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1

INVESTIGATION OF MIXED METAL SORBENT/CATALYSTS FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS REMOVAL OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN OXIDES  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded research of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4} air mixtures.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

2

INVESTIGATION OF MIXED METAL SORBENT/CATALYSTS FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS REMOVAL OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN OXIDES  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4}-air mixtures.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

3

Investigation of mixed metal sorbent/catalysts for the simultaneous removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4}-air mixtures.

Akyurtlu, A.; Akyurtlu, J.F.

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Removing Barriers to Interdisciplinary Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant amount of high-impact contemporary scientific research occurs where biology, computer science, engineering and chemistry converge. Although programmes have been put in place to support such work, the complex dynamics of interdisciplinarity are still poorly understood. In this paper we interrogate the nature of interdisciplinary research and how we might measure its "success", identify potential barriers to its implementation, and suggest possible mechanisms for removing these impediments.

Naomi Jacobs; Martyn Amos

2010-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

5

Removal of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) by nanosized V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2} catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Novel reactive nanosized V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/TiO{sub 2} catalysts (aerogel, xerogel, and impregnated catalysts) for the removal of Hg{sup 0} and their synthesis methods have been introduced in this research. Aerogel catalyst has the highest surface area among the catalysts synthesized in this research and contained reactive monovanadates on its surfaces resulting in higher reactivity for the Hg{sup 0} removal than impregnated and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. XPS analyses on the surfaces of nanosized catalysts after the removal of Hg{sup 0} suggest that adsorbed Hg{sup 0} oxidatively transformed to Hg{sup O} by surface vanadates (mono- and poly vanadates), consistent with the Mars-Maessen mechanism. Early column breakthrough has been observed at temperatures above 300{sup o}C due mainly to the desorption of Hg{sup 0} from the catalyst surfaces. The decrease in Hg{sup 0} concentration and increase in catalyst content in a column reactor have increased the removal of Hg{sup 0}, indicating that the removal is a heterogeneous surface-limited reaction. At 400{sup o}C, the catalysts under air flow have shown a higher Hg{sup 0} removal because gas-phase oxygen from the flow could provide an oxygen-rich environment for producing more oxidized vanadate species on their surfaces. No significant difference in the Hg{sup 0} removal between different gas types (nitrogen and air) has been observed at 100{sup o}C. 27 refs., 5 figs.

Lee, W.; Bae, G.N. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Republic of Korea)

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Sulphur Removal Characteristics from a Commercial NOx Storage/Reduction Catalyst.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ability to effectively remove sulphur from sulphur-poisoned NOx storage/reduction (NSR) catalysts, while minimizing associated fuel penalties and thermal degradation, is important for commercial application… (more)

Kisinger, Darren

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

NREL Patents a Catalyst that Removes Syngas Tar, Boosting the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schroeder, NREL 20393 Quick Facts NREL patented a catalyst that can reform tar in a gasification reactor, an important shortcut in making biomass suitable as a drop-in fuel....

8

NREL: Biomass Research - Chemical and Catalyst Science Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical and Catalyst Science Projects Chemical and Catalyst Science Projects A photo of a large white tank the size of a water heater. Several metal fittings stick out of the sides of the tank. Thin tubes are attached to some of the fittings and lead to flow meters and other metal pipes. Researchers use experimental data from this four-inch fluidized bed reactor to develop and validate gasification process models. NREL uses chemical analysis to study biomass-derived products online during the conversion process. Catalysts are used in the thermochemical conversion process to convert tars (a byproduct of gasification) to syngas and to convert syngas to liquid transportation fuels. Among the chemical and catalyst science projects at NREL are: Catalyst Fundamentals NREL is working to develop and understand the performance of catalyst and

9

Effects of catalysts and additives on fluorocarbon removal with surface discharge plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The decomposition of fluorocarbons (1%) in Ar was investigated using a surface discharge-type plasma reactor. To enhance the effectiveness of plasma chemical processing, we investigated the effects of catalysts and additives. The removal rate increased when the plasma reactor was packed with TiO2 pellets as a catalyst. The catalytic effect seems to be derived from the direct activation of the TiO2 surface by the plasma discharge, because significant UV emission and temperature increase were not observed in the plasma reactor. The removal rate was also enhanced when water vapor, oxygen, or hydrogen was added to the reactant. In addition, the presence of TiO2 or the additional gases or both depressed byproduct formation. Analysis of the reaction products suggested that the catalysts and additives enhanced the process by preventing the recombination of decomposed fragments.

Atsushi Ogata; Hyun-Ha Kim; Shigeru Futamura; Satoshi Kushiyama; Koichi Mizuno

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

NREL: Biomass Research - Chemical and Catalyst Science Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical and Catalyst Science Capabilities Chemical and Catalyst Science Capabilities A photo of a man in a white lab coat and dark goggles looking at a microscope. A bright green light shines down from the microscope lens and illuminates a round glass tray containing small white beads. The Laser Raman Spectrometer is used to obtain phase and structural identification information for catalysts used in the thermochemical conversion process. NREL researchers use chemical and catalyst science to assess and improve biochemical and thermochemical conversion throughout the processes, from analyzing feedstocks to improving the yield of desired end products. Catalyst Science Syngas produced during gasification contains tars that are contaminants, but these tars can be reformed to more syngas using tar-reforming

11

UA Researchers design a catalyst that neutralizes the gases responsible for climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UA Researchers design a catalyst that neutralizes the gases responsible for climate change Toxic Researchers at the University of Alicante have developed and patented a novel catalyst capable of decomposing gas streams. "However, nitrous oxide can be decomposed at lower temperatures using a suitable catalyst

Escolano, Francisco

12

KL2/Catalyst Medical Research Investigator Training (CMeRIT) Request for Applications (RFA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KL2/Catalyst Medical Research Investigator Training (CMeRIT) Request for Applications (RFA) Due Decisions Announced: Late September, 2014 Funding Start Date: October 1, 2014 II. Funding The KL2/Catalyst Harvard Catalyst will be tuition-free. Each awardee will also receive a small research support funding

Church, George M.

13

Investigation of mixed metal sorbent/catalysts for the simultaneous removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides. Semiannual report, Apr 1, 1998--Oct 31, 1998  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823--900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4} air mixtures. The sorbents consisting of cerium oxide and copper oxide impregnated on alumina have been prepared and characterized. Their sulfation performance has been investigated in a TGA setup, studying mainly the effects of temperature and sorbent composition. The results of the sulfation experiments have been evaluated and presented in this report. A study to model the sulfation selectivity of the two constituents of the sorbents is also underway.

Dr. Ates Akyurtlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Harvard Catalyst Pathway for Independence in Clinical and Translational Research In order to facilitate the development of outstanding clinical and translational investigators,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harvard Catalyst Pathway for Independence in Clinical and Translational Research In order to facilitate the development of outstanding clinical and translational investigators, Harvard Catalyst

Church, George M.

15

Phenol removal by a novel non-photo-dependent semiconductor catalyst in a pilot-scaled study: effects of initial phenol concentration, light, and catalyst loading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel non-photo-dependent semiconductor catalyst (CT) was employed to degrade phenol in the present pilot-scaled study. Effect of operational parameters such as phenol initial concentration, light area, and catalyst loading on phenol degradation, was ...

Xiao Chen, Yan Liang, Xuefei Zhou, Yanling Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Serving as a catalyst to promotecollaborativeinterdisciplinary environmental and ecological research through graduate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research through graduate education NEED IMPACT STATEMENT INITIATIVE The ESE IGP was launched in fall 2005 environmental research among faculty. IMPACT L10 August 2013 http://www.purdue.edu/discoverypark The EcologicalServing as a catalyst to promotecollaborativeinterdisciplinary environmental and ecological

Ginzel, Matthew

17

Advanced Cathode Catalysts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

new catalysts, this research program will also target other issues crucial to PEMFC cathode electrocatalysis: novel electrode structures; catalyst durability meeting the...

18

Controlling proton source speeds catalyst | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controlling proton source speeds catalyst Controlling proton source speeds catalyst Nickel-based catalyst three times faster with adjustments to key acid Research showing that...

19

ACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of their high rates of chemical consumption. Additionally, chemical scrubbers are ineffective for the removalACCEPTED BY WATER ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH _______ ODOR AND VOC REMOVAL FROM WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT of biofilters for sequential removal of H2S and VOCs from wastewater treatment plant waste air. The biofilter

20

Insoluble Phase-Transfer Catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An important problem facing the designer of industrial phase-transfer catalysis (PTC) processes using soluble PTC catalysts concerns the removal of the catalyst from the reaction mixture, and its economic recy...

Charles M. Starks; Charles L. Liotta; Marc E. Halpern

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Effect of V2O5 additive on simultaneous SO2 and NO removal from flue gas over a monolithic cordierite-based CuO/Al2O3 catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A monolithic cordierite-based CuO/Al2O3 catalyst showed industrial potential for simultaneous SO2 and NO removal from flue gases at 350–400 °C. However, it is still a challenge to prevent CuO from aggregation and to keep it in an active state during the removal and regeneration processes. This work shows that addition of V2O5 to the catalyst can significantly reduce CuO particle size and improve SO2 removal activity, and maintain a high selective catalytic reduction (SCR) activity for NO removal. Furthermore, V2O5 additive prevents aggregation of SiO2 in the cordierite with the coated Al2O3, and inhibits over reduction of the SO2 removal product, CuSO4, during the regeneration by NH3, which are important to the catalyst's stability. V2O5 additive changes the regeneration product from Cu3N to CuO and thus may avoid the temperature rise and \\{NOx\\} release in the subsequent removal process.

Qingya Liu; Zhenyu Liu; Weize Wu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Catalyst systems and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of carbon monoxide (CO) removal comprises providing an oxidation catalyst comprising cobalt supported on an inorganic oxide. The method further comprises feeding a gaseous stream comprising CO, and oxygen (O.sub.2) to the catalyst system, and removing CO from the gaseous stream by oxidizing the CO to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) in the presence of the oxidation catalyst at a temperature between about 20 to about 200.degree. C.

Ozkan, Umit S. (Worthington, OH); Holmgreen, Erik M. (Columbus, OH); Yung, Matthew M. (Columbus, OH)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

23

Theoretical Research Program on Bio-inspired Inorganic Hydrogen Generating Catalysts and Electrodes  

SciTech Connect

In this project, we have successfully designed and characterized a promising biomimetic catalyst/electrode complex, [FeFe]P/FeS2 for producing hydrogen from water. It is comprised of earth-abundant materials and, with a diffusion-limited rate in acidified water, is efficient as well as oxygen tolerant. The theoretical techniques we have developed and the experience we have gained are broadly applicable for the design and analysis of biomimetic electrochemically active catalysts.

Selloni, Annabella; Car, Roberto; Cohen, Morrel H.

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

24

Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption process, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gases from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or passivating the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

Gangwal, S.; Jothimurugesan, K.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

25

Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption processes, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gasses from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or "passivating" the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

Gangwal, Santosh (Cary, NC); Jothimurugesan, Kandaswamy (Hampton, VA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Low Temperature Catalyst for Fuel Injection System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A low temperature oxidation catalyst applied to a DOC and DPF combined with a unique fuel injection system remove soot from a diesel exhaust system.

27

NETL: News Release - DOE Seeks Cost-Shared Research Proposals to Remove  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 20, 2000 March 20, 2000 DOE Seeks Cost-Shared Research Proposals to Remove Mercury From Coal-Fired Power Plants With the Environmental Protection Agency expected to decide in December whether to regulate mercury emissions from coal-burning boilers, the U.S. Department of Energy has kicked off a new effort to develop more affordable pollution control technologies that can remove mercury from power plant flue gases. The Energy Department, through its National Energy Technology Laboratory, has issued a solicitation offering up to $13 million over three years for industry proposals on cost-cutting mercury-control methods for coal-based power systems. Currently no technology exists that can uniformly control mercury from power plant flue gas emissions. The effectiveness of existing flue gas emission controls in removing mercury can vary considerably from plant to plant, or even from boiler to boiler. With today's technologies, mercury removal can range from essentially no control to as high as 90 percent.

28

Natta catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

\\¦nät-(¦)tä-\\ n. Any of several catalysts used in the stereospecific polymerization of olefins, ... .g., ethylene and propylene, particularly a catalyst made from titanium chloride and aluminum alkyl...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Natta Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

\\?nät-(?)tä-\\ n Any of several catalysts used in the stereospecific polymerization of olefins, ... .g., ethylene and propylene, particularly a catalyst made from titanium chloride and aluminum alkyl...

Jan W. Gooch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Attrition resistant catalysts for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch process  

SciTech Connect

The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. Iron-based (Fe) catalysts are preferred catalysts for F-T because they are relatively inexpensive and possess reasonable activity for F-T synthesis (FTS). Their most advantages trait is their high water-gas shift (WGS) activity compared to their competitor, namely cobalt. This enables Fe F-T catalysts to process low H{sub 2}/CO ratio synthesis gas without an external shift reaction step. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, make the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, an d result in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. The objectives of this research were to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance.

K. Jothimurugesan

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Comprehensive catalyst management  

SciTech Connect

From January 2009, as SCR season expands from five months to year-round to meet new US Clean Air Interstate Rule standards, new catalyst strategies are increasingly important. Power plants will need a comprehensive management strategy that accounts for a wide range of old and new issues to achieve peak performance. An optimum plan is necessary for catalyst replacement or addition. SCR systems should be inspected and evaluated at least once a year. Levels of deactivation agents, most often arsenic and calcium oxide, need to match the particular coals used. Tools such as Cormetech's FIELD Guide are available to quantify the effect on catalyst life under various fuel-firing scenarios. Tests should be conducted to evaluate the NH{sub 3}/NOx distribution over time to maximise catalyst performance. The article gives a case study of catalyst management at the Tennessee Valley Authority Allen plant. Recent changes have created new variables to be considered in a catalyst management process, notably the expansion of the operating temperature range, mercury oxidation and SO{sub 3} emission limits. Cormetech has researched these areas. 5 figs., 2 photos.

Pritchard, S. [Cormetech (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare-earth exchanged Y zeolite in a silica-alumina matrix. X-ray fluorescence analyses showed that the rare earths used in preparing the catalysts were a mixture of lanthanum and cerium. Antimony found in the spent catalyst was added during operation of the FCC unit as a way to suppress the adverse effects of deposited nickel. The fresh HDS samples consisted of sulfided nickel and molybdenum on an alumina support. The spent catalyst showed nearly 10% vanadium on the catalyst and a modest increase in nickel and sulfur on the catalyst as a result of operations. Hydrocracking catalysts were not available for this study.

CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

Cheap catalyst gets expensive accessory | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

catalyst and its ability to remove oxygen from m-cresol, which is a model compound for lignin, an integral part of cell walls in plants. The synergy between the palladium and iron...

34

CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data - Pres. 1: Coordination of CLEERS Project; Pres. 2: ORNL Research on LNT Sulfation & Desulfation CLEERS Coordination & Development of...

35

Thief Carbon Catalyst for Oxidation of Mercury in Effluent Stream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Catalyst for Oxidation of Mercury in Effluent Carbon Catalyst for Oxidation of Mercury in Effluent Stream Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov January 2012 Significance * Oxidizes heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury, in gas streams * Uses partially combusted coal ("Thief" carbon) * Yields an inexpensive catalyst * Cheap enough to be a disposable catalyst * Cuts long-term costs * Simultaneously addresses oxidation and adsorption issues Applications * Any process requiring removal of heavy

36

Tethered catalysts for the hydration of carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided that substantially increases the efficiency of CO.sub.2 capture and removal by positioning a catalyst within an optimal distance from the air-liquid interface. The catalyst is positioned within the layer determined to be the highest concentration of carbon dioxide. A hydrophobic tether is attached to the catalyst and the hydrophobic tether modulates the position of the catalyst within the liquid layer containing the highest concentration of carbon dioxide.

Valdez, Carlos A; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Aines, Roger D; Wong, Sergio E; Baker, Sarah E; Lightstone, Felice C; Stolaroff, Joshuah K

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

37

Thief carbon catalyst for oxidation of mercury in effluent stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalyst for the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg), in an effluent stream is presented. The catalyst facilitates removal of mercury through the oxidation of elemental Hg into mercury (II) moieties. The active component of the catalyst is partially combusted coal, or "Thief" carbon, which can be pre-treated with a halogen. An untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-promoting in the presence of an effluent gas streams entrained with a halogen.

Granite, Evan J. (Wexford, PA); Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

38

Materials Needs for Catalysts To Improve our Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Materials Needs for Catalysts To Improve our Environment ... Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research1997 36 (7), 2533-2536 ...

John N. Armor

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

More Economical Sulfur Removal for Fuel Processing Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

enabled TDA to develop and commercialize its direct oxidation process-a simple, catalyst-based system for removing sulfur from natural gas and petroleum-that was convenient and economical enough for smaller fuel processing plants to use. TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) of Wheat Ridge, CO, formed in 1987, is a privately-held R&D company that brings products to market either by forming internal business

40

Method for reactivating catalysts and a method for recycling supercritical fluids used to reactivate the catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thompson, David N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Raymond P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Improved catalyst loading reduces guard reactor fouling  

SciTech Connect

A new catalyst-loading strategy reduced the fouling tendency of the gas oil hydrotreater guard reactors at Syncrude Canada Ltd.'s heavy-crude upgrading facilities. Studies conducted on the guard reactors were designed to determine the thermal stability of the coker gas oil and to understand the properties of the fouling material. Small particles (described as fines) were present in the upper section of the removed catalyst bed. This part of the bed was then replaced in one of three ways. One way was to replace the catalyst with used, nonregenerated catalyst, and cover the catalyst with nonactive support balls, 10 and 13 mm in diameter. The second way was to fill the entire space with nonactive support balls, and the third way was to fill with regenerated oxidic catalyst combined with semiactive support balls (unsulfided).

Sanford, E.C.; Kirchen, R.P. (Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton (CA))

1988-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

42

High-activity fuel cell catalyst layers via block copolymer nanocomposites.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Current polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalyst layers are disordered blends of carbon-supported platinum catalyst in an ionomeric matrix. The objective of this research… (more)

Alabi, Toheeb Bola

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Nano-Structured Nobel Metal Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nobel Metal Catalysts Nobel Metal Catalysts for Hydrocarbon Reforming Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Nano- Structured Nobel Metal Catalysts Based on Hexametallate Architecture for the Reforming of Hydrocarbon Fuels." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Methods for generating synthesis gas from hydrocarbon feedstocks routinely involve the use of a catalyst-a material that speeds up the reaction, but itself is not consumed-to make this process economically feasible. Sulfur, higher hydrocarbons, and olefins present a major technical challenge since these components can deactivate conventional

44

Perovskite-Based Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Perovskite-Based Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells ... The addition of Ru substantially improves the CO tolerance of the catalyst, and there has been a great deal of research on the optimization of the alloy composition and structure. ...

Aidong Lan; Alexander S. Mukasyan

2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Searching for novel catalysts for water oxidation | Center for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center News Research Highlights Center Research News Media about Center Center Video Library Bisfuel Picture Gallery Searching for novel catalysts for water oxidation 30 Oct 2012...

46

Lithium phosphate catalyst, III. New supported catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some new non-stoichiometric Li3PO4 supported on ?-Al2O3, ?-Al2O3, TiO2 and SiO2 are described as catalysts. The catalysts are used in the isomerization of propene oxide. The catalyst supported on SiO2...is more a...

A. M. Delgado; J. V. Sinisterra

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Optimization of catalyst system reaps economic benefits  

SciTech Connect

Champlin Refining and Chemicals Inc. is learning to optimize its catalyst systems for hydrotreating Venezuelan gas oils through a program of research, pilot plant testing, and commercial unit operation. The economic results of this project have been evaluated, and the benefits are most evident in improvements in product yields and qualities. The project has involved six commercial test runs, to date (Runs 10-15), with a seventh run planned. A summary of the different types of catalyst systems used in the test runs, and the catalyst philosophy that developed is given. Runs 10 and 11 used standard CoMo and NiMo catalysts for heavy gas oils hydrotreating. These catalysts had small pore sizes and suffered high deactivation rates because of metals contamination. When it was discovered that metals contamination was a problem, catalyst options were reviewed.

Le Roy, C.F.; Hanshaw, M.J.; Fischer, S.M.; Malik, T.; Kooiman, R.R. (Champlin Refining and Chemicals Inc., Corpus Christi, TX (US))

1991-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

48

Reaction Rates and Catalysts in Ethanol Production (1 Activity)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Students will have the opportunity to investigate alternative catalysts for the degradation of hydrogen peroxide, which will be used as a model system for the breaking down of cellulose into sugar. After identifying other potential catalysts, students will develop their own research question about catalysts and conduct an additional experiment of their own design to investigate their question.

49

Electrochemical catalyst recovery method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: (a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; (b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; (c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and (d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications. 3 figs.

Silva, L.J.; Bray, L.A.

1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS  

SciTech Connect

Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Preliminary evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with ammonia, but indicated low selectivity when methane was used as the reductant. Since the replacement of ammonia by another reductant is commercially very attractive, in this project, four research components will be undertaken. The investigation of the reaction mechanism, the first component, will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations (second component). If this research is successful, the combined SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} removal process based on alumina-supported copper oxide-ceria sorbent/catalysts will become very attractive for commercial applications. The objective of the third component of the project is to develop an alternative SCR process using another inexpensive fuel, residual fuel oil, instead of natural gas. This innovative proposal is based on very scant evidence concerning the good performance of coked catalysts in the selective reduction of NO and if proven to work the process will certainly be commercially viable. The fourth component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long-term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the first year of the project, the catalysts were investigated by the temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) technique. The results from TPR indicated that the interaction with support appears to promote reduction at lower temperatures. Copper oxide in excess of monolayer coverage reduces at temperatures close to the reduction temperature of the unsupported copper oxide. Increased dispersion increases the support effect. Low activity of ceria in NO reduction may be due to its resistance to reduction at low temperatures.

Dr. Ates Akyurtlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Oxygen sorption and thermal regeneration of sorption centers on catalysts of ammonia synthesis in helium and hydrogen flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction of oxygen with catalysts for ammonia synthesis in helium and hydrogen flow has been studied. Various catalysts sorb from 7 to 12 oxygen layers. 2 to 4 layers can be removed by thermal activatio...

A. V. Krylova; V. V. Morozov; S. S. Lachinov…

52

Direct coal liquefaction at HTI using dispersed slurry catalyst  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Direct Coal Liquefaction effort, in which Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI) is a major participant, is an integral part of the effort to meet the US National Energy Strategy goal of relying more on indigenous sources of energy. This is also very applicable to the China situation where there is a need to use the abundant coal, and organic waste resources present in China to produce cost-effective fuels that will meet environmental goals of high efficiency with neutral consequences on air, water and ground status. Located at HTI`s Research and Development Center in Lawrenceville, New Jersey are several pilot scale continuous flow operating units to study, develop and demonstrate direct coal liquefaction and hydrocracking. These units include two two-stage, 50 Kg/day process evaluation units, one 3/4 ton/day process confirmation unit and a 5 ton/day process development unit. Each of these units are adaptable for operation as fluidized (ebullated) beds or fully backmixed slurry catalyst reactor units. These units are completely integrated to provide feed preparation and handling, preheating, reaction, vapor/liquid separation, on-line hydrotreating, product fractionation, bottoms recycling and solid removal. These units have not only been used in the processing of coal, but also in the upgrading of heavy oil, tar sand bitumen, shale oil, waste tires, plastics, lignin and other organic municipal and industrial wastes. HTI has developed an advanced direct liquefaction process, HTI Coal Process, that produces clean transportation fuels and chemicals at a US cost of less than $30/bbl., equivalent crude oil price, at a grass roots facility. This process is based on the use of an HTI iron based catalyst, GelCat, with backmixed reactors, a close-coupled hydrotreater and interstage gas/liquid separation. Coal conversion, distillate yields and product qualities are comparable to that seen with a supported catalyst reactor system. The process is continuous, isothermal and free of solids accumulation with all coal ranks tested. Under the auspices of the US DOE, HTI has developed multi-stage liquefaction processes based on both supported and dispersed catalysts. The supported catalyst configuration involves the use of a three-phase ebullated bed reactor in which the supported catalyst is maintained at a random (fluidization) stage by re-circulating a relatively large quantity of catalyst-gas-free process fluid collected from the top of the reactor.

Lee, L.K.; Comolli, A.G.; Popper, G.; Zhou, P.Z. [Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc., Lawrenceville, NJ (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles  

SciTech Connect

In this reporting period, a study of ultra-fine iron catalyst filtration was initiated to study the behavior of ultra-fine particles during the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids filtration. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The change of particle size during the slurry-phase FTS has monitored by withdrawing catalyst sample at different TOS. The measurement of dimension of the HRTEM images of samples showed a tremendous growth of the particles. Carbon rims of thickness 3-6 nm around the particles were observed. This growth in particle size was not due to carbon deposition on the catalyst. A conceptual design and operating philosophy was developed for an integrated wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor to be used in Phase II of this research program. The system will utilize a primary inertial hydroclone followed by a Pall Accusep cross-flow membrane. Provisions for cleaned permeate back-pulsing will be included to as a flux maintenance measure.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Burtron H. Davis

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Catalyst by Design - Theoretical, Nanostructural, and Experimental...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. p-08narula.pdf More Documents & Publications Catalyst by Design...

55

Removing mercury from coal emissions: options for ash-friendly technologies  

SciTech Connect

The article gives a brief description of techniques to remove mercury emitted from coal-fired power plants and discusses environmental considerations associated with the effect of emission controls on coal fly ash. Techniques covered include use of injected mercury sorbents (activated carbon, metal oxide catalysts, MerCAP{trademark} and MercScreen{trademark}) and fuel cleaning. Technologies currently being researched are mentioned. 8 refs.

Sager, J. [United States Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Method for producing catalysts from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere. 1 fig.

Farcasiu, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kaufman, P.B.; Jagtoyen, M.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

57

Road Blocks Yield Key Information about a Catalyst | The Ames...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Road Blocks Yield Key Information about a Catalyst Researchers systematically blocked key chemical reaction pathways to get unambiguous information about how carbon-nitrogen bonds...

58

Cooperative Catalyst leads to Transformative Results | The Ames...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooperative Catalyst leads to Transformative Results Capitalizing on the concept that everything proceeds faster with a little cooperation, researchers showed how designing...

59

Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SCR is promising non-urea solution PARTNERS U. Houston (lead) Center for Applied Energy Research (U. Kentucky) Ford Motor Company BASF Catalysts LLC Oak Ridge...

60

Catalyst for hydrotreating carbonaceous liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalyst for denitrogenating and desulfurating carbonaceous liquid such as solvent refined coal includes catalytic metal oxides impregnated within a porous base of mostly alumina with relatively large pore diameters, surface area and pore volume. The base material includes pore volumes of 0.7-0.85 ml/g, surface areas of 200-350 m.sup.2 /g and pore diameters of 85-200 Angstroms. The catalytic metals impregnated into these base materials include the oxides of Group VI metals, molybdenum and tungsten, and the oxides of Group VIII metals, nickel and cobalt, in various combinations. These catalysts and bases in combination have effectively promoted the removal of chemically combined sulfur and nitrogen within a continuous flowing mixture of carbonaceous liquid and hydrogen gas.

Berg, Lloyd (Bozeman, MT); McCandless, Frank P. (Bozeman, MT); Ramer, Ronald J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Tungsten Cathode Catalyst for PEMFC  

SciTech Connect

Final report for project to evaluate tungsten-based catalyst as a cathode catalyst for PEM cell applications.

Joel B. Christian; Sean P. E. Smith

2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

62

Catalyst-free growth of ZnO nanorods and their nanodevice applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We review recent research activities on catalyst-free growth of ZnO nanorods and their nanodevice applications. Since ZnO nanomaterials add excellent chemical sensing characteristics due to their large surface-to-volume ratio to intrinsic ZnO properties including semiconducting and piezoelectric properties, a wide direct band gap energy, and a large exciton binding energy, they are expected to become one of the most ideal materials for future high performance nanodevice applications. There have been extensive research activities for synthesis of high quality ZnO nanomaterials for nanodevice applications. Among the numerous growth methods, we have focused on catalyst-free metal-organic chemical vapour deposition, since this enables us to grow vertically aligned ZnO nanorods on various substrates, including Si and glass, without any special substrate treatment. This catalyst-free approach yields high purity and single crystalline nanostructures, and does not require a subsequent catalyst removal process. Furthermore, we established techniques for fabricating ZnO nanorod heterostructures with composition modulations along either radial or axial direction, which can provide more opportunities for novel optical and electronic device development. Furthermore, we briefly describe our activities on ZnO nanorod device fabrication and evaluation, including field-effect transistors, biological molecule sensors, Schottky diodes, and light emitting devices. We also address the remaining scientific issues and technical challenges, required to fully understand the device characteristics and to realise integrated nanodevices.

Won Il Park; Dong-Wook Kim; Sug Woo Jung; Gyu-Chul Yi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels Vanadium catalysts break down biomass into useful components Breaking down biomass could help in converting biomass to fuels. March 26, 2012 Biomass Due to diminishing petroleum reserves, non-food biomass (lignocellulose) is an attractive alternative as a feedstock for the production of renewable chemicals and fuels. Get Expertise Researcher Susan Hanson Inorganic Isotope & Actinide Chem Email Researcher Ruilian Wu Bioenergy & Environmental Science Email Researcher Louis "Pete" Silks Bioenergy & Environmental Science Email Vanadium is an inexpensive, earth-abundant metal that is well suited for promoting oxidations in air. Vanadium catalysts break down biomass into useful components Due to diminishing petroleum reserves, non-food biomass (lignocellulose) is

64

Molecularly engineering homogenous catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have developed new strategies for homogeneous catalyst recovery. Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) and poly (N-octadecylacrylamide) supports, for example, yield recoverable catalysts that are selectively soluble in the lower (polar) phase and the upper (non...

Hughes, Reagan Rebekah

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

65

Catalyst Manufacturing Science and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalyst Manufacturing Science and Engineering Consortium (CMSEC) Rutgers University New Jersey, U, automotive, and energy industries makes and/or uses catalysts, there has been no academic program focusing on the operations required to make catalytic materials. Thus, catalyst manufacturing processes are often designed

66

Cleaner water using bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater contaminated by hazardous chlorinated compounds, especially chlorinated ethenes, continues to be a significant environmental problem in industrialized nations. The conventional treatment methods of activated carbon adsorption and air-stripping successfully remove these compounds by way of transferring them from the water phase into the solid or gas phase. Catalysis is a promising approach to remove chlorinated compounds completely from the environment, by converting them into safer, non-chlorinated compounds. Palladium-based materials have been shown to be very effective as hydrodechlorination catalysts for the removal of chlorinated ethenes and other related compounds. However, relatively low catalytic activity and a propensity for deactivation are significant issues that prevent their widespread use in groundwater remediation. Palladium-on-gold bimetallic nanoparticles, in contrast, were recently discovered to exhibit superior catalyst activity and improved deactivation resistance. This new type of material is a significant next-step in the development of a viable hydrodechlorination catalysis technology.

Wong, Michael S.; Alvarez, Pedro J.J.; Fang, Yu-Iun; Akçin, Nurgül; Nutt, Michael O.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Heck, Kimberly N.

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

67

Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. This report discusses initial results from fundamental investigations into the behavior of mercury species in the presence of SCR catalysts at Southern Research Institute. Three different SCR catalysts are being studied. These are honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts are manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Test methods and experimental procedures were developed for current and future testing. The methods and procedures equalize factors influencing mercury adsorption and oxidation (surface area, catalyst activity, and pore structure) that normally differ for each catalyst type. Initial testing was performed to determine the time necessary for each catalyst to reach surface-adsorption equilibrium. In addition, the fraction of Hg oxidized by each of the SCR catalyst types is being investigated, for a given amount of catalyst and flow rate of mercury and flue gas. The next major effort will be to examine the kinetics of mercury oxidation across the SCR catalysts with respect to changes in mercury concentration and with respect to HCl concentration. Hg-sorption equilibrium times will also be investigated with respect to ammonia concentration in the simulated flue gas.

