Sample records for remote surplus facilities

  1. The surplus facility inventory and assessment project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, L.A.; Szilagyi, A.P. [DOE, Washington, DC (United States); Rae, L.J.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the ending of the Cold War, the Department of Energy (DOE) is experiencing a downsizing of the DOE nuclear weapons complex similar to the downsizing and base closures being experienced by the armed forces. Declining budgets across all DOE programs have further contributed to the extent and rate at which DOE`s assets are being declared surplus. The Surplus Facility Inventory and Assessment (SFIA) Project will define the magnitude of risk associated with the DOE surplus, contaminated assets. The results of the SFIA Project will be fundamental to all planning, budgeting, and management associated with the surplus, contaminated inventory.

  2. Hanford surplus facilities programs facilities listings and descriptions. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiser, S.K.; Witt, T.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the Hanford Site, many surplus facilities exist (including buildings, stacks, tanks, cribs, burial grounds, and septic systems) that are scheduled to be decommissioned. Many of these facilities contain large inventories of radionuclides, which present potential radiological hazards on and off the Hanford Site. Some structures with limited structural deterioration present potential radiological and industrial safety hazards to personnel. Because of the condition of these facilities, a systematic surveillance and maintenance program is performed to identify and correct potential hazards to personnel and the environment until eventual decommissioning operations are completed.

  3. Hanford Surplus Facilities Program plan, Fiscal year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, M.C.; Wahlen, R.K.; Winship, R.A.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Surplus Facilities Program is responsible for the safe and cost-effective surveillance, maintenance, and decommissioning of surplus facilities at the Hanford Site. The management of these facilities requires a surveillance and maintenance program to keep them in a safe condition and development of a plan for ultimate disposition. Criteria used to evaluate each factor relative to decommissioning are based on the guidelines presented by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Division, and are consistent with the Westinghouse Hanford Company commitment to decommission the Hanford Site retired facilities in the safest and most cost-effective way achievable. This document outlines the plan for managing these facilities to the end of disposition. 12 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. The ORNL Surplus Facilities Management Program Long Range Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrick, T.E.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National SFMP, administered by the Richland Operations Office. This program was established to provide for the management of DOE surplus radioactively contaminated facilities from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition is completed. As part of this program, the ORNL SFMP oversees some 76 individual surplus facilities, ranging in complexity from abandoned waste storage tanks to large experimental reactors. The ORNL SFMP has prepared this Long Range Plan to outline the long-term management strategy for those facilities included in the program. The primary objective of this plan are to: (1) develop a base of information for each ORNL SFMP facility, (2) conduct preliminary decommissioning analyses to identify feasible alternatives, (3) assess the current and future risk of each facility, (4) establish a priority list for the decommissioning projects, and (5) integrate the individual project costs and schedules into an overall program schedule and cost estimate for the ORNL site. The Long Range Plan also provides an overview of the ORNL SFMP management structure, specifies the decommissioning criteria to be employed, and identifies special technical problems, research and development needs, and special facilities and equipment that may be required for decommissioning operations.

  5. Site Selection for Surplus Plutonium Disposition Facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L.D.

    2000-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to identify, assess, and rank potential sites for the proposed Surplus Plutonium Disposition Facilities complex at the Savannah River Site.

  6. Decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy surplus facilities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, S. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States); Dorries, J. [Booz, Allen and Hamilton Inc., Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has identified more than 850 contaminated surplus facilities that require decommissioning through the environmental restoration program. This paper discusses the regulatory framework for decommissioning these facilities, specifically the framework established by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). CERCLA jurisdiction covers releases of hazardous substances to the environment, substantial threats of such releases, and responses to these situations. DOE has determined that the use of CERCLA removal action authority is the appropriate means of responding to releases or threats of releases from contaminated surplus facilities under the jurisdiction, custody, or control of the Department. This paper focuses on the policy and process for decommissioning contaminated surplus facilities. Not all surplus facilities to be decommissioned will fall under CERCLA jurisdiction. In all instances, however, the same basic process will still be followed and a graded approach will be applied, consistent with DOE orders.

  7. Site Selection for Surplus Plutonium Disposition Facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L.D.

    2000-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A site selection study was conducted to evaluate locations for the proposed Surplus Plutonium Disposition Facilities. Facilities to be located include the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility, the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF), and the Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) facility. Objectives of the study include: (1) Confirm that the Department of Energy (DOE) selected locations for the MOX and PDCF were suitable based on selected siting criteria, (2) Recommend a site in the vicinity of F Area that is suitable for the PIP, and (3) Identify alternative suitable sites for one or more of these facilities in the event that further geotechnical characterization or other considerations result in disqualification of a currently proposed site.

  8. Niagara Falls Storage Site, Annual site environmental report, Lewiston, New York, Calendar year 1986: Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1986, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York, presently used for the interim storage of radioactive residues and contaminated soils and rubble. The monitoring program is being conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. The monitoring program at the NFSS measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in the report, this individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. By comparison, the incremental dose received from living in a brick house versus a wooden house is 10 mrem/yr above background. The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1986 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 14 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

  9. Remote machine engineering applications for nuclear facilities decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toto, G.; Wyle, H.R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decontamination and decommissioning of a nuclear facility require the application of techniques that protect the worker and the enviroment from radiological contamination and radiation. Remotely operated portable robotic arms, machines, and devices can be applied. The use of advanced systems should enhance the productivity, safety, and cost facets of the efforts; remote automatic tooling and systems may be used on any job where job hazard and other factors justify application. Many problems based on costs, enviromental impact, health, waste generation, and political issues may be mitigated by use of remotely operated machines. The work that man can not do or should not do will have to be done by machines.

  10. Structural acceptance criteria Remote Handling Building Tritium Extraction Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertz, G.

    1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This structural acceptance criteria contains the requirements for the structural analysis and design of the Remote Handling Building (RHB) in the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF). The purpose of this acceptance criteria is to identify the specific criteria and methods that will ensure a structurally robust building that will safely perform its intended function and comply with the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) structural requirements.

  11. Department of Energy Announces Decision to Consolidate Surplus...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and instead disposing of all the surplus plutonium through the MOX facility and H-Canyon. DOE's plan ensures that surplus plutonium which will be consolidated at SRS has...

  12. Draft principles, policy, and acceptance criteria for decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy contaminated surplus facilities and summary of international decommissioning programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, B.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); [USDOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards, Washington, DC (United States). Systems Analysis and Standards Div.; Gillette, J.; Jackson, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning activities enable the DOE to reuse all or part of a facility for future activities and reduce hazards to the general public and any future work force. The DOE Office of Environment, Health and Safety has prepared this document, which consists of decommissioning principles and acceptance criteria, in an attempt to establish a policy that is in agreement with the NRC policy. The purpose of this document is to assist individuals involved with decommissioning activities in determining their specific responsibilities as identified in Draft DOE Order 5820.DDD, ``Decommissioning of US Department of Energy Contaminated Surplus Facilities`` (Appendix A). This document is not intended to provide specific decommissioning methodology. The policies and principles of several international decommissioning programs are also summarized. These programs are from the IAEA, the NRC, and several foreign countries expecting to decommission nuclear facilities. They are included here to demonstrate the different policies that are to be followed throughout the world and to allow the reader to become familiar with the state of the art for environment, safety, and health (ES and H) aspects of nuclear decommissioning.

  13. REMOTE SURVEILLANCE OF FACILITIES AWAITING D AND D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this investigation is to compile the remote surveillance needs of different DOE facilities and to design and build a system that can measure the required parameters (such as radiation field, temperature, roof leakage), and transmit the data to a base location. The base station with its transceiver, computer, and software will receive, store, retrieve, and manipulate the data so that the values can be graphically represented and trends predicted. It is also important that the components should be commercially available, so that they can be configured into a user-friendly system. Since the measurements need to be performed over extended periods, mostly unattended, the components and system should be able to withstand adverse conditions, such as varying temperatures and relative humidities, and corrosive and radioactive atmospheres. The integrated system will be tested at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) and at a DOE site. Based on these tests, and cost-benefit analysis, plans for deployment of the system will be made. The closed facilities may not have main power and telephone lines. An alternative method of solar-powering the system with storage batteries has been considered, which would be capable of supplying power to the system for a week in cloudy conditions. RF module and RF radio will be used for transmission of data to the remote station and receipt at the base station.

  14. WIPP Remote Handled Waste Facility: Performance Dry Run Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrington, T. P.; Britain, R. M.; Cassingham, S. T.

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Handled (RH) TRU Waste Handling Facility at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was recently upgraded and modified in preparation for handling and disposal of RH Transuranic (TRU) waste. This modification will allow processing of RH-TRU waste arriving at the WIPP site in two different types of shielded road casks, the RH-TRU 72B and the CNS 10-160B. Washington TRU Solutions (WTS), the WIPP Management and Operation Contractor (MOC), conducted a performance dry run (PDR), beginning August 19, 2002 and successfully completed it on August 24, 2002. The PDR demonstrated that the RHTRU waste handling system works as designed and demonstrated the handling process for each cask, including underground disposal. The purpose of the PDR was to develop and implement a plan that would define in general terms how the WIPP RH-TRU waste handling process would be conducted and evaluated. The PDR demonstrated WIPP operations and support activities required to dispose of RH-TRU waste in the WIPP underground.

  15. Preliminary Safety Design Report for Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Solack; Carol Mason

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new onsite, remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled low-level waste disposal for remote-handled low-level waste from the Idaho National Laboratory and for nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled low-level waste in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This preliminary safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by discussing site characteristics that impact accident analysis, by providing the facility and process information necessary to support the hazard analysis, by identifying and evaluating potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled low-level waste, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  16. Preliminary Hazard Analysis for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; Mike Lehto

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for remote handled low level waste (LLW) disposal capability has been identified. A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal capability for remote-handled LLW that is generated as part of the nuclear mission of the Idaho National Laboratory and from spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This document supports the conceptual design for the proposed remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization and by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW.

  17. Preliminary Hazard Analysis for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; Mike Lehto

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for remote handled low level waste (LLW) disposal capability has been identified. A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal capability for remote-handled LLW that is generated as part of the nuclear mission of the Idaho National Laboratory and from spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This document supports the conceptual design for the proposed remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization and by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW.

  18. Conceptual Safety Design Report for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal for remote-handled LLW from the Idaho National Laboratory and for spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW, by evaluating consequences of postulated accidents, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  19. Conceptual Safety Design Report for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal for remote-handled LLW from the Idaho National Laboratory and for spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW, by evaluating consequences of postulated accidents, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  20. Conceptual Design Report for Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; David Duncan; Joan Connolly; Margaret Hinman; Charles Marcinkiewicz; Gary Mecham

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report addresses development of replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability for the Idaho National Laboratory. Current disposal capability at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex is planned until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual design report includes key project assumptions; design options considered in development of the proposed onsite disposal facility (the highest ranked alternative for providing continued uninterrupted remote-handled low level waste disposal capability); process and facility descriptions; safety and environmental requirements that would apply to the proposed facility; and the proposed cost and schedule for funding, design, construction, and operation of the proposed onsite disposal facility.

  1. Remote Technology for Facility Deactivation and Decommissioning at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoffner, P.A.; Lagos, L.E.; Varona, J. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Faldowski, J.A.; Vesco, D. [NuVision Engineering, Inc., Road, Mooresville, NC (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that will undergo deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) over the next several years include highly contaminated hot cell facilities, reactor facilities, process facilities, and a variety of other buildings. The D and D effort will require physical, chemical, and radiological characterization as well as decontamination, material sorting, size reduction, dismantlement, and waste removal and packaging. D and D planning for ORNL facilities includes recognizing that a significant number of the facilities contain hazards that prevent the use of safe manual D and D techniques. These hazards include seriously deteriorated structural integrity as well as very high dose rates (some in the hundreds of R/hr). The hazards also include high levels of fixed and removable radioactive contamination on facility surfaces and in equipment as well as chemically hazardous materials. Thus, manned entry may be highly restricted. In these situations, remotely operated technologies will be required to complete the necessary D and D activities, minimize dose and protect workers. To prepare to use remote technologies, it is first necessary to understand the tasks typically required to complete D and D of these facilities as well as the availability, applicability, and sustainability of previously deployed remote technologies. Technologies of specific interest included remote inspection, characterization, decontamination, and dismantlement. The Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU), in partnership with NuVision Engineering (NVE, formerly AEA Technology), assessed the requirements for remotely operated technologies to support D and D at ORNL. FIU-ARC and NVE then identified existing technologies that can meet the expected requirements and performed a gap analysis between the D and D needs and currently available technologies. (authors)

  2. Surplus Plutonium Disposition (SPD) Environmental Data Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fledderman, P.D.

    2000-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an overview of existing environmental and ecological information at areas identified as potential locations of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Surplus Plutonium Disposition (SPD) facilities. This information is required to document existing environmental and baseline conditions from which SPD construction and operation impacts can be defined. It will be used in developing the required preoperational monitoring plan to be used at specific SPD facilities construction sites.

  3. Benchmarking the Remote-Handled Waste Facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O. P. Mendiratta; D. K. Ploetz

    2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Facility decontamination activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), the site of a former commercial nuclear spent fuel reprocessing facility near Buffalo, New York, have resulted in the removal of radioactive waste. Due to high dose and/or high contamination levels of this waste, it needs to be handled remotely for processing and repackaging into transport/disposal-ready containers. An initial conceptual design for a Remote-Handled Waste Facility (RHWF), completed in June 1998, was estimated to cost $55 million and take 11 years to process the waste. Benchmarking the RHWF with other facilities around the world, completed in November 1998, identified unique facility design features and innovative waste pro-cessing methods. Incorporation of the benchmarking effort has led to a smaller yet fully functional, $31 million facility. To distinguish it from the June 1998 version, the revised design is called the Rescoped Remote-Handled Waste Facility (RRHWF) in this topical report. The conceptual design for the RRHWF was completed in June 1999. A design-build contract was approved by the Department of Energy in September 1999.

  4. A facility to remotely assemble radioisotope thermoelectric generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engstrom, J.W.; Goldmann, L.H.; Truitt, R.W.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) are electrical power sources that use heat from decaying radioisotopes to directly generate electrical power. The RTG assembly process is performed in an inert atmosphere inside a large glovebox, which is surrounded by radiation shielding to reduce exposure to neutron and gamma radiation from the radioisotope heat source. In the past, allowable dose rate limits have allowed direct, manual assembly methods; however, current dose rate limits require a thicker radiation shielding that makes direct, manual assembly infeasible. To minimize RTG assembly process modifications, telerobotic systems are being investigated to perform remote assembly tasks. Telerobotic systems duplicate human arm motion and incorporate force feedback sensitivity to handle objects and tools in a human-like manner. A telerobotic system with two arms and a three-dimensional (3-D) vision system can be used to perform remote RTG assembly tasks inside gloveboxes and cells using unmodified, normal hand tools.

  5. Working with SRNL - Our Facilities - Remote Systems Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abigpresentedMetal Hydride LaboratoriesRemote

  6. Hazard Classification of the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is constructing a new facility to replace remote-handled low-level radioactive waste disposal capability for INL and Naval Reactors Facility operations. Current disposal capability at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) will continue until the facility is full or closed for remediation (estimated at approximately fiscal year 2015). Development of a new onsite disposal facility is the highest ranked alternative and will provide RH-LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate RH-LLW for the foreseeable future. As a part of establishing a safety basis for facility operations, the facility will be categorized according to DOE-STD-1027-92. This classification is important in determining the scope of analyses performed in the safety basis and will also dictate operational requirements of the completed facility. This paper discusses the issues affecting hazard classification in this nuclear facility and impacts of the final hazard categorization.

  7. Remote auditing of radiotherapy facilities using optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lye, Jessica, E-mail: jessica.lye@arpansa.gov.au; Dunn, Leon; Kenny, John; Alves, Andrew [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia)] [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Lehmann, Joerg; Williams, Ivan [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Victoria 3085, Australia and School of Applied Science, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia)] [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Victoria 3085, Australia and School of Applied Science, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia); Kron, Tomas [School of Applied Science, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000, Australia and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne 3008 (Australia)] [School of Applied Science, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000, Australia and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne 3008 (Australia); Oliver, Chris; Butler, Duncan; Johnston, Peter [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia)] [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Franich, Rick [School of Applied Science, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia)] [School of Applied Science, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: On 1 July 2012, the Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) released its Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeter (OSLD) Level I audit, replacing the previous TLD based audit. The aim of this work is to present the results from this new service and the complete uncertainty analysis on which the audit tolerances are based. Methods: The audit release was preceded by a rigorous evaluation of the InLight® nanoDot OSLD system from Landauer (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL). Energy dependence, signal fading from multiple irradiations, batch variation, reader variation, and dose response factors were identified and quantified for each individual OSLD. The detectors are mailed to the facility in small PMMA blocks, based on the design of the existing Radiological Physics Centre audit. Modeling and measurement were used to determine a factor that could convert the dose measured in the PMMA block, to dose in water for the facility's reference conditions. This factor is dependent on the beam spectrum. The TPR{sub 20,10} was used as the beam quality index to determine the specific block factor for a beam being audited. The audit tolerance was defined using a rigorous uncertainty calculation. The audit outcome is then determined using a scientifically based two tiered action level approach. Audit outcomes within two standard deviations were defined as Pass (Optimal Level), within three standard deviations as Pass (Action Level), and outside of three standard deviations the outcome is Fail (Out of Tolerance). Results: To-date the ACDS has audited 108 photon beams with TLD and 162 photon beams with OSLD. The TLD audit results had an average deviation from ACDS of 0.0% and a standard deviation of 1.8%. The OSLD audit results had an average deviation of ?0.2% and a standard deviation of 1.4%. The relative combined standard uncertainty was calculated to be 1.3% (1?). Pass (Optimal Level) was reduced to ?2.6% (2?), and Fail (Out of Tolerance) was reduced to >3.9% (3?) for the new OSLD audit. Previously with the TLD audit the Pass (Optimal Level) and Fail (Out of Tolerance) were set at ?4.0% (2?) and >6.0% (3?). Conclusions: The calculated standard uncertainty of 1.3% at one standard deviation is consistent with the measured standard deviation of 1.4% from the audits and confirming the suitability of the uncertainty budget derived audit tolerances. The OSLD audit shows greater accuracy than the previous TLD audit, justifying the reduction in audit tolerances. In the TLD audit, all outcomes were Pass (Optimal Level) suggesting that the tolerances were too conservative. In the OSLD audit 94% of the audits have resulted in Pass (Optimal level) and 6% of the audits have resulted in Pass (Action Level). All Pass (Action level) results have been resolved with a repeat OSLD audit, or an on-site ion chamber measurement.

  8. Performance Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Arthur S. Rood

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This performance assessment for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the facility. This assessment evaluates compliance with the applicable radiological criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involve modeling transport of radionuclides from buried waste to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses are calculated for both offsite receptors and individuals who inadvertently intrude into the waste after site closure. The results of the calculations are used to evaluate the future performance of the low-level radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide input for establishment of waste acceptance criteria. In addition, one-factor-at-a-time, Monte Carlo, and rank correlation analyses are included for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The comparison of the performance assessment results to the applicable performance objectives provides reasonable expectation that the performance objectives will be met

  9. ESTIMATING IMPURITIES IN SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FOR DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allender, J.; Moore, E.

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States holds at least 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium that is permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs, including 47.2 MT of weapons-grade plutonium. Surplus inventories will be stored safely by the Department of Energy (DOE) and then transferred to facilities that will prepare the plutonium for permanent disposition. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) operates a Feed Characterization program for the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition of the National Nuclear Security Administration and the DOE Office of Environmental Management. Many of the items that require disposition are only partially characterized, and SRNL uses a variety of techniques to predict the isotopic and chemical properties that are important for processing through the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility and alternative disposition paths. Recent advances in laboratory tools, including Prompt Gamma Analysis and Peroxide Fusion treatment, provide data on the existing inventories that will enable disposition without additional, costly sampling and destructive analysis.

  10. National Environmental Policy Act Compliance Strategy for the Remote-Handled Low-level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggy Hinman

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to have disposal capability for remote-handled low level waste (LLW) generated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at the time the existing disposal facility is full or must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the INL Subsurface Disposal Area in approximately the year 2017.

  11. Recycling and surplus chemical programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, T.J.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1988, 45 years of defense production came to a close at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The mission of the Hanford Site was formally changed to environmental restoration and remediation. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is the management and operations (M&O) contractor leading the cleanup. Within the framework of future Site cleanup, Hanford recycling and surplus chemical programs are making a viable contribution today to waste minimization, diversion of materials from the waste stream, and setting a standard for future operations. This paper focuses on two successful efforts: paper recycling and surplus chemical sales.

