsystems used to process HLW into stainless steel canisters of borosilicate waste-glass that satisfy waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for disposal in a federal geologic repository. HLW processing and canister production began in 1996. The final step in meeting the HLW solidification objective involved ending Vit system operations and shut ting down the Vit Facility. This was accomplished by conducting a discrete series of activities to remove as much residual material as practical from the primary process vessels, components, and associated piping used in HLW canister production before declaring a formal end to Vit system operations. Flushing was the primary method used to remove residual radioactive material from the vitrification system. The inventory of radioactivity contained within the entire primary processing system diminished by conducting the flushing activities. At the completion of flushing activities, the composition of residual molten material remaining in the melter (the primary system component used in glass production) consisted of a small quantity of radioactive material and large quantities of glass former materials needed to produce borosilicate waste-glass. A special system developed during the pre-operational and testing phase of Vit Facility operation, the Evacuated Canister System (ECS), was deployed at the West Valley Demonstration Project to remove this radioactively dilute, residual molten material from the melter before Vit system operations were brought to a formal end. The ECS consists of a stainless steel canister of the same size and dimensions as a standard HLW canister that is equipped with a special L-shaped snorkel assembly made of 304L stainless steel. Both the canister and snorkel assembly fit into a stainless steel cage that allows the entire canister assembly to be positioned over the melter as molten glass is drawn out by a vacuum applied to the canister. This paper describes the process used to prepare and apply the ECS to complete molten glass removal before declaring a formal end to Vit system operations and placing the Vit Facility into a safe standby mode awaiting potential deactivation.

May, Joseph J.; Dombrowski, David J.; Valenti, Paul J.; Houston, Helene M.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

18

ANALYSIS OF THE LEACHING EFFICIENCY OF INHIBITED WATER AND TANK SIMULANT IN REMOVING RESIDUES ON THERMOWELL PIPES  

SciTech Connect

A key component for the accelerated implementation and operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is the recovery of Tank 48H. Tank 48H is a type IIIA tank with a maximum capacity of 1.3 million gallons. Video inspection of the tank showed that a film of solid material adhered to the tank internal walls and structures between 69 inch and 150 inch levels. From the video inspection, the solid film thickness was estimated to be 1mm, which corresponds to {approx}33 kg of TPB salts (as 20 wt% insoluble solids) (1). This film material is expected to be easily removed by single-rinse, slurry pump operation during Tank 48H TPB disposition via aggregation processing. A similar success was achieved for Tank 49H TPB dispositioning, with slurry pumps operating almost continuously for approximately 6 months, after which time the tank was inspected and the film was found to be removed. The major components of the Tank 49H film were soluble solids - Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} (Hydrated Sodium Carbonate, aka: Trona), Al(OH){sub 3} (Aluminum Hydroxide, aka: Gibbsite), NaTPB (Sodium Tetraphenylborate), NaNO{sub 3} (Sodium Nitrate) and NaNO{sub 2} (Sodium Nitrite) (2). Although the Tank 48H film is expected to be primarily soluble solids, it may not behave the same as the Tank 49H film. There is a risk that material on the internal surfaces of Tank 48H could not be easily removed. As a risk mitigation activity, the chemical composition and leachability of the Tank 48H film are being evaluated prior to initiating tank aggregation. This task investigated the dissolution characteristics of Tank 48H solid film deposits in inhibited water and DWPF recycle. To this end, SRNL received four separate 23-inch long thermowell-conductivity pipe samples which were removed from the tank 48H D2 risers in order to determine: (1) the thickness of the solid film deposit, (2) the chemical composition of the film deposits, and (3) the leaching behavior of the solid film deposit in inhibited water (IW) and in DWPF recycle simulant (3).

Fondeur, F.; White, T.; Oji, L.; Martino, C.; Wilmarth, B.

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

19

RELAP5/MOD3 simulation of the loss of residual heat removal during midloop operation experiment conducted at the ROSA-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modeling of the complex thermal hydraulics Of reactor systems involves the use Of experimental test systems as well as numerical codes. A simulation of the loss of residual heat removal (RHR) during midloop operations was performed using the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code. The experiment was conducted at the Rig of Safety Assessment (ROSA)-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). The experiment involved a 5% cold leg break along with the loss of the RHR system-The transient was simulated for 3040 seconds. The ROSA-1-V/]LsTF is one of the largest test facilities in the world and is located in Japan. It is a volumetrically scaled (1/48) full height, two loop model of a Westinghouse four loop pressurized water reactor (PWR). The facility consists of pressure vessel, two symmetric loops, a pressurizer and a full emergency core cooling system (ECCS) system. The transient was run on the CRAY-YMP supercomputer at Texas A&M university. Core boiling and primary pressurization followed the initiation of the transient. The time to core boiling was overpredicted. Almost all Primary parameters were predicted well until the occurrence of the loop seal clearing (LSC) at 2400 seconds. The secondary side temperatures were in good agreement with the experimental data until the LSC. Following the LSC, the steam condensation in the tubes was not calculated. This resulted in the overprediction of primary pressures after the LSC. Also, the temperatures in the hot and the cold legs were overpredicted. Because there was no significant condensation in the U-tubes, the core remained uncovered. Moreover, the LSC did not recover. Consequently, secondary side temperatures were underpredicted after the LSC. This indicated the deficiency of the condensation model. The core temperature excursion at the time of the LSC was not predicted, though there was good agreement between the experimental and calculated data for the rest of the transient. Severe oscillations were calculated throughout the course of the transient. Overall, there was reasonable qualitative agreement between the measured and the calculated data.

Banerjee, Sibashis Sanatkumar

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Crop residues as feedstock for renewable fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrient removal and net costs weigh on decisions to use crop residues as biofuel feedstocks. Crop residues as feedstock for renewable fuels Inform Magazine Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Inform Archives Crop residues as feedstock for rene

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Fabrication of inverse micro/nano pyramid structures using soft UV-NIL and wet chemical methods for residual layer removal and Si-etching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study we present a novel and simple fabrication method for micro- and nano-scale inverse pyramidal structures by a combination of soft UV-NIL and wet chemical etchings. The unique feature of our method is the absence of a RIE process, which is ... Keywords: Micro/nano inverse pyramids, Nanoimprint, Residual layer etching with wet chemical

J. W. Kim, U. Plachetka, C. Moormann, H. Kurz

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Ion Removal  

INL’s ion removal technology leverages the ability of phosphazene polymers discriminate between water and metal ions, which allows water to pass ...

23

DISSOLUTION METHOD OF REMOVING BONDING AGENTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for removing residual aluminumsilicon bonding agents from uranium slugs after the removal of aluminum coatings. To accomplish this the slug is immersed in an aqueous solution about 0.75 N in hydrofluoric acid and about 7 N in nitric acid.

Hyman, H.H.

1960-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

24

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

25

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

27

Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah Savannah River Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 1 November 6, 2008 Presentation By Sherri R. Ross Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office The Issue * How clean is clean? * Ultimate Challenge - Justify highly radioactive radionuclides have been removed to the maximum extent practical? 2 removed to the maximum extent practical? - Building compelling regulatory documentation that will withstand intense scrutiny §3116 Requirements 1. Does not require disposal in deep geological repository 2. Highly radioactive radionuclides removed to the maximum extent practical 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 3 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C 4. Waste disposed pursuant to a State-approved closure plan or permit Note: If it is anticipated that Class C disposal limits will be exceeded, additional

28

Process for particulate removal from coal liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Suspended solid particulates are removed from liquefied coal products by first subjecting such products to hydroclone action for removal in the underflow of the larger size particulates, and then subjecting the overflow from said hydroclone action, comprising the residual finer particulates, to an electrostatic field in an electrofilter wherein such finer particulates are deposited in the bed of beads of dielectric material on said filter. The beads are periodically cleaned by backwashing to remove the accumulated solids.

Rappe, Gerald C. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

30

ICME for Residual Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012 ... Application of ICME to Weld Process Innovations and Residual Stress ... Incorporation of Residual Stresses into Design of Ni-Base Superalloy ...

31

Data - Food Community | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data - Food Community Data - Food Community Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture Search Terms Category -Any- Agriculture Investment and Engineering Animals and Animal Systems Agriculture Fire Hazard Food/Non-Food Agricultural Products Geography and Environment Human Health and Nutrition International Trade Local and Regional Food Systems Markets, Prices, and Economics Natural Resources and Environment Plants and Plant Systems Agriculture Rural Development Science and Technology Water Quality Watershed Protection Items per page 25 50 100 Apply Name Downloads Rating Pesticide Data Program 1994 The USDA Pesticide Data Program (PDP) database provides national data on pesticide residues in food and water, with an emphasis on foods consumed by infants and children. PDP data are used primarily...

32

System for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee' s Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

33

Metals removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); Von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Brummond, William A. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Part 3: Removal Action | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Removal Action 3: Removal Action Part 3: Removal Action Question: When may removal actions be initiated? Answer: Removal actions may be initiated when DOE determines that the action will prevent, minimize, stabilize, or eliminate a risk to health or the environment. The NCP specifies that the determination that a risk to health or the environment is appropriate for removal action should be based on: actual or potential exposure of humans, animals, or the food chain the presence of contained hazardous substances that pose a threat of release the threat of migration of the hazardous substances the threat of fire or explosion the availability of an appropriate Federal or State response capability [section 300.415(b)(2)]. In essence, where DOE identifies a threat of exposure to or migration of

35

Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection The Maine Department of Environmental Protection's Residuals, Sludge, and Composting program regulates the land application and post-processing of organic wastes, including sewage sludge, septage, food waste, and wood

36

Functional Foods Package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contains five (5) titles regarding functional foods. Functional Foods Package Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Value Packages Nutrition Health Food Science Biochemistry This Value Package includes: ...

37

Bauxite Residue Use to Remove SO2 from Gas Effluents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolution Kinetics of Steelmaking Slag and Its Promotion for the Growth of Algae · Electrodeposition of PbTe Thermoelectric Materials in NaOH Solutions.

38

Moose Food  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moose Food Moose Food Name: Mrs. Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My husband & I own 30 acres of prime moose habitat. Unfortunately they have just about eaten up all of the aquatic browse. Either that or the hard winters in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and the fact that we have a shallow lake has killed these plants the moose like. What would be best to plant native to our lakes in michigan for the moose? They like aquatic plants the best that we have observed from afar, but what kinds. Hope you can help. The biologist for our area is new & didn't have any names of aquatic plants. Replies: Dear Mrs. The following sites may be useful: http://www.mooseworld.com/moosebrowse.htm http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF9/910.html http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/taxbre/value_and_use.html

39

Modelling of residual stresses in the shot peened material C-1020 by artificial neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study consists of two cases: (i) The experimental analysis: Shot peening is a method to improve the resistance of metal pieces to fatigue by creating regions of residual stress. In this study, the residual stresses induced in steel specimen type ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Layer removal technique, Residual stresses, Shot peening

Cetin Karata?; Adnan Sozen; Emrah Dulek

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Corn fiber hulls as a food additive or animal feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a novel animal feed or food additive that may be made from thermochemically hydrolyzed, solvent-extracted corn fiber hulls. The animal feed or food additive may be made, for instance, by thermochemically treating corn fiber hulls to hydrolyze and solubilize the hemicellulose and starch present in the corn fiber hulls to oligosaccharides. The residue may be extracted with a solvent to separate the oil from the corn fiber, leaving a solid residue that may be prepared, for instance by aggolmerating, and sold as a food additive or an animal feed.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IN); Cecava, Michael J. (Decatur, IN); Doane, Perry H. (Decatur, IN)

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste  

SciTech Connect

Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant; Rivera, M.A. [Lamb Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Gender, IFIs and Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Haiti, the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere, suffers from chronic food insecurity (World Food Program, 2010). One third of the population is food insecure, the most vulnerable of whom are women and children. International Financial

Elizabeth Arend; Lisa Vitale

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Process for removing metals from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions. 2 tabs.

Napier, J.M.; Hancher, C.M.; Hackett, G.D.

1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

44

Materials - Recycling - Shredder Residue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovering Materials from Shredder Residue Recovering Materials from Shredder Residue Obsolete automobiles, home appliances and other metal-containing scrap are shredded for the recovery of metals. More than 50% of the material shredded is automobiles. In the United States, shredders generate about 5 million tons of shredder residue every year. Similar amounts are produced in Europe and in the Pacific Rim. Because recycling shredder waste has not been profitable, most of it ends up in landfills; smaller amounts are incinerated. Argonne researchers have developed and tested a process to recover polymers and metals from shredder residue. A 2-ton/hr pilot plant, consisting of a mechanical separation facility and a six-stage wet density/froth flotation plant, was built at Argonne. In the mechanical part of the plant, the shredder waste was separated into five primary components: a polymer fraction (about 45% by weight), a residual metals concentrate (about 10% by weight), a polyurethane foam portion (about 5% by weight), an organic-rich fraction (about 25% by weight) and a metal oxides fraction (about 15% by weight). The polymer fraction was then separated further in the wet density/froth flotation system to recover individual plastic types or compatible families of polymers.

45

Agriculture Residues Recycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Saudi Arabia, as well as other countries in the Near East region, is characterized by erratic weather conditions, limited area of fertile arable lands, and with acute water shortage. Although agricultural residues (AGR) production in the region is huge (more than 440 million tons), most of these residues are either burned in the field or utilized in an inefficient way. Utilization of AGR as compost may contribute to expansion of arable lands through its use for reclamation of soil and reduce irrigation requirements. This study was conducted at Al Khalidiah farm, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia to assess compost production at large commercial scale using several types of agricultural and animal by-products with addition of a BZT®Compost Activator (based mainly on microorganism, enzymes and yeast). In this study, two types of compost piles were made at the farm. The first pile of compost was made of different agriculture residues, namely: animal wastes (quail, goat and sheep manure), brownian agricultural wastes (windbreaks residues, date trees, citrus and olive trees pruning) and green landscape grasses (50%, 25 % and 25%, respectively) and was treated with a tested compost activator. The same agriculture residues combination was also made for the second pile as traditional compost

M. W. Sadik; H. M. El Shaer; H. M. Yakot

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Turbomachinery debris remover  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for removing debris from a turbomachine. The apparatus includes housing and remotely operable viewing and grappling mechanisms for the purpose of locating and removing debris lodged between adjacent blades in a turbomachine.

Krawiec, Donald F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kraf, Robert J. (North Huntingdon, PA); Houser, Robert J. (Monroeville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

48

Graphitic packing removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Holiday Food Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Drive Food Drive Holiday Food Drive During the recent holiday food drive, employees donated enough food to provide about 23,604 holiday meals for Northern New Mexico families. More than 432 frozen turkeys were donated this year by employees and other donors during 'Bring a Turkey to Work Day,' an annual Lab event that takes places Thanksgiving week. September 16, 2013 LANL employees organize food for the Holiday Food Drive. Contacts Giving Drives Ed Vigil Community Programs Office (505) 665-9205 Email Giving Drives Enrique Trujillo Community Programs Office (505) 665-6384 Email Helping feed Northern New Mexico families Community partners The Food Depot (Santa Fe) Del Norte Credit Union Smith's Food and Drug Giving Holiday Food Drive Holiday Gift Drive LANL Laces Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund

50

SRC Residual fuel oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

Tewari, Krishna C. (Whitehall, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of residual stresses in pipe fittings include fabrication processes, installation and welding. There are a number of methods to characterize the magnitude and orientation of residual stresses. These include numerical analysis, chemical cracking tests, and measurement (e.g., X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, strain gage/hole drilling, strain gage/trepanning, strain gage/section and layer removal, and acoustics). This paper presents 400 C steam SCC test results demonstrating that residual stresses in as-fabricated Alloy 600 pipe fittings are sufficient to induce SCC. Residual stresses present in as-fabricated pipe fittings are characterized by chemical cracking tests (stainless steel fittings tested in boiling magnesium chloride solution) and by the sectioning and layer removal (SLR) technique.

Parrington, R.J.; Scott, J.J.; Torres, F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Food Sales | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sales Jump to: navigation, search Building Type Food Sales Definition Buildings used for retail or wholesale of food. Sub Categories grocery store or food market, gas station with...

53

Food Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Food Service Food service buildings are those used for preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Food Service Buildings... An overwhelming majority (72 percent) of food service buildings were small buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet). Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Food Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of food service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Food Service Buildings

54

Residual Stresses and Numerical Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2013 ... Advances in Hydroelectric Turbine Manufacturing and Repair: Residual Stresses and Numerical Simulation Sponsored by: Metallurgical ...

55

Device for removing blackheads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for removing blackheads from pores in the skin having a elongated handle with a spoon shaped portion mounted on one end thereof, the spoon having multiple small holes piercing therethrough. Also covered is method for using the device to remove blackheads.

Berkovich, Tamara (116 N. Wetherly Dr., Suite 115, Los Angeles, CA)

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Apparatus for catalytic reforming with continuous sulfur removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An apparatus for continuously removing residual sulfur from a naptha stream has a primary manganous oxide absorber, a secondary parallel manganous oxide absorber and valve and duct means for by-passing the primary absorber and directing the naptha feed stream to the secondary absorber. The apparatus also includes means for removing manganous oxide from the primary absorber and nitrogen purge means for purging the same.

Novak, W. J.

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

57

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal silica using small gel particles. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Silica Scaling Removal Process Applications: Cooling tower systems Water treatment systems Water evaporation systems Potential mining applications (produced water) Industry applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits: Reduces scaling in cooling towers by up to 50% Increases the number of cycles of concentration substantially Reduces the amount of antiscaling chemical additives needed Decreases the amount of makeup water and subsequent discharged water (blowdown) Enables considerable cost savings derived from reductions in

58

A method for in situ measurement of residual layer thickness in nano-imprint lithography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanoimprint lithography has the advantages of high throughput, sub-10-nm fabrication process, and low cost. However, residual layer encountered in the imprinting process requires removal through reactive ion etching to maintain pattern fidelity. This ... Keywords: Nanoimprint lithography (NIL), Non-destructive measurement, Residual layer, Surface plasmon resonance (SPR)

Wei-Hsuan Hsu, Hong Hocheng, Jow-Tsong Shy

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Continuous sulfur removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream using a membrane comprising a metal oxide deposited on a porous support is disclosed. 4 figures.

Jalan, V.; Ryu, J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

60

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

SciTech Connect

This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

BT8 Residual Stress Diffractometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 5) T. Gnaupel-Herold, HJ Prask, AV Clark, CS Hehman, TN Nguyen, A Comparison of Neutron and Ultrasonic Determinations of Residual Stress ...

62

BT8 Residual Stress Diffractometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Residual Stresses and Mechanical Damage in Gas Pipelines. ... Pressure in a pipeline superimposes a stress on ... are exceeded in pipelines with low ...

63

Techniques for Measuring Residual Stresses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Classification of techniques for measuring residual stress...stress A-1 Stress-relaxation techniques using electric

64

Techniques for Measuring Residual Stresses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Classification of techniques for measuring residual stress...stress A-1 Stress relaxation techniques using electric

65

Environmental and economic evaluation of energy recovery from agricultural and forestry residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four conversion methods and five residues are examined in this report, which describes six model systems: hydrolysis of corn residues, pyrolysis of corn residues, combustion of cotton-ginning residues, pyrolysis of wheat residues, fermentation of molasses, and combustion of pulp and papermill wastes. Estimates of material and energy flows for those systems are given per 10/sup 12/ Btu of recovered energy. Regional effects are incorporated by addressing the regionalized production of the residues. A national scope cannot be provided for every residue considered because of the biological and physical constraints of crop production. Thus, regionalization of the model systems to the primary production region for the crop from which the residue is obtained has been undertaken. The associated environmental consequences of residue utilization are then assessed for the production region. In addition, the environmental impacts of operating the model systems are examined by quantifying the residuals generated and the land, water, and material requirements per 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy generated. On the basis of estimates found in the literature, capital, operating, and maintenance cost estimates are given for the model systems. These data are also computed on the basis of 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy recovered. The cost, residual, material, land, and water data were then organized into a format acceptable for input into the SEAS data management program. The study indicates that the most serious environmental impacts arise from residue removal rather than from conversion.

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

2012 Food for Thought  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... such as Safeway and Whole Foods, department stores like JC Penney and Sears, apparel companies Gap and VF Corporation, and DIY and big ...

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

67

Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications.

Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Derzon, Dora K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nelson, Jill S. (Albuquerque, NM); Rand, Peter B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications. 1 fig.

Arnold, C. Jr.; Derzon, D.K.; Nelson, J.S.; Rand, P.B.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

69

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

70

Removable feedwater sparger assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A removable feedwater sparger assembly includes a sparger having an inlet pipe disposed in flow communication with the outlet end of a supply pipe. A tubular coupling includes an annular band fixedly joined to the sparger inlet pipe and a plurality of fingers extending from the band which are removably joined to a retention flange extending from the supply pipe for maintaining the sparger inlet pipe in flow communication with the supply pipe. The fingers are elastically deflectable for allowing engagement of the sparger inlet pipe with the supply pipe and for disengagement therewith. 8 figs.

Challberg, R.C.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

71

Food Structure & Functionality Forum Newsletter January 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the January 2013 Food Structure & Functionality Forum newsletter. Food Structure & Functionality Forum Newsletter January 2013 Food Structure & Functionality Forum Division division divisions food materials food structure Food Structure & Functional

72

Hanford tank residual waste – contaminant source terms and release models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual waste is expected to be left in 177 underground storage tanks after closure at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State (USA). In the long term, the residual wastes represent a potential source of contamination to the subsurface environment. Residual materials that cannot be completely removed during the tank closure process are being studied to identify and characterize the solid phases and estimate the release of contaminants from these solids to water that might enter the closed tanks in the future. As of the end of 2009, residual waste from five tanks has been evaluated. Residual wastes from adjacent tanks C-202 and C-203 have high U concentrations of 24 and 59 wt%, respectively, while residual wastes from nearby tanks C-103 and C-106 have low U concentrations of 0.4 and 0.03 wt%, respectively. Aluminum concentrations are high (8.2 to 29.1 wt%) in some tanks (C-103, C-106, and S-112) and relatively low (Technetium leachability is not as strongly dependent on the concentration of Tc in the waste, and it appears to be slightly more leachable by the Ca(OH)2-saturated solution than by the CaCO3-saturated solution. In general, Tc is much less leachable (<10 wt% of the available mass in the waste) than previously predicted. This may be due to the coprecipitation of trace concentrations of Tc in relatively insoluble phases such as Fe oxide/hydroxide solids.

Deutsch, William J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

73

Indian Agriculture and Foods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agriculture and Foods Agriculture and Foods Nature Bulletin No. 387-A September 19, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN AGRICULTURE AND FOODS Most of the Indian tribes east of the Great Plains were part-time farmers. Some of them cultivated sunflowers, giant ragweed, canary grass and pigweed for their seeds, which they used as food. Many grew tobacco. But corn, beans and squash -- wherever the climate permitted - - were the principal crops. There were several varieties of beans. They ate both the seeds and rinds of some dozens of kinds of squash and pumpkin. When game was not abundant there was a wealth of wild fruits, berries, and many kinds of wild plants with edible leaves, seeds, or roots. Corn, however, was the ' staff of life" and they depended on corn, beans and squash -- "the three sisters" -- for year-round food.

74

Summer Food Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUMMER FOOD SAFETY SUMMER FOOD SAFETY Year after year, we hear and read the same advice: Handle food carefully in the summer because foodborne illness -- also known as "food poisoning" -- is more prevalent in warmer weather. Do foodborne illnesses increase during the summer months? If so, why? Yes, foodborne illnesses do increase during the summer, and the answer appears to be twofold. First, there are the natural causes. Bacteria are present throughout the environment in soil, air, water, and in the bodies of people and animals. These microorganisms grow faster in the warm summer months. Most foodborne bacteria grow fastest at temperatures from 90 to 110 °F. Bacteria also need moisture to flourish, and summer weather is often hot and humid. Given the right circumstances, harmful bacteria can quickly multiply on food to large numbers.

75

Food Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Sub Categories fast food, restaurant or cafeteria References EIA CBECS Building Types 1 References EIA CBECS...

76

Food science-based instruction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The food industry faces a shortage of graduates needed to fill scientific and technical positions available in the coming years, and university food science programs… (more)

Peacock, Amy Rowley

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

DOE Removes Brookhaven Contractor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Removes DOE Removes Brookhaven Contractor Peña sends a message to DOE facilities nationwide INSIDE 2 Accelerator Rx 4 FermiKids 6 Spring at Fermilab Photos courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory by Judy Jackson, Office of Public Affairs Secretary of Energy Federico Peña announced on Thursday, May 1, that the Department of Energy would immediately terminate the current management contract with Associated Universities, Inc. at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York. Peña said that he made the decision after receiving the results of a laboratory safety management review conducted by the independent oversight arm of DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. In addition, the Secretary said he found unacceptable "the continued on page 8 Volume 20 Friday, May 16, 1997

78

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

Neuhaus, J.E.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

80

Residual Circulation and Tropopause Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of large-scale dynamics as represented by the residual mean meridional circulation in the transformed Eulerian sense, in particular its stratospheric part, on lower stratospheric static stability and tropopause structure is studied ...

Thomas Birner

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Graduate Study Food Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guide to Graduate Study Field of Food Science and Technology Cornell University #12;Field of Food Science and Technology DE P A R T M E N T O F FO O D SC I E N C E A N D TE C H N O L O G Y Mission Science represents the application of the basic sciences, biotechnology, and engineering to the production

Walter, M.Todd

82

DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

Kyser, E

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

83

Method for removal of beryllium contamination from an article  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removal of beryllium contamination from an article is disclosed. The method typically involves dissolving polyisobutylene in a solvent such as hexane to form a tackifier solution, soaking the substrate in the tackifier to produce a preform, and then drying the preform to produce the cleaning medium. The cleaning media are typically used dry, without any liquid cleaning agent to rub the surface of the article and remove the beryllium contamination below a non-detect level. In some embodiments no detectible residue is transferred from the cleaning wipe to the article as a result of the cleaning process.

Simandl, Ronald F.; Hollenbeck, Scott M.

2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

84

Engine Removal Projection Tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Navy has over 3500 gas turbine engines used throughout the surface fleet for propulsion and the generation of electrical power. Past data is used to forecast the number of engine removals for the next ten years and determine engine down times between removals. Currently this is done via a FORTRAN program created in the early 1970s. This paper presents results of R&D associated with creating a new algorithm and software program. We tested over 60 techniques on data spanning 20 years from over 3100 engines and 120 ships. Investigated techniques for the forecast basis including moving averages, empirical negative binomial, generalized linear models, Cox regression, and Kaplan Meier survival curves, most of which are documented in engineering, medical and scientific research literature. We applied those techniques to the data, and chose the best algorithm based on its performance on real-world data. The software uses the best algorithm in combination with user-friendly interfaces and intuitively understandable displays. The user can select a specific engine type, forecast time period, and op-tempo. Graphical displays and numerical tables present forecasts and uncertainty intervals. The technology developed for the project is applicable to other logistic forecasting challenges.