Jared W. Cannon; Thomas K. Gale

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

NOVEL SLURRY PHASE DIESEL CATALYSTS FOR COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in novel slurry phase catalysts for converting coal-derived synthesis gas to diesel fuels. The primary objective of this research program is to develop attrition resistant catalysts that exhibit high activities for conversion of coal-derived syngas.

Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. Ketil Hanssen; Alec Klinghoffer; Dr. Lech Nowicki; Patricia O'Dowd; Dr. Hien Pham; Jian Xu

2001-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

Non-Conventional Plasma Assisted Catalysts for Diesel Exhaust Treatment: A Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the application of pulse discharges along with catalysts in treating the exhaust gas at higher temperatures. In the present work a plasma reactor, filled with catalysts, called as plasma catalytic reactor, is studied for removal of oxides of nitrogen, total hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. The experiments are conducted on an actual diesel engine exhaust at no-load and at different temperatures starting from room temperature to 300°C. The removal efficiencies of these pollutants are studied. The experiments are carried out with both conventional and non-conventional catalysts. The idea is to explore the pollutant removal efficiency characteristics by non-conventional catalysts. The efficiency results are compared with that of conventional catalysts. The experiments are carried out at a constant pulse repetition rate of 120 pps. Both pellet and honeycomb type catalysts are used in the study.

B S Rajanikanth; P K Srinivas Kumar; V Ravi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

INL's patented, continuous-flow Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) produces the highest ASTM-quality B-100 biodiesel from waste fats, oils, and greases at the site of waste generation. SSC delivers low-cost transportation fuel, avoids significant landfill costs for municipalities, and reduces potent methane and other emissions produced in landfills from these wastes. You can learn more about INL's energy research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

71

Methods of making textured catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

Werpy, Todd (West Richland, WA); Frye, Jr., John G. (Richland, WA); Wang, Yong (Richland, WA); Zacher, Alan H. (Kennewick, WA)

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

72

NREL Team Creates High-Activity, Durable Platinum Extended Surface Catalyst for Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Researchers with NREL's Fuel Cell team showed that platinum can replace copper nanowires in such a way that high-surface-area and high-specific-activity catalysts are produced, potentially allowing for lower-cost catalysts.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Advanced Cathode Catalysts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation, which focuses on advanced cathode catalysts, was given by Piotr Zelenay of Los Alamos National laboratory at a February 2007 meeting on new fuel cell projects.

74

Synthesis and Understanding of Novel Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The research took advantage of our capabilities to perform in-situ and operando Raman spectroscopy on complex systems along with our developing expertise in the synthesis of uniform, supported metal oxide materials to investigate relationships between the catalytically active oxide composition, atomic structure, and support and the corresponding chemical and catalytic properties. The project was organized into two efforts: 1) Synthesis of novel catalyst materials by atomic layer deposition (ALD). 2) Spectroscopic and chemical investigations of coke formation and catalyst deactivation. ALD synthesis was combined with conventional physical characterization, Raman spectroscopy, and probe molecule chemisorption to study the effect of supported metal oxide composition and atomic structure on acid-base and catalytic properties. Operando Raman spectroscopy studies of olefin polymerization leading to coke formation and catalyst deactivation clarified the mechanism of coke formation by acid catalysts.

Stair, Peter C. [Northwestern University] [Northwestern University

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

75

Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch  

SciTech Connect

The slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process has attracted considerable attention recently. The process can make liquid fuels by reacting hydrogen-lean synthesis gas produced from modern energy-efficient gasifiers. continuing assessment of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) has a high priority within an indirect liquefaction program, a part of the liquid fuels program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and executed by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Funding for the indirect liquefaction program in 1990:0090 is anticipated to be about $8.5 million compared to $6.6 million in 1989 and a like amount in the year before. The studies within the program are conducted by industry, universities, national laboratories and in-house PETC research and development. This article reviews preparation and properties of iron-based catalysts, including recent patent activities and in-depth process analysis of slurry-phase FTS. The review provides an analysis of Fischer-Tropsch catalyst research and development trends and describes options to increase selectivity for iron-based catalysts in a slurry phase.

Srivastava, R.D. (Burns and Roe Services Corp. (US)); Rao, V.U.S.; Cinquegrane, G.; Stiegel, G.J. (Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (US))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Catalyst Characterization | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalyst Characterization Catalyst Characterization Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Biofuel Impacts on Aftertreatment Devices (Agreement ID:26463) Project ID:18519...

77

Catalyst Renewables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Catalyst Renewables Jump to: navigation, search Name: Catalyst Renewables Place: Dallas, Texas Zip: 75204 Product: Pursue projects with low technical risk, stable fuel supply and...

78

Bio-inspired MOF-based Catalysts for Lignin Valorization.  

SciTech Connect

Lignin is a potentially plentiful source of renewable organics, with ~50Mtons/yr produced by the pulp/paper industry and 200-300 Mtons/yr projected production by a US biofuels industry. This industry must process approximately 1 billion tons of biomass to meet the US Renewable Fuel goals. However, there are currently no efficient processes for converting lignin to value-added chemicals and drop-in fuels. Lignin is therefore an opportunity for production of valuable renewable chemicals, but presents staggering technical and economic challenges due to the quantities of material involved and the strong chemical bonds comprising this polymer. Aggressive chemistries and high temperatures are required to degrade lignin without catalysts. Moreover, chemical non-uniformity among lignins leads to complex product mixtures that tend to repolymerize. Conventional petrochemical approaches (pyrolysis, catalytic cracking, gasification) are energy intensive (400-800 degC), require complicated separations, and remove valuable chemical functionality. Low-temperature (25-200 degC) alternatives are clearly desirable, but enzymes are thermally fragile and incompatible with liquid organic compounds, making them impractical for large-scale biorefining. Alternatively, homogeneous catalysts, such as recently developed vanadium complexes, must be separated from product mixtures, while many heterogenous catalysts involve costly noble metals. The objective of this project is to demonstrate proof of concept that an entirely new class of biomimetic, efficient, and industrially robust synthetic catalysts based on nanoporous Metal- Organic Frameworks (MOFs) can be developed. Although catalytic MOFs are known, catalysis of bond cleavage reactions needed for lignin degradation is completely unexplored. Thus, fundamental research is required that industry and most sponsoring agencies are currently unwilling to undertake. We introduce MOFs infiltrated with titanium and nickel species as catalysts for the C-O bond hydrogenolysis in model compounds, which mimic the b-O-4, a-O-4, and 4-O-5 linkages of natural lignin. The versatile IRMOF-74(n) series is proposed as a platform for creating efficient hydrogenolysis catalysts as it not only displays tunable pore sizes, but also has the required thermal and chemical stability. The catalytic C-O bond cleavage occurs at 10 bar hydrogen pressure and temperatures as low as 120 degC. The conversion efficiency of the aromatic ether substrates into the corresponding hydrocarbons and phenols varies as PhCH 2 CH 2 OPh > PhCH 2 OPh > PhOPh (Ph = phenyl), while the catalytic activity generally follows the following trend Ni%40IRMOF-74>Ti%40IRMOF-74>IRMOF-74. Conversions as high as 80%, coupled with good selectivity for hydrogenolysis vs. hydrogenation, highlight the potential of MOF-based catalysts for the selective cleavage of recalcitrant aryl-ether bonds found in lignin and other biopolymers. This project supports the DOE Integrated Biorefinery Program goals, the objective of which is to convert biomass to fuels and high-value chemicals, by addressing an important technology gap: the lack of low-temperature catalysts suitable for industrial lignin degradation. Biomass, which is ~30 wt% lignin, constitutes a potentially major source of platform chemicals that could improve overall profitability and productivity of all energy-related products, thereby benefiting consumers and reducing national dependence on imported oil. Additionally, DoD has a strong interest in low-cost drop-in fuels (Navy Biofuel Initiative) and has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with DOE and USDA to develop a sustainable biofuels industry.

Allendorf, Mark D.; Stavila, Vitalie; Ramakrishnan, Parthasarathi; Davis, Ryan Wesley

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Nanostructured catalyst supports  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

80

Methods of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov May 2012 Opportunity Research is currently active on the technology "Methods of Reforming Hydrocarbon Fuels Using Hexaaluminate Catalysts." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview This invention discloses a method to reform hydrocarbon fuels using hexa- aluminate catalysts. In general, the method successfully disrupts the forma- tion of carbon that leads to the deactivation of the catalyst, a key element in the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels. When researchers are designing catalysts to reform hydrocarbon fuels, one

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Low Cost Autothermal Diesel Reforming Catalyst Development  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic autothermal reforming (ATR) represents an important step of converting fossil fuel to hydrogen rich reformate for use in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The state-of-the-art reforming catalyst, at present, is a Rh based material which is effective but costly. The objective of our current research is to reduce the catalyst cost by finding an efficient ATR catalyst containing no rhodium. A group of perovskite based catalysts have been synthesized and evaluated under the reforming condition of a diesel surrogate fuel. Hydrogen yield, reforming efficiency, and conversion selectivity to carbon oxides of the catalyst ATR reaction are calculated and compared with the benchmark Rh based material. Several catalyst synthesis improvements were carried out including: 1) selectively doping metals on the A-site and B-site of the perovskite structure, 2) changing the support from perovskite to alumina, 3) altering the method of metal addition, and 4) using transition metals instead of noble metals. It was found that the catalytic activity changed little with modification of the A-site metal, while it displayed considerable dependence on the B-site metal. Perovskite supports performed much better than alumina based supports.

Shihadeh, J.; Liu, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. Three different SCR catalysts are currently being studied in this project--honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts were manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Parametric testing was performed to investigate the contribution of flue-gas chemistry on mercury oxidation via SCR catalysts. Future work to characterize flue gas simulations typically derived from low and high sulfur bituminous coal are being performed in a stepwise manner, to avoid the constant interruptions in testing that occur when leaks in the system are generated during temperature transitions. Specifically, chlorine concentration vs. mercury oxidation correlations will be developed for each catalyst. The contributions of temperature are also being investigated. SO2 oxidation is also being investigated for each test condition.

Thomas K. Gale

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Removing Arsenic from Drinking Water  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

See how INL scientists are using nanotechnology to remove arsenic from drinking water. For more INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

84

Removing Arsenic from Drinking Water  

SciTech Connect

See how INL scientists are using nanotechnology to remove arsenic from drinking water. For more INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A New Instrument For Characterizing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS A New Instrument For Characterizing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Catalysts From fuels to renewable energy sources. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have enormous potential in this area A New Instrument For Characterizing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Catalysts Rob Usiskin In partnership

86

Development of Highly Selective Oxidation Catalysts by Atomic Layer Deposition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to use Atomic Layer Deposition to construct nanostructured catalysts to improve the effectiveness of oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes. More effective catalysts could enable higher specific conversion rates and result in drastic energy savings - up to 25 trillion Btu per year by 2020.

87

Supported catalysts using nanoparticles as the support material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making a porous catalyst, comprises a) providing an aqueous solution containing a nanoparticle precursor, b) forming a composition containing nanoparticles, c) adding a first catalytic component or precursor thereof and a pore-forming agent to the composition containing nanoparticles and allowing the first catalytic component, the pore-forming agent, and the nanoparticles form an organic-inorganic structure, d) removing water from the organic-inorganic structure; and e) removing the pore-forming agent from the organic-inorganic structure so as to yield a porous catalyst.

Wong, Michael S. (Houston, TX); Wachs, Israel E. (Bethlehem, PA); Knowles, William V. (Pearland, TX)

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

88

Catalyst regeneration: the business case  

SciTech Connect

As an alternative to purchasing new catalyst, technological and economic advantages make a compelling case for regenerating rather than replacing the metal or ceramic that enables selective catalytic reduction systems to capture NOx. The article examines the differences in the process, economics and reliability of new catalyst versus regenerated catalyst, and in rejuvenation versus regeneration of catalysis. SCR-Tech has developed programs to evaluate most catalyst management scenarios. They can predict catalyst life, allow for mixing and matching different catalyst types, provide risk assessment associated with extending catalyst life and evaluate site-specific economics. 2 figs., 1 tab.

McMahon, B. [SCR-Tech (United States)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Modeling of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst ... Optimization of hydrocarbon (HC) oxidation over a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) requires consideration of (i) HC gas diffusion into the catalyst layer, (ii) HC gas adsorption and desorption from catalyst sites, and (iii) kinetics of the oxidation reaction. ... Mutagenicity of Diesel Engine Exhaust Is Eliminated in the Gas Phase by an Oxidation Catalyst but Only Slightly Reduced in the Particle Phase ...

Yasushi Tanaka; Takashi Hihara; Makoto Nagata; Naoto Azuma; Akifumi Ueno

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Sopchak, David A. (Livermore, CA); Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA); Satcher, Joseph H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alex E. (Brentwood, CA)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Epoxidation catalyst and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

Linic, Suljo (Ann Arbor, MI); Christopher, Phillip (Ann Arbor, MI)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

92

Phase-Transfer Catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In previous chapters we learned that a phase-transfer catalyst must have two particular chemical functions to be successful, that is, it must rapidly transfer one of the reactant species into the normal phase ...

Charles M. Starks; Charles L. Liotta; Marc E. Halpern

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst by supercritical extraction. Quarterly report, July 1, 1996 - September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research projects is to evaluate the potential of SCF extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer- Tropsch (F-T) slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor into two fractions: (1) a catalyst-free wax containing less than 10 ppm particulate matter and (2) a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle or regeneration. The wax will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e. 200-300{degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. The success of the projects depends on two major factors. First, the supercritical solvent must be able to dissolve the F-T wax; furthermore, the must be accomplished without entraining the solid catalyst. Second, the extraction must be controlled so as not to favor the removal of the low molecular weight wax compounds, i.e., a constant carbon-number distribution of the alkanes in the wax slurry must be maintained at steady-state column operation. The project includes three tasks (1) equilibrium solubility measurements, (2) thermodynamic modeling, and (3) process design studies.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Sherrard, D.; Biales, J.; Kilpatrick, P.; Roberts, G. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilication, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanidation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical. 2 figs.

Angelici, R.J.; Gao, H.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

95

Crystalline titanate catalyst supports  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

96

Catalyst deactivation kinetics: An apparent delay in decreasing of catalyst activity, “inflection point” and data interpretation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Problems of catalyst deactivation kinetics and catalyst stability testing are considered. An apparent delay...

N. M. Ostrovskii

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Down-flow moving-bed gasifier with catalyst recycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The gasification of coal and other carbonaceous materials by an endothermic gasification reaction is achieved in the presence of a catalyst in a down-flow, moving-bed gasifier. Catalyst is removed along with ash from the gasifier and is then sufficiently heated in a riser/burner by the combustion of residual carbon in the ash to volatilize the catalyst. This volatilized catalyst is returned to the gasifier where it uniformly contacts and condenses on the carbonaceous material. Also, the hot gaseous combustion products resulting from the combustion of the carbon in the ash along with excess air are introduced into the gasifier for providing heat energy used in the endothermic reaction. 1 fig.

Halow, J.S.

1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

98

Down-flow moving-bed gasifier with catalyst recycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The gasification of coal and other carbonaceous materials by an endothermic gasification reaction is achieved in the presence of a catalyst in a down-flow, moving-bed gasifier. Catalyst is removed along with ash from the gasifier and is then sufficiently heated in a riser/burner by the combustion of residual carbon in the ash to volatilize the catalyst. This volatilized catalyst is returned to the gasifier where it uniformly contacts and condenses on the carbonaceous material. Also, the hot gaseous combustion products resulting from the combustion of the carbon in the ash along with excess air are introduced into the gasifier for providing heat energy used in the endothermic reaction.

Halow, John S. (Waynesburg, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

LSU EFRC - Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design - Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 space control 2012 Technical Conference: Center for Atomic-level Catalyst Design Oct. 8-10, 2012 LSU Welcomes CALC-D researchers to the Center's 4th Annual Technical Conference....

100

Pt-free, Perovskite-based Lean NOx Trap Catalysts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conference Pt-free, Perovskite-based Lean NO x Trap Catalysts Gongshin Qi, Chang H. Kim, and Wei Li GM Global Research & Development 2010 DEER Conference Overview LNT Chemistry...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS  

SciTech Connect

Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis to convert syngas (CO + H{sub 2}) derived from natural gas or coal to liquid fuels and wax is a well-established technology. For low H{sub 2} to CO ratio syngas produced from CO{sub 2} reforming of natural gas or from gasification of coal, the use of Fe catalysts is attractive because of their high water gas shift activity in addition to their high FT activity. Fe catalysts are also attractive due to their low cost and low methane selectivity. Because of the highly exothermic nature of the FT reaction, there has been a recent move away from fixed-bed reactors toward the development of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) that employ 30 to 90 {micro}m catalyst particles suspended in a waxy liquid for efficient heat removal. However, the use of FeFT catalysts in an SBCR has been problematic due to severe catalyst attrition resulting in fines that plug the filter employed to separate the catalyst from the waxy product. Fe catalysts can undergo attrition in SBCRs not only due to vigorous movement and collisions but also due to phase changes that occur during activation and reaction.

K. Jothimurugesan; James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Santosh K. Gangwal

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. This report discusses initial results from fundamental investigations into the behavior of mercury species in the presence of SCR catalysts at Southern Research Institute. The testing was performed at Southern Research's Catalyst Test Facility, a bench-scale reactor capable of simulating gas-phase reactions occurring in coal-fired utility pollution-control equipment. Three different SCR catalysts are currently being studied in this project - honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts were manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Parametric testing was performed to investigate the contribution of flue-gas chemistry on mercury oxidation via SCR catalysts. Methods and procedures for experimental testing continue to be developed to produce the highest quality mercury-oxidation data. Most experiments so far have focused on testing the catalysts in a simulated Powder River Basin (PRB) flue-gas environment, which contains lower sulfur and chlorine than produced by other coals. Future work to characterize flue gas simulations typically derived from low and high sulfur bituminous coal will be performed in a stepwise manner, to avoid the constant interruptions in testing that occur when leaks in the system are generated during temperature transitions. Specifically, chlorine concentration vs. mercury oxidation graph will be developed for each catalyst. The contributions of temperature and later sulfur will be investigated after this is complete. Also, last quarter's tests showed a potential linear relationship between SO3 conversion and mercury oxidation. As a result, SO3 samples will be taken more frequently to investigate each catalyst's ability to selectively oxidize mercury.

Alex J. Berry; Thomas K. Gale

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

103

Modeling nanostructured catalyst layer in PEMFC and catalyst utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A lattice model of the nanoscaled catalyst layer structure in proton exchange membrane fuel ... all the four components in a typical PEMFC catalyst layer: platinum (Pt), carbon, ionomer ... each average sized Pt ...

Jiejing Zhang; Pengzhen Cao; Li Xu…

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

THE UNIVERSITY OF SHEFFIELD CATALYST HIGHER EDUCATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page | 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF SHEFFIELD & CATALYST HIGHER EDUCATION (SHEFFIELD) PLC. UNIVERSITY of Sheffield / Catalyst Higher Education (Sheffield) plc Project Co Accommodation: Accommodation / Catalyst Higher Education (Sheffield) plc LLFM: Lend Lease Facilities Management Ltd Project Co: Catalyst

Dixon, Peter

105

Catalyst, method of making, and reactions using the catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a catalyst having a layered structure with, (1) a porous support, (2) a buffer layer, (3) an interfacial layer, and optionally (4) a catalyst layer. The invention also provides a process in which a reactant is converted to a product by passing through a reaction chamber containing the catalyst.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

106

Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 130-156 seconds at 120-140 C to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases, evaluate removal capabilities of hydrogen sulfide and COS from coal gases with formulated catalysts, and develop an economic regeneration method of deactivated catalysts. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,300-3,800-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-1,900 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-21 v% hydrogen, 29-34 v% CO, 8-10 v% CO{sub 2}, 5-18 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 114-132 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-140 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 116-129 psia. The molar ratio of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} in the monolithic catalyst reactor is

K. C. Kwon

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Novel Intermetallic Catalysts to Enhance PEM Membrane Durability  

SciTech Connect

The research examined possible sources of degradation of platinum based anode catalysts under long term use. Scientists at the United Technologies Research Center had shown that the anode as well as the cathode catalysts degrade in hydrogen fuel cells. This goal of this research was to see if mechanisms of anode degradation could be understood using forefront electrochemical techniques in an aqueous system. We found that this method is limited by the very low levels of impurities (perhaps less than a part per trillion) in the electrolyte. This limitation comes from the relatively small catalyst surface area (a few sq cm or less) compared to the electrolyte volume of 10 to 25 ml. In real fuel cells this ratio is completelyreversed: high catalyst surface area and low electrolyte violume, making the system much less sensitive to impurities in the electrolyte. We conclude that degradation mechanisms should be studied in real fuel cell systems, rather than in ex-situ, large electrolyte volume experiments.

Francis J. DiSalvo

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

108

Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis -- 2011 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Research during FY 2011 continued to examine the performance of RhMn catalysts on alternative supports including selected zeolite, silica, and carbon supports. Catalyst optimization continued using both the Davisil 645 and Merck Grade 7734 silica supports. Research also was initiated in FY 2011, using the both Davisil 645 silica and Hyperion CS-02C-063 carbon supports, to evaluate the potential for further improving catalyst performance, through the addition of one or two additional metals as promoters to the catalysts containing Rh, Mn, and Ir.

Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Rummel, Becky L.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Developing Enzyme and Biomimetic Catalysts for Upgrading Heavy Crudes via Biological Hydrogenation and Hydrodesulfurization  

SciTech Connect

The recovery and conversion of heavy oils is limited due to the high viscosity of these crudes and their high heteroatom content. Conventional technology relies on thermochemical hydrogenation and hydrodesulfurization to address these problems and is energy intensive due to the high operating temperature and pressure. This project was initiated to explore biological catalysts for adding hydrogen to the heavy oil molecules. Biological enzymes are efficient at hydrogen splitting at very mild conditions such as room temperature and pressure, however, they are very specific in terms of the substrates they hydrogenate. The goal of the project was to investigate how the specificity of these enzymes can be altered to develop catalysts for oil upgrading. Three approaches were used. First was to perform chemical modification of the enzyme surface to improve binding of other non-natural substrates. Second approach was to expose the deeply buried catalytic active site of the enzyme by removal of protein scaffolding to enable better interaction with other substrates. The third approach was based on molecular biology to develop genetically engineered systems for enabling targeted structural changes in the enzyme. The first approach was found to be limited in success due to the non-specificity of the chemical modification and inability to target the region near the active site or the site of substrate binding. The second approach produced a smaller catalyst capable of catalyzing hydrogen splitting, however, further experimentation is needed to address reproducibility and stability issues. The third approach which targeted cloning of hydrogenase in alternate hosts demonstrated progress, although further work is necessary to complete the cloning process. The complex nature of the hydrogenase enzyme structure-function relationship and role of various ligands in the protein require significant more research to better understand the enzyme and to enable success in strategies in developing catalysts with broader specificity as that required for crude upgrading.

Borole, A.P.

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

110

Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

Huffman, G.P. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

Research continues on coal liquefaction in the following areas: (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

Huffman, G.P. (ed.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Project Catalyst | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Catalyst Project Catalyst Jump to: navigation, search Name Project Catalyst Agency/Company /Organization ClimateWorks, European Climate Foundation Sector Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Forestry Website http://www.project-catalyst.in References Project Catalyst[1] Project Catalyst Screenshot Contents 1 About 2 Resources 2.1 Tools 2.2 Programs 3 References About "Project Catalyst is an initiative of the ClimateWorks Foundation. ClimateWorks is a global, nonprofit philanthropic foundation headquartered in San Francisco, California with a network of affiliated foundations in China, India, the US, and the European Union. The ClimateWorks family of organizations focus on enacting policies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions through three general policy areas: energy efficiency standards,

114

Oxygen Atoms Display Novel Behavior on Common Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11, 2008 11, 2008 Oxygen Atoms Display Novel Behavior on Common Catalyst Like waltzing dancers, the two atoms of an oxygen molecule usually behave identically when they separate on the surface of a catalyst. However, new research from the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory reveals that on a particular catalyst, the oxygen atoms act like a couple dancing the tango: one oxygen atom plants itself while the other shimmies away, probably with energy partially stolen from the stationary one. Scientists from EMSL and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory discovered this unanticipated behavior while studying how oxygen interacts with reduced titanium oxide, a popular catalyst and a model oxide. Their research began with a slice of titanium oxide crystal, oriented so that titanium and oxygen

115

Characteristics of V2O5/Ti-PILC catalyst for the reduction of NO by NH3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Titania-pillared clay (Ti-PILC) as a catalyst support exhibited peculiar physicochemical characteristics compared to that of titania for the reduction of NO by NH3. The morphological variation of Ti-PILC was examined with respect to the preparation method. For the freeze-dried Ti-PILC, the development of needle-like crystallites, which may reveal the formation of a “house-of-cards” structure by delamination of Ti-PILC, has been observed. Ti-PILC catalyst contains high surface acidity examined by NH3 TPD. Without the impregnation of WO3 and MoO3 on V2O5/Ti-PILC catalyst as a promoter, the catalyst exhibits competitive NO removal performance to a commercial V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. In addition, Ti-PILC catalyst also exhibits the strong sulfur tolerance mainly attributed to the unique pore structure of the catalyst.

Ho Jeong Chae; In-Sik Nam; Young Gul Kim; Hee Sung Yang; Hyun Chul Choi{rk; Seok Lyong Song{rk

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalyst Screening 2007 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are researching the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is obtaining commercially available mixed alcohol or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. The most promising catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. After a review of the literature in 2006 and conversations with companies that produce catalysts, it was determined that no commercial mixed-alcohol synthesis catalysts were available. One manufacturer supplied a modified methanol catalyst that was tested in the PNNL laboratory-scale system and provided to NREL for further testing. PNNL also prepared and tested the behavior of 10 other catalysts representing the distinct catalyst classes for mixed alcohol syntheses. Based on those results,testing in 2007 focused on the performance of the rhodium-based catalysts. The effects of adding promoters to the rhodium catalysts in addition to the manganese already being used were examined. The iron and rhenium promoters both stood out as achieving higher carbon selectivities , followed by Cu. Iridium and Li, on the other hand, had low carbon selectivity ratios of 0.27 and 0.22, respectively. Although testing of candidate promoters is not complete, it appears that Ir and Li promoters warrant further optimization and possibly combination to further improve STYs and carbon selectivities to C2+ oxygenates. However, using these promoters, it will be necessary to incorporate a separate hydrogenation catalyst to improve the yield of C2+ alcohols with respect to the other oxygenates. Fe, Re, and Cu stand out as possible candidates in this respect, but additional research is needed to examine whether they can be combined with the other promoters on the Rh-based catalyst or need to be optimized on a separate catalyst support that is either physically mixed or used in series with the promoted Rh-based catalyst.

Gerber, Mark A.; White, J. F.; Gray, Michel J.; Stevens, Don J.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal Liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, we have studied the attrition behavior of Iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas into liquid fuels.

Abhaya K. Datye

1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

118

SLURRY PHASE IRON CATALYSTS FOR INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, they have studied the attrition behavior of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for converting coal based syngas into liquid fuels.

Abhaya K. Datye

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

119

Experimental investigation of in situ upgrading of heavy oil by using a hydrogen donor and catalyst during steam injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Catalysts have been used for decades in refineries to improve and extract the maximum value from each barrel of produced oil, by using upgrading processes such as hydro-treating, and hydro-cracking. Catalysts have also been used for the removal...

Mohammad, Ahmad A A

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

120

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst using supercritical fluid extraction. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of SCF extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer- Tropsch (F-T) slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor into two fractions: (1) a catalyst-free wax containing less than 10 ppm particulate matter and (2) a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle or regeneration. The wax will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300{degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. The success of the project depends on two major factors. First, the supercritical solvent must be able to dissolve the F-T wax; furthermore, this must be accomplished without entraining the solid catalyst. Second, the extraction must be controlled so as not to favor the removal of the low molecular weight wax compounds, i.e., a constant carbon-number distribution of the alkanes in the wax slurry must be maintained at steady-state column operation. To implement our objectives, the following task structure is being implemented: Task 1 equilibrium solubility measurements; Task 2 thermodynamic modeling; and Task 3 process design studies. Progress reports are presented for each task.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst using supercritical fluid extraction. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January 1996--31 March 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor into two fractions: (1) a catalyst-free wax containing less than 10 ppm particulate matter and (2) a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle or regeneration. The wax will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200--300 {degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. The success of the project depends on two major factors. First, the supercritical solvent must be able to dissolve the F-T wax; furthermore, this must be accomplished without entraining the solid catalyst. Second, the extraction must be controlled so as not to favor the removal of the low molecular weight wax compounds, i.e., a constant carbon-number distribution of the alkanes in the wax slurry must be maintained at steady-state column operation. During this quarter work focused on task 1b, experimental measurement of selected model systems. Vapor-liquid equilibrium experiments for the n- hexane/squalane system, which we initiated in the previous quarter, were continued and results are discussed in this report.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Development of Sulfur and Carbon Tolerant Reforming Alloy Catalysts Aided Fundamental Atomistic Insights  

SciTech Connect

Current hydrocarbon reforming catalysts suffer from rapid carbon and sulfur poisoning. Even though there is a tremendous incentive to develop more efficient catalysts, these materials are currently formulated using inefficient trial and error experimental approaches. We have utilized a hybrid experimental/theoretical approach, combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and various state-of-the-art experimental tools, to formulate carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. We have employed DFT calculations to develop molecular insights into the elementary chemical transformations that lead to carbon poisoning of Ni catalysts. Based on the obtained molecular insights, we have identified, using DFT quantum calculation, various Ni alloy catalysts as potential carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. The alloy catalysts were synthesized and tested in steam reforming and partial oxidation of methane, propane, and isooctane. We demonstrated that the alloy catalysts are much more carbon-tolerant than monometallic Ni catalysts under nearly stoichiometric steam-to-carbon ratios. Under these conditions, monometallic Ni is rapidly poisoned by sp2 carbon deposits. The research approach is distinguished by two characteristics: (a) knowledge-based, bottomup approach, compared to the traditional trial and error approach, allows for a more efficient and systematic discovery of improved catalysts. (b) the focus is on exploring alloy materials which have been largely unexplored as potential reforming catalysts.

Suljo Linic

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Application of boron-modified nickel catalysts on the steam reforming of ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes the fabrication of NiCe and \\{BNiCe\\} catalysts for steam reforming of ethanol (SRE) via co-precipitation and impregnation methods using Ni(NO3)2·6H2O, Ce(NO3)3·6H2O and H3BO3 as precursors. All samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET surface area, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), temperature programmed oxidation (TPO), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), elemental analysis (EA) and thermogravimetry (TG) techniques at various stages of the catalyst. The results indicated that the incorporation of nickel and boron into the ceria lattice could increase the dispersion of the catalyst especially prepared by the co-precipitation method. The formation of Ni–B alloy and CeBO3 intermediate might be the impact factors necessary for enhancement of the catalytic performance and removal of deposited carbon. As a result, boron-modified catalysts are preferential to non-boron catalysts, where the Y H 2 exceeds 5 at 375 °C and only minor CO (<0.1%) and CH4 (?2%) species are detected over the BNiCe(C) and BNi/Ce(I) catalysts. The behavior of coke for the used catalysts was characterized using TG, TPR, TPO and EA methods. The results indicated that the NiCe(C) catalyst accumulated more deposited carbon in the confined space than the \\{BNiCe\\} catalysts.

Hsin-Hua Huang; Shen-Wei Yu; Chen-Lung Chuang; Chen-Bin Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal...