  12. SNS Target Test Facility: Prototype Hg Operations and Remote Handling Tests P. T. Spampinato, T. W. Burgess, J. B. Chesser, V. B. Graves, and S.L. Schrock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    SNS Target Test Facility: Prototype Hg Operations and Remote Handling Tests P. T. Spampinato, T. W remote handling techniques and tools for replacing target system components. During the past year and analytical data. These included a welded-tube heat exchanger, an electromagnetic flow meter, a hydraulically

  13. in the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental EIS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and manufacture of critical nuclear weapons components. SRS also manages surplus nuclear materials, solid and transuranic waste, domestic and international used research...

  14. Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium Environmental Impact Statement kternationd Atomic Energy Agency Idaho Nationrd Engineering Laborato low-enriched uranium low-level waste...

  15. Characterizing Surplus US Plutonium for Disposition - 13199

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allender, Jeffrey S. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken SC 29808 (United States); Moore, Edwin N. [Moore Nuclear Energy, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken SC 29808 (United States)] [Moore Nuclear Energy, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States (US) has identified 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium that is permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs, including 47.2 MT of weapons-grade plutonium. Surplus inventories will be stored safely by the Department of Energy (DOE) and then transferred to facilities that will prepare the plutonium for permanent disposition. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) operates a Feed Characterization program for the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM). SRNL manages a broad program of item tracking through process history, laboratory analysis, and non-destructive assay. A combination of analytical techniques allows SRNL to predict the isotopic and chemical properties that qualify materials for disposition through the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The research also defines properties that are important for other disposition paths, including disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as transuranic waste (TRUW) or to high-level waste (HLW) systems. (authors)

  16. Characterizing surplus US plutonium for disposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allender, Jeffrey S.; Moore, Edwin N.

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States (US) has identified 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium that is permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs, including 47.2 MT of weapons-grade plutonium. Surplus inventories will be stored safely by the Department of Energy (DOE) and then transferred to facilities that will prepare the plutonium for permanent disposition. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) operates a Feed Characterization program for the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM). SRNL manages a broad program of item tracking through process history, laboratory analysis, and non-destructive assay. A combination of analytical techniques allows SRNL to predict the isotopic and chemical properties that qualify materials for disposition through the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The research also defines properties that are important for other disposition paths, including disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as transuranic waste (TRUW) or to high-level waste (HLW) systems.

  17. EIS-0283: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with alternatives for the disposition of surplus plutonium.

  18. Assessment of Geochemical Environment for the Proposed INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Craig Cooper

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conservative sorption parameters have been estimated for the proposed Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility. This analysis considers the influence of soils, concrete, and steel components on water chemistry and the influence of water chemistry on the relative partitioning of radionuclides over the life of the facility. A set of estimated conservative distribution coefficients for the primary media encountered by transported radionuclides has been recommended. These media include the vault system, concrete-sand-gravel mix, alluvium, and sedimentary interbeds. This analysis was prepared to support the performance assessment required by U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management.' The estimated distribution coefficients are provided to support release and transport calculations of radionuclides from the waste form through the vadose zone. A range of sorption parameters are provided for each key transport media, with recommended values being conservative. The range of uncertainty has been bounded through an assessment of most-likely-minimum and most-likely-maximum distribution coefficient values. The range allows for adequate assessment of mean facility performance while providing the basis for uncertainty analysis.

  19. SELECTION OF SURPLUS PLUTONIUM MATERIALS FOR DISPOSITION TO WIPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allender, J.; Mcclard, J.; Christopher, J.

    2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a Surplus Plutonium Disposition (SPD) Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS). Included in the evaluation are up to 6 metric tons (MT) of plutonium in the form of impure oxides and metals for which a disposition plan has not been decided, among options that include preparation as feed for the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility; disposing to high-level waste through the Savannah River Site (SRS) HB Line and H Canyon; can-in-canister disposal using the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility; and preparation for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE and SRS have identified at least 0.5 MT of plutonium that, because of high levels of chemical and isotopic impurities, is impractical for disposition by methods other than the WIPP pathway. Characteristics of these items and the disposition strategy are discussed.

  20. Surplus Plutonium Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published the ''Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Storage and Disposition PEIS)'' (DOE 1996a). That PEIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternative strategies for the long-term storage of weapons-usable plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) and the disposition of weapons-usable plutonium that has been or may be declared surplus to national security needs. The Record of Decision (ROD) for the ''Storage and Disposition PEIS'', issued on January 14, 1997 (DOE 1997a), outlines DOE's decision to pursue an approach to plutonium disposition that would make surplus weapons-usable plutonium inaccessible and unattractive for weapons use. DOE's disposition strategy, consistent with the Preferred Alternative analyzed in the ''Storage and Disposition PEIS'', allows for both the immobilization of some (and potentially all) of the surplus plutonium and use of some of the surplus plutonium as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in existing domestic, commercial reactors. The disposition of surplus plutonium would also involve disposal of both the immobilized plutonium and the MOX fuel (as spent nuclear fuel) in a potential geologic repository.

  1. DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a policy in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for decommissioning surplus DOE facilities consistent with the...

  2. Study 59 - Fed 70WY Surplus Deficit.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3207 4763 2170 167 10 1319 1971 Federal SurplusDeficit 521 219 230 4334 4461 3914 3727 5182 3917 3972 2460 741 2797 1972 Federal SurplusDeficit 995 294 697 4223 4038 4997 3482...

  3. Safety issues in fabricating mixed oxide fuel using surplus weapons plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buksa, J.; Badwan, F.; Barr, M.; Motley, F.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an assessment of the safety issues and implications of fabricating mixed oxide (MOX) fuel using surplus weapons plutonium. The basis for this assessment is the research done at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in identifying and resolving the technical issues surrounding the production of PuO{sub 2} feed, removal of gallium from the PuO{sub 2} feed, the fabrication of test fuel, and the work done at the LANL plutonium processing facility. The use of plutonium in MOX fuel has been successfully demonstrated in Europe, where the experience has been almost exclusively with plutonium separated from commercial spent nuclear fuel. This experience in safely operating MOX fuel fabrication facilities directly applies to the fabrication and irradiation of MOX fuel made from surplus weapons plutonium. Consequently, this paper focuses on the technical difference between plutonium from surplus weapons, and light-water reactor recycled plutonium. Preliminary assessments and research lead to the conclusion that no new process or product safety concerns will arise from using surplus weapons plutonium in MOX fuel.

  4. Mechanical generation of networks with surplus complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell Standish

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous work I examined an information based complexity measure of networks with weighted links. The measure was compared with that obtained from by randomly shuffling the original network, forming an Erdos-Renyi random network preserving the original link weight distribution. It was found that real world networks almost invariably had higher complexity than their shuffled counterparts, whereas networks mechanically generated via preferential attachment did not. The same experiment was performed on foodwebs generated by an artificial life system, Tierra, and a couple of evolutionary ecology systems, EcoLab and WebWorld. These latter systems often exhibited the same complexity excess shown by real world networks, suggesting that the complexity surplus indicates the presence of evolutionary dynamics. In this paper, I report on a mechanical network generation system that does produce this complexity surplus. The heart of the idea is to construct the network of state transitions of a chaotic dynamical system, such as the Lorenz equation. This indicates that complexity surplus is a more fundamental trait than that of being an evolutionary system.

  5. The implications of consumer surplus levels for equitable pricing decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Neal Alan

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    benefits, expressed as consumer surplus, derived by the campers as a result of participating in their present trip. The contingent valuation method was approved by the U. S, Water Resource Council in 1979 for use by government agencies as an acceptable... the individual demand function. This inverse demand function specified price as the dependent variable. In the proposed model a measure of a consumer' s surplus was used as an alternative to price. A Consumer's surplus was defined as the amount which...

  6. Decommissioning of surplus facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stout, D.S.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning Buildings 3 and 4 South at Technical Area 21, Los Alamos National Laboratory, involves the decontamination, dismantlement, and demolition of two enriched-uranium processing buildings containing process equipment and ductwork holdup. The Laboratory has adopted two successful management strategies to implement this project: Rather than characterize an entire site, upfront, investigators use the ``observational approach,`` in which they collect only enough data to begin decommissioning activities and then determine appropriate procedures for further characterization as the work progresses. Project leaders augment work packages with task hazard analyses to fully define specific tasks and inform workers of hazards; all daily work activities are governed by specific work procedures and hazard analyses.

  7. Disposition and transportation of surplus radioactive low specific activity nitric acid. Volume 1, Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE is deactivating the PUREX plant at Hanford; this will involve the disposition of about 692,000 liters (183,000 gallons) of surplus nitric acid contaminated with low levels of U and other radionuclides. The nitric acid, designated as low specific activity, is stored in 4 storage tanks at PUREX. Five principal alternatives were evaluated: transfer for reuse (sale to BNF plc), no action, continued storage in Hanford upgraded or new facility, consolidation of DOE surplus acid, and processing the LSA nitric acid as waste. The transfer to BNF plc is the preferred alternative. From the analysis, it is concluded that the proposed disposition and transportation of the acid does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

  8. Disposition of surplus fissile materials via immobilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Sutcliffe, W.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); McKibben, J.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Danker, W. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Cold War aftermath, the US and Russia have agreed to large reductions in nuclear weapons. To aid in the selection of long-term management options, the USDOE has undertaken a multifaceted study to select options for storage and disposition of surplus plutonium (Pu). One disposition alternative being considered is immobilization. Immobilization is a process in which surplus Pu would be embedded in a suitable material to produce an appropriate form for ultimate disposal. To arrive at an appropriate form, we first reviewed published information on HLW immobilization technologies to identify forms to be prescreened. Surviving forms were screened using multi-attribute utility analysis to determine promising technologies for Pu immobilization. We further evaluated the most promising immobilization families to identify and seek solutions for chemical, chemical engineering, environmental, safety, and health problems; these problems remain to be solved before we can make technical decisions about the viability of using the forms for long-term disposition of Pu. All data, analyses, and reports are being provided to the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition to support the Record of Decision that is anticipated in Summer of 1996.

  9. D&D Toolbox Project- Technology Demonstration of Fixatives Applied to Hot Cell Facilities via Remote Sprayer Platforms

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Many facilities slated for D&D across the DOE complex pose hazards (radiological, chemical, and structural) which prevent the use of traditional manual techniques.

  10. End points for facility deactivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szilagyi, A.P. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States); Negin, C.A. [Oak Technologies, Washington Grove, MD (United States); Stefanski, L.D. [Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE`s Office of Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization mission includes deactivating surplus nuclear facilities. Each deactivation project requires a systematic and explicit specification of the conditions to be established. End Point methods for doing so have been field developed and implemented. These methods have worked well and are being made available throughout the DOE establishment.

  11. Summary of Conceptual Models and Data Needs to Support the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter; Arthur S. Rood

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the technical approach and data required to support development of the performance assessment, and composite analysis are presented for the remote handled low-level waste disposal facility on-site alternative being considered at Idaho National Laboratory. Previous analyses and available data that meet requirements are identified and discussed. Outstanding data and analysis needs are also identified and summarized. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of facility performance and of the composite performance are required to meet the Department of Energy’s Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE Order 435.1, 2001) which stipulate that operation and closure of the disposal facility will be managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. The corresponding established procedures to ensure these protections are contained in DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1 2001). Requirements include assessment of (1) all-exposure pathways, (2) air pathway, (3) radon, and (4) groundwater pathway doses. Doses are computed from radionuclide concentrations in the environment. The performance assessment and composite analysis are being prepared to assess compliance with performance objectives and to establish limits on concentrations and inventories of radionuclides at the facility and to support specification of design, construction, operation and closure requirements. Technical objectives of the PA and CA are primarily accomplished through the development of an establish inventory, and through the use of predictive environmental transport models implementing an overarching conceptual framework. This document reviews the conceptual model, inherent assumptions, and data required to implement the conceptual model in a numerical framework. Available site-specific data and data sources are then addressed. Differences in required analyses and data are captured as outstanding data needs.

  12. Supplement to the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    On May 22, 1997, DOE published a Notice of Intent in the Federal Register (62 Federal Register 28009) announcing its decision to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that would tier from the analysis and decisions reached in connection with the ''Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic EIS (Storage and Disposition PEIS)''. ''The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement'' (SPD Draft EIS) (DOWEIS-0283-D) was prepared in accordance with NEPA and issued in July 1998. It identified the potential environmental impacts of reasonable alternatives for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three facilities for plutonium disposition. These three facilities would accomplish pit disassembly and conversion, immobilization, and MOX fuel fabrication. For the alternatives that included MOX fuel fabrication, the draft also described the potential environmental impacts of using from three to eight commercial nuclear reactors to irradiate MOX fuel. The potential impacts were based on a generic reactor analysis that used actual reactor data and a range of potential site conditions. In May 1998, DCE initiated a procurement process to obtain MOX fuel fabrication and reactor irradiation services. The request for proposals defined limited activities that may be performed prior to issuance of the SPD EIS Record of Decision (ROD) including non-site-specific work associated with the development of the initial design for the MOX fuel fabrication facility, and plans (paper studies) for outreach, long lead-time procurements, regulatory management, facility quality assurance, safeguards, security, fuel qualification, and deactivation. No construction on the proposed MOX facility would begin before an SPD EIS ROD is issued. In March 1999, DOE awarded a contract to Duke Engineering & Services; COGEMA, Inc.; and Stone & Webster (known as DCS) to provide the requested services. The procurement process included the environmental review specified in DOE's NEPA regulations in 10 CFR 1021.216. The six reactors selected are Catawba Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2 in South Carolina McGuire Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2 in North Carolina, and North Anna Power Station Units 1 and 2 in Virginia. The Supplement describes the potential environmental impacts of using MOX fuel in these six specific reactors named in the DCS proposal as well as other program changes made since the SPD Draft EIS was published.

  13. The SWAP SHOP: A surplus materials exchange network at DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, L.H.; Birch-Kennedy, S.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The diversity and continually changing nature of the research and production programs at the ORR plant sites, as well as the size of the facilities and their physical separation on the ORR, lead to the buildup of surplus equipment and materials from canceled or completed projects, changes in work orders or directives, or over-procurement of particular items or materials. Many times, for lack of a means to find legitimate uses for these excess items, they have been disposed of as wastes or sold as salvage. Recognizing that this situation prevails at most, if not all, government facilities, Congress has enacted legislation encouraging the establishment of waste minimization, pollution prevention, and cost avoidance measures throughout government-owned facilities. In response to this, the Secretary of Energy has instituted a high-priority DOE initiative to develop, promote, and implement waste minimization and pollution prevention at government installations. One result of the increased awareness and emphasis on environmental concerns and improved resource management is the recent grassroots development of a surplus materials exchange network developed and operated on a voluntary basis by Environmental Protection Officers (EPOs) at the Oak Ridge installations. The EPOs are full-time or part-time staff members employed by each division to provide guidance and assistance for achieving compliance with all environmental regulatory requirements and to resolve waste disposal problems. The materials exchange network, called the SWAP SHOP, provides an EPO communications and problem-solving network to help eliminate unnecessary disposal of usable surplus chemicals and equipment at the Oak Ridge plant sites.

  14. Issues and Recommendations Arising from the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Composite Analysis - 13374

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood, Arthur S.; Schafer, Annette L.; Sondrup, A. Jeff [Idaho National Laboratory, Battelle Energy Alliance, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83401-2107 (United States)] [Idaho National Laboratory, Battelle Energy Alliance, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83401-2107 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of the composite analysis (CA) for the Idaho National Laboratory's (INLs) proposed remote-handled (RH) low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility has underscored the importance of consistency between analyses conducted for site-specific performance assessments (PAs) for LLW disposal facilities, sites regulated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) [1], and residual decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) inventories. Consistency is difficult to achieve because: 1) different legacy sources and compliance time-periods were deemed important for each of the sites evaluated at INL (e.g., 100 years for CERCLA regulated facilities vs. 1,000 years for LLW disposal facilities regulated under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 [2]); 2) fate and transport assumptions, parameters, and models have evolved through time at the INL including the use of screening-level parameters vs. site-specific values; and 3) evaluation objectives for the various CERCLA sites were inconsistent with those relevant to either the PA or CA including the assessment of risk rather than effective dose. The proposed single site-wide CA approach would provide needed consistency, allowing ready incorporation of new information and/or facilities in addition to being cost effective in terms of preparation of CAs and review by the DOE. A single site-wide CA would include a central database of all existing INL sources, including those from currently operating LLW facilities, D and D activities, and those from the sites evaluated under CERCLA. The framework presented for the INL RH-LLW disposal facility allows for development of a single CA encompassing air and groundwater impacts. For groundwater impacts, a site-wide MODFLOW/MT3D-MS model was used to develop unit-response functions for all potential sources providing responses for a grid of receptors. Convolution and superposition of the response functions are used to compute groundwater concentrations. A similar approach could be applied for the air pathway where air emissions are stored in a central database and air concentrations for unit releases could be scaled to actual releases. (authors)

  15. Electro-Mechanical Manipulator for Use in the Remote Equipment Decontamination Cell at the Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River Site - 12454

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambrecht, Bill; Dixon, Joe [Par Systems, Shoreview, Minnesota, 55126 (United States); Neuville, John R. [Savannah River Remediation, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the legacies of the cold war is millions of liters of radioactive waste. One of the locations where this waste is stored is at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. A major effort to clean up this waste is on-going at the defense waste processing facility (DWPF) at SRS. A piece of this effort is decontamination of the equipment used in the DWPF to process the waste. The remote equipment decontamination cell (REDC) in the DWPF uses electro-mechanical manipulators (EMM) arms manufactured and supplied by PaR Systems to decontaminate DWPF process equipment. The decontamination fluid creates a highly corrosive environment. After 25 years of operational use the original EMM arms are aging and need replacement. To support continued operation of the DWPF, two direct replacement EMM arms were delivered to the REDC in the summer of 2011. (authors)

  16. TRACKING SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FROM WEAPONS TO DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allender, J.; Beams, J.; Sanders, K.; Myers, L.

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Supporting nuclear nonproliferation and global security principles, beginning in 1994 the United States has withdrawn more than 50 metric tons (MT) of government-controlled plutonium from potential use in nuclear weapons. The Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, established protocols for the tracking of this "excess" and "surplus" plutonium, and for reconciling the current storage and utilization of the plutonium to show that its management is consistent with the withdrawal policies. Programs are underway to ensure the safe and secure disposition of the materials that formed a major part of the weapons stockpile during the Cold War, and growing quantities have been disposed as waste, after which they are not included in traditional nuclear material control and accountability (NMC&A) data systems. A combination of resources is used to perform the reconciliations that form the basis for annual reporting to DOE, to U.S. Department of State, and to international partners including the International Atomic Energy Agency.

  17. NNSA B-Roll: MOX Facility

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1999, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a contract with a consortium, now called Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC to design, build, and operate a Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. This facility will be a major component in the United States program to dispose of surplus weapon-grade plutonium. The facility will take surplus weapon-grade plutonium, remove impurities, and mix it with uranium oxide to form MOX fuel pellets for reactor fuel assemblies. These assemblies will be irradiated in commercial nuclear power reactors.

  18. NNSA B-Roll: MOX Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1999, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a contract with a consortium, now called Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC to design, build, and operate a Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. This facility will be a major component in the United States program to dispose of surplus weapon-grade plutonium. The facility will take surplus weapon-grade plutonium, remove impurities, and mix it with uranium oxide to form MOX fuel pellets for reactor fuel assemblies. These assemblies will be irradiated in commercial nuclear power reactors.

  19. ANL-W MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement (EIS). This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. The DOE Office of fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) has developed a dual-path strategy for disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. One of the paths is to disposition surplus plutonium through irradiation of MOX fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. MOX fuel consists of plutonium and uranium oxides (PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}), typically containing 95% or more UO{sub 2}. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. The paper describes the following: Site map and the LA facility; process descriptions; resource needs; employment requirements; wastes, emissions, and exposures; accident analysis; transportation; qualitative decontamination and decommissioning; post-irradiation examination; LA fuel bundle fabrication; LA EIS data report assumptions; and LA EIS data report supplement.

  20. LLNL MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. The DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) has developed a dual-path strategy for disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. One of the paths is to disposition surplus plutonium through irradiation of MOX fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. MOX fuel consists of plutonium and uranium oxides (PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}), typically containing 95% or more UO{sub 2}. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. LLNL has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. This includes receipt and storage of PuO{sub 2} powder, fabrication of MOX fuel pellets, assembly of fuel rods and bundles, and shipping of the packaged fuel to a commercial reactor site. Support activities will take place within a Category 1 area. Building 332 will be used to receive and store the bulk PuO{sub 2} powder, fabricate MOX fuel pellets, and assemble fuel rods. Building 334 will be used to assemble, store, and ship fuel bundles. Only minor modifications would be required of Building 332. Uncontaminated glove boxes would need to be removed, petition walls would need to be removed, and minor modifications to the ventilation system would be required.