Ferryman, Thomas A.; Matzke, Brett D.; Wilson, John E.; Sharp, Julia L.; Greitzer, Frank L.

2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

85

Green food through green food: a human centered design approach to green food technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Real sustainability will only be possible by consuming less." A ubiquitous computing path to consume less while improving health is to help us consume less processed food (60-70% of US/UK diet) in favor of whole food. The paper shows both the ... Keywords: design, food, health, processed food

m.c. schraefel

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Chemistry of combined residual chlorination  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decay of the combined chlorine residual was investigated in this work. Recent concerns about the formation of undesirable compounds such as chloroform with free residual chlorination have focused attention on the alternative use of combined residual chlorination. This work investigates the applicability of reactions proposed to describe the transformations and decay of the combined residual with time. Sodium hypochlorite was added to buffered solutions of ammonia with the chlorine residual being monitored over periods extending up to 10 days. The reaction was studied at four initial concentrations of hypochlorite of 100, 50, 25 and 10 mg/L as Cl/sub 2/ with molar application ratios of chlorine to ammonia, defined herein as M ratios, of 0.90, 0.50, 0.25 and 0.05 at each hypochlorite dose. Sixty-eight experiments were conducted at the pH of 6.6 and 7.2. The conclusions are: (1) in the absence of free chlorine, the concentration of NH/sub 3/ does not seem to affect the rate of disappearance of the residual other than through the formation of NHCl/sub 2/ by NH/sub 2/Cl hydrolysis; (2) the reaction between NHCl/sub 2/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ to form NH/sub 2/Cl is either much slower than reported by Gray et. al. or the mechanism is different with a rate limiting step not involving NH/sub 3/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/; (3) a redox reaction in addition to the first-order decomposition of NHCl/sub 2/ appears necessary. Model simulation results indicated that a reaction of the type NH/sub 2/Cl + NHCl/sub 2/ ..-->.. P added to the first-order NHCl/sub 2/ decomposition can explain the results observed except at the higher chlorine doses.

Leao, S.F.; Selleck, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The HMDS Coating Flaw Removal Tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many high energy laser systems, optics with HMDS sol gel antireflective coatings are placed in close proximity to each other making them particularly susceptible to certain types of strong optical interactions. During the coating process, halo shaped coating flaws develop around surface digs and particles. Depending on the shape and size of the flaw, the extent of laser light intensity modulation and consequent probability of damaging downstream optics may increase significantly. To prevent these defects from causing damage, a coating flaw removal tool was developed that deploys a spot of decane with a syringe and dissolves away the coating flaw. The residual liquid is evacuated leaving an uncoated circular spot approximately 1mm in diameter. The resulting uncoated region causes little light intensity modulation and thus has a low probability of causing damage in optics downstream from the mitigated flaw site.

Monticelli, M V; Nostrand, M C; Mehta, N; Kegelmeyer, L; Johnson, M A; Fair, J; Widmayer, C

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

88

Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

Urban, P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator value mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, J.F.

1991-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

90

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

91

Co-digestion of cattle manure with food waste and sludge to increase biogas production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small increase in methane production was observed applying sonication pretreatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biogas productions between 720 and 1100 mL/Lreactor day were achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Volatile solids removal efficiencies ranged between 53% and 60%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lower methane yields were obtained when operating under thermophilic conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum OLR in lab-scale CSTR was 1.2-1.3 g VS/L day (HRT: 20 days). - Abstract: Anaerobic co-digestion strategies are needed to enhance biogas production, especially when treating certain residues such as cattle/pig manure. This paper presents a study of co-digestion of cattle manure with food waste and sewage sludge. With the aim of maximising biogas yields, a series of experiments were carried out under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions using continuously stirred-tank reactors, operating at different hydraulic residence times. Pretreatment with ultrasound was also applied to compare the results with those obtained with non-pretreated waste. Specific methane production decreases when increasing the OLR and decreasing HRT. The maximum value obtained was 603 LCH{sub 4}/kg VS{sub feed} for the co-digestion of a mixture of 70% manure, 20% food waste and 10% sewage sludge (total solid concentration around 4%) at 36 Degree-Sign C, for an OLR of 1.2 g VS/L day. Increasing the OLR to 1.5 g VS/L day led to a decrease of around 20-28% in SMP. Lower methane yields were obtained when operating at 55 Degree-Sign C. The increase in methane production when applying ultrasound to the feed mixtures does not compensate for the energy spent in this pretreatment.

Maranon, E., E-mail: emara@uniovi.es [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University Institute of Technology of Asturias, Campus of Gijon, University of Oviedo, 33203 Gijon (Spain); Castrillon, L.; Quiroga, G.; Fernandez-Nava, Y. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University Institute of Technology of Asturias, Campus of Gijon, University of Oviedo, 33203 Gijon (Spain); Gomez, L.; Garcia, M.M. [Zero Emissions Technology, 41018 Seville (Spain)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Michelle Springfield Food Insecurity: The prospects for Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................................................................................44 4 Kenya and Ethiopia as examples of food insecure countries ..........................................................................................................................................148 Food aid from developing countries Countries. IASSTD The International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology IATP

Sheldon, Nathan D.

93

Recovery of plutonium from molten salt extraction residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), Savannah River Plant (SRP), and Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) are jointly developing a process to recover plutonium from molten salt extraction residues. These NaCl, KCl, MgCl/sub 2/ residues, which are generated in the pyrochemical extraction of /sup 241/Am from aged plutonium metal, contain up to 25 wt % dissolved PUCl/sub 3/ and up to 2 wt % AmCl/sub 3/. The objective is to develop a process to convert these residues to plutonium metal product and discardable waste. The first step of the conceptual process is to convert the actinides to a heterogenous scrub alloy with aluminum and magnesium. This step, performed at RFP, effectively separates the actinides from the bulk of the chloride. This scrub alloy will then be dissolved in a HNO/sub 3/-HF solution at SRP. Residual chloride will be removed by precipitation with Hg/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ followed by centrifugation. Plutonium and americium will be separated using the Purex solvent extraction process. The /sup 241/Am will be diverted to the solvent extraction waste stream where it can either be discarded to the waste farm or recovered. The plutonium will be finished via PuF/sub 3/ precipitation, oxidation to a mixture of PUF/sub 4/ and PuO/sub 2/, followed by reduction to plutonium metal with calcium.

Gray, L.W.; Holcomb, H.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Aqueous recovery of plutonium from pyrochemical processing residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pyrochemical processes provide rapid methods to reclaim plutonium from scrap residues. Frequently, however, these processes yield an impure plutonium product and waste residues that are contaminated with actinides and are therefore nondiscardable. The Savannah River Laboratory and Plant and the Rocky Flats Plant are jointly developing new processes using both pyrochemistry and aqueous chemistry to generate pure product and discardable waste. An example of residue being treated is that from the molten salt extraction (MSE), a mixture of NaCl, KCl, MgCl/sub 2/, PuCl/sub 3/, AmCl/sub 3/, PuO/sub 2/, and Pu/sup 0/. This mixture is scrubbed with molten aluminum containing a small amount of magnesium to produce a nonhomogeneous Al-Pu-Am-Mg alloy. This process, which rejects most of the NaCl-KCl-MgCl/sub 2/ salts, results in a product easily dissolved in 6M HNO/sub 3/ -0.1M HF. Any residual chloride in the product is removed by precipitation with Hg(I) followed by centrifuging. Plutonium and americium are then separated by the standard Purex process. The americium, initially diverted to the solvent extraction waste stream, can either be recovered or sent to waste.

Gray, L.W.; Gray, J.H.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Food Movements Unite! Strategies to Transform Our Food Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ac- tivists and practitioners from organizations such as Via Campesina, the Slow Food Movement, and the World

McLean, Lindsey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Radioactivity in food crops  

SciTech Connect

Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Dressing and modeling food  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The food and the kitchen that it is made in are key components of our film Ratatouille. We treated them almost as if they were characters that grew and changed along with the story line. It was extremely important to create a kitchen that becomes ...

Han Cho

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry FAPC Food Process Engineer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

172-1 Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-172 Robert M and Natural Resources Introduction Carbon strategy is a term that refers to a systematic plan of action for managing carbon consumption and emissions related to food manufacturing and distribution activities

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

99

NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One Ton of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removes More Than One Ton of Removes More Than One Ton of Food | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More ... NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One Ton of Food Posted By Office of Public Affairs Contributing to DOE/NNSA's efforts to support the Office of Personnel

100

Removal to Maximum Extent Practical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary Notes from 1 November 2007 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Removal of Highly Radioactive Radionuclides/Key Radionuclides to the Maximum Extent Practical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EU approves food labeling rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New food-labeling regulations are in place in the European Union after the European Parliament (EP) approved rules aimed at helping consumers make “better informed, healthier [sic] choices.” EU approves food labeling rules Inform Magazine Inform Archives

102

Estimation of residual MSW heating value as a function of waste component recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recycling of packaging wastes may be compatible with incineration within integrated waste management systems. To study this, a mathematical model is presented to calculate the fraction composition of residual municipal solid waste (MSW) only as a function of the MSW fraction composition at source and recycling fractions of the different waste materials. The application of the model to the Lisbon region yielded results showing that the residual waste fraction composition depends both on the packaging wastes fraction at source and on the ratio between that fraction and the fraction of the same material, packaging and non-packaging, at source. This behaviour determines the variation of the residual waste LHV. For 100% of paper packaging recycling, LHV reduces 4.2% whereas this reduction is of 14.4% for 100% of packaging plastics recycling. For 100% of food waste recovery, LHV increases 36.8% due to the moisture fraction reduction of the residual waste. Additionally the results evidence that the negative impact of recycling paper and plastic packaging on the LHV may be compensated by recycling food waste and glass and metal packaging. This makes packaging materials recycling and food waste recovery compatible strategies with incineration within integrated waste management systems.

Magrinho, Alexandre [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Semiao, Viriato [Mechanical Engineering Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: ViriatoSemiao@ist.utl.pt

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Vitrification of NAC process residue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vitrification tests have been performed with simulated waste compositions formulated to represent the residue which would be obtained from the treatment of low-level, nitrate wastes from Hanford and Oak Ridge by the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process. The tests were designed to demonstrate the feasibility of vitrifying NAC residue and to quantify the impact of the NAC process on the volume of vitrified waste. The residue from NAC treatment of low-level nitrate wastes consists primarily of oxides of aluminum and sodium. High alumina glasses were formulated to maximize the waste loading of the NAC product. Transparent glasses with up to 35 wt% alumina, and even higher contents in opaque glasses, were obtained at melting temperatures of 1200{degrees}C to 1400{degrees}C. A modified TCLP leach test showed the high alumina glasses to have good chemical durability, leaching significantly less than either the ARM-1 or the DWPF-EA high-level waste reference glasses. A significant increase in the final waste volume would be a major result of the NAC process on LLW vitrification. For Hanford wastes, NAC-treatment of nitrate wastes followed by vitrification of the residue will increase the final volume of vitrified waste by 50% to 90%; for Melton Valley waste from Oak Ridge, the increase in final glass volume will be 260% to 280%. The increase in volume is relative to direct vitrification of the waste in a 20 wt% Na{sub 2}O glass formulation. The increase in waste volume directly affects not only disposal costs, but also operating and/or capital costs. Larger plant size, longer operating time, and additional energy and additive costs are direct results of increases in waste volume. Such increases may be balanced by beneficial impacts on the vitrification process; however, those effects are outside the scope of this report.

Merrill, R.A.; Whittington, K.F.; Peters, R.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Low-quality natural gas sulfur removal/recovery: Task 2. Topical report, September 30, 1992--August 29, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this Task 2 Report is to present conceptual designs developed to treat a large portion of proven domestic natural gas reserves which are low quality. The conceptual designs separate hydrogen sulfide and large amounts of carbon dioxide (>20%) from methane, convert hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur, produce a substantial portion of the carbon dioxide as EOR or food grade CO{sub 2}, and vent residual CO{sub 2} virtually free of contaminating sulfur containing compounds. A secondary purpose of this Task 2 Report is to review existing gas treatment technology and identify existing commercial technologies currently used to treat large volumes of low quality natural gas with high acid content. Section II of this report defines low quality gas and describes the motivation for seeking technology to develop low quality gas reserves. The target low quality gas to be treated with the proposed technology is identified, and barriers to the production of this gas are reviewed. Section III provides a description of the Controlled Freeze Zone (CFG)-CNG technologies, their features, and perceived advantages. The three conceptual process designs prepared under Task 2 are presented in Section IV along with the design basis and process economics. Section V presents an overview of existing gas treatment technologies, organized into acid gas removal technology and sulfur recovery technology.

Cook, W.J.; Neyman, M.; Brown, W. [Acrion Technologies, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Klint, B.W.; Kuehn, L.; O`Connell, J.; Paskall, H.; Dale, P. [Bovar, Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Food Safety and Nutrition in MML  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Material Measurement Laboratory's program area in Food Safety and Nutrition. MML Program Area: Food Safety and Nutrition. ...

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

106

Transforms for prediction residuals in video coding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Typically the same transform, the 2-D Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT), is used to compress both image intensities in image coding and prediction residuals in video coding. Major prediction residuals include the motion ...

Kam??l?, Fatih

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

CRBRP decay heat removal systems  

SciTech Connect

The Decay Heat Removal Systems for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) are designed to adequately remove sensible and decay heat from the reactor following normal shutdown, operational occurrences, and postulated accidents on both a short term and a long term basis. The Decay Heat Removal Systems are composed of the Main Heat Transport System, the Main Condenser and Feedwater System, the Steam Generator Auxiliary Heat Removal System (SGAHRS), and the Direct Heat Removal Service (DHRS). The overall design of the CRBRP Decay Heat Removal Systems and the operation under normal and off-normal conditions is examined. The redundancies of the system design, such as the four decay heat removal paths, the emergency diesel power supplies, and the auxiliary feedwater pumps, and the diversities of the design such as forced circulation/natural circulation and AC Power/DC Power are presented. In addition to overall design and system capabilities, the detailed designs for the Protected Air Cooled Condensers (PACC) and the Air Blast Heat Exchangers (ABHX) are presented.

Hottel, R.E.; Louison, R.; Boardman, C.E.; Kiley, M.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Incineration of Residue from Paint Stripping Operations Using Plastic Media Blasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A preliminary investigation has been performed on the environmental consequences of incinerating plastic-media-blasting (PHB) wastes from paint removal operations. PHB is similar to sandblasting although blasting takes place at a much lower pressure. The blasted media can be recovered and recycled several times, but ultimately a residue of paint dust/chips and attrited media dust are left for disposal. This residue is a dry solid that may potentially be classified as a hazardous waste. One possible alternative to depositing the waste residue directly into a hazardous waste landfill is incineration. Incineration would provide desirable volume reduction. However, the fate of heavy metals from the entrained paint waste is not known. Samples of PHB residue were combusted at temperatures between 690°C and 815°C with approximately 125% of stoichiometric air. The ash remaining after combustion was then analyzed for heavy metal content and tested for leachability using the EPA toxicity characteristics leaching procedures (TCLP).

Helt, J. E.; Mallya, N.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Spectrum Fatigue Lifetime and Residual Strength for Fiberglass Laminates  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the effects of spectrum loading on lifetime and residual strength of a typical fiberglass laminate configuration used in wind turbine blade construction. Over 1100 tests have been run on laboratory specimens under a variety of load sequences. Repeated block loading at two or more load levels, either tensile-tensile, compressive-compressive, or reversing, as well as more random standard spectra have been studied. Data have been obtained for residual strength at various stages of the lifetime. Several lifetime prediction theories have been applied to the results. The repeated block loading data show lifetimes that are usually shorter than predicted by the most widely used linear damage accumulation theory, Miner's sum. Actual lifetimes are in the range of 10 to 20 percent of predicted lifetime in many cases. Linear and nonlinear residual strength models tend to fit the data better than Miner's sum, with the nonlinear providing a better fit of the two. Direct tests of residual strength at various fractions of the lifetime are consistent with the residual strength models. Load sequencing effects are found to be insignificant. The more a spectrum deviates from constant amplitude, the more sensitive predictions are to the damage law used. The nonlinear model provided improved correlation with test data for a modified standard wind turbine spectrum. When a single, relatively high load cycle was removed, all models provided similar, though somewhat non-conservative correlation with the experimental results. Predictions for the full spectrum, including tensile and compressive loads were slightly non-conservative relative to the experimental data, and accurately captured the trend with varying maximum load. The nonlinear residual strength based prediction with a power law S-N curve extrapolation provided the best fit to the data in most cases. The selection of the constant amplitude fatigue regression model becomes important at the lower stress, higher cycle loading cases. The residual strength models may provide a more accurate estimate of blade lifetime than Miner's rule for some loads spectra. They have the added advantage of providing an estimate of current blade strength throughout the service life.

WAHL, NEIL K.; MANDELL, JOHN F.; SAMBORSKY, DANIEL D.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Role of carbon dioxide in gas expanded liquids for removal of photoresist and etch residue.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Progress in the microelectronics industry is driven by smaller and faster transistors. As feature sizes in integrated circuits become smaller and liquid chemical waste becomes… (more)

Song, Ingu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Variance Decomposition Sensitivity Analysis of a Passive Residual Heat Removal System Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor ­ Pebble Bed Modular (HTR-PM). 1. Introduction Generation IV nuclear reactor with an application to a gas-cooled reactor", Nuclear Engineering and Design, 238(1), pp.217-228. McKay, M. D., 1996 of Nuclear and New Energy technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China b Department of Energy, Polytechnic

112

SAFETY MARGINS CONFIDENCE ESTIMATION FOR A PASSIVE RESIDUAL HEAT REMOVAL SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OS Order Statistics BE Best-Estimate NPP Nuclear Power Plant HTR-PM High Temperature Reactor Algorithms for Calibrating Simplified Models of Nuclear Reactor Dynamics. Annals of Nuclear Energy, 31, 1219, Italy enrico.zio@polimi.it 2 INET, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology Tsinghua University

113

Residual Nutrient Removal by a Winter Cover Crop From Broiler Litter Amended Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Poultry production throughout Southern Kentucky is becoming a major agricultural enterprise. Rapid spread of the industry has led to many agricultural advances as well as… (more)

Johnson, Jennifer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

115

POST-OPERATIONAL TREATMENT OF RESIDUAL NA COOLLANT IN EBR-2 USING CARBONATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the end of 2002, the Experimental Breeder Reactor Two (EBR-II) facility became a U.S. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted site, and the RCRA permit1 compelled further treatment of the residual sodium in order to convert it into a less reactive chemical form and remove the by-products from the facility, so that a state of RCRA 'closure' for the facility may be achieved (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992k, 2002). In response to this regulatory driver, and in recognition of project budgetary and safety constraints, it was decided to treat the residual sodium in the EBR-II primary and secondary sodium systems using a process known as 'carbonation.' In early EBR-II post-operation documentation, this process is also called 'passivation.' In the carbonation process (Sherman and Henslee, 2005), the system containing residual sodium is flushed with humidified carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The water vapor in the flush gas reacts with residual sodium to form sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the CO{sub 2} in the flush gas reacts with the newly formed NaOH to make sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}). Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) is produced as a by-product. The chemical reactions occur at the exposed surface of the residual sodium. The NaHCO{sub 3} layer that forms is porous, and humidified carbon dioxide can penetrate the NaHCO{sub 3} layer to continue reacting residual sodium underneath. The rate of reaction is controlled by the thickness of the NaHCO{sub 3} surface layer, the moisture input rate, and the residual sodium exposed surface area. At the end of carbonation, approximately 780 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II primary tank ({approx}70% of original inventory), and just under 190 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II secondary sodium system ({approx}50% of original inventory), were converted into NaHCO{sub 3}. No bare surfaces of residual sodium remained after treatment, and all remaining residual sodium deposits are covered by a layer of NaHCO{sub 3}. From a safety standpoint, the inventory of residual sodium in these systems was greatly reduced by using the carbonation process. From a regulatory standpoint, the process was not able to achieve deactivation of all residual sodium, and other more aggressive measures will be needed if the remaining residual sodium must also be deactivated to meet the requirements of the existing environmental permit. This chapter provides a project history and technical summary of the carbonation of EBR-II residual sodium. Options for future treatment are also discussed.

Sherman, S.; Knight, C.

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

116

Article removal device for glovebox  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article removal device for a glovebox is described comprising a conduit extending through a glovebox wall which may be closed by a plug within the glovebox, and a fire-resistant container closing the outer end of the conduit and housing a removable container for receiving pyrophoric or otherwise hazardous material without disturbing the interior environment of the glovebox or adversely affecting the environment outside of the glovebox. (Official Gazette)

Guyer, R.H.; Leebl, R.G.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Refiner Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Sulfur < 1% Residual F.O., Sulfur > 1% No. 4 Fuel Oil Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes...

118

Food and Agriculture Organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International cereal prices (in US dollar terms) have been increasing since 2003, but it is domestic prices that affect food consumption and production. This paper analyzes, for seven large Asian countries, the extent to which domestic prices have increased since 2003 and presents several conclusions. First, the data show that the increases in world cereal prices have been accompanied by a real depreciation of the US dollar. For many countries (but not all), this depreciation has neutralized a substantial proportion of the increase in world prices. Second, domestic commodity specific policies in several of these Asian countries have further stabilized domestic prices relative to the change in world prices. This has been especially true for rice, the main staple food in the region, but it is also true for wheat. On average, through the end of 2007, the increase in real domestic rice prices was about onethird of the increase in real US dollar world market rice prices. Third, for the specific cases analyzed here, producer or farmgate prices have changed by approximately the same percentage as consumer prices. Thus, in these Asian countries, domestic markets seem to be transmitting price changes between farmers and consumers rather efficiently. Fourth, the

David Dawe; Of The United Nations; David Dawe

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Phytoplankton fuels Delta food web  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass — CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE, VOLUME 57 , NUMBER 4 and therefore the food supplyand biomass in many aquatic systems. A low nutrient supply

Jassby, Alan D.; Cloern, James E.; Müller-Solger, Anke B.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Mrowka, Stanley (Richmond, CA)

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Arsenic removal and stabilization by synthesized pyrite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arsenic is ubiquitous whether it is naturally occurring or produced by humans. It is found at sites on the National Priority List and at sites operated by DOE, where it is the second most commonly found contaminant. More wastes containing arsenic will be produced due to the lowering of the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for arsenic in drinking water which will result in more treatment facilities for arsenic removal that will generate residuals. Furthermore, arsenic can be released from such wastes under the reduced conditions that are found in landfills. Pyrite (FeS2) is believed to be a compound that has a high affinity for arsenic and is stable under anoxic conditions. The first task of this research was to develop a method for making pyrite crystals of defined size with minimal reaction time and at high yield. Effects on the synthesis of pyrite particles of pH, the ratio of Fe/S, temperature and reaction time were investigated in batch reactor systems. Pyrite was synthesized within 24 hours at pH values ranging from pH 3.6 through pH 5.6, and at a ratio of Fe/S of 0.5. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to size and characterize the pyrite particles. Experimental and analytical procedures developed for this work, included a hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method for measuring arsenic species (As(III), As(V)). The synthesized pyrite was applied to remove arsenic and its maximum capacity for arsenic removal was measured in batch adsorption experiments to be 3.23 ?mol/g for As(III) and 113 ?mol/g for As(V). Information obtained on the characteristics of chemical species before and after the reaction with arsenic showed that iron and sulfur were oxidized. Last, how strongly arsenic was bound to pyrite was investigated and it was determined that release of arsenic from As(III)-pyrite is not affected by pH, but release from As(V)-pyrite is affected by pH with minimum release in the range pH 5 to pH 8.

Song, Jin Kun

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Removal - An alternative to clearance  

SciTech Connect

This presentation shows the differences between the application of clearance and removal, both being procedures for materials leaving radiation protection areas permanently. The differentiation will be done on the basis of the German legislation but may be also applicable for other national legislation. For clearance in Germany two basic requirements must be given, i.e. that the materials are activated or contaminated and that they result from the licensed use or can be assigned to the scope of the license. Clearance needs not to be applied to objects in Germany which are to be removed only temporarily from controlled areas with the purpose of repair or reuse in other controlled areas. In these cases only the requirements of contamination control apply. In the case of removal it must either be proved by measurements that the relevant materials are neither activated nor contaminated or that the materials result from areas where activation or contamination is impossible due to the operational history considering operational procedures and events. If the material is considered neither activated nor contaminated there is no need for a clearance procedure. Therefore, these materials can be removed from radiation protection areas and the removal is in the responsibility of the licensee. Nevertheless, the removal procedure and the measuring techniques to be applied for the different types of materials need an agreement from the competent authority. In Germany a maximum value of 10% of the clearance values has been established in different licenses as a criterion for the application of removal. As approximately 2/3 of the total mass of a nuclear power plant is not expected to be contaminated or activated there is a need for such a procedure of removal for this non contaminated material without any regulatory control especially in the case of decommissioning. A remarkable example is NPP Stade where in the last three years more than 8600 Mg were disposed of by removal and only 315 Mg were released by clearance, even before the decommissioning licensing procedure was finished. (authors)

Feinhals, J.; Kelch, A. [TUV NORD SysTec GmbH and Co. KG, Hamburg (Germany); Kunze, V. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Salzgitter (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A Novel Treatment for Acid Mine Drainage Utilizing Reclaimed Limestone Residual  

SciTech Connect

The viability of utilizing Reclaimed Limestone Residual (RLR) to remediate Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) was investigated. Physical and chemical characterization of RLR showed that it is composed of various minerals that contain significant quantities of limestone or calcium bearing compounds that can be exploited for acid neutralization. Acid Neutralization Potential (ANP) test results showed that RLR has a neutralization potential of approximately 83% as calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}). Neutralization tests with most of the heavy metals associated with AMD showed removal efficiencies of over 99%. An unexpected benefit of utilizing RLR was the removal of hexavalent chromium Cr (VI) from the aqueous phase. Due to an elevation in pH by RLR most AMD heavy metals are removed from solution by precipitation as their metal hydroxides. Cr (VI) however is not removed by pH elevation and therefore subsequent ongoing tests to elucidate the mechanism responsible for this reaction were conducted.

Horace K. Moo-Young; Charles E. Ochola

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Large Component Removal/Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

Wheeler, D. M.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

125

Multipollutant Removal with WOWClean® System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WOW Energy built and tested its multipollutant removal WOWClean® system in a development program with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). A 2,500 ACFM mobile unit was built to field test the removal of air pollution constituents from the flue gas of a power plant and demonstrate the technology. The system integrates proven emission reduction techniques into a single, multi-pollutant reduction system and is designed to remove Mercury, SOx, NOx, particulates, heavy metals and other pollutants from low temperature flue gases. Its advantages include robust operation, lower investment, lower operating cost and high removal rates. The WOWClean® system has been tested on flue gases resulting from the combustion of diverse fuels such as petcoke, coal, wood, diesel and natural gas. In addition to significant removal of CO2, test results demonstrate the capability to reduce 99.5% SOx (from levels as high as 2200 ppm), 90% reduction of NOx, and > 90% heavy metals. The paper will include details of the multi-pollutant system along with test results.