125

Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash coat, and catalytic metals, to develop a regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor. The task of developing kinetic rate equations and modeling the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants will be abandoned since formulation of catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS is being in progress. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. Experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 46-570 seconds under reaction conditions to formulate catalysts suitable for the removal of H{sub 2}S and COS from coal gases and evaluate their capabilities in reducing hydrogen sulfide and COS in coal gases. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,200-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-20,000-ppmv sulfur dioxide, 18-27 v% hydrogen, 29-41 v% CO, 8-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of simulated coal gas mixtures to the reactor are 30 - 180 cm{sup 3}/min at 1 atm and 25 C (SCCM). The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-155 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 40-210 psia. The molar ratio

K.C. Kwon

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Laser Catalyst - Energy Innovation Portal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Find More Like This Return to Search Laser Catalyst Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing...

127

Catalyst Characterization | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation pm028watkins2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Catalyst...

128

High Impact Technology (HIT) Catalyst  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Impact Technology (HIT) Catalyst Images courtesy CREE, True Manufacturing, A.O. Smith, Bernstein Associates, Cambridge Engineering, Alliance Laundry Systems, NREL Commercial...

129

Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. This report discusses initial results from fundamental investigations into the behavior of mercury species in the presence of SCR catalysts at Southern Research Institute. The testing was performed at Southern Research's Catalyst Test Facility, a bench-scale reactor capable of simulating gas-phase reactions occurring in coal-fired utility pollution-control equipment. Three different SCR catalysts are currently being studied in this project--honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts were manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Parametric testing was performed to investigate the contribution of flue-gas chemistry on mercury oxidation via SCR catalysts. Methods and procedures for experimental testing continue to be developed to produce the highest quality mercury-oxidation data. During this past quarter, it was discovered that long periods (12 - 24 hours) are required to equilibrate the catalysts in the system. In addition, after the system has been equilibrated, operational changes to temperature, gas concentration, or flow rate shifts the equilibrium, and steady-state must be reestablished, which can require as much as twelve additional hours per condition change. In the last quarter of testing, it was shown that the inclusion of ammonia had a strong effect on the oxidation of mercury by SCR catalysts, both in the short-term (a transitional period of elemental and oxidized mercury off gassing) and the long-term (less steady-state mercury oxidation). All experiments so far have focused on testing the catalysts in a simulated Powder River Basin (PRB) flue-gas environment, which contains lower sulfur and chlorine than produced by other coals. In the next quarter, parametric testing will be expanded to include flue gases simulating power plants burning Midwestern and Eastern coals, which are higher in sulfur and chlorine. Also, the isolation of such gases as hydrogen chloride (HCl), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) will be investigated. All of these efforts will be used to examine the kinetics of mercury oxidation across the SCR catalysts with respect to flue gas composition, temperature, and flow rate.

Jared W. Cannon; Thomas K. Gale

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - SCR Catalyst Blinding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCR Catalyst Blinding SCR Catalyst Blinding University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UND-EERC) is determining the potential of low-rank coal ash to cause blinding or masking of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. A secondary goal will be to determine the degree of elemental mercury conversion across the catalysts. Specific objectives include (1) identify candidate coals and blends for testing under bench-scale conditions, (2) conduct bench-scale testing to screen coals and identify key conditions for full-scale testing, (3) design and construct an SCR slipstream test chamber for sampling at full-scale facilities, (4) conduct testing at full-scale testing, (5) identify SCR blinding mechanisms, rates, and cleaning methods as well as mercury conversion efficiencies, and (6) interpret data, prepare a report, and attend sponsor meetings to present information and recommendations.

131

Catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bruce, Richard Catlow and Peter Edwards Catalyst supports for polymer electrolyte fuel...durability in fuel cells is to discover catalyst supports that do not corrode, or corrode...black support. fuel cells|oxides|catalyst supports|nanoparticles|conductivity...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Conversion of Hydrogen Sulfide in Coal Gases to Liquid Elemental Sulfur with Monolithic Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced power plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppmv and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation power plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2} in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S In the Single-Step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP), the direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The H{sub 2} and CO components of syngas appear to behave as inert with respect to sulfur formed at the SSRP conditions. One problem in the SSRP process that needs to be eliminated or minimized is COS formation that may occur due to reaction of CO with sulfur formed from the Claus reaction. The objectives of this research are to formulate monolithic catalysts for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gases and minimum formation of COS with monolithic catalyst supports, {gamma}-alumina wash or carbon coats, and catalytic metals, to develop a catalytic regeneration method for a deactivated monolithic catalyst, to measure kinetics of both direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur with SO{sub 2} as an oxidizer and formation of COS in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and moisture, using a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives using a monolithic catalyst reactor, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS were carried out for the space time range of 40-560 seconds at 120-150 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperatures, total pressure, space time, and catalyst regeneration on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur and formation of COS. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 3,600-4,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,800-2,000 ppmv sulfur dioxide, 23-27 v% hydrogen, 36-41 v% CO, 10-12 v% CO{sub 2}, 0-10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 30-180 SCCM. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 120-150 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 40-210 psia. The molar ratio of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} in the monolithic catalyst reactor is mai

K. C. Kwon

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

Catalyst by Design - Theoretical, Nanostructural, and Experimental...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Treatment The overlap among theory, structure, and fully formed catalysts form the foundation of this study deer09narula.pdf More Documents & Publications Catalyst by Design -...

134

CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

135

Characterization of Catalysts for Aftertreatment and Biomass...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalysts for Aftertreatment and Biomass-derived Fuels: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Characterization of Catalysts for...

136

Exhaust Phosphorous Chemistry and Catalyst Poisoning | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Chemistry and Catalyst Poisoning Exhaust Phosphorous Chemistry and Catalyst Poisoning 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Oak Ridge National...

137

Doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supported oxidation catalyst includes a support having a metal oxide or metal salt, and mixed metal particles thereon. The mixed metal particles include first particles including a palladium compound, and second particles including a precious metal group (PMG) metal or PMG metal compound, wherein the PMG metal is not palladium. The oxidation catalyst may also be used as a gas sensor.

Mohajeri, Nahid

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

138

Successfully cope with FCC catalyst  

SciTech Connect

The fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) process converts straight-run atmospheric gas oil, vacuum gas oils, certain atmospheric residues, and heavy stocks recovered from other operations into high-octane gasoline, light fuel oils, and olefin-rich light gases. The main features of the FCC processes are long-term reliability and operating adjustability, allowing the refinery to easily adapt their product yields to an ever changing market. The produced gasoline, for example, has an excellent front-end octane number and good overall octane characteristics. The cracking reactions are carried out in a vertical reactor vessel in which vaporized oil rises and carries along with it in intimate contact small fluidized catalyst particles. The reactions are very rapid, and a contact time of only a few seconds is enough for most applications. During the cracking a carbonaceous material of low hydrogen-to-carbon ratio, coke, forms and deposits on the catalyst. The coke blocks the access to the internal structure of the catalyst particle and thus reduces its activity. The spent catalyst is separated from the cracking products in a catalyst stripper/disengager, and the catalyst is transported to a separate vessel, the regenerator, where the coke is burned off reactivating the catalyst. The regenerated catalyst is then transported to the bottom of the reactor riser, where the cycle begins again.

Lindstrom, T.H.; Hashemi, R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Materials - Catalysts for Diesel Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne's deNOx Catalyst Begins Extensive Diesel Engine Exhaust Testing Argonne's deNOx Catalyst Begins Extensive Diesel Engine Exhaust Testing denox monolith Argonne's deNOx catalyst can be prepared as a powder or a monolith. chris marshall Principal investigator Chris Marshall shows the monolith form of the Argonne deNOx catalyst with a sensor inserted for testing. doug longman Mechanical engineer Doug Longman inserts the instrumented deNOx catalyst monolith into the aftertreatment chamber of Argonne's heavy-duty Caterpillar diesel test engine. Background Diesel engines, while efficient, produce many undesirable combustion byproducts in their exhaust. While we tend to think of the sooty exhaust products we see as the bad stuff, it is the less-visible exhaust products such as nitrogen oxides (NOx) that create bigger problems.

140

Novel catalysts for upgrading coal-derived liquids. Final technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

Research described in this report was aimed at synthesizing and evaluating supported Mo oxynitrides and oxycarbides for the selective removal of nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen from model and authentic coal-derived liquids. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported oxynitrides and oxycarbides were synthesized via the temperature programmed reaction of supported molybdenum oxides or hydrogen bronzes with NH{sub 3} or an equimolar mixture of CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}. Phase constituents and composition were determined by X-ray diffraction, CHN analysis, and neutron activation analysis. Oxygen chemisorption was used to probe the surface structure of the catalysts. The reaction rate data was collected using specially designed micro-batch reactors. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported Mo oxynitrides and oxycarbides were competitively active for quinoline hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), benzothiophene hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and benzofuran hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). In fact, the HDN and HDO specific reaction rates for several of the oxynitrides and oxycarbides were higher than those of a commercial Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} hydrotreatment catalyst. Furthermore, the product distributions indicated that the oxynitrides and oxycarbides were more hydrogen efficient than the sulfide catalysts. For HDN and HDS the catalytic activity was a strong inverse function of the Mo loading. In contrast, the benzofuran hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) activities did not appear to be affected by the Mo loading but were affected by the heating rate employed during nitridation or carburization. This observation suggested that HDN and HDS occurred on the same active sites while HDO was catalyzed by a different type of site.

Thompson, L.T.; Savage, P.E.; Briggs, D.E.

1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Performance of hydrous titanium oxide-supported catalysts in coal-liquids upgrading  

SciTech Connect

Experimental tests were performed in a continuous-flow hydrotreating unit at Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center to evaluate the performance of hydrous titanium oxide-supported (HTO) catalysts as hydrotreating catalysts for use in two-stage coal liquefaction. Catalysts containing either a combination of Co, Ni, and Mo as the active metal components or Pd as the active metal component were tested with representative hydrotreater feed stocks from the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility. Catalyst performance evaluation was based on desulfurization and denitrogenation activity, the conversion of cyclohexane-insoluble material, and hydrogenation activity, during 100-hour reactor runs. Results indicated that the HTO catalysts were comparable to a commercial Ni/Mo-alumina supported catalyst in the areas evaluated.

Cillo, D.L.; Smith, D.N.; Ruether, J.A.; Stephens, H.P.; Dosch, R.G. (Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Performance of hydrous titanium oxide-supported catalysts in coal-liquids upgrading  

SciTech Connect

Experimental tests were performed in a continuous-flow hydrotreating unit at Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center to evaluate the performance of hydrous titanium-oxide supported (HTO) catalysts as hydrotreating catalysts for use in two-stage coal liquiefaction. Catalysts containing either a combination of CO, Ni, and Mo as the active metal components or Pd as the active metal componet were tested with representative hydrotreater feed stocks from the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility. Catalyst performance evaluation was based on desulfurization and denitrogenation activity, the conversion of cyclohexane-insolbule material, and hydrogenation activity during 100-hour reactor runs. Results indicated that the HTO catalysts were comparable to a commercial Ni/Mo-alumina supported catalyst in the areas evaluated. 11 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Cillo, D.L.; Smith, D.N.; Ruether, J.A.; Stephens, H.P.; Dosch, R.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Thermal Processing Techniques to Improve Metal Sulfide Mixed Alcohol Catalyst Performance  

SciTech Connect

Research over several decades by several institutions has shown that alkali-promoted metal sulfide catalysts are capable of producing mixed alcohols from syngas with high selectivity and yield. Unfortunately, process models suggest that syngas to mixed alcohol processes, and especially thermochemical biomass to mixed alcohol processes, require improvements to sulfide catalyst activity and/or selectivity for acceptable economics. These improvements, if incremental, cannot result in increased process complexity, capital expenditure, or catalyst costs. It is well accepted among catalyst researchers that thermal processing techniques like calcining and reduction can have profound effects on the properties and performance of finished catalysts, and that small variations in thermal processing do not usually affect the overall cost of the catalyst. Metal sulfide catalysts are no exception but surprisingly, little attention has been given to the effects of thermal treatment on bulk metal sulfide mixed alcohol catalysts. This presentation will discuss how parameters like temperature, dwell time, metal ratios, and purge gas affect the performance and physical properties of K-Co/Mo catalysts.

Hensley, J.; Menart, M.; Costelow, K.; Thibodeaux, J.; Yung, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metallocene catalyst system is described for the polymerization of {alpha}-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula shown wherein: R{sup 1}, R{sup 2}, and R{sup 3} are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyls as a substituent, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R{sup 8}){sub 3} where R{sup 8} is selected from the group consisting of C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; R{sup 4} and R{sup 6} are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R{sup 1} and R{sup 3}; R{sup 5} is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E{sup 1}, E{sup 2} are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Ge(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Sn(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, where R{sup 9} is C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C{sub S} or C{sub 1}-symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from {alpha}-olefin monomers.

Bercaw, J.E.; Herzog, T.A.

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

145

Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metallocene catalyst system for the polymerization of .alpha.-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula ##STR1## wherein: R.sup.1, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyls as a substituent, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R.sup.8).sub.3 where R.sup.8 is selected from the group consisting of C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; R.sup.4 and R.sup.6 are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R.sup.1 and R.sup.3 ; R.sup.5 is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E.sup.1, E.sup.2 are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Si(R.sup.9).sub.2 --Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Ge(R.sup.9).sub.2, Sn(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2 --C(R.sup.9).sub.2, where R.sup.9 is C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C.sub.S or C.sub.1 -symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from .alpha.-olefin monomers.

Bercaw, John E. (Pasadena, CA); Herzog, Timothy A. (Pasadena, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Isomerization of hydrocarbons in the presence of zeolite-containing catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Y-type zeolites with 97% of the sodium removed and after aluminium removal (modulus close to 8) and without precious metal activation - are active and fairly selective catalysts for the isomerization of paraffinic and naphthenic hydrocarbons at 200/sup 0/-280/sup 0/C. The isomerization activity of HY and HM zeolites correlates with the concentration of strong acid sites; the isomerization of paraffins requires stronger centres sites than are needed for the isomerization of naphthenes. HY Catalysts may be used for increasing the octane number of refined oils in catalytic reforming.

Zhorov, Yu.M.; Kartashev, Yu.N.; Panchenkov, G.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

An Oregon State University Publication Catalyst Staff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Catalyst An Oregon State University Publication Volume 3 #12;The Catalyst Staff Editors Megan and remain flexible to the possibilities of new modes of thinking. As editors of the Catalyst, we encourage. Keep on discovering! Katy, Megan, and Carly The Catalyst * Scientific Articles * Creative Writing

Escher, Christine

148

Octahedral molecular sieve sorbents and catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Octahedral molecular sieve sorbents and catalysts are disclosed, including silver hollandite and cryptomelane. These materials can be used, for example, to catalyze the oxidation of CO.sub.x (e.g., CO), NO.sub.x (e.g., NO), hydrocarbons (e.g., C.sub.3H.sub.6) and/or sulfur-containing compounds. The disclosed materials also may be used to catalyze other reactions, such as the reduction of NO.sub.2. In some cases, the disclosed materials are capable of sorbing certain products from the reactions they catalyze. Silver hollandite, in particular, can be used to remove a substantial portion of certain sulfur-containing compounds from a gas or liquid by catalysis and/or sorption. The gas or liquid can be, for example, natural gas or a liquid hydrocarbon.

Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; King, David L [Richland, WA

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

149

High Temperature Membrane & Advanced Cathode Catalyst Development  

SciTech Connect

Current project consisted of three main phases and eighteen milestones. Short description of each phase is given below. Table 1 lists program milestones. Phase 1--High Temperature Membrane and Advanced Catalyst Development. New polymers and advanced cathode catalysts were synthesized. The membranes and the catalysts were characterized and compared against specifications that are based on DOE program requirements. The best-in-class membranes and catalysts were downselected for phase 2. Phase 2--Catalyst Coated Membrane (CCM) Fabrication and Testing. Laboratory scale catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) were fabricated and tested using the down-selected membranes and catalysts. The catalysts and high temperature membrane CCMs were tested and optimized. Phase 3--Multi-cell stack fabrication. Full-size CCMs with the down-selected and optimized high temperature membrane and catalyst were fabricated. The catalyst membrane assemblies were tested in full size cells and multi-cell stack.

Protsailo, Lesia

2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

150

as Catalyst in Public Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crisis as Catalyst in Public Health Immigration Reform and the Threat of Rhetorical Violence look at immigration reform and the impact of public discourse focused on this topic. The panel

Bushman, Frederic

151

Secret Lives of Catalysts Revealed  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai of Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division discuss the first-ever glimpse of nanoscale catalysts in action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-relea...

Miquel Salmeron and Gabor Somorjai

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

152

Studies on rejuvenation of spent residue hydroprocessing catalysts by leaching of foulant metals: influence of inorganic salt additives on the leaching efficiency of organic acids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comparative study has been made on the efficiency of oxalic, malonic and acetic acids for selective removal of metal foulants (e.g. vanadium) from spent residue hydrotreating catalysts in the presence and ab...

M. Marafi; A. Stanislaus; C. J. Mumford

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Synthesis, characterization and properties of anti-sintering nickel incorporated MCM-41 methanation catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Several nickel incorporated MCM-41 catalysts with a nickel molar content from 1% to 10% were prepared by a hydrothermal synthesis method, and investigated for their catalytic performances for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) from syngas methanation in a continuous flow fixed-bed reactor. The catalysts were characterized by FTIR, ICP, XRD, H2-TPR, TG–DTA and TEM, and the results showed that the mesoporous structure of MCM-41 still maintained well when the incorporated Ni molar content was up to 10%. The Ni–M catalyst prepared by the hydrothermal synthesis method with a nickel molar content of 10% showed the best catalytic activity with a high CO conversion of almost 100%, and a CH4 yield of 95.7% at 350 °C with 3:1 molar ratio of H2 to CO under 1.0 MPa and 12000 ml/h/g. Compared with the 10%Ni/M catalyst prepared by the impregnation method, the 10%Ni–M catalyst showed a higher resistance to sintering and no decrease in catalytic activity after calcination at 700 °C for 2 h. In the 100 h stability test under atmospheric pressure, the CO conversion rate and the CH4 yield obtained on 10%Ni–M catalyst maintained at about 100% and 82%, respectively, suggesting an excellent catalytic stability of this catalyst. The results of XRD, H2-TPR and TG–DTA showed that there was a strong interaction between the Ni species and the support, which inhibited the catalyst sintering. And the amount of coke formed on the spent 10%Ni–M catalyst in the stability test was 3.0 wt%. The coke formation was relatively easily to remove by calcination because the deposited carbon had a small particle size and uniform dispersion on the catalyst.

Jiaying Zhang; Zhong Xin; Xin Meng; Miao Tao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation Catalysts for Diesel Emission Control Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation...

155

Cyclic process for producing methane with catalyst regeneration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst capable of catalyzing the disproportionation of carbon monoxide so as to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon on the catalyst essentially without formation of inactive coke thereon. The surface layer is contacted with steam and is thus converted to methane and CO.sub.2, from which a relatively pure methane product may be obtained. For practical commercial operations utilizing the two-step process of the invention of a cyclic basis, nickel, cobalt, ruthenium, thenium and alloys thereof are especially prepared for use in a metal state, with CO disproportionation being carried out at temperatures up to about 350.degree. C. and with the conversion of active surface carbon to methane being carried out by reaction with steam. The catalyst is employed in such cyclic operations without the necessity for employing a regeneration step as part of each processing cycle. Inactive carbon or coke that tends to form on the catalyst over the course of continuous operations utilizing such cyclic process is effectively and advantageously removed, on a periodic basis, in place of conventional burn off with an inert stream containing a low concentration of oxygen.

Frost, Albert C. (Congers, NY); Risch, Alan P. (New Fairfield, CT)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Haloporphyrins and their preparation and use as catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides novel catalyst compositions, useful in the oxidation of hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to form hydroxy-group containing compounds and in the decomposition of hydroperoxides to form hydroxy-group containing compounds. The catalysts comprise transition metal complexes of a porphyrin ring having 1 to 12 halogen substituents on the porphyrin ring, at least one of said halogens being in a meso position and/or the catalyst containing no aryl group in a meso position. The compositions are prepared by halogenating a transition metal complex of a porphyrin. In one embodiment, a complex of a porphyrin with a metal whose porphyrin complexes are not active for oxidation of hydrocarbons is halogenated, thereby to obtain a haloporphyrin complex of that metal, the metal is removed from the haloporphyrin complex to obtain the free base form of the haloporphyrin, and a metal such as iron whose porphyrin complexes are active for oxidation of hydrocarbons and for the decomposition of alkyl hydroperoxides is complexed with the free base to obtain an active catalyst for oxidation of hydrocarbons and decomposition of alkyl hydroperoxides.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Haloporphyrins and their preparation and use as catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides novel catalyst compositions, useful in the oxidation of hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to form hydroxy-group containing compounds and in the decomposition of hydroperoxides to form hydroxy-group containing compounds. The catalysts comprise transition metal complexes of a porphyrin ring having 1 to 12 halogen substituents on the porphyrin ring, at least one of said halogens being in a meso position and/or the catalyst containing no aryl group in a meso position. The compositions are prepared by halogenating a transition metal complex of a porphyrin. In one embodiment, a complex of a porphyrin with a metal whose porphyrin complexes are not active for oxidation of hydrocarbons is halogenated, thereby to obtain a haloporphyrin complex of that metal, the metal is removed from the haloporphyrin complex to obtain the free base form of the haloporphyrin, and a metal such as iron whose porphyrin complexes are active for oxidation of hydrocarbons and for the decomposition of alkyl hydroperoxides is complexed with the free base to obtain an active catalyst for oxidation of hydrocarbons and decomposition of alkyl hydroperoxides.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

158

Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that dispersed catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on exploring novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction and the effectiveness of temperature-programmed liquefaction using dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research was to explore novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular precursors, that could be used in low concentrations but exhibit relatively high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. We have synthesized and tested various catalyst precursors in liquefaction of subbituminous and bituminous coals and in model compound studies to examine how do the composition and structure of the catalytic precursors affect their effectiveness for coal liquefaction under different reaction conditions, and how do these factors affect their catalytic functions for hydrogenation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, for cleavage of C-C bonds in polycyclic systems such as 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, for hydrogenolysis of C-O bond such as that in dinaphthylether, for hydrodeoxygenation of phenolic compounds and other oxygen-containing compounds such as xanthene, and for hydrodesulfurization of polycyclic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene. The novel bimetallic and monometallic precursors synthesized and tested in this project include various Mo- and Fe-based compounds.

Chunshan Song; Schobert, H.H.; Parfitt, D.P. [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI Aftertreatment System Chang H. Kim, Kevin Perry, Wei Li, Kushal Narayanaswamy, and Michael Viola Global Research &...

160

Retrofit and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel Oxidation Catalyst...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Retrofit and Testing of a Pre-Turbo, Diesel Oxidation Catalyst on a Tier 0, SD60M Freight Locomotive Achieving Over 50% PM Reduction Don Newburry Research & Development Manager...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

It Takes a Village: Students as a Catalyst for Conservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

It Takes a Village: Students as a Catalyst for Conservation It Takes a Village: Students as a Catalyst for Conservation Speaker(s): Julie Osborn Date: January 23, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Successful conservation projects must address human influences on species and their habitat by integrating local residents into the conservation solution. Involving local students in research can serve as a catalyst to gain community participation in protection efforts; educate those who have the most immediate connection to the issues; and empower individuals with tangible ways they can contribute to conservation. Effective community response requires the collaboration of educational institutions, NGOs, landowners, government agencies, and individual community members. Ecology Project International (EPI) has integrated local students in conservation

162

In silico search for novel methane steam reforming catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates a method for screening transition metal and metal alloy catalysts based on their predicted rates and stabilities for a given catalytic reaction. This method involves combining reaction and activation energies (available to the public via a web-based application 'CatApp') with a microkinetic modeling technique to predict the rates and selectivities of a prospective material. This paper illustrates this screening technique using the steam reforming of methane to carbon monoxide and hydrogen as a test reaction. While catalysts are already commercially available for this process, the method demonstrated in this paper is very general and could be applied to a wide range of catalytic reactions. Following the steps outlined herein, such an analysis could potentially enable researchers to understand reaction mechanisms on a fundamental level and, on this basis, develop leads for new metal alloy catalysts.

Yue Xu; Adam C Lausche; Shengguang Wang; Tuhin S Khan; Frank Abild-Pedersen; Felix Studt; Jens K Nørskov; Thomas Bligaard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Technologies for Boron Removal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tests were performed to examine the removal of boron from aqueous solution either with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) alone or by both PVA and other inorganic additives under room temperature. ... Added calcium hydroxide increased the co-removal of borate with PVA, and this offers a polishing treatment after borate removal by liming. ... As boron removal can be achieved by chemical precipitation and coagulation, it is logical to assume that the EC could remove boron from water and industrial effluent. ...

Yonglan Xu; Jia-Qian Jiang

2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

164

Experimental research on emission and removal of dioxins in flue gas from a co-combustion of MSW and coal incinerator  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the experimental study of dioxins removal from flue gas from a co-combustion municipal solid waste and coal incinerator by means of a fluidized absorption tower and a fabric filter. A test rig has been set up. The flow rate of flue gas of the test rig is 150-2000 m{sup 3}/h. The system was composed of a humidification and cooling system, an absorption tower, a demister, a slurry make-up tank, a desilter, a fabric filter and a measurement system. The total height of the absorption tower was 6.5 m, and the diameter of the reactor pool was 1.2 m. When the absorbent was 1% limestone slurry, the recirculation ratio was 3, the jet rate was 5-15 m/s and the submerged depth of the bubbling pipe under the slurry was 0.14 m, the removal efficiency for dioxins was 99.35%. The concentration of dioxins in the treated flue gas was 0.1573 x 10{sup -13} kg/Nm{sup 3} and the concentration of oxygen was 11%. This concentration is comparable to the emission standards of other developed countries.

Zhong Zhaoping [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)]. E-mail: zzhong@seu.edu.cn; Jin Baosheng [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Huang Yaji [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Zhou Hongcang [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Lan Jixiang [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275{degrees}C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275[degrees]C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics of water-gas shift were studied over ferrochrome catalysts under conditions with high carbon dioxide partial pressures, such as would be expected in a membrane reactor. The catalyst activity is inhibited by increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure. A microkinetic model of the reaction kinetics was developed. The model indicated that catalyst performance could be improved by decreasing the strength of surface oxygen bonds. Literature data indicated that adding either ceria or copper to the catalyst as a promoter might impart this desired effect. Ceria-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did not perform any better than unpromoted catalyst at the conditions tested, but copper-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did offer an improvement over the base ferrochrome material. A different class of water-gas shift catalyst, sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is not affected by carbon dioxide and may be a good alternative to the ferrochrome system, provided other constraints, notably the requisite sulfur level and maximum temperature, are not too limiting. A model was developed for an adiabatic, high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor. Simulation results indicate that an excess of steam in the feed (three moles of water per mole of CO) is beneficial even in a membrane reactor as it reduces the rate of adiabatic temperature rise. The simulations also indicate that much greater improvement can be attained by improving the catalyst as opposed to improving the membrane. Further, eliminating the inhibition by carbon dioxide will have a greater impact than will increasing the catalyst activity (assuming inhibition is still operative). Follow-up research into the use of sulfide catalysts with continued kinetic and reactor modeling is suggested.

Carl R.F. Lund

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

168

Metal/ceria water-gas shift catalysts for automotive polymer electrolyte fuel cell system.  

SciTech Connect

Polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems are a leading candidate for replacing the internal combustion engine in light duty vehicles. One method of generating the hydrogen necessary for the PEFC is reforming a liquid fuel, such as methanol or gasoline, via partial oxidation, steam reforming, or autothermal reforming (a combination of partial oxidation and steam reforming). The H{sub 2}-rich reformate can contain as much as 10% carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide has been shown to poison the platinum-based anode catalyst at concentrations as low as 10 ppm,1 necessitating removal of CO to this level before passing the reformate to the fuel cell stack. The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, CO + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}, is used to convert the bulk of the reformate CO to CO{sub 2}. Industrially, the WGS reaction is conducted over two catalysts, which operate in different temperature regimes. One catalyst is a FeCr mixed oxide, which operates at 350-450 C and is termed the high-temperature shift (HTS) catalyst. The second catalyst is a CuZn mixed oxide, which operates at 200-250 C and is termed the low-temperature shift (LTS) catalyst. Although these two catalysts are used industrially in the production of H{sub 2} for ammonia synthesis, they have major drawbacks that make them unsuitable for transportation applications. Both the LTS and the HTS catalysts must first be ''activated'' before being used. For example, the copper in the copper oxide/zinc oxide LTS catalyst must first be reduced to elemental copper in situ before it becomes active for the WGS reaction. This reduction reaction is exothermic and must be carried out under well- controlled conditions using a dilute hydrogen stream (1 vol% H{sub 2}) to prevent high catalyst temperatures, which can result in sintering (agglomeration) of the copper particles and loss of active surface area for the WGS reaction. Also, once the catalyst has been activated by reduction, it must be protected from exposure to ambient air to prevent re-oxidation of the copper. The activated catalyst must also be protected from the condensation of liquids, for example, during start-up or transient operation. For these reasons, a more thermally rugged catalyst is needed which has sufficient activity to operate at the low temperatures that are thermodynamically necessary to achieve low CO concentrations.

Myers, D. J.; Krebs, J. F.; Carter, J. D.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

169

SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect

In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The shakedown phase of the pilot-scale filtration platform was completed at the end of the last reporting period. A study of various molecular weight waxes was initiated to determine the effect of wax physical properties on the permeation rate without catalyst present. As expected, the permeation flux was inversely proportional to the nominal average molecular weight of the polyethylene wax. Even without catalyst particles present in the filtrate, the filtration membranes experience fouling during an induction period on the order of days on-line. Another long-term filtration test was initiated using a batch of iron catalyst that was previously activated with CO to form iron carbide in a separate continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system. The permeation flux stabilized more rapidly than that experienced with unactivated catalyst tests.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

170

Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane  

SciTech Connect

A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

171

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorbent and Catalyst Preparation Facilities Sorbent and Catalyst Preparation Facilities NETL researchers are seeking technical solutions to pressing problems related to fossil fuel extraction, processing, and utilization. To this end, laboratory-scale facilities are used to prepare, test, and analyze sorbents and catalysts used in fixed-, moving-, and fluid-bed reactors — three types of reactors often used in advanced fossil-fueled power plants. Equipment in these facilities is also available for standard American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) attrition tests, crush measurements, and particle size analysis to confirm the suitability of the sorbents and catalysts for their intended applications. NETL researchers use these facilities in conjunction with facilities for sorbent/catalyst bench-scale testing and for in-situ (in-place) reaction studies. In 2000, NETL received an R&D 100 Award for its RSV-1 Regenerable Desulfurization Sorbent. The process for preparation of this sorbent has been patented, licensed, and published.

172

Catalysts for carbon and coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Catalyst for the production of methane from carbon and/or coal by means of catalytic gasification. The catalyst compostion containing at least two alkali metal salts. A particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used.

McKee, Douglas W. (Burnt Hills, NY); Spiro, Clifford L. (Scotia, NY); Kosky, Philip G. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Chapter 13 - Heterogeneous Catalysts and Biomass Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The application of heterogeneous catalysts to conversion processes based on biomasses is described and discussed. The role of heterogeneous catalysts in the development of renewable industrial chemistry is emphasized.

Guido Busca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Improve reformer operation with trace sulfur removal  

SciTech Connect

Modern bimetallic reforming catalysts typically have feed specifications for sulfur of 0.5 to 1 wppm in the reformer naphtha carge. Sulfur in the raw naphtha is reduced to this level by naphtha hydrotreating. While most naphtha hydrotreating operations can usually obtain these levels without substantial problems. It is difficult to obtain levels much below 0.5 to 1 wppm with this process. Revamp of a constrained existing hydrotreater to reduce product sulfur slightly can be extremely costly typically entailing replacement or addition of a new reactor. At Engelhard the authors demonstrated that if the last traces of sulfur remaining from hydrotreating can be removed, the resulting ultra-low sulfur feed greatly improves the reformer operation and provides substantial economic benefit to the refiner. Removal of the remaining trace sulfur is accomplished in a simple manner with a special adsorbent bed, without adding complexity to the reforming operation.