  1. EIS-0240: Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department proposes to eliminate the proliferation threat of surplus highly enriched uranium (HEU) by blending it down to low enriched uranium (LEU), which is not weapons-usable. The EIS assesses the disposition of a nominal 200 metric tons of surplus HEU. The Preferred Alternative is, where practical, to blend the material for use as LEU and use overtime, in commercial nuclear reactor field to recover its economic value. Material that cannot be economically recovered would be blended to LEU for disposal as low-level radioactive waste.

  2. Dismantling of Highly Contaminated Process Installations of the German Reprocessing Facility (WAK) - Status of New Remote Handling Technology - 13287

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dux, Joachim; Friedrich, Daniel; Lutz, Werner; Ripholz, Martina [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O. Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)] [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O. Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning and dismantling of the former German Pilot Reprocessing Plant Karlsruhe (WAK) including the Vitrification Facility (VEK) is being executed in different Project steps related to the reprocessing, HLLW storage and vitrification complexes /1/. While inside the reprocessing building the total inventory of process equipment has already been dismantled and disposed of, the HLLW storage and vitrification complex has been placed out of operation since vitrification and tank rinsing procedures where finalized in year 2010. This paper describes the progress made in dismantling of the shielded boxes of the highly contaminated laboratory as a precondition to get access to the hot cells of the HLLW storage. The major challenges of the dismantling of this laboratory were the high dose rates up to 700 mSv/h and the locking technology for the removal of the hot cell installations. In parallel extensive prototype testing of different carrier systems and power manipulators to be applied to dismantle the HLLW-tanks and other hot cell equipment is ongoing. First experiences with the new manipulator carrier system and a new master slave manipulator with force reflection will be reported. (authors)

  3. EIS-0283-S2: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Supplemental EIS (SEIS) analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with changes to the surplus plutonium disposition program, including changes to the inventory of surplus plutonium and proposed new alternatives.

  4. Does the Budget Surplus Justify Large-Scale Tax Cuts?: Updates and Extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Does the Budget Surplus Justify Large-Scale Tax Cuts?: Updates and Extensions Alan J. Auerbach agreed should not be used for tax cuts. All of the remaining "on-budget" surplus was due to implausible of the on-budget surplus was due to accumulations in government trust funds for medicare and pensions, which

  5. Radio frequency security system, method for a building facility or the like, and apparatus and methods for remotely monitoring the status of fire extinguishers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Runyon, Larry (Richland, WA); Gunter, Wayne M. (Richland, WA); Gilbert, Ronald W. (Gilroy, CA)

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for remotely monitoring the status of one or more fire extinguishers includes means for sensing at least one parameter of each of the fire extinguishers; means for selectively transmitting the sensed parameters along with information identifying the fire extinguishers from which the parameters were sensed; and means for receiving the sensed parameters and identifying information for the fire extinguisher or extinguishers at a common location. Other systems and methods for remotely monitoring the status of multiple fire extinguishers are also provided.

  6. EIS-0119: Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Harford Site, Richland, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS presents analyses of potential environmental impacts of decommissioning the eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

  7. The producer surplus associated with gasoline fuel use in the United States1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    : Q41, Q43 Keywords: oil, marginal costs, producer surplus, gasoline, wealth transfer, drilling costs, exploratory wells, development wells 1 We received financial support from the Sustainable Transportation

  8. EIS-0119: Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS presents analyses of potential environmental impacts of decommissioning the eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

  9. ISAB 2001-3 Hatchery Surplus Letter -Page 1 Independent Scientific Advisory Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ISAB 2001-3 Hatchery Surplus Letter - Page 1 Independent Scientific Advisory Board Portland, Oregon 97204 ISAB@nwppc.org April 16, 2001 Dr. Usha Varanasi Science Director Northwest Fisheries Surplus Review Dear Dr. Varanasi: This letter is the ISAB's response to your January 29, 2001 request

  10. Hanford MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. Six initial site combinations were proposed: (1) Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) with support from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), (2) Hanford, (3) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with support from Pantex, (4) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (5) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and (6) Savannah River Site (SRS). After further analysis by the sites and DOE-MD, five site combinations were established as possible candidates for producing MOX LAs: (1) ANL-W with support from INEEL, (2) Hanford, (3) LANL, (4) LLNL, and (5) SRS. Hanford has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. An alternate approach would allow fabrication of fuel pellets and assembly of fuel rods in an S and S Category 1 facility. In all, a total of three LA MOX fuel fabrication options were identified by Hanford that could accommodate the program. In every case, only minor modification would be required to ready any of the facilities to accept the equipment necessary to accomplish the LA program.

  11. LANL MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R.; Ludwig, S.B. [and others

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. LANL has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. This includes receipt and storage of PuO{sub 2} powder, fabrication of MOX fuel pellets, assembly of fuel rods and bundles, and shipping of the packaged fuel to a commercial reactor site. Support activities will take place within both Category 1 and 2 areas. Technical Area (TA) 55/Plutonium Facility 4 will be used to store the bulk PuO{sub 2} powder, fabricate MOX fuel pellets, assemble rods, and store fuel bundles. Bundles will be assembled at a separate facility, several of which have been identified as suitable for that activity. The Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building (at TA-3) will be used for analytical chemistry support. Waste operations will be conducted in TA-50 and TA-54. Only very minor modifications will be needed to accommodate the LA program. These modifications consist mostly of minor equipment upgrades. A commercial reactor operator has not been identified for the LA irradiation. Postirradiation examination (PIE) of the irradiated fuel will take place at either Oak Ridge National Laboratory or ANL-W. The only modifications required at either PIE site would be to accommodate full-length irradiated fuel rods. Results from this program are critical to the overall plutonium distribution schedule.

  12. STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE 21.01.10.M0.02 Disposal of Surplus or Excess Property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Management Manual, System Regulation 21.01.09. 2. DISPOSAL OF FEDERAL SURPLUS PERSONAL PROPERTY Unless property. Procedures and Responsibilities 1. GENERAL 1.1 The Federal Surplus Property Donation Program-consumable Federal surplus personal property and Federal excess personal property, other than scrap acquired

  13. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  14. Surplus solid angle as an imprint of Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sung-Soo; Kim, Taekyung; Kim, Yoonbai [Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Institutes, ULB-C.P. 231, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Department of Physics, BK21 Physics Research Division, and Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the electrostatic field of a point charge coupled to Horava-Lifshitz gravity and find an exact solution describing the space with a surplus (or deficit) solid angle. Although, theoretically in general relativity, a surplus angle is hardly to be obtained in the presence of ordinary matter with positive energy distribution, it seems natural in Horava-Lifshitz gravity. We present the sudden disappearance and reappearance of a star image as an astrophysical effect of a surplus angle. We also consider matter configurations of all possible power law behaviors coupled to Horava-Lifshitz gravity and obtain a series of exact solutions.

  15. Mound facility physical characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonne, W.R.; Alexander, B.M.; Cage, M.R.; Hase, E.H.; Schmidt, M.J.; Schneider, J.E.; Slusher, W.; Todd, J.E.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline physical characterization of Mound`s facilities as of September 1993. The baseline characterizations are to be used in the development of long-term future use strategy development for the Mound site. This document describes the current missions and alternative future use scenarios for each building. Current mission descriptions cover facility capabilities, physical resources required to support operations, current safety envelope and current status of facilities. Future use scenarios identify potential alternative future uses, facility modifications required for likely use, facility modifications of other uses, changes to safety envelope for the likely use, cleanup criteria for each future use scenario, and disposition of surplus equipment. This Introductory Chapter includes an Executive Summary that contains narrative on the Functional Unit Material Condition, Current Facility Status, Listing of Buildings, Space Plans, Summary of Maintenance Program and Repair Backlog, Environmental Restoration, and Decontamination and Decommissioning Programs. Under Section B, Site Description, is a brief listing of the Site PS Development, as well as Current Utility Sources. Section C contains Site Assumptions. A Maintenance Program Overview, as well as Current Deficiencies, is contained within the Maintenance Program Chapter.

  16. SRS MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. Six initial site combinations were proposed: (1) Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) with support from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), (2) Hanford, (3) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with support from Pantex, (4) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (5) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and (6) Savannah River Site(SRS). After further analysis by the sites and DOE-MD, five site combinations were established as possible candidates for producing MOX LAs: (1) ANL-W with support from INEEL, (2) Hanford, (3) LANL, (4) LLNL, and (5) SRS. SRS has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. An alternate approach would allow fabrication of fuel pellets and assembly of fuel rods in an S and S Category 2 or 3 facility with storage of bulk PuO{sub 2} and assembly, storage, and shipping of fuel bundles in an S and S Category 1 facility. The total Category 1 approach, which is the recommended option, would be done in the 221-H Canyon Building. A facility that was never in service will be removed from one area, and a hardened wall will be constructed in another area to accommodate execution of the LA fuel fabrication. The non-Category 1 approach would require removal of process equipment in the FB-Line metal production and packaging glove boxes, which requires work in a contamination area. The Immobilization Hot Demonstration Program equipment in the Savannah River Technology Center would need to be removed to accommodate pellet fabrication. This work would also be in a contaminated area.

  17. Union Station, Tacoma, Washington : a design study for a surplus rail site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, Jeffrey David

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent technological changes in railroads, mergers, major shifts in urban land use patterns, and declining rail passenger travel has resulted in a surplus of urban rail lands. These lands represent a significant resource ...

  18. Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) Contract No. DE-AC05-810R20722

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc.5 R A D I O'^ l '"17 ^'

  19. Remote File Access 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    Remote File Access 2010 Mac Users Guide #12;Remote File Access: MAC Users Guide 2010 2 Table Remote File Access 11 Part IV: Using Remote File Access 15 Part V: FAQ 24 #12;Remote File Access: MAC Users Guide 2010 3 1. What is Remote File Access? UTS Remote File Access service is provided to enable

  20. Strategies for Facilities Renewal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Good, R. L.

    psig * Plant or Service Air 90 psig * Starting Air for gas engines 220 psig * Instrument Air 80 psig * 02 - process * N2 high purity 4. Water production systems and distribution * Potable water (remote rural site) * Fire water (not treated) * Cooling... sewers 6. Fuel systems * Mixed fuel (both by-product and purchased methane) * Pipeline natural gas * Fuel oil 7. Maintenance and office facilities * Various maintenance/construction shops, stores, offices * Office facilities for technical...

  1. Remote monitoring for international safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupree, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sonnier, C.S. [Jupiter Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote monitoring is not a new technology, and its application to safeguards relevant activities has been examined for a number of years. On behalf of the US Department of Energy and international partners, remote monitoring systems have been emplaced in nuclear facilities and laboratories in various parts of the world. The experience gained from these field trials of remote monitoring systems has shown the viability of the concept of using integrated monitoring systems. Although a wide variety of sensors has been used in the remote monitoring field trials conducted to date, the possible range of instrumentation that might be used has scarcely been touched. As the technology becomes widespread, large amounts of data will become available to inspectors responsible for safeguards activities at the sites. Effective use of remote monitoring will require processing, archiving, presenting, and assessing of these data. To provide reasonable efficiency in the application of this technology, data processing should be done in a careful and organized manner. The problem will be not an issue of poring over scant records but of surviving under a deluge of information made possible by modern technology. Fortunately, modern technology, which created the problem of the data glut, is available to come to the assistance of those inundated by data. Apart from the technological problems, one of the most important aspects of remote monitoring is the potential constraint related to the transmission of data out of a facility or beyond national borders. Remote monitoring across national borders can be seriously considered only in the context of a comprehensive, transparent, and open implementation regime.

  2. Remote Method Invocation Remote Method Invocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Jin-Kao

    Remote Method Invocation Remote Method Invocation Jean-Michel Richer jean-michel.richer@univ-angers.fr http://www.info.univ-angers.fr/pub/richer M2 Informatique 2010-2011 1 / 22 #12;Remote Method Invocation Plan Plan 1 Introduction 2 RMI en d´etails 3 Exemple 4 Application 2 / 22 #12;Remote Method Invocation

  3. Commercial nuclear fuel from U.S. and Russian surplus defense inventories: Materials, policies, and market effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear materials declared by the US and Russian governments as surplus to defense programs are being converted into fuel for commercial nuclear reactors. This report presents the results of an analysis estimating the market effects that would likely result from current plans to commercialize surplus defense inventories. The analysis focuses on two key issues: (1) the extent by which traditional sources of supply, such as production from uranium mines and enrichment plants, would be displaced by the commercialization of surplus defense inventories or, conversely, would be required in the event of disruptions to planned commercialization, and (2) the future price of uranium considering the potential availability of surplus defense inventories. Finally, the report provides an estimate of the savings in uranium procurement costs that could be realized by US nuclear power generating companies with access to competitively priced uranium supplied from surplus defense inventories.

  4. A Systems-Integration Approach to Optimizing the Water-Energy Nexus in Energy Surplus Processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel, Kerron Jude

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    . In the screening problem, a targeting and benchmarking approach was used to identify the limits of the process for producing water and power from surplus energy. Various designs of the process were explored to compare the effects of process change on the overall...

  5. ISIS Facility: Facility Design Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ­ Cooling ­ Radiation Damage & Rad Accelerated Corrosion ­ Remote Handling/Radioactive Waste ­ Remote are assumed. 2. Hot Cell / Remote Handling ­ All mercury target and process components must be contained in nature to a similar solid target. · PROCESS EQUIPMENT: Remote handling requirements of mercury pump, HX

  6. Characterization of Representative Materials in Support of Safe, Long Term Storage of Surplus Plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narlesky, Joshua E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Paul Herrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wayne, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mason, Richard E. [MET-1: ACTINIDE PROCESSING SUPPORT; Worl, Laura A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surveillance and Monitoring Program is a joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Savannah River Site effort funded by the Department of Energy-Environmental Management to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5,000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on 54 samples of plutonium, with 53 chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper summarizes the characterization data, moisture analysis, particle size, surface area, density, wattage, actinide composition, trace element impurity analysis, and shelf life surveillance data and includes origin and process history information. Limited characterization data on fourteen nonrepresentative samples is also presented.

  7. Handleiding Remote Desktop Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galis, Frietson

    Handleiding Remote Desktop Service Versie: 1.3 Remote Desktop Datum: 29-08-2013 #12;2 Configureren Remote Desktop Connection 1) Type in de zoekbalk van Windows 7: "remote" of "mstsc" en start de applicatie "Remote Desktop Connection" zoals in onderstaand voorbeeld wordt getoond. 2) Selecteer "Show

  8. Remote Access

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliability Technology earnsRemembering 9-11'sRemote

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: REMOTE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REMOTE Sandia to Partner with MOgene Green Chemicals on ARPA-E REMOTE Project On October 2, 2013, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Research & Capabilities,...

  10. Multiple node remote messaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton on Hudson, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Ohmacht, Martin (Yorktown Heights, NY); Salapura, Valentina (Chappaqua, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard (Esslingen, DE); Vranas, Pavlos (Danville, CA)

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for passing remote messages in a parallel computer system formed as a network of interconnected compute nodes includes that a first compute node (A) sends a single remote message to a remote second compute node (B) in order to control the remote second compute node (B) to send at least one remote message. The method includes various steps including controlling a DMA engine at first compute node (A) to prepare the single remote message to include a first message descriptor and at least one remote message descriptor for controlling the remote second compute node (B) to send at least one remote message, including putting the first message descriptor into an injection FIFO at the first compute node (A) and sending the single remote message and the at least one remote message descriptor to the second compute node (B).

  11. LANSCE | Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LINAC Outreach Affiliations Visiting LANSCE Facilities Isotope Production Facility Lujan Neutron Scattering Center MaRIE Proton Radiography Ultracold Neutrons Weapons Neutron...

  12. ENGO 435 Remote Sensing LAB 1: INTRODUCTION TO REMOTE SENSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    ENGO 435 ­ Remote Sensing Fall 2003 LAB 1: INTRODUCTION TO REMOTE SENSING Due: By 4:30 pm on September 30th Objectives: To familiarize you with: Remote sensing resources on the Internet. Some remote (Metadata). Part A: Remote Sensing Resources There is a wealth of remote sensing information and data

  13. Remote Desktop | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remote Desktop Use a remote desktop connection to access your work computer from home. Using Remote Desktop to Connect to Your Work Computer With Remote Desktop, you can have...

  14. Fuel qualification issues and strategies for reactor-based surplus plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowell, B.S.; Copeland, G.L.; Moses, D.L.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed irradiation of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in existing commercial reactors as a disposition method for surplus plutonium from the weapons program. The burning of MOX fuel in reactors is supported by an extensive technology base; however, the infrastructure required to implement reactor-based plutonium disposition does not exist domestically. This report identifies and examines the actions required to qualify and license weapons-grade (WG) plutonium-based MOX fuels for use in domestic commercial light-water reactors (LWRs).

  15. FMIT facility control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suyama, R.M.; Machen, D.R.; Johnson, J.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The control system for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility, under construction at Richland, Washington, uses current techniques in distributed processing to achieve responsiveness, maintainability and reliability. Developmental experience with the system on the FMIT Prototype Accelerator (FPA) being designed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is described as a function of the system's design goals and details. The functional requirements of the FMIT control system dictated the use of a highly operator-responsive, display-oriented structure, using state-of-the-art console devices for man-machine communications. Further, current technology has allowed the movement of device-dependent tasks into the area traditionally occupied by remote input-output equipment; the system's dual central process computers communicate with remote communications nodes containing microcomputers that are architecturally similar to the top-level machines. The system has been designed to take advantage of commercially available hardware and software.

  16. Facility Microgrids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  17. Experience with Remote Job Execution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; Cobb, John W [ORNL; Green, Mark L [ORNL; Kohl, James Arthur [ORNL; Miller, Stephen D [ORNL; Ren, Shelly [ORNL; Smith, Bradford C [ORNL; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutron Science Portal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory submits jobs to the TeraGrid for remote job execution. The TeraGrid is a network of high performance computers supported by the US National Science Foundation. There are eleven partner facilities with over a petaflop of peak computing performance and sixty petabytes of long-term storage. Globus is installed on a local machine and used for job submission. The graphical user interface is produced by java coding that reads an XML file. After submission, the status of the job is displayed in a Job Information Service window which queries globus for the status. The output folder produced in the scratch directory of the TeraGrid machine is returned to the portal with globus-url-copy command that uses the gridftp servers on the TeraGrid machines. This folder is copied from the stage-in directory of the community account to the user's results directory where the output can be plotted using the portal's visualization services. The primary problem with remote job execution is diagnosing execution problems. We have daily tests of submitting multiple remote jobs from the portal. When these jobs fail on a computer, it is difficult to diagnose the problem from the globus output. Successes and problems will be presented.

  18. Niagara falls storage site: Annual site environmental report, Lewiston, New York, Calendar Year 1988: Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The monitoring program at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in this report, this hypothetical individual receives an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure is less than a person receives during two round-trip flights from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that results from radioactive materials present at the site is indistinguishable from the dose that the same population receives from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1988 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with applicable DOE radiation protection standards. 17 refs., 31 figs., 20 tabs.

  19. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (RHLLW) Disposal Project Code of Record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of fiscal year 2015). Development of a new onsite disposal facility, the highest ranked alternative, will provide necessary remote handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability.

  20. Remote File PC Users Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    UTS: ITD Remote File Access 2010 PC Users Guide V3.0 #12;UTS:ITD Remote File Access: PC Users Guide Part III: Accessing Remote File Access 8 Part IV: Using Remote File Access 14 Part V: FAQ 25 #12;UTS:ITD Remote File Access: PC Users Guide v3.0 2010 3 1. What is Remote File Access? UTS Remote File Access

  1. Remote Sensing ENGO 435 Introduction to Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    1 Remote Sensing ENGO 435 Introduction to Remote Sensing Fall 2003 #12;2 Remote Sensing ENGO 435://www.geomatics.ucalgar.ca/~habib/courses.html #12;3 Remote Sensing ENGO 435 Grading Scheme · Lab Assignments (5 labs): (25% of Total Grade will be reduced by 10% per day for each day overdue. #12;4 Remote Sensing ENGO 435 Programming & Software

  2. Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 2, Risk evaluation work procedure for the retired Hanford Site facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk from retired surplus facilities has always been assumed to be low at the Hanford Site as the facilities are inactive and have few potentials for causing an offsite hazardous material release. However,the fatal accident that occurred in the spring of 1992 in which an employee fell through a deteriorated roof at the 105-F Reactor Building has raised the possibility that retired facilities represent a greater risk than was originally assumed. Therefore, Westinghouse Hanford Company and the US Department of Energy management have determined that facility risk management strategies and programmatic plans should be reevaluated to assure risks are identified and appropriate corrective action plans are developed. To evaluate risk management strategies, accurate risk information about the current and projected condition of the facilities must be developed. This work procedure has been created to address the development of accurate and timely risk information. By using the evaluation results in this procedure, it will be possible to create a prioritized baseline for managing facility risk until all retired surplus facilities are demolished.