Romero, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

IMPACTS OF BIOFUEL PRODUCTION ON FOOD SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food security exists when all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for a healthy and active life”. This definition was adopted at the World Food Summit in 1996 (FAO, 1996) when references to food safety,

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Radiological surveys of properties contaminated by residual radioactive materials from uranium processing sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines methods for determining the extent and nature of contamination on properties contaminated by residual radioactive materials from uranium processing sites. Methods are also examined for verifying the success of remedial actions in removing the residual radioactive materials. Using literature review and practical experiences from the Edgemont, South Dakota survey program a critical review is made of sampling programs, instrumentation, analytical procedures, data reporting format, and statistical analyses of data. Protocols are recommended for measuring indoor and outdoor gamma-ray exposure rates, surface and subsurface Radium-226 concentrations in soil, and radon daughter concentrations.

Young, J.A.; Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Hanford Site Tank 241-C-108 Residual Waste Contaminant Release Models and Supporting Data  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of laboratory characterization, testing, and analysis for a composite sample (designated 20578) of residual waste collected from single-shell tank C-108 during the waste retrieval process after modified sluicing. These studies were completed to characterize concentration and form of contaminant of interest in the residual waste; assess the leachability of contaminants from the solids; and develop release models for contaminants of interest. Because modified sluicing did not achieve 99% removal of the waste, it is expected that additional retrieval processing will take place. As a result, the sample analyzed here is not expected to represent final retrieval sample.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Arey, Bruce W.; Schaef, Herbert T.

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

129

Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removal NNSANews posted a photo: Vietnam HEU Removal A truck carrying the last highly enriched uranium in Vietnam winds through the Vietnamese countryside. Facebook Twitter Youtube...

130

Food Environments Near Home and School Related to Consumption of Soda and Fast Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fried Food Away From Home With Body Mass Index and DietJuly 2011 Food Environments Near Home and School Related toof the food environment near home with diet healthier food

Babey, Susan H; Wolstein, Joelle; Diamant, Allison L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Free 3-MCPD in Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reference list for Free 3-MCPD(3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol )in Foods. Free 3-MCPD in Foods 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles certified chemists chloropropanediol contaminants detergents esters fat

132

Actinide removal from spent salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Linguistic Acculturation and Food Behaviors among Mexican-Origin Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that  sell  food.   Restaurant  spending  includes  dine-­?of  Eating  Fast  Food  or   Restaurant  Food  within  the  Food  or  Sit-­?Down  Restaurants  in  the  Previous  Two  

Langellier, Brent Alan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Methods of separating particulate residue streams  

SciTech Connect

A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Christopher T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

135

Residual stresses in IN 718 Turbine Disks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the thermally induced residual stresses in plate-like components during cooling. The plate is. 527 ... cooled down symmetrically with respect to its middle plane.

136

,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.5;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","...

137

Lipid Oxidation: Challenges in Food Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid oxidation in food systems is one of the most important factors which affect food quality, nutrition, safety, color and consumers’ acceptance. Lipid Oxidation: Challenges in Food Systems Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol con

138

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients is written to serve as a reference for food product developers, food technologists, nutritionists, plant breeders, academic and government professionals, college graduates, and anyone who is interested in learni

139

A Benchmark Study on Casting Residual Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stringent regulatory requirements, such as Tier IV norms, have pushed the cast iron for automotive applications to its limit. The castings need to be designed with closer tolerances by incorporating hitherto unknowns, such as residual stresses arising due to thermal gradients, phase and microstructural changes during solidification phenomenon. Residual stresses were earlier neglected in the casting designs by incorporating large factors of safety. Experimental measurement of residual stress in a casting through neutron or X-ray diffraction, sectioning or hole drilling, magnetic, electric or photoelastic measurements is very difficult and time consuming exercise. A detailed multi-physics model, incorporating thermo-mechanical and phase transformation phenomenon, provides an attractive alternative to assess the residual stresses generated during casting. However, before relying on the simulation methodology, it is important to rigorously validate the prediction capability by comparing it to experimental measurements. In the present work, a benchmark study was undertaken for casting residual stress measurements through neutron diffraction, which was subsequently used to validate the accuracy of simulation prediction. The stress lattice specimen geometry was designed such that subsequent castings would generate adequate residual stresses during solidification and cooling, without any cracks. The residual stresses in the cast specimen were measured using neutron diffraction. Considering the difficulty in accessing the neutron diffraction facility, these measurements can be considered as benchmark for casting simulation validations. Simulations were performed using the identical specimen geometry and casting conditions for predictions of residual stresses. The simulation predictions were found to agree well with the experimentally measured residual stresses. The experimentally validated model can be subsequently used to predict residual stresses in different cast components. This enables incorporation of the residual stresses at the design phase along with external loads for accurate predictions of fatigue and fracture performance of the cast components.

Johnson, Eric M. [John Deere -- Moline Tech Center; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Schmidlin, Joshua E [ORNL; Dutler, S. A. [MAGMA Foundry Technologies, Inc.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

Murray, A.M.

1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals Forecasts A document describing how volume fellings and removals are handled in the 2011 Production Forecast system. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Felling and removals forecasts Background A fellings and removals

142

Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Portfolio includes: paper 1. Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost: literature review  – paper 2. Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost: comparative analysis… (more)

Lok, Stanley Yap Peng.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES FROM RESIDUES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the recovery of uranium from insoluble oxide residues resistant to repeated leaching with mineral acids. The residue is treated with gaseous hydrogen fluoride, then with hydrogen and again with hydrogen fluoride, preferably at 500 to 700 deg C, prior to the mineral acid leaching.

Schaap, W.B.

1959-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

144

Costing forest residue recovery through simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The search for alternative energy sources has renewed interest in the energy potential of wood. Supplies of wood residue seem to be a likely source of material and the greatest volumes of residue are located in the forest. Methods are needed to more ...

Leonard R. Johnson; Edward L. Fisher

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact laser system is disclosed that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1,000 ft{sup 2}/hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, D.L.; Celliers, P.M.; Hackel, L.; Da Silva, L.B.; Dane, C.B.; Mrowka, S.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

146

Plant experience using hydrogen peroxide for enhanced fat flotation and BOD removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen peroxide (H[sub 2]O[sub 2]), is known in the food processing industry to reduce COD, BOD, to prevent anaerobic conditions in pipes, tanks and lagoons and to remove malodorous sulfides in effluents from anaerobic wastewater treatment. It has recently been shown to also provide effective solids removal from food processing wastewater. The wastewater of food processing plants often contains a very high loading of organic material consisting of fat, oil and grease (FOG), resulting in unacceptable BOD and COD levels. Since many wastewater treatment systems are being pushed to the limit of their capacity or are already overloaded, the high FOG loading cannot be removed well by the conventional means of treating the wastewater with dissolved air flotation or grease traps. As a result, many food processors are paying surcharges for not being in compliance with the tight discharge limits. To overcome these problems, a process has been developed using H[sub 2]O[sub 2] for enhanced FOG recovery and BOD removal. The process is based on the formation of microbubbles which attach themselves to the FOG particles and float them to the surface where they can be easily skimmed off. In addition to meeting effluent standards, the process has been able to yield a material that is very renderable and suitable for reuse. Technical and operational data of several industrial applications in the US and Canada are presented, together with process costs. H[sub 2]O[sub 2] treatment will generally be most applicable when improvement of solids removal is required without major investment costs, e.g. emergency situations, during seasonal peaks or increased production. 12 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Steiner, N.; Gec, R. (Degussa Corp., Allendale, NJ (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Process for treatment of residual gas  

SciTech Connect

A process is disclosed for the treatment of the residual gases which are produced when hydrogen sulfide is reduced, by combustion, to elementary sulfur by the Claus process. The residual gases are fed through a heated conduit and gas scrubber, wherein the temperature of those residual gases are maintained above the melting point of sulfur. A portion of the raw coke oven gas condensate is admitted to the gas scrubber to be returned to the coke oven battery main from the flushing liquid separator as flushing liquor. The residual gases are then conducted through the coke oven gas purification process equipment along with the raw coke oven gas where the residual gases are intermixed with the raw coke oven gas prior to tar separation.

Nolden, K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Food Industry 2000: Food Processing Opportunities, Challenges, New Technology Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of some of the major factors affecting the food processing industry, i. e., economic pressures, consumer concerns and pressures, regulatory restrictions, and general conservatism. The food industry must be responsive to the growing consumer interest in the relationship between diet and general health, to the changes in consumer demographics and desires, and to the opportunities offered by new technology, especially electrotechnologies.

2000-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

149

Food Apps | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 next Global Food Security Showing 1 - 4 of 22 results. aWhere aWhere transforms how global development initiatives are managed and monitored. aWhere's location intelligence...

150

Chloride removal from plutonium alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SRP is evaluating a program to recover plutonium from a metallic alloy that will contain chloride salt impurities. Removal of chloride to sufficiently low levels to prevent damaging corrosion to canyon equipment is feasible as a head-end step following dissolution. Silver nitrate and mercurous nitrate were each successfully used in laboratory tests to remove chloride from simulated alloy dissolver solution containing plutonium. Levels less than 10 ppM chloride were achieved in the supernates over the precipitated and centrifuged insoluble salts. Also, less than 0.05% loss of plutonium in the +3, +4, or +6 oxidation states was incurred via precipitate carrying. These results provide impetus for further study and development of a plant-scale process to recover plutonium from metal alloy at SRP.

Holcomb, H.P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic Residues in Cellulase Enzymes (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL researchers use high-performance computing to demonstrate fundamental roles of aromatic residues in cellulase enzyme tunnels. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) computer simulations of a key industrial enzyme, the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 cellulase (Cel6A), predict that aromatic residues near the enzyme's active site and at the entrance and exit tunnel perform different functions in substrate binding and catalysis, depending on their location in the enzyme. These results suggest that nature employs aromatic-carbohydrate interactions with a wide variety of binding affinities for diverse functions. Outcomes also suggest that protein engineering strategies in which mutations are made around the binding sites may require tailoring specific to the enzyme family. Cellulase enzymes ubiquitously exhibit tunnels or clefts lined with aromatic residues for processing carbohydrate polymers to monomers, but the molecular-level role of these aromatic residues remains unknown. In silico mutation of the aromatic residues near the catalytic site of Cel6A has little impact on the binding affinity, but simulation suggests that these residues play a major role in the glucopyranose ring distortion necessary for cleaving glycosidic bonds to produce fermentable sugars. Removal of aromatic residues at the entrance and exit of the cellulase tunnel, however, dramatically impacts the binding affinity. This suggests that these residues play a role in acquiring cellulose chains from the cellulose crystal and stabilizing the reaction product, respectively. These results illustrate that the role of aromatic-carbohydrate interactions varies dramatically depending on the position in the enzyme tunnel. As aromatic-carbohydrate interactions are present in all carbohydrate-active enzymes, the results have implications for understanding protein structure-function relationships in carbohydrate metabolism and recognition, carbon turnover in nature, and protein engineering strategies for biofuels production.

Not Available

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Removing Barriers to Interdisciplinary Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant amount of high-impact contemporary scientific research occurs where biology, computer science, engineering and chemistry converge. Although programmes have been put in place to support such work, the complex dynamics of interdisciplinarity are still poorly understood. In this paper we interrogate the nature of interdisciplinary research and how we might measure its "success", identify potential barriers to its implementation, and suggest possible mechanisms for removing these impediments.

Naomi Jacobs; Martyn Amos

2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

153

METHOD OF REMOVING STRONTIUM IONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for removing trace amounts of Sr/sup 90/ from solutions. Phosphate ion is added to the solution and it is then brought into contact with a solid salt such as calcium carbonate which will react methathetically with the phosphate ion to form a salt such as calcium phosphate. During this reaction, strontium will be absorbed to a high degree within the newly formed lattice. (AEC)

Rhodes, D.W.; McHenry, J.R.; Ames, L.L. Jr.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Chloroesters in foods: An emerging issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detection, in some foods and vegetable oils, of fatty acid esters of the contaminant known as 3-MCPD is an emerging issue for food and vegetable oil processors Chloroesters in foods: An emerging issue Inform Magazine Inform Archives 3-MCPD Food Sci

155

Analysis of decay heat removal capabilities at Susquehanna  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the Susquehanna station began operating in 1982, the Nuclear Safety Assessment Group (NSAG) has conducted independent outage safety reviews. In 1990, NSAG published The Outage Planning Information document which consolidated some of the knowledge gained during the outage safety review process. The report discusses the requirements in the technical specifications and it analyzes the decay heat removal problem during the various stages of an outage. The appendices contain facts concerning decay heat generation and the capabilities of the decay heat removal systems. To the maximum extent possible, design documents and certified test data have been used to establish the capabilities of the systems. The Susquehanna station has two General Electric (GE) boiling water reactors (BWR)-4 GE BWR-4 reactors with Mark-2 containments. The safety systems are composed of two independent divisions. The possible heat sinks are the cooling towers via the circulating water and service water systems, the spray pond via the residual heat removal systems, and the atmosphere via boiling.

Miltenberger, J.R. (Pennsylvania Power and Light Co., Allentown (United States)); Henry, R.A. (Pennsylvania Power and Light Co., Berwick (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Method for removing oxide contamination from silicon carbide powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The described invention is directed to a method for removing oxide contamination in the form of oxygen-containing compounds such as SiO/sub 2/ and B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ from a charge of finely divided silicon carbide. The silicon carbide charge is contacted with a stream of hydrogen fluoride mixed with an inert gas carrier such as argon at a temperature in the range of about 200/sup 0/ to 650/sup 0/C. The oxides in the charge react with the heated hydrogen fluoride to form volatile gaseous fluorides such as SiF/sub 4/ and BF/sub 3/ which pass through the charge along with unreacted hydrogen fluoride and the carrier gas. Any residual gaseous reaction products and hydrogen fluoride remaining in the charge are removed by contacting the charge with the stream of inert gas which also cools the powder to room temperature. The removal of the oxygen contamination by practicing the present method provides silicon carbide powders with desirable pressing and sintering characteristics. 1 tab.

Brynestad, J.; Bamberger, C.E.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

SAR impulse response with residual chirps.  

SciTech Connect

A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Gasification of in-Forest Biomass Residues.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Described is a laboratory-scale continuous-feed supercritical water gasification (SCWG) system. The system is operated using real-world Ponderosa Pine sawmill residues at high biomass loadings, short… (more)

Faires, Kenneth B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Natural gas: Removing the obstacles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defining and then figuring out how to remove whatever obstacles may be blocking the wider use of natural gas was the purpose of a conference held early last month in Phoenix, Arizona. The unique, three-day event was jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). It drew an overflow crowd of more than 500, with a registration list that read like a Who's Who of the natural gas industry. This article summarizes some of the main points of this conference.

Romo, C.

1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Residual Circulations Due to Bottom Roughness Variability under Tidal Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tidal flows over irregular bathymetry are known to produce residual circulation flows due to nonlinear interaction with gradients of depth. Using the depth-averaged vorticity equations, the generation of residual vorticity and residual flows due ...

Thomas F. Gross; Francisco E. Werner

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Residual Fuel Oil Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Sulfur < 1% Residual F.O., Sulfur > 1% No. 4 Fuel Oil Period-Unit: Monthly - Thousand Gallons per Day Annual - Thousand Gallons per Day...

162

The Neutron Residual Stress Mapping Facility at HFIR | ORNL Neutron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Residual Stress Mapping Facility at HFIR Neutron Residual Stress Mapping Facility (HB-2B) Neutron Residual Stress Mapping Facility (HB-2B). The HB-2B beam port is optimized...

163

Food Services | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Services Food Services Food Services The Department offers many food services for employees within the Headquarters' buildings. Forrestal Forrestal Cafeteria (2nd floor, West Building). See the Cafeteria web page for further information. Hours: Monday-Friday 6:45 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Breakfast hours are from 6:45 a.m. until 10:00 a.m., lunch from 11:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m., and a "Happy Hour" is featured from 2:00-2:30 p.m. offering 30% off all hot and cold buffet items. Other Places to Eat, Forrestal Food services available inside the Forrestal building (DOE Powerpedia) Places to eat near the Forrestal building (DOE Powerpedia) Germantown Germantown Cafeteria - See the Cafeteria web page for further information. Hours: Monday-Friday 6:45 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Breakfast hours are from 7:00 a.m. until 10:00 a.m., lunch from 11:00 a.m.

164

Mesquite pods into nutritious foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesquite trees produce bean pods that a new process can turn into nutrient-rich foods. A simple, automated procedure converts the dried mesquite pods into a high-protein, sweet-tasting flour and a gum that can be used as a natural thickening additive in foods. Standard food-processing equipment can be used. For flour, whole pods are ground with a disk mill, which produces a mixture of seeds and flour. The mixture is then sifted to separate the two components. Its the seeds that contain the gum - a thin, white film that lines the inside of the hard, brown seed coat. To extract gum, seeds are split and soaked in an alkali solution. The solution, after being neutralized, is sprayed through a fine-mist nozzle into a heated chamber, where it dries as a fine powder of edible gum. This spray-drying is the same process that converts fresh milk into powdered. Analyses showed that the natural gum in mesquite pods is better than the guar gum US food processors now import to use as a natural thickener in ice cream; salad dressings, puddings, and other foods.

Wood, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Integrating the Clearance in NPP Residual Material Management  

SciTech Connect

Previous Experiences in decommissioning projects are being used to optimize the residual material management in NPP, metallic scrap usually. The approach is based in the availability of a materials Clearance MARSSIM-based methodology developed and licensed in Spain. A typical project includes the integration of segregation, decontamination, clearance, quality control and quality assurance activities. The design is based in the clearance methodology features translating them into standard operational procedures. In terms of ecological taxes and final disposal costs, significant amounts of money could be saved with this type of approaches. The last clearance project managed a total amount of 405 tons scrap metal and a similar amount of other residual materials occupying a volume of 1500 m{sup 3}. After less than a year of field works 251 tons were finally recycled in a non-licensed smelting facility. The balance was disposed as LILW. In the planning phase the estimated cost savings were 4.5 Meuro. However, today a VLLW option is available in European countries so, the estimated cost savings are reduced to 1.2 Meuro. In conclusion: the application of materials clearance in NPP decommissioning lessons learnt to the NPP residual material management is an interesting management option. This practice is currently going on in Spanish NPP and, in a preliminary view, is consistent with the new MARSAME Draft. An interesting parameter is the cost of 1 m3 of recyclable scrap. The above estimates are very project specific because in the segregation process other residual materials were involved. If the effect of this other materials is removed the estimated Unit Cost were in this project around 1700 euro/m{sup 3}, this figure is clearly below the above VLLW disposal cost of 2600 euro. In a future project it appears feasible to descend to 839 euro/m{sup 3} and if it became routine values and is used in big Decommissioning projects, around 600 euro/m{sup 3} or below possibly could be achieved. A rough economical analysis permits to estimate a saving around 2000 US$ to 13000 US$ per cubic meter of steel scrap according the variability of materials and disposal costs. Many learnt lessons of this practice were used as a feed back in the planning of characterization activities for decommissioning a Spanish NPP and today are considered as a significant reference in our Decommissioning engineering approaches.

Garcia-Bermejo, R.; Lamela, B. [Iberdrola Ingenieria y Construccion, Jose Bardasano Baos 28036, Madrid (Spain)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Material Removal and Disposition | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal and Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

167

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS SRS Employees Donate Food to Golden Harvest Food Bank  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Donate Food to Golden Harvest Food Bank Employees Donate Food to Golden Harvest Food Bank AIKEN, S.C. - (June 7, 2012) Today, the Savannah River Site (SRS) donated $22,000 and 18,000 pounds of food during its annual food drive for the Golden Harvest Food Bank. Several SRS organizations participated in this food drive-Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Savannah River Remediation, U.S. Forest Service-Savannah River, URS and WSI- Savannah River. The SRS food drive is one of Golden Harvest Food Bank's largest, local fund-raisers. According to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC President and CEO Dwayne Wilson, the Site's past food drives have collec- tively yielded over 262,475 pounds of food for Golden Harvest. "We're pleased to support Golden Harvest in their highly effective efforts as they strive

168

Geography of urban food access : exploring potential causes of food deserts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We believe we understand food deserts, but we do not. In the last decade the phenomenon of food deserts has been often discussed, and many solutions are proposed to alleviate food access issues in American cities. However, ...

Cameron, Caitlin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage...

170

EIS-0277: Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

77: Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub Alloy Stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site EIS-0277: Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub...

171

Animal Performance and Diet Quality While Grazing Corn Residue.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Grazing cattle on corn residue as a winter feed source has become an integral part of many Nebraska producers’ management plans. Utilizing corn residues extends… (more)

Gigax, Jennifer A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Potential for biogas production fromslaughter houses residues in Bolivia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Residues from slaughter houses offer an abundant resource in Bolivia. The residues can beused for biogas production with biofertilizer as a bi-product. These resources… (more)

Tesfaye Tefera, Tadious

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Peak Oil Food Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Network Network Jump to: navigation, search Name Peak Oil Food Network Place Crested Butte, Colorado Zip 81224 Website http://www.PeakOilFoodNetwork. References Peak Oil Food Network[1] LinkedIn Connections This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Peak Oil Food Network is a networking organization located in Crested Butte, Colorado, and is open to the general public that seeks to promote the creation of solutions to the challenge of food production impacted by the peak phase of global oil production. Private citizens are encouraged to join and contribute by adding comments, writing blog posts or adding to discussions about food and oil related topics. Peak Oil Food Network can be followed on Twitter at: http://www.Twitter.com/PeakOilFoodNtwk Peak Oil Food Network on Twitter

174

World Food Crisis: Imperfect Markets Starving Development, A Decomposition of Recent Food Price Increases.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The recent decade has experienced two rather substantial food price spikes. This thesis sets out to provide an in-depth look at the recent food price… (more)

Costello, Christine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

All auto shredding: evaluation of automotive shredder residue generated by shredding only vehicles.  

SciTech Connect

A well developed infrastructure exists for the reuse and recycling of automotive parts and materials. At the end of a vehicle's useful life many parts are removed and sold for reuse and fluids are recovered for recycling or proper disposal. What remains is shredded, along with other metal bearing scrap such as home appliances, demolition debris and process equipment, and the metals are separated out and recycled. The remainder of the vehicle materials is call shredder residue which ends up in the landfill. As energy and natural resources becomes more treasured, increased effort has been afforded to find ways to reduce energy consumption and minimize the use of our limited resources. Many of the materials found in shredder residue could be recovered and help offset the use of energy and material consumption. For example, the energy content of the plastics and rubbers currently landfilled with the shredder residue is equivalent to 16 million barrels of oil per year. However, in the United States, the recovered materials, primarily polymers, cannot be recycled due to current regulatory barriers which preclude the re-introduction into commerce of certain materials because of residual contamination with substances of concern (SOCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The source of the PCBs is not well understood. Old transformers, capacitors, white goods and ballasts from lighting fixtures are likely contributing factors. The project was designed to evaluate whether vehicles of varying age and manufacturing origin contribute to the PCB content in shredder residue. Additionally, the project was designed to determine if there are any trends in material composition of the shredder residue from varied age and manufacturing groups. This information would aid in future material recovery facility strategy and design. The test utilized a newly installed shredder plant to shred four categories of automobiles. The categories were defined by vehicle age and the manufacturing company and location. Each category of vehicles was processed individually through the shredder plant and the resulting shredder residue was analyzed for its materials composition and presence of PCBs and leachable metals. The results show that shredder residue from all vehicle categories tested are not significant contributors of PCBs and leachable metals. It was evident that leachable cadmium levels have decreased in newer vehicles. The composition of the shredder residue from each of the four categories is similar to the others. In addition, these compositions are approximately equal to the composition of typical shredder residues, not limited to automotive materials.

Duranceau, C. M.; Spangenberger, J. S. (Energy Systems); (Vehicle Recycling Partnership, LLC); (American Chemistry Counsel, Plastics Division)

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

176

Reclamation of plutonium from pyrochemical processing residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), Savannah River Plant (SRP), and Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) have jointly developed a process to recover plutonium from molten salt extraction residues. These NaCl, KCL, and MgCl/sub 2/ residues, which are generated in the pyrochemical extraction of /sup 241/Am from aged plutonium metal, contain up to 25 wt % dissolved plutonium and up to 2 wt % americium. The overall objective was to develop a process to convert these residues to a pure plutonium metal product and discardable waste. To meet this objective a combination of pyrochemical and aqueous unit operations was used. The first step was to scrub the salt residue with a molten metal (aluminum and magnesium) to form a heterogeneous ''scrub alloy'' containing nominally 25 wt % plutonium. This unit operation, performed at RFP, effectively separated the actinides from the bulk of the chloride salts. After packaging in aluminum cans, the ''scrub alloy'' was then dissolved in a nitric acid - hydrofluoric acid - mercuric nitrate solution at SRP. Residual chloride was separated from the dissolver solution by precipitation with Hg/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ followed by centrifuging. Plutonium was then separated from the aluminum, americium and magnesium using the Purex solvent extraction system. The /sup 241/Am was diverted to the waste tank farm, but could be recovered if desired.

Gray, L.W.; Gray, J.H.; Holcomb, H.P.; Chostner, D.F.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

THERMALLY SHIELDED MOISTURE REMOVAL DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is presented for removing moisture from the air within tanks by condensation upon a cartridge containing liquid air. An insulating shell made in two halves covers the cartridge within the evacuated system. The shell halves are hinged together and are operated by a system of levers from outside the tank with the motion translated through a sylphon bellows to cover and uncover the cartridge. When the condensation of moisture is in process, the insulative shell is moved away from the liquid air cartridge, and during that part of the process when there is no freezing out of moisture, the shell halves are closed on the cell so thnt the accumulated frost is not evaporated. This insulating shell greatly reduces the consumption of liquid air in this condensation process.

Miller, O.E.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

178

Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

Richardson, BS

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Nitrogen removal from natural gas  

SciTech Connect

According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Genetic Engineered Food and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Engineered Food and Safety Genetic Engineered Food and Safety Name: Christopher Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is genetically engineered food safe to eat? Replies: Well, I hope so, since I and you and all of us have been eating it for centuries. All common foodstuffs have been seriously engineered since they were discovered. The modern tomato plant, apple tree, wheat stalk, and corn plant bear only a general resemblance to their ancestors, as farmers have engineered them to increase their yield, shelf life, resistance to disease, etc. It is, however, true that up until recently changes to the genetic code of foodstuffs could only be made via natural mutation (which occurs via naturally-occuring ionizing radiation and mutagenic chemicals), and the food engineer's job was limited to selecting those changes he wanted to preserve, and those he wanted to weed out. Now you can induce mutations directly, with intention and forethought, and avoid much of the waiting around for natural mutation that was heretofore necessary in plant breeding.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Food Battery Competition Sponsored by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food Battery Competition Sponsored by: The University of Tennessee, Materials Research Society (MRS growing populations and energy needs forever. Batteries have evolved a great deal and when you compare the bulky, heavy, toxic car lead batteries to the novel and outstanding lithium-ion batteries, you can

Tennessee, University of

182

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE FOR THE NFSS CENTRAL DRAINAGE DITCH DECEMBER 1986 Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OFFICE Under Contract No. DE-AC05-81OR20722 By Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 I 1.0 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY 1.1 OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE The objective of this report is to describe the methodology used for establishing a supplemental residual contamination guideline for the NFSS vicinity property known as the Central Drainage Ditch (CDD). Supplemental guidelines may exceed authorized guidelines if the resultant dose will not exceed the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr (Ref. 1). This evaluation is based on realistic exposure pathways that were

183

System and method for measuring residual stress  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method and system for determining the residual stress within an elastic object. In the method, an elastic object is cut along a path having a known configuration. The cut creates a portion of the object having a new free surface. The free surface then deforms to a contour which is different from the path. Next, the contour is measured to determine how much deformation has occurred across the new free surface. Points defining the contour are collected in an empirical data set. The portion of the object is then modeled in a computer simulator. The points in the empirical data set are entered into the computer simulator. The computer simulator then calculates the residual stress along the path which caused the points within the object to move to the positions measured in the empirical data set. The calculated residual stress is then presented in a useful format to an analyst.