McClung, R.G.; Novak, W.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

NREL: Biomass Research - Josh Schaidle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Josh Schaidle Josh Schaidle Photo of Josh Schaidle Josh Schaidle works in the Thermochemical Catalysis Research and Development group, headed by Jesse Hensley. He manages a $500,000 per year task focused on developing catalysts, processes, and reactor systems for the catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis products to produce fungible transportation fuels. Research Interests Biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals Environmentally-sustainable engineering practices Photochemical and electrochemical routes for fuel production Rational design of catalysts through the combination of experiment and theory Early transition metal carbide and nitride catalysts Process design and optimization Life-cycle Assessment (LCA) Catalysts for automotive exhaust treatment Education Ph.D., Chemical Engineering; Concentration in Environmental

176

Experts reveal catalyst-selection methodologies  

SciTech Connect

Refining catalyst selection procedure were discussed in detail at Oil and Gas Journal`s International Catalyst Conference, Feb. 1--2, in Houston. Marathon Oil Co.`s James P. Wick revealed details of Marathon`s program for review and optimization of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) and hydrotreating catalysts. And renowned FCC expert Del Tolen outlined a step-by-step procedure for choosing an FCC catalyst. The paper describes Marathon`s program and Tolen`s selection process.

NONE

1996-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

177

On-line regeneration of hydrodesulfurization catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrotreating catalyst is regenerated as it concurrently hydrotreats a hydrocarbon fuel by introducing a low concentration of oxygen into the catalyst bed either continuously or periodically. At low oxygen concentrations the carbon deposits on the catalyst are burned off without harming the catalyst and without significantly affecting the hydrotreating process. In a preferred embodiment the hydrotreating process is hydrodesulfurization, and regenerating is done periodically with oxygen concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 volume percent.

Preston, Jr., John L. (Hebron, CT)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, August 1, 1991--October 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This Quarterly Report on coal liquefaction research includes discussion in the areas of (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

Huffman, G.P. [ed.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Cooperative research program in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, November 1, 1991--January 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Research continues on coal liquefaction in the following areas: (1) Iron Based Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction; (2) Exploratory Research on Coal Conversion; (3) Novel Coal Liquefaction Concepts; (4) Novel Catalysts for Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

Huffman, G.P. [ed.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

New life for old catalyst  

SciTech Connect

Technology originally developed in Europe is now being optimized to make an attractive catalyst rejuvenation option even better. SCR-Tech undertook a study with American Electric Power (AEP) and Southern Company to quantify the primary effects of five independent factors in SCR-Tech's catalytic regeneration process on the rate of CO{sub 2} oxidation. The study demonstrated the process could minimise CO{sub 2} conversion while maximising the restoration of NOx reduction activity. The team developed statistically valid linear models for SO{sub 2} conversion (K{sub 23}) on both honeycomb and plate catalyst as a function of controlled regeneration process parameters. 1 fig., 1 photo.

Cooper, M. [SCR-Tech (United States)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Gold catalyst Styrene Benzaldehyde Styrene oxide Acetophenone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O O O + + O2 Gold catalyst Styrene Benzaldehyde Styrene oxide Acetophenone studies. However, the study by Turner et al.1 seems to be the first to use Au55 in the synthesis of supported gold catalysts a very narrow and reproducible size distribution for the result- ing particles. Traditional catalyst

Rouyer, Francois

182

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature and by-products formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature efficiency together with the catalyst activation temperature when a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) is placed the advantageous plasma catalyst coupling effect on the lowering of the catalyst activation temperature

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

183

Novel catalysts for upgrading coal-derived liquids. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October 1993--31 December 1993  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this research is to evaluate the hydrotreatment properties of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported Mo oxynitride and oxycarbide catalysts. This information will be used to assess the potential of these materials for use as commercial catalysts for hydrotreating coal-derived liquids. During this quarter, the authors evaluated the catalytic properties of a series of supported molybdenum nitride catalysts. These catalysts were prepared in the laboratory for comparison with the supported molybdenum oxynitrides. Pyridine hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) was used as the test reaction.

Thompson, L.T.; Savage, P.E.; Briggs, D.E.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Method for forming gold-containing catalyst with porous structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming a gold-containing catalyst with porous structure according to one embodiment of the present invention includes producing a starting alloy by melting together of gold and at least one less noble metal that is selected from the group consisting of silver, copper, rhodium, palladium, and platinum; and a dealloying step comprising at least partial removal of the less noble metal by dissolving the at least one less noble metal out of the starting alloy. Additional methods and products thereof are also presented.

Biener, Juergen; Hamza, Alex V; Baeumer, Marcus; Schulz, Christian; Jurgens, Birte; Biener, Monika M.

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

185

Turbomachinery debris remover  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for removing debris from a turbomachine. The apparatus includes housing and remotely operable viewing and grappling mechanisms for the purpose of locating and removing debris lodged between adjacent blades in a turbomachine.

Krawiec, Donald F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kraf, Robert J. (North Huntingdon, PA); Houser, Robert J. (Monroeville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

Campbell, Kenneth D. (Charleston, WV)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Perovskites of the structure A[sub 2]B[sub 2]C[sub 3]O[sub 10] are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

Campbell, K.D.

1991-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

188

as Catalyst in Public Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crisis as Catalyst in Public Health Alex's Lemonade Stand and the Fight Against Childhood Cancer, Medical Director, Pediatric Advanced Care Team, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia For more information, survivorship, and palliative care. We will also explore the impact that individuals can make on medical

Bushman, Frederic

189

Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System  

SciTech Connect

This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during a planned unit outage. On October 2, 2009, Unit 3 was taken out of service for a fall outage and the catalyst upstream of Absorber C was removed. This ended the demonstration after approximately 17 months of the planned 24 months of operation. This report discusses reasons for the pressure drop increase and potential measures to mitigate such problems in any future application of this technology. Mercury oxidation and capture measurements were made on Unit 3 four times during the 17-month demonstration. Measurements were performed across the catalyst and Absorber C and 'baseline' measurements were performed across Absorber A or B, which did not have a catalyst upstream. Results are presented in the report from all four sets of measurements during the demonstration period. These results include elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, mercury capture across Absorber C downstream of the catalyst, baseline mercury capture across Absorber A or B, and mercury re-emissions across both absorbers in service. Also presented in the report are estimates of the average mercury control performance of the oxidation catalyst technology over the 17-month demonstration period and the resulting mercury control costs.

Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Existing technology transfer report: second-stage support. [SRC hydrotreating catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Since the economics of SRC hydrotreating depends greatly on both catalyst life and the type of reactor system, an extensive research program was initiated to address several issues pertaining to the design and operation of a large-scale SRC hydrotreater, including catalyst activity and aging, reactor design, and catalyst replacement rate. The objectives of this program were to (1) study the hydrotreating of SRC in an upflow fixed-bed reactor, (2) study the hydrotreating of SRC in a downflow fixed-bed reactor, (3) compare the performances of upflow and downflow fixed-bed reactors, (4) study the fluid dynamics of upflow and downflow fixed-bed reactors, and (5) study the activity, selectivity, and aging of a specially prepared monolithic catalyst for hydroprocessing SRC. APCI focused its work on the fixed-bed reactor, since it was conventionally used in hydrotreating petroleum products. The active materials used to prepare the catalysts were metals selected from Groups VI and VIII of the periodic table. Catalysts such as cobalt-molybdenum, nickel-molybdenum, and nickel-tungsten supported on alumina were tested. These catalysts are usually poisoned by the ash present in coal-derived materials. Therefore, another aspect of the internally funded program was to develop an ash-tolerant catalyst to successfully hydrotreat SRC. An ash-tolerant catalyst was prepared by supporting the catalytic metals on a honeycomb (monolithic) structure. The honeycomb structure was thought to be extremely ash resistant because of its high geometric surface area per unit volume and large open cross-sectional area. Furthermore, liquid flow in the channels of the honeycomb was expected to be laminar, with little or no induced turbulence due to form friction. Activity of the so-called ash-tolerant honeycomb (monolithic) catalyst was measured for SRC hydrotreating in a catalytic fixed-bed reactor, using both upflow and downflow operating modes. 2 references, 14 figures, 6 tables.

Garg, D.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE  

SciTech Connect

Removal of NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}) from exhaust gases is a challenging subject. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based catalysts are commercial catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH{sub 3} for stationary sources. However, for diesel and lean-burn gasoline engines in vehicles, hydrocarbons would be the preferred reducing agents over NH{sub 3} because of the practical problems associated with the use of NH{sub 3} (i.e., handling and slippage through the reactor). The noble-metal three-way catalysts are not effective under these conditions. The first catalyst found to be active for selective catalytic reduction of NO by hydrocarbons in the presence of excess oxygen was copper exchanged ZSM-5 and other zeolites, reported in 1990 by Iwamoto in Japan and Held et al. in Germany. Although Cu-ZSM-5 is very active and the most intensively studied catalyst, it suffers from severe deactivation in engine tests, mainly due to H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. In this project, we found that ion-exchanged pillared clays and MCM-41 catalysts showed superior SCR activities of NO with hydrocarbon. All Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged pillared clays showed higher SCR activities than Cu-ZSM-5 reported in the literature. In particular, H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} only slightly deactivated the SCR activity of Cu-TiO{sub 2}-PILC, whereas severe deactivation was observed for Cu-ZSM-5. Moreover, Pt/MCM-41 provided the highest specific NO reduction rates as compared with other Pt doped catalysts, i.e., Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pt/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/ZSM-5. The Pt/MCM-41 catalyst also showed a good stability in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}.

R.Q. Long; N. Tharappiwattananon; W.B. Li; R.T. Yang

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Pyrochlore-Based Catalysts for Syngas-Derived Alcohol Synthesis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pyrochlore-Based Catalysts for Syngas-Derived Pyrochlore-Based Catalysts for Syngas-Derived Alcohol Synthesis Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov PON-13-006 August 2013 Opportunity This technology provides an advantageous means to convert syngas into a class of chemicals known as higher oxygenates as well as other long-chain hydrocarbons. Research is currently active on this patent-pending technology "Method of CO and/or CO2 Hydrogenation Using Doped Mixed Metal Oxides." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Significance * Improves the conversion of syngas from natural gas, coal, or biomass * Enhances the potential use of oxygenates as

193

Supported fischer-tropsch catalyst and method of making the catalyst  

SciTech Connect

A Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and a method of making the catalyst for a Fischer-Tropsch process utilizing the catalyst by which synthesis gas, particularly carbon-monoxide rich synthesis gas, is selectively converted to higher hydrocarbons of relatively narrow carbon number range is disclosed. In general, the selective and notably stable catalyst, consist of an inert carrier first treated with a Group IV B metal compound (such as zirconium or titanium), preferably an alkoxide compound, and subsequently treated with an organic compound of a Fischer-Tropsch metal catalyst, such as cobalt, iron or ruthenium carbonyl. Reactions with air and water and calcination are specifically avoided in the catalyst preparation procedure.

Dyer, Paul N. (Allentown, PA); Pierantozzi, Ronald (Orefield, PA); Withers, Howard P. (Douglassville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Catalyst for selective conversion of synthesis gas and method of making the catalyst  

SciTech Connect

A Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst, a method of making the catalyst and an F-T process utilizing the catalyst by which synthesis gas, particularly carbon-monoxide rich synthesis gas is selectively converted to higher hydrocarbons of relatively narrow carbon number range. In general, the selective and notably stable catalyst, consists of an inert carrier first treated with a Group IV B metal compound (such as zirconium or titanium), preferably an alkoxide compound, and subsequently treated with an organic compound of an F-T metal catalyst, such as cobalt, iron or ruthenium carbonyl. Reactions with air and water and calcination are specifically avoided in the catalyst preparation procedure.

Dyer, Paul N. (Allentown, PA); Pierantozzi, Ronald (Macungie, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Sustainability in Research: Chemistry Researcher Title Respective Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems for the direct conversion/storage of solar energy. Dr. Brett Taubman AppalAir Brett Taubman Hambourger Development of Catalysts and Photochemical Systems for Solar Energy Storage. Research in the Hambourger lab is focused on the development of catalysts and photochemical systems for solar energy storage

Rose, Annkatrin

196

Risk Removal | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Risk Removal Risk Removal Workers safely remove old mercury tanks from the Y-12 National Security Complex. Workers safely remove old mercury tanks from the Y-12 National Security...

197

Heavy metals removal from oil sludge using ion exchange textiles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this research, ion exchange textiles were used for the first time for the removal of heavy metals from oil sludge. The target metals which… (more)

Muslat, Ziyad

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

On the nature of the deactivation of supported palladium nanoparticle catalysts in the decarboxylation of fatty acids.  

SciTech Connect

Supported palladium catalysts are effective catalysts for the hydrogen-free decarboxylation of fatty acids. However, the catalysts deactivate severely after one use. Here, the recyclability of a well-defined, mesoporous silica-supported palladium nanoparticle catalyst is evaluated in the batch decarboxylation of stearic acid at 300 C under inert atmosphere, producing n-heptadecane. The nature of the catalyst deactivation is examined in detail via an array of characterization techniques. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) demonstrates that little palladium surface oxidation occurs over the course of the reaction, and a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) suggests negligible particle sintering or agglomeration. Physisorption and chemisorption measurements demonstrate substantial loss in total surface area and porosity as well as accessible palladium surface area with these losses attributed to significant organic deposition on the catalyst, as verified via thermogravimetric analysis. High temperature calcination is applied to combust and remove these residues, but resultant nanoparticle agglomeration is significant. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and solid dissolution followed by organic extraction methodologies demonstrate that the carbonaceous deposits are not coke but rather strongly adsorbed reactants and products. Detrimental coke formation, as suggested by prior literature, is verified to be absent, as extraction of the surface-deposited organic species yields nearly complete recovery of the total surface area, pore volume, and active palladium surface area. Furthermore, the regenerated catalyst exhibits a corresponding significant recovery of decarboxylation activity.

Ping, E. W.; Pierson, J.; Wallace, R.; Miller, J. T.; Fuller, T. F.; Jones, C. W. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Georgia Institute of Technology)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Steam reforming utilizing high activity catalyst  

SciTech Connect

High activity, sulfur tolerant steam reforming catalysts are described comprising rhodium or nickel supported on lanthanum stabilized alumina or magnesium promoted lanthanum stabilized alumina. The catalysts have improved activity over conventionally used catalysts in the presence of sulfur containing hydrocarbon fuel (such as No. 2 fuel oil) in a steam reforming environment. The material has particular utility in autothermal, tubular, cyclic and adiabatic steam reforming processes.

Setzer, H. J.

1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

200

Catalysts for Dehydrogenation of ammonia boranes  

SciTech Connect

Several effective homogeneous catalysts for the dehydrogenation of amine boranes have been developed. The best catalyst uses an iridium complex, and is capable of dehydrogenating H3NBH3 (AB) and CH3NH2BH3 (MeAB) at comparable rates. Thermodynamic measurements using this catalyst demonstrate that the dehydrogenation of AB and MeAB is substantially exothermic, which has important implications for regeneration.

Heinekey, Dennis M.

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host  

SciTech Connect

The addition of hydrothermally-aged zeolite Y precursor to an SBA-15 synthesis mixture under a mildly acidic condition resulted in the formation of a mesoporous aluminosilicate catalyst, AlSBA-15. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst contains strong Br{umlt o}nsted acid sites and aluminum (Al) stabilized in a totally tetrahedral coordination. The physicochemical characteristics of the catalyst varied as a function of the synthesis conditions. The catalyst possessed surface areas ranging between 690 and 850 m{sup 2}/g, pore sizes ranging from 5.6 to 7.5 nm, and pore volumes up 1.03 cm{sup 3}, which were comparable to the parent SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Two wt % Al was present in the catalyst that was obtained from the reaction mixture that contained the highest Al content. The Al remained stable in totally tetrahedral coordination after calcination at a temperature of 550 C. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst showed significant catalytic activity for cumene dealkylation, and the activity increased as the amount of zeolite precursor added to the SBA-15 mixture was increased. In preparation for the final phase of the project, the catalyst was embedded into a psuedoboemite alumina (catapal B) matrix and then formed into pellets. In the final phase of the project, the pelletized catalyst is being evaluated for the conversion of a heavy petroleum feedstock to naphtha and middle distillates. This phase was significantly delayed during the past six months due to a serious malfunction of the fume hoods in the Clark Atlanta University's Research Center for Science and Technology, where the project is being conducted. The fume hood system was repaired and the catalyst evaluation is now underway.

Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Precursors of copper/zinc oxide catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent results on hydroxycarbonate precursors of copper/zinc oxide catalysts for methanol synthesis are reinterpreted, taking into account earlier work on these systems.

M.S. Spencer

203

Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems...

204

Diffusion in Porous Catalysts and Adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diffusion in Porous Catalysts and Adsorbents ... Single industrial adsorbent pellets of zeolites 5A and 13X were mounted with a polymer capable of withstanding high temperatures. ...

Jan Hoogschagen

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Highly Dispersed Alloy Cathode Catalyst for Durability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation, which focuses on alloy cathode catalysts, was given by T. D. Jarvi of UTC Power at a February 2007 meeting on new fuel cell projects.

206

A SOLID CATALYST METHOD FOR BIODIESEL PRODUCTION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biodiesel has considerable production potential as a renewable source of energy. The conventional processes use soluble alkali catalysts that contaminate the biodiesel and glycerol products,… (more)

Kannan, Dheeban Chakrvarthi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass into useful components Breaking down biomass could help in converting biomass to fuels. March 26, 2012 Biomass Due to diminishing petroleum...

208

Steam reforming utilizing sulfur tolerant catalyst  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a steam reforming process for converting hydrocarbon material to hydrogen gas in the presence of sulfur which consists of: adding steam to the hydrocarbon material and passing the steam and hydrocarbon material over catalyst material at elevated temperatures. The improvement comprises utilizing as a catalyst material high activity, sulfur tolerant catalyst of platinum supported on lanthanum stabilized alumina or magnesium promoted lanthanum stabilized alumina. It also describes a steam process for converting hydrocarbon material to hydrogen gas in the presence of sulfur which consists of steam to the hydrocarbon material over catalyst material at elevated temperatures. The improvement comprises utilizing as a catalyst material high activity, sulfur tolerant catalysts consisting essentially of iridium supported on lanthanum stabilized alumina or magnesium promoted lanthanum stabilized alumina. In addition a steam reforming process is described for converting hydrocarbon material to hydrogen gas in the presence of sulfur comprising adding steam to the hydrocarbon material and passing the steam and hydrocarbon material over catalyst material at elevated temperatures. The improvement comprises utilizing as a catalyst material high activity sulfur tolerant catalysts consisting essentially of palladium supported on lanthanum stabilized alumina or magnesium promoted lanthanum stabilized alumina.

Setzer, H.J.; Karavolis, S.; Bett, J.A.S.

1987-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

New Catalyst Converts CO2 to Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Catalyst Converts CO to Fuel Calculations Run at NERSC Help Confirm University of Illinois Breakthrough September 5, 2014 | Tags: Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Carver,...

210

New Catalyst Converts CO2 to Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

offer better catalytic performance." The proportion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen in the syngas produced in the reaction can also be easily manipulated using the new catalyst,...

211

Polyfunctional catalyst for processiing benzene fractions  

SciTech Connect

A by-product of the coke industry is a raw benzene fraction benzene- 1 which may serve as for catalytic processes. The paper reports a study on the influence of the composition and temperatures on the activity and selectivity of NiO-V{sub 2}O{sub 6}-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the corresponding binary and tertiary subsystems are studied by a pulse method in model reactions; the hydrodealkylating of toluene and the hydrodesulfurizing of thioprhene. The optimal catalyst composition is established. The new catalyst is compared with industrial catalysts.

G. Byakov; B.D. Zubitskii; B.G. Tryasunov; I.Ya. Petrov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Sandia National Laboratories: fuel cell catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel cell catalyst ECIS and Compass Metals: Platinum Nanostructures for Enhanced Catalysis On March 29, 2013, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Capabilities, Energy, Energy...

213

Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

The general objectives of this research are (1) to investigate the use of highly dispersed catalysts for the pretreatment of coal by mild hydrogenation, (2) to identify the active forms of the catalysts under reaction conditions and (3) to clarify the mechanisms of catalysis. The ultimate objective is to ascertain if mild catalytic hydrogenation resulting in very limited or no coal solubilization is an advantageous pretreatment for the transformation of coal into transportable fuels. The experimental program will focus upon the development of effective methods of impregnating coal with catalysts, evaluating the conditions under which the catalysts are most active and establishing the relative impact of improved impregnation on conversion and product distributions obtained from coal hydrogenation.

Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal silica using small gel particles. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Silica Scaling Removal Process Applications: Cooling tower systems Water treatment systems Water evaporation systems Potential mining applications (produced water) Industry applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits: Reduces scaling in cooling towers by up to 50% Increases the number of cycles of concentration substantially Reduces the amount of antiscaling chemical additives needed Decreases the amount of makeup water and subsequent discharged water (blowdown) Enables considerable cost savings derived from reductions in

215

Activation studies with promoted precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Ruhrchemie catalyst, the catalyst activity and stability changed markedly with reduction procedure. Hs reduction at 220'C was repeated since it gave very loiv activity. The reproducibility of this test ivas good. Hs reduction at 250 gave higher catalyst...

Manne, Rama Krishna

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Focussing the view on Nature's water-splitting catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formation in synthetic Mn-catalyst. Inorg. Chem. 43, 264-Nature’s water-splitting catalyst Samir Zein 1,2 , Leonid V.Nature’s water splitting catalyst Abstract About 3 billion

Yano, Junko

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Lean NOx Reduction with Dual Layer LNT/SCR Catalysts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Results show that a series of dual layer catalysts with a bottom layer of LNT catalyst and a top layer of SCR catalyst can carry out coupled ammonia generation and NOx reduction, achieving high NOx conversion with minimal ammonia slip

218

Highly Active Steam Reforming Catalyst for Hydrogen and Syngas Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Toyo Engineering Corporation developed a steam reforming catalyst, which is four times as active as conventional catalysts, for hydrogen and syngas production from light natural gas. The catalyst has...3 plant. B...

Toru Numaguchi

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Influence of OH/metal ratio on the stability of alfe-pilc catalyst for wet peroxide oxidation of phenol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AlFe-pillared clay catalyst with OH/metal = 4; 5 mmol metal/g clay and Al : Fe = 5:5 swells intensively in phenol-water solution and has no measurable catalytic activity in phenol removal from water solutions,...

Ern? E. Kiss; Tatjana J. Vuli?…

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect

In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. In this reporting period, a series of crossflow filtration experiments were initiated to study the effect of olefins and oxygenates on the filtration flux and membrane performance. Iron-based FTS reactor waxes contain a significant amount of oxygenates, depending on the catalyst formulation and operating conditions. Mono-olefins and aliphatic alcohols were doped into an activated iron catalyst slurry (with Polywax) to test their influence on filtration properties. The olefins were varied from 5 to 25 wt% and oxygenates from 6 to 17 wt% to simulate a range of reactor slurries reported in the literature. The addition of an alcohol (1-dodecanol) was found to decrease the permeation rate while the olefin added (1-hexadecene) had no effect on the permeation rate. A passive flux maintenance technique was tested that can temporarily increase the permeate rate for 24 hours.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

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221

The Different Impacts of SO2 and SO3 on Cu/zeolite SCR Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The different impacts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} on Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts were investigated by SCR performance tests and multiple characterization techniques including temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results indicate that a larger amount of highly dispersed CuSO{sub 4} formed in the zeolite catalysts (Z-CuSO{sub 4}) upon SO{sub 3} poisoning, explaining the much more significant deactivation of the Cu/zeolite catalysts that were exposed to SO{sub 3} compared to poisoning by SO{sub 2}. This paper provides the first demonstration that active sites of Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts involved in the storage and removal of sulfur can react with SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} in very different ways. In particular, the significant differences in the extent of sulfur uptake account for the considerably different impacts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} poisoning on the performance of Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts.

Cheng, Y.; Lambert, C; Kim, D; Kwak, J; Cho, S; Peden, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - aged catalyst extrudates Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

catalyst extrudates Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aged catalyst...

223

A Novel Nanobio Catalyst for Biofuels | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multiple Crystal Cavities for Unlimited X-ray Energy Resolution and Multiple Crystal Cavities for Unlimited X-ray Energy Resolution and Coherence An Intriguing Twist in the Structure of a Cobalt Oxide Catalyst Breaking Records in Neurological Microradiology Exposing Valence-Bond Model Inadequacies Plants' Rapid Response System Revealed Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed A Novel Nanobio Catalyst for Biofuels AUGUST 27, 2012 Bookmark and Share Core shell nanoparticle inside Apo. Nanoparticles synthesized from noble metals such as ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, silver (Ag), osmium, iridium, platinum, and gold (Au) are attracting increased attention by researchers around the world looking for

224

CARBON COATED (CARBONOUS) CATALYST IN EBULLATED BED REACTOR FOR PRODUCTION OF OXYGENATED CHEMICALS FROM SYNGAS/CO2  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work completed under DOE's Support of Advanced Fuel Research program, Contract No. DE-FG26-99FT40681. The contract period was October 2000 through September 2002. This R&D program investigated the modification of the mechanical strength of catalyst extrudates using Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. (HTI) carbon-coated catalyst technology so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO{sub 2} efficiently and economically. Exothermic chemical reactions benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. The carbon-coated extrudates prepared using these procedures had sufficient attrition resistance and surface area for use in ebullated bed operation. The low cost of carbon coating makes the carbon-coated catalysts highly competitive in the market of catalyst extrudates.

Peizheng Zhou

2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this program were to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel and to develop a greater understanding of mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts in the form of a simple model. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH provided co-funding for this program. REI used a multicatalyst slipstream reactor to determine oxidation of mercury across five commercial SCR catalysts at a power plant that burned a blend of 87% subbituminous coal and 13% bituminous coal. The chlorine content of the blend was 100 to 240 {micro}g/g on a dry basis. Mercury measurements were carried out when the catalysts were relatively new, corresponding to about 300 hours of operation and again after 2,200 hours of operation. NO{sub x}, O{sub 2} and gaseous mercury speciation at the inlet and at the outlet of each catalyst chamber were measured. In general, the catalysts all appeared capable of achieving about 90% NO{sub x} reduction at a space velocity of 3,000 hr{sup -1} when new, which is typical of full-scale installations; after 2,200 hours exposure to flue gas, some of the catalysts appeared to lose NO{sub x} activity. For the fresh commercial catalysts, oxidation of mercury was in the range of 25% to 65% at typical full-scale space velocities. A blank monolith showed no oxidation of mercury under any conditions. All catalysts showed higher mercury oxidation without ammonia, consistent with full-scale measurements. After exposure to flue gas for 2,200 hours, some of the catalysts showed reduced levels of mercury oxidation relative to the initial levels of oxidation. A model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Cooperative Research Program in coal liquefaction. Technical report, May 1, 1994--October 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: coliquefaction of coal with waste materials; catalysts for coal liquefaction to clean transportation fuels; fundamental research in coal liquefaction; and in situ analytical techniques for coal liquefaction and coal liquefaction catalysts.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Thermodynamic Properties of Supported Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The goals of this work were to develop Coulometric Titration as a method for characterizing the thermodynamic redox properties of oxides and to apply this technique to the characterization of ceria- and vanadia-based catalysts. The redox properties of ceria and vanadia are a major part of what makes these materials catalytically active but their properties are also dependent on their structure and the presence of other oxides. Quantifying these properties through the measurement of oxidation energetics was the goal of this work.

Gorte, Raymond J.

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

228

Attrition resistant fluidizable reforming catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of preparing a steam reforming catalyst characterized by improved resistance to attrition loss when used for cracking, reforming, water gas shift and gasification reactions on feedstock in a fluidized bed reactor, comprising: fabricating the ceramic support particle, coating a ceramic support by adding an aqueous solution of a precursor salt of a metal selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pt, Pd, Ru, Rh, Cr, Co, Mn, Mg, K, La and Fe and mixtures thereof to the ceramic support and calcining the coated ceramic in air to convert the metal salts to metal oxides.

Parent, Yves O. (Golden, CO); Magrini, Kim (Golden, CO); Landin, Steven M. (Conifer, CO); Ritland, Marcus A. (Palm Beach Shores, FL)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

229

Two Catalyst Formulations - One Solution for NOx After-treatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Two Catalyst Formulations - One Solution for NOx After-treatment Systems Low-temperature SCR combined with standard high-temperature SCR catalyst formulation in one system provides...

230

Investigation of Sulfur Deactivation on Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Sulfur Deactivation on CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Investigation of Sulfur Deactivation on CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Investigation of...

231

Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx...

232

Transmural Catalysis - High Efficiency Catalyst Systems for NOx...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Transmural Catalysis - High Efficiency Catalyst Systems for NOx Adsorbers and SCR Transmural Catalysis - High Efficiency Catalyst Systems for NOx Adsorbers and SCR Presentation...

233

Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems Lean NOx Reduction with Dual Layer LNTSCR Catalysts Development of Optimal...

234

Understanding the Deactivation Mechanisms of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Deactivation Mechanisms of CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Understanding the Deactivation Mechanisms of CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application To understand...

235

Catalyst-Assisted Production of Olefins from Natural Gas Liquids...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalyst-Assisted Production of Olefins from Natural Gas Liquids: Prototype Development and Full-Scale Testing, April 2013 Catalyst-Assisted Production of Olefins from Natural Gas...

236

Nanosegregated Surfaces as Catalysts for Fuel Cells | Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysts for Fuel Cells Technology available for licensing: A method for creating a new class of platinum multi-metallic catalysts that are not only compositionally stable but...

237

Enhanced Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts on Functionalized...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts on Functionalized Graphene Sheets for Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction . Enhanced Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts on...

238

Active Hydrogenation Catalyst with a Structured, Peptide-Based...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogenation Catalyst with a Structured, Peptide-Based Outer-Coordination Sphere. Active Hydrogenation Catalyst with a Structured, Peptide-Based Outer-Coordination Sphere....

239

Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

240

Bond Energies in Models of the Schrock Metathesis Catalyst. ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energies in Models of the Schrock Metathesis Catalyst. Bond Energies in Models of the Schrock Metathesis Catalyst. Abstract: Heats of formation, adiabatic and diabatic bond...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Defining Active Catalyst Structure and Reaction Pathways from...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Active Catalyst Structure and Reaction Pathways from ab Initio Molecular Dynamics and Operando XAFS: Dehydrogenation of Defining Active Catalyst Structure and Reaction Pathways...

242

Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-high Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

243

Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterization 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen...

244

Cobalt discovery replaces precious metals as industrial catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

replaces precious metals Cobalt discovery replaces precious metals as industrial catalyst Cobalt holds promise as an industrial catalyst with potential applications in such...

245

Cobalt discovery replaces precious metals as industrial catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Replaces Precious Metals Cobalt discovery replaces precious metals as industrial catalyst Cobalt holds promise as an industrial catalyst with potential applications in such...

246

Expulsion Leads to a New Catalyst | The Ames Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expulsion Leads to a New Catalyst Locating a catalyst and reactants in confined spaces makes catalytic reactions go faster in the desired direction. Of course, the reaction...

247

Arginine-Containing Ligands Enhance H-2 Oxidation Catalyst Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arginine-Containing Ligands Enhance H-2 Oxidation Catalyst Performance. Arginine-Containing Ligands Enhance H-2 Oxidation Catalyst Performance. Abstract: In H2 fuel cells,...

248

Bifunctional Anode Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anode Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells. Bifunctional Anode Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells. Abstract: Using the binding energy of OH* and CO* on close-packed...

249

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel...

250

The Science And Engineering of Duralbe Ultralow PGM Catalysts...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Science And Engineering of Duralbe Ultralow PGM Catalysts The Science And Engineering of Duralbe Ultralow PGM Catalysts Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects...