  3. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

  4. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

  5. Surplus weapons plutonium: Technologies for pit disassembly/conversion and MOX fuel fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toevs, J.W.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will provide a description of the technologies involved in the disposition of plutonium from surplus nuclear weapon components (pits), based on pit disassembly and conversion and on fabrication of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for disposition through irradiation in nuclear reactors. The MOX/Reactor option is the baseline disposition plan for both the US and russian for plutonium from pits and other clean plutonium metal and oxide. In the US, impure plutonium in various forms will be converted to oxide and immobilized in glass or ceramic, surrounded by vitrified high level waste to provide a radiation barrier. A similar fate is expected for impure material in Russia as well. The immobilization technologies will not be discussed. Following technical descriptions, a discussion of options for monitoring the plutonium during these processes will be provided.

  6. Remote reset circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gritzo, Russell E. (West Melbourne, FL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote reset circuit acts as a stand-alone monitor and controller by clocking in each character sent by a terminal to a computer and comparing it to a given reference character. When a match occurs, the remote reset circuit activates the system's hardware reset line. The remote reset circuit is hardware based centered around monostable multivibrators and is unaffected by system crashes, partial serial transmissions, or power supply transients.

  7. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  8. Remote Belief: Preserving Volition 2 Remote Belief: Preserving Volition 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivilotti, Paul

    1 ! " Remote Belief: Preserving Volition 2 # $ % & # ' # (& #) & $ $ $ $ $ & $ * # # $ $ * # * # $ $ # $ & # * & & %+ $ ' # & $ Remote Belief: Preserving Volition 3 , $ (- ). / $ / $ / 0 1/ / & $ / 0 $ $ & (1 - & ) 2 & # & $ & / 3 & / * # $ / 4 & Remote Belief: Preserving Volition 4 ! All possible scenarios Equivalence classes of scenarios

  9. Remote USB Ports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshan, Rakesh

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or actuator placed in fields can be accessed by a system remotely and securely. In this thesis, we propose a remote USB port, which is an abstraction of a USB port. In the USB core driver of the server machine, with the hub information, port status of all...

  10. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  11. Analysis of a Nuclear Accident: Fission and Activation Product Releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Facility as Remote Indicators of Source Identification, Extent of Release, and State of Damaged Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Clark, Richard A.

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of several radionuclides within environmental samples taken from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility and reported on the Tokyo Electric Power Company website following the recent tsunami-initiated catastrophe were evaluated for the purpose of identifying the source term, reconstructing the release mechanisms, and estimating the extent of the release. 136Cs/137Cs and 134Cs/137Cs ratios identified Units 1-3 as the major source of radioactive contamination to the surface soil close to the facility. A trend was observed between the fraction of the total core inventory released for a number of fission product isotopes and their corresponding Gibbs Free Energy of formation for the primary oxide form of the isotope, suggesting that release was dictated primarily by chemical volatility driven by temperature and reduction potential within the primary containment vessels of the vented reactors. The absence of any major fractionation beyond volatilization suggested all coolant had evaporated by the time of venting. High estimates for the fraction of the total inventory released of more volatile species (Te, Cs, I) indicated the damage to fuel bundles was likely extensive, minimizing any potential containment due to physical migration of these species through the fuel matrix and across the cladding wall. 238Pu/239,240Pu ratios close-in and at 30 km from the facility indicated that the damaged reactors were the major contributor of Pu to surface soil at the source but that this contribution likely decreased rapidly with distance from the facility. The fraction of the total Pu inventory released to the environment from venting units 1 and 3 was estimated to be ~0.003% based upon Pu/Cs isotope ratios relative to the within-reactor modeled inventory prior to venting and was consistent with an independent model evaluation that considered chemical volatility based upon measured fission product release trends. Significant volatile radionuclides within the spent fuel at the time of venting but not as yet observed and reported within environmental samples are suggested as potential analytes of concern for future environmental surveys around the site.

  12. Remote Job Testing for the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; Cobb, John W [ORNL; Miller, Stephen D [ORNL; Reuter, Michael A [ORNL; Smith, Bradford C [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote job execution gives neutron science facilities access to high performance computing such as the TeraGrid. A scientific community can use community software with a community certificate and account through a common interface of a portal. Results show this approach is successful, but with more testing and problem solving, we expect remote job executions to become more reliable.

  13. Preliminary Hazard Analysis for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; Mike Lehto

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for remote handled low level waste (LLW) disposal capability has been identified. A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal capability for remote-handled LLW that is generated as part of the nuclear mission of the Idaho National Laboratory and from spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This document supports the conceptual design for the proposed remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization and by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW.

  14. Center for Remote Sensing Remote Sensing Seminar Series 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Feili Li Center for Remote Sensing 10-20-2009 Remote Sensing Seminar Series 2009 #12;Outline for Meteorological Satellite Studies · University of South Florida - Institute for Marine Remote Sensing · Rutgers MODIS Today Real-Time Polar Remote Sensing Products #12;Software Visualization FlAniS AniS is still

  15. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Ferguson, S.D.; Fielden, J.M.; Schumann, P.L.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 576 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the tenth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title work, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords.

  16. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, N.P.; Webb, J.R.; Ferguson, S.D.; Goins, L.F.; Owen, P.T.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 394 abstracted references on environmental restoration, nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eleventh in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Citations to foreign and domestic literature of all types -- technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions -- have been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Programs, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (8) Technical Measurements Center, (9) Remedial Action Program, and (10) Environmental Restoration Program. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication title. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, subject category, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies.

  17. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for Department of Energy facilities, which includes nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards mitigation, and the System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1A. DOE O 420.1B Chg 1 issued 4-19-10.

  18. REMOTE SENSING OF THE ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    1 CHAPTER 1: REMOTE SENSING OF THE ENVIRONMENT REFERENCE: Remote Sensing of the Environment John R. Jensen (2007) Second Edition Pearson Prentice Hall What is Remote Sensing? #12;2 Photogrammetry ­ the art of identifying objects and judging their significance (Colwell, 1966). Remote Sensing ­ the measurement

  19. Evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyer, J.S.; Butler, J.C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Edmunds, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Record of Decision (ROD) selected alternatives for disposition of surplus, weapons grade plutonium. A major objective of this decision was to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Other concerns addressed included economic, technical, institutional, schedule, environmental, and health and safety issues. The analysis reported here was conducted in parallel with technical, environmental, and nonproliferation analyses; it uses multiattribute utility theory to combine these considerations in order to facilitate an integrated evaluation of alternatives. This analysis is intended to provide additional insight regarding alternative evaluation and to assist in understanding the rationale for the choice of alternatives recommended in the ROD. Value functions were developed for objectives of disposition, and used to rank alternatives. Sensitivity analyses indicated that the ranking of alternatives for the base case was relatively insensitive to changes in assumptions over reasonable ranges. The analyses support the recommendation of the ROD to pursue parallel development of the vitrification immobilization alternative and the use of existing light water reactors alternative. 27 refs., 109 figs., 20 tabs.

  20. Application and Removal of Strippable Coatings via Remote Platform - 13133

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoffner, P.; Lagos, L. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)] [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Maggio, S. [International Climbing Machine, 630 Elmira Road, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)] [International Climbing Machine, 630 Elmira Road, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Florida International University's (FIU's) Applied Research Center is currently supporting the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office of D and D and Facility Engineering program. FIU is supporting DOE's initiative to improve safety, reduce technical risks, and limit uncertainty within D and D operations by identifying technologies suitable to meet specific facility D and D requirements, assessing the readiness of those technologies for field deployment, and conducting feasibility studies and technology demonstrations of selected technologies and working with technology vendors to optimize the design of their current technologies to accomplish dangerous and demanding tasks during D and D operations. To meet one identified technology gap challenge for a technology to remotely apply strippable coatings, fixatives and decontamination gels, FIU identified and performed an initial demonstration of an innovative remote fixative sprayer platform from International Climbing Machines (ICM). The selected technology was demonstrated spraying fixative products at the hot cell mockup facility at the Applied Research Center at FIU in November 2008 under cold (non-radioactive) conditions. The remotely controlled platform was remotely operated and entered the facility and sprayed a fixative onto horizontal and vertical surfaces. Based on the initial FIU demonstration and the specific technical requirements identified at the DOE facilities, a follow-up demonstration was expanded to include strippable coatings and a decontamination gel, which was demonstrated in June 2010 at the ICM facility in Ithaca, NY. This second technology evaluation documented the ability of the remote system to spray the selected products on vertical stainless steel and concrete surfaces to a height of 3 meters (10 feet) and to achieve sufficient coverage and product thickness to promote the ability to peel/remove the strippable coatings and decontamination gel. The next challenge was to determine if a remote platform could be used to remove the strippable coatings and decontamination gels. In 2012, FIU worked with the technology provider, ICM, to conduct feasibility and trade studies to identify the requirements for the remote removal of strippable coatings or decontamination gels using the existing remote controlled platform. (authors)

  1. Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing #12;0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4 and x-ray Ultraviolet Infrared Microwave and radio waves Wavelength in meters (m) Electromagnetic.77 700 red limit 30k0.041 2.48 green500 near-infrared far infrared ultraviolet Thermal Infrare refers

  2. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris (Richland, WA); Larson, David (Las Cruces, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

  3. Portsmouth X300 remote assay monitor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.E.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Personnel in the Instrumentation and Controls Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in association with the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) have recently developed a system for monitoring and tracking the assay of enriched uranium from the production facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). This work was sponsored by the USEC and has involved the expansion and improvement of an existing system that was developed by ORNL. The system provides control room operators with real-time information on the withdrawal operations of uranium hexafluoride at the withdrawal stations at PORTS. An additional system was developed to display the real-time information from each of the three withdrawal stations at a remotely located building. This report describes the remote assay monitor and display system that has been developed and installed at PORTS Building X300.

  4. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish facility safety requirements for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 420.1. Canceled by DOE O 420.1B.

  5. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and the System Engineer Program.Chg 1 incorporates the use of DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, mandatory for Hazard Category 1, 2 and 3 nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 420.1A.

  6. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-STD-1104 contains the Department's method and criteria for reviewing and approving nuclear facility's documented safety analysis (DSA). This review and approval formally document the basis for DOE, concluding that a facility can be operated safely in a manner that adequately protects workers, the public, and the environment. Therefore, it is appropriate to formally require implementation of the review methodology and criteria contained in DOE-STD-1104.

  7. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Order is to establish facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. The Order has Change 1 dated 11-16-95, Change 2 dated 10-24-96, and the latest Change 3 dated 11-22-00 incorporated. The latest change satisfies a commitment made to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in response to DNFSB recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety.

  8. A Methodology for the Analysis and Selection of Alternative for the Disposition of Surplus Plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) has announced a Record of Decision (ROD) selecting alternatives for disposition of surplus plutonium. A major objective of this decision was to further U.S. efforts to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Other concerns that were addressed include economic, technical, institutional, schedule, environmental, and health and safety issues. The technical, environmental, and nonproliferation analyses supporting the ROD are documented in three DOE reports [DOE-TSR 96, DOE-PEIS 96, and DOE-NN 97, respectively]. At the request of OFMD, a team of analysts from the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium (ANRCP) provided an independent evaluation of the alternatives for plutonium that were considered during the evaluation effort. This report outlines the methodology used by the ANRCP team. This methodology, referred to as multiattribute utility theory (MAU), provides a structure for assembling results of detailed technical, economic, schedule, environment, and nonproliferation analyses for OFMD, DOE policy makers, other stakeholders, and the general public in a systematic way. The MAU methodology has been supported for use in similar situations by the National Research Council, an agency of the National Academy of Sciences.1 It is important to emphasize that the MAU process does not lead to a computerized model that actually determines the decision for a complex problem. MAU is a management tool that is one component, albeit a key component, of a decision process. We subscribe to the philosophy that the result of using models should be insights, not numbers. The MAU approach consists of four steps: (1) identification of alternatives, objectives, and performance measures, (2) estimation of the performance of the alternatives with respect to the objectives, (3) development of value functions and weights for the objectives, and (4) evaluation of the alternatives and sensitivity analysis. These steps are described below.

  9. Conversion and Blending Facility Highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) which will have two missions: (1) convert surplus HEU materials to pure HEU UF{sub 6} and a (2) blend the pure HEU UF{sub 6} with diluent UF{sub 6} to produce LWR grade LEU-UF{sub 6}. The primary emphasis of this blending be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The chemical and isotopic concentrations of the blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. The blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry.

  10. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  11. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility, the highest ranked alternative, will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  12. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility, the highest ranked alternative, will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  13. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  14. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  15. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

    1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

  16. Remote connector development study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) connectors, the most common connectors used at the Hanford site, offer a certain level of flexibility in pipe routing, process system configuration, and remote equipment/instrument replacement. However, these desirable features have inherent shortcomings like leakage, high pressure drop through the right angle bends, and a limited range of available pipe diameters that can be connect by them. Costs for construction, maintenance, and operation of PUREX connectors seem to be very high. The PUREX connector designs include a 90{degree} bend in each connector. This increases the pressure drop and erosion effects. Thus, each jumper requires at least two 90{degree} bends. PUREX connectors have not been practically used beyond 100 (4 in.) inner diameter. This study represents the results of a survey on the use of remote pipe-connection systems in US and foreign plants. This study also describes the interdependence between connectors, remote handling equipment, and the necessary skills of the operators.

  17. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

    1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

  18. rfs Remote File System Softwarepraktikum fur Fortgeschrittene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rfs ­ Remote File System Softwarepraktikum f¨ur Fortgeschrittene Parallele und Verteilte Systeme. Overview 5 2.1. Remote File System Daemon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.2. Remote File System Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.3. Global Remote

  19. Audit Report - The Department of Energy's Management of Surplus Nuclear Materials, OAS-L-13-04

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from TarasaName Affiliation Ahern,5Management of Surplus

  20. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. Cancels DOE 5480.7A, DOE 5480.24, DOE 5480.28 and Division 13 of DOE 6430.1A. Canceled by DOE O 420.1A.

  1. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for DOE and NNSA for nuclear safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1B, DOE G 420.1-2 and DOE G 420.1-3.

  2. Interpreting Remote Sensing NOx Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Interpreting Remote Sensing NOx Measurements Robert Slott, Consultant, Donald Stedman and Saj tailpipe emissions (HC, CO, NOx) are changing with time hUse remote sensing hMeasurements in at least 4 of the year at each location hUniform QC/QA and data reporting Paper # 2001-01-3640 #12;Remote Sensing

  3. Remote Implementation of Quantum Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Susana F. Huelga; Martin B. Plenio; Guo-Yong Xiang; Jian Li}and Guang-Can Guo

    2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Shared entanglement allows, under certain conditions, the remote implementation of quantum operations. We revise and extend recent theoretical results on the remote control of quantum systems as well as experimental results on the remote manipulation of photonic qubits via linear optical elements.

  4. Vacuum Vessel Remote Handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Remote Handling 4 Vacuum vessel functions · Plasma vacuum environment · Primary tritium confinement, incl ports 65 tonnes - Weight of torus shielding 100 tonnes · Coolant - Normal Operation Water, Handling 12 Vessel octant subassembly fab. (3) · Octant-to-octant splice joint requires double wall weld

  5. Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

  6. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 1 Introduction #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 2 Overview · Remote sensing: definition. · Remote sensing versus photogrammetry. · Elements of remote sensing. · Key;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Overview · Acquisition platforms: ­ Historical overview. ­ Terrestrial

  7. A Distributed Facilities Automation System For IBM Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houle, W. D. Sr.

    to the host would be via an IBM-supplied local communications network protocol. Remote appli cations would include process control, security, energy manage ment, facilities automation or any other automation application. The remote systems... of these areas which are affected are: - HVAC - Chemical Processes Control - Utilities Generation - Tank Farm Monitoring Resource Management - Solvent Supply and Recovery Systems - DI Water Distribution - Sewage and Waste Treatment Plant Control...

  8. The U.S.-Russian joint studies on using power reactors to disposition surplus weapon plutonium as spent fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chebeskov, A.; Kalashnikov, A. [State Scientific Center, Obninsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering; Bevard, B.; Moses, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pavlovichev, A. [State Scientific Center, Moscow (Russian Federation). Kurchatov Inst.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1996, the US and the Russian Federation completed an initial joint study of the candidate options for the disposition of surplus weapons plutonium in both countries. The options included long term storage, immobilization of the plutonium in glass or ceramic for geologic disposal, and the conversion of weapons plutonium to spent fuel in power reactors. For the latter option, the US is only considering the use of existing light water reactors (LWRs) with no new reactor construction for plutonium disposition, or the use of Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) heavy water reactors. While Russia advocates building new reactors, the cost is high, and the continuing joint study of the Russian options is considering only the use of existing VVER-1000 LWRs in Russia and possibly Ukraine, the existing BN-60O fast neutron reactor at the Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant in Russia, or the use of the Canadian CANDU reactors. Six of the seven existing VVER-1000 reactors in Russia and the eleven VVER-1000 reactors in Ukraine are all of recent vintage and can be converted to use partial MOX cores. These existing VVER-1000 reactors are capable of converting almost 300 kg of surplus weapons plutonium to spent fuel each year with minimum nuclear power plant modifications. Higher core loads may be achievable in future years.

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - astra critical facility Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results for: astra critical facility Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 FoneAstra: Enabling Remote Monitoring of Vaccine Cold-Chains Using Commodity Mobile Phones Summary: FoneAstra:...

  10. Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

  11. Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

  12. Experimental Underground facility to evaluate remote sensing instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is quite easy to obtain, in the case of conventional techniques, but the problems remain with optical, hydrocarbons, and specific pollutants such äs NH3, naphtalene,... Before putting such an instrument Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) devices. The procedure is based on that used for conventional point monitors

  13. Remote switch actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Edwin Gerard; Beauman, Ronald; Palo, Jr., Stefan

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a device and method for actuating electrical switches remotely. The device is removably attached to the switch and is actuated through the transfer of a user's force. The user is able to remain physically removed from the switch site obviating need for protective equipment. The device and method allow rapid, safe actuation of high-voltage or high-current carrying electrical switches or circuit breakers.

  14. Remote-Handled Low Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  15. Satellite remote sensing for hydrology and water management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, E.C.; Power, C.H. (Univ. of Bristol (GB)); Micallef, A. (Univ. of Malta, Valletta (IT)); Voute, C. (International Inst. for Aerospace Survey and Earth Sciences, Enschede (NL))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in satellite remote sensing is fast moving away from pure science and individual case studies towards truly operational applications. At the same time the micro-computer revolution is ensuring that data reception and processing facilities need no longer be the preserve of a small number of global centers, but can be common-place installations in smaller countries and even local regional agency offices or laboratories. As remote sensing matures, and its applications proliferate, a new type of treatment is required to ensure both that decision makers, managers and engineers with problems to solve are informed of today's opportunities and that scientists are provided with integrated overviews of the ever-growing need for their services. This book addresses these needs uniquely focusing on the area bounded by satellite remote sensing, pure and applied hydrological sciences, and a specific world region, namely the Mediterranean basin.

  16. Remote repair appliance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heumann, F.K.; Wilkinson, J.C.; Wooding, D.R.

    1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote appliance for supporting a tool for performing work at a work site on a substantially circular bore of a work piece and for providing video signals of the work site to a remote monitor comprises: a base plate having an inner face and an outer face; a plurality of rollers, wherein each roller is rotatably and adjustably attached to the inner face of the base plate and positioned to roll against the bore of the work piece when the base plate is positioned against the mouth of the bore such that the appliance may be rotated about the bore in a plane substantially parallel to the base plate; a tool holding means for supporting the tool, the tool holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the base plate such that the working end of the tool is positioned on the inner face side of the base plate; a camera for providing video signals of the work site to the remote monitor; and a camera holding means for supporting the camera on the inner face side of the base plate, the camera holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the base plate. In a preferred embodiment, roller guards are provided to protect the rollers from debris and a bore guard is provided to protect the bore from wear by the rollers and damage from debris. 5 figs.