Prime, Michael B. (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Development of an extraction process for removal of heteroatoms from coal liquids. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main goal of this contract was to develop an extraction process for upgrading coal liquids; and in doing so, to reduce the hydrogen requirement in downstream upgrading processes and to yield valuable byproducts. This goal was to be achieved by developing a novel carbon dioxide extraction process for heteroatom removal from coal-derived naphtha, diesel, and jet fuel. The research plan called for the optimization of three critical process variables using a statistically-designed experimental matrix. The commercial potential of the new process was to be evaluated by demonstrating quantitatively the effectiveness of heteroatom removal from three different feedstocks and by conducting a comparative economic analysis of alternate heteroatom removal technologies. Accomplishments are described for the following tasks: food procurement and analysis process variable screening studies; and process assessment.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The bottom of the ocean food chain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The bottom of the ocean food chain 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:July 2013 All Issues submit The bottom of the ocean food chain Global ocean...

186

Omega-3 Oils: Applications in Functional Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New applications of omega-3 fatty acids from both plant and marine sources in food supplements and pharmaceuticals. Omega-3 Oils: Applications in Functional Foods Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary

187

Study on Residual Current Protective Strategy Based on Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual current protective devices play an important role in electrical safety engineering. When dangerous residual current occurs, automatic disconnection of power supply can prevent dangerous residual currents which may cause burns, fires and electrocution. ... Keywords: residual current device, discrimination protection, fieldbus, protective strategy

Yue Dawei; Li Kui; Wang Yao; Wang Jibo

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The wet corn milling industry emits almost a sixth of the energy-related carbon in the food industry. ...

189

Apparatus and method for removing solvent from carbon dioxide in resin recycling system  

SciTech Connect

A two-step resin recycling system and method solvent that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material. The system and method includes one or more solvent wash vessels to expose resin particles to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles in the one or more solvent wash vessels to substantially remove contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is provided to separate the solvent from the resin particles after removal from the one or more solvent wash vessels. The resin particles are next exposed to carbon dioxide in a closed loop carbon dioxide system. The closed loop system includes a carbon dioxide vessel where the carbon dioxide is exposed to the resin, substantially removing any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation. A separation vessel is also provided to separate the solvent from the solvent laden carbon dioxide. Both the carbon dioxide and the solvent are reused after separation in the separation vessel.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

190

Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

174-1 Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-174 and Natural Resources Carbon footprinting in the food industry is an activity that determines the greenhouse.g. tons) of carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent per functional unit (e.g. kg or liter of goods sold) (PAS2050

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

191

Food Security in the Western US  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food Security in the Western US and Pacific Territories 23 Rural Connections Nov. 2009 By PeteR BaRcinas ADAP is tackling the food security implications of climate change, rising sea levels, and fuel costs Pacific (aDaP) Regional Food security and Sufficiency Project brings together community, local, state

192

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ({gamma}-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

1988-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

193

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (both Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (both Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

195

A critical review of residual stress technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current technology for evaluating residual in materials has been critically reviewed from the perspective of LLNL needs. The primary technique available continues to be x-ray diffraction (XRD). Substantial analytical and experimental refinements have been made in the past decade. An especially promising development in XRD is the use of energy dispersive spectroscopy for evaluating triaxial stress. This would provide an alternative to neutron diffraction, a technique limited to a relatively small number of outside laboratories. Recent research in residual stress measurement using ultrasonics have concentrated on shear wave techniques. Substantial progress has been made in the use of electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT's), surface waves, corrections for texture, and, of special interest to LLNL, the ability to characterize interfacial stress. Strain gages and related technologies continue to be actively used in field measurements of residual stress, although there is generally some destructive nature to those techniques. An increased use of multiple technique approaches to residual stress evaluation is occurring for the purposes of both verification and complementary measurements. Among a number of miscellaneous techniques found in the recent literature are several involving the use of stress-sensitive magnetic properties and an especially promising use of the thermoelastic effect for noncontact stress mapping. Recommendations for LLNL activity include energy dispersive XRD, ultrasonics characterization of anisotropy and interfacial stress, and investigation of the thermoelastic effect. 57 refs.

Shackelford, J.F.; Brown, B.D.

1987-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Passive Core Decay Heat Removal Performance Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive decay heat removal systems operate without pumps when normal heat removal systems are not available. Safety is ensured by confirming that an adequate thermal margin is provided to accommodate various operating conditions, design uncertainties, and degradation. Guidelines to ensure adequate thermal performance are provided for three different system configurations.This report introduces utility systems engineers to the design and operation of passive decay heat removal systems and ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

197

Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residues  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt percent graphite, 15 wt percent calcium fluoride (CaF2), and 12 wt percent plutonium oxide (PuO2). Approximately 950 kilograms of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 degrees C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO2 concentration in the residue averages 12 wt percent, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF2 dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO2) as a surrogate for PuO2 and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF2 and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.In general, the recovery of cerium from the full-scale waste forms was higher than for smaller scale experiments. The presence of CaF2 also caused a dramatic increase in cerium recovery not seen in the small-scale experiments. However, the results from experiments with actual graphite fines were encouraging. A 4:1 frit to residue ratio, a temperature of 700 degrees C, and a 2 hr heating time produced waste forms with plutonium recoveries of 4 plus/minus 1 g/kg. With an increase in the frit to residue ratio, waste forms fabricated at this scale should meet the Rocky Flats product specification. The scale-up of the waste form fabrication process to nominally 3 kg is expected to require a 5:1 to 6:1 frit to residue ratio and maintaining the waste form centerline temperature at 700 degrees C for 2 hr.

Rudisill, T. S.

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

198

Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSANews posted a photo: Vietnam HEU Removal A convoy escorting the last highly enriched uranium in Vietnam departs Dalat. Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr Headlines Jul 23,...

199

Metal Organic Clathrates for Carbon Dioxide Removal  

removal from coal-fired power plant flue gas streams.  Modified variations of the materials can be used in a variety of other fields as well, ...

200

Improved sulfur removal processes evaluated for IGCC  

SciTech Connect

An inherent advantage of Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electric power generation is the ability to easily remove and recover sulfur. During the last several years, a number of new, improved sulfur removal and recovery processes have been commercialized. An assessment is given of alternative sulfur removal processes for IGCC based on the Texaco coal gasifier. The Selexol acid gas removal system, Claus sulfur recovery, and SCOT tail gas treating are currently used in Texaco-based IGCC. Other processes considered are: Purisol, Sulfinol-M, Selefning, 50% MDEA, Sulften, and LO-CAT. 2 tables.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel  

ORNL 2010-G00619/jcn UT-B ID 200902314 Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel Technology Summary At ORNL the application of ultrasonic energy, or ...

202

Internal Controls Over Classified Computersand Classified Removable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Classified Removable Media at theLawrence Livermore National Laboratory, IG-0628 Computers are used extensively in the full range of operations at Lawrence Livermore National...

203

Removal of radioisotopes from waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention comprises removing radioisotopes from waste liquids or solutions by passing these through filters and through a column containing a suitable salt of phosphoric acid. (Official Gazette)

Kirby, H.W.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Tritium Removal Facility High Tritium Distillation Simulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A dynamic model was developed for the distillation mechanism of the Darlington Tritium Removal Facility. The model was created using the commercial software package MATLAB/Simulink.… (more)

Zahedi, Polad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION SAMPLING OF FIRE DEBRIS RESIDUES IN THE PRESENCE OF RADIONUCLIDE SURROGATE METALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory currently does not have on site facilities for handling radioactive evidentiary materials and there are no established FBI methods or procedures for decontaminating highly radioactive fire debris (FD) evidence while maintaining evidentiary value. One experimental method for the isolation of FD residue from radionuclide metals involves using solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers to remove the residues of interest. Due to their high affinity for organics, SPME fibers should have little affinity for most (radioactive) metals. The focus of this research was to develop an examination protocol that was applicable to safe work in facilities where high radiation doses are shielded from the workers (as in radioactive shielded cells or ''hot cells''). We also examined the affinity of stable radionuclide surrogate metals (Co, Ir, Re, Ni, Ba, Cs, Nb, Zr and Nd) for sorption by the SPME fibers. This was done under exposure conditions that favor the uptake of FD residues under conditions that will provide little contact between the SPME and the FD material (such as charred carpet or wood that contains commonly-used accelerants). Our results from mass spectrometric analyses indicate that SPME fibers show promise for use in the room temperature head space uptake of organic FD residue (namely, diesel fuel oil, kerosene, gasoline and paint thinner) with subsequent analysis by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. No inorganic forms of ignitable fluids were included in this study.

Duff, M; Keisha Martin, K; S Crump, S

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

206

Screened non-bonded interactions in native proteins manipulate optimal paths for robust residue communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A protein structure is represented as a network of residues whereby edges are determined by intra-molecular contacts. We introduce inhomogeneity into these networks by assigning each edge a weight that is determined by amino-acid pair potentials. Two methodologies are utilized to calculate the average path lengths (APLs) between pairs: To minimize (i) the maximum weight in the strong APL, and (ii) the total weight in the weak APL. We systematically screen edges that have higher than a cutoff potential and calculate the shortest APLs in these reduced networks, while keeping chain connectivity. Therefore, perturbations introduced at a selected region of the residue network propagate to remote regions only along the non-screened edges that retain their ability to disseminate the perturbation. The shortest APLs computed from the reduced homogeneous networks with only the strongest few non-bonded pairs closely reproduce the strong APLs from the weighted networks. The rate of change in the APL in the reduced residue network as compared to its randomly connected counterpart remains constant until a lower bound. Upon further link removal, this property shows an abrupt increase, towards a random coil behavior. Under different perturbation scenarios, diverse optimal paths emerge for robust residue communication.

Ali Rana Atilgan; Deniz Turgut; Canan Atilgan

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

207

Vision - Food | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vision - Food Vision - Food Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture This website is supported by the Interagency Council on Agricultural and Rural Statistics (ICARS). ICARS is the effort of the US federal government's statistical agencies in support of the "Global Strategy to Improve Agriculture and Rural Statistics" which was developed under the United Nations Statistical Commission. The impetus for the Global Strategy was the recognition that agriculture and rural statistics are declining across the globe at the same time as new data requirements are emerging. ICARS brings together experts from economic, demographic, environmental and agricultural statistical agencies and from natural resource agencies to

208

Study of radionuclide leaching from the residues of K Basin sludge dissolution  

SciTech Connect

The sludges remaining in the K Basins after removal of the spent N Reactor nuclear fuel will be conditioned for disposal. After conditioning, an acid-insoluble residue will remain that may require further leaching to properly condition it for disposal. This document presents a literature study to identify and recommend one or more chemical leaching treatments for laboratory testing, based on the likely compositions of the residues. The processes identified are a nitric acid cerate leach, a silver-catalyzed persulfate leach, a nitric hydrofluoric acid leach, an oxalic citric acid reactor decontamination leach, a nitric hydrochloric acid leach, a ammonium fluoride nitrate leach, and a HEOPA formate dehydesulfoxylate leach. All processes except the last two are recommended for testing in that order.

Bechtold, D.B.

1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 10 Soy Molasses: Processing and Utilization as a Functional Food  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 10 Soy Molasses: Processing and Utilization as a Functional Food Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pre

210

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 8 Barriers to Soy Protein Applications in Food Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 8 Barriers to Soy Protein Applications in Food Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

211

Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

Soung, Wen Y. (Houston, TX)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Treatment of plutonium process residues by molten salt oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal process that can remove more than 99.999% of the organic matrix from combustible {sup 238}Pu material. Plutonium processing residues are injected into a molten salt bed with an excess of air. The salt (sodium carbonate) functions as a catalyst for the conversion of the organic material to carbon dioxide and water. Reactive species such as fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, sulfur, phosphorous and arsenic in the organic waste react with the molten salt to form the corresponding neutralized salts, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and NaAsO{sub 2} or Na{sub 3}AsO4. Plutonium and other metals react with the molten salt and air to form metal salts or oxides. Saturated salt will be recycled and aqueous chemical separation will be used to recover the {sup 238}Pu. The Los Alamos National Laboratory system, which is currently in the conceptual design stage, will be scaled down from current systems for use inside a glovebox.

Stimmel, J.; Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.; Brock, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Heslop, M. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (United States). Indian Head Div.; Wernly, K. [Molten Salt Oxidation Corp. (United States)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Global Cut Framework for Removing Symmetries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a general technique for removing symmetries in CSPs during search. The idea is to record no-goods, during the exploration of the search tree, whose symmetric counterpart (if any) should be removed. The no-good, called Global ...

Filippo Focacci; Michela Milano

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

COST OF MERCURY REMOVAL IN IGCC PLANTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost of Mercury Removal Cost of Mercury Removal in an IGCC Plant Final Report September 2002 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory By: Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group Inc. Reading, Pennsylvania Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania DOE Product Manager: Gary J. Stiegel DOE Task Manager: James R. Longanbach Principal Investigators: Michael G. Klett Russell C. Maxwell Michael D. Rutkowski PARSONS The Cost of Mercury Removal in an IGCC Plant Final Report i September 2002 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Title Page 1 Summary 1 2 Introduction 3 3 Background 4 3.1 Regulatory Initiatives 4 3.2 Mercury Removal for Conventional Coal-Fired Plants 4 3.3 Mercury Removal Experience in Gasification 5 3.4 Variability of Mercury Content in Coal 6 4 Design Considerations 7 4.1 Carbon Bed Location

215

Catalyst regeneration process including metal contaminants removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Spent catalysts removed from a catalytic hydrogenation process for hydrocarbon feedstocks, and containing undesired metals contaminants deposits, are regenerated. Following solvent washing to remove process oils, the catalyst is treated either with chemicals which form sulfate or oxysulfate compounds with the metals contaminants, or with acids which remove the metal contaminants, such as 5-50 W % sulfuric acid in aqueous solution and 0-10 W % ammonium ion solutions to substantially remove the metals deposits. The acid treating occurs within the temperature range of 60.degree.-250.degree. F. for 5-120 minutes at substantially atmospheric pressure. Carbon deposits are removed from the treated catalyst by carbon burnoff at 800.degree.-900.degree. F. temperature, using 1-6 V % oxygen in an inert gas mixture, after which the regenerated catalyst can be effectively reused in the catalytic process.

Ganguli, Partha S. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Recovery of recyclable materials from shredder residue  

SciTech Connect

Each year, about 11 million tons of metals (ferrous and nonferrous) are recovered in the US from about 10 million discarded automobiles. The recovered metals account for about 75% of the total weight of the discarded vehicles. The balance of the material or shredder residue, which amounts to about 3 million tons annually, is currently landfilled. The residue contains a diversity of potentially recyclable materials, including polyurethane foams, iron oxides, and certain thermoplastics. This paper discusses a process under development at Argonne National Laboratory to separate and recover the recyclable materials from this waste stream. The process consists essentially of two-stages. First, a physical separation is used to recover the foams and the metal oxides, followed by a chemical process to extract certain thermoplastics. Status of the technology is discussed and process economics reviewed.

Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Brockmeier, N.F.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Residual stress determination using strain gage measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strain gage technique, which relates the prior residual stress state in a material to the strain data obtained by fixing a strain gage on one surface and grinding off the other, has been proposed previously. In the current work, a generalized solution for obtaining an arbitrary residual stress profile from strain gage data is presented. Numerical analysis using the solution indicates that the formulation is insensitive to random errors of 10% or less in the experimental data. Based on the results of the analysis, a procedure for determining stress profiles from strain gage data is outlined. Experimental data for tempered glass was analyzed using the technique proposed. The stress profiles predicted are in good agreement with independent observations using indentation and strength data.

Tandon, R.; Green, D.J. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (US))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Controlling Residual Stresses by Heat Sink Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are described of a combined finite element and pipe welding study in which the welding and heat sink parameters required to optimize fast pass heat sink welding (LPHSW) were identified and evaluated in analytic and experimental tasks. Also discussed is the application of an elastic-plastic finite element computer code model to evaluate and optimize the LPHSW process and to verify the results through residual stress measurements on LPHSW pipes.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

1-D Transforms for the Motion Compensation Residual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transforms used in image coding are also commonly used to compress prediction residuals in video coding. Prediction residuals have different spatial characteristics from images, and it is useful to develop transforms that ...

Kamisli, Fatih

220

Scientists detect residue that has hindered efficiency of promising...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

detect residue that has hindered efficiency of promising type of solar cell By Jared Sagoff * May 3, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint LEMONT, Ill. - Drivers who have ever noticed a residue on...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Directional wavelet transforms for prediction residuals in video coding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various directional transforms have been developed recently to improve image compression. In video compression, however, prediction residuals of image intensities, such as the motion compensation residual or the resolution ...

Kamisli, Fatih

222

Residual Fuel Demand - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In the 1986 to 1991 period, residual fuel oil demand declined only slightly both in absolute and as a percent of total product demand. While not shown, residual fuel ...

223

In-Situ Method for Treating Residual Sodium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R.; Henslee, S. Paul

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

224

Actinide removal from nitric acid waste streams  

SciTech Connect

Actinide separations research at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) has found ways to significantly improve plutonium secondary recovery and americium removal from nitric acid waste streams generated by plutonium purification operations. Capacity and breakthrough studies show anion exchange with Dowex 1x4 (50 to 100 mesh) to be superior for secondary recovery of plutonium. Extraction chromatography with TOPO(tri-n-octyl-phosphine oxide) on XAD-4 removes the final traces of plutonium, including hydrolytic polymer. Partial neutralization and solid supported liquid membrane transfer removes americium for sorption on discardable inorganic ion exchangers, potentially allowing for non-TRU waste disposal.

Muscatello, A.C.; Navratil, J.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

In situ removal of contamination from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination, and further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed.

Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Method for changing removable bearing for a wind turbine generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY), Gadre; Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

227

Residual Stress Tensor in a Compact Tension Weld Specimen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Residual Stress Tensor in a Compact Tension Weld Specimen ... austenitic stainless steel (Esshete 1250) compact tension weld specimen.

228

Colorado Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Other/Residual Fuel Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Other/Residual Fuel Oil Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

229

Feedstock Logistics of a Mobile Pyrolysis System and Assessment of Soil Loss Due to Biomass Removal for Bioenergy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess feedstock logistics for a mobile pyrolysis system and to quantify the amount of soil loss caused by harvesting agricultural feedstocks for bioenergy production. The analysis of feedstock logistics was conducted using ArcGIS with the Network Analyst extension and model builder. A square grid methodology was used to determine biomass availability of corn stover and bioenergy sorghum in Texas. The SWAT model was used to quantify soil erosion losses in surface runoff caused by sorghum residue removal for bioenergy production in the Oso Creek Watershed in Nueces County. The model simulated the removal of 25, 50, 75, and 100 percent residue removal. The WEPS model was used to quantify wind erosion soil loss caused by corn stover removal in Dallam County. Nine simulations were run estimating soil loss for corn stover removal rates of 0 percent to 50 percent. The results of the SWAT and WEPS analyses were compared to the NRCS tolerable soil loss limit of 5 tons/acre/year for both study areas. The GIS analysis determined the optimum route distances between mobile unit sites were 2.07 to 58.02 km for corn and 1.95 to 60.36 km for sorghum. The optimum routes from the mobile pyrolysis sites and the closest refineries were 49.50 to 187.18 km for corn and 7.00 to 220.11 km for sorghum. These results were used as input to a separate bioenergy economic model. The SWAT analysis found that maximum soil loss (1.24 tons/acre) occurred during the final year of the simulation where 100 percent of the sorghum residue was removed. The WEPS analysis determined that at 30 percent removal the amount of soil loss starts to increase exponentially with increasing residue removal and exceeds the tolerable soil loss limit. Limited harvesting of biomass for bioenergy production will be required to protect crop and soil productivity ensuring a sustainable biomass source.

Bumguardner, Marisa

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Free Online Food Safety Legislation Training - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 25, 2011 ... F4ESL - From Farm to Fork European Food Safety Legislation Training Programme is an EU Project under EC LLP Leonardo da Vinci Program ...

231

Energy Efficiency in Food-Service Facilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Food-service facilities have high energy intensities compared to other commercial buildings due to their energy use for cooking and refrigeration. Assessing the energy performance… (more)

Paillat, Etienne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to:...

233

The Future of Food in Suburbia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis addresses resilience for the future of Canadian suburbs, through the lens of buildings and food, particularly against the backdrop of peak oil and… (more)

Khalid, Sarah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Cat under Food and Water Stress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Questions Referencing NEWTON About NEWTON About Ask A Scientist Education At Argonne Cat under Food and Water Stress Name: Nitin Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside...

235

Food Industry - Motor Contactors Burning Up  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of motor contactors that have burnt up several times in the last year at a food manufacturing facility.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Free Online Food Safety Legislation Training  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 25, 2011 ... F4ESL - From Farm to Fork European Food Safety Legislation Training Programme is an EU Project under EC LLP Leonardo da Vinci Program ...

237

Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Kazakhstan HEU Removal Kazakhstan HEU Removal Location Kazakhstan United States 48° 59' 44.1492" N, 67° 3' 37.9692" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

238

Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Sweden Plutonium Removal Sweden Plutonium Removal Location Sweden United States 62° 24' 4.4136" N, 15° 22' 51.096" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

239

Hungary HEU removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

removal | National Nuclear Security Administration removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Hungary HEU removal Hungary HEU removal Location Hungary United States 47° 11' 51.6336" N, 19° 41' 15" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view this map.

240

Mexico HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Mexico HEU Removal Mexico HEU Removal Location Mexico United States 24° 24' 35.298" N, 102° 49' 55.3116" W See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view this map.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Removal of volatile materials from forepump oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of clearing condensable vapors from forepump oil is described. Air is bubbled though the oil reservoir removing volatile material from the oil and allowing continuous pumping of materials by non?vented pumps.

Paul P. Nicole

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

Cook, Gus T. (Paducah, KY); Holshouser, Stephen K. (Boaz, KY); Coleman, Richard M. (Paducah, KY); Harless, Charles E. (Smithland, KY); Whinnery, III, Walter N. (Paducah, KY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

Cook, G.T.; Holshouser, S.K.; Coleman, R.M.; Harless, C.E.; Whinnery, W.N. III

1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

244

Chile HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Removal Location United States 25 28' 1.4916" S, 69 33' 55.548" W See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view...

245

France HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

HEU Removal Location United States 45 44' 20.0544" N, 2 17' 6.5616" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view...

246

Libya HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal Location Libya United States 27 34' 9.5448" N, 17 24' 8.4384" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version Javascript is required to view...

247

Install Removable Insulation on Valves and Fittings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This revised ITP tip sheet on installing removable insulation on valves and fittings provides how-to advice for improving the system using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > content > Four-Year Plan > Turkey HEU Removal Turkey HEU Removal Location Turkey United States 38° 26' 50.2044" N, 40° 15' 14.0616" E See map: Google Maps Printer-friendly version Printer-friendly version

249

Electric Commercial Cooking Appliance Development Needs: Preparation and Characterization of Chromium- Coated Residual Heat Removal System Piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foodservice establishments are the most energy-intensive customers in the commercial sector. This report addresses the need to improve the energy efficiency of electric cooking appliances by identifying current market opportunities and technologies for further development.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Laser removal of sludge from steam generators  

SciTech Connect

A method of removing unwanted chemical deposits known as sludge from the metal surfaces of steam generators with laser energy is provided. Laser energy of a certain power density, of a critical wavelength and frequency, is intermittently focused on the sludge deposits to vaporize them so that the surfaces are cleaned without affecting the metal surface (sludge substrate). Fiberoptic tubes are utilized for laser beam transmission and beam direction. Fiberoptics are also utilized to monitor laser operation and sludge removal.

Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effect of crop residue harvest on long-term crop yield, soil erosion, and carbon balance: tradeoffs for a sustainable bioenergy feedstock  

SciTech Connect

Agricultural residues are a potential feedstock for bioenergy production, if residue harvest can be done sustainably. The relationship between crop residue harvest, soil erosion, crop yield and carbon balance was modeled with the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator/ Environment Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) using a factorial design. Four crop rotations (winter wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – sunflower [Helianthus annuus]; spring wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – canola [Brassica napus]; corn [Zea mays L.] – soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]; and cotton [Gossypium hirsutum] – peanut [Arachis hypogaea]) were simulated at four US locations each, under different topographies (0-10% slope), and management practices [crop residue removal rates (0-75%), conservation practices (no till, contour cropping, strip cropping, terracing)].

Gregg, Jay S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

252

Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods Development of the foods grasping mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this mechanism, and shows performance. Key Words: Remote shopping, Mobile Manipulator, Foods handling 1. 1·1 1) 1Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods ­Development of the foods grasping mechanism­ Tetsuo) Abstract-- Our purpose is developing the remote shopping system as a concrete application. A human uses

Ohya, Akihisa

253

Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods Method of handling foods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods ­ Method of handling foods ­ Tetsuo TOMIZAWA, Akihisa a mobile manipulator as a teleoperated tool for accessing and manipulating remote objects. A human uses the system to select and buy fresh foods of a super market from a remote location via the Internet. We

Ohya, Akihisa

254

Food practices as situated action: exploring and designing for everyday food practices with households  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Household food practices are complex. Many people are unable to effectively respond to challenges in their food environment to maintain diets considered to be in line with national and international standards for healthy eating. We argue that recognizing ... Keywords: everyday practice, food, health, situated action

Rob Comber; Jettie Hoonhout; Aart van Halteren; Paula Moynihan; Patrick Olivier

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Sustainable Harvest for Food and Fuel Preliminary Food & Fuel Gap Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect

To promote economic growth and energy security, and to protect the environment, the U.S. is pursuing a national strategy of energy independence and climatic protection in which domestic renewable carbon-neutral biofuels displace 30 percent of U.S. oil consumption by the mid-21st century. Such fuels, including ethanol and biodiesel, will be produced from biological feed stocks (biomass). The availability of this billion-ton biomass will hinge on the application of modern scientific and engineering tools to create a highly-integrated biofuel production system. Efforts are underway to identify and develop energy crops, ranging from agricultural residues to genetically engineered perennials; to develop biology-based processing methods; and, to develop large-scale biorefineries to economically convert biomass into fuels. In addition to advancing the biomass-to-biofuel research and development agenda, policy makers are concurrently defining the correct mix of governmental supports and regulations. Given the volumes of biomass and fuels that must flow to successfully enact a national biomass strategy, policies must encourage large-scale markets to form and expand around a tightly integrated system of farmers, fuel producers and transporters, and markets over the course of decades. In formulating such policies, policy makers must address the complex interactions of social, technical, economic, and environmental factors that bound energy production and use. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering national laboratory dedicated to supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The INL Bioenergy Program supports the DOE and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Key multidisciplinary INL capabilities are being leveraged to address major science and technology needs associated with the cost-effective utilization of biomass. INL’s whole crop utilization (WCU) vision is focused on the use of the entire crop, including both the grain and traditionally discarded plant biomass to produce food, feed, fiber, energy, and value-added products.