251

Controlling Axial p-n Heterojunction Abruptness Through Catalyst...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Axial p-n Heterojunction Abruptness Through Catalyst Alloying in Vapor-Liquid-Solid Grown Semiconductor Nanowires. Controlling Axial p-n Heterojunction Abruptness Through Catalyst...

252

The Electrode as Organolithium Reagent: Catalyst-Free Covalent...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Electrode as Organolithium Reagent: Catalyst-Free Covalent Attachment of Electrochemically Active Species to an Azide The Electrode as Organolithium Reagent: Catalyst-Free...

253

Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues. Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues....

254

Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts Print Wednesday, 28 January 2009 00:00...

255

Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM Fuel Cells |...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM Fuel Cells Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM Fuel Cells 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

256

New Catalysts for Green Diesel | The Ames Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Catalysts for Green Diesel A new economical and efficient catalyst for upgrading renewable feedstocks to green diesel has been created. Green diesel, produced by converting...

257

Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, November 9, 1991--February 8, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The investigation of methods for the production and testing of iron-pillared clay catalysts was continued in this quarter. The surface area of the mixed alumina/iron pillared clay catalyst decreased to 51 m{sup 2}/g on sulfidation. Thus the stability of the alumina pillars during the sulfidation and thermal treatments prevented the total collapse that occurred in the case of the iron-pillared clays. Previously the mixed alumina/iron pillared clays were tested for hydrocracking activities with bibenzyl. This testing was extended to a determination of activity with a second model compound substrate (pyrene), representative of the polynuclear aromatic systems present in coal. Testing of the mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalysts with 1-methylnaphthalene gave interesting results that demonstrate shape selectivity. The clay-supported iron hydroxyoxide catalysts prepared by impregnation of iron species on acidic clays were further investigated. Sulfidation of these catalysts using the carbon disulfide in situ method gave hydrocracking activities with bibenzyl that were somewhat less than those obtained by presulfidation with H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}S mixtures. Liquefaction of Wyodak subbituminous coal was very successful with the iron impregnated clay catalyst, giving a highly soluble product. High conversions were also obtained with the mixed alumina/iron-pillared clay catalyst, but the yield of oil-solubles was considerably lower. Several new catalysts were synthesized with the idea of decreasing the pillar density and thereby increasing the micropore volume. These catalysts were prepared by first pillaring with an organic ammonium pillaring agent, then introducing a lower number of silica or alumina pillars. Finally the iron component was added either before or after thermal removal of organic pillars.

Olson, E.S.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98% elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, but declined to 79% oxidation after nearly 13 months in service. The other two catalysts, an SCR-type catalyst (titanium/vanadium) and an experimental fly-ash-based catalyst, were significantly less active. The palladium-based and SCR-type catalysts were effectively regenerated at the end of the long-term test by flowing heated air through the catalyst overnight. The carbon-based catalyst was not observed to regenerate, and no regeneration tests were conducted on the fourth, fly-ash-based catalyst. Preliminary process economics were developed for the palladium and carbon-based catalysts for a scrubbed, North Dakota lignite application. As described above, the pilot-scale results showed the catalysts could not sustain 90% or greater oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas for a period of two years. Consequently, the economics were based on performance criteria in a later DOE NETL solicitation, which required candidate mercury control technologies to achieve at least a 55% increase in mercury capture for plants that fire lignite. These economics show that if the catalysts must be replaced every two years, the catalytic oxidation process can be 30 to 40% less costly than conventional (not chemically treated) activated carbon injection if the plant currently sells their fly ash and would lose those sales with carbon injection. If the plant does not sell their fly ash, activated carbon injection was estimated to be slightly less costly. There was little difference in the estimated cost for palladium versus the carbon-based catalysts. If the palladium-based catalyst can be regenerated to double its life to four years, catalytic oxidation process economics are greatly improved. With regeneration, the catalytic oxidation process shows over a 50% reduction in mercury control cost compared to conventional activated carbon injection for a case where the plant sells its fly ash. At Spruce Plant, mercury oxidation catalyst testing began in September 2003 and continued through the end of April 2005, interrupted only by a

Richard Rhudy

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Oxidation of propylene in the presence of catalysts containing copper compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the very significant effect of temperature on catalytic activity, it seems appar? ent that energy transfer sometimes can be of extreme impor? tance, particularly in cases involving highly exothermic reactionso In these cases, failure to remove energy... of control of temperature that exothermic reactions produce? Catalyst behavior has been shown to depend upon many factors other than the chemical nature of the catalytically active agent? Factors such as surface area, crystalling structure, the physical...

Woodham, John Frank

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification and improved processes for catalytic coal gasification for the production of methane. The catalyst is composed of at least two alkali metal salts and a particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used. 10 figures, 2 tables.

McKee, D.W.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.

1984-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Long-term catalyst health care  

SciTech Connect

Now that many US selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems are in their fifth or sixth year of operation, a number of utilities are shifting their attention from implementing the technology to operating and maintaining it. Catalyst management and performance are key to the successful operation of any SCR system. The article looks at the various stages of successful catalyst management. 7 figs.

Scot Pritchard [Cormetech Inc. (United States)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels March 26, 2012 Vanadium catalysts break down biomass into useful components Due to diminishing petroleum reserves, non-food biomass (lignocellulose biomass into high-value commodity chemicals. The journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition published

263

Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;3 Objectives: Development of a durable, low cost, high performance cathode electrode (catalyst and support and Approach Approach: Development of advanced cathode catalysts and supports based on 3M's nanostructured thin Review (6/8/10) Water management for cool/wet transient operation (Task 5.2) Developed key strategy

264

Improved catalyst can clear the air  

SciTech Connect

Catalyst technology can make clean coal plants look as clean as they are. This article examines the need and available methods for SO{sub 2} control with a specific focus on a catalyst technology developed by Cormetech. It also presents the results of commercial operating experience. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Pritchard, S. [Cormetech Inc. (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded.

Doctor, Richard D. (Lisle, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded. 1 figures.

Doctor, R.D.

1993-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

267

Continuous sulfur removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream using a membrane comprising a metal oxide deposited on a porous support is disclosed. 4 figures.

Jalan, V.; Ryu, J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

268

Flame-Made Titania/Silica Epoxidation Catalysts:? Toward Large-Scale Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle laden gases from the burner were filtered through a commercial jet filter unit (Friedli AG, FRR 4/1.6, 2.5 m high, 0.6 m diameter), equipped with four PTFE coated Nomex baghouse filters covering a total surface of 2.2 m2. ... The particles were removed from the filter bags by periodic pressure shocks and collected into a removable container at the bottom of the filtration unit. ... The filtrate without catalyst was kept at 90 °C, and the concentrations of all species were monitored as for normal runs. ...

Wendelin J. Stark; Hendrik K. Kammler; Reto Strobel; Detlef Günther; Alfons Baiker; Sotiris E. Pratsinis

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

269

Catalysts for the hydrodenitrogenation of organic materials and process for the preparation of the catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention discloses a process for forming a catalyst for the hydrodenitrogenation of an organic feedstock, which includes (a) obtaining a precatalyst comprising cobalt and molybdenum or nickel and molybdenum; (b) adding in a non-oxidizing an atmosphere selected from hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, neon, argon, carbon monoxide or mixtures thereof to the precatalyst of step (a), a transition met ORIGIN OF THE INVENTION This invention was made in the course of research partially sponsored by the Department of Energy through grants DE-FG22-83P C60781 and DE-FG-85-PC80906, and partially supported by grant CHE82-19541 of the National Science Foundation. The invention is subject to Public Law 96-517 (and amendments), and the United States Government has rights in the present invention.

Laine, Richard M. (Palo Alto, CA); Hirschon, Albert S. (Menlo Park, CA); Wilson, Jr., Robert B. (Mountain View, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Recent Progress of Counter Electrode Catalysts in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each catalyst and put forward ideas for designing new CE catalysts in future research for DSCs and other application fields. ... (79) As pointed out previously,(37) opacity is another disadvantage of carbon CEs, and development of transparent carbon materials for DSCs will become a promising research direction in the future. ... Although the energy conversion efficiency of such modified SnO2 electrodes is still inferior to that of the usually employed TiO2 electrodes, the larger band gap of SnO2 offers the advantage of better long-term stability of the solar cell in the presence of UV light. ...

Mingxing Wu; Tingli Ma

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

271

Nanostructured carbide catalysts for the hydrogen economy  

SciTech Connect

The above quote, taken from the executive summary of the Report from the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences Workshop held August 6–8, 2007,[1] places in context the research carried out at the University of California, Santa Barbara, which is reported in this document. The enormous impact of heterogeneous catalysis is exemplified by the Haber process for the synthesis of ammonia, which consumes a few % of the world’s energy supply and natural gas, and feeds as many as a third of the world’s population. While there have been numerous advances in understanding the process,[2] culminating in the awarding of the Nobel Prize to Gerhard Ertl in 2007, it is interesting to note that the catalysts themselves have changed very little since they were discovered heuristically in the the early part of the 20th century. The thesis of this report is that modern materials chemistry, with all the empirical knowledge of solid state chemistry, combined with cutting edge structural tools, can help develop and better heterogeneous catalysis. The first part of this report describes research in the area of early transition metal carbides (notably of Mo and W), potentially useful catalysts for water gas shift (WGS) and related reactions of use to the hydrogen economy. Although these carbides have been known to be catalytically useful since the 1970s,[3] further use of these relatively inexpensive materials have been plagued by issues of low surface areas and ill-defined, and often unreactive surfaces, in conjunction with deactivation. We have employed for the first time, a combination of constant-wavelength and time-of-flight neutron scattering, including a total scattering analysis of the latter data, to better understand what happens in these materials, in a manner that for the first time, reveals surface graphitic carbon in these materials in a quantitative manner. Problems of preparation, surface stability, and irreversible reactivity have become manifest in this class of materials that discourage us from pursuing these materials further.

Ram Seshadri, Susannah Scott, Juergen Eckert

2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

272

Development of a catalyst for conversion of syngas-derived materials to isobutylene  

SciTech Connect

The initial objective of this program was to develop a catalyst and process for the conversion of synthesis gas to isobutylene via the isosynthesis process. Preliminary work directed at identifying potential catalysts for this reaction did not have promising results. Therefore, the objectives of this program were revised to the development of a catalyst and process for the conversion of synthesis gas to isobutanol. Two approaches have been investigated in this area: the direct conversion of synthesis gas to higher alcohols and indirect conversion via methanol produced using conventional methanol synthesis technology. The isosynthesis reaction for the conversion of synthesis gas to branched hydrocarbons was pioneered by German workers during World War II The primary products of this reaction are either isobutane or isobutylene depending on the catalyst system used. Thoria-based catalysts were found to give the highest yields, but virtually all of the products were alkanes. More recently, there have been several reports of olefin production using ZrO{sub 2}-based. The preliminary work in this program focussed on the evaluation of ZrO{sub 2} and modified ZrO{sub 2} catalysts for the direct conversion of CO/H{sub 2} to isobutylene via the isosynthesis reaction. All of the catalysts and conditions evaluated in this work gave isobutylene yields of less than 4% which is far below that required for an economically viable process. A summary of the key results from this portion of the project is given in Section 3.6. In view of the poor performance of these catalysts and the lack any encouraging results from other research groups working in the isosynthesis area, this approach was abandoned in favor of approaches related to higher alcohols synthesis.

Barger, P.T.; Spehlmann, B.C.; Gajda, G.J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Premier lauds Tessonics as economic catalyst (Daily News May 7, 2007) A company founded by a University of Windsor professor as a way to bring his research innovations to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, computer science, biology, and even the Odette School of Business. "Actually, the business students work the award, which includes a research grant of $200,000, shows the value of applied sciences: "It's a good in biomedical research, possibly in conjunction with the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry ­ Windsor

274

Alternative formulations of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The major source of man-made SO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is the burning of coal for electric power generation. Coal-fired utility plants are also large sources of NO{sub x} pollution. Regenerable flue gas desulfurization/NO{sub x} abatement catalysts provide one mechanism of simultaneously removing SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} species from flue gases released into the atmosphere. The purpose of this project is to examine routes of optimizing the adsorption efficiency, the adsorption capacity, and the ease of regeneration of regenerable flue gas cleanup catalysts. We are investigating two different mechanisms for accomplishing this goal. The first involves the use of different alkali and alkaline earth metals as promoters for the alumina sorbents to increase the surface basicity of the sorbent and thus adjust the number and distribution of adsorption sites. The second involves investigation of non-aqueous impregnation, as opposed to aqueous impregnation, as a method to obtain an evenly dispersed monolayer of the promoter on the surface.

Mitchell, M.B.; White, M.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Optimization of Rhodium-Based Catalysts for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis – 2012 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). In recent years, this research has primarily involved the further development of catalysts containing rhodium and manganese based on the results of earlier catalyst screening tests. Testing continued in FY 2012 to further improve the Ir-promoted RhMn catalysts on both silica and carbon supports for producing mixed oxygenates from synthesis gas. This testing re-examined selected alternative silica and carbon supports to follow up on some uncertainties in the results with previous test results. Additional tests were conducted to further optimize the total and relative concentrations of Rh, Mn, and Ir, and to examine selected promoters and promoter combinations based on earlier results. To establish optimum operating conditions, the effects of the process pressure and the feed gas composition also were evaluated.

Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Thompson, Becky L.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS ON DUAL-UEGO ACTIVE CATALYST CONTROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS ON DUAL-UEGO ACTIVE CATALYST CONTROL Giovanni Fiengo Jessy W. Grizzle ignition engine equipped with a three-way catalyst and pre- and post-catalyst oxygen sensors. The control hydrocarbons. Linear exhaust gas oxygen sensors are used to measure pre- and post-catalyst air-fuel ratio

Grizzle, Jessy W.

277

CATALYST ENHANCED MICRO SCALE BATCHCATALYST ENHANCED MICRO SCALE BATCH ASSEMBLYASSEMBLY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CATALYST ENHANCED MICRO SCALE BATCHCATALYST ENHANCED MICRO SCALE BATCH ASSEMBLYASSEMBLY RajashreeCollection/Analysis Capabilities · Parts (800x800x50µmParts (800x800x50µm33 ) and catalysts (2x2x.5mm) and catalysts (2x2x.5mm33 non-participating millimeter scale parts that act as `catalysts'. We present experimental results

278

Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula: PS --R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS --H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS --Br; treating said PS --Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS --Li; substituting said PS-- Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

Vollhardt, Kurt P. C. (Kensington, CA); Perkins, Patrick (Berkeley, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula: PS --R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS --H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS --Br; treating said PS --Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS --Li; substituting said PS-- Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

Vollhardt, Kurt P. C. (Kensington, CA); Perkins, Patrick (Berkeley, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula PS -R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS -H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS -Br; treating said PS -Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS -Li; substituting said PS - Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

Vollhardt, Kurt P. C. (Kensington, CA); Perkins, Patrick (Berkeley, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Adsorption of hydrogen on copper catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Copper catalysts display a high activity and selectivity in the hydrogenation of various carbonyl compounds, and copper is a component of the complex catalysts for the synthesis of methanol from CO and H/sub 2/. The adsorption of H/sub 2/ on copper catalysts has been studied by means of thermal desorption. The molecular form of adsorption of H/sub 2/ has been established, the thermal desorption parameters calculated, and the heat of adsorption of H/sub 2/ on a copper surface estimated.

Pavlenko, N.V.; Tripol'skii, A.I.; Golodets, G.I.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Steam reforming utilizing iron oxide catalyst  

SciTech Connect

High activity steam reforming iron oxide catalysts are described. Such catalysts can be unsupported utilizing at least 90% by weight iron oxide and various modifiers (Ai/sub 2/O/sub 3/, K/sub 2/O, CaO, SiO/sub 2/) or unmodified and supported on such things as alumina, CaO impregnated alumina, and lanthanum stabilized alumina. When used in steam reformers such as autothermal and tubular steam reformers, these catalysts demonstrate much improved resistance to carbon plugging.

Setzer, H. T.; Bett, J. A. S.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

283

Drum lid removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tool for removing the lid of a metal drum wherein the lid is clamped over the drum rim without protruding edges, the tool having an elongated handle with a blade carried by an angularly positioned holder affixed to the midsection of the handle, the blade being of selected width to slice between lid lip and the drum rim and, when the blade is so positioned, upward motion of the blade handle will cause the blade to pry the lip from the rim and allow the lid to be removed.

Pella, Bernard M. (Martinez, GA); Smith, Philip D. (North Augusta, SC)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

284

NETL Research Results in New U.S. Patents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

14, 2013 14, 2013 NETL Research Results in New U.S. Patents Innovations Make Energy Use Cleaner, More Economical Pittsburgh, Pa. - Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) received nine patents in 2012 for innovations that address the Nation's energy challenges. The patents include an integrated process for removing pollutants from fossil-fuel combustion systems; a metallurgical melting process to produce defective-free metal ingots; catalysts that make it easier to reform hydrocarbon fuels; stainless steel compositions and heat treatment processes to enhance stainless steel durability; a method to measure the circulation rate of coal solids in gasification reactors; and a process to separate and purify carbon dioxide (CO2). Deployment of these technologies will enhance energy efficiency, improve metallurgical processes, and allow for better emissions monitoring and control.

285

Predicting the Effect of Catalyst Axial Active Site Distributions on a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Zone-coated diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) can be used to obtain overall improved performance in oxidation reaction extents. However, why this occurs and under what conditions… (more)

Al-Adwani, Suad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Catalyst for methanol synthesis: Preparation and activation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phase composition and structure of the initial and reduced forms of the copper-zinc oxide catalysts for methanol synthesis are discussed. The mechanism of the process is discussed.

T. M. Yurieva

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Poisoning and Sulfation on Vanadia SCR Catalyst.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Deactivation of titania-supported vanadia commercial SCR catalysts exposed to flue gases from both coal and coal-biomass co-firing boilers were investigated. BET surface area and average… (more)

Guo, Xiaoyu 1974-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Poisoning and Sulfation on Vanadia SCR Catalyst.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Deactivation of titania-supported vanadia commercial SCR catalysts exposed to flue gases from both coal and coal-biomass co-firing boilers were investigated. BET surface area and… (more)

Guo, Xiaoyu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Clay Minerals as Catalysts and Adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... largely devoted to a discussion on the use of clay minerals as catalysts and industrial adsorbents ; in the later part of the afternoon some general papers Were also given. ...

D. M. C. MACEWAN

1948-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Building Better Catalysts for Splitting Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists are eagerly developing catalysts to lower the energy demands, and thus the cost, of H2 production. Yet, they still struggle with the basics, such as what structural...

291

Combustion Catalysts in Industry- An Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications of combustion catalysts for coal are presented. Combustion efficiency and calculations are discussed, followed by an explanation of the theories of combustion catalysis and a review of three case histories....

Merrell, G. A.; Knight, R. S.

292

Extended Platinum Nanotubes as Fuel Cell Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Energy consumption has relied principally on fossil fuels as an energy source; fuel cells, however, can provide a clean and sustainable alternative, an answer to the depletion and climate change concerns of fossil fuels. Within proton exchange membrane fuel cells, high catalyst cost and poor durability limit the commercial viability of the device. Recently, platinum nanotubes (PtNTs) were studied as durable, active catalysts, providing a platform to meet US Department of Energy vehicular activity targets.[1] Porous PtNTs were developed to increase nanotube surface area, improving mass activity for oxygen reduction without sacrificing durability.[2] Subsurface platinum was then replaced with palladium, forming platinum-coated palladium nanotubes.[3] By forming a core shell structure, platinum utilization was increased, reducing catalyst cost. Alternative substrates have also been examined, modifying platinum surface facets and increasing oxygen reduction specific activity. Through modification of the PtNT platform, catalyst limitations can be reduced, ensuring a commercially viable device.

Alia, S.; Pivovar, B. S.; Yan, Y.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Oxford Catalysts Group plc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oxford Catalysts Group plc Oxford Catalysts Group plc Jump to: navigation, search Name Oxford Catalysts Group plc Place Oxford, United Kingdom Zip OX2 6UD Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Developer of catalysts for room-temperature hydrogen production, hot steam production and Fischer-Tropsch processes. Coordinates 43.781517°, -89.571699° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.781517,"lon":-89.571699,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

294

Condensate removal device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A condensate removal device is disclosed which incorporates a strainer in unit with an orifice. The strainer is cylindrical with its longitudinal axis transverse to that of the vapor conduit in which it is mounted. The orifice is positioned inside the strainer proximate the end which is remoter from the vapor conduit.

Maddox, James W. (Newport News, VA); Berger, David D. (Alexandria, VA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques  

SciTech Connect

Research in this project centers upon developing a new approach to the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates all aspects of the coal liquefaction process including coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, coal liquefaction experimentation, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. On May 28, 1992, the Department of Energy authorized starting the experimental aspects of this projects; therefore, experimentation at Amoco started late in this quarterly report period. Research contracts with Auburn University, Pennsylvania State University, and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation were signed during June, 1992, so their work was just getting underway. Their work will be summarized in future quarterly reports. A set of coal samples were sent to Hazen Research for beneficiation. The samples were received and have been analyzed. The literature search covering coal swelling has been up-dated, and preliminary coal swelling experiments were carried out. Further swelling experimentation is underway. An up-date of the literature on the liquefaction of coal using dispersed catalysts is nearing completion; it will be included in the next quarterly report.

Curtis, C.W. (Auburn Univ., AL (United States)); Gutterman, C. (Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)); Chander, S. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States))

1992-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

296

30 News in Engineering RESEARCH UPDATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for this technology, and experts believe the type of fuel cell best suited to cars is one that runs on hydrogen. Ohio Environmentally Safer Catalyst Aids Hydrogen Production Around the world, researchers are working to develop fuel a toxic metal common to other catalysts. "Hydrogen is the ultimate fuel," said Umit Ozkan, professor

Davis, James W.

297

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

298

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

299

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Wednesday, 28 January 2009 00:00 The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

300

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

302

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

303

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles dispersed on high-surface-area supports. While these particles are the active elements of the catalyst, the overall performance depends not only on their size and composition but also on their multiple interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even the catalytically active chemical species is not known. A Dutch team working at the ALS has combined scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with a reaction chamber adapted from electron microscopy to identify the chemical species present for an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst and to image their distribution on the nanoscale. When developed further, this new tool may give chemists the ability to design and tailor catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes.

304

Extended Two Dimensional Nanotube and Nanowire Surfaces as Fuel Cell Catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the development of PEMFC cathode catalysts. The Pt content70] Conclusions PEMFC cathode catalysts were developed wereFor PEMFC development, highly active cathode catalysts are

Alia, Shaun Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

One-Pot Formation of Functionalized Indole and Benzofuran Derivatives Using a Single Bifunctional Ruthenium Catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bifunctional Ruthenium Catalyst Reji N. Nair • Paul J. Lee •bifunctional ruthenium catalyst for cyclization of terminalof transi- tion metal based catalysts have been reported to

Nair, Reji N; Lee, Paul J; Grotjahn, Douglas B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Single Bifunctional Ruthenium Catalyst for One-Pot Cyclization and Hydration giving Functionalized Indoles and Benzofurans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soc. 2004, 126, 12232. Catalyst 1 is now available from7992 – 7995 Bifunctional Ruthenium Catalyst COMMUNICATIONuse of bifunctional catalyst 1 for hydration and cycliza-

Nair, Rejiâ??N.; Lee, Paulâ??J.; Rheingold, Arnoldâ??L.; Grotjahn, Douglasâ??B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Nanolithographic Fabrication and Heterogeneous Reaction Studies of Two-Dimensional Platinum Model Catalyst Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and truly tune the catalyst to the reaction. References 1.Gavriilidis, A. Varma, Catalyst Design, Cambridge UniversityStructure of Metallic Catalysts, Academic Press, London,

Contreras, A.M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A Well-Defined, Silica-Supported Tungsten Imido Alkylidene Olefin Metathesis Catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

olefin metathesis catalyst. Bouchra Rhers, a Alain Salameh,active propene metathesis catalyst, which can achieve 16000W-based olefin metathesis catalyst through the reaction of [

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Effects of Membrane- and Catalyst-layer-thickness Nonuniformities in Polymer-electrolyte Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thicknesses for the membrane and catalyst layer. Figure 2.of dry membrane (a) and catalyst-layer (b) thickness (andhollow symbols) and catalyst-layer (filled symbols)

Weber, Adam Z.; Newman, John

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative silp-scr catalysts Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Ce 16 3. Catalysts based on alternative... .2 Catalytic activity of iron based PILC catalysts 24 4. Catalysts based on alternative support materials... , which deals with...

311

The Corrosion of PEM Fuel Cell Catalyst Supports and Its Implications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Corrosion of PEM Fuel Cell Catalyst Supports and Its Implications for Developing Durable Catalysts. The Corrosion of PEM Fuel Cell Catalyst Supports and Its Implications for...

312

Experimental Study of In Situ Combustion with Decalin and Metallic Catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a hydrogen donor and a catalyst for upgrading and increasing oil recovery during in situ combustion is a known and proven technique. Based on research conducted on this process, it is clear that widespread practice in industry is the usage...

Mateshov, Dauren

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

313

New Catalyst Might Expand Bio-Ethanol's Possible uses: fuel additives, rubber and solvents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environmentally friendly products including octane- boosting gas and rubber for tires. #12;WHAT'S NEXT? FutureNew Catalyst Might Expand Bio-Ethanol's Usefulness Possible uses: fuel additives, rubber it first, potentially keeping costs lower and production times faster. Reported by researchers

314

Monodisperse metal nanoparticle catalysts on silica mesoporous supports: synthesis, characterizations, and catalytic reactions  

SciTech Connect

The design of high performance catalyst achieving near 100% product selectivity at maximum activity is one of the most important goals in the modern catalytic science research. To this end, the preparation of model catalysts whose catalytic performances can be predicted in a systematic and rational manner is of significant importance, which thereby allows understanding of the molecular ingredients affecting the catalytic performances. We have designed novel 3-dimensional (3D) high surface area model catalysts by the integration of colloidal metal nanoparticles and mesoporous silica supports. Monodisperse colloidal metal NPs with controllable size and shape were synthesized using dendrimers, polymers, or surfactants as the surface stabilizers. The size of Pt, and Rh nanoparticles can be varied from sub 1 nm to 15 nm, while the shape of Pt can be controlled to cube, cuboctahedron, and octahedron. The 3D model catalysts were generated by the incorporation of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica supports via two methods: capillary inclusion (CI) and nanoparticle encapsulation (NE). The former method relies on the sonication-induced inclusion of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica, whereas the latter is performed by the encapsulation of metal nanoparticles during the hydrothermal synthesis of mesoporous silica. The 3D model catalysts were comprehensively characterized by a variety of physical and chemical methods. These catalysts were found to show structure sensitivity in hydrocarbon conversion reactions. The Pt NPs supported on mesoporous SBA-15 silica (Pt/SBA-15) displayed significant particle size sensitivity in ethane hydrogenolysis over the size range of 1-7 nm. The Pt/SBA-15 catalysts also exhibited particle size dependent product selectivity in cyclohexene hydrogenation, crotonaldehyde hydrogenation, and pyrrole hydrogenation. The Rh loaded SBA-15 silica catalyst showed structure sensitivity in CO oxidation reaction. In addition, Pt-mesoporous silica core-shell structured NPs (Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2}) were prepared, where the individual Pt NP is encapsulated by the mesoporous silica layer. The Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} catalysts showed promising catalytic activity in high temperature CO oxidation. The design of catalytic structures with tunable parameters by rational synthetic methods presents a major advance in the field of catalyst synthesis, which would lead to uncover the structure-function relationships in heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

Somorjai, G.A.

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

315

NETL: Gasification Systems - Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Warm Gas Multi-Contaminant Removal System Project Number: DE-SC00008243 TDA Research, Inc. is developing a high-capacity, low-cost sorbent that removes anhydrous ammonia (NH3), mercury (Hg), and trace contaminants from coal- and coal/biomass-derived syngas. The clean-up system will be used after the bulk warm gas sulfur removal step, and remove NH3 and Hg in a regenerable manner while irreversibly capturing all other trace metals (e.g., Arsenic, Selenium) reducing their concentrations to sub parts per million (ppm) levels. Current project plans include identifying optimum chemical composition and structure that provide the best sorbent performance for removing trace contaminants, determining the effect of operating parameters, conducting multiple-cycle experiments to test the life of the sorbent for NH3 and Hg removal, and conducting a preliminary design of the sorbent reactor.

316

Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing: Direct coal liquefaction of rawhide sub-bituminous coal. Final topical report, June 1994--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

Supported catalysts, either in fixed bed or ebullating bed reactors, are subject to deactivation with time, especially if the feed contains deactivating species, such as metals and coke precursors. Dispersed catalyst systems avoid significant catalyst deactivation because there are no catalyst pores to plug, hence no pore mouth plugging, and hopefully, no relevant decline of catalyst surface area or pore volume. The tests carried out in 1994, at the Exxon Research and Development Laboratories (ERDL) for DOE covered a slate of 5 dispersed catalysts for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal, which is similar to the Black Thunder coal tested earlier at Wilsonville. The catalysts included three iron and two molybdenum types. The Bailey iron oxide and the two molybdenum catalysts have previously been tested in DOE-sponsored research. These known catalysts will be used to help provide a base line and tie-in to previous work. The two new catalysts, Bayferrox PK 5210 and Mach-1`s Nanocat are very finely divided iron oxides. The iron oxide addition rate was varied from 1.0 to 0.25 wt % (dry coal basis) but the molybdenum addition rate remained constant at 100 wppm throughout the experiments. The effect of changing recycle rate, sulfur and iron oxide addition rates, first stage reactor temperature, mass velocity and catalyst type were tested in the 1994 operations of ERDL`s recycle coal liquefaction unit (RCLU). DOE will use these results to update economics and plan future work. The test program will resume in mid 1995, with another 2-3 months of pilot plant testing.

Coless, L.A.; Poole, M.C.; Wen, M.Y.

1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

317

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed-structure mercury sorbent upstream. This final report presents and discusses detailed results from all of these efforts, and makes a number of conclusions about what was learned through these efforts.

Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Method of treating emissions of a hybrid vehicle with a hydrocarbon absorber and a catalyst bypass system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of treating emissions from an internal combustion engine of a hybrid vehicle includes directing a flow of air created by the internal combustion engine when the internal combustion engine is spinning but not being fueled through a hydrocarbon absorber to collect hydrocarbons within the flow of air. When the hydrocarbon absorber is full and unable to collect additional hydrocarbons, the flow of air is directed through an electrically heated catalyst to treat the flow of air and remove the hydrocarbons. When the hydrocarbon absorber is not full and able to collect additional hydrocarbons, the flow of air is directed through a bypass path that bypasses the electrically heated catalyst to conserve the thermal energy stored within the electrically heated catalyst.

Roos, Bryan Nathaniel; Gonze, Eugene V; Santoso, Halim G; Spohn, Brian L

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

319

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control - Emissions & Emission Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control Catalysts for controlling NOx from lean engines are studied in great detail at FEERC. Lean NOx Traps (LNTs) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) are two catalyst technologies of interest. Catalysts are studied from the nanoscale to full scale. On the nanoscale, catalyst powders are analyzed with chemisorptions techniques to determine the active metal surface area where catalysis occurs. Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy is used to observe the chemical reactions occurring on the catalyst surface during catalyst operation. Both powder and coated catalyst samples are analyzed on bench flow reactors in controlled simulated exhaust environments to better characterize the chemical

320

Characteristics of vanadia on the surface of V2O5/Ti-PILC catalyst for the reduction of \\{NOx\\} by NH3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of vanadia catalysts impregnated on titania pillared interlayered clays (Ti-PILCs) were prepared to identify the characteristics of vanadia on the surface of Ti-PILC for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by NH3. V2O5/Ti-PILC exhibited superior performance as a novel SCR catalyst compared to conventional catalysts including V2O5/TiO2 and V2O5/Al2O3. NO removal activity over the supported vanadia catalyst is strongly influenced by the structure of vanadia species on the catalyst surface. The structure of vanadia species on various supports including TiO2, Al2O3, and SiO2 along with Ti-PILC has been examined by XRD, NMR and Raman analyses for the comparative study. Increasing the content of vanadia up to the monolayer coverage of the surface of Ti-PILC catalyst enhanced the ratio of the polymerized surface vanadia species to the isolated ones. These results are well correlated with TOF of vanadia on the catalyst surface for the reduction of NO by NH3.