  17. Remote repair appliance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heumann, Frederick K. (Ballston Spa, NY); Wilkinson, Jay C. (Ballston Spa, NY); Wooding, David R. (Saratoga Springs, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote appliance for supporting a tool for performing work at a worksite on a substantially circular bore of a workpiece and for providing video signals of the worksite to a remote monitor comprising: a baseplate having an inner face and an outer face; a plurality of rollers, wherein each roller is rotatably and adjustably attached to the inner face of the baseplate and positioned to roll against the bore of the workpiece when the baseplate is positioned against the mouth of the bore such that the appliance may be rotated about the bore in a plane substantially parallel to the baseplate; a tool holding means for supporting the tool, the tool holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the baseplate such that the working end of the tool is positioned on the inner face side of the baseplate; a camera for providing video signals of the worksite to the remote monitor; and a camera holding means for supporting the camera on the inner face side of the baseplate, the camera holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the baseplate. In a preferred embodiment, roller guards are provided to protect the rollers from debris and a bore guard is provided to protect the bore from wear by the rollers and damage from debris.

  18. Conceptual Design Report for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report addresses development of replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability for the Idaho National Laboratory. Current disposal capability at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex is planned until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual design report includes key project assumptions; design options considered in development of the proposed onsite disposal facility (the highest ranked alternative for providing continued uninterrupted remote-handled low level waste disposal capability); process and facility descriptions; safety and environmental requirements that would apply to the proposed facility; and the proposed cost and schedule for funding, design, construction, and operation of the proposed onsite disposal facility.

  19. Conceptual Design Report for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; David Duncan; Joan Connolly; Margaret Hinman; Charles Marcinkiewicz; Gary Mecham

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report addresses development of replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability for the Idaho National Laboratory. Current disposal capability at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex is planned until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual design report includes key project assumptions; design options considered in development of the proposed onsite disposal facility (the highest ranked alternative for providing continued uninterrupted remote-handled low level waste disposal capability); process and facility descriptions; safety and environmental requirements that would apply to the proposed facility; and the proposed cost and schedule for funding, design, construction, and operation of the proposed onsite disposal facility.

  20. Project Execution Plan for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danny Anderson

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of ongoing cleanup activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) is proceeding under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (42 USC 9601 et seq. 1980). INL-generated radioactive waste has been disposed of at RWMC since 1952. The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at RWMC accepted the bulk of INL’s contact and remote-handled low-level waste (LLW) for disposal. Disposal of contact-handled LLW and remote-handled LLW ion-exchange resins from the Advanced Test Reactor in the open pit of the SDA ceased September 30, 2008. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at RWMC will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the SDA (approximately at the end of fiscal year FY 2017). The continuing nuclear mission of INL, associated ongoing and planned operations, and Naval spent fuel activities at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) require continued capability to appropriately dispose of contact and remote handled LLW. A programmatic analysis of disposal alternatives for contact and remote-handled LLW generated at INL was conducted by the INL contractor in Fiscal Year 2006; subsequent evaluations were completed in Fiscal Year 2007. The result of these analyses was a recommendation to the Department of Energy (DOE) that all contact-handled LLW generated after September 30, 2008, be disposed offsite, and that DOE proceed with a capital project to establish replacement remote-handled LLW disposal capability. An analysis of the alternatives for providing replacement remote-handled LLW disposal capability has been performed to support Critical Decision-1. The highest ranked alternative to provide this required capability has been determined to be the development of a new onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility to replace the existing remote-handled LLW disposal vaults at the SDA. Several offsite DOE and commercial disposal options exist for contact-handled LLW; however, offsite disposal options are either not currently available (i.e., commercial disposal facilities), practical, or cost-effective for all remote-handled LLW streams generated at INL. Offsite disposal of all INL and tenant-generated remote-handled waste is further complicated by issues associated with transporting highly radioactive waste in commerce; and infrastructure and processing changes at the generating facilities, specifically NRF, that would be required to support offsite disposal. The INL Remote-Handled LLW Disposal Project will develop a new remote handled LLW disposal facility to meet mission-critical, remote-handled LLW disposal needs. A formal DOE decision to proceed with the project has been made in accordance with the requirements of National Environmental Policy Act (42 USC§ 4321 et seq.). Remote-handled LLW is generated from nuclear programs conducted at INL, including spent nuclear fuel handling and operations at NRF and operations at the Advanced Test Reactor. Remote-handled LLW also will be generated by new INL programs and from segregation and treatment (as necessary) of remote handled scrap and waste currently stored in the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex.

  1. Mobile Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide Capture inFacility AMF Information Science

  2. Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd ofEvaluations in Covered Facilities | Department of Energy

  3. Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd ofEvaluations in Covered Facilities | Department of Energy063-2011

  4. Facility Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederalFYRANDOM DRUG TESTING The requirementFacility

  5. Remote state preparation: arbitrary remote control of photon polarization Nicholas A. Peters,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwiat, Paul

    Remote state preparation: arbitrary remote control of photon polarization Nicholas A. Peters,1 University, Kirksville, MO 63501 (Dated: October 22, 2004) We experimentally demonstrate the first remote, we remotely prepare arbitrary states at two wavelengths. Further, we derive theoretical bounds

  6. Remote Viewing End Effectors for Light Duty Utility Arm Robot (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heckendorn, F.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Robinson, C.W.; Haynes, H.B.; Anderosn, E.K.; Pardini, A.F. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Robotics Development Groups at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the Hanford site have developed remote video and photography systems for deployment in underground radioactive-waste storage tanks at the Department of Energy (DOE) sites as a part of the Office of Science and Technology (OST) program within DOE. Viewing and documenting the tank interiors and their associated annular spaces is an extremely valuable tool in characterizing their condition and contents and in controlling their remediation. Several specialized video/photography systems and robotic End Effectors have been fabricated that provide remote viewing and lighting. All are remotely deployable into and out of the tank, with all viewing functions remotely operated. Positioning all control components away from the facility prevents the potential for personnel exposure to radiation and contamination. Only the remote video systems are discussed in this paper.

  7. REMOTE AND RURAL ENTERPRISE (RARE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viglas, Anastasios

    in remote central Australia is establishing a commercial aquaponics enterprise, a social entrepreneur, hospitality and horticulture. The current focus is on a commercial aquaponics enterprise and a cultural

  8. Remote Sensor Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 c/) ReleaseRemote AccessSpectrum

  9. Work plan for the High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Ranking Facilities Deactivation Project (HRFDP), commissioned by the US Department of Energy Nuclear Materials and Facility Stabilization Program, is to place four primary high-risk surplus facilities with 28 associated ancillary facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a safe, stable, and environmentally sound condition as rapidly and economically as possible. The facilities will be deactivated and left in a condition suitable for an extended period of minimized surveillance and maintenance (S and M) prior to decontaminating and decommissioning (D and D). These four facilities include two reactor facilities containing spent fuel. One of these reactor facilities also contains 55 tons of sodium with approximately 34 tons containing activated sodium-22, 2.5 tons of lithium hydride, approximately 100 tons of potentially contaminated lead, and several other hazardous materials as well as bulk quantities of contaminated scrap metals. The other two facilities to be transferred include a facility with a bank of hot cells containing high levels of transferable contamination and also a facility containing significant quantities of uranyl nitrate and quantities of transferable contamination. This work plan documents the objectives, technical requirements, and detailed work plans--including preliminary schedules, milestones, and conceptual FY 1996 cost estimates--for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan has been developed by the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO).

  10. Disposition of PUREX facility tanks D5 and E6 uranium and plutonium solutions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, D.P.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 9 kilograms of plutonium and 5 metric tons of uranium in a 1 molar nitric acid solution are being stored in two PUREX facility vessels, tanks D5 and E6. The plutonium was accumulated during cleanup activities of the plutonium product area of the PUREX facility. Personnel at PUREX recently completed a formal presentation to the Surplus Materials Peer Panel (SMPP) regarding disposition of the material currently in these tanks. The peer panel is a group of complex-wide experts who have been chartered by EM-64 (Office of Site and Facility Transfer) to provide a third party independent review of disposition decisions. The information presented to the peer panel is provided in the first section of this report. The panel was generally receptive to the information provided at that time and the recommendations which were identified.

  11. Remote-State Prparation eines einzelnen Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinfurter, Harald

    Remote-State Präparation eines einzelnen Atoms Diplomarbeit am Department für Physik der Ludwig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.3.3 Remote-State-Präparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.3.4 Zusammenfassung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 3 Remote-State-Präparation 31 3.1 Einleitung

  12. Remotely operated pipe connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Josefiak, Leonard J. (Scotia, NY); Cramer, Charles E. (Guilderford, NY)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for remotely assembling and disassembling a Graylock type coctor between a pipe and a closure for the pipe includes a base and a receptacle on the base for the closure. The pipe is moved into position vertically above the closure by a suitable positioning device such that the flange on the pipe is immediately adjacent and concentric with the flange on the closure. A moving device then moves two semicircular collars from a position free of the closure to a position such that the interior cam groove of each collar contacts the two flanges. Finally, a tensioning device automatically allows remote tightening and loosening of a nut and bolt assembly on each side of the collar to cause a seal ring located between the flanges to be compressed and to seal the closure. Release of the pipe and the connector is accomplished in the reverse order. Preferably, the nut and bolt assembly includes an elongate shaft portion on which a removable sleeve is located.

  13. Assessment of the facilities on Jackass Flats and other Nevada test site facilities for the new nuclear rocket program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, G.; Collins, D.; Dye, K.; Eberhart, C.; Hynes, M.; Kovach, R.; Ortiz, R.; Perea, J.; Sherman, D. (Field Test Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

    1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent NASA/DOE studies for the Space Exploration Initiative have demonstrated a critical need for the ground-based testing of nuclear rocket engines. Experience in the ROVER/NERVA Program, experience in the Nuclear Weapons Testing Program, and involvement in the new nuclear rocket program has motivated our detailed assessment of the facilities used for the ROVER/NERVA Program and other facilities located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The ROVER/NERVA facilities are located in the Nevada Research Development Area (NRDA) on Jackass Flats at NTS, approximately 85 miles northwest of Las Vegas. To guide our assessment of facilities for an engine testing program we have defined a program goal, scope, and process. In particular we have assumed that the program goal will be to certify a full engine system design as flight test ready. All nuclear and non-nuclear components will be individually certified as ready for such a test at sites remote from the NRDA facilities, the components transported to NRDA, and the engine assembled. We also assume that engines of 25,000--100,000 lb thrust levels will be tested with burn times of 1 hour or longer. After a test, the engine will be disassembled, time critical inspections will be executed, and a selection of components will be transported to remote inspection sites. The majority of the components will be stored for future inspection at Jackass Flats. To execute this program scope and process will require ten facilities. We considered the use of all relevant facilities at NTS including existing and new tunnels as well as the facilities at NRDA. Aside from the facilities located at remote sites and the inter-site transportation system, all of the required facilities are available at NRDA. In particular we have studied the refurbishment of E-MAD, ETS-1, R-MAD, and the interconnecting railroad.

  14. Characterization of decontamination and decommissioning wastes expected from the major processing facilities in the 200 Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Hyre, R.A.; Lowy, R.M.; Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was intended to characterize and estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the major processing and handling facilities in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site are decontaminated and decommissioned. The facilities in this study were selected based on processing history and on the magnitude of the estimated decommissioning cost cited in the Surplus Facilities Program Plan; Fiscal Year 1993 (Winship and Hughes 1992). The facilities chosen for this study include B Plant (221-B), T Plant (221-T), U Plant (221-U), the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant (224-U and 224-UA), the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) or S Plant (202-S), the Plutonium Concentration Facility for B Plant (224-B), and the Concentration Facility for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and REDOX (233-S). This information is required to support planning activities for current and future solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal operations and facilities.

  15. SmartConnect: Data connectivity for peripheral health facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    : Solar Panels (not in use) 6/15/2010 17NSDR 2010 #12;Nicaragua Public Health System · Health Post for SMS connectivity · Cellular connectivity is reaching remote areas · Relatively low cost for 161-visit · Target facilities with vaccine storage ­ Grid power or solar power ­ Associate the device

  16. Performance of high plutonium-containing glasses for the immobilization of surplus fissile materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, J.K.; Emery, J.W.; Hoh, J.C.; Johnson, T.R.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium from dismantled weapons is being evaluated for geological disposal. While a final waste form has not been chosen, borosilicate glass will be one of the waste forms to be evaluated. The reactivity of the reference blend glass containing the standard amount of Pu ({approximately}0.01 wt %) to be produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is compared to that of glasses made from the same nominal frit composition but doped with 2 and 7 wt % Pu, and also equal mole percentages of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The Gd is added to act as a neutron poison to address criticality concerns. The four different glasses have been reacted using the PCT-B method with a SA/V of 20,000 m{sup {minus}1} and the Argonne Vapor Hydration Test (VHT) method. Both test methods accelerate the reaction of the glass. PCT-B is used to determine the reactivity of the glass by analyzing the solution and reacted test components, while the VHT is used to evaluate the long-term reactivity of the glass and the distribution of Pu to secondary phases that will control the long-term reaction of the glass. The results of the tests with high levels of Pu are compared to those with the nominal levels to be produced in the standard DWPF glass.

  17. from Isotope Production Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium 2:32 Isotope cancer treatment...

  18. Fuel Fabrication Facility

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility November 2005 May 2007 June 2008 May 2012...

  19. Guide to research facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  20. Remote Method Invocations 13.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    Chapter 13 Remote Method Invocations 13.1 Introduction A popular way of developing distributed applications is based on the concept of remote procedure calls (RPC's) or remote method invocations (RMI's). Here the main idea is that a process can make calls to methods of a remote object as if it were

  1. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Image Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    1 Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 6 Image Classification Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 2. ­ Unsupervised classification. · Accuracy assessment. #12;2 Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Image Classification of image pixels is based on their digital numbers/grey values in one or more spectral bands. Remote Sensing

  2. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Radiometric Processing of Remote Sensing Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 4 Radiometric Processing of Remote Sensing Data #12;Remote. · Noise removal. · Point and edge detection. ­ Frequency domain. #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Radiometric Calibration #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 4 Recorded Digital Numbers (DN) · Recorded grey

  3. Chit-based Remote Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paluska, Justin Mazzola

    We propose a model for reliable remote storage founded on contract law. Consumers submit their bits to storage providers in exchange for a chit. A chit is a cryptographically secure, verifiable contract between a consumer ...

  4. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Fielden, J.M.; Johnson, C.A.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains 693 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions. Foreign, as well as domestic, literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Grand Junction Remedial Action Program, and Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Chapter sections for chapters 1 and 2 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Land Decontamination and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; and General Studies. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for (1) author; (2) corporate affiliation; (3) title; (4) publication description; (5) geographic location; and (6) keywords. An appendix of 202 bibliographic references without abstracts or indexes has been included in this bibliography. This appendix represents literature identified but not abstracted due to time constraints.

  5. Siting Study for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; Joan Connolly; Lance Peterson; Brennon Orr; Bob Starr

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy has identified a mission need for continued disposal capacity for remote-handled low-level waste (LLW) generated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). An alternatives analysis that was conducted to evaluate strategies to achieve this mission need identified two broad options for disposal of INL generated remote-handled LLW: (1) offsite disposal and (2) onsite disposal. The purpose of this study is to identify candidate sites or locations within INL boundaries for the alternative of an onsite remote handled LLW disposal facility and recommend the highest-ranked locations for consideration in the National Environmental Policy Act process. The study implements an evaluation based on consideration of five key elements: (1) regulations, (2) key assumptions, (3) conceptual design, (4) facility performance, and (5) previous INL siting study criteria, and uses a five-step process to identify, screen, evaluate, score, and rank 34 separate sites located across INL. The result of the evaluation is identification of two recommended alternative locations for siting an onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility. The two alternative locations that best meet the evaluation criteria are (1) near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex and (2) west of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Disposal Facility.

  6. Remote direct memory access

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, parallel computers, and computer program products are disclosed for remote direct memory access. Embodiments include transmitting, from an origin DMA engine on an origin compute node to a plurality target DMA engines on target compute nodes, a request to send message, the request to send message specifying a data to be transferred from the origin DMA engine to data storage on each target compute node; receiving, by each target DMA engine on each target compute node, the request to send message; preparing, by each target DMA engine, to store data according to the data storage reference and the data length, including assigning a base storage address for the data storage reference; sending, by one or more of the target DMA engines, an acknowledgment message acknowledging that all the target DMA engines are prepared to receive a data transmission from the origin DMA engine; receiving, by the origin DMA engine, the acknowledgement message from the one or more of the target DMA engines; and transferring, by the origin DMA engine, data to data storage on each of the target compute nodes according to the data storage reference using a single direct put operation.

  7. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  8. INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

  9. The Fermilab CMTF cryogenic distribution remote control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Batavia, IL, 60510 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) is able to provide the necessary test bed for measuring the performance of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities in a cryomodule (CM). The CMTF have seven 300 KW screw compressors, two liquid helium refrigerators, and two Cryomodule Test Stands (CMTS). CMTS1 is designed for 1.3 GHz cryomodule operating in a pulsed mode (PM) and CMTS2 is for cryomodule operating in Half-Wave (HW) and Continuous Wave (CW) mode. Based on the design requirement, each subsystem has to be far away from each other and be placed in distant locations. Therefore choosing Siemens Process Control System 7-400, DL205 PLC, Synoptic and Fermilab ACNET are the ideal choices for CMTF cryogenic distribution real-time remote control system. This paper presents a method which has been successfully used by many Fermilab distribution cryogenic real-time remote control systems.

  10. REVIEW OF INDUSTRIES AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES FOR TECHNOLOGIES APPLICABLE TO DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilkoff, T. E.; Hetland, M. D.; O'Leary, E. M.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area's (DDFA's) mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy improved deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. This mission requires that emphasis be continually placed on identifying technologies currently employed or under development in other nuclear as well as nonnuclear industries and government agencies. In support of DDFA efforts to clean up the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) radiologically contaminated surplus facilities using technologies that improve worker safety, reduce costs, and accelerate cleanup schedules, a study was conducted to identify innovative technologies developed for use in nonnuclear arenas that are appropriate for D&D applications.

  11. Vol. 48 No. SIG 0(PRO 35) 2007 Java Remote GluonJ Remote GluonJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiba, Shigeru

    Vol. 48 No. SIG 0(PRO 35) 2007 Java Remote GluonJ Remote GluonJ Remote GluonJ Remote GluonJ Java Remote GluonJ Remote GluonJ An AOP based Agile Development Environment for Distributed Software Muga/from the existing program easily. To support software development for Java with our method, we developed Remote

  12. T-573: Windows Remote Desktop Client DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in Windows Remote Desktop Client. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system.

  13. Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, L.N. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project.

  14. CRAD, Facility Safety- Nuclear Facility Safety Basis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used for assessment of a contractor's Nuclear Facility Safety Basis.

  15. Texas Facilities Commission's Facility Management Strategic Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, J. A.

    , Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 Facility Strategic Plan ?High Performance Building Approach ? Envelope ? Load Reduction ? (Re)Design ? Advanced Tactics ?Building Automation ? Sub-metering ? Controls ?Commissioning ? Assessment ? Continuous ?Facility... International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 Commissioning Assessment ?30 buildings ?CC Opportunities ?O&M Improvements ?Energy/Capital Improvement Opportunities ?Quick Payback Implementation ?Levering DM...

  16. Assessment of the facilities on Jackass Flats and other Nevada Test Site facilities for the new nuclear rocket program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, G.; Collins, D.; Dye, K.; Eberhart, C.; Hynes, M.; Kovach, R.; Ortiz, R.; Perea, J.; Sherman, D.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent NASA/DOE studies for the Space Exploration Initiative have demonstrated a critical need for the ground-based testing of nuclear rocket engines. Experience in the ROVER/NERVA Program, experience in the Nuclear Weapons Testing Program, and involvement in the new nuclear rocket program has motivated our detailed assessment of the facilities used for the ROVER/NERVA Program and other facilities located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The ROVER/NERVA facilities are located in the Nevada Research L, Development Area (NRDA) on Jackass Flats at NTS, approximately 85 miles northwest of Las Vegas. To guide our assessment of facilities for an engine testing program we have defined a program goal, scope, and process. To execute this program scope and process will require ten facilities. We considered the use of all relevant facilities at NTS including existing and new tunnels as well as the facilities at NRDA. Aside from the facilities located at remote sites and the inter-site transportation system, all of the required facilities are available at NRDA. In particular we have studied the refurbishment of E-MAD, ETS-1, R-MAD, and the interconnecting railroad. The total cost for such a refurbishment we estimate to be about $253M which includes additional contractor fees related to indirect, construction management, profit, contingency, and management reserves. This figure also includes the cost of the required NEPA, safety, and security documentation.