Ray Grosshans; Kevin M. Kostelnik; Jake Jacobson

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co Ltd Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd. Place Nanping City, Fujian Province, China Zip 365001 Sector Biomass Product Chinese developer of a CDM registered biomass plant. References Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd. is a company located in Nanping City, Fujian Province, China . References ↑ "[ Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd.]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Kaisheng_Biomass_Residue_Power_Co_Ltd&oldid=347879" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

257

Cat under Food and Water Stress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asimikas Asimikas Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside U.S. Country: USA Date: N/A Question: How long can a domestic cat live without food, and drink water only? Replies: Asimikas, If at all possible, attempt to coax food into the cat by mixing wet cat food with water until 'soupy', and use a syringe to inject food into the back of the cat's mouth. The cat probably won't like this, but if you try repeatedly and with gentle firmness, you may successfully get food into the feline. From observing a case as a veterinary assistant, a cat refusing solid food can go several days on water alone. Then, the cat generally begins to refuse water as well and there is a noticeable gauntness about the body shape of the cat. The skin on the back, for example, when gently pinched will not quickly spring back to laying flat as it should --- this indicates serious dehydration on a subcutaneous level, indicating the cat needs an IV to get fluids in quickly before organ failure etc. Again, this is the general series of events I observed in a vet's office when a cat was brought in, having refused food for more than a few days. A vet should definitely be contacted if a feline has refused food for two consecutive days or more.

258

Transparency in complex dynamic food supply chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food supply chains are increasingly complex and dynamic due to (i) increasing product proliferation to serve ever diversifying and globalising markets as a form of mass customisation with resulting global flows of raw materials, ingredients and products, ... Keywords: Consumer and governmental demands, Food supply chain, Governance, Information systems, Quality and safety standards, Transparency

J. H. Trienekens; P. M. Wognum; A. J. M. Beulens; J. G. A. J. van der Vorst

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Treatability study for removal of leachable mercury in crushed fluorescent lamps  

SciTech Connect

Nonserviceable fluorescent lamps removed from radiological control areas at the Oak Ridge Department of Energy facilities have been crushed and are currently managed as mixed waste (hazardous and radiologically contaminated). We present proposed treatment flowsheets and supporting treatability study data for conditioning this solid waste residue so that it can qualify for disposal in a sanitary landfill. Mercury in spent fluorescent lamps occurs primarily as condensate on high-surface-area phosphor material. It can be solubilized with excess oxidants (e.g., hypochlorite solution) and stabilized by complexation with halide ions. Soluble mercury in dechlorinated saline solution is effectively removed by cementation with zero-valent iron in the form of steel wool. In packed column dynamic flow testing, soluble mercury was reduced to mercury metal and insoluble calomel, loading > 1.2 g of mercury per grain of steel wool before an appreciable breakthrough of soluble mercury in the effluent.

Bostick, W.D.; Beck, D.E.; Bowser, K.T. [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas fired furnances or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

Beaufrere, A.H.

1982-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A NSGA-II algorithm for the residue-residue contact prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a multi-objective evolutionary approach to predict protein contact maps. The algorithm provides a set of rules, inferring whether there is contact between a pair of residues or not. Such rules are based on a set of specific amino acid properties. ... Keywords: contact map, multi-objective evolutionary computation, protein structure prediction

Alfonso E. Márquez-Chamorro; Federico Divina; Jesús S. Aguilar-Ruiz; Jaume Bacardit; Gualberto Asencio-Cortés; Cosme E. Santiesteban-Toca

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Trunnion Collar Removal Machine - Gap Analysis Table  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to review the existing the trunnion collar removal machine against the ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (NSDB) [Ref. 10] requirements and to identify codes and standards and supplemental requirements to meet these requirements. If these codes and standards can not fully meet these requirements then a ''gap'' is identified. These gaps will be identified here and addressed using the ''Trunnion Collar Removal Machine Design Development Plan'' [Ref. 15]. The codes and standards, supplemental requirements, and design development requirements for the trunnion collar removal machine are provided in the gap analysis table (Appendix A, Table 1). Because the trunnion collar removal machine is credited with performing functions important to safety (ITS) in the NSDB [Ref. 10], design basis requirements are applicable to ensure equipment is available and performs required safety functions when needed. The gap analysis table is used to identify design objectives and provide a means to satisfy safety requirements. To ensure that the trunnion collar removal machine performs required safety functions and meets performance criteria, this portion of the gap analysis tables supplies codes and standards sections and the supplemental requirements and identifies design development requirements, if needed.

M. Johnson

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

263

SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL BY ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE 12390  

SciTech Connect

High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently stored in aging underground storage tanks. This waste is a complex mixture of insoluble solids, referred to as sludge, and soluble salts. Continued long-term storage of these radioactive wastes poses an environmental risk. Operations are underway to remove and disposition the waste, clean the tanks and fill with grout for permanent closure. Heel removal is the intermediate phase of the waste retrieval and tank cleaning process at SRS, which is intended to reduce the volume of waste prior to treatment with oxalic acid. The goal of heel removal is to reduce the residual amount of radioactive sludge wastes to less than 37,900 liters (10,000 gallons) of wet solids. Reducing the quantity of residual waste solids in the tank prior to acid cleaning reduces the amount of acid required and reduces the amount of excess acid that could impact ongoing waste management processes. Mechanical heel removal campaigns in Tank 12 have relied solely on the use of mixing pumps that have not been effective at reducing the volume of remaining solids. The remaining waste in Tank 12 is known to have a high aluminum concentration. Aluminum dissolution by caustic leaching was identified as a treatment step to reduce the volume of remaining solids and prepare the tank for acid cleaning. Dissolution was performed in Tank 12 over a two month period in July and August, 2011. Sample results indicated that 16,440 kg of aluminum oxide (boehmite) had been dissolved representing 60% of the starting inventory. The evolution resulted in reducing the sludge solids volume by 22,300 liters (5900 gallons), preparing the tank for chemical cleaning with oxalic acid.

Keefer, M.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

264

High-oleic canola oils and their food applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-oleic canola oils are among the major healthful oils replacing trans fat in food processing and foodservices in North America. High-oleic canola oils and their food applications Inform Magazine Edible Applications Food Structure and Functionality

265

Hydrogen Removal From Heating Oil of a Parabolic Trough ...  

Hydrogen Removal From Heating Oil of a Parabolic Trough Increases the Life of the Trough and its Components A Method to Selectively Remove & Measure Hydrogen Gas from ...

266

An Experimental Study of Chemical Oxygen Demand Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental results showed that the refractory organics in coking wastewater can be effectively removed by this process, and COD removal efficiency was ...

267

Michigan Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from...

268

Salt Fluxes for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2001... for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from Molten Aluminum ... Solid chloride salts containing MgC2 can be used to remove alkali ...

269

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

270

South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Removed from Natural Gas...

271

TRUPACT-II residue pipe payload container  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the project to develop, test and certify a new payload container for the TRUPACT-II, a Type B packaging for the shipment of transuranic waste. The new payload container will provide segregation of plutonium waste materials within the TRUPACT-II. This segregation of fissile contents will support a new criticality safety analysis that may allow an increase in the TRUPACT-II Pu-239 Fissile Gram Equivalent (FGE) limit from 325 grams to 2800 grams. The need for this project was brought about by the end of the Cold War and the resulting shift in value of plutonium residues from providing recoverable Defense Program material to being considered disposable waste. This paper will not cover many of the details of the project but will instead aim to provide a general picture of all the project activities.

Geinitz, R. [Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, CO (United States); Gregory, P. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Leaching hierarchies in co-combustion residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The leaching propensities from co-combustion residues of 10 trace elements (Be, V, Cr, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Ba, Hg, Pb) were evaluated. Eight fuels varying from coal blends to coal and secondary fuel mixtures to ternary mixtures were co-combusted in two reactor configurations and at two temperatures (850 and 950{sup o}C). The ash was subjected to a miniaturized toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) developed for this study, and the trace element content in the leachate was analyzed, andpercentage retentions of elements in the ashes and leachates were calculated. Hg and Se were almost completely volatilized during combustion and, therefore, were largely absent from the ashes, in all cases. For the other trace elements, it was not possible to establish a hierarchy of relative trace-element retention. Retention was primarily a function of the combustion method, with no clear effect of temperature retention being observed. The measured trace-element retentions were compared to those predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium modeling, using the MTDATA software. The model successfully predicted the measured values in many cases; however, many anomalies were also noted. From trace-element analysis in the leachates, an extent-of-leaching hierarchy could be established. The elements that underwent low degrees of leaching were Zn, Hg, Pb, low to moderate leaching were Be, Cr, and Cd, and thoseleached to a greater extent were V, As, Se, and Ba. This hierarchy was observed for all fuels and conditions studied. Leaching was found to be a strong function of the combustion temperature and combustion method. When assessing the potential toxicity of leachate from co-combustion residues, Zn, Hg, and Pb may be deemed of least concern, while a greater emphasis should be placed in mitigating the release of the remaining elements. 18 refs., 7 tabs.

A. George; D.R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Mercury removal from solid mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

The removal of mercury from mixed wastes is an essential step in eliminating the temporary storage of large inventories of mixed waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Currently thermal treatment has been identified as a baseline technology and is being developed as part of the DOE Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP). Since thermal treatment will not be applicable to all mercury containing mixed waste and the removal of mercury prior to thermal treatment may be desirable, laboratory studies have been initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop alternative remediation technologies capable of removing mercury from certain mixed waste. This paper describes laboratory investigations of the KI/I{sub 2} leaching processes to determine the applicability of this process to mercury containing solid mixed waste.

Gates, D.D.; Morrissey, M.; Chava, K.K.; Chao, K.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Technetium Removal Using Tc-Goethite Coprecipitation  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Low temperature waste forms coupled with technetium removal using an alternative immobilization process such as Fe(II) treated-goethite precipitation” to increase our understanding of 99Tc long-term stability in goethite mineral form and the process that controls the 99Tc(VII) reduction and removal by the final Fe (oxy)hydroxide forms. The overall objectives of this task were to 1) evaluate the transformation process of Fe (oxy)hydroxide solids to the more crystalline goethite (?-FeOOH) mineral for 99Tc removal and 2) determine the mechanism that limits 99Tc(IV) reoxidation in Fe(II)-treated 99Tc-goethite mineral and 3) evaluate whether there is a long-term 99Tcoxidation state change for Tc sequestered in the iron solids.

Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Jung, Hun Bok; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

275

Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separting the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF.sub.2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium, without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

Pulley, Howard (West Paducah, KY); Seltzer, Steven F. (Paducah, KY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separating the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

Pulley, H.; Seltzer, S.F.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

277

New Food-Addiction Link Found  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 20, 2002 May 20, 2002 Electronic newsroom 02-40 New Food-Addiction Link Found Mere sight/smell of food spikes levels of brain “pleasure” chemical UPTON, NY — Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory have found that the mere display of food — where food-deprived subjects are allowed to smell and taste their favorite foods without actually eating them — causes a significant elevation in brain dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with feelings of pleasure and reward. This activation of the brain’s dopamine motivation circuits is distinct from the role the brain chemical plays when people actually eat, and may be similar to what addicts experience when craving drugs. “Eating is a highly reinforcing behavior, just like taking illicit drugs,” said psychiatrist Nora Volkow, the study’s lead investigator. “But this is the first time anyone has shown that the dopamine system can be triggered by food when there is no pleasure associated with it since the subjects don’t eat the food. This provides us with new clues about the mechanisms that lead people to eat other than just for the pleasure of eating, and in this respect may help us understand why some people overeat.” The study will appear in the June 1, 2002 issue of Synapse (now available online ).

278

Big Data, New Physics and Geospatial Super-Food  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Big Data, New Physics and Geospatial Super-Food. Purpose: As ... amazing. As it turns out, geospatial data are analytic super-food. ...

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

279

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS Internet Food...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internet Food Service for SRS Employees Sought Greater Aiken-Augusta area food service companies are invited to consider providing meal ordering via the internet for delivery to...

280

Event:Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change: on...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

SUSTAINABILITY INDICATORS IN THE VERMONT-REGIONAL FOOD SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Food systems are inherently complex areas of interaction between economic, environmental, and social factors. The local food movement in Vermont presents new opportunities to shape… (more)

Schattman, Rachel

282

Central, peripheral, and contextual regulation of food intake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A, Grinker, JA. Food and water intake, meal patterns andreceptors in food and water intake. Neuropharmacology.hyperdipsic response (>10 ml water intake within 30 min) to

Parylak, Sarah Lynne; Parylak, Sarah Lynne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Measurement and correlation of conditions for entrapment and mobilization of residual oil. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six tasks are reported: capillary number relationships for rock samples, residual oil saturation near wellbore, residual oil structure, effect of gravity on residual saturation, magnitude of residual oil saturation, and effects of wettability on capillary number relationships. (DLC)

Morrow, N.R.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Non-destructive residual stress distribution measurement in nano-structured ultrahigh-strenght gear steels.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The well-established enhanced fatigue performance associated with beneficial compressive residual stresses has been broadly applied in the development of new engineering materials, particularly gear and bearing steels. Residual stress enhancement processes, such as shot/laser peening, have also been investigated to maximize their benefits on fatigue strength. However, the measurement of residual stress distributions still heavily relies on the conventional X-ray technique, involving destructive material removal, tedious data correction and time-consuming data collection, which slows new material design and process optimization. To overcome this problem, we employ novel, non-destructive synchrotron techniques with high-energy x-rays to measure the distribution of residual strain/stress in a laser-peened, ultrahigh-strength gear steel. This study will assist in process optimization, to achieve the desired residual stresses for selected applications. X-ray measurements were performed at the 1-ID beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory. An x-ray energy of 76 keV and conical slit were used to create a diffraction volume of {approx} 20 x 20 x 150{micro}m{sup 3}. An area detector was placed after the conical slit to collect diffraction over a plane encompassing (nearly) the axial and normal strain directions. Cylindrical specimens (76 mm long, 9.525 mm diameter) were rotated during the measurement to ensure a sufficiently large number of grains were irradiated. The steel, FerriumC67{reg_sign}, was designed utilizing thermodynamics-based strengthening models to achieve a new level of case hardness (67 HRc) and good core toughness, employing a 3nm M{sub 2}C carbide dispersion. After heat treatment, C67 was laser peened and subject to rolling contact fatigue (RCF) screening tests under the extreme Hertzian contact stress of 5.4 GPa. Both regions away from ('untested') and under wear tracks were studied for comparison. Four BCC reflections from martensite [(200), (211), (220) and (222)] were recorded and (211) was used for residual strain analysis. Strain components ({var_epsilon}{sub 11}, {var_epsilon}{sub 12} and {var_epsilon}{sub 22}) were obtained and the axial ({var_epsilon}{sub 11}) is plotted in Fig. 1 for unpeened and laser peened C67 samples. Large compressive axial strains were observed near-surface after peening. After cyclic loading the surface strain relaxed but a sub-surface maximum was formed, attributed to yielded material from the extreme cyclic loading. These strains were converted to stresses (not shown) via elastic constants and assuming equibiaxial strain ({var_epsilon}{sub 33} = {var_epsilon}{sub 11}).

Qian, Y.; Almer, J.; Lienert, U.; Tiemens, B.; Olson, G. B.; Northwestern Univ.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

food items and household goods, that was donated to local food banks for direct distribution to those in need in the D.C. area. NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative...

286

Assisted thermal stripping (ATS) for removal of PCBs from contaminated soils. Design of experiments modeling of the ATS process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a companion report, the Assisted Thermal Stripping (ATS) process for enhanced removal of PCBs from PCB-contaminated soil is described. In studies directed toward achieving residual PCB levels of {le}2 ppm, it was found that four factors were particularly important -- (1) process temperature; (2) process time; (3) the amount of additive (for enhancing the removal of PCBs); and (4) steam flow rate. In order to optimize the ATS process, it was deemed crucial to ascertain the relative effect exerted by each of those process factors and the reproducibility of the process. To accomplish that, we have relied on the technique {open_quotes}Design of Experiments{close_quotes} (DOE) to mathematically model the ATS process. After considering the findings from our previous investigations, it was decided to employ formic acid as the additive for enhancing the removal of PCBs.

Krabbenhoft, H.O.; Webb, J.L.; Gascoyne, D.G. [GE Corporate Research & Development, Schenectady, NY (United States); Cawse, J.N. [GE Plastics, Pittsfield, MA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Human exposure through food chains:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using information collected under the community right to know'' provision of the Superfund reauthorization act, the US Environmental Protection Agency has revealed that some two to three billion pounds of toxic chemicals are released annually to the atmosphere from industries in the US. Human populations can contact these environmental pollutants through food, water, and air in varying amounts each day throughout a lifetime. A realistic strategy for managing the potential health risks of industrial emissions requires a comprehensive approach with adequate attention to uncertainties. Using contaminant transfers from air to milk and as a case study, I consider here two important issues in exposure assessment --- (1) estimation of and (2) reduction of uncertainty in exposure estimates. This case study provides a distinction between variability, ignorance and uncertainty. For the air/milk pathways, I explore the use of exposure models that combine information on environmental partitioning with data on human diet, behavior patterns, and physiology into a numerical expression that links ambient air concentrations with chronic daily intake. I examine how uncertainty limits current exposure modeling efforts and suggest research to reduce these uncertainty. 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

McKone, T.E.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

California's program converts biomass residues to energy  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a brief introduction to the emerging biomass fuel industry in California and includes descriptions of California's biomass potential, California's biomass development program, and legislation that expands the state's developmental efforts in biomass commercialization. California's agriculture and forest industries residues were discussed. These residues can be converted to energy, and now, through California's aggressive development program, more residues will be converted. (DP)

Ward, P.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Residual Stress Determination in Cast Bi-Metallic Joints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-Situ Neutron Diffraction and Crystal Plasticity Modeling of a-Uranium · In-Situ Studies of the ... Thermal Residual Stresses and Strains in Depleted Uranium.

290

Plastic Strain and Residual Stress Distributions in an AISI 304 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effect of DH Concentration on Crud Deposition on Heated Zircaloy-4 in .... and Residual Stress Distributions in an AISI 304 Stainless Steel BWR Pipe Weld.

291

Intergranular Thermal Residual Strain in Rolled and Texture-free ? ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the intergranular thermal residual strains are determined from ... rolled and texture-free ?-uranium measured by neutron diffraction during cooling.

292

Ohio Residual Fuel Oil Prices by Sales Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Values of U.S. residual ...

293

Pilot Test of Bauxite Residue Carbonation With Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of bauxite residue in water with flue gas, produced from direct oil burning. ... New Development Model for Bauxite Deposits - Dedicated Compact Refinery.

294

Hot Isostatic Pressing of Chlorine-Containing Plutonium Residues ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Some of the plutonium residues wastes at Sellafield contain ... Effect of Alloy Composition on the Environmental cracking of Nickel Alloys in ...

295

Investigation of carbon residue from pyrolyzed scrap tires.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objectives of this study are: (1) Blending the Conrad residue with coal-derived pitches and its effect on the pitch properties. (2) The activation of… (more)

Bandlamudi, Bhagat Chandra.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

297

Wisconsin Residual Fuel Oil Prices by Sales Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Values of U.S. residual ...

298

Determination of Aluminum Rolling Oil and Machinery Oil Residues ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Determination of Aluminum Rolling Oil and Machinery Oil Residues on Aluminum Sheet and Foil by Using Elemental Analysis and Fourier  ...

299

residual fuel oil - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residual fuel oil: A general classification for the heavier oils, known as No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils, that remain after the distillate fuel oils and lighter ...

300

Michigan Residual Fuel Oil Prices by Sales Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Values of U.S. residual ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Implementing Residue Chippers On Harvesting Operation for Biomass Recovery.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Three operations that implemented a small residue chipper on their conventional logging operations were studied in 2006. Two of the jobs were thinning operations, the… (more)

Aulakh, Jaspreet

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Potential of biomass residue availability; The case of Thailand  

SciTech Connect

An acute shortage of fuel wood and charcoal prevails in many developing countries. A logical approach to the problem places emphasis on the development of alternative energy sources, including use of biomass residues. An assessment of the potential of biomass residues for energy and other uses calls for an estimation of their annual production. Also, because the residues are normally bulky they should be utilized near their place of origin whenever possible to avoid high transportation costs. Thus knowledge of the total national generation of residues per year does not provide enough information for planning residue utilization. This article illustrates a method of residue estimation that takes the case of Thailand as an example. It presents the annual generation of nine agricultural resides (paddy husk, paddy straw, bagasse, cotton stalk, corn cob, groundnut shell, cassava stalk and coconut husk and shell) and one forestry residue (sawdust) in different agroeconomic zones and regions of Thailand. The methodology used for the investigation of crop-to-residue ratios is outlined. The annual generation figures for the different residues along with observations about their traditional uses are presented.

Bhattacharya, S.C.; Shrestha, R.M.; Ngamkajornvivat, S. (Energy Technology Div., Asian Institute of Technology, Bangkok 10501 (TH))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Vermont Residual Fuel Oil Prices by Sales Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Values of U.S. residual ...

304

Midwest (PADD 2) Residual Fuel Oil Prices by Sales Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Values of U.S. residual ...

305

Investigation of Residual Stress in Key-Hole Laser Formed ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual strain/stress measurements in weldments produced using the fibre ... Dislocation Densities, Burgers Vector Populations and Slip System Activity in ...

306

NRC/EPRI Welding Residual Stress Validation Program (Phase III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NRC/EPRI weld residual stress (WRS) program currently consists of four phases, with each phase increasing in complexity from lab size specimens to ...

307

Logging and Agricultural Residue Supply Curves for the Pacific Northwest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report quantified the volume of logging residues at the county level for current timber harvests. The cost of recovering logging residues was determined for skidding, yearding, loading, chipping and transporting the residues. Supply curves were developed for ten candidate conversion sites in the Pacific Northwest Region. Agricultural field residues were also quantified at the county level using five-year average crop yields. Agronomic constraints were applied to arrive at the volumes available for energy use. Collection costs and transportation costs were determined and supply curves generated for thirteen candidate conversion sites.

Kerstetter, James D.; Lyons, John Kim

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Provides 640 Turkeys to People in Need Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Provides 640 Turkeys to People in Need November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Volunteers from West Valley Demonstration Project gather before distributing items collected in an annual food drive. Volunteers from West Valley Demonstration Project gather before distributing items collected in an annual food drive. Volunteer John Schelble helps unload a delivery truck at a food pantry. Volunteer John Schelble helps unload a delivery truck at a food pantry. John Rizzo passes canned food to John Rendall to deliver to a food pantry. John Rizzo passes canned food to John Rendall to deliver to a food pantry.

309

Method of removing cesium from steam  

SciTech Connect

Method for removal of radioactive cesium from a hot vapor, such as high temperature steam, including the steps of passing input hot vapor containing radioactive cesium into a bed of silicate glass particles and chemically incorporating radioactive cesium in the silicate glass particles at a temperature of at least about 700.degree. F.

Carson, Jr., Neill J. (Clarendon Hills, IL); Noland, Robert A. (Oak Park, IL); Ruther, Westly E. (Skokie, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report  

SciTech Connect

The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

ASBESTOS PIPE-INSULATION REMOVAL ROBOT SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

This final topical report details the development, experimentation and field-testing activities for a robotic asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system developed for use within the DOE's weapon complex as part of their ER and WM program, as well as in industrial abatement. The engineering development, regulatory compliance, cost-benefit and field-trial experiences gathered through this program are summarized.

Unknown

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Process for removing carbon from uranium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon contamination is removed from uranium and uranium alloys by heating in inert atmosphere to 700.degree.-1900.degree.C in effective contact with yttrium to cause carbon in the uranium to react with the yttrium. The yttrium is either in direct contact with the contaminated uranium or in indirect contact by means of an intermediate transport medium.

Powell, George L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Heat exchanger with a removable tube section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is described in which the tube sheet is secured against primary liquid pressure, but which allows for easy removal of the tube section. The tube section is supported by a flange which is secured by a number of shear blocks, each of which extends into a slot which is immovable with respect to the outer shell of the heat exchanger. (auth)

Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.

1975-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

314

REMOVAL OF CHLORIDE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The removal of chlorides from aqueons solutions is described. The process involves contacting the aqueous chloride containing solution with a benzene solution about 0.005 M in phenyl mercuric acetate whereby the chloride anions are taken up by the organic phase and separating the organic phase from the aqueous solutions.

Schulz, W.W.

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Using Multiple Household Food Inventories to Measure Food Availability in the Home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of conducting multiple household food inventories over the course of 30 days to examine weekly food variability. Household food availability influences the foods individuals choose to consume; therefore, by assessing the home food environment a better understanding of what people are eating can be obtained. Methods of measuring home food availability have been developed and tested in recent years; however most of these methods assess food availability on one occasion only. This study aimed to capture "usual" availability by using multiple assessments. After the development and pre-testing of the 171-item home observation guide to determine the presence and amount of food items in the home (refrigerator, freezer, pantry, elsewhere), two trained researchers recruited a convenience sample of 9 households (44.4% minority), administered a baseline questionnaire (personal info, shopping habits, food resources, and food security), and conducted 5 in-home assessments (5-7 day interval) over a 30-day period. Each in-home assessment included shopping and fast food activities since the last assessment and an observational survey of types and amounts of foods present. The final in-home assessment included an audio recorded interview on food habits and beliefs. Complete data were collected from all 9 women (32.8 y +/- 6.0; 3 married; 4 +/- 1.6 adults/children in household; 4 SNAP; 6 food insecure) and their households. Weekly grocery purchases (place, amount, and purpose) use (frequency) varied from once (n=1) to every week (n=5); 4 used fast food 2-3 times/wk for 4 weeks. Quantity and types of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables varied by week and by family. The feasibility of conducting multiple in-home assessments was confirmed with 100% retention from all participants. This methodology is important in that it provided detailed information on intra-monthly variation in food availability. The findings suggest the inadequacy of a single measure to assess food availability in the home.