Ho Jeong Chae; In-Sik Nam; Sung-Won Ham; Suk Bong Hong

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

A Broad Spectrum Catalytic System for Removal of Toxic Organics from Water by Deep Oxidation - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A most pressing need for the DOE environmental management program is the removal of toxic organic compounds present in groundwater and soil at specific DOE sites. While several remediation procedures have been proposed, they suffer from one or more drawbacks. The objective of the present research was to develop new catalytic procedures for the removal of toxic organic compounds from the environment through their deep oxidation to harmless products. In water, metallic palladium was found to catalyze the deep oxidation of a wide variety of toxic organic compounds by dioxygen at 80-90 C in the presence of carbon monoxide or dihydrogen. Several classes of organic compounds were examined: benzene, phenol and substituted phenols, nitro and halo organics, organophosphorus, and organosulfur compounds. In every case, deep oxidation to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water occurred in high yields, resulting in up to several hundred turnovers over a 24 hour period. For substrates susceptible to hydrogenation, the conversions were generally high with dihydrogen than with carbon monoxide. It is clear from the results obtained that we have discovered an exceptionally versatile catalytic system for the deep oxidation of toxic organic compounds in water. This system possesses several attractive features not found simultaneously in other reported systems. These are (a) the ability to directly utilize dioxygen as the oxidant, (b) the ability to carry out the deep oxidation of a particularly wide range of functional organics, and (c) the ease of recovery of the catalyst by simple filtration.

Sen, Ayusman

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

DOE Removes Brookhaven Contractor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Removes DOE Removes Brookhaven Contractor Peña sends a message to DOE facilities nationwide INSIDE 2 Accelerator Rx 4 FermiKids 6 Spring at Fermilab Photos courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory by Judy Jackson, Office of Public Affairs Secretary of Energy Federico Peña announced on Thursday, May 1, that the Department of Energy would immediately terminate the current management contract with Associated Universities, Inc. at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York. Peña said that he made the decision after receiving the results of a laboratory safety management review conducted by the independent oversight arm of DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. In addition, the Secretary said he found unacceptable "the continued on page 8 Volume 20 Friday, May 16, 1997

323

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

Neuhaus, J.E.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

324

Development of Vanadium Phosphaate Catalysts for Methanol Production by Selective Oxidation of Methane.  

SciTech Connect

This DOE sponsored study of methane partial oxidation was initiated at Amax Research and Development in Golden, CO in October of 1993. Shortly thereafter the management of Amax closed this R&D facility and the PI moved to the Colorado School of Mines. The project was begun again after contract transfer via a novation agreement. Experimental work began with testing of vandyl pyrophosphate (VPO), a well known alkane selective oxidation catalyst. It was found that VPO was not a selective catalyst for methane conversion yielding primarily CO. However, promotion of VPO with Fe, Cr, and other first row transition metals led to measurable yields for formaldehyde, as noted in the summary table. Catalyst characterization studies indicated that the role of promoters was to stabilize some of the vanadium in the V{sup 5+} oxidation state rather than the V{sup 4+} state formally expected for (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}.

McCormick, R.L.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the seventh Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

326

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, the available data from laboratory, pilot and full-scale SCR units was reviewed, leading to hypotheses about the mechanism for mercury oxidation by SCR catalysts.

Constance Senior

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a review of the available data on mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts from small, laboratory-scale experiments, pilot-scale slipstream reactors and full-scale power plants was carried out. Data from small-scale reactors obtained with both simulated flue gas and actual coal combustion flue gas demonstrated the importance of temperature, ammonia, space velocity and chlorine on mercury oxidation across SCR catalyst. SCR catalysts are, under certain circumstances, capable of driving mercury speciation toward the gas-phase equilibrium values at SCR temperatures. Evidence suggests that mercury does not always reach equilibrium at the outlet. There may be other factors that become apparent as more data become available.

Constance Senior

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction. Technical progress report, October--December 1991  

SciTech Connect

The general objectives of this research are (1) to investigate the use of highly dispersed catalysts for the pretreatment of coal by mild hydrogenation, (2) to identify the active forms of the catalysts under reaction conditions and (3) to clarify the mechanisms of catalysis. The ultimate objective is to ascertain if mild catalytic hydrogenation resulting in very limited or no coal solubilization is an advantageous pretreatment for the transformation of coal into transportable fuels. The experimental program will focus upon the development of effective methods of impregnating coal with catalysts, evaluating the conditions under which the catalysts are most active and establishing the relative impact of improved impregnation on conversion and product distributions obtained from coal hydrogenation.

Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

On the performance and mechanisms of toluene removal by FeOx/SBA-15-assisted non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure and room temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract FeOx/SBA-15 catalysts were prepared via impregnation and utilized for toluene removal in dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Toluene removal was investigated in the environment of various mixed N2/O2 plasmas, showing that toluene removal efficiency and \\{COx\\} selectivity were greatly increased by FeOx/SBA-15 and that the organic intermediates were greatly reduced by catalysts. In pure N2 plasma, the bulk oxygen in the catalyst was involved in the toluene oxidation, and the 3%FeOx/SBA-15 catalyst showed the optimal toluene oxidation activity. The catalysts were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption–desorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and O2 temperature-programmed desorption (O2-TPD), showing that toluene oxidation was closely related to the highly dispersed nature of iron on the SBA-15 surface, the reduction temperature of Fe2+ and the oxygen adsorption ability of the catalyst. The pathways of toluene decomposition in the combination of FeOx/SBA-15 with a non-thermal plasma (NTP) system were proposed based on the identified intermediates.

Meijuan Lu; Rong Huang; Junliang Wu; Mingli Fu; Limin Chen; Daiqi Ye

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

New applications of noble metal catalysts in hydrocracking  

SciTech Connect

The paper explores how a noble metal hydrocracking catalyst functions stably in a hydrogen sulfide and ammonia environment and, in particular, how the physical positioning of the noble metal molecules affects catalyst performance. A commercial example, HC-28 catalyst in the Unicracking unit at Marathon Oil Refinery in Robinson, Illinois, demonstrates the success of the noble metal catalyst approach for naphtha production. In addition, a new Unicracking catalyst, HC-35, which uses a noble metal component to produce high-quality middle distillates, is introduced. The paper also shows how refiners may derive increased economic and operational benefits from their catalyst investment by using the latest developments in reactor internals design.

Mitchell, D.H.G.; Bertram, R.V. [UOP, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Dencker, G.D. [Marathon Oil Co., Robinson, IL (United States). Illinois Refining Div.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Removal of asphaltene and paraffin deposits using micellar solutions and fused reactions. Final report, 1995--1997  

SciTech Connect

Chemical treatments of paraffin and asphaltene deposition by means of cleaning fluids were carried out in this research project. Research focused on the characterization of asphaltene and paraffin materials and dissolution of asphaltene and paraffin deposits using surfactant/micellar fluids developed early in the project. The key parameters controlling the dissolution rate were identified and the process of asphaltene/paraffin dissolution were examined using microscopic apparatus. Numerical modeling was also carried out to understand the dissolution of paraffin deposits. The results show that fused chemical reaction systems are a promising way of removing paraffin deposits in subsea pipelines. The fused system may be in the form of alternate pulses, emulsions systems or encapsulated catalyst systems. Fused reaction systems, in fact, are extremely cost-effective--less than 10% of the cost of replacing entire sections of the blocked pipeline. The results presented in this report can have a real impact on the petroleum industry and the National Oil Program, if it is realized that the remediation technologies developed here can substantially delay abandonment (due to asphaltene/paraffin plugging) of domestic petroleum resources. The report also sheds new light on the nature and properties of asphaltenes and paraffin deposits which will ultimately help the scientific and research community to develop effective methods in eliminating asphaltene/paraffin deposition problems. It must also be realized that asphaltene remediation technologies developed and presented in this report are a real alternative to aromatic cleaning fluids currently used by the petroleum industry.

Chang, C.L.; Nalwaya, V.; Singh, P.; Fogler, H.S.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Homogeneous catalysts in hypersonic combustion  

SciTech Connect

Density and residence time both become unfavorably small for efficient combustion of hydrogen fuel in ramjet propulsion in air at high altitude and hypersonic speed. Raising the density and increasing the transit time of the air through the engine necessitates stronger contraction of the air flow area. This enhances the kinetic and thermodynamic tendency of H/sub 2/O to form completely, accompanied only by N/sub 2/ and any excess H/sub 2/(or O/sub 2/). The by-products to be avoided are the energetically expensive fragment species H and/or O atoms and OH radicals, and residual (2H/sub 2/ plus O/sub 2/). However, excessive area contraction raises air temperature and consequent combustion-product temperature by adiabatic compression. This counteracts and ultimately overwhelms the thermodynamic benefit by which higher density favors the triatomic product, H/sub 2/O, over its monatomic and diatomic alternatives. For static pressures in the neighborhood of 1 atm, static temperature must be kept or brought below ca. 2400 K for acceptable stability of H/sub 2/O. Another measure, whose requisite chemistry we address here, is to extract propulsive work from the combustion products early in the expansion. The objective is to lower the static temperature of the combustion stream enough for H/sub 2/O to become adequately stable before the exhaust flow is massively expanded and its composition ''frozen.'' We proceed to address this mechanism and its kinetics, and then examine prospects for enhancing its rate by homogeneous catalysts. 9 refs.

Harradine, D.M.; Lyman, J.L.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Pack, R.T.; Schott, G.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing: Direct coal liquification of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal. Technical report, July 1995--December 1995  

SciTech Connect

In 1994 extensive tests were conducted in the Exxon Research and Engineering Recycle Coal Liquefaction Unit (RCLU) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The work conducted in 1994 explored a variety of dispersed iron molybdenum promoted catalyst systems for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide subbituminus coal. The goal was to identify the preferred iron system. We learned that among the catalysts tested, all were effective; however, none showed a large process advantage over the others. In 1995, we tested dispersed molybdenum catalysts systems for direct coal liquefaction on a second subbituminous coal, Black Thunder. Catalyst properties are shown in Table 1. We also checked a molybdenum promoted iron case, as well as the impact of process variables, such as sulfur type, hydrogen treat rate, and catalyst addition rate, as shown in Table 2. In 1995, we ran 18 material balances over a 7 week period, covering 7 conditions. This report covers the 1995 operations and results.

Coless, L.A.; Poole, M.C.; Wen, M.Y.

1996-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

334

Membrane Based intensification of ammonia removal from wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this research was to study a novel membrane based oxygen intensification system to enhance a biological wastewater treatment process for ammonia removal. Specifically, this work is concerned with the biological nitrification process which...

Almutairi, Azel

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Ordered Vertex Removal Subgraph Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the vertex removal and subgraph problems are shown to be P­complete. In addition, a natural lex­ icographicOrdered Vertex Removal and Subgraph Problems Ray Greenlaw Department of Computer Science University­8703196. #12; Vertex Removal and Graph Problems Ray Greenlaw Department of Computer Science FR­35

Greenlaw, Ray

336

Methods for sulfate removal in liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass  

SciTech Connect

Processing of wet biomass feedstock by liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a pre-treatment temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent removal of soluble sulfate contaminants, or combinations thereof. Processing further includes reacting the soluble sulfate contaminants with cations present in the feedstock material to yield a sulfate-containing precipitate and separating the inorganic precipitates and/or the sulfate-containing precipitates out of the wet feedstock. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfate contaminants that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogenous catalyst for gasification.

Elliott, Douglas C; Oyler, James

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

337

Methods for sulfate removal in liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass  

SciTech Connect

Processing of wet biomass feedstock by liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a pre-treatment temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent removal of soluble sulfate contaminants, or combinations thereof. Processing further includes reacting the soluble sulfate contaminants with cations present in the feedstock material to yield a sulfate-containing precipitate and separating the inorganic precipitates and/or the sulfate-containing precipitates out of the wet feedstock. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfate contaminants that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogeneous catalyst for gasification.

Elliott, Douglas C; Oyler, James R

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

338

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

339

Computational Design of Lignin Depolymerization Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Lignin is a major component of plant cell walls that is typically underutilized in selective conversion strategies for renewable fuels and chemicals. The mechanisms by which thermal and catalytic treatments deconstruct lignin remain elusive, for which quantum mechanical calculations can offer fundamental insights. In this work, a computational approach has been used to elucidate the reductive deconstruction pathway of a ruthenium-catalyzed system. Transition states have been computed to determine the rate-limiting steps for a catalyst that cleaves arylether linkages. Our calculations are supported by experimental synthesis and kinetic and thermodynamic measurements of the deconstruction of model lignin dimers by a ruthenium catalyst with the ultimate objective of designing new catalysts to eventually utilize lignin in biorefineries.

Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Sturgeon, M.; Katahira, R.; Paton, R. S.; Beckham, G. T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Jumping-Catalyst Dynamics in Nanowire Growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanowire growth is generally considered a steady-state process, but oscillatory phenomena are known to often play a fundamental role. Here we identify a natural sequence of distinct growth modes, in two of which the catalyst droplet jumps periodically on and off a crystal facet. The oscillatory modes result from a mismatch between catalyst size and wire diameter; they enable growth of straight smooth-sided wires even when the droplet is too small to span the wire tip. Jumping-catalyst growth modes are seen both in computer simulations of vapor-liquid-solid growth, and in movies of Si nanowire growth obtained by in situ microscopy. Our simulations also provide new insight into nanowire kinking.

K.?W. Schwarz; J. Tersoff; S. Kodambaka; F.?M. Ross

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Catalyst for steam reforming of hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A catalyst's resistance to deactivation by polymer formation is vital to the successful gasification of heavy feedstocks such as kerosene and gas oil. The improved polymer-resistance performance of this steam-reforming catalyst is directly relate to the distribution of the pore sizes in its calcined (but unreduced) precursor form and to a certain pore-size ratio: 1) At least 55% of the pore volume of pores having a radius of between 12 and 120 A(2000A) is in the range of 12-30 A(2000A) and 2) the ratio of the pore volume contained in pores of 10-50 A(2000A) to the volume contained in pores of 50-300 A(2000A) is at least 5:1. The catalyst-preparation method involves coprecipitation with a minimum of heat treatment (at temperatures not greater than 140/sup 0/F or 60/sup 0/C).

Banks, R.G.S.; Williams, A.

1980-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

342

Catalytic studies of supported Pd-Au catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reaction conditions is the ultimate goal. This thesis is mainly focused on the application of Pd-Au supported catalysts for vinyl acetate synthesis and CO oxidation reactions using highsurface area catalysts. We have attempted to improve the conventional Pd...

Boopalachandran, Praveenkumar

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

343

Volatility of Vanadia from Vanadia-Based SCR Catalysts under...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Vanadia from Vanadia-Based SCR Catalysts under Accelerated Aging Conditions Volatility of Vanadia from Vanadia-Based SCR Catalysts under Accelerated Aging Conditions TiO2-supported...

344

Steam Gasification of Biomass Surrogates: Catalyst Development and Kinetic Modelling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study reports a new fluidizable La2O3 promoted Ni/?-Al2O3 catalyst. Prepared catalysts are characterized using BET specific surface area, XRD, TPR, TPO, H2-pulse chemisorptions, Pyridine… (more)

Mazumder, A S M Jahirul Islam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Harvard Catalyst Pilot Grants Projects Funded for Year Three  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harvard Catalyst Pilot Grants Projects Funded for Year Three Experimental Approach to Genotype the Harvard Catalyst Program we aim to:1) Review, select and culturally adapt evidence-based modules from

Paulsson, Johan

346

Reaction of adsorption substitution of oxygen on a cracking catalyst  

SciTech Connect

In an investigation of catalysts for methanol synthesis and carbon monoxide conversion, the authors have observed, for the first time, the reaction of adsorption substitution of strongly bound oxygen on catalysts containing zeolites and compounds of lanthanum and cerium.

Vishnetskaya, M.V.; Takhtarova, G.N.; Topchieva, K.V.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Catalysts for Selective Hydrocarbon Combustion in the Presence of CO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As fast screen for catalyst performance, relative heat of reaction was selected. A high-throughput...35–37]. In brief, the library filled with catalysts was placed in a tight gas phase reactor covered by an IR-tr...

P. Rajagopalan; K. Stöwe; W. F. Maier

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Breakout Session: Open Innovation: SunShot Catalyst & Next Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Open Innovation: SunShot Catalyst & Next Generation Government Prizes Breakout Session: Open Innovation: SunShot Catalyst & Next Generation Government Prizes May 21, 2014 2:45PM to...

349

Long term experiences with HDD SCR Catalysts | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

term experiences with HDD SCR Catalysts Long term experiences with HDD SCR Catalysts Test bench results and on-road experiences of more than 1 million km offer comparisons of...

350

Applications of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation on noble metal catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogenation and dehydrogenation on Pd- and Pt- catalysts are encountered in many industrial hydrocarbon processes. The present work considers the development of catalysts and their kinetic modeling along a general and rigorous approach. The first...

Wang, Bo

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Los Alamos catalyst could jumpstart e-cars, green energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalyst could jumpstart e-cars, green energy Los Alamos catalyst could jumpstart e-cars, green energy The new material has the highest oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity in...

352

Development of Ultra-low Platinum Alloy Cathode Catalyst for...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Development of Ultra-low Platinum Alloy Cathode Catalyst for PEM Fuel Cells Development of Ultra-low Platinum Alloy Cathode Catalyst for PEM Fuel Cells These slides were presented...

353

Deactivation and poisoning of fuel cell catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The deactivation and poisoning phenomena reviewed are: the poisoning of anode (fuel electrode) catalyst by carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide; the deactivation of the cathode (air electrode) catalyst by sintering; and the deactivation of the cathode by corrosion of the support. The anode catalyst is Pt supported on a conductive, high area carbon black, usually at a loading of 10 w/o. This catalyst is tolerant to some level of carbon monoxide or hydrogen sulfide or both in combination, the level depending on temperature and pressure. Carbon monoxide poisoning has been studied extensively, including detailed adsorption studies at various temperatures and pressures. Predictive models have been developed that effectively predict anode tolerance to carbon monoxide. Much less is known about hydrogen sulfide poisoning. Typical tolerance levels are 2% CO, and 10 ppM H/sub 2/S. The cathode catalyst is typically Pt supported on a graphitic carbon black, usually a furnace black heat-treated to 2700/sup 0/C. The Pt loading is typically 10 w/o, and the dispersion (or percent exposed) as-prepared is typically 30%. The loss of dispersion in use depends on the operational parameters, most especially the cathode potential history, i.e. higher potentials cause more rapid decrease in dispersion. The mechanism of loss of dispersion is not well known. The graphitic carbon support corrodes at a finite rate that is also potential dependent. Support corrosion causes thickening of the eletrolyte film between the gas pores and the catalyst particles, which in turn causes increased diffusional resistance and performance loss. In addition, support corrosion may also cause loss of Pt into the separator. Support corrosion appears to be the life limiting factor for phosphoric acid fuel cells.

Ross, P.N. Jr.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

90 Seconds of Discovery: Biofuel Catalyst Life and Plugs  

SciTech Connect

Scientist at PNNL are working to extend the life of the catalysts used in the production of biomass fuels.

Zacher, Alan; Olarte, Mariefel

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

355

Fuel Cell Catalyst Layers: A Polymer Science Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the approaching commercialization of PEM fuel cell technol., developing active, inexpensive non-precious metal ORR catalyst materials to replace currently used Pt-based catalysts is a necessary and essential requirement in order to reduce the overall system cost. ... Polymer electrolyte membranes were catalyzed by direct application of thin film layers cast from solns. of suspended Pt/C catalyst and solubilized Nafion ionomer. ... Identification of dominant transport mechanisms in PEMFC cathode catalyst layers operated under low RH ...

Steven Holdcroft

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

356

Catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The addition of an inert metal component, such as gold, silver or copper, to a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprising cobalt enables said catalyst to convert synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels at about 240.degree.-370.degree. C. with advantageously reduced selectivity of said cobalt for methane in said conversion. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Effects of Hydrothermal Agingon a Commercial Cu SCR Catalyst  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Examines the effect of hydrothermal aging on the Nox reduction over a commercial Cu-zeolite SCR catalyst.

358

Catalyst and process for steam-reforming of hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

An improved catalyst and an improved process for use of the catalyst in the steam-hydrocarbon reforming reaction are disclosed. The catalyst comprises a group VIII metal on a cylindrical ceramic support consisting essentially of alpha alumina and having a plurality of gas passages extending axially therethrough. These supported catalysts display a higher geometric surface area and a lower pressure drop than do standard rings.

Atwood, K.; Merriam, J.S.; Wright, J.H.

1980-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

359

90 Seconds of Discovery: Biofuel Catalyst Life and Plugs  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Scientist at PNNL are working to extend the life of the catalysts used in the production of biomass fuels.

Zacher, Alan; Olarte, Mariefel

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

360

The Challenges for PEMFC Catalysts in Automotive Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation by Stephen Campbell for the 2013 DOE Catalysis Working Group Meeting on PEMFC catalysts in automotive applications.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Reversible chemisorption on highly dispersed Ru catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorptions have been studied by static gas volumetric measurement on a range of highly dispersed Y-zeolite-supported ruthenium catalysts prepared by ion exchange. At ambient temperature, the absorption isotherms indicated two distinct types of adsorption - reversible (composed of both physisorption and weak chemisorption) and irreversible (strongly chemisorbed). The catalysts were highly dispersed and had average particle diameters ranging from 0.9 to 1.6 nm. Reversible hydrogen chemisorption was found to be a function of average particle diameter and dispersion. On the other hand, reversible carbon monoxide chemisorption seemed to be mainly due to interaction with the support.

Yang, C.H.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

This research was supported as part of the Catalysis Center for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New Generations of Zeolite Catalysts This research was conducted by the group of George...

363

Nitrogen removal from natural gas  

SciTech Connect

According to a 1991 Energy Information Administration estimate, U.S. reserves of natural gas are about 165 trillion cubic feet (TCF). To meet the long-term demand for natural gas, new gas fields from these reserves will have to be developed. Gas Research Institute studies reveal that 14% (or about 19 TCF) of known reserves in the United States are subquality due to high nitrogen content. Nitrogen-contaminated natural gas has a low Btu value and must be upgraded by removing the nitrogen. In response to the problem, the Department of Energy is seeking innovative, efficient nitrogen-removal methods. Membrane processes have been considered for natural gas denitrogenation. The challenge, not yet overcome, is to develop membranes with the required nitrogen/methane separation characteristics. Our calculations show that a methane-permeable membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 4 to 6 would make denitrogenation by a membrane process viable. The objective of Phase I of this project was to show that membranes with this target selectivity can be developed, and that the economics of the process based on these membranes would be competitive. Gas permeation measurements with membranes prepared from two rubbery polymers and a superglassy polymer showed that two of these materials had the target selectivity of 4 to 6 when operated at temperatures below - 20{degrees}C. An economic analysis showed that a process based on these membranes is competitive with other technologies for small streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. Hybrid designs combining membranes with other technologies are suitable for high-flow, higher-nitrogen-content streams.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Changes in the catalytic properties of a multicomponent molybdenum catalyst under vibro-fluidized catalyst bed conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Activation effect of oxidative dehydrogenation of butene-l on a multicomponent molybdenum catalyst at various temperatures has been studied by ... only reactive but also adsorption properties of the catalyst surf...

A. V. Simakov; S. A. Veniaminov; W. Walkov…

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

REMOVAL OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS FROM SUBCRITICAL WATER WITH ACTIVATED CARBON  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has demonstrated that controlling the temperature (and to a lesser extent, the pressure) of water can dramatically change its ability to extract organics and inorganics from matrices ranging from soils and sediments to waste sludges and coal. The dielectric constant of water can be changed from about 80 (a very polar solvent) to <5 (similar to a nonpolar organic solvent) by controlling the temperature (from ambient to about 400 C) and pressure (from about 5 to 350 bar). The EERC has shown that hazardous organic pollutants such as pesticides, PACS (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) can be completely removed from soils, sludges, and sediments at temperatures (250 C) and pressures (<50 atm) that are much milder than typically used for supercritical water processes (temperature >374 C, pressure >221 atm). In addition, the process has been demonstrated to be particularly effective for samples containing very high levels of contaminants (e.g., part per thousand). Current projects include demonstrating the subcritical water remediation process at the pilot scale using an 8-liter system constructed under separate funding during 1997. To date, subcritical water has been shown to be an effective extraction fluid for removing a variety of organic pollutants from soils and sludges contaminated with fossil fuel products and waste products, including PACS from soil (e.g., town gas sites), refining catalysts, and petroleum tank bottom sludges; PCBs from soil and sediments; toxic gasoline components (e.g., benzene) from soil and waste sludge; and phenols from petroleum refinery sludges. The obvious need to clean the wastewater from subcritical water processes led to preliminary experiments with activated carbon placed in line after the extractor. Initial experiments were performed before and after cooling the extractant water (e.g., with water at 200 C and with water cooled to 25 C). Surprisingly, the ability of activated carbon to remove organics from the water is better at a high temperature than at room temperature. These initial results are opposite to those expected from chromatographic theory, since the solubility of the organics is about 100,000-fold higher in the hot water than in ambient water. At present, the physicochemical mechanism accounting for these results is unknown; however, it is possible that the lower surface tension and lower viscosity of subcritical water (compared to water at ambient conditions) greatly increases the available area of the carbon by several orders of magnitude. Regardless of the mechanism involved, the optimal use of activated carbon to clean the wastewater generated from subcritical water remediation will depend on obtaining a better understanding of the controlling parameters. While these investigations focused on the cleanup of wastewater generated from subcritical water remediation, the results also apply to cleanup of any wastewater contaminated with nonpolar and moderately polar organics such as wastewaters from coal and petroleum processing.

Steven B. Hawthorne; Arnaud J. Lagadec

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Supported metal catalysts for alcohol/sugar alcohol steam reforming  

SciTech Connect

Despite extensive studies on hydrogen production via steam reforming of alcohols and sugar alcohols, catalysts typically suffer a variety of issues from poor hydrogen selectivity to rapid deactivation. Here, we summarize recent advances in fundamental understanding of functionality and structure of catalysts for alcohol/sugar alcohol steam reforming, and provide perspectives on further development required to design highly efficient steam reforming catalysts.

Davidson, Stephen; Zhang, He; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

367

Catalyst: Seeing Through the Eyes of a Cat Jeremy Long  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalyst: Seeing Through the Eyes of a Cat Jeremy Long University of Victoria jsl present Catalyst, an educational game that uses our simulation to teach players about the differences between human and cat vi- sion. The tasks in Catalyst are based on the principle of situated cognition

Gooch, Amy

368

Dynamic Restructuring Of Solid Catalyst Cluster During Carbon Nanotube CVD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic Restructuring Of Solid Catalyst Cluster During Carbon Nanotube CVD Stephan Hofmann1 , Renu, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. It is commonly assumed that the catalyst metal forms a liquid intermediate and that bulk catalyst effects dominate CNT growth dynamics. Calculations of size

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

369

Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface Christian P. Canlas1 , Junling Lu2 of molecules or can modify the product selectivity (regioselectivity or enantioselectivity) of catalyst sites, and not all catalyst classes can be readily synthesized with pores of the correct dimensions. Here, we present

Mohseni, Hooman

370

Technology Offer Heterogeneous Leaching Free Pd-Catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology Offer Heterogeneous Leaching Free Pd-Catalyst For further information please contact) of the carrier particles and the catalyst Potential Fields of Application Production of substituted biphenyls-coupling reactions Overview The present invention relates to non-leaching Pd-catalysts for C-C, C-O or C-N couplings

371

Separation of catalyst from Fischer-Tropsch slurry  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a process for the separation of catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The separation is accomplished by extraction in which the organic compounds in the wax are dissolved and carried away from the insoluble inorganic catalyst particles that are primarily inorganic. The purified catalyst can be upgraded by various methods.

White, C.M.; Quiring, M.S.; Jensen, K.L.; Hickey, R.F.; Gillham, L.D.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Coal liquefaction process research quarterly report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report summarizes the activities of Sandia's continuing program in coal liquefaction process research. The overall objectives are to: (1) provide a fundamental understanding of the chemistry of coal liquefaction; (2) determine the role of catalysts in coal liquefaction; and (3) determine the mechanism(s) of catalyst deactivation. The program is composed of three major projects: short-contact-time coal liquefaction, mineral effects, and catalyst studies. These projects are interdependent and overlap significantly.

Bickel, T.C.; Curlee, R.M.; Granoff, B.; Stohl, F.V.; Thomas, M.G.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Configurational diffusion of asphaltenes in fresh and aged catalyst extrudates. Quarterly progress report, 20 December 1993--20 March 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to determine the relationship between the size and shape of coal and petroleum macromolecules and their diffusion rates, i.e., effective diffusivities, in catalyst pore structures. That is, how do the effective intrapore diffusivities depend on molecule configuration and pore geometry. This quarter the authors developed a mathematical diffusion model for spent catalyst with a nonuniform pore structure due to nonuniform coke and metals deposition. Diffusion experiments with both spent extrudates and crushed catalysts were performed. Effective diffusivities were obtained by fitting the experimental data with a diffusion model. The results showed that a skin effect due to coke and metals deposition exists in the coal liquefaction catalysts. The uniform particle model did not satisfactorily represent the diffusion behavior in the spent catalyst extrudates, which gave rise to extremely high tortuosity values. On the other hand, the experimental results were well represented by the nonuniform particle model. Due to deposits in catalyst pores during the coal liquefaction process, the effective diffusivity decreased to a very low value.

Guin, J.A.; Tarrer, A.R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sub 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

Hui Su

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Catalysts allow CO and CO/sub 2/ comethanation  

SciTech Connect

Kyoto University researchers have developed a series of composite catalysts that permit simultaneous methanation of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide in mixtures with hydrogen at temperatures as low as 270/sup 0/C. The procedure may provide considerable simplifications for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis; offer a long-sought route for the direct use of carbon dioxide as a recyclable material in industrial processes; and replace some synthetic procedures based on carbon monoxide which are hindered by the presence of carbon dioxide. The best comethanation catalysts are small amounts of lanthanide oxides on iron group substrates with platinum group metals as promoters, e.g., 5% Ni, 2.7% La/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 0.6% Ru supported on 3 mm dia spherical silica pellets which have pores having a bimodal size distribution between 5 and 600 nm. Test reactions at 160/sup 0/-400/sup 0/C showed considerable variation with temperature and a very complex adsorption sequence. Carbon dioxide apparently enhances carbon monoxide methanation at higher temperatures. The mechanism is not understood but does not involve a water/carbon monoxide shift effect.

Not Available

1980-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

376

DME-to-olefin process over ZSM-5 catalyst  

SciTech Connect

The production of hydrocarbons via a synthetic route has been extensively studied by Mobil in its MTG process. The focus of much of this research was centered on gasoline range hydrocarbons from a methanol feedstock. Since its development, a novel, more efficient hydrocarbon synthesis process has been developed by the University of Akron using dimethyl ether; namely UA/EPRI DME-to-Hydrocarbon process (DTG). The DTG process has many distinct advantages over Mobil`s methanol based MTG process. Key features of the DTG process include enhanced per-pass conversion and volumetric productivity, lower heat duties, extended catalyst life, and higher selectivity to hydrocarbons. Product distributions for the DTG process are similar to the MTG process. In an effort to satisfy the industries growing need for olefins, it became necessary to determine which set of operating parameters affected the olefinic fraction of the product gas. Product distributions were determined for various levels of DUE weight hourly space velocity, as well as reactor temperature and pressure. The experimental investigation took place in a fixed bed micro-reactor. Capable of holding 1--15 g catalyst, the fixed bed was designed to obtain kinetic/mechanistic data for hydrocarbon production. Product gas analysis was performed using an external GC standard method.