  17. Technology Transitions Facilities Database

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The types of R&D facilities at the DOE Laboratories available to the public typically fall into three broad classes depending on the mode of access: Designated User Facilities, Shared R&D...

  18. Wind Scanner: A full-scale Laser Facility for Wind and Turbulence Measurements around large Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Scanner: A full-scale Laser Facility for Wind and Turbulence Measurements around large Wind Turbines Torben Mikkelsen, Jakob Mann and Michael Courtney Wind Energy Department, Risř National Laboratory:Torben.Mikkelsen@Risoe.dk Summary RISŘ DTU has started to build a newly designed laser-based lidar scanning facility for remote wind

  19. Remote Store Programming: Mechanisms and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wentzlaff, David

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents remote store programming (RSP). This paradigm combines usability and efficiency through the exploitation of a simple hardware mechanism, the remote store, which can easily be added to existing ...

  20. Remote Food Shopping Robot System in a Supermarket Realization of the shopping task from remote places

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohya, Akihisa

    Remote Food Shopping Robot System in a Supermarket ­Realization of the shopping task from remote- ulating remote objects. This system attempts to answer the challenge of extending mobile robot potentials in a supermarket from a remote location using the Internet. We built the prototype system by integrating custom

  1. Remote State Preparation: Arbitrary remote control of photon polarizations for quantum communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwiat, Paul

    Remote State Preparation: Arbitrary remote control of photon polarizations for quantum measurement to one photon of a polarization- entangled pair, we remotely prepare single photons in arbitrary. Finally, we discuss the states remotely preparable given a particular two-qubit resource state. Keywords

  2. Remote Sens. 2011, 3, 2529-2551; doi:10.3390/rs3112529 Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remote Sens. 2011, 3, 2529-2551; doi:10.3390/rs3112529 Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292 www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing Article Multispectral Remote Sensing from Unmanned Aircraft: Image Processing Workflows and Applications Abstract: Using unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) as remote sensing platforms offers the unique ability

  3. Remote Sens. 2009, 1, 519-533; doi:10.3390/rs1030519 Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    Remote Sens. 2009, 1, 519-533; doi:10.3390/rs1030519 Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292 www of Remotely Sensed Data Paul H. Evangelista 1, *, Thomas J. Stohlgren 2 , Jeffrey T. Morisette 2 and Sunil model (Maxent) for its application and performance in remotely sensing invasive Tamarix sp. Six Landsat

  4. 10 January 2009 PHOTOGRAMMETRIC ENGINEERING & REMOTE SENSING High Performance Computing in Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    10 January 2009 PHOTOGRAMMETRIC ENGINEERING & REMOTE SENSING High Performance Computing in Remote Book ReviewBook Review High Performance Computing in Remote Sensing introduces the most recent advances in the incorporation of the high-performance computing (HPC) paradigm in remote sensing missions. Eighteen well

  5. Mission Need Statement for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory proposes to establish replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability to meet Nuclear Energy and Naval Reactors mission-critical, remote-handled low-level waste disposal needs beyond planned cessation of existing disposal capability at the end of Fiscal Year 2015. Remote-handled low-level waste is generated from nuclear programs conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory, including spent nuclear fuel handling and operations at the Naval Reactors Facility and operations at the Advanced Test Reactor. Remote-handled low-level waste also will be generated by new programs and from segregation and treatment (as necessary) of remote-handled scrap and waste currently stored in the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex. Replacement disposal capability must be in place by Fiscal Year 2016 to support uninterrupted Idaho operations. This mission need statement provides the basis for the laboratory’s recommendation to the Department of Energy to proceed with establishing the replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability, project assumptions and constraints, and preliminary cost and schedule information for developing the proposed capability. Without continued remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability, Department of Energy missions at the Idaho National Laboratory would be jeopardized, including operations at the Naval Reactors Facility that are critical to effective execution of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program and national security. Remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability is also critical to the Department of Energy’s ability to meet obligations with the State of Idaho.

  6. Remote Laboratory Towards an integrated training system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Remote Laboratory Towards an integrated training system Arnaud LELEVE, Hcene BENMOHAMED, Patrick.Meyer@ictt.ec-lyon.fr Abstract ­ Remote laboratories are essential to e-learning platforms in scientific and technical with the aim of giving means to instructors to build generic remote laboratory environments, homogeneously melt

  7. Remote Sensing for Water Quality Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remote Sensing for Water Quality Applications #12;Objective Give a brief update on GEO Inland and Nearshore Coastal Water Quality Remote Sensing Workshop (GEO Work Task WA-06-01)) Held in Geneva and Nearshore Coastal Water Quality Remote Sensing Workshop (GEO Work Task WA-06-01)) Organizing committee

  8. Remote Batch Invocation for Compositional Object Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryder, Barbara G.

    Remote Batch Invocation for Compositional Object Services Ali Ibrahim2 , Yang Jiao1 , Eli Tilevich1 Remote Procedure Calls do not compose efficiently, design- ers of distributed object systems use Data Transfer and Remote Fac¸ade patterns to create large-granularity interfaces, hard-coded for particular

  9. A REMOTE CONTROLLED UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHIC SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A REMOTE CONTROLLED UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHIC SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM by Paul J. Kruse, Jr. MarineKernan, Director A Remote Controlled Underwater Photographic Surveillance System by Paul J. Kruse, Jr. United. September 1964 #12;#12;CONTENTS Page Introduction 1 Remote controlled photographic system and accessories 1

  10. INTERVAL METHODS IN REMOTE SENSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    INTERVAL METHODS IN REMOTE SENSING: RELIABLE SUB­DIVISION OF GEOLOGICAL AREAS David D. Coblentz, G of the locations which weren't that thoroughly analyzed. 1 #12; 2 The subdivision of a geological zone TOPOGRAPHIC INFORMATION One reason for subjectivity of the geological subdivision is the fact

  11. The Remote Media Immersion (RMI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    the ultimate digital media delivery platform. Its streaming media server delivers multiple high- bandwidth aspects). The hope is that our advances in digital media delivery will enable new applicationsThe Remote Media Immersion (RMI) system blends multiple cutting- edge media technologies to create

  12. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Electro-Magnetic Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 2 Electro-Magnetic Radiation #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 2 Elements of Remote Sensing #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Chapter 2 Radiation: nature & source #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 4 Chapter 2 Interaction with the atmosphere #12;Remote Sensing

  13. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Electro-Magnetic Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 2 Electro-Magnetic Radiation Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 2 Elements of Remote Sensing #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Chapter 2 Radiation: nature & source Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 4 Chapter 2 Interaction with the atmosphere #12;Remote Sensing Ayman

  14. Decontamination and demolition of a former plutonium processing facility`s process exhaust system, firescreen, and filter plenum buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFrate, P.J. Jr.; Stout, D.S.; Elliott, J.W.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Project has decontaminated, demolished, and decommissioned a process exhaust system, two filter plenum buildings, and a firescreen plenum structure at Technical Area 21 (TA-2 1). The project began in August 1995 and was completed in January 1996. These high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums and associated ventilation ductwork provided process exhaust to fume hoods and glove boxes in TA-21 Buildings 2 through 5 when these buildings were active plutonium and uranium processing and research facilities. This paper summarizes the history of TA-21 plutonium and uranium processing and research activities and provides a detailed discussion of integrated work process controls, characterize-as-you-go methodology, unique engineering controls, decontamination techniques, demolition methodology, waste minimization, and volume reduction. Also presented in detail are the challenges facing the LANL Decommissioning Project to safely and economically decontaminate and demolish surplus facilities and the unique solutions to tough problems. This paper also shows the effectiveness of the integrated work package concept to control work through all phases.

  15. Decontamination and demolition of a former plutonium processing facility`s process exhaust system, firescreen, and filter plenum buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFrate, P.J. Jr.; Stout, D.S.; Elliott, J.W.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Project has decontaminated, demolished, and decommissioned a process exhaust system, two filter plenum buildings, and a firescreen plenum structure at Technical Area 21 (TA-21). The project began in August 1995 and was completed in January 1996. These high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums and associated ventilation ductwork provided process exhaust to fume hoods and glove boxes in TA-21 Buildings 2 through 5 when these buildings were active plutonium and uranium processing and research facilities. This paper summarizes the history of TA-21 plutonium and uranium processing and research activities and provides a detailed discussion of integrated work process controls, characterize-as-you-go methodology, unique engineering controls, decontamination techniques, demolition methodology, waste minimization, and volume reduction. Also presented in detail are the challenges facing the LANL Decommissioning Project to safely and economically decontaminate and demolish surplus facilities and the unique solutions to tough problems. This paper also shows the effectiveness of the integrated work package concept to control work through all phases.

  16. Further Development at JET of Remote Digital Photogrammetry Techniques and Remote Welding Under Conditions of Restricted Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Further Development at JET of Remote Digital Photogrammetry Techniques and Remote Welding Under Conditions of Restricted Access

  17. T-606: Sun Java System Access Manager Lets Remote Users Partially Modify Data and Remote Authenticated Users Partially Access Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sun Java System Access Manager Lets Remote Users Partially Modify Data and Remote Authenticated Users Partially Access Data.

  18. The Remote Photogrammetric Survey and Engineering Analysis of the Divertor Structure during JET’s Remote Tile Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Remote Photogrammetric Survey and Engineering Analysis of the Divertor Structure during JET’s Remote Tile Exchange

  19. Texas Facilities Commission's Facility Management Strategic Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, J. A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 Building Automation Pneumatic DDC ESL-IC-09-11-12 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Austin, Texas, November 17 - 19, 2009 Building Automation Pneumatic DDC #0;y... Pneumatic compressor and air distribution piping. #0;y Controls tend to drift out of calibration. #0;y Susceptible to leaks. #0;y Compressor is a single point of failure. #0;y Reconfiguration requires hardware and piping. #0;y Can not be remotely...

  20. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1999. This was the fourth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 453,117 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities not only slightly exceeded the 450,000 fish quota, but a second release of 76,386 yearlings (hereafter called Surplus) were acclimated at the Big Canyon facility and released about two weeks after the primary releases. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 9,941 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 9,583 from Big Canyon, 2,511 Big Canyon Surplus and 2,494 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 983 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low and did not appear to increase after transport to the acclimation facilities. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery and relatively high at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the release groups ranged from 147.4 mm (146.7-148.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 163.7 mm (163.3-164.1 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.04 at Pittsburg Landing to 1.23 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.8% (82.1-93.4%) for Big Canyon Surplus to 94.1% (90.1-98.1%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 58.7% (49.3-68.1%) for Big Canyon Surplus to 71.3% (60.1-82.5%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 9.3 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 18.7 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 9.0 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 17.3 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 7-10 days to Lower Granite Dam and 21-23 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, were all from April 23-25. The median arrival date for Big Canyon Surplus was May 4. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 7-8. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam were May 17 for Big Canyon Surplus and April 26 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery.

  1. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: UNH blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. Disposition is a process of use or disposal of material that results in the material being converted to a form that is substantially and inherently more proliferation-resistant than is the original form. Examining options for increasing the proliferation resistance of highly enriched uranium (HEU) is part of this effort. This report provides data to be used in the environmental impact analysis for the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate blending option to produce oxide for disposal. This the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) alternative will have two missions (1) convert HEU materials into HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend the HEU uranyl nitrate with depleted and natural assay uranyl nitrate to produce an oxide that can be stored until an acceptable disposal approach is available. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  2. Small Power Production Facilities (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purpose of these regulations, a small power production facility is defined as a facility that:...

  3. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations for the 600 Area facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document determines the need for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans for Westinghouse Hanford Company's 600 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared in accordance with A Guide For Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (WHC 1991). Five major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 600 Area were evaluated: the Purge Water Storage Facility, 212-N, -P, and -R Facilities, the 616 Facility, and the 213-J K Storage Vaults. Of the five major facilities evaluated in the 600 Area, none will require preparation of a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan.

  4. Disposable remote zero headspace extractor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hand, Julie J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Roberts, Mark P. (Arco, ID)

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The remote zero headspace extractor uses a sampling container inside a stainless steel vessel to perform toxicity characteristics leaching procedure to analyze volatile organic compounds. The system uses an in line filter for ease of replacement. This eliminates cleaning and disassembly of the extractor. All connections are made with quick connect fittings which can be easily replaced. After use, the bag can be removed and disposed of, and a new sampling container is inserted for the next extraction.

  5. Remote Sensing R. E. Mcintosh

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 c/) ReleaseRemote Access

  6. ARM Mobile Facilities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Orr, Brad; Coulter, Rich

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This video provides an overview of the ARM Mobile Facilities, two portable climate laboratories that can deploy anywhere in the world for campaigns of at least six months.

  7. DOE Designated Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactor** Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Joint Genome Institute - Production Genomics Facility (PGF)** (joint with LLNL, LANL, ORNL and PNNL) Advanced Light Source (ALS)...

  8. Accelerator Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Facility Vitaly Yakimenko October 6-7, 2010 ATF User meeting DOE HE, S. Vigdor, ALD - (Contact) T. Ludlam Chair, Physics Department V. Yakimenko Director ATF, Accelerator...

  9. ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORY PHYSICS DEPARTMENT Effective: 04012004 Page 1 of 2 Subject: Accelerator Test Facility - Linear Accelerator General Systems Guide Prepared by: Michael Zarcone...

  10. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Carbon Fiber Technology Facility is relevant in proving the scale- up of low-cost carbon fiber precursor materials and advanced manufacturing technologies * Significant...

  11. Science and Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    IBRF Project Lessons Learned Report Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility Lessons Learned - Stage I Acquisition through Stage II Construction Completion August 2011 This...

  12. Programs & User Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Facility Climate, Ocean, and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Terrestrial Ecosystem and Climate Dynamics Fusion Energy Sciences Magnetic Fusion Experiments Plasma Surface...

  13. Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Some of the nation's most powerful and sophisticated facilities for energy research Argonne National Laboratory is home to some of the nation's most powerful and sophisticated...

  14. Existing Facilities Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The NYSERDA Existing Facilities program merges the former Peak Load Reduction and Enhanced Commercial and Industrial Performance programs. The new program offers a broad array of different...

  15. Facility Survey & Transfer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    InstituteSandia Photovoltaic Systems Symposium On April 15, 2014, in Concentrating Solar Power, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Facilities, Grid Integration, News,...

  17. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  18. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  19. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  20. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  1. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 6. A selected bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography of 683 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the sixth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Facilities Contaminated with Natural Radioactivity; (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (6) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (7) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; (8) Technical Measurements Center; and (9) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 7 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate affiliation or by publication description.

  2. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography: Volume 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Michelson, D.C.; Knox, N.P.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 553 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the eighth in a series of reports. Foreign and domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of energy's remedial action program. Major chapters are Surplus Facilities Management Program, Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Management, Technical Measurements Center, and General Remedial Action Program Studies. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 5, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms and abbreviations.

  3. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions. Volume 1. A selected bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faust, R.A.; Fore, C.S.; Knox, N.P.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography of 633 references represents the first in a series to be produced by the Remedial Actions Program Information Center (RAPIC) containing scientific, technical, economic, and regulatory information concerning the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Major chapters selected for this bibliography are Facility Decommissioning, Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup, Contaminated Site Restoration, and Criteria and Standards. The references within each chapter are arranged alphabetically by leading author, corporate affiliation, or title of the document. When the author is not given, the corporate affiliation appears first. If these two levels of authorship are not given, the title of the document is used as the identifying level. Indexes are provided for (1) author(s), (2) keywords, (3) title, (4) technology development, and (5) publication description. An appendix of 123 entries lists recently acquired references relevant to decommissioning of nuclear facilities. These references are also arranged according to one of the four subject categories and followed by author, title, and publication description indexes. The bibliography was compiled from a specialized data base established and maintained by RAPIC to provide information support for the Department of Energy's Remedial Actions Program, under the cosponsorship of its three major components: Surplus Facilities Management Program, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Actions Program, and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Actions Program. RAPIC is part of the Ecological Sciences Information Center within the Information Center Complex at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  4. Glass and ceramic immobilization alternatives and the use of new facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kan, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Sullivan, K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for placing weapons-usable surplus nuclear materials (principally plutonium [Pu] and highly enriched uranium [U]) in a form or condition that is substantially and inherently more difficult to use in weapons either by the Host Country or by a subnational group. The two most promising alternatives for achieving these aims are: fabrication and use as fuel, without reprocessing, in existing or modified nuclear reactors; or vitrification in combination with high-level radioactive waste. The mission of the immobilization technologies and facilities considered in this paper and the paper ``Use of Savannah River Site (SRS) Facilities for Glass and Ceramics,`` is to produce a waste form by incorporating plutonium in either an amorphous glass or a crystalline ceramic matrix and then disposal of it in a geologic repository. This paper summarizes all the glass and ceramic alternatives under consideration and presents the immobilization options using new facilities. The subsequent paper presents the immobilization options which use existing facilities at the Savannah River Site.

  5. MINERAL FACILITIES MAPPING PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    MINERAL FACILITIES MAPPING PROJECT Yadira Soto-Viruet Supervisor: David Menzie, Yolanda Fong-Sam Minerals Information Team (MIT) USGS Summer Internship 2009 U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Minerals Information Team (MIT): Annually reports on the minerals facilities of more than 180 countries

  6. A Materials Facilities Initiative -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Materials Facilities Initiative - FMITS & MPEX D.L. Hillis and ORNL Team Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division July 10, 2014 #12;2 Materials Facilities Initiative JET ITER FNSF Fusion Reactor Challenges for materials: fluxes and fluence, temperatures 50 x divertor ion fluxes up to 100 x neutron

  7. Geophysical InversionFacility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    UBC Geophysical InversionFacility Modelling and Inversion of EMI data collected over magnetic soils of EMI data acquired at sites with magnetic soils · Geophysical Proveouts · Geonics EM63 Data · First model parameters: · Location · Orientation · Polarizabilities 4 #12;UBC Geophysical Inversion Facility

  8. Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2010 ANNUAL REPORT S C I E N C E P O W E R E D B Y S U P E R C O M P U T I N G ANL-11/15 The Argonne Leadership Computing States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees

  9. Emergency Facilities and Equipment

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume clarifies requirements of DOE O 151.1 to ensure that emergency facilities and equipment are considered as part of emergency management program and that activities conducted at these emergency facilities are fully integrated. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  10. Nanotechnology User Facility for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A National Nanotechnology User Facility for Industry Academia Government #12;The National Institute of Commerce's nanotechnology user facility. The CNST enables innovation by providing rapid access to the tools new measurement and fabrication methods in response to national nanotechnology needs. www

  11. Remote Chemical Sensing Using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, Warren W.; Strasburg, Jana D.; Aker, Pam M.; Schultz, John F.

    2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Research done by the IR sensors team at PNNL is focused on developing advanced spectroscopic methods for detecting signatures of nuclear, chemical, biological and explosives weapons or weapons production. The sensors we develop fall into two categories: remote sensors that can be operated at distances ranging from 150 m to 10 km, and point sensors that are used for in-situ inspection and detection. FY03 has seen an explosion in FM DIAL progress with the net result being solid confirmation that FM DIAL is a technique capable of remote chemical monitoring in a wide variety of venues. For example, FM DIAL was used to detect a small plume of hydrogen sulfide, a candidate CW agent, released in the desert environment of the Hanford 200 Area site. These experiments were conducted over a range of physical conditions including outside temperatures ranging from 70 F to 105 F and turbulence conditions ranging from quiescent to chaotic. We are now rapidly developing the information needed to design prototype FM DIAL systems that are optimized for specific applications that include scenarios such as fixed position stand-off detection and mobile UAV mounted remote monitoring. Just as an example, in FY04 we will use FM DIAL to detect both in-facility and outdoor release of enriched UF6. The rapid progress in FM DIAL research made in FY03 is attributed to several advances. First, final construction of a custom-designed trailer allowed the instrument to be housed in a mobile temperature-controlled environment. This allowed the experiment to be transported to several locations so that data could be collected under a range of physical conditions. This has led to a better understanding of a variety of experimental noise sources. With this knowledge, we have been able to implement several changes in the way the FM DIAL data is collected and processed, with the net result being a drastic improvement in our confidence of analyte concentration measurement and an improvement i n the instrument detection limit. The range of chemicals detectable by FM DIAL has also been extended. Prior to FY03 only water and nitrous oxide (N2O) had been seen. Experiments on extending the tuning range of the quantum cascade laser (QCL) currently used in the experiments demonstrate that many more species are now accessible including H2S, C2F4H2, and CH4. We additionally demonstrated that FM DIAL measurements can be made using short wave infrared (SWIR) telecommunications lasers. While measurements made using these components are noisier because turbulence and particulate matter cause more interference in this spectral region, monitoring in this region enables larger species to be detected simply because these lasers have a greater tuning range. In addition, SWIR monitoring also allows for the detection of second-row hydride species such as HF and HCl, which are important nuclear and CWA proliferation signatures.