Sisk, Cheree L.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Global Food Security | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Food Security Global Food Security aWhere aWhere transforms how global development initiatives are managed and monitored. aWhere's location intelligence data management platform enables integration of complex agricultural, environmental and public health data into local, actionable insight. Application URL: http://www.awhere.com/en-us Read more about aWhere 0 comment(s) | Food Frequency Method Online A fast, low cost, effective method to assess micro-nutrient deficiencies in a developing country on a household basis, while also allowing for an aggregation to a community or regional basis quickly and effectively. Application URL: http://www.foodfrequencyonline.org/index Read more about Food Frequency Method Online 0 comment(s) | e-Afghan AG e-Afghan Ag provides credible relevant information to those helping farmers

317

West Pico Food | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pico Food Pico Food Jump to: navigation, search Name West Pico Food Place Vernon, California Sector Solar Product A distributor of wholesale frozen foods to supermarket chains in Southern California, which has had a solar installation built on its roof. Coordinates 42.761624°, -72.511495° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.761624,"lon":-72.511495,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

318

Collaborate - Food Community | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborate - Food Community Collaborate - Food Community Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture Collaborate This Food, Agriculture, and Rural Community establishes a unified point of access to data and statistics, and tools to identify relevant data sets. Providing researchers and other users of data and statistics with authoritative, high quality sources will realize greater benefits from public research, help to coordinate effort and reduce duplication in scientific investigation, and reveal new connections for innovative uses. It is hoped that this community will foster the development of new applications and tools to improve agricultural production, human health and nutrition, environmental benefits, and global food security and poverty

319

A systems approach to food accident analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food borne illnesses lead to 3000 deaths per year in the United States. Some industries, such as aviation, have made great strides increasing safety through careful accident analysis leading to changes in industry practices. ...

Helferich, John D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

BNL Blood Drives: Iron-rich foods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BNL Blood Drives: Iron-Rich Foods Blood Drive Home Seafood: Fish (cod, sardines, tuna, clams, oysters, shrimp) Poultry: Chicken, eggs, yolk Lean Red Meats: Beef, lamb, veal, pork,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Early Days of Food and Environmental Virology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel cells, so that the water produced as a byproduct wasproblem. Although the water produced by the hydrogen–oxygenof food produced for human consumption, plus water ad lib.

Cliver, Dean O.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Sechage solaire des aliments (solar food drying and conservation of food for year-round consumption)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an introduction to food drying as a measure to avoid the loss of agricultural surpluses, and conserve food for year-round consumption. It discusses the basic rules of food drying and gives an overview of various methods and appropriate dryer constructions. It also provides detailed explanations on how to process vegetables, fruits, and meats and gives advice on storage and cooking.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

By the MSU Food Security Group 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decades of research have led to substantially improved understanding of the nature of food insecurity. 2 Until the food crisis of 2007/08, a combination of economic growth and targeted programs resulted in a steady fall in the percentage of the world’s population suffering from under-nutrition (from 20 % in 1990/92 to 16 % in 2006). 3 Yet over a billion people still face both

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Progress in recycling of automobile shredder residue  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At Argonne National Laboratory, we have been developing a potentially economical process to recycle automobile shredder residue (ASR). We identified three potentially marketable materials that can be recovered from ASR and developed technologies to recover and upgrade these materials. We build and tested a field-demonstration plant for recycling polyurethane foam and produced about 2000 lb of recycled foam. Several 300-lb samples were sent for evaluation and were found to be of marketable quality. We are also preparing for a large-scale test in which about 200 tons of ASR-derived fines will be used as a raw material in cement making. A major cement company has evaluated small samples of fines prepared in the laboratory and found that they meet its requirements as a substitute for iron ore or mill scale. We also produced about 50 lb of recycled acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) from obsolete automobiles and found that it has properties that could be readily upgraded to meet the specifications of the automotive industry. In this paper, we briefly discuss the process as a whole and summarize the results obtained from the field work on foam and fines recycling.

Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Pomykala, J.A. Jr.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Mobile Food Fusion: Using the Power of Mobile Food to Create a New Restaurant Typology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mobile food vending has recently experienced a dramatic resurgence, providing lucrative opportunities for entrepreneurs in a difficult economy. By accessing larger regional networks that engage… (more)

Bohlman, Steven Eric

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

FOOD-ASTRUCTURE: Re-Articulating the Architectural Space of Food Distribution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract a. Material processes and their catalysts shape urban and exurban morphology. b. Food distribution is an example of a material process. Its catalysts are… (more)

Bartell, Christopher R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Trade My Food | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trade My Food Trade My Food Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Trade My Food Agency/Company /Organization: Boston Cleanweb Hackathon Focus Area: Agriculture, Food Supply Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Application prototype User Interface: Website Website: hackerleague.org/hackathons/boston-cleanweb-hackathon/hacks/trade-my-f Country: USA Web Application Link: www.FoodForYouFoodFor.Me Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Cleanweb Hackathon, Boston, Community Generated UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 42.3490737°, -71.0481764° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3490737,"lon":-71.0481764,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

328

Food and Beverage Manufacturing Subsectors in Lane County, Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and employment multipliers that indicate that the brewing, flour milling, and a few other select food

Oregon, University of

329

Tangential residual as error estimator in the boundary element method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a new error estimator based on tangential derivative Boundary Integral Equation residuals for 2D Laplace and Helmholtz equations is shown. The direct problem for general mixed boundary conditions is solved using standard and hypersingular ... Keywords: Adaptivity, Boundary Integral Equation residual, Boundary element method, Error estimation, Mesh adaptation, Mesh refinement, Nodal sensitivity

Alejandro E. Martínez-Castro; Rafael Gallego

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Canyon dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative to the FB-Line scrap recovery dissolver was desired for the dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible (SS{ampersand}C) residues from the plutonium reduction process due to the potential generation of hydrogen gas concentrations above the lower flammability limit. To address this concern, a flowsheet was developed for the F-Canyon dissolvers. The dissolvers are continually purged with nominally 33 SCFM of air; therefore the generation of flammable gas concentrations should not be a concern. Following removal of crucible fragments, small batches of the remaining sand fines or slag chunks containing less than approximately 350 grams of plutonium can be dissolved using the center insert in each of the four annular dissolver ports to address nuclear criticality safety concerns. Complete dissolution of the sand fines and slag chunks was achieved in laboratory experiments by heating between 75 and 85 degrees Celsius in a 9.3M nitric acid/0.013M (hydrogen) fluoride solution. Under these conditions, the sand and slag samples dissolved between 1 and 3 hours. Complete dissolution of plutonium and calcium fluorides in the slag required adjusting the dissolver solution to 7.5 wt% aluminum nitrate nonahydrate (ANN). Once ANN was added to a dissolver solution, further dissolution of any plutonium oxide (PuO2) in successive charges was not practical due to complexation of the fluoride by aluminum. During the laboratory experiments, well mixed solutions were necessary to achieve rapid dissolution rates. When agitation was not provided, sand fines dissolved very slowly. Measurement of the hydrogen gas generation rate during dissolution of slag samples was used to estimate the amount of metal in the chunks. Depending upon the yield of the reduction, the values ranged between approximately 1 (good yield) and 20% (poor yield). Aging of the slag will reduce the potential for hydrogen generation as calcium metal oxidizes over time. The potential for excessive corrosion in the dissolvers was evaluated using experimental data reported in the literature. Corrosion data at the exact flowsheet conditions were not available; however, the corrosion rate for 304L stainless steel (wrought material) corrosion coupons in 10M nitric acid/0.01M hydrofluoric acid at 95 degrees Celsius was reported as 21 mils per year. If the fluoride in the dissolver is complexed with aluminum, the corrosion rate will decrease to approximately 5 mils per year.

Rudisill, T.S.; Gray, J.H.; Karraker, D.G.; Chandler, G.T.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Experimental measurement and numerical simulation of residual stresses in a carburized layer of a 5120 steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined experimental and numerical study of residual stress and microstructure has been performed for a carburized steel 5120 specimen. Specimens were cut from 5120 steel bar stock, in the shape of hockey pucks and were subsequently carburized and quenched. X-ray diffraction was used to record stress profiles through the case for the martensite and retained austenite on the two flat surfaces oriented up and down during the quench. Layer removal was performed by electropolishing. Rietveld analysis was used to determine the lattice parameters of the phases at each depth varying with both carbon content and stress. The experimental measurements are compared with a numerical simulation of the phase transformation and the metallurgical changes following the carburization and quench. Results am discussed in the context of the microstructure and the role played by the retained austenite in interpretation. In addition the carbon profile obtained from the lattice parameters is compared with profiles measured using burnout.

Rangaswamy, P.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Shipley, J.C.; Goldstone, J.A.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Improved Cobalt Removal: Field Testing Phase: Effects of Normally Encountered Plant Impurities on Removal Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined the effects of plant impurities on cobalt removal from liquid radioactive waste. Improved process knowledge is critical to utilities that are continually working to increase the performance of their low-level waste (LLW) treatment systems. This report provides predictive chemistry information for improved cobalt removal obtained from test work at Catawba Nuclear Station. It also provides test methodologies for performing similar evaluations at other member plants.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

333

Residual fuel outlook - 1981 through 1995. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report forecasts the future availability of residual fuel and its implications to the marine industry. The results are based on the completion of three separate tasks. The first examines past trends and recent developments in worldwide supply and demand markets for residual and other fuels, while the second investigates upgrading and expansion activities by the refining industry. The combination of these efforts produces an overview of the worldwide residual market and a complete understanding of refiners' economic and technical decision factors determining final product mix production. The last task utilizes information gained in previous tasks to review available longterm forecasts and their underlying assumptions. The forecasts completed by the National Petroleum Council (NPC) were utilized for a depiction of residual availability in 1985, while the Department of Energy's (DOE) Midterm Energy Forecasting System (MEFS) was utilized and adjusted to provide estimates of residual availability in 1990 and 1995.

Varndell, T.B.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Conversion of direct process high-boiling residue to monosilanes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of monosilanes from the high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride with silicon metalloid in a process typically referred to as the "direct process." The process comprises contacting a high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride and silicon metalloid, with hydrogen gas in the presence of a catalytic amount of aluminum trichloride effective in promoting conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. The present process results in conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. At least a portion of the aluminum trichloride catalyst required for conduct of the process may be formed in situ during conduct of the direct process and isolation of the high-boiling residue.

Brinson, Jonathan Ashley (Vale of Glamorgan, GB); Crum, Bruce Robert (Madison, IN); Jarvis, Jr., Robert Frank (Midland, MI)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Crop residues as a fuel for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Crop residues could serve as an alternative energy source for producing electric power and heat in agricultural regions of the United States. Nearly 2 quads of residues are estimated to be available as a sustainable annual yield. These can substitute for up to one quad of conventional fuels used to generate electricity and up to an additional quad of petroleum and natural gas currently used for producing heat. The most promising routes to residue conversion appear to be regional generators sized in the megawatt range, and the mixing of residues with coal for burning in coal power plants. Costing farmers from $0.70 to $1.25 per million Btu, to harvest and prepare for use as a fuel, residues can be a competitive renewable energy supply.

Bhagat, N.; Davitian, H.; Pouder, R.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids Final Technical Report (From October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2005) Principle Authors Aihua Zhang, Qisheng Ma, Kangshi Wang, Yongchun Tang (co-PI), William A. Goddard (PI), Date Report was issued: December 9, 2005 DOE Award number: DE-FC26-02NT15383 Name and Address of Submitting Organization California Institute of Technology 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA91125 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

337

Method of arsenic removal from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

338

Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: a. treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10 and, b. separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (a) and (b) are repeated using a bicarbonate.

Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Photoacoustic removal of occlusions from blood vessels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Partial or total occlusions of fluid passages within the human body are removed by positioning an array of optical fibers in the passage and directing treatment radiation pulses along the fibers, one at a time, to generate a shock wave and hydrodynamics flows that strike and emulsify the occlusions. A preferred application is the removal of blood clots (thrombin and embolic) from small cerebral vessels to reverse the effects of an ischemic stroke. The operating parameters and techniques are chosen to minimize the amount of heating of the fragile cerebral vessel walls occurring during this photo acoustic treatment. One such technique is the optical monitoring of the existence of hydrodynamics flow generating vapor bubbles when they are expected to occur and stopping the heat generating pulses propagated along an optical fiber that is not generating such bubbles.

Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Maitland, IV, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA); Esch, Victor C. (San Francisco, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Method of removing cesium from steam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The foregoing objects of the present invention are achieved by a method for removing radioactive cesium from a hot vapor, such as steam, by a technique wherein the cesium chemically reacts with a filtering material which retains the cesium without causing degradation of the filtering material. The method is carried out at temperatures in the range of from about 700{degree}F to about 1000{degree}F, and even higher, but it preferably is utilized at a temperature of at least about 800{degree}F. The method uses a silica glass which is preferably in the form of spheres as the filter material. The preferred material is a borosilicate glass (Pyrex). The degree of removal of the radioactive cesium from the hot steam or other vapor approaches 90 to 100%.

Carson, N.J. Jr.; Noland, R.A.; Ruther, W.E.

1990-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Acid treatment removes zinc sulfide scale restriction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that removal of zinc sulfide (ZnS) scale with acid restored an offshore Louisiana well's production to original rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near well bore area. The selected acid had been proven to control iron sulfide (FeS) scales in sour wells without causing harm to surface production equipment, tubing, and other downhole hardware. The successful removal of the blockage re-established previous production rates with a 105% increase in flowing tubing pressure. On production for a number of months, a high rate, high-pressure offshore well was experiencing unusually rapid pressure and rate declines. A small sample of the restrictive material was obtained during the wire line operations. The well was subsequently shut in while a laboratory analysis determined that zinc sulfide was the major component of the obstruction.

Biggs, K. (Kerr McGee Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Allison, D. (Otis Engineering Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Ford, W.G.F. (Halliburton Co., Duncan, OK (United States))

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Categorical Exclusion 4568, Crane Removal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

l)eterminationFornl l)eterminationFornl Project Title: Crane Removal Project (4568) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is to remove an old legacy crane trolley and old crane operated cab. General Administration/Management DA I - Routine business actions DA2 - Administrative contract amendments DA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations DA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect DA6 - Procedural rulemakings upgrade DA7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged DA8 - Award of technical support/M&O/personal service contracts DA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training DAIO - Reports on non-DOE legislation DA II - Technical advice and planning assistance

343

IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the second year of this project, we continued our effort to develop low temperature decarboxylation catalysts and investigate the behavior of these catalysts at different reaction conditions. We conducted a large number of dynamic measurements with crude oil and model compounds to obtain the information at different reaction stages, which was scheduled as the Task2 in our work plan. We developed a novel adsorption method to remove naphthenic acid from crude oil using naturally occurring materials such as clays. Our results show promise as an industrial application. The theoretical modeling proposed several possible reaction pathways and predicted the reactivity depending on the catalysts employed. From all of these studies, we obtained more comprehensive understanding about catalytic decarboxylation and oil upgrading based on the naphthenic acid removal concept.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang, William A. Goddard, Yongchun Tang

2005-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

344

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Makarewicz, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Meredith, Paul F. (Knoxville, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Makarewicz, M.A.; Meredith, P.F.

1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

346

Trojan PWR Decommissioning: Large Component Removal Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the decommissioning of large commercial nuclear plants in the United States is in its infancy, the technical challenges with associated radioactive waste management are clear. This report describes the removal and disposal of four steam generators and one pressurizer from the Trojan nuclear power plant, the first large PWR to be decommissioned in the United States. The report chronicles the problems, successes, and lessons learned in this project, which was completed on schedule and under budget in...

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

347

Removal of iron from impure graphites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Iron-impregnated and ash-rich graphites have been purified by leaching with gaseous I/sub 2/ at 900/sup 0/C. With addition of H/sub 2/, the rate of removal of impurity iron can be markedly increased and becomes comparable to that obtained with Cl/sub 2/. I/sub 2/ has an advantage in that it can also volatilize Ca and perhaps Ba and Sr.

Growcock, F.B.; Heiser, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

1987-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Process for removing sulfur from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

Aida, T.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.

1983-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

351

Removal of copper from ferrous scrap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

Blander, Milton (12833 S. 82nd Ct., Palos Park, IL 60464); Sinha, Shome N. (5748 Drexel, 2A, Chicago, IL 60637)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

New book on `Technological Innovation, Food Sovereignty and Food Security in More than 80 persons participated in the presentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New book on `Technological Innovation, Food Sovereignty and Food Security in Bolivia' More than 80 persons participated in the presentation of a new book, `InnovaciĂłn TecnolĂłgica, SoberanĂ­a y Seguridad AlimentarĂ­a' (Technological Innovation, Food Sovereignty and Food Security). The book was written by Freddy

Richner, Heinz

353

Recovery and removal of mercury from mixed wastes. Final report, September 1994--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

In recognition of the major environmental problem created by mercury contamination of wastes and soils at an estimated 200,000 sites along US natural gas and oil pipelines and at a number of government facilities, including Oak Ridge, Savannah River, Hanford, and Rocky Flats, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking an effective and economical process for removing mercury from various DOE waste streams in order to allow the base waste streams to be treated by means of conventional technologies. In response to the need for Unproved mercury decontamination technology, Mercury Recovery Services (MRS) has developed and commercialized a thermal treatment process for the recovery of mercury from contaminated soils and industrial wastes. The objectives of this program were to: demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of the MRS process to successfully remove and recover mercury from low-level mixed waste containing mercury compounds (HgO, HgS, HgCl{sub 2}) and selected heavy metal compounds (PbO, CdO); determine optimum processing conditions required to consistently reduce the residual total mercury content to 1 mg/kg while rendering the treated product nontoxic as determined by TCLP methods; and provide an accurate estimate of the capital and operating costs for a commercial processing facility designed specifically to remove and recovery mercury from various waste streams of interest at DOE facilities. These objectives were achieved in a four-stage demonstration program described within with results.

Sutton, W.F.; Weyand, T.E.; Koshinski, C.J.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Soil treatment to remove uranium and related mixed radioactive contaminants. Final report September 1992--October 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A research and development project to remove uranium and related radioactive contaminants from soil by an ultrasonically-aided chemical leaching process began in 1993. The project objective was to develop and design, on the basis of bench-scale and pilot-scale experimental studies, a cost-effective soil decontamination process to produce a treated soil containing less than 35 pCi/g. The project, to cover a period of about thirty months, was designed to include bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to remove primarily uranium from the Incinerator Area soil, at Fernald, Ohio, as well as strontium-90, cobalt-60 and cesium-137 from a Chalk River soil, at the Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario. The project goal was to develop, design and cost estimate, on the basis of bench-scale and pilot-scale ex-situ soil treatment studies, a process to remove radionuclides form the soils to a residual level of 35 pCi/g of soil or less, and to provide a dischargeable water effluent as a result of soil leaching and a concentrate that can be recovered for reuse or solidified as a waste for disposal. In addition, a supplementary goal was to test the effectiveness of in-situ soil treatment through a field study using the Chalk River soil.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 15 Food Uses for Soybean Oil and Alternatives to Trans Fatty Acids in Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 15 Food Uses for Soybean Oil and Alternatives to Trans Fatty Acids in Foods Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science &

356

Data Call - Food Community | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Call - Food Community Data Call - Food Community Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture Data Call Understanding food, agriculture, and rural issues is a multidisciplinary effort that incorporates natural resources and land use, biological and physical sciences, international commodity and financial market information, social sciences, human health and nutrition, and many other areas. Relevant data collection and compilation of official statistics occur throughout the U.S. government, not just in agencies with an explicit focus on agriculture. With so many different sources of knowledge and widely felt areas of impact, successful data integration and distribution requires making full use of new approaches and technologies.

357

Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

A manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material at sites identified by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. 36 refs., 16 figs, 22 tabs.

Gilbert, T.L.; Yu, C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Zielen, A.J.; Jusko, M.J.; Wallo, A. III

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Nitrogen Removal From Low Quality Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. It is especially important in the residential sector, where it supplies nearly half of all the energy consumed in U.S. homes. However, significant quantities of natural gas cannot be produced economically because its quality is too low to enter the pipeline transportation system without some type of processing, other than dehydration, to remove the undesired gas fraction. Such low-quality natural gas (LQNG) contains significant concentration or quantities of gas other than methane. These non- hydrocarbons are predominantly nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide, but may also include other gaseous components. The nitrogen concentrations usually exceeds 4%. Nitrogen rejection is presently an expensive operation which can present uneconomic scenarios in the potential development of natural gas fields containing high nitrogen concentrations. The most reliable and widely used process for nitrogen rejection from natural gas consists of liquefying the feed stream using temperatures in the order of - 300{degrees}F and separating the nitrogen via fractionation. In order to reduce the gas temperature to this level, the gas is compressed, cooled by mullet-stream heat exchangers, and expanded to low pressure. Significant energy for compression and expensive materials of construction are required. Water and carbon dioxide concentrations must be reduced to levels required to prevent freezing. SRI`s proposed research involves screening new nitrogen selective absorbents and developing a more cost effective nitrogen removal process from natural gas using those compounds. The long-term objective of this project is to determine the technical and economical feasibility of a N{sub 2}2 removal concept based on complexation of molecular N{sub 2} with novel complexing agents. Successful development of a selective, reversible, and stable reagent with an appropriate combination of capacity and N{sub 2} absorption/desorption characteristics will allow selective separation of N{sub 2} from LQNG.

Alvarado, D.B.; Asaro, M.F.; Bomben, J.L.; Damle, A.S.; Bhown, A.S.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

Cha, Chang Y. (3807 Reynolds St., Laramie, WY 82070)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

362

Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag.

Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN); Trowbridge, Lee D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stories Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time The Lab's 1,000th shipment of transuranic waste recently left Los Alamos,...

364

DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > DOE removes all remaining HEU from Hungary DOE removes all remaining HEU...

365

Method for removal of methane from coalbeds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing methane gas from underground coalbeds prior to mining the coal which comprises drilling at least one borehole from the surface into the coalbed. The borehole is started at a slant rather than directly vertically, and as it descends, a gradual curve is followed until a horizontal position is reached where the desired portion of the coalbed is intersected. Approaching the coalbed in this manner and fracturing the coalbed in the major natural fraction direction cause release of large amounts of the trapped methane gas.

Pasini, III, Joseph (Morgantown, WV); Overbey, Jr., William K. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Removal of Fluoride from Waste Water of Aluminium Smelter by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , General Abstracts: Light Metals Division. Presentation Title, Removal of ...

367

Method for removing fluoride contamination from nitric acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fluoride ions are removed from nitric acid solution by contacting the vaporized solution with alumina or zirconium.

Pruett, David J. (Knoxville, TN); Howerton, William B. (Kingston, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Removing Pollutants from Water, Solar Energy - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 5, 2013 ... B. Materials for the Environment: Removing Pollutants from Water, Solar Energy Program Organizers: Fernand Marquis, Naval Postgraduate ...

369

Powder Removal from Complex Structures Produced Using Electron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Additive Manufacturing of Metals. Presentation Title, Powder Removal from ...

370

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Removal | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our...

371

Removal of Inclusions from Solar Grade Silicon Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polysilicon in Photovoltaics: Market Conditions & Competing PV Technologies ... Removal of Inclusions from Solar Grade Silicon Using Electromagnetic Field.

372

Modified Bayer Process for Alumina Removal from Hanford Waste  

AREVA NC Inc. Modified Bayer Process for Alumina Removal from Hanford Waste January 24, 2007 Don Geniesse AREVA NC Inc.

373

Plutonium Residue Recovery (PuRR) project quarterly progress report, April--June 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A material-balance flowsheet for ash-heel processing has been prepared. The major process features are (1) reduction of Pu into a calcium-zinc alloy and selective electrolytic recovery of the Pu from the alloy, (2) removal of americium as a waste, (3) concentration of nontransuranic tramp elements in a zinc waste, (4) removal of oxygen and recovery of calcium by electrolysis of CaO, and (5) zinc recycle by evaporation. Based on this idealized flowsheet, the mass of solid waste is only 62% of that of the original residue. This is accomplished by recycling virtually all the reagents and discarding the oxygen as CO and CO{sub 2}. The pyrochemical recovery of Pu from incinerator ash heel from the Rocky Flats Plant was investigated. During this period, zinc-calcium alloys were used to reduce the PuC{sub 2} in the ash. Reduction of ash heel has been attempted with zinc-calcium alloys containing 2, 6, and 10 wt% calcium after the reduction. These resulted in extractions of 95%, 97%, and 99.5%, respectively, of the Pu from the salt. Following exposure of the reduction alloy to a ZnCl{sub 2}-bearing salt, the Pu was removed effectively from the alloy; however, the Pu recovered in the salt did not complete the material balance. Experiments were made to test a calcium-zinc reference electrode against a Zn-Ca-Mg-Al liquid alloy. The results agreed well with calculated potentials, and such electrodes are promising for application to process monitoring. Calculations were made that verify that most of the americium in the molten salt is present in the divalent state when distributed between liquid Pu and NaCl-KCl. The AmCl{sub 2} activity coefficient is about 10 times that of PuCl{sub 3} in the salt mixture.

Gregg, D.W.; Hickman, R.G.; Landrum, J.H. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Johnson, G.K.; Johnson, I.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Pierce, R.D.; Poa, D.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1989-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

374

A preliminary assessment of the state of harvest and collection technology for forest residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To meet the 'Twenty in Ten Initiative' goals set in the 2007 State of the Union address, forest resources will be needed as feedstocks for lignocellulosic ethanol production. It has been estimated that 368 million dry tons can be produced annually in the U.S. from logging residues and fuel treatment thinnings. Currently, very little of this woody biomass is used for energy production due to the costs and difficulty in collecting and transporting this material. However, minimizing biomass costs (including harvest, handling, transport, storage, and processing costs) delivered to the refinery is necessary to develop a sustainable cellulosic ethanol industry. Achieving this goal requires a fresh look at conventional timber harvesting operations to identify ways of efficiently integrating energy wood collection and developing cost-effective technologies to harvest small-diameter trees. In conventional whole-tree logging operations, entire trees are felled and skidded from the stump to the landing. The residues (also called slash), consisting of tops and limbs, accumulate at the landing when trees are delimbed. This slash can be ground at the landing with a mobile grinder or transported to another central location with a stationary grinder. The ground material is transported via chip vans, or possibly large roll on/off containers, to the user facility. Cut-to-length harvesting systems are gaining popularity in some locations. In these operations, specialized harvesters that can fall, delimb, and cut logs to length are used. The small diameter tops and limbs accumulate along the machine's track. It can be left in the forest to dry or removed soon after harvest while logs are extracted. Removing slash during the same operation as the wood has been shown to be more efficient. However, leaving residue in the forest to dry reduces moisture content, which improves grinder performance, reduces dry matter loss during storage, and inhibits colonization of fungi that produce harmful spores. In recent years, new machines that are specially designed for collection of small diameter wood have been developed in the U.S. and Europe. Residue bundlers and balers improve transportation and handling efficiency by densifying the material and packaging it so that it can be handled with conventional equipment. An experimental integrated harvester/grinder can fall small diameter trees and feed them into a grinder. The ground material is collected in a bin that can be dumped into a chip van. The harvester head is also capable of delimbing and bucking (cut into sections) small timber to be used for pulp and posts. Limitations of these new technologies are their large capital costs and complexity, leading to high maintenance costs and the need for highly trained operators. To ensure that quality feedstock materials consistently enter the mouth of the refinery, the uniform format supply system concept proposes that feedstock diversity be managed at harvest, much like the current grain supply system. This allows for standardization of key infrastructure components and facilitation of a biomass commodity system. Challenges in achieving a uniform woody biomass supply include, but are not limited to, developing machines for efficient harvest of small-diameter trees in a range of topographies and conditions, developing machines and operating plans for grinding biomass as near to the stump as possible, developing cost-effective drying strategies to reduce losses and mold growth during wood chip storage, and quantifying environmental impacts of slash removal and fuel thinnings to aid landowner decisions and policy development.