Lee, S.; Sardesai, A.; Tartamella, T.L. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States); Kulik, C.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Photoactivated metal removal  

SciTech Connect

The authors propose the use of photochromic dyes as light activated switches to bind and release metal ions. This process, which can be driven by solar energy, can be used in environmental and industrial processes to remove metals from organic and aqueous solutions. Because the metals can be released from the ligands when irradiated with visible light, regeneration of the ligands and concentration of the metals may be easier than with conventional ion exchange resins. Thus, the process has the potential to be less expensive than currently used metal extraction techniques. In this paper, the authors report on their studies of the metal binding of spirogyran dyes and the hydrolytic stability of these dyes. They have prepared a number of spirogyrans and measured their binding constants for calcium and magnesium. They discuss the relationship of the structure of the dyes to their binding strengths. These studies are necessary towards determining the viability of this technique.

Nimlos, M.R.; Filley, J.; Ibrahim, M.A.; Watt, A.S.; Blake, D.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

New Generation of Catalyst Layers for PEMFCs Based on Carbon Aerogel Supported Pt Catalyst (CASPC)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mass production of PEMFC power generators requires a price reduction and, ... the amount of noble metals present in the cathode and anode catalyst layers. Automotive, residential, military, and small scale ap...

Alevtina Smirnova; Xing Dong; Hiro Hara; Nigel M. Sammes

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Kinetics of catalyst regeneration by coke combustion. II. Influence of temperature rise in the catalyst particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A grain-pellet model has been used to study the effect of high reaction rates upon the temperature profiles developed during regeneration of coked catalyst particles. The possibility of falsification of kinetic.....

D. Lafarga; C. Royo; A. Monzón; M. Menéndez…

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Catalyst for splitting water &Catalyst for splitting water & Synthetic Modeling of InorganicSynthetic Modeling of Inorganic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Importance Hydrogen technology in fuel cellsHydrogen technology in fuel cells As a combustion fuel, it producesCatalyst for splitting water &Catalyst for splitting water & Synthetic Modeling of Inorganic of evolution ·Optimized catalyst for water splitting in all oxygenic phototrophs S0 S4 S1 S2 S3 O2 2 H O2 e- e

Petta, Jason

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

382

Probing Solid Catalysts Under Operating Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...J.W., TRACING THE CONVERSION OF AURICHALCITE TO A COPPER CATALYST BY COMBINED X-RAY...synthetic variants of the mineral phase aurichalcite [Cu5, Zn,(OH)6(CO3)21...stages of the thermal treatment of the aurichalcite, no significant changes occur in the...

John Meurig Thomas; G. Neville Greaves

1994-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

383

Water Uptake in PEMFC Catalyst Layers  

SciTech Connect

Water uptake profiles of proton-exchange-membrane fuel-cell catalyst layers are characterized in the form of capillary-pressure saturation (Pc-S) curves. The curves indicate that the catalyst layers tested are highly hydrophilic and require capillary pressures as low as -80 kPa to eject imbibed water. Comparison of materials made with and without Pt indicates a difference in water ejection and uptake phenomena due to the presence of Pt. The addition of Pt increases the tendency of the catalyst layer to retain water. Dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) is used to characterize the water-vapor sorption onto Nafion, Pt/C, and C surfaces. The DVS results align with the trends found from the Pc-S curves and show an increased propensity for water uptake in the presence of Pt. The effect of the ion in Nafion, sodium or protonated form, is also compared and demonstrates that although the protonation of the Nafion in the catalyst layer also increases hydrophilicity, the effect is not as great as that caused by Pt.

Gunterman, Haluna P.; Kwong, Anthony H.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Weber, Adam Z.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Nanotube/Nanowire Based ORR Catalyst  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation about nanotube or nanowire-based oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts, presented by Yushan Yan, University of Delaware, at the kick-off meeting of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program's Catalysis Working Group, held May 14, 2012, in Arlington, Virginia.

385

Prealloyed catalyst for growing silicon carbide whiskers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A prealloyed metal catalyst is used to grow silicon carbide whiskers, especially in the .beta. form. Pretreating the metal particles to increase the weight percentages of carbon or silicon or both carbon and silicon allows whisker growth to begin immediately upon reaching growth temperature.

Shalek, Peter D. (Los Alamos, NM); Katz, Joel D. (Niagara Falls, NY); Hurley, George F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Fluidizable Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluidizable Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from Biomass Pyrolysis/Steam Reforming K. Magrini/Objective Develop and demonstrate technology to produce hydrogen from biomass at $2.90/kg plant gate price based Bio-oil aqueous fraction CO H2 CO2 H2O Trap grease Waste plastics textiles Co-processing Pyrolysis

387

Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been replaced with one or more nitro groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Ozone removal by HVAC filters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Residential and commercial HVAC filters that have been loaded with particles during operation in the field can remove ozone from intake or recirculated air. However, knowledge of the relative importance of HVAC filters as a removal mechanism for ozone in residential and commercial buildings is incomplete. We measured the ozone removal efficiencies of clean (unused) fiberglass, clean synthetic filters, and field-loaded residential and commercial filters in a controlled laboratory setting. For most filters, the ozone removal efficiency declined rapidly but converged to a non-zero (steady-state) value. This steady-state ozone removal efficiency varied from 0% to 9% for clean filters. The mean steady-state ozone removal efficiencies for loaded residential and commercial filters were 10% and 41%, respectively. Repeated exposure of filters to ozone following a 24-h period of no exposure led to a regeneration of ozone removal efficiency. Based on a theoretical scaling analysis of mechanisms that are involved in the ozone removal process, we speculate that the steady-state ozone removal efficiency is limited by reactant diffusion out of particles, and that regeneration is due to internal diffusion of reactive species to sites available to ozone for reaction. Finally, by applying our results to a screening model for typical residential and commercial buildings, HVAC filters were estimated to contribute 22% and 95%, respectively, of total ozone removal in HVAC systems.

P. Zhao; J.A. Siegel; R.L. Corsi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

391

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Novel Non-Precious Metal Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Non-Precious Metal Catalysts Novel Non-Precious Metal Catalysts Project Summary Full Title: Novel Non-Precious Metal Catalysts for PEMFC: Catalyst Selection through Molecular Modeling and Durability Studies Project ID: 147 Principal Investigator: Branko Popov Brief Description: The University of South Carolina is synthesizing novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts with similar activity and stability as Pt for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Keywords: Catalyst; oxygen reduction; non precious metals; molecular modeling; durability Purpose Develop highly active and stable carbon-based metal-free catalysts and carbon composite catalysts with strong Lewis basicity to facilitate the ORR. Performer Principal Investigator: Branko Popov Organization: University of South Carolina Address: 2C19 Swearingen, Chemical Engineering, 301 Main Street

392

Near Critical Catalyst Reactant Branching Processes with Controlled Immigration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near critical catalyst-reactant branching processes with controlled immigration are studied. The reactant population evolves according to a branching process whose branching rate is proportional to the total mass of the catalyst. The bulk catalyst evolution is that of a classical continuous time branching process; in addition there is a specific form of immigration. Immigration takes place exactly when the catalyst population falls below a certain threshold, in which case the population is instantaneously replenished to the threshold. Such models are motivated by problems in chemical kinetics where one wants to keep the level of a catalyst above a certain threshold in order to maintain a desired level of reaction activity. A diffusion limit theorem for the scaled processes is presented, in which the catalyst limit is described through a reflected diffusion, while the reactant limit is a diffusion with coefficients that are functions of both the reactant and the catalyst. Stochastic averaging principles under ...

Budhiraja, Amarjit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Total oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane over transition metal-fluorite oxide composite catalysts. I. Catalyst composition and activity  

SciTech Connect

A novel metal oxide composite catalyst for the total oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane was prepared by combining fluorite oxides with active transition metals. The fluorite oxides, such as ceria and zirconia, are oxygen-ion-conducting materials having catalytic properties usually at high temperatures. Active base metal catalysts, such as copper, were used as additives to promote the catalytic properties of these oxides. The contact of the two types of materials gave rise to a high active oxidation catalyst. At a space velocity of about 42,000 h{sup {minus}1}, complete carbon monoxide oxidation in air occurred at room temperature on the Au{sub 0.05}[Ce(La)]{sub 0.95}L{sub x} catalyst and at ca. 100{degrees}C on Cu-Ce-O composite catalysts. At the same space velocity, total oxidation of methane on the Cu-Ce-O catalyst doped with La{sub 2}O{sub 3} or SrO took place at ca. 550{degrees}C. The specific carbon monoxide oxidation activity of the Cu-Ce-O catalyst was several orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional copper-based catalysts and comparable or superior to platinum catalysts. This type of composite catalyst also showed excellent resistance to water vapor poisoning. The enhanced catalyst activity and stability resulted from strong interaction of the transition metal and fluorite oxide materials. 44 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, F. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)] [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Role of Phosphorus and Soot on the Deactivation of Diesel Oxidation Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The deactivation of diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) by soot contamination and lube-oil derived phosphorus poisoning is investigated. Pt/CeO2/-Al2O3 DOCs aged using three different protocols developed by the authors and six high mileage field-returned DOCs of similar formulation are evaluated for THC and CO oxidation performance using a bench-flow reactor. Collectively, these catalysts exhibit a variety of phosphorus and soot morphologies contributing to performance deactivation. To isolate and examine the contribution of each deactivation mechanism, performance evaluations are carried out for each DOC ''as received'' and after removal of surface carbon in a high-temperature oxidizing environment. In such a manner the deactivation contribution of soot contamination is de-convoluted from that of phosphorus poisoning. It will be shown that this is accomplished while preserving phosphorus (and to a lesser degree sulfur, calcium and zinc) chemistries and concentrations within the washcoat. Washcoat contaminant information and materials changes are characterized using electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), BET surface area, oxygen storage capacity (OSC), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, from which the relative severity of each mechanism can be quantified. Results show that soot contamination from diesel exhaust severely degrades THC and CO oxidation performance by acting as a catalyst surface diffusion barrier. This results in a considerable increase of light-off temperatures. In contrast, phosphorus poisoning, which is considered a significant deactivation mechanism in three-way catalysts, is shown to have minimal effect on DOC oxidation performance for the conditions studied here. Material changes include the formation of both Ce(III-IV) and aluminum phosphates which do not significantly hinder the THC and CO oxidation in lean exhaust. In addition, thermal aging and sulfur poisoning are shown to produce minimal contributions to the overall deactivation. Consequently, performance of aged DOCs after soot removal is observed to be comparable to that of a fresh catalyst under our testing conditions.

Eaton, Scott J [ORNL; Nguyen, Ke [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Final quarterly technical progress report No. 11, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary results on the effect of reaction temperature on the performance of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis obtained during the last quarter confirmed that Co catalysts were very sensitive to temperature and deactivated significantly at temperatures above 240{degree}C both in the fixed bed and the slurry bubble column reactors. Following this preliminary investigation, a series of tests were carried out during this period in order to elucidate the nature of this deactivation process as well as determine possible means of preventing it. In order to elucidate the nature of this deactivation process, the catalysts which had undergone significant deactivation after high temperature (280{degree}C) reaction in either the fixed bed reactor or the slurry bubble column reactor were regenerated and retested in the fixed bed reactor. In both cases the catalysts recovered completely their initial activity. In addition, reactions at very high H{sub 2}CO ratios and high temperatures showed very little deactivation, suggesting that the deactivation of the Co catalysts during F-T synthesis at high temperatures was mainly due carbon formation via the Boudouard reaction. Due to the unreactive nature of this carbon, it could only be removed by calcination. A second series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effect of certain promoters (Zr, La, Cr, and Re) as well as the effect of another support such as silica on the deactivation characteristics of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis at high temperature. The results suggest that the deactivation process and rate for most of these catalysts are similar to those of the alumina-supported catalysts tested previously (Co.005 and Co-053), and that none of the promoters helps to slow down the rate of carbon formation at high temperatures above 240{degree}C.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

396

Novel Attrition-Resistant Fischer Tropsch Catalyst  

SciTech Connect

There is a strong national interest in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process because it offers the possibility of making liquid hydrocarbon fuels from reformed natural gas or coal and biomass gasification products. This project explored a new approach that had been developed to produce active, attrition-resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that are based on glass-ceramic materials and technology. This novel approach represented a promising solution to the problem of reducing or eliminating catalyst attrition and maximizing catalytic activity, thus reducing costs. The technical objective of the Phase I work was to demonstrate that glass-ceramic based catalytic materials for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis have resistance to catalytic deactivation and reduction of particle size superior to traditional supported Fischer-Tropsch catalyst materials. Additionally, these novel glass-ceramic-based materials were expected to exhibit catalytic activity similar to the traditional materials. If successfully developed, the attrition-resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalyst materials would be expected to result in significant technical, economic, and social benefits for both producers and public consumers of Fischer-Tropsch products such as liquid fuels from coal or biomass gasification. This program demonstrated the anticipated high attrition resistance of the glass-ceramic materials. However, the observed catalytic activity of the materials was not sufficient to justify further development at this time. Additional testing documented that a lack of pore volume in the glass-ceramic materials limited the amount of surface area available for catalysis and consequently limited catalytic activity. However, previous work on glass-ceramic catalysts to promote other reactions demonstrated that commercial levels of activity can be achieved, at least for those reactions. Therefore, we recommend that glass-ceramic materials be considered again as potential Fischer-Tropsch catalysts if it can be demonstrated that materials with adequate pore volume can be produced. During the attrition resistance tests, it was learned that the glass-ceramic materials are very abrasive. Attention should be paid in any further developmental efforts to the potential for these hard, abrasive materials to damage reactors.

Weast, Logan, E.; Staats, William, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Lactose oxidation kinetics with oxygen in catalyst-solution-gas three-phase system with simultaneous electrical potential measurement of supported gold catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lactose oxidation kinetics was studied on an supported gold catalyst with simultaneous control of catalyst potential. The experimental data were described well...

D. Yu. Murzin; E. V. Murzina; A. V. Tokarev…

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

From First Principles Design to Realization of Bimetallic Catalysts for Enhanced Selectivity  

SciTech Connect

“Catalysis by design” has been a dream for decades. To specify the composition and structure of matter to effect a desired catalytic transformation with desired and predicted rate and selectivity remains a monumental challenge, especially in heterogeneous catalysis. Our research thrusts have been chosen not only for their practical and scientific relevance, e.g. for more efficient and sustainable chemicals and fuels production, but also because they provide a foundation for developing and exploring broadly applicable principles and strategies for catalyst design.

Lobo, Raul F.; Crooks, Richard M.; Mavrikakis, Manos

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

399

Appliances Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Appliances Research Emerging Technologies » Appliances Research Appliances Research The Emerging Technology team conducts research into residential and commercial appliances. By partnering with industry, researchers, and other stakeholders, the Department of Energy acts as a catalyst in driving research in energy efficient technologies, with the goal of realizing 20% energy savings relative to a 2010 baseline. Appliance research focuses on refrigerators, washers, and dryers. Refrigerators Photo of a stainless steel refrigerator. Refrigerators have become substantially more energy efficient over the years, using less energy while also providing more space. While appliance standards for refrigerators have helped, continued research into new ways of improving refrigerators in the

400

Effect of steam on supported metal catalysts  

SciTech Connect

In order to examine the effect of steam on supported metal catalysts, model supported metal catalysts of Ni, Co, or Fe on alumina have been heated in steam at 700/sup 0/C. The transmission electron micrographs show that for all these metals, patches of film extend from the crystallites. Prolonged heating results in the disappearance of the patches which probably spread as a contiguous film over the entire surface of the substrate. The degree of spreading is in the order: C0 > Ni > Fe. On subsequent heating in H/sub 2/, small crystallites were generated, probably via the rupture of the contiguous film. The contraction of the patches of film bridging two or several particles caused the coalescence of the latter. This subsequent heating in H/sub 2/ favors redispersion only when the heating time is sufficiently short. Prolonged heating in H/sub 2/ leads to the disappearance of the small particles.

Ruckenstein, E.; Hu, X.D.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Selective Monoterpene-like Cyclization Reactions Achieved by Water Exclusion from Reactive Intermediates in a Supramolecular Catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a Supramolecular Catalyst William M.  Hart?Cooper, confinement of the catalyst’s interior, Prins cyclizations acidic solution  Entry  Catalyst  pH  Conv.  (%)  1 a  

Hart-Cooper, William

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE BY CARBON MONOXIDE OVER A SILICA SUPPORTED PLATINUM CATALYST: INFRARED AND KINETIC STUDIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System. • B. Procedures. Catalyst Preparation Infrared DiskPreparation. Catalyst Characterization. PreliminaryReduction by CO Over a Pt Catalyst," M.S. thesis, Department

Lorimer, D.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1995  

SciTech Connect

Coal liquefaction involves cleavage of methylene, dimethylene and ether bridges connecting polycyclic aromatic units and the reactions of various oxygen functional groups. Here in this quarterly, we report on the hydrocracking of 4-(l-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl in the presence of iron (Fe) catalysts and sulfur and residual wall catalytic effect. Catalytic hydrocracking of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl (NMBB) predominantly yielded naphthalene and 4-methylbibenzyl. Various iron compounds were examined as catalyst precursors. Sulfur addition to most catalyst precursors led to substantially higher catalyst activity and higher conversion. NMBB was also treated with sulfur in the absence of iron compounds, in concentrations of 1.2-3.4 wt%, corresponding to the conditions present in reactions with added iron compounds. Increasing sulfur concentrations led to higher NMBB conversions. Furthermore, sulfur had a permanent effect on the reactor walls. A black sulfide layer formed on the surface which could not be removed mechanically. The supposed non-catalytic reactions done in the same reactor but after experiments with added sulfur showed higher conversions than comparable experiments done in new reactors. This wall catalytic effect can be reduced by treating the sulfided reactors with hydrochloric acid. The results of this work demonstrate the significant effect of sulfur addition and sulfur-induced residual wall effects on carbon-carbon bond cleavage and hydrogenation of aromatics.

Song, Chunshan; Schmidt, E.; Schobert, H.H.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

HIGHLY DISPERSED ALLOY CATHODE CATALYST FOR DURABILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding high performance materials Pt/C cathode B.S.E. Pt PtCo/C cathode IrB.S.E. Pt Co PtIrCo/C cathodeHIGHLY DISPERSED ALLOY CATHODE CATALYST FOR DURABILITY T. D. Jarvi UTC Power Corporation Electrochemical Area Loss Activity at 900 mVRHE (IR-Free) 0.44 A/mg Pt Specific Activity at 900 m

405

Oxidation of propylene over copper oxide catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the study of propylene oxidation. Dunlop (17) reported that small quantities of iron compounds substantially enhanced the catalytic activity of chromia-alumina catalysts with respect to propylene oxidation, Woodharn (72) has suggested that under... between 360 C and 430oC the rate of propane oxidation decreases as the teznperature is increased, and the rate of conversion to olefins, especially propylene, becomes progressively greater. Above 430 C the proportion of propane converted to ethylene in...

Billingsley, David Stuart

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

406

Reverse osmosis treatment to remove inorganic contaminants from drinking water  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the research project was to determine the removal of inorganic contaminants from drinking water using several state-of-the-art reverse osmosis membrane elements. A small 5-KGPD reverse osmosis system was utilized and five different membrane elements were studied individually with the specific inorganic contaminants added to several natural Florida ground waters. Removal data were also collected on naturally occurring substances.

Huxstep, M.R.; Sorg, T.J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Chemistry Dept. Research Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Department Overview: Chemistry Department Overview: While the subjects of chemical research in the Chemistry Department are diverse, several predominant themes span traditional research fields and research groups. These themes include: artificial photosynthesis, charge transfer for energy conversion, chemistry with ionizing radiation, catalysis and surface science, nanoscience, combustion, and nuclear chemistry. Artificial Photosynthesis This program addresses major issues hindering progress in photoinduced catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide, water splitting, and small molecule activation using an integrated experimental and theoretical approach that offers fundamental insights into the underlying photochemical processes. One thrust investigates factors controlling reductive half-reactions. Among these are: (1) searching for visible-light absorbers to couple with electron transfer and/or catalytic processes; (2) avoiding high-energy intermediates through multi-electron, multi-proton processes; (3) using earth-abundant metals, or metal complexes that have bio-inspired or non-innocent ligands to achieve low-energy pathways via second-coordination sphere interactions or redox leveling; (4) adopting water as the target solvent and the source of protons and electrons; and (5) immobilizing catalysts on electrode or semiconductor surfaces for better turnover rates and frequencies. Another thrust investigates water oxidation, focusing on photoelectrolysis processes occurring in band-gap-narrowed semiconductor and catalyst components by: (i) tuning semiconductors to control their light-harvesting and charge-separation abilities; (ii) developing viable catalysts for the four-electron water oxidation process; (iii) immobilizing the homogenous catalysts and metal oxide catalysts on electrodes and/or metal-oxide nanoparticles; and (iv) exploring the interfacial water-decomposition reactions using carriers generated by visible-light irradiation with the goal of understanding semiconductorccatalystcwater charge transport.

408

Los Alamos catalyst could jumpstart e-cars, green energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalyst could jumpstart e-cars, green energy Catalyst could jumpstart e-cars, green energy Los Alamos catalyst could jumpstart e-cars, green energy The new material has the highest oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity in alkaline media of any non-precious metal catalyst developed to date. June 4, 2013 A high-resolution microscopic image of a new type of nanostructured-carbon-based catalyst developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory that could pave the way for reliable, economical next-generation batteries and alkaline fuel cells. (Photo credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory) A high-resolution microscopic image of a new type of nanostructured-carbon-based catalyst developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory that could pave the way for reliable, economical next-generation batteries and alkaline fuel cells. (Photo credit: Los Alamos National

409

Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,776,780 entitled "Catalysts for Oxidation of Mercury in Flue Gas." Disclosed in this patent are catalysts for the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas. These novel catalysts include iridium (Ir), platinum/iridium (Pt/Ir), and Thief carbons. The catalyst materials will adsorb the oxidizing agents HCl, Cl 2 , and other halogen species in the flue gas stream that are produced when fuel is combusted. These adsorbed oxidizing agents can then react with elemental mercury in the stream, which is difficult to capture, and oxidize it to form Hg (II) species,

410

Los Alamos catalyst could jumpstart e-cars, green energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalyst could jumpstart e-cars, green energy Catalyst could jumpstart e-cars, green energy Los Alamos catalyst could jumpstart e-cars, green energy The new material has the highest oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity in alkaline media of any non-precious metal catalyst developed to date. June 4, 2013 A high-resolution microscopic image of a new type of nanostructured-carbon-based catalyst developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory that could pave the way for reliable, economical next-generation batteries and alkaline fuel cells. (Photo credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory) A high-resolution microscopic image of a new type of nanostructured-carbon-based catalyst developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory that could pave the way for reliable, economical next-generation batteries and alkaline fuel cells. (Photo credit: Los Alamos National

411

Transition metal-promoted oxygen ion conductors as oxidation catalyst  

SciTech Connect

A novel metal oxide composite catalyst for the complete oxidation of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons was prepared by combining oxygen ion conducting materials with active transition metals. The oxygen ion conductors used were typical fluorite-type oxides, such as ceria, zirconia, and others. Active base metal catalysts, such as copper, were used as additives to promote the catalytic properties of oxygen ion conductors. The intimate contact of the two kinds of materials gave rise to a highly active oxidation catalyst. On Cu-Ce-O composite catalysts, 95% of carbon monoxide was oxidized by air at {approximately} 100 C. Complete methane oxidation on the same catalyst took place at {approximately} 550 C. When the stoichiometric amount of sulfur dioxide was sued to oxidize carbon monoxide, 96% of sulfur dioxide was reduced to elemental sulfur at temperatures above 460 C with 99% of sulfur dioxide conversion. This type of composite catalyst also showed excellent resistance to water poisoning.

Liu, W.; Sarofim, A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance  

SciTech Connect

The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150oC and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metalic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

Patel, Anant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Harvey, David; Dutta, Monica; Colbow, Vesna

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance  

SciTech Connect

The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150 C and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metallic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

A. Patel; K. Artyushkova; P. Atanassov; David Harvey; M. Dutta; V. Colbow; S. Wessel

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Issue --04 Catalyst.Management School --Autumn 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Issue -- 04 Catalyst.Management School -- Autumn 2012 SChooL newS page 09 Move to new world class InTernATIonAL BuSIneSS GrowTh CATALYST -- Become a business growth leader In The CITY -- The City in touch 03 04 05 08 12 14 16 17 18 20 22 23 24 26 28 30 32 34 ThIS ISSue In this issue of Catalyst we take

Stevenson, Mark

415

Comparative studies of hydrodenitrogenation by mixed metal sulfide catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. , Sanchez, K. M. , and Reibenspies, J. , "Synthesis and characterization of [Et4N][M(CO)5SR] and [Et4N]2[M2 (CO) 8 (SR) 2] complexes (M = Cr, Mo, W) . Ligand substitution... to mimic the commercial catalyst (ie. no sulfide bridges prior to activation) l a Ni/Mo sulfide catalyst which consisted of Ni and Mo atoms brought in intimate contact by sulfide bridges; Ni/Mo and Co/Mo organometallic catalysts whose central metal had...

Luchsinger, Mary Margaret

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Enhanced catalyst stability for cyclic co methanation operations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. The active carbon is thereafter reacted with steam or hydrogen to form methane. Enhanced catalyst stability for long term, cyclic operation is obtained by the incorporation of an alkali or alkaline earth dopant in a silica binding agent added to the catalyst-support additive composition.

Risch, Alan P. (New Fairfield, CT); Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

NETL: Aligned Gasification Research Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to remove environmental concerns related to coal use. For this purpose, NETL's Clean Coal Research Program (CCRP) is developing a portfolio of innovative technologies,...

418

Thiophene Hydrogenation to Tetrahydrothiophene over Tungsten Sulfide Catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Independent reactions of thiophene reduction to tetrahydrothiophene and thiophene hydrogenolysis to form hydrogen sulfide...4...hydrocarbons are shown to occur over supported tungsten sulfide catalysts and unsupp...

A. V. Mashkina

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Catalyst for Improving the Combustion Efficiency of Petroleum...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Improving the Combustion Efficiency of Petroleum Fuels in Diesel Engines Catalyst for Improving the Combustion Efficiency of Petroleum Fuels in Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel...

420

Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Coupled LNTSCR Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Coupled LNTSCR We introduce a new bench-scale engine generator testing system for different...

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Impact of Fuel-Borne Catalysts on Diesel Aftertreatment | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel-Borne Catalyst Assisted DPF regeneration on a Renault truck MD9 Engine Outfitted with SCR Fuel Additivies for Improved Performance of Diesel Aftertreatment Systems...

422

Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Optimal Catalyst Designs & Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems Mike Harold, Vemuri Balakotaiah, Dan Luss U. Houston Mark Crocker, U. Kentucky...

423

Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Coupled LNTSCR Mike Harold, Vemuri Balakotaiah, and Dan Luss University of Houston Mark Crocker University of...

424

Effectiveness of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) to control...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Effectiveness of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) to control CO and hydrocarbon emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) combustion Effectiveness of a...

425

Impact of Fuel Metal Impurities on Diesel Exhaust Catalysts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Metal Impurities on Diesel Exhaust Catalysts Aaron Williams, Jonathan Burton, Robert McCormick National Renewable Energy Laboratory Todd Toops, Michael Lance, Andrew...

426

Catalyst-Assisted Production of Olefins from Natural Gas Liquids...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalyst-Assisted Production of Olefins from Natural Gas Liquids: Prototype Development and Full-Scale Testing New Process Produces Ethylene More Efficiently and Reduces Coke...

427

LSU EFRC - Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design - About Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysis and Atomic-Level Synthesis" The mission of LSU's Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design is to advance: the ability of computational methods to accurately model...

428

LSU EFRC - Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design - Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

new computational tools that will guide the formulation of novel heterogeneous catalyst materials. An important class of reactions involving CO hydrogenation and oxidation...

429

LSU EFRC - Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design - Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to provide guidance to the computational description of the fundamental steps on the catalyst surface. It is centered at Utrecht University (assembly of 3D model systems,...

430

LSU EFRC - Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysis and Atomic-Level Synthesis" The mission of LSU's Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design is to advance: the ability of computational methods to accurately model...

431

LSU EFRC - Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design - Contact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Us >> space control Center for Atomic-Level Catalyst Design (CALCD) 110 Chemical Engineering South Stadium Road Baton Rouge, LA 70803 Telephone: 225.578.1426 Fax:...

432

Catalyst Structure-Performance Relationship Identified by High...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identified by High-Throughput Operando Method: New Insight for Silica-Supported Catalyst Structure-Performance Relationship Identified by High-Throughput Operando Method: New...

433

LSU EFRC - Center for Atomic Level Catalyst Design - Contact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control of Structures on Complex Catalyst Supports space control Ulrike Diebold Wayne Goodman Richard Kurtz Ward Plummer David Sholl Phil Sprunger Ye Xu space control PI names &...

434

Catalyst Activity Comparison of Alcohols over Zeolites. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activity Comparison of Alcohols over Zeolites. Catalyst Activity Comparison of Alcohols over Zeolites. Abstract: Alcohol transformation to transportation fuel range hydrocarbon on...

435

Biomass-derived Hydrogen-evolution catalyst and electrode - Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Find More Like This Return to Search Biomass-derived Hydrogen-evolution catalyst and electrode Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact...

436

SunShot Catalyst Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

vast array of tools, capabilities, data assets and additional resources developed by Energy Department and the national laboratories. Catalyst's open, fast-paced innovation cycle...

437

DOE's Fuel Cell Catalyst R&D Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Test and Polarization Curve Protocols (http:www.uscar.orgcommandsfilesdownload.php?filesid267), Catalyst Support Cycle and Metrics (Table 2). Activity loss is based on...

438

Pt Nanophase supported catalysts and electrode systems for water electrolysis .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this study novel composite electrodes were developed, in which the catalytic components were deposited in nanoparticulate form. The efficiency of the nanophase catalysts and… (more)

Petrik, Leslie Felicia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Catalysts and process for liquid hydrocarbon fuel production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a novel process and system in which a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen synthesis gas, or syngas, is converted into hydrocarbon mixtures composed of high quality gasoline components, aromatic compounds, and lower molecular weight gaseous olefins in one reactor or step. The invention utilizes a novel molybdenum-zeolite catalyst in high pressure hydrogen for conversion, as well as a novel rhenium-zeolite catalyst in place of the molybdenum-zeolite catalyst, and provides for use of the novel catalysts in the process and system of the invention.

White, Mark G; Liu, Shetian

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

440

What Makes a Good Catalyst for the Deacon Process?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The catalytic activity is to a large extent determined by the binding strength of the reaction intermediates to the catalyst’s surface (Sabatier principle). ... Therefore, a single metal oxide catalyst may not be improved according to the calculations performed in Norskov’s group. ... Reactor parameters that we have investigated in detail include the oxidizer and chlorinator temps., the catalyst circulation rate and its residence time in each fluidized-bed reactor, the HCl/O2 ratio in the oxidizer feed, and the fluid velocities in both reactors. ...

Herbert Over; Reinhard Schomäcker

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Ordered Nanoparticle Catalysts article is an Energy Focus > Archived...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gruner's time at CHESS In This Section EMC2 News Archived News Stories Ordered Nanoparticle Catalysts article is an Energy Focus January 24th, 2013 A Nature Materials...

442

Small Catalyst Finding Could Lead to Big Breakthrough for Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

hold the promise of helping us dramatically reduce our dependence on oil while reducing air pollution. Yet, the high costs of fuel cell catalysts, which rely on expensive...

443

New Catalyst Opens Way to Next-Generation Fuel Cells  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A new highly stable catalyst developed at Brookhaven Lab lowers barriers to commercial use of fuel cells in vehicles and stationary applications.