  12. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as oxide. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials into pure HEU oxide and (2) blend the pure HEU oxide with depleted and natural uranium oxide to produce an LWR grade LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  13. HEU to LEU conversion and blending facility: Metal blending alternative to produce LEU oxide for disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    US DOE is examining options for disposing of surplus weapons-usable fissile materials and storage of all weapons-usable fissile materials. The nuclear material is converted to a form more proliferation- resistant than the original form. Blending HEU (highly enriched uranium) with less-enriched uranium to form LEU has been proposed as a disposition option. Five technologies are being assessed for blending HEU. This document provides data to be used in environmental impact analysis for the HEU-LEU disposition option that uses metal blending with an oxide waste product. It is divided into: mission and assumptions, conversion and blending facility descriptions, process descriptions and requirements, resource needs, employment needs, waste and emissions from plant, hazards discussion, and intersite transportation.

  14. Remote State Preparation for Quantum Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ran Ber; Erez Zohar

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote state preparation is generation of a desired state by a remote observer. In spite of causality, it is well known, according to the Reeh-Schlieder theorem, that it is possible for relativistic quantum field theories, and a "physical" process achieving this task, involving superoscillatory functions, has recently been introduced. In this work we deal with non-relativistic fields, and show that remote state preparation is also possible for them, hence generalizing the Reeh-Schlieder theorem.

  15. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Image Registration & Rectification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 5 Image Registration & Rectification #12;Remote Sensing: Resampling techniques. #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Image Registration #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F be integrated/fused. Object Space Left Image Right Image Image Registration: Objective #12;Remote Sensing Ayman

  16. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Image Registration & Rectification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    1 Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 5 Image Registration & Rectification Remote Sensing Ayman: Resampling techniques. #12;2 Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Image Registration Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib be integrated/fused. Object Space Left Image Right Image Image Registration: Objective #12;3 Remote Sensing

  17. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Data Acquisition Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 3 Data Acquisition Systems #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. ­ Electro-mechanical scanners. #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Overview · LIDAR operational principles for recognition and classification purposes. #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 4 Remote Sensing Systems Utilized

  18. Fast Flux Test Facility interim examination and maintenance cell: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vincent, J.R.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast Flux Test Facility Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell was designed to perform interim examination and/or disassembly of experimental core components for final analysis elsewhere, as well as maintenance of sodium-wetted or neutron-activated internal reactor parts and plant support hardware. The Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell equipment developed and used for the first ten years of operation has been primarily devoted to the disassembly and examination of core component test assemblies. While no major reactor equipment has required remote repair or maintenance, the Interim Examina Examination and Maintenance Cell has served as the remote repair facility for its own in-cell equipment, and several innovative remote repairs have been accomplished. The Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell's demonstrated versatility has shown its capability to support a challenging future. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: remote sensing devices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    remote sensing devices Sandia, Endicott Interconnect Technologies, EMCORE, International Micro Industries, NREL, Universal Instruments: Solar Glitter On March 21, 2013, in...

  20. Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 5969-5998; doi:10.3390/rs5115969 Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 5969-5998; doi:10.3390/rs5115969 Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292 www, the technique presented in this paper would help them to quantify the impacts of OPEN ACCESS #12;Remote Sens; urban heat island effect; NDVI; artificial neural network; Markov chain; Dhaka 1. Introduction Urban

  1. Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 5173-5192; doi:10.3390/rs5105173 Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Scott L.

    Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 5173-5192; doi:10.3390/rs5105173 Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292 www for a geosynchronous OPEN ACCESS #12;Remote Sens. 2013, 5 5174 satellite with modern imaging detectors, software, and algorithms able to detect heat from early and small fires, and yield minute-scale detection times. Keywords

  2. Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 1484-1497; doi:10.3390/rs5031484 Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 1484-1497; doi:10.3390/rs5031484 Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292 www.mdpi.com/journal and the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), we investigated percent changes and controlling factors of global vegetation growth for the period 1982 to 2009. Over that 28-year period, both the remote-sensing estimate

  3. Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 2857-2882; doi:10.3390/rs5062857 Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 2857-2882; doi:10.3390/rs5062857 Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292 www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing Article Evaluation of CLM4 Solar Radiation Partitioning Scheme Using Remote Sensing and Site Level FPAR.e., that of the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) with coupled carbon and nitrogen cycles. Taking advantage of a unique

  4. CHAPTER 12:CHAPTER 12: Remote Sensing ofRemote Sensing of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    - and middle-infrared regions, water bodies appear very dark even black becausebodies appear very dark, even and pure and contains little suspended sediment or organic matter. Water Penetration Cozumel Island1 CHAPTER 12:CHAPTER 12: Remote Sensing ofRemote Sensing of WaterWaterWaterWater REFERENCE: Remote

  5. Remote imaging of concealed objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lev, Aner, E-mail: lev@soreq.gov.il; Sfez, Bruno, E-mail: lev@soreq.gov.il [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical detection of objects hidden behind opaque screening layers is a challenging problem. We demonstrate an optically detected echographic-like method that combines collimated acoustic and laser beams. The acoustic waves cross the screening layers and their back-reflection from the hidden objects is detected through the analysis of a dynamic laser speckle pattern created at the outer surface of the screening layer. Real-time remote detection of moving targets 15 meters away, with a few mm resolutions is demonstrated using a very sensitive camera detection scheme.

  6. Remote Access | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 c/) ReleaseRemote Access Ames Laboratory

  7. STAR Facility Tritium Accountancy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. J. Pawelko; J. P. Sharpe; B. J. Denny

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed.

  8. STAR facility tritium accountancy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawelko, R. J.; Sharpe, J. P.; Denny, B. J. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5 g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed. (authors)

  9. DOE/NNSA Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NNSA Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor Award Date End Date OptionsAward Term Ultimate Potential Expiration Date Contract FY Competed Parent Companies LLC...

  10. Test Facility Daniil Stolyarov, Accelerator Test Facility User...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development of the Solid-State Laser System for the Accelerator Test Facility Daniil Stolyarov, Accelerator Test Facility User's Meeting April 3, 2009 Outline Motivation for...

  11. Sandia Energy - About the Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Facility About the FacilityTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-11T19:38:37+00:00 Test-Bed Wind Turbines Allow Facility Flexibility While Providing Reliable Data in Many Regimes SWiFT...

  12. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 300 Area facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 300 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. These determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide For Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. Sixteen Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 300 Area were evaluated: 303 (A, B, C, E, F, G, J and K), 303 M, 306 E, 308, 309, 313, 333, 334 A, and the 340 Waste Handling Facility. The 303, 306, 313, 333, and 334 facilities Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared by Columbia Energy and Environmental Services of Richland, Washington. The 340 Central Waste Complex determination was prepared by Bovay Northwest, Incorporated. The 308 and 309 facility determinations were prepared by Westinghouse Handford Company. Of the 16 facilities evaluated, 3 will require preparation of a Facility effluent Monitoring Plan: the 313 N Fuels Fabrication Support Building, 333 N Fuels fabrication Building, and the 340 Waste Handling Facility. 26 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. V-202: Cisco Video Surveillance Manager Bugs Let Remote Users...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TE Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service and Remote Adjacent Authenticated Users Gain Root Shell Access V-076: Cisco Wireless LAN Controller Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service and...

  14. User Guide Remote Workplace to VDI Using RSA | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    User Guide Remote Workplace to VDI Using RSA User Guide Remote Workplace to VDI Using RSA Last updated on March 17, 2015 This document provides instructions for logging onto Remote...

  15. Remotely readable fiber optic compass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM); Garrett, Steven L. (Pebble Beach, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remotely readable fiber optic compass. A sheet polarizer is affixed to a magnet rotatably mounted in a compass body, such that the polarizer rotates with the magnet. The optical axis of the sheet polarizer is preferably aligned with the north-south axis of the magnet. A single excitation light beam is divided into four identical beams, two of which are passed through the sheet polarizer and through two fixed polarizing sheets which have their optical axes at right angles to one another. The angle of the compass magnet with respect to a fixed axis of the compass body can be determined by measuring the ratio of the intensities of the two light beams. The remaining ambiguity as to which of the four possible quadrants the magnet is pointing to is resolved by the second pair of light beams, which are passed through the sheet polarizer at positions which are transected by two semicircular opaque strips formed on the sheet polarizer. The incoming excitation beam and the four return beams are communicated by means of optical fibers, giving a remotely readable compass which has no electrical parts.

  16. Remotely readable fiber optic compass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Migliori, A.; Swift, G.W.; Garrett, S.L.

    1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A remotely readable fiber optic compass. A sheet polarizer is affixed to a magnet rotatably mounted in a compass body, such that the polarizer rotates with the magnet. The optical axis of the sheet polarizer is preferably aligned with the north-south axis of the magnet. A single excitation light beam is divided into four identical beams, two of which are passed through the sheet polarizer and through two fixed polarizing sheets which have their optical axes at right angles to one another. The angle of the compass magnet with respect to a fixed axis of the compass body can be determined by measuring the ratio of the intensities of the two light beams. The remaining ambiguity as to which of the four possible quadrants the magnet is pointing to is resolved by the second pair of light beams, which are passed through the sheet polarizer at positions which are transected by two semicircular opaque strips formed on the sheet polarizer. The incoming excitation beam and the four return beams are communicated by means of optical fibers, giving a remotely readable compass which has no electrical parts.

  17. Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in...

  18. Pollution Control Facilities (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purpose of this legislation, pollution control facilities are defined as any facilities designed for the elimination, mitigation or prevention of air or water pollution, including all...

  19. LANL | Physics | Trident Laser Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery science at Trident Laser Facility Several important discoveries and first observations have been made at the Trident Laser Facility, a unique three-beam neodymium-glass...

  20. Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure, and post-closure of these facilities.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: SWIFT Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SWIFT Facility Characterizing Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Inflow On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy The Scaled...

  2. User Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Facilities Advanced Photon Source Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System Center for Nanoscale Materials Transportation Research and...

  3. Cornell University Facilities Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Sturt

    Description: The Large Animal Teaching Complex (LATC) will be a joint facility for the College of Veterinary or increase operating costs of the dairy barn; therefore, the College of Veterinary Medicine has agreed

  4. Photovoltaic Research Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) at its national laboratory facilities located throughout the country. To encourage further innovation,...

  5. NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's electricity from renewable resources by 2010. The Guidebook outlines eligibility and legal requirementsCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ` NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK March 2007 CEC-300 Executive Director Heather Raitt Technical Director RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFICE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

  6. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  7. NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

  8. Liquidity facilities and signaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arregui, Nicolás

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation studies the role of signaling concerns in discouraging access to liquidity facilities like the IMF contingent credit lines (CCL) and the Discount Window (DW). In Chapter 1, I analyze the introduction of ...

  9. Facilities Management Department Restructuring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullins, Dyche

    ­ Zone 2 ­ Mission Bay/East Side: Includes Mission Bay, Mission Center Bldg, Buchanan Dental, Hunters Point, 654 Minnesota, Oyster Point 2. Recommendation that UCSF align all Facility Services and O

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy, SWIFT, Wind Energy One of the primary roles of Sandia's Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility will be to conduct detailed experiments on turbine wakes...

  11. Overview of Remote Handling Equipment Used for the NPP A1 Decommissioning - 12141

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravarik, K.; Medved, J.; Pekar, A.; Stubna, M. [VUJE, Inc., Okruzna 5, 918 64 Trnava (Slovakia); Michal, V. [IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O.Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Vargovcik, L. [ZTS VVU Kosice, Inc., Juzna Trieda 95, 041 24 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first Czechoslovak NPP A1 was in operation from 1972 to 1977 and it was finally shutdown due to an accident (level 4 according to the INES). The presence of radioactive, toxic or hazardous materials limits personnel access to facilities and therefore it is necessary to use remote handling technologies for some most difficult characterization, retrieval, decontamination and dismantling tasks. The history of remote handling technologies utilization started in nineties when the spent nuclear fuel, including those fuel assemblies damaged during the accident, was prepared for the transport to Russia. Subsequent significant development of remote handling equipment continued during implementation of the NPP A1 decommissioning project - Stage I and ongoing Stage II. Company VUJE, Inc. is the general contractor for both mentioned stages of the decommissioning project. Various remote handling manipulators and robotics arms were developed and used. It includes remotely controlled vehicle manipulator MT-15 used for characterisation tasks in hostile and radioactive environment, special robust manipulator DENAR-41 used for the decontamination of underground storage tanks and multi-purposes robotics arms MT-80 and MT-80A developed for variety of decontamination and dismantling tasks. The heavy water evaporator facility dismantling is the current task performed remotely by robotics arm MT-80. The heavy water evaporator is located inside the main production building in the room No. 220 where loose surface contamination varies from 10 Bq/cm{sup 2} to 1x10{sup 3} Bq/cm{sup 2}, dose rate is up to 1.5 mGy/h and the feeding pipeline contained liquid RAW with high tritium content. Presented manipulators have been designed for broad range of decommissioning tasks. They are used for recognition, sampling, waste retrieval from large underground tanks, decontamination and dismantling of technological equipments. Each of the mentioned fields claims specific requirements on design of manipulator, their operation and control systems as well as tools of manipulators. Precise planning of decontamination and dismantling tasks is necessary for its successful performance by remotely controlled manipulator. The example of the heavy water evaporator demonstrates typical procedure for decommissioning of contaminated technological equipment by remotely controlled manipulators - planning of decommissioning tasks, preparatory tasks, modification of applied tools and design of specific supporting constructions for manipulator and finally decontamination and dismantling themselves. Due to the particularly demanding conditions in highly contaminated A1 NPP, a team of experts with special know-how in the field of decommissioning has grown up, and unique technological equipment enabling effective and safe work in environment with a high radiation level has been developed. (authors)

  12. Remote-handled transuranic system assessment. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document identifies the necessary actions for addressing current questions concerning the safe and efficient disposal of remote-handled transuranic wastes that have been generated through Department of Energy activities. In addition, this document presents summaries of existing information and analyses regarding the potential alternatives for disposing of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste at the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A further discussion of DOE`s approach for addressing RH-TRU issues is contained in the document, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Disposal Strategy, DOE/WIPP-95-1090 (DOE, 1995a). Of this stored and projected inventory, approximately 30% can be characterized with current technology and subsequently certified to meet the waste acceptance criteria for disposal at WIPP; characterization of the remaining 70% will require the use of alternative techniques. At most of the generator sites, characterization equipment and facilities need to be procured in order for the sites to certify waste for shipment either to WIPP or to an interim site. If surface dose rates are too high, the use of non-invasive techniques such as non-destructive examination (NDE) and non-destructive assay (NDA) may be precluded. Characterization methods using NDA can be effectively used on RH-TRU wastes with surface dose rates of less than 1.0 rem/hr (neutron); NDE methods are effective on waste with surface dose rates of less than 10 rem/hr (gamma). The ability to use current NDE technology on waste with surface dose rates above 10 rem/hr will need to be demonstrated. Alternate characterization techniques, such as examination within a hot cell, could be used for the remaining waste; however, such techniques are labor intensive and would require additional effort to gather assay data. Improvements in characterization capabilities are being pursued through future technology development initiatives.

  13. U-137: HP Performance Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7: HP Performance Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Codes U-137: HP Performance Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Codes March...

  14. V-149: Microsoft Internet Explorer Object Access Bug Lets Remote...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CDwnBindInfo Object Reuse Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-047: Siemens Automation License Manager Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service or Execute Arbitrary...

  15. Equitable Access: Remote and Rural Communities 'Transport Needs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Equitable Access: Remote and Rural Communities 'Transport Needs' Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Equitable Access: Remote and Rural Communities...

  16. automated remote plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Siegel, Mel 15 Use of remote sensing data to enhance the performance of a hydrodynamic simulation of a partially frozen power plant Engineering Websites Summary: Use of remote...

  17. U-074: Microsoft .NET Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4: Microsoft .NET Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Commands, Access User Accounts, and Redirect Users U-074: Microsoft .NET Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Commands,...

  18. V-150: Apache VCL Input Validation Flaw Lets Remote Authenticated...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tomcat FORM Authenticator Lets Remote Users Conduct Session Fixation Attacks U-084: Cisco Digital Media Manager Lets Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated Privileges U-233:...

  19. U-010:HP Onboard Administrator Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HP Service Manager Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain Unauthorized Access V-120: EMC Smarts Network Configuration Manager Java RMI Access Control Flaw Lets Remote Users...

  20. availiable remote sensing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remote SensingThermal Infrared Remote Sensing Thermal infrared) and thermal infrared energy (3.0 - 14 m). However, thermal infrared sensors allow humans to sense 2 Thermal...

  1. atmospheric remote sensing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Remote SensingThermal Infrared Remote Sensing Thermal infrared) and thermal infrared energy (3.0 - 14 m). However, thermal infrared sensors allow humans to...

  2. aerospace remote sensing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remote SensingThermal Infrared Remote Sensing Thermal infrared) and thermal infrared energy (3.0 - 14 m). However, thermal infrared sensors allow humans to sense 2 Thermal...

  3. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 71 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility the irradiated cells. Both the microbeam and the track segment facilities continue to be utilized in various investigations of this phenomenon. The single- particle microbeam facility provides precise control of the number

  4. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 1 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility for Radiological Research (CRR). Using the mi- crobeam facility, 10% of the cells were irradiated through particle beam as well as the first fo- cused microbeam in the new microbeam facility. · Another significant

  5. Facility Location with Hierarchical Facility Costs Zoya Svitkina #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tardos, Ă?va

    Facility Location with Hierarchical Facility Costs Zoya Svitkina # â?? Eva Tardos + Abstract We consider the facility location problem with hierarchi­ cal facility costs, and give a (4 installation costs. Shmoys, Swamy and Levi [13] gave an approxi­ mation algorithm for a two­level version

  6. NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Facility Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit | NationalWebmaster ToStaffCapabilities TheFacility

  7. Radiation Effects Facility - Facilities - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, andSmartRadiation Effects Facility

  8. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: a selected bibliography. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Chilton, B.D.; Baldauf, M.F.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography of 756 references with abstracts on the subject of nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions is the fifth in a series of annual reports prepared for the US Department of Energy, Division of Remedial Action Projects. Foreign as well as domestic literature of all types - technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, conference papers, symposium proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions - has been included in this publication. The bibliography contains scientific (basic research as well as applied technology), economic, regulatory, and legal literature pertinent to the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Program. Major chapters are: (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program; (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning; (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program; (4) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program; (5) Grand Junction Remedial Action Program; (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management; and (7) Technical Measurements Center. Chapter sections for chapters 1, 2, 4, and 6 include Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. The references within each chapter or section are arranged alphabetically by leading author. References having no individual author are arranged by corporate author or by title. Indexes are provided for the categories of author, corporate affiliation, title, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. The Appendix contains a list of frequently used acronyms.

  9. UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD FAU Research Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Harriet L.Wilkes Honors College FAU Research Facility Expansion Satellite Utility Plant Chiller Lift

  10. Method for remote detection of trace contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simonson, Robert J.; Hance, Bradley G.

    2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for remote detection of trace contaminants in a target area comprises applying sensor particles that preconcentrate the trace contaminant to the target area and detecting the contaminant-sensitive fluorescence from the sensor particles. The sensor particles can have contaminant-sensitive and contaminant-insensitive fluorescent compounds to enable the determination of the amount of trace contaminant present in the target are by relative comparison of the emission of the fluorescent compounds by a local or remote fluorescence detector. The method can be used to remotely detect buried minefields.

  11. Heating remote rooms in passive solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote rooms can be effectively heated by convection through a connecting doorway. A simple steady-state equation is developed for design purposes. Validation of a dynamic model is achieved using data obtained over a 13-day period. Dynamic effects are investigated using a simulation analysis for three different cases of driving temperature; the effect is to reduce the temperature difference between the driving room and the remote room compared to the steady-state model. For large temperature swings in the driving room a strategy which uses the intervening door in a diode mode is effective. The importance of heat-storing mass in the remote room is investigated.