Webb, Erin [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Blackwelder, D. Brad [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Hess, J. Richard [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

An urban infill : a residual site in Boston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is concerned with the treatment of residual sites in the context of the urban environment and in particular with the wounds inflicted by the passage of the Massachusetts Turnpike through the city of Boston. The ...

Savvides, Andreas L. (Andreas Loucas)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Ohio Imports of Residual Fuel Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Imports of Residual Fuel Oil (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2000: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 108: 0: 0: 0: 0: 0: 27: 2001: 0: 44 ...

377

Generation of residual energy in the turbulent solar wind  

SciTech Connect

In situ observations of the fluctuating solar wind flow show that the energy of magnetic field fluctuations always exceeds that of the kinetic energy, and therefore the difference between the kinetic and magnetic energies, known as the residual energy, is always negative. The same behaviour is found in numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We study the dynamics of the residual energy for strong, anisotropic, critically balanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence using the eddy damped quasi-normal Markovian approximation. Our analysis shows that for stationary critically balanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, negative residual energy will always be generated by nonlinear interacting Alfven waves. This offers a general explanation for the observation of negative residual energy in solar wind turbulence and in the numerical simulations.

Gogoberidze, G. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Ilia State University, 3/5 Cholokashvili Ave., 0162 Tbilisi (Georgia); Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Asphalt landscape after all : residual suburban surface as public infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thesis proposes a hybridized commercial retail strip inserted into a residual suburban condition as a manner of investigating the latent potential of suburban logic, both its constituent elements and its formal rules ...

O'Connor, Joseph Michael, M. Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention in one aspect comprises a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous-derived liquids by contacting said liquid with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene polymer (i.e. PS-DVB) having catechol ligands anchored to said polymer, said contacting being at an elevated temperature. In another aspect, the invention is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene polymer by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid in accordance with the aspect described above which regenerating process comprises: (a) treating said spent catecholated polystyrene polymer with an aqueous solution of at least one member selected from the group consisting of carbonates and bicarbonates of ammonium, alkali metals, and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10, and said treating being at a temperature in the range of about 20/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/C; (b) separating the solids and liquids from each other. In a preferred embodiment the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step: (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution which includes at least one lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (c) and (d) are added. Steps (c) and (d) comprise: (c) treating the solids with an aqueous alcoholic solution of at least one ammonium, alkali or alkaline earth metal bicarbonate at a temperature in the range of about 20 to 100/sup 0/C; and (d) separating the solids from the liquids.

Fish, R.H.

1984-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

380

Process for removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permitting the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Hancher, C.W.; Saunders, M.B.; Googin, J.M.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nondestructive Evaluation: Nondestructive Evaluation and Measurement of Residual Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for residual stress measurements conducted on Alloy 600 samples that have undergone changes in material properties resulting from simulated operating conditions, including heat treatment, three-point bending load, cracking, and repair. The overall objective was to identify suitable NDE techniques that would augment the existing and proven surface residual stress measurements by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and extend the measurem...

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN  

SciTech Connect

This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

383

Characterization and stabilization of arsenic in water treatment residuals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The characterization of water treatment residuals containing arsenic was investigated in the first study. Arsenic desorption and leachability from the residuals were the focus of this study. Arsenic leaching from water treatment residuals was found to be underestimated by the toxicity characteristic leaching test (TCLP) due to the pH of the leachates being favorable for As(V) adsorption. Competitive desorption of arsenic with phosphate was significant because phosphate tends to compete with As(V) on the surface of the metal hydroxide for adsorption sites. However, arsenic desorption by the competition of sulfate and chloride was found to be negligible. The pH in the leachate was a critical variable in controlling arsenic stability in the residuals. The release of arsenic from the residuals was elevated at low and high pH due to the increase dissolution of the adsorbents such as Fe and Al hydroxides. In the second phase of the study, the stabilization techniques for arsenic contained residuals and were examined to develop methods to suitably stabilize arsenic to eliminate and/or minimize leaching. A decrease of arsenic leaching was achieved by the addition of lime to the residuals and believed to be due to the formation of less soluble and stable calcium-arsenic compounds. However, it is suggested that the ordinary Portland cement (OPC) should be added with the lime for the long term stabilization because lime can be slowly consumed when directly exposed to atmospheric CO2. The solidification and stabilization (S/S) technique with lime and OPC was shown to be successfully applied by the immobilization of a wide variety of arsenic tainted water treatment residuals.

Wee, Hun Young

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

Energy Use In American Food Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dale Pfeiffer (2006, 29) opens the fifth chapter of his book Eating Fossil Fuels with the statement, “Current civilization is founded upon an abundance of cheap energy derived from hydrocarbons.” He presents the natural extension of that premise to food production in the opening of his sixth chapter, “Modern industrial agriculture is unsustainable. It has been pushed to the limit and is in

Michael Minn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Satiating Effects of Rye Foods Hanna Isaksson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= 15 Increased satiety during 120 min (Hlebowicz et al., 2008b) Bread with 80% whole-grain wheat flour., 1998) Bread with 15% pearled barley flour (6 g df) Control: refined wheat bread (0.1 g df) Higher rye foods, compared with iso-caloric refined wheat bread, served as parts of breakfast meals in cross

387

10/1/2010 1 Biotech Foods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for new materials and energy sources Develop Crops as production vehicles for medicines and vaccines) ­2000 American Society of Microbiology ­2000 American Medical Association ­2001 US National Research"... states Joel Cohen and colleagues in a brief issued by the International Food Policy Research Institute

Hammock, Bruce D.

388

ORGANICS: YARD TRIMMINGS AND FOOD SCRAPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter describes the methodology used in EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM) to estimate streamlined life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors for yard trimmings and food scraps beginning at the point of waste generation. The WARM GHG emission factors are used to compare the net emissions associated with these two organic material types in the following three

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Food Safety & Functionality Forum Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryFood Structure & Functionality Forum Division2013 Members116 Members as of July 1, 2013Acevedo, NuriaUniversity of GuelphAmes, IA, USAAdriaenssens, MarkBarry CallebautPennsauken, NJ, USAAimutis, WilliamCargill IncWayzata

390

Recipe for Reform: The Food Economy Movement in Britain During the First World War  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lectures Suitable for Food Economy Exhibitions. Apr. 1917.F. C. No. 17: Food Economy Exhibitions: Suggestions forF. C. No. 44: Food Economy Exhibitions: Suggestions as to

Buckley, Michael Dennis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Food Nutrition Link--Level III Nutrition for the Health of It  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4-H members in the level three food project learn about nutrients, foods of different cultures, and careers in the food industry.

Bielamowicz, Mary K.; Cooksey, Dymple C.; Hall, Charles R.

1995-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

392

The effects of background adaptation and food availability on habitat preference of Corythoichthys flavofasciatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADAPTATION AND FOOD AVAILABILITY ON HABITAT PREFERENCE OFchoice is related to the availability of food, presence ofbackground adaptation, food availability, or a combination

Iyer, Neetha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Homeward Bound: Food-Related Transportation Strategies in Low Income and Transit Dependent Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Ad Hoc Food Security ing Home the Broccoli: Innovativeor administrative home for food security planning, includingtheir goods home. broadly, food security approaches. The

Gottlieb, Robert; Fisher, Andrew; Dohan, Marc; O'Connor, Linda; Parks, Virginia

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Chemical and microbiological hazards associated with recycling of anaerobic digested residue intended for agricultural use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study, three full-scale biogas plants (BGP) were investigated for the concentration of heavy metals, organic pollutants, pesticides and the pathogenic bacteria Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli in the anaerobically digested residues (ADR). The BGPs mainly utilize source-separated organic wastes and industrial food waste as energy sources and separate the ADR into an ADR-liquid and an ADR-solid fraction by centrifugation at the BGP. According to the Norwegian standard for organic fertilizers, the ADR were classified as quality 1 mainly because of high zinc (132-422 mg kg{sup -1} DM) and copper (23-93 mg kg{sup -1} DM) concentrations, but also because of high cadmium (0.21-0.60 mg kg{sup -1} DM) concentrations in the liquid-ADR. In the screening of organic pollutants, only DEHP (9.7-62.1 mg kg{sup -1}) and {Sigma} PAH 16 (0.2-1.98 mg kg{sup -1} DM) were detected in high concentrations according to international regulations. Of the 250 pesticides analyzed, 11 were detected, but only imazalil (<0.30-5.77 mg kg{sup -1} DM) and thiabendazol (<0.14-0.73 mg kg{sup -1} DM) were frequently detected in the ADR-fiber. Concentrations of imazalil and thiabendazol were highest during the winter months, due to a high consumption of citrus fruits in Norway in this period. Ten percent of the ADR-liquid samples contained cereulide-producing B. cereus, whereas no verotoxigenic E. coli was detected. The authors conclude that the risk of chemical and bacterial contamination of the food chain or the environment from agricultural use of ADR seems low.

Govasmark, Espen, E-mail: espen.govasmark@bioforsk.no [Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research - Soil and Environment, Fredrik A. Dahlsvei 20, NO-1432 Aas (Norway); Staeb, Jessica [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institut fuer Siedlungswasserbau, Wasserguete- und Abfallwirtschaft, Abteilung Hydrochemie, Bandtaele 2, D-70569 Stuttgart (Buesnau) (Germany); Holen, Borge [Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research - Plant Health, Hogskoleveien 7, NO-1432 Aas (Norway); Hoornstra, Douwe [University of Helsinki, Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, Biocenter, Viikinkaari 9, FIN-00014 (Finland); Nesbakk, Tommy [Mjosanlegget AS, Roverudmyra Miljostasjon, Asmarkveien 301, NO-2600 Lillehammer (Norway); Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja [University of Helsinki, Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, Biocenter, Viikinkaari 9, FIN-00014 (Finland)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed- Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanford’s 300 Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, WA – Hanford’s River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has met a significant cleanup challenge on the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site by removing a 1,082-ton nuclear test reactor from the 300 Area.

396

Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hot Food Holding Cabinets to someone by E-mail Hot Food Holding Cabinets to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories

397

A center for food, Kowloon City, Hong Kong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern day living limits us from understanding and seeing where our food comes from and how it was planted, grown, and manufactured. As we become more and more conscious about our diets, our relationship to food is more ...

Chan, Kwan Yue, 1979-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Distant harvest : the production and price of organic food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic food is growing in popularity, enjoying a 15 to 20% increase in sales, yearly, since about 1997, according to the Organic Trade Association. Organic produce makes up about 2% of the United States' total food sales ...

Sherburne, Morgan (Morgan L.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Curbside eating : mobilizing food trucks to activate public space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past 5 years, cities across the United States have seen the rise of a new form of street vending: the modern food truck. Nearly overnight, food trucks have become an expected and anticipated occurrence in many ...

Sheppard, Alison Marguerite

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

trans Fatty acid content of foods in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growing evidence that dietary consumption of trans fatty acid (TFA) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease has made TFA a hot topic among people, food industries, and government officials in China. trans Fatty acid content of foods in China

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Business plan for the frozen food industry in Morocco  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I develop a business plan for a frozen food company (Chiwate) that will operate in Morocco. Until very recently, the frozen food product-line in Morocco was very restricted. However, recent demographic and ...

Miri, Leila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Buffers between grazing sheep and leafy crops augment food safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sheep and the edge of a food crop was adequate to preventgrazing sheep and leafy crops augment food safety Thedomestic animals and the crop edge is adequate to minimize

Hoar, Bruce R; Atwill, Edward R; Carlton, Lesa; Celis, Jorge; Carabez, Jennifer; Nguyen, Tran

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

HEART SMART NUTRITION Prepare Food Right--Ensure It's Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lesson 4 HEART SMART NUTRITION Prepare Food Right--Ensure It's Light To prepare foods lower in fat Heart Smart? True or False ______ 1. A cholesterol- free product is also fat-free. True or False

404

Mathematics: Food, Soil, Water, Air, Free Speech  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Atrazine in Contaminated Soils Using Dairy-Manure Biochar Xinde Cao,*, Lena Ma, Yuan Liang, Bin Gao, Florida 32611 bS Supporting Information ' INTRODUCTION Biochar is increasingly receiving attention, and crop residues have been used for biochar production.1 Biochar is produced as a soil amendment

Russo, Bernard

405

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

406

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

407

EM Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge EM Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Testing and equipment simulations ensure first-of-a-kind technological processes for sludge removal can be conducted safely and efficiently. Testing and equipment simulations ensure first-of-a-kind technological processes for sludge removal can be conducted safely and efficiently. RICHLAND, Wash. - The Richland Operations Office and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company successfully removed a portion of a highly radioactive sludge from underwater storage in a large basin adjacent to the K West reactor at the Hanford site this month. In that milestone, workers removed sludge originating from knock-out pots,

408

NETL: Gasification Systems - Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Project Number: DE-SC00008243 TDA Research, Inc. is developing a high-capacity, low-cost sorbent that removes anhydrous ammonia (NH3), mercury (Hg), and trace contaminants from coal- and coal/biomass-derived syngas. The clean-up system will be used after the bulk warm gas sulfur removal step, and remove NH3 and Hg in a regenerable manner while irreversibly capturing all other trace metals (e.g., Arsenic, Selenium) reducing their concentrations to sub parts per million (ppm) levels. Current project plans include identifying optimum chemical composition and structure that provide the best sorbent performance for removing trace contaminants, determining the effect of operating parameters, conducting multiple-cycle experiments to test the life of the sorbent for NH3 and Hg removal, and conducting a preliminary design of the sorbent reactor.

409

Apparatus for removing noncondensable gases from cogenerated process steam in dual fluid cheng cycle engines  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus is described for removing noncondensable gases from process steam cogenerated in a steam-injected gas turbine engine. The engine consists of: (a) a chamber; (b) compressor means for introducing air into the chamber; (c) means for introducing steam within the chamber, the steam introducing means including an automatically controlled steam injector valve and steam injection line, (d) means for heating the air and steam in the chamber, including means for combustion; (e) turbine means responsive to a mixture of air, combustion products and steam for converting the energy associated with the mixture to mechanical energy; (f) counterflow heat exchanger means, including at least superheater and evaporator sections, for transferring residual thermal energy from a mixture of air, combustion products and steam exhausted from the turbine means to incoming water and steam.

Cheng, D.Y.

1987-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

410

Analyzing strategic behaviors in electricity markets via transmission-constrained residual demand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation studies how to characterize strategic behaviors in electricity markets from a transmission-constrained residual demand perspective. This dissertation generalizes the residual demand concept, widely… (more)

Xu, Lin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

South Dakota Residual Fuel Oil Adj Sales/Deliveries to Oil Company ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Referring Pages: Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil for Oil Company Use ; Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil for Oil Company Use ; South Dakota Adjusted Distillate ...

412

Categorical Exclusion 4566, Ash Removal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOrnI FOrnI Project Title: Ash Removal Project (4566) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is to split, containerize, package, transport and disposition one hundred and two (102) cans of mixed waste. General Administration/Management OA I - Routine business actions OA2 * Administrative contract amendments OA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations OA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect OA6 - Procedural rule makings upgrade OA 7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged OA8 . Award of technical supportlM&O/personal service contracts OA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training OA 10 - Reports on non-DOE legislation OA II -

413

Electrochemical removal of material from metallic work  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Deburring, polishing, surface forming and the like are carried out by electrochemical machining with conformable electrode means including an electrically conducting and an insulating web. The surface of the work to be processed is covered by a deformable electrically insulating web or cloth which is perforated and conforms with the work. The web is covered by a deformable perforated electrically conducting screen electrode which also conforms with, and is insulated from, the work by the insulating web. An electrolyte is conducted through the electrode and insulating web and along the work through a perforated elastic member which engages the electrode under pressure pressing the electrode and web against the work. High current under low voltage is conducted betwen the electrode and work through the insulator, removing material from the work. Under the pressure of the elastic member, the electrode and insulator continue to conform with the work and the spacing between the electrode and work is maintained constant.

Csakvary, Tibor (Wilkens Township, Allegheny County, PA); Fromson, Robert E. (Wilkens Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1980-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

414

IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS  

SciTech Connect

In the first year of this project, we have established our experimental and theoretical methodologies for studies of the catalytic decarboxylation process. We have developed both glass and stainless steel micro batch type reactors for the fast screening of various catalysts with reaction substrates of model carboxylic acid compounds and crude oil samples. We also developed novel product analysis methods such as GC analyses for organic acids and gaseous products; and TAN measurements for crude oil. Our research revealed the effectiveness of several solid catalysts such as NA-Cat-1 and NA-Cat-2 for the catalytic decarboxylation of model compounds; and NA-Cat-5{approx}NA-Cat-9 for the acid removal from crude oil. Our theoretical calculations propose a three-step concerted oxidative decarboxylation mechanism for the NA-Cat-1 catalyst.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang

2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

415

AX Tank Farm tank removal study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

SKELLY, W.A.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

416

Ebeling: Handbook of Indian Foods and Fibers of Arid America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research has barely begun. Handbook of Indian Foods andeffort was remarkable, and his Handbook should be a standard

Sutton, Mark Q

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Removal Sorbents for High Temperature Gas Streams Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,767,000 entitled "Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a unique regenerable sorbent process that can remove contaminants from gas produced by the gasification of fossil fuels. Specifically, the process removes hydrogen chloride by using the regenerable sorbent and simultaneously extracts hydrogen chloride compounds and hydrogen

418

Food web complexity and chaotic population Gregor F. Fussmann1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT Food web complexity and chaotic population dynamics Gregor F. Fussmann1 * and Gerd Heber2 1 their complexity increases. We determined the dynamical stability of a universe of mathematical, nonlinear food web, chaotic dynamics increases with the number of trophic levels in a food web but decreases with the degree

Fussman, Gregor

419

Negotiating food waste: Using a practice lens to inform design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ecological sustainability is becoming of increasing concern to the HCI community, though little focus has been given yet to issues around food waste. Given the environmental impact of food waste, there is potential to make a significant difference. To ... Keywords: Everyday practice, design, food and waste, sustainability

Eva Ganglbauer, Geraldine Fitzpatrick, Rob Comber

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Zero emissions systems in the food processing industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The food processing industry is part of an interlinked group of sectors. It plays an important role in the economic development of every country. However, a strongly growing food processing industry greatly magnifies the problems of waste management, ... Keywords: anaerobic digestion, food processing industry, pineapple waste, zero emissions system

Uyen Nguyen Ngoc; Hans Schnitzer

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Creating visibility: understanding the design space for food waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Support for ecological sustainability is of growing interest and the over-consumption, production and disposal of foods are a major concern for sustainability, ethics and the economy. However, there is a deficit in current understandings of how technologies ... Keywords: food waste, human food interaction, in-home tour, mobile diary, qualitative study, sustainability

Eva Ganglbauer; Geraldine Fitzpatrick; Georg Molzer

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Inhibited Release of Mobile Contaminants from Hanford Tank Residual Waste  

SciTech Connect

Investigations of contaminant release from Hanford Site tank residual waste have indicated that in some cases certain contaminants of interest (Tc and Cr) exhibit inhibited release. The percentage of Tc that dissolved from residual waste from tanks 241-C-103, 241-C-106, 241-C-202, and 241-C-203 ranged from approximately 6% to 10%. The percent leachable Cr from residual waste from tanks C-103, C 202, and C-203 ranged from approximately 1.1% to 44%. Solid phase characterization results indicate that the recalcitrant forms of these contaminants are associated with iron oxides. X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of Tc and Cr in residual waste indicates that these contaminants occur in Fe oxide particles as their lower, less soluble oxidation states [Tc(IV) and Cr(III)]. The form of these contaminants is likely as oxides or hydroxides incorporated within the structure of the Fe oxide. Leaching behavior of U from tank residual waste was studied using deionized water, and CaCO3 and Ca(OH)2 saturated solutions as leachants. The release behavior of U from tank residual waste is complex. Initial U concentrations in water and CaCO3 leachants are high due to residual amounts of the highly soluble U mineral cejkaite. As leaching and dilution occur NaUO2PO4 {center_dot} xH2O, Na2U2O7(am) and schoepite (or a similar phase) become the solubility controlling phases for U. In the case of the Ca(OH)2 leachant, U release from tank residual waste is dramatically reduced. Thermodynamic modeling indicates that the solubility of CaUO4(c) controls release of U from residual waste in the Ca(OH)2 leachants. It is assumed the solubility controlling phase is actually a hydrated version of CaUO4 with a variable water content ranging from CaUO4 to CaUO4 {center_dot} (H2O). The critically reviewed value for CaUO4(c) (log KSP0 = 15.94) produced good agreement with our experimental data for the Ca(OH)2 leachates.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Heald, Steve M.; Arey, Bruce W.; Lindberg, Michael J.

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

423

Recipe for Reform: The Food Economy Movement in Britain During the First World War  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Food Economy League Handbook for Housewives. 24thThe National Food Fund Handbook for Housewives. 1915. Women,of Food. Food Economy Handbook. Dec. 1917. GD Gt Brit.

Buckley, Michael Dennis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Solution-reactor-produced-{sup 99}Mo using activated carbon to remove {sup 131}I  

SciTech Connect

This research explores the idea of producing {sup 99}Mo in a solution reactor. The Solution High Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA), located at the Los Alamos Critical Assembly Facility, was used to facilitate this study. The goal of this study was to build on work previously completed and to investigate a possible mode of radioactive contaminant removal prior to a {sup 99}Mo extraction process. Prior experiments, performed using SHEBA and a single-step sorption process, showed a significant amount of {sup 131}I present along with the {sup 99}Mo on the alumina that was used to isolate the {sup 99}Mo. A high concentration of {sup 131}I and/or other contaminants present in a sample prohibits the Food and Drug Administration from approving an extraction of that nature for radiopharmaceutical use. However, if it were possible to remove the {sup 131}I and other contaminants prior to a {sup 99}Mo extraction, a simple column extraction process might be feasible. Activated charcoal was used to try to filter the {sup 131}I contaminant from an irradiated fuel solution. Gamma spectroscopy confirmed that the activated carbon trapped a significant amount of the {sup 131}I, as well as notable amounts of {sup 133}Xe, {sup 105}Rb, and {sup 140}Ba. Most importantly, the carbon traps a diminutive amount of {sup 99}Mo.

Kitten, S.; Cappiello, C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

FOOD STANDARDS AGENCY SCOTTISH ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION AGENCY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 FOREWORD We are pleased to present the 9th annual Radioactivity in Food and the Environment report, which contains radiological monitoring data for 2003. This report is the second to contain radiological monitoring data from our four agencies, providing a complete picture of the levels of radioactivity found in food and the environment in the UK. The report builds on the success of last year’s report by considering a new methodology of assessing dose to the public for some of the UK’s nuclear sites. This new methodology takes account of all public exposure routes in a realistic way, leading to an improved and more reliable assessment of dose to the public from

Radiological Monitoring; Bamber Bridge; Preston Pr Bx; Castle Place; Erskine Court; Stirling Fk Tr

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Food for fuel: The price of ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of corn to ethanol in the US since 2005 has been a major cause of global food price increases during that time and has been shown to be ineffective in achieving US energy independence and reducing environmental impact. We make three key statements to enhance understanding and communication about ethanol production's impact on the food and fuel markets: (1) The amount of corn used to produce the ethanol in a gallon of regular gas would feed a person for a day, (2) The production of ethanol is so energy intensive that it uses only 20% less fossil fuel than gasoline, and (3) The cost of gas made with ethanol is actually higher per mile because ethanol reduces gasoline's energy per gallon.

Albino, Dominic K; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Geothermal demonstration: Zunil food dehydration facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A food dehydration facility was constructed near the town of Zunil, Guatemala, to demonstrate the use of geothermal energy for industrial applications. The facility, with some modifications to the design, was found to work quite satisfactorily. Tests using five different products were completed during the time geothermal energy was used in the plant. During the time the plant was not able to use geothermal energy, a temporary diesel-fueled boiler provided the energy to test dehydration on seven other crops available in this area. The system demonstrates that geothermal heat can be used successfully for dehydrating food products. Many other industrial applications of geothermal energy could be considered for Zunil since a considerable amount of moderate-temperature heat will become available when the planned geothermal electrical facility is constructed there. 6 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

Maldonado, O. (Consultecnia, Guatemala City (Guatemala)); Altseimer, J.; Thayer, G.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Cooper, L. (Energy Associates International, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Caicedo, A. (Unidad de Desarrollo Geotermico, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Inst. Nacional de Electrificacion)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Metal Cutting for Large Component Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of large components mainly consisting of the reactor vessel, steam generators and pressurizer. In order to remove and package these large components nozzles must be cut from the reactor vessel to precise tolerances. In some cases steam generators must be segmented for size and weight reduction. One innovative technology that has been used successfully at several commercial nuclear plant decommissioning is diamond wire sawing. Diamond wire sawing is performed by rotating a cable with diamond segments attached using a flywheel approximately 24 inches in diameter driven remotely by a hydraulic pump. Tension is provided using a gear rack drive which also takes up the slack in the wire. The wire is guided through the use of pulleys keeps the wire in a precise location. The diamond wire consists of 1/4 inch aircraft cable with diamond beads strung over the cable separated by springs and brass crimps. Standard wire contains 40 diamond beads per meter and can be made to any length. Cooling the wire and controlling the spread of contamination presents significant challenges. Under normal circumstances the wire is cooled and the cutting kerf cleaned by using water. In some cases of reactor nozzle cuts the use of water is prohibited because it cannot be controlled. This challenge was solved by using liquid Carbon Dioxide as the cooling agent. The liquid CO{sub 2} is passed through a special nozzle which atomizes the liquid into snowflakes which is introduced under pressure to the wire. The snowflakes attach to the wire keeping it cool and to the metal shavings. As the CO{sub 2} and metal shavings are released from the wire due to its fast rotation, the snowflakes evaporate leaving only the fine metal shavings as waste. Secondary waste produced is simply the small volume of fine metal shavings removed from the cut surface. Diamond wire sawing using CO{sub 2} cooling has been employed for cutting the reactor nozzles at San Onofre Unit 1 and at Connecticut Yankee. These carbon steel nozzles ranged up to 54 inch diameter with a 15 inch thick wall and an interior stainless cladding. Diamond wire sawing using traditional water cooling has been used to segment the reactor head at Rancho Seco and for cutting reactor nozzles and control rod drive tubes at Dairyland Power's Lacrosse BWR project. Advantages: - ALARA: All cutting is preformed remotely significantly reducing dose. Stringing of wires is accomplished using long handle tools. - Secondary waste is reduced to just the volume of material cut with the diamond wire. - The potential for airborne contamination is eliminated. Due to the flexibility of the wire, any access restrictions and interferences can be accommodated using pulleys and long handle tools. - The operation is quiet. Disadvantages: - With Liquid Carbon Dioxide cooling and cleaning, delivery of the material must be carefully planned. The longer the distance from the source to the cut area, the greater the chance for pressure drop and subsequent problems with line freezing. - Proper shrouding and ventilation are required for environmental reasons. In each case, the metal structures were cut at a precise location. Radiation dose was reduced significantly by operating the equipment from a remote location. The cuts were very smooth and completed on schedule. Each project must be analyzed individually and take into account many factors including access, radiological conditions, environmental conditions, schedule requirements, packaging requirements and size of cuts.