Snyder, Kendra

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

444

Mi-Young Kim - Research Staff - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mi-Young Kim Mi-Young Kim Post Doctoral Research Associate (F) 865-946-1354 kimm@ornl.gov Professional Highlights Education Ph.D., Applied Chemical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 2008 Miyoung joined the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as a post-doctoral researcher in 2010. She has worked at the Center for Development of Fine Chemicals and the Research Institute for Catalysis in Chonnam National University prior to joining the ORNL. Her research background is in heterogeneous catalysis and highly dispersed noble metal catalysts. She has extensive experience in characterizing catalysts using EXAFS, XPS, XRD, solid NMR and ESR. She is currently involved in automotive catalysis research with an emphasis on monolithic catalysts & materials relevant to lean NOx and cold start emissions controls

445

WCH Removes Massive Test Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, WA -- Hanford's River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has met a significant cleanup challenge on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site by removing a 1,082...

446

Catalyst performance of novel Pt/Mg(Ga)(Al)O catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation Georges Siddiqi, Pingping Sun, Vladimir Galvita, Alexis T. Bell *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalyst performance of novel Pt/Mg(Ga)(Al)O catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation Georges Siddiqi dehydrogenation Pt Hydrotalcite a b s t r a c t The dehydrogenation of ethane and propane using a Pt catalyst supported on a novel Mg(Ga)(Al)O mixed oxide support was investigated. Catalyst performance is strongly

Bell, Alexis

447

A Multi-Ligand Based Pd Catalyst for C–N Cross-Coupling Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An alternative approach to catalyst development, which led to a Pd catalyst based on two biarylphosphine ligands for C?N cross-coupling reactions, is reported. By effectively being able to take the form of multiple catalysts ...

Fors, Brett P.

448

Break-up of Pt catalyst surfaces by high CO coverage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and atomic arrangement of catalyst surface under reactionof reactant molecules on the catalyst surfaces are the norm.Break-up of Pt catalyst surfaces by high CO coverage Feng

Tao, Feng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

High-Resolution Structure of the Photosynthetic Mn4Ca Catalyst from X-ray Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Photosynthetic Mn 4 Ca Catalyst from X-ray Spectroscopystructure of the Mn 4 Ca catalyst at high-resolution whichthe structure of Mn 4 Ca catalyst as it cycles through the

Yano, Junko

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Extensive Isomerization of Alkenes Using a Bifunctional Catalyst:  An Alkene Zipper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Placement of the base in the catalyst is crucial: adding 1-of the heterocycle in the catalyst 21 is that complex 1e ismay or may not involve metal catalyst but for simplicity is

Grotjahn, Douglas B; Larsen, Casey R; Gustafson, Jeffery L; Nair, Reji; Sharma, Abhinandini

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

DOE's Fuel Cell Catalyst R&D Activities | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Catalyst R&D Activities DOE's Fuel Cell Catalyst R&D Activities Presentation about the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) fuel cell catalyst R&D activities, presented by...

452

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia using Cu-ZSM-5 and Va-based honeycomb monolith catalysts: effect of H2 pretreatment, NH3-to-NO ratio, O2, and space velocity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, the steady-state performance of zeolite-based (Cu-ZSM-5) and vanadium-based honeycomb monolith catalysts was investigated in the selective catalytic reduction process (SCR) for NO removal using NH3. The aim was to delineate the effect...

Gupta, Saurabh

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

Understanding the Distributed Intra-Catalyst Impact of Sulfation on Water Gas Shift in a Lean NOx Trap Catalyst  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Lean NOx Trap catalyst is an aftertreatment technology for abatement of nitrogen-oxide emissions from lean-burn vehicle engines.

454

Application of high intensity UVC-LED for the removal of acetamiprid with the photo-Fenton process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Research into the use of light-emitting diodes (LED) for wastewater treatment has increased in recent years. \\{LEDs\\} are more efficient than other UV lamps because of their reduced heat dissipation and much longer life span. However, most of the UVC-LEDs that are currently available are of such low intensity that the large number of bulbs required for effective treatment of wastewater streams makes their application uneconomic. The development of higher intensity UVC-LEDs may therefore lead to more feasible technology options for wastewater treatment with UV-based advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The aim of this work was to study the efficiency of high-intensity UVC-LED lamps (20 W/m2) for the removal of micropollutants with the photo-Fenton process. The pesticide acetamiprid was used as model pollutant at a concentration of 100 ?g/L in synthetic secondary effluent due to its recalcitrant nature. Degradation using a low-pressure UVC-lamp (LPL) was also assessed for comparative purposes. The process was operated at pH 2.8 and at natural pH. The volumetric photon absorption (VRPA) was calculated for the results at acidic pH, where the catalyst was soluble, to investigate the influence of iron and hydrogen peroxide concentrations on acetamiprid degradation, based on their absorption for both systems. A model was proposed and results indicated that the contribution of both hydrogen peroxide and iron to the generation of radicals was the same in the LED system. At natural pH, the high intensity LED system was effective in the removal of acetamiprid, achieving degradation in 20 min adding 1+1+1 mg Fe/L (sequential iron dosage) and 12 mg H2O2/L.

Irene Carra; José Antonio Sánchez Pérez; Sixto Malato; Olivier Autin; Bruce Jefferson; Peter Jarvis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

The Use of Soluble Polyolefins as Supports for Transition Metal Catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, agrochemicals, etc.). Thus catalyst and ligand separations are of increasing importance. One method for the recovery and separation of catalysts is to use an insoluble or heterogeneous support. This has the advantage of allowing for separation of catalyst..., agrochemicals, etc.). Thus catalyst and ligand separations are of increasing importance. One method for the recovery and separation of catalysts is to use an insoluble or heterogeneous support. This has the advantage of allowing for separation of catalyst...

Hobbs, Christopher Eugene

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

456

Strategies for Probing Nanometer-Scale Electrocatalysts: From Single Particles to Catalyst-Membrane Architectures  

SciTech Connect

The project primary objectives are to prepare and elucidate the promoting properties of materials that possess high activity for the conversion of hydrogen and related small molecules (water, oxygen, carbon monoxide and methanol) in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. One area of research has focused on the study of catalyst materials. Protocols were developed for probing the structure and benchmarking the activity of Pt and Pt bimetallic nanometer-scale catalyst against Pt single crystal electrode standards. A second area has targeted fuel cell membrane and the advancement of simple methods mainly based on vibrational spectroscopy that can be applied broadly in the study of membrane structure and transport properties. Infrared and Raman methods combined with least-squares data modeling were applied to investigate and assist the design of robust, proton conductive membranes, which resist reactant crossover.

Korzeniewski, Carol

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

457

Subnanometer and nanometer catalysts, method for preparing size-selected catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Highly uniform cluster based nanocatalysts supported on technologically relevant supports were synthesized for reactions of top industrial relevance. The Pt-cluster based catalysts outperformed the very best reported ODHP catalyst in both activity (by up to two orders of magnitude higher turn-over frequencies) and in selectivity. The results clearly demonstrate that highly dispersed ultra-small Pt clusters precisely localized on high-surface area supports can lead to affordable new catalysts for highly efficient and economic propene production, including considerably simplified separation of the final product. The combined GISAXS-mass spectrometry provides an excellent tool to monitor the evolution of size and shape of nanocatalyst at action under realistic conditions. Also provided are sub-nanometer gold and sub-nanometer to few nm size-selected silver catalysts which possess size dependent tunable catalytic properties in the epoxidation of alkenes. Invented size-selected cluster deposition provides a unique tool to tune material properties by atom-by-atom fashion, which can be stabilized by protective overcoats.

Vajda, Stefan (Lisle, IL), Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Elam, Jeffrey W. (Elmhurst, IL); Marshall, Christopher L. (Naperville, IL); Winans, Randall A. (Downers Grove, IL); Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz (Roggentin, GR)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

458

Subnanometer and nanometer catalysts, method for preparing size-selected catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Highly uniform cluster based nanocatalysts supported on technologically relevant supports were synthesized for reactions of top industrial relevance. The Pt-cluster based catalysts outperformed the very best reported ODHP catalyst in both activity (by up to two orders of magnitude higher turn-over frequencies) and in selectivity. The results clearly demonstrate that highly dispersed ultra-small Pt clusters precisely localized on high-surface area supports can lead to affordable new catalysts for highly efficient and economic propene production, including considerably simplified separation of the final product. The combined GISAXS-mass spectrometry provides an excellent tool to monitor the evolution of size and shape of nanocatalyst at action under realistic conditions. Also provided are sub-nanometer gold and sub-nanometer to few nm size-selected silver catalysts which possess size dependent tunable catalytic properties in the epoxidation of alkenes. Invented size-selected cluster deposition provides a unique tool to tune material properties by atom-by-atom fashion, which can be stabilized by protective overcoats.

Vajda, Stefan (Lisle, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Elam, Jeffrey W. (Elmhurst, IL); Marshall, Christopher L. (Naperville, IL); Winans, Randall A. (Downers Grove, IL); Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz (Roggentin, GR)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

459

Electrically heated particulate filter using catalyst striping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system generally includes a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine. A grid of electrically resistive material is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF and selectively heats exhaust passing through the grid to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF. A catalyst coating is applied to the PF that increases a temperature of the combustion of the particulates within the PF.

Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore, Jr., Michael J; Ament, Frank

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

460

Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "removal catalyst research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Low-cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite submicronparticles. Low-cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite submicronparticles. Abstract: Low-cost...

462

Deactivation Mechanism of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mechanism of CuZeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive Hydrothermal Aging Deactivation Mechanism of CuZeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive Hydrothermal Aging Better control for...

463

NMR Studies of Cu/zeolite SCR Catalysts Hydrothermally Aged with...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cuzeolite SCR Catalysts Hydrothermally Aged with Urea. NMR Studies of Cuzeolite SCR Catalysts Hydrothermally Aged with Urea. Abstract: The effects of hydrothermal aging of Cu...

464

Zirconium Catalyst Follows a Low Energy Pathway for Carbon-Nitrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zirconium Catalyst Follows a Low Energy Pathway for Carbon-Nitrogen Bond Formation Chemists have synthesized a highly selective and highly efficient zirconium catalyst that makes...

465

Using IR Thermography to Evaluate Temperature Distributions on a Diesel NOx Adsorber Catalyst during Simulated Operation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In emissions catalyst applications, an axial distribution of reaction, surface chemistry, and temperature all exist on or along the surface of the catalyst. Understanding these… (more)

Aftab, Khurram

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

New Directions in Catalyst Design and Interrogation: Applications in Dinitrogen Activation and Olefin Metathesis .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A major driving force for development of new catalyst systems is the need for more efficient synthesis of chemical compounds essential to modern life. Catalysts… (more)

Blacquiere, Johanna M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Putting a Smiley Face on the Dragon: Wal-Mart as Catalyst to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Dragon: Wal-Mart as Catalyst to U.S. -China Trade Emekthat Wal-Mart acts as a catalyst to greater imports and

Basker, Emek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Extended Two Dimensional Nanotube and Nanowire Surfaces as Fuel Cell Catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

x-ray spectroscopy EOR: Ethanol oxidation reaction EGOR:in catalysts for MOR, ethanol (EOR), and ethylene glycolreported as an alkaline EOR catalyst, often with activity

Alia, Shaun Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Improving Platinum Catalyst Durability with a Doped Graphene Support  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improving the durability of a platinum catalyst is an important step in increasing its utility when incorporated as the anode or cathode of a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell. ... Carboxyl Group Enhanced CO Tolerant GO Supported Pt Catalysts: DFT and Electrochemical Analysis ... Chemical Structure of Nitrogen-Doped Graphene with Single Platinum Atoms and Atomic Clusters as a Platform for the PEMFC Electrode ...

Michael N. Groves; Cecile Malardier-Jugroot; Manish Jugroot

2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

470

IN SITU Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements  

SciTech Connect

SCR catalyst management has become an important operations and maintenance activity for coal-fired utility boilers in the United States. To facilitate this activity, a method to determine Catalyst Activity in situ is being developed. This report describes the methodology and presents the results of a two ozone season demonstration conducted at Alabama Power Company's Gorgas Unit 10 during the 2005 and 2006 ozone seasons. The results showed that the in situ measurements are in good agreement with the laboratory measurements and the technique has some advantages over the traditional laboratory method of determining Catalyst Activity and Reactor Potential. SCR Performance is determined by the overall Reactor Potential (the product of the Catalyst Activity and the available surface area per unit of flue gas). The in situ approach provides a direct measurement of Reactor Potential under actual operating conditions, whereas laboratory measurements of Catalyst Activity need to be coupled with estimates of catalyst pluggage and flue gas flowrate in order to assess Reactor Potential. The project also showed that the in situ activity results can easily be integrated into catalyst management software to aid in making informed catalyst decisions.

Fossil Energy Research

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

471

Effects of catalyst pretreatment for carbon nanotube growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of pretreatment of iron catalyst for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth was studied. CNTs were grown on Fe/A1203 (1/10 nm) thin-film catalyst deposited on silicon substrates via exposure to C2H4 in a thermal chemical ...

Morgan, Caitlin D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over iron-rhodium alloy catalysts  

SciTech Connect

To investigate the nature of iron-rhodium alloy catalysts during the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, a combination of experimental techniques were applied. Infrared spectroscopy was mainly used to extract direct information on the surface of catalysts under the reaction conditions. In addition, Mossbauer spectroscopy was employed to study the iron alloy catalysts. Further characterization of the catalysts was performed by chemisorption measurements. Hydrocarbon products of the CO + H/sub 2/ synthesis reaction were analyzed by gas chromatography. The working surface of a silica-supported rhodium catalyst was found to be saturated with molecular carbon monoxide. The intensity of the linear carbonyl absorption band remained constant compared to that for room temperature CO adsorption, while that of the bridge-bonded carbonyl absorption band was drastically reduced during the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The bridge-bonded adsorption sites are assumed to be the active sites for dissociating carbon monoxide. The hydrogenation rate of the linearly adsorbed carbon monoxide was much slower than the steady state reaction rate. The alloy catalyst did not form a bulk carbide, but the presence of surface carbon was suggested by the large shift of the linear carbonyl absorption band. On the other hand, infrared spectra on an iron catalyst showed only weak bands, indicating a high degree of CO dissociation. On a silica-supported iron-rhodium alloy catalyst, surface analysis by infrared spectroscopy presents evidence of well-mixed alloy formation. Three models of carbon monoxide adsorption were identified.

Choi, S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Silica-Supported Tantalum Clusters: Catalyst for Alkane Conversion  

SciTech Connect

Silica-supported tantalum clusters (on average, approximately tritantalum) were formed by the treatment, in either H{sub 2} or ethane, of adsorbed Ta(CH{sub 2}Ph){sub 5}; the supported catalyst is active for ethane conversion to methane and propane at 523 K, with the used catalyst containing clusters of the same average nuclearity as the precursor.

Nemana ,S.; Gates, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Decomposition of nitrous oxide on AlFe-PILC catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two AlFe-PILC catalysts were prepared with different OH/metal...2O) decomposition reactions. The 100% conversion of N2O with NH3into N2and H2O was achieved below 500oC with both applied catalysts. However, the ac...

Ern? E. Kiss; Tatjana J Vuli?…

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Catalyzing a Cleaner Energy Future When asked about catalysts, most  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a deeper fundamental understanding of how catalysts aid reactions. As for the "human catalysts," EMSL does it begin with the EMSL's 1997 ribbon-cutting as a new national scientific user facility.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Chuck Peden, catalysis scientist and PNNL Laboratory Fellow, remembers exploring

476

Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Engineering Division Catalysts for autothermal reforming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Krause Chemical Engineering Division Argonne National Laboratory Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure2, CO, CO2, and CH4) as a function of: catalyst composition fuel composition and sulfur content,110,861) awarded Oct 2000: CRADA w/H2Fuel to commercialize reformer Aug 2001: Began work on perovskite catalysts

477

Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron Arsenic Removal by Photochemical Methods: Nanoparticulate Zerovalent Iron and Heterogeneous Photocatalysis with TiO2 Speaker(s): Marta Litter Date: November 19, 2010 - 11:00am Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Hugo Destaillats Arsenic in groundwater is a dramatic global problem due to the high incidence of arsenicosis or HACRE (Chronic Endemic Regional Hydro-arsenicism, Hidroarsenicismo Crónico Regional Endémico in Spanish), a severe illness causing skin lesions and cancer in extended regions of the world. For this reason, research on low-cost technologies for As removal to be applied in isolated, poor, rural locations is mandatory. This seminar will present a brief overview of arsenic pollution issues and mitigation needs in Latin America. It will also present results on As(V) removal using

478

Recommendation 199: Recommendation to Remove Uncontaminated Areas...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

9: Recommendation to Remove Uncontaminated Areas of the Oak Ridge Reservation from the National Priorities List Recommendation 199: Recommendation to Remove Uncontaminated Areas of...

479

Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts Print Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts Print Catalytic systems based on bimetallic particles with controlled size, composition, and structure dispersed on a high-surface-area support are widely used for catalytic reforming, pollution control, alcohol oxidation, and electrocatalysis in fuel cells. Owing to the nanoscale size of the particles, the modification of the surface structure and composition that may occur when reaction conditions change can have dramatic effects on catalyst activity and selectivity. Working at the ALS, a University of California, Berkeley-Berkeley Lab group has used an ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) apparatus to demonstrate that bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts can undergo profound structural and chemical changes in response to reactive environments at ambient pressures, thereby opening the way for engineering catalysts with enhanced activity and selectivity.

480

The Science And Engineering of Duralbe Ultralow PGM Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies 2009 Kickoff Meeting The Science And Engineering of Durable Ultralow PGM Catalysts Eric Brosha, Neil Henson and Fernando Garzon (PI) LANL 1 Los Alamos National Laboratory (lead participant) Ballard Power Systems (BPS) University of California Riverside (UCR) University of New Mexico (UNM) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) *Development of durable, high mass activity Platinum Group Metal cathode catalysts *Elucidation of the fundamental relationships between PGM catalyst shape, particle size and activity *Optimization of the cathode electrode layer to maximize the performance of PGM catalysts *Understanding the performance degradation mechanisms of high mass activity cathode catalysts *Development and testing of fuel cells using ultra-low loading high activity

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481

Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts Print Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts Print Catalytic systems based on bimetallic particles with controlled size, composition, and structure dispersed on a high-surface-area support are widely used for catalytic reforming, pollution control, alcohol oxidation, and electrocatalysis in fuel cells. Owing to the nanoscale size of the particles, the modification of the surface structure and composition that may occur when reaction conditions change can have dramatic effects on catalyst activity and selectivity. Working at the ALS, a University of California, Berkeley-Berkeley Lab group has used an ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) apparatus to demonstrate that bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts can undergo profound structural and chemical changes in response to reactive environments at ambient pressures, thereby opening the way for engineering catalysts with enhanced activity and selectivity.

482

Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts Print Reaction-Driven Restructuring of Bimetallic Nanoparticle Catalysts Print Catalytic systems based on bimetallic particles with controlled size, composition, and structure dispersed on a high-surface-area support are widely used for catalytic reforming, pollution control, alcohol oxidation, and electrocatalysis in fuel cells. Owing to the nanoscale size of the particles, the modification of the surface structure and composition that may occur when reaction conditions change can have dramatic effects on catalyst activity and selectivity. Working at the ALS, a University of California, Berkeley-Berkeley Lab group has used an ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) apparatus to demonstrate that bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts can undergo profound structural and chemical changes in response to reactive environments at ambient pressures, thereby opening the way for engineering catalysts with enhanced activity and selectivity.

483

Supported Molten Metal Catalysis. A New Class of Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new class of heterogeneous catalysts called supported molten metal catalysis (SMMC), in which molten metal catalysts are dispersed as nanodroplets on the surface of porous supports, allowing much larger active surface area than is possible in conventional contacting techniques for catalytic metals that are molten under reaction conditions, thus greatly enhancing their activity and potential utility. Specific examples of different types of reactions are provided to demonstrate the broad applicability of the technique in designing active, selective, and stable new catalysts. It is shown that dispersing the molten metal on a support in the suggested manner can enhance the rate of a reaction by three to four orders of magnitude as a result of the concomitant increase in the active surface area. New reaction examples include {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported molten Te (melting point 450 C) and Ga (MP 30 C) catalysts for bifunctional methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation. These catalysts provide activity similar to conventional Pt-based catalysts for this with better resistance to coking. In addition, results are described for a controlled pore glass supported molten In (MP 157 C) catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NO with ethanol in the presence of water, demonstrating activities superior to conventional catalysts for this reaction. A discussion is also provided on the characterization of the active surface area and dispersion of these novel supported catalysts. It is clear based on the results described that the development of new active and selective supported molten metal catalysts for practical applications is entirely plausible.

Ravindra Datta; Ajeet Singh; Manuela Serban; Istvan Halasz

2006-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

484

Study on Production Process of Biodiesel from Rubber Seed (Hevea Brasiliensis) by in Situ (Trans)Esterification Method with Acid Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Biodiesel is fatty acid methyl or ethyl esters made from vegetable oils (edible and non edible) or animal fats. The objective of this research was to produce biodiesel from rubber seed by in situ method with acid catalyst with a goal for obtaining environmentally friendly alternative fuels from non edible raw material. This research focuses on influence of reaction time, concentration of acid catalyst and ratio raw material to methanol. The first stage was carried out in order to get reaction time based on the density and viscosity of mixture produced. In this process H2SO4 0.5% (v/v) was used as catalyst and ratio of raw material to methanol (1:2). The experiments were conducted by investigating the catalyst concentration in range 0.1-1%(v/v) and ratio of raw material to methanol in range 1:1.5-1:3. The research method included, the preparation of samples, biodiesel production, biodiesel separation, and biodiesel characterization i.e density, viscosity, GC analysis, acid value and Iodine number. The results shows that the operation time for biodiesel production by in situ method with acid catalyst was 120 minutes and the yield of Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) obtained was at 91,05%.

Widayat; Agam Duma Kalista Wibowo; Hadiyanto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Removing Stains from Washable Fabrics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of May 8, 1914, as amended, and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture. Zerle L. Carpenter, Director, Texas Agricultural Extension Service, The Texas A&M University System. lOM-1l-88, New CLO ...I UUL. Z TA24S.7 8873 NO.1616 B.1616 / Texas Agricultural Extension Service LIBRARY FEB 0 1 1989 Texas A&M University Removing Stains from Washable Fabrics Ann Vanderpoorten 8eard* Most spots and stains can be removed by prompt...

Beard, Ann Vanderpoorten

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, the author introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, they demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sup 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection. In the second part of this dissertation, the author used laser-induced native fluorescence coupled with capillary electrophoresis (LINF-CE) and microscope imaging to study the single cell degranulation. On the basis of good temporal correlation with events observed through an optical microscope, they have identified individual peaks in the fluorescence electropherograms as serotonin released from the granular core on contact with the surrounding fluid.

Hui Su

2001-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

487

Study of the kinetics of hydrogenation using aged catalysts. Final technical progress report, 1 October 1983-30 October 1985. [Shell No. 324M  

SciTech Connect

We have demonstrated that a l-liter Robinson reactor can be used to quantify the aging characteristics of Wilsonville hydrotreater catalyst, Shell No. 324M. We compared the derived, lumped kinetic constants measured by Sandia National Labs. in a 15-ml microautoclave (tubing bomb reactor) on the identical catalyst samples shared with this program. Our results show the two reactor systems are sensitive to the carbon coking and pore mouth blocking that affect the rate of pyrene hydrogenation. The program objective was to determine the catalytic hydrogenation of coal liquid model compounds using authentically aged catalysts. Results of the program quantified the change in rate of hydrogenation pyrene as a function of the process age of the Wilsonville Pilot Plant. Comparison of whole pellet and crushed catalyst (Sandia Labs.) showed carbon coating and metals deposition blocking pores of active sites, thereby reducing overall hydrogenation activity by 20 to 25%. The range of the apparent kinetic constants, calculated from the Robinson reactor data, is 2 to 3 times greater than those calculated from the microautoclave. Both reactor systems show the absolute trend in decrease of hydrogenation potential with whole aged pellets. The rate constants derived for crushed catalyst from the microautoclave were a factor of 10 higher than the whole pellet constants. This is due to the exposure of new surface area with crushing, which normalizes the aging effect. Comparing the methods as analytical tools clearly favors the microautoclave technique with whole pellets. Comparing the methods as research tools to model the kinetics of hydrogenation of a bulk catalyst (pellets) the Robinson reactor allows for more precise data acquisition, with reduced catalyst sampling error and a closer approximation of the ''true'' activity of the catalyst as a function of coking and metal deposition. 21 refs., 10 tabs.

Schweighardt, F.K.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

The use of ethanol to remove sulfur from coal. Final report, September 1991--December 1992; Revision  

SciTech Connect

The initial technical goal in the project was to develop a chemical method for the cost effective removal of both inorganic and organic sulfur from Ohio coals. Verifying and using a process of reacting ethanol vapors with coal under conditions disclosed in U.S. Patent 4,888,029, the immediate technical objectives were to convert a small scale laborative batch process to a larger scale continuous process which can serve as the basis for commercial development of the technology. This involved getting as much information as possible from small scale batch autoclave or fluid bed laboratory reactors for use in pilot plant studies. The laboratory data included material balances on the coal and sulfur, temperature and pressure ranges for the reaction, minimum reaction times at different conditions, the effectiveness of different activators such as oxygen and nitric oxide, the amount and nature of by-products such as sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and acetaldehyde, the effect of coal particle size on the speed and completeness of the reaction, and the effectiveness of the reaction on different Ohio coals. Because the laboratory experiments using the method disclosed in U.S. 4,888,029 were not successful, the objective for the project was changed to develop a new laboratory process to use ethanol to remove sulfur from coal. Using copper as a catalyst and as an H{sub 2}S scavenger, a new laboratory procedure to use ethanol to remove sulfur from coal has been developed at Ohio University and a patent application covering this process was filed in March, 1993. The process is based on the use of copper as a catalyst for the dehydrogenation of ethanol to produce nascent hydrogen to remove sulfur from the coal and the use of copper as a scavenger to capture the hydrogen sulfide formed from the sulfur removed from coal.

Savage, R.L.; Lazarov, L.K.; Prudich, M.E.; Lange, C.A.; Kumar, N.

1994-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

489

Tin-containing zeolites are highly active catalysts for the isomerization of glucose in water  

SciTech Connect

The isomerization of glucose into fructose is a large-scale reaction for the production of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS; reaction performed by enzyme catalysts) and recently is being considered as an intermediate step in the possible route of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Here, it is shown that a large-pore zeolite that contains tin (Sn-Beta) is able to isomerize glucose to fructose in aqueous media with high activity and selectivity. Specifically, a 10% (wt/wt) glucose solution containing a catalytic amount of Sn-Beta (1?50 Sn:glucose molar ratio) gives product yields of approximately 46% (wt/wt) glucose, 31% (wt/wt) fructose, and 9% (wt/wt) mannose after 30 min and 12 min of reaction at 383 K and 413 K, respectively. This reactivity is achieved also when a 45 wt% glucose solution is used. The properties of the large-pore zeolite greatly influence the reaction behavior because the reaction does not proceed with a medium-pore zeolite, and the isomerization activity is considerably lower when the metal centers are incorporated in ordered mesoporous silica (MCM-41). The Sn-Beta catalyst can be used for multiple cycles, and the reaction stops when the solid is removed, clearly indicating that the catalysis is occurring heterogeneously. Most importantly, the Sn-Beta catalyst is able to perform the isomerization reaction in highly acidic, aqueous environments with equivalent activity and product distribution as in media without added acid. This enables Sn-Beta to couple isomerizations with other acid-catalyzed reactions, including hydrolysis/isomerization or isomerization/dehydration reaction sequences [starch to fructose and glucose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) demonstrated here].

Moliner, Manuel; Roman-Leshkov, Yuriy; Davis, Mark E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Catalytic activity of oxidized (combusted) oil shale for removal of nitrogen oxides with ammonia as a reductant in combustion gas streams, Part 1  

SciTech Connect

Oxidized oil shale from the combustor in the LLNL hot recycle solids oil shale retorting process has been studied as a catalyst for removing nitrogen oxides from laboratory gas streams using NH{sub 3} as areductant. Combusted Green River oil shale heated at 10{degrees}C/min in an Ar/O{sub 2}/NO/NH{sub 3} mixture ({approximately}93%/6%/2000 ppm/4000 ppm) with a gas residence time of {approximately}0.6 sec exhibited NO removal between 250 and 500{degrees}C, with maximum removal of 70% at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Under isothermal conditions with the same gas mixture, the maximum NO removal was found to be {approximately}64%. When CO{sub 2} was added to the gas mixture at {approximately}8%, the NO removal dropped to {approximately}50%. However, increasing the gas residence time to {approximately}1.2 sec, increased NO removal to 63%. These results are not based on optimized process conditions, but indicate oxidized (combusted) oil shale is an effective catalyst for NO removal from combustion gas streams using NH{sub 3} as the reductant.

Reynolds, J.G.; Taylor, R.W.; Morris, C.J.

1992-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

491

Catalytic activity of oxidized (combusted) oil shale for removal of nitrogen oxides with ammonia as a reductant in combustion gas streams, Part 2  

SciTech Connect

Oxidized oil shale from the combustor in the LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retorting process has been found to be a catalyst for removing nitrogen oxides from laboratory gas streams using NH{sub 3} as a reductant. Oxidized Green River oil shale heated at 10{degree}C/min in an Ar/O{sub 2}/NO/NH{sub 3} mixture ({approximately}93%/6%/2000 ppM/4000 ppM) with a gas residence time of {approximately}0.6 sec removed NO between 250 and 500{degree}C, with maximum removal of 70% at {approximately}400{degree}C. Under isothermal conditions with the same gas mixture, the maximum NO removal was {approximately}64%. When CO{sub 2} was added to the gas mixture at {approximately}8%, the NO removal dropped to {approximately}50%. However, increasing the gas residence time to {approximately}1.2 sec, increased NO removal to 63%. Nitrogen balances of these experiments suggest selective catalytic reduction of NO is occurring using NH{sub 3} as the reductant. These results are not based on completely optimized process conditions, but indicate oxidized oil shale is an effective catalyst for NO removal from combustion gas streams using NH{sub 3} as the reductant. Parameters calculated for implementing oxidized oil shale for NO{sub x} remediation on the current HRS retort indicate an abatement device is practical to construct.

Reynolds, J.G.; Taylor, R.W.; Morris, C.J.

1993-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

492

Catalytic activity of oxidized (combusted) oil shale for removal of nitrogen oxides with ammonia as a reductant in combustion gas streams, Part 2  

SciTech Connect

Oxidized oil shale from the combustor in the LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retorting process has been found to be a catalyst for removing nitrogen oxides from laboratory gas streams using NH[sub 3] as a reductant. Oxidized Green River oil shale heated at 10[degree]C/min in an Ar/O[sub 2]/NO/NH[sub 3] mixture ([approximately]93%/6%/2000 ppM/4000 ppM) with a gas residence time of [approximately]0.6 sec removed NO between 250 and 500[degree]C, with maximum removal of 70% at [approximately]400[degree]C. Under isothermal conditions with the same gas mixture, the maximum NO removal was [approximately]64%. When CO[sub 2] was added to the gas mixture at [approximately]8%, the NO removal dropped to [approximately]50%. However, increasing the gas residence time to [approximately]1.2 sec, increased NO removal to 63%. Nitrogen balances of these experiments suggest selective catalytic reduction of NO is occurring using NH[sub 3] as the reductant. These results are not based on completely optimized process conditions, but indicate oxidized oil shale is an effective catalyst for NO removal from combustion gas streams using NH[sub 3] as the reductant. Parameters calculated for implementing oxidized oil shale for NO[sub x] remediation on the current HRS retort indicate an abatement device is practical to construct.

Reynolds, J.G.; Taylor, R.W.; Morris, C.J.

1993-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

493

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper (II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the orginal organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge and transferred to a virtrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage.

Doherty, Joseph P. (Elkton, MD); Marek, James C. (Augusta, GA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z