  12. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune31, 2005 [Facility

  13. Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment6 FY 2007FY 2014Facilities Facilities

  14. Facility Disposition Projects

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of.pdf6-OPAMDepartment6 FY 2007FY 2014Facilities Facilities

  15. Facility Data Policy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget » FY 2014Facilities FusionFacility Data Policy

  16. DECOMMISSIONING OF A CAESIUM-137 SEALED SOURCE PRODUCTION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, A.; Abbott, H.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Amersham owns a former Caesium-137 sealed source production facility. They commissioned RWE NUKEM to carry out an Option Study to determine a strategy for the management of this facility and then the subsequent decommissioning of it. The decommissioning was carried out in two sequential phases. Firstly robotic decommissioning followed by a phase of manual decommissioning. This paper describes the remote equipment designed built and operated, the robotic and manual decommissioning operations performed, the Safety Management arrangements and summarizes the lessons learned. Using the equipment described the facility was dismantled and decontaminated robotically. Some 2300kg of Intermediate Level Waste containing in the order of 4000Ci were removed robotically from the facility. Ambient dose rates were reduced from 100's of R per hour {gamma} to 100's of mR per hour {gamma}. The Telerobotic System was then removed to allow man access to complete the decommissioning. Manual decommissioning reduced ambient dose rates further to less than 1mR per hour {gamma} and loose contamination levels to less than 0.25Bq/cm2. This allowed access to the facility without respiratory protection.

  17. Sensor test facilities and capabilities at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, W.B.; Burke, L.J.; Gomez, B.J.; Livingston, L.; Nelson, D.S.; Smathers, D.C.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently developed two major field test capabilities for unattended ground sensor systems at the Department of energy`s Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first capability utilizes the NTS large area, varied terrain, and intrasite communications systems for testing sensors for detecting and tracking vehicular traffic. Sensor and ground truth data can be collected at either of two secure control centers. This system also includes an automated ground truth capability that consists of differential Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) receivers on test vehicles and live TV coverage of critical road sections. Finally there is a high-speed, secure computer network link between the control centers and the Air Force`s Theater Air Command and Control Simulation Facility in Albuquerque NM. The second capability is Bunker 2-300. It is a facility for evaluating advanced sensor systems for monitoring activities in underground cut-and-cover facilities. The main part of the facility consists of an underground bunker with three large rooms for operating various types of equipment. This equipment includes simulated chemical production machinery and controlled seismic and acoustic signal sources. There has been a thorough geologic and electromagnetic characterization of the region around the bunker. Since the facility is in a remote location, it is well-isolated from seismic, acoustic, and electromagnetic interference.

  18. B cell remote-handled waste shipment cask alternatives study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RIDDELLE, J.G.

    1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The decommissioning of the 324 Facility B Cell includes the onsite transport of grouted remote-handled radioactive waste from the 324 Facility to the 200 Areas for disposal. The grouted waste has been transported in the leased ATG Nuclear Services 3-82B Radioactive Waste Shipping Cask (3-82B cask). Because the 3-82B cask is a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-certified Type B shipping cask, the lease cost is high, and the cask operations in the onsite environment may not be optimal. An alternatives study has been performed to develop cost and schedule information on alternative waste transportation systems to assist in determining which system should be used in the future. Five alternatives were identified for evaluation. These included continued lease of the 3-82B cask, fabrication of a new 3-82B cask, development and fabrication of an onsite cask, modification of the existing U.S. Department of Energy-owned cask (OH-142), and the lease of a different commercially available cask. Each alternative was compared to acceptance criteria for use in the B Cell as an initial screening. Only continued leasing of the 3-82B cask, fabrication of a new 3-82B cask, and the development and fabrication of an onsite cask were found to meet all of the B Cell acceptance criteria.

  19. U-203: HP Photosmart Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in HP Photosmart. A remote user can cause denial of service conditions.

  20. Can remote sensing of land cover improve species distribution modelling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Bethany

    COMMENTARY Can remote sensing of land cover improve species distribution modelling? Remote sensing- guish among broad classes of vegetation. However, the applicability of remote sensing to classification like from remote sensing ­ a map of tree species ­ and what can be delivered ­ a map of forest types

  1. applied remote sensing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing 12;0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4 Infrared Remote SensingThermal Infrared Remote SensingThermal Infrared...

  2. Gated x-ray detector for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oertel, John A.; Aragonez, Robert; Archuleta, Tom; Barnes, Cris; Casper, Larry; Fatherley, Valerie; Heinrichs, Todd; King, Robert; Landers, Doug; Lopez, Frank; Sanchez, Phillip; Sandoval, George; Schrank, Lou; Walsh, Peter; Bell, Perry; Brown, Matt; Costa, Robert; Holder, Joe; Montelongo, Sam; Pederson, Neal [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); VI Control Systems Ltd., Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new gated x-ray imaging cameras have recently been designed, constructed, and delivered to the National Ignition Facility in Livermore, CA. These gated x-Ray detectors are each designed to fit within an aluminum airbox with a large capacity cooling plane and are fitted with an array of environmental housekeeping sensors. These instruments are significantly different from earlier generations of gated x-ray images due, in part, to an innovative impedance matching scheme, advanced phosphor screens, pulsed phosphor circuits, precision assembly fixturing, unique system monitoring, and complete remote computer control. Preliminary characterization has shown repeatable uniformity between imaging strips, improved spatial resolution, and no detectable impedance reflections.

  3. REMOTE INTERVENTION TOWER ELIMINATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dave Murnane; Renauld Washington

    2002-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report is presented to satisfy reporting requirements in the Statement of work section J.5 page 120 per Department of Energy contract DE-AC26-01NT41093. The project does not contain any imperial research data. This report describes the assembly of Commercial off the shelf (COTS) items configured in a unique manner to represent new and innovative technology in the service of size reduction and material handling at DOE sites, to assist in the D&D effort currently underway at the designated DOE Facilities.

  4. User Guide Remote PIV to VDI Using ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Click here to view certificate properties. Select the Detail tab. U. S. Department of Energy | Remote PIV to VDI Using a PIV Card 7 a. Select Enhanced Key Usage to display the...

  5. The Remote distractor effect in manual responses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricketts, Katie

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The remote distracter effect (RDE) has previously only been studied in relation to the saccadic system. Given the hypothesis of the premotor theory (Rizzolatti et al, 1987) that a covert shift of attention is a programmed ...

  6. FACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    to the repair of hydraulic turbine runners and large pump impellers. Reclamation operates and maintains a wideFACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES VOLUME 2-5 TURBINE REPAIR Internet Version variety of reaction and impulse turbines as well as axial flow, mixed flow, radial flow pumps and pump

  7. Facilities Management Field Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Facilities Management Field Services FieldStationsAnnualReport2006 #12;Cover Photo by Dr Mark Jermy coast #12; Introduction A very wet Steve Weaver emerges from the river. Ah, field work! The Government broadband, at least there is now an alternative to the telephone line. Electrical power spikes (and outages

  8. Graph algorithms experimentation facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonom, Donald George

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DRAWADJMAT 2 ~e ~l 2. ~f ~2 2 ~t ~& [g H 2 O? Z Mwd a P d ed d Aid~a sae R 2-BE& T C dbms Fig. 2. External Algorithm Handler The facility is menu driven and implemented as a client to XAGE. Our implementation follows very closely the functionality...

  9. NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for and receive production incentives, referred to as supplemental energy payments (SEPs), from the New RenewableCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK APRIL 2006 CEC-300 Director Heather Raitt Technical Director Renewable Energy Program Drake Johnson Office Manager Renewable

  10. DOE issues Finding of No Significant Impact on Environmental Assessment for Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low Level Radioactive Waste Generated at Idaho Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho Falls, ID – After completing a careful assessment, the U.S. Department of Energy has determined that building a new facility at its Idaho National Laboratory site for continued disposal of remote-handled low level radioactive waste generated by operations at the site will not have a significant impact on the environment.

  11. Remote sensing, imaging, and signal engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brase, J.M.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering (RISE) trust area which has been very active in working to define new directions. Signal and image processing have always been important support for existing programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), but now these technologies are becoming central to the formation of new programs. Exciting new applications such as high-resolution telescopes, radar remote sensing, and advanced medical imaging are allowing us to participate in the development of new programs.

  12. REMOTE OPERATION PATTERN Class Structural Enable clients to invoke operations on remote objects as if they were local. This pattern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Rudolf K.

    1 / 7 REMOTE OPERATION PATTERN Class Structural Intent Enable clients to invoke operations on remote objects as if they were local. This pattern decouples the client from the network calls needed to access the remote object. Also Known As Remote Procedure Call Motivation This pattern applies

  13. Fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, M.A.

    1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission systems described wherein optical data may be transmitted over an optical data fiber from a remote source which includes a data transmitter and a power supply at the remote source. The transmitter may be remotely calibrated and stabilized via an optical control fiber, and the power source may be remotely cycled between duty and standby modes via an optical control fiber. 3 figs.

  14. Remotely releasable template and dome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, G.G. Jr.

    1986-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a remotely releasable template assembly for precision placement of a template of the type having at least one sleeve member for placing about a well casing stub extending from the sea floor, comprising: mating means mounted with the template for demountably coupling the template to a complementary end of a drill string extending from a support structure located above the well casing stub. The mating means is positioned near the template assembly center of balance when the template assembly is demountably coupled to the drill string; the vertical axis of the drill string being essentially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the sleeve member when the drill string is demountably couple to the template assembly; the end of the drill string includes a gyroscopic orientation means for detecting the deviation of the template from a desired bearing; and the mating means maintains the template semi-ridgidly coupled to the drill string until the template is controllably released from the drill string; whereby the rotation of the drill string about the vertical axis of the drill string rotates the template assembly into the desired orientation.

  15. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  16. Nano Research Facility Lab Safety Manual Nano Research Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    1 Nano Research Facility Lab Safety Manual Nano Research Facility: Weining Wang Office: Brauer---chemical, biological, or radiological. Notify the lab manager, Dr. Yujie Xiong at 5-4530. Eye Contact: Promptly flush

  17. Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

  18. Facility for the automatic spray painting of structural elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duggins, B.D.; Goolsby, T.D.; Benham, R.A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process has been developed for remote controlled spray painting of structures of various sizes and shapes with a coating of sensitive explosive. The damaging effects of a hostile nuclear burst are simulated when the explosive layer is detonated. The process has evolved from a cumbersome, motor driven carriage assembly, to a facility which employs robotics and automatic positioning hardware. This paper will describe the hardware components which have been introduced into the facility and also the software which is used to control the spray application. The proper use of this hardware/software combination allows the design in advance of operations which deposit uniform or contoured thickness coatings onto complex shapes. 7 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. The Caterpillar Coal Gasification Facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welsh, J.; Coffeen, W. G., III

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a review of one of America's premier coal gasification installations. The caterpillar coal gasification facility located in York, Pennsylvania is an award winning facility. The plant was recognized as the 'pace setter plant of the year...

  20. Facilities Automation and Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jen, D. P.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computerized facilities automation and energy management systems can be used to maintain high levels of facilities operations efficiencies. The monitoring capabilities provides the current equipment and process status, and the analysis...

  1. Biomass Feedstock National User Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1B—Integration of Supply Chains I: Breaking Down Barriers Biomass Feedstock National User Facility Kevin L. Kenney, Director, Biomass Feedstock National User Facility, Idaho National Laboratory

  2. 2007 Urban Remote Sensing Joint Event Application of satellite Remote Sensing for Urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2007 Urban Remote Sensing Joint Event Application of satellite Remote Sensing for Urban Risk Analysis: a case study of the 2003 extreme heat wave in Paris Bénédicte Dousset Hawaii Institute@ogs.trieste.it Abstract ­ Satellite observations are used to monitor the August 2003 heat wave in Paris

  3. Medical Remote Monitoring using sound environment analysis and wearable sensors 1 Medical Remote Monitoring using sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Medical Remote Monitoring using sound environment analysis and wearable sensors 1 X Medical Remote Monitoring using sound environment analysis and wearable sensors Dan Istrate1, Jérôme Boudy2, Hamid Medjahed1. In Europe, for example, the life expectancy for men is about 71 years and for women about 79 years

  4. REMOTE LABORATORIES IN AUTOMATION: AIP-PRIMECA RAO ARI PLATFORM Remote Laboratories in Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for thorough trainings in industrial We thank our sponsors : Schneider Electric which provided the automationREMOTE LABORATORIES IN AUTOMATION: AIP-PRIMECA RAO ARI PLATFORM Remote Laboratories in Automation of resources and competencies about industrial topics for many universities in Rhône-Alpes french Region. Due

  5. Reed Reactor Facility Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frantz, Stephen G.

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the report of the operations, experiments, modifications, and other aspects of the Reed Reactor Facility for the year.

  6. CFTF | Carbon Fiber Technology Facility | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF Working with CFTF HFIR MDF NTRC OLCF SNS Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Home | User Facilities | CFTF CFTF | Carbon Fiber Technology Facility SHARE Oak...

  7. CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 May 29, 2009 Nuclear Facility...

  8. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    175 THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY #12;176 #12;177 THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH the microbeam and the track-segment facilities have been utilized in various investigations. Table 1 lists-segment facility. Samples are treated with graded doses of radical scavengers to observe changes in the cluster

  9. Design-only conceptual design report for pit disassembly and conversion facility. Rev 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zygmunt, S.; Christensen, L.; Richardson, C.

    1997-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This design-only conceptual design report (DOCDR) was prepared to support a funding request by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Office of Fissile Material Disposition (OFMD) for engineering design of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) Project No. 99-D-141. The PDCF will be used to disassemble the nation`s inventory of surplus nuclear weapons pits and convert the plutonium recovered from those pits into a form suitable for storage, international inspection, and final disposition. The PDCF is a complex consisting of a hardened building that will contain the plutonium processes in a safe and secure manner, and conventional buildings and structures that will house support personnel, systems, and equipment. The PDCF uses the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES), a low waste, modular pyroprocessing system to convert pits to plutonium oxide. The PDCF project consists of engineering and design, and construction of the buildings and structures, and engineering and design, procurement, installation, testing and start-up of equipment to disassemble pits and convert plutonium in pits to oxide form. The facility is planned to operate for 10 years, averaging 3.5 metric tons (3.86 tons) of plutonium metal per year. On conclusion of operations, the PDCF will be decontaminated and decommissioned.

  10. Nuclear facility decommissioning and site remedial actions: A selected bibliography, volume 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, P.T.; Knox, N.P.; Michelson, D.C.; Turmer, G.S.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 604 abstracted references on nuclear facility decommissioning, uranium mill tailings management, and site remedial actions constitute the ninth in a series of reports prepared annually for the US Department of Energy's Remedial Action Programs. Foreign and domestic literature of all types--technical reports, progress reports, journal articles, symposia proceedings, theses, books, patents, legislation, and research project descriptions--has been included. The bibliography contains scientific, technical, economic, regulatory, and legal information pertinent to the US Department of Energy's remedial action programs. Major sections are (1) Surplus Facilities Management Program, (2) Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning, (3) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, (4) Facilities Contaminated with Naturally Occurring Radionuclides, (5) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program, (6) Uranium Mill Tailings Management, (7) Technical Measurements Center, and (8) General Remedial Action Program Studies. Subsections for sections 1, 2, 5, and 6 include: Design, Planning, and Regulations; Environmental Studies and Site Surveys; Health, Safety, and Biomedical Studies; Decontamination Studies; Dismantlement and Demolition; Site Stabilization and Reclamation; Waste Disposal; Remedial Action Experience; and General Studies. Within these categories, references are arranged alphabetically by first author. Those references having no individual author are listed by corporate affiliation or by publication description. Indexes are provided for author, corporate affiliation, title word, publication description, geographic location, and keywords. This report is a product of the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC), which selects and analyzes information on remedial actions and relevant radioactive waste management technologies. RAPIC staff and resources are available to meet a variety of information needs. Contact the center at (615) 576-0568 or FTS 626-0568.

  11. Preliminary Project Execution Plan for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This preliminary project execution plan (PEP) defines U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project objectives, roles and responsibilities of project participants, project organization, and controls to effectively manage acquisition of capital funds for construction of a proposed remote-handled low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The plan addresses the policies, requirements, and critical decision (CD) responsibilities identified in DOE Order 413.3B, 'Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets.' This plan is intended to be a 'living document' that will be periodically updated as the project progresses through the CD process to construction and turnover for operation.

  12. DOE Robotic and Remote Systems Assistance to the Government of Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Wadsworth; Victor Walker

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the Government of Japan, DOE did a complex wide survey of available remotely operated and robotic systems to assist in the initial assessment of the damage to the Fukushima Daiichi reactors following an earthquake and subsequent tsunami. As a result several radiation hardened cameras and a Talon robot were identified as systems that could immediately assist in the effort and were subsequently sent to Japan. These systems were transferred to the Government of Japan and used to map radiation levels surrounding the damaged facilities. This report describes the equipment, its use, data collected, and lessons learned from the experience.

  13. Occupational dose estimates for a monitored retrievable storage facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Occupational doses were estimated for radiation workers at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. This study provides an estimate of the occupational dose based on the current MRS facility design, examines the extent that various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates, and identifies the areas and activities where exposures can be reduced most effectively. Occupational doses were estimated for both the primary storage concept and the alternate storage concept. The dose estimates indicate the annual dose to all radiation workers will be below the 5 rem/yr federal dose equivalent limit. However, the estimated dose to most of the receiving and storage crew (the workers responsible for the receipt, storage, and surveillance of the spent fuel and its subsequent retrieval), to the crane maintenance technicians, and to the cold and remote maintenance technicians is above the design objective of 1 rem/yr. The highest annual dose is received by the riggers (4.7 rem) in the receiving and storage crew. An indication of the extent to which various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates was obtained by changing various design-based assumptions such as work procedures, background dose rates in radiation zones, and the amount of fuel received and stored annually. The study indicated that a combination of remote operations, increased shielding, and additional personnel (for specific jobs) or changes in operating procedures will be necessary to reduce worker doses below 1.0 rem/yr. Operations that could be made at least partially remote include the removal and replacement of the tiedowns, impact limiters, and personnel barriers from the shipping casks and the removal or installation of the inner closure bolts. Reductions of the background dose rates in the receiving/shipping and the transfer/discharge areas may be accomplished with additional shielding.

  14. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the facilities. Field Calibration Facilities for Environmental Measurement of Radium, Thorium, and Potassium (October 2013) More Documents & Publications Calibration Model...

  15. Materials Engineering Research Facility | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Engineering Research Facility Argonne's new Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF) supports the laboratory's Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and...

  16. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF)...

  17. SERAPH facility capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castle, J.; Su, W.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SERAPH (Solar Energy Research and Applications in Process Heat) facility addresses technical issues concerning solar thermal energy implementation in industry. Work will include computer predictive modeling (refinement and validation), system control and evaluation, and the accumulation of operation and maintenance experience. Procedures will be consistent (to the extent possible) with those of industry. SERAPH has four major components: the solar energy delivery system (SEDS); control and data acquisition (including sequencing and emergency supervision); energy distribution system (EDS); and areas allocated for storage development and load devices.

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015 [Facility News] Flynn,

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015 [Facility News]

  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015 [Facility News]June 15,

  1. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015 [Facility News]June

  2. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015 [Facility

  3. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature Stories and8, 2015 [FacilitySeptember 30,

  4. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit |Infrastructure TheSolar1855Facilities NREL's

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune 30, 2010ARM31,

  6. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune 30, 2010ARM31,5,

  7. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune 30,

  8. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune 30,YouTube©

  9. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune 30,YouTube©Aide

  10. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune

  11. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune31, 2005

  12. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune31, 2005November

  13. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune31, 2005November8,

  14. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune31,

  15. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune31,15, 2005

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune31,15,

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune31,15,October 15,

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News]SPARTICUSJune31,15,October

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility

  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [FacilityMission Under Control: Scientists

  1. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [FacilityMission Under Control: Scientists20,

  2. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [FacilityMission Under Control:

  3. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [FacilityMission Under Control:From Coastal

  4. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [FacilityMission Under Control:From

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [FacilityMission Under Control:FromAugust 31,

  6. ARM - SGP Central Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51InstrumentsCentral Facility SGP Related Links

  7. ARM - SGP Extended Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51InstrumentsCentral Facility SGP RelatedExtended

  8. ARM - SGP Intermediate Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51InstrumentsCentral Facility SGPIntermediate

  9. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities andPastWritten Records5 ARM Climate

  10. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities andPastWritten Records5 ARM Climate3 ARM

  11. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities andPastWritten Records5 ARM Climate3 ARM

  12. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities andPastWritten Records5 ARM Climate3

  13. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities andPastWritten Records5 ARM Climate38

  14. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities andPastWritten Records5 ARM Climate383

  15. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities andPastWritten Records5 ARM

  16. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links Facilities andPastWritten Records5 ARMIngest Status

  17. WIPP - Public Reading Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRural Public Reading Facilities/Electronic

  18. User Facilities | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSite Map SiteResearchMichiganAboutFacilities at

  19. NREL: Biomass Research - Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifNREL NRELChemical and Catalyst ScienceFacilities At

  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15, 2005 [Facility News]

  1. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15, 2005 [Facility News]28,

  2. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15, 2