Hulick, Robert M. [Bluegrass Concrete Cutting Inc., 107 Mildred Street PO Box 427, Greenville, Alabama 36037 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

The functions of tryptophan residues in membrane proteins  

SciTech Connect

Membrane proteins in general have a significantly higher Trp content than do soluble proteins. This is especially true for the M and L subunits of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria. The Trp residues are located mostly in the segments that connect the transmembrane helices. Further, they are concentrated at the periplasmic side of the complex. Within the protein subunits, many form hydrogen bonds with carbonyl oxygens of the main chain, thereby stabilizing the protein. On the surface of the molecule, they are correctly positioned to form hydrogen bonds with the lipid head groups while their hydrophobic rings are immersed in the lipid part of the bilayer. We suggest that Trp residues are involved in the translocation of protein through the membrane and that following translocation, Trp residues serve as anchors on the periplasmic side of the membrane.

Schiffer, M.; Chang, C.H.; Stevens, F.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Matrix Effects on Radiolytic Gas Generation in Plutonium Residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transportation of plutonium bearing materials requires a shipping package that has been rigorously tested to withstand normal and accident conditions. Plutonium bearing materials can contribute to package internal pressure by producing heat and gases from chemical and radiochemical reactions. Of particular concern is the production of hydrogen gas from the radiolysis of moisture, which can result in flammable gas mixtures within the shipping package. Estimating the gas generation rates for plutonium residues is complicated by the large variability of material composition and process origin. In February 1999, the Savannah River Technology Center established a gas generation test program to support transportation of plutonium residue materials. The initial efforts of this program have focused on evaluation of residues identified as Sand, Slag, and Crucible (SS and C) generated as a byproduct of plutonium metal production.

Livingston, R.

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

431

ADVANCES IN HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for conversion to the new resin. This paper will describe the results of the testing, performance in the facilities, continued optimization in the pump and treat facilities, and the estimated savings and non-tangible benefits of the conversion.

NESHEM DO; RIDDELLE J

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

Review: Balancing Limiting Factors and Economic Drivers to Achieve Sustainable Midwestern US Agricultural Residue Feedstock Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced biofuels will be developed using cellulosic feedstock rather than grain or oilseed crops that can also be used for food and feed. To be sustainable, these new agronomic production systems must be economically viable without degrading soil resources. This review examines six agronomic factors that collectively define many of the limits and opportunities for harvesting crop residue for biofuel feedstock. These six “limiting factors” are discussed in relationship to economic drivers associated with harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover as a potential cellulosic feedstock. The limiting factors include soil organic carbon, wind and water erosion, plant nutrient balance, soil water and temperature dynamics, soil compaction, and off-site environmental impacts. Initial evaluations using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2.0 (RUSLE2) show that a single factor analysis based on simply meeting tolerable soil loss might indicate stover could be harvested sustainably, but the same analysis based on maintaining soil organic carbon shows the practice to be non-sustainable. Modifying agricultural management to include either annual or perennial cover crops is shown to meet both soil erosion and soil carbon requirements. The importance of achieving high yields and planning in a holistic manner at the landscape scale are also shown to be crucial for balancing limitations and drivers associated with renewable bioenergy production.

Wally W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess; Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth; Jane M. F. Johnson; John M. Baker; Hero T. Gollany; Jeff M. Novak; Diane E. Stott; Gary E. Varvel

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Food Applications List | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Applications List Food Applications List Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture Apps & Maps This page highlights apps and websites for Food, Agriculture, and Rural community. Showing 1 - 25 of 48 results. Resources sort ascending Type Last Updated On Web Soil Survey Web Soil Survey (WSS) provides soil data and information produced by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. It is operated by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and provides access to the largest natural resource information system in the world. Agriculture 04/28/2013 VegScape This U.S. vegetative crop condition tool provides satellite-based U.S. crop condition vegetation assessment and monitoring web service; provides data exploration and visualization tools; delivers public dissemination of NASS geospatial vegetation condition; and decision support tools providing open quantitative access, interactive visualization, web based data dissemination, and geospatial queries. Agriculture 05/17/2013

434

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL’s greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A.

435

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Magnetic Process For Removing Heavy Metals From Water Employing Magnetites A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and

436

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL’s greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A.

437

NETL: News Release - Innovative Mercury Removal Technique Shows Early  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 5, 2003 August 5, 2003 Innovative Mercury Removal Technique Shows Early Promise Photochemical Process Developed in Federal Lab Removes Mercury from Flue Gas - NETL scientist Evan Granite prepares a lab test of the UV mercury removal process. - NETL scientist Evan Granite prepares for a lab test of the UV mercury removal process. MORGANTOWN, WV - A promising technology to remove mercury from coal-fired power plants -- dubbed the "GP-254 Process" -- has been developed and is currently being tested at the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Newly patented, the GP-254 Process enhances mercury removal using ultraviolet light to induce various components of power plant stack gas to react with the mercury, and changes the

438

Regeneratively cooled coal combustor/gasifier with integral dry ash removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal combustor/gasifier is disclosed which produces a low or medium combustion gas for further combustion in modified oil or gas fired furnaces or boilers. Two concentric shells define a combustion volume within the inner shell and a plenum between them through which combustion air flows to provide regenerative cooling of the inner shell for dry ash operation. A fuel flow and a combustion air flow having opposed swirls are mixed and burned in a mixing-combustion portion of the combustion volume and the ash laden combustion products flow with a residual swirl into an ash separation region. The ash is cooled below the fusion temperature and is moved to the wall by centrifugal force where it is entrained in the cool wall boundary layer. The boundary layer is stabilized against ash re-entrainment as it is moved to an ash removal annulus by a flow of air from the plenum through slots in the inner shell, and by suction on an ash removal skimmer slot.

Beaufrere, Albert H. (Huntington, NY)

1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

439

A Look at Food Service Buildings - Index Page  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Service Food Service Home: A Look at CBECS Building Activities How large are they? How many employees are there? Where are they located? How old are they? Who owns and occupies them? How do they use energy and how much does it cost? How do they use electricity? How do they use natural gas? What types of equipment do they use? How do they measure up on conservation efforts? Summary Comparison Table (All Activities) FOOD SERVICE BUILDINGS There were an estimated 285,000 food service buildings in the U.S. in 1995. Number of Buildings In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), food service buildings are those used for the preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption; they include buildings such as fast food establishments, full service restaurants, caterers, cafeterias, diners, and bars.

440

Insulating shade assembly with removable cover  

SciTech Connect

An insulating window shade assembly is described which consists of: bracket means adapted to be mounted on the frame of a window; a first roller carrying an insulating shade and being disposed within the bracket means on the inside of the window, the shade being adapted to be drawn from the roller to cover the inside of the window and to be wound upon the roller to expose the window, a second roller carrying a removable cover fabric on the inside of the shade and being supported by the bracket means, the second roller being spaced from and disposed independently of the first roller, means disposed adjacent only the bottom edge of the insulating shade for connecting only the bottom edge of the cover fabric to the bottom only of the insulating shade so that the insulating shade and cover fabric may be drawn together over the inside of the window; guide means disposed adjacent the second roller and between the second roller and the insulating shade, the cover fabric passing over the guide means, for causing the cover fabric to hang closely adjacent the front of the insulating shade when the insulating shade is drawn over the window and when the insulating shade and cover fabric are connected together by the connecting means, and means for continually tensioning the cover fabric when the insulating shade is drawn and when the cover fabric is connected thereto so that the cover fabric lies smoothly over the shade.

Hausmann, S.; McLane, A. Jr.

1986-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Metagenomic analysis of phosphorus removing sludgecommunities  

SciTech Connect

Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) is not wellunderstood at the metabolic level despite being one of the best-studiedmicrobially-mediated industrial processes due to its ecological andeconomic relevance. Here we present a metagenomic analysis of twolab-scale EBPR sludges dominated by the uncultured bacterium, "CandidatusAccumulibacter phosphatis." This analysis resolves several controversiesin EBPR metabolic models and provides hypotheses explaining the dominanceof A. phosphatis in this habitat, its lifestyle outside EBPR and probablecultivation requirements. Comparison of the same species from differentEBPR sludges highlights recent evolutionary dynamics in the A. phosphatisgenome that could be linked to mechanisms for environmental adaptation.In spite of an apparent lack of phylogenetic overlap in the flankingcommunities of the two sludges studied, common functional themes werefound, at least one of them complementary to the inferred metabolism ofthe dominant organism. The present study provides a much-needed blueprintfor a systems-level understanding of EBPR and illustrates thatmetagenomics enables detailed, often novel, insights into evenwell-studied biological systems.

Garcia Martin, Hector; Ivanova, Natalia; Kunin, Victor; Warnecke,Falk; Barry, Kerrie; McHardy, Alice C.; Yeates, Christine; He, Shaomei; Salamov, Asaf; Szeto, Ernest; Dalin, Eileen; Putnam, Nik; Shapiro, HarrisJ.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Blackall, Linda Louise; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

443

Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

HIGH SO2 REMOVAL EFFICIENCY TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of performance tests at six full-scale wet lime- and limestone-reagent flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The objective of these tests was to evaluate the effectiveness of low capital cost sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal upgrades for existing FGD systems as an option for complying with the provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The upgrade options tested at the limestone-reagent systems included the use of organic acid additives (dibasic acid (DBA) and/or sodium formate) as well as increased reagent ratio (higher excess limestone levels in the recirculating slurry solids) and absorber liquid-to-gas ratio. One system also tested operating at higher flue gas velocities to allow the existing FGD system to treat flue gas from an adjacent, unscrubbed unit. Upgrade options for the one lime-based system tested included increased absorber venturi pressure drop and increased sulfite concentration in the recirculating slurry liquor.

Gary M. Blythe; James L. Phillips

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past three years, we followed the work plan as we suggested in the proposal and made every efforts to fulfill the project objectives. Based on our large amount of creative and productive work, including both of experimental and theoretic aspects, we received important technical breakthrough on naphthenic acid removal process and obtained deep insight on catalytic decarboxylation chemistry. In detail, we established an integrated methodology to serve for all of the experimental and theoretical work. Our experimental investigation results in discovery of four type effective catalysts to the reaction of decarboxylation of model carboxylic acid compounds. The adsorption experiment revealed the effectiveness of several solid materials to naphthenic acid adsorption and acidity reduction of crude oil, which can be either natural minerals or synthesized materials. The test with crude oil also received promising results, which can be potentially developed into a practical process for oil industry. The theoretical work predicted several possible catalytic decarboxylation mechanisms that would govern the decarboxylation pathways depending on the type of catalysts being used. The calculation for reaction activation energy was in good agreement with our experimental measurements.

Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang; Yongchun Tang; William A. Goddard

2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

446

Predicting Current Serviceability And Residual Service Life Of Plywood Roof Sheathing Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents the findings and implications of a 10-year research program, carried out at the USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, to develop kinetics-based service-life models for untreated and fire-retardant- (FR) treated plywood roof sheathing exposed to elevated in-service temperatures. This program was initiated because some FR-treated sheathing products were experiencing significant thermal degrade and needed to be replaced. This 10-year research program systematically identified the cause of the degradation and has resulted in new acceptance and performance standards and revisions to U.S. building codes. The strength loss was cumulatively related to FR chemistry, thermal exposure during pretreatment, treatment, and post-treatment processing, and in-service exposure. Quantitatively, a kinetics-based approach could be used to predict strength loss of plywood based on its time-- temperature exposure history. The research program then developed models to assess current condition, predict future hazard based on past service life, and predict residual serviceability of untreated and FR-treated plywood used as structural roof sheathing. Findings for each of these subjects are briefly described in this report. Results of research programs like this one can be used to extend the service life of wood by providing engineers with an estimate of residual serviceability and thereby avoiding premature removal. Many of the approaches in these kinetics-based servicelife models for plywood roof sheathing are directly applicable to the development of predictive durability models for wood and wood composite roof and wall sheathing that has been exposed to moisture and has eventually decayed. When those models are developed, they will help building code officials, ...

Kinetics-Based Models Je; Je Win; Y Pk Lebow; Jf Murphy; Usda Forest; Service Madison; Wisconsin Usa

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

448

Thiacrown polymers for removal of mercury from waste streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thiacrown polymers immobilized to a polystyrene-divinylbenzene matrix react with Hg.sup.2+ under a variety of conditions to efficiently and selectively remove Hg.sup.2+ ions from acidic aqueous solutions, even in the presence of a variety of other metal ions. The mercury can be recovered and the polymer regenerated. This mercury removal method has utility in the treatment of industrial wastewater, where a selective and cost-effective removal process is required.

Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA); Fox, Glenn A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Heat recirculating cooler for fluid stream pollutant removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process by which heat is removed from a reactant fluid to reach the operating temperature of a known pollutant removal method and said heat is recirculated to raise the temperature of the product fluid. The process can be utilized whenever an intermediate step reaction requires a lower reaction temperature than the prior and next steps. The benefits of a heat-recirculating cooler include the ability to use known pollutant removal methods and increased thermal efficiency of the system.

Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Berry, David A. (Morgantown, WV)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

450

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

451

Application of Feed and Bleed Operations to Remove High Level ...  

Cleaning Method Phase Date. 5 Process Identification • After Mechanical Sludge Removal and Chemical Cleaning: ... Block Diagram Filtrate Solids Separation Solids Slurry

452

Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas ...  

Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas ... required for sequestration, an area of research identified as a high priority

453

Removal of Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam - Time Lapse Video...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(MOST) and the Russian Federation successfully removed 11 kilograms of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute. This is the eleventh country...

454

Heading Error Removal System for Tracking Devices - Energy ...  

Systems are able to reduce or remove slowly-varying drift errors, such as heading errors, rate of rotation errors, and direction of travel errors, to correct the ...

455

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

456

NETL: News Release - NETL Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power and Cost Savings DOE Laboratory Signs License Agreement Incorporating Sorbents in HVAC Add-on Technology Washington, DC - Carbon dioxide removal sorbents developed by the...

457

A New Method to Evaluate Hydrogen Sulfide Removal from Biogas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen sulfide in biogas fuel increases the speed at which the system utilizing the biogas corrodes. This corrosion may be prevented by separating and removing… (more)

Martin, Jerry H II

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Impurity Removal from Petroleum Coke - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Impurity Removal from Petroleum Coke. Author(s), Alexandre Gagnon, Hans Darmstadt, Nigel Backhouse, Esme Ryan, Laurence Dyer, David ...

459

Comparative Analysis of Alternative Means for Removing Noncondensable...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study to compare six methods of removing noncondensable gases from direct-use geo-thermal steam power plants. This report defines the study methodologies and compares the...

460

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; ... Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures United States Patent ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Study of Alternative Approaches for Transite Panel Removal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) assembled an experienced team from both sites to evaluate both the manual and mechanical methods of transite panel removal.

462

Method of removal of sulfur from coal and petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the removal of sulfur from sulfur-bearing materials such as coal and petroleum products using organophosphine and organophosphite compounds is provided.

Verkade, John G. (Ames, IA); Mohan, Thyagarajan (Ames, IA); Angelici, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Using Microwave Radiation for Removing Heavy Metal Ions and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Using Microwave Radiation for Removing Heavy Metal Ions and Producing Biofuels. Author(s), Aharon Gedanken. On-Site Speaker (Planned ) ...

464

Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

465

Hydrogen Removal From Heating Oil of a Parabolic Trough ...  

A Method to Selectively Remove & Measure Hydrogen Gas from a Fluid Volume Parabolic trough power plants use concentrated solar thermal energy to ...

466

Selective Removal of Thiophene from Liquid Fuels over Nickel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Selective Removal of Thiophene from Liquid Fuels over Nickel -Based Nanocrystalline Zinc Oxide. Author(s), Mohammad Rafiqul Islam, Jewel ...

467

REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF DEPOSITS FROM COAL GASIFICATION ...  

A method is provided for on-line removal and recovery of deposits from fossil fuel gasification systems to improve plant performance and recover a valuable metalloid.

468

Use, Maintenance, Removal, Inspections, and Safety of Dams (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes operating plans for dams with movable structures, as well as procedures for raising or lowering of impoundment levels, dam removal, and dam safety inspections.

469

Method for Removal of Mercury from Various Gas Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 6,576,092 entitled "Method for Removal of Mercury from Various Gas Streams."...

470

Nitrogen removal from natural gas using two types of membranes ...  

A process for treating natural gas or other methane-rich gas to remove excess nitrogen. The invention relies on two-stage membrane separation, using ...

471

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

473

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants from syngas typically rely on chemical or physical absorption processes operating at low temperatures. When cooled...

474

Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administrat...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mexico HEU Removal: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

476

Plutonium Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removal from Sweden: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

477

US, International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International Partners Remove Last Remaining HEU from Vietnam, Set Nuclear Security Milestone | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile...

478

Methylmercury in fish: a review of residue levels, fish consumption and regulatory action in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The dangers associated with the consumption of large amounts of methylmercury in fish are well recognized, and there is some evidence to suggest that methylmercury may be the cause of subtle neurological impairments when ingested at even low to moderate levels, particularly the prenatal and early childhood periods. This concern has prompted a continuing assessment of the risk of methylmercury toxicity among fish consumers in the US as well as other countries. The toxicokinetics of methylmercury in humans are reviewed and used to estimate body burdens associated with toxic effects. To determine seafood consumption patterns among the continental US population the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has analyzed data from a diary study commissioned by the Tuna Research Foundation. Mercury residue levels in domestic fish sampled by the FDA were used to determine the level of exposure to methylmercury. Until evidence is presented that substantially lowers the known body burden of methylmercury which causes toxicity, calculations indicate that the current 1.0 ppm regulatory level provides adequate protection for the average fish consumer, for young children, and for a significant number of consumers exceeding the acceptable daily intake. However, additional studies are being carried out in a continuing process to ensure that safe levels of prenatal exposure to mercury residues in fish are maintained.

Tollefson, L.; Cordle, F.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Award Review Analysis of Food Allergen Structures and Development of Foods for Allergic Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food allergy is one of the important health problems, and countermeasures are socially required. We have been undertaking studies on wheat allergens and their epitopes, and have developed a method for producing hypoallergenic wheat flour by enzymatic modification. The hypoallergenic products are now provided to patients. More noteworthy, by taking hypoallergenic cupcakes over a long period, more than half of patients are hyposensitized and become able to eat normal wheat products. This suggests that the hypoallergenic wheat flour can act as anti-allergenic via allergen-specific immunotolerance. This series of studies was followed by expansive research on food allergy: analysis of epitopes of bovine serum albumin (the major beef allergen), isolation and identification of inhibitory peptides for allergen absorption at the intestine, evaluation of hesperetin as an inhibitor of degranulation of mast cells, and the development of PCR detection methods for verifying allergen labeling and for identifying hidden allergic ingredients in processed foods. Key words: food allergy; epitope; hypoallergenic wheat flour; allergen permeation; Caco-2 The worldwide prevalence of allergic diseases such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis has increased during the last two decades, 1) and it is assumed that in Japan more than one-third of the population is now suffering from at least one of these diseases. Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Hen’s egg, 2) cow’s milk, 3) wheat 4) and peanuts 5) are generally known allergens for food-allergic patients. Allergens are proteins characterized by their ability to induce a pathogenic IgE response in susceptible individuals, giving rise to asthma, atopic dermatitis, and rhinitis. Although the reasons that certain individuals suffer particular hypersensitivities are unclear, there is evidence that both genetic and environmental factors influence susceptibility. 6)

Soichi Tanabe

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

NDE Studies on CRDMs Removed From Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are focused on assessing the effectiveness of NDE inspections of control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of ultrasonic testing (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. In describing two CRDM assemblies removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE measurements, this paper will address the following questions: 1) What did each technique detect?, 2) What did each technique miss?, 3) How accurately did each technique characterize the detected flaws? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. One contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data; the other contained evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, but this was unconfirmed. The selected NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory based NDE methods will be employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper will also describe the NDE methods used and discus the NDE results. Future work will involve using the results from these NDE studies to guide the development of a destructive characterization plan to reveal the crack morphology, to be compared with NDE responses.

Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Schuster, George J.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Abrefah, John

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remove food residue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Residual Fuel Oil Prices, Average - Sales to End Users  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product/Sales Type: Residual Fuel, Average - Sales to End Users Residual Fuel, Average - Sales for Resale Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales for Resale Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales for Resale Period: Monthly Annual Product/Sales Type: Residual Fuel, Average - Sales to End Users Residual Fuel, Average - Sales for Resale Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales for Resale Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales for Resale Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product/Sales Type Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. - - - - - - 1983-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) - - - - - - 1983-2013 New England (PADD 1A) - - - - - - 1983-2013 Connecticut - - - - - - 1983-2013 Maine - - - - - - 1983-2013 Massachusetts - - - - - - 1983-2013

482

Modeling EU electricity market competition using the residual supply index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An econometric approach to related hourly Residual Supply Index to price-cost margins in the major EU electricity generation markets suggests that market structure, as measured by the RSI, is a significant explanatory factor for markups, even when scarcity and other explanatory variables are included. (author)

Swinand, Gregory; Scully, Derek; Ffoulkes, Stuart; Kessler, Brian

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

Measuring residual stress in glasses and ceramics using instrumented indentation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumented indentation has yielded mixed results when used to measure surface residual stresses in metal films. Relative to metals, many glasses and ceramics have a low modulus-to-yield strength (E/sy) ratio. The advantage of this characteristic for measuring residual stress using instrumented indentation is demonstrated by a series of comparative spherical and conical tip finite element simulations. Two cases are considered: (i) a material with E/s{sub y} = 24-similar to glass and (ii) a material with E/s{sub y} = 120-similar to metal films. In both cases, compressive residual stress shifts the simulated load-displacement response toward increasing hardness, irrespective of tip geometry. This shift is shown to be entirely due to pile up for the ''metal'' case, but primarily due to the direct influence of the residual stress for the ''glass'' case. Hardness changes and load-displacement curve shifts are explained by using the spherical cavity model. Supporting experimental results on stressed glasses are provided.

Tandon, Rajan; Buchheit, Thomas E.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Crop residue conversion to biogas by dry fermentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple 'dry fermentation' process has been developed that may enable economical conversion of drier crop residues to biogas. Results from two years of process definition and scale-up to a 110 m/sup 3/ prototype show that biogas production rates exceeding those necessary to make the dry fermentor competitive have been achieved. 13 refs.

Jewell, W.J.; Dell'Orto, S.; Fanfoni, K.J.; Fast, S.J.; Jackson, D.A.; Kabrick, R.M.; Gottung, E.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Adsorption process producing chronologically constant amount of a residual gas  

SciTech Connect

An adsorption process is disclosed for purifying or fractionating a gaseous feed mixture comprises an adsorption phase, at least one expansion phase, a purging phase and at least one pressure buildup phase. The expansion phase(S) and the purging phase produce residual process gas fractions. The sum total of volume, and/or mass streams of the residual process gas fractions comprises a residual gas stream which is maintained chronologically substantially constant by controlling the volume and/or gas streams of the gas entering the purging phase and maintaining the gas leaving the expansion phase(S) at a substantially constant value, dependent on the desired mass and/or volume quantity of the residual gas stream. The length of the purging phase and of the expansion phase(S) is adjusted accordingly so that the relationship of the length of time of the purging phase to the length of time of the expansion phase(S) is substantially the same as the relationship of the volume and/or mass of the gas fractions obtained during the purging to those obtained during the expansion phase(S), respectively. The control of the purging and of the expansion phase(S) can also be varied in response to a flow rate of a feed gas entering the process.

Benkmann, C.

1982-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

486

European experience in transport/storage cask for vitrified residues  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Because of the evolution of burnup of spent fuel to be reprocessed, the high activity vitrified residues would not be transported in the existing cask designs. Therefore, TN International has decided in the late nineties to develop a brand new design of casks with optimized capacity able to store and transport the most active and hottest canisters: the TN{sup TM}81 casks currently in use in Switzerland and the TN{sup TM}85 cask which shall permit in the near future in Germany the storage and the transport of the most active vitrified residues defining a thermal power of 56 kW (kilowatts). The challenges for the TN{sup TM}81 and TN{sup TM}85 cask designs were that the geometry entry data were very restrictive and were combined with a fairly wide range set by the AREVA NC Specification relative to vitrified residue canister. The TN{sup TM}81 and the TN{sup TM}85 casks have been designed to fully anticipate shipment constraints of the present vitrified residue production. It also used the feedback of current shipments and the operational constraints and experience of receiving and shipping facilities. The casks had to fit as much as possible in the existing procedures for the already existing flasks such as the TN{sup TM}28 cask and TS 28 V cask, all along the logistics chain of loading, unloading, transport and maintenance. (authors)

Otton, Camille; Sicard, Damien [AREVA - TN International (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Design of thermal imprinting system with uniform residual thickness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new thermal imprinting system for the printed circuit boards (PCBs) with both large areas and fine conducting lines was developed adopting hot airs with a high pressure. Several small nickel stamps were used to cover the large area, and the stamps ... Keywords: Patterned circuit boards, Thermal imprinting system, Uniformity of residual thickness

Won-Ho Shin

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

The Effect of Fast Food Restaurants on Obesity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We investigate the health consequences of changes in the supply of fast food using the exact geographical location of fast food restaurants. Specifically, we ask how the supply of fast food affects the obesity rates of 3 million school children and the weight gain of over 1 million pregnant women. We find that among 9 th grade children, a fast food restaurant within a tenth of a mile of a school is associated with at least a 5.2 percent increase in obesity rates. There is no discernable effect at.25 miles and at.5 miles. Among pregnant women, models with mother fixed effects indicate that a fast food restaurant within a half mile of her residence results in a 2.5 percent increase in the probability of gaining over 20 kilos. The effect is larger, but less precisely estimated at.1 miles. In contrast, the presence of non-fast food restaurants is uncorrelated with obesity and weight gain. Moreover, proximity to future fast food restaurants is uncorrelated with current obesity and weight gain, conditional on current proximity to fast food. The implied effects of fast-food on caloric intake are at least one order of magnitude smaller for mothers, which suggests that they are less constrained by travel costs than school children. Our results imply that policies restricting access to fast food near schools could

Janet Currie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 31513160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 3151­3160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters P. Zhao, J.A. Siegel�, R May 2006; accepted 14 June 2006 Abstract Residential and commercial HVAC filters that have been loaded of the relative importance of HVAC filters as a removal mechanism for ozone in residential and commercial

Siegel, Jeffrey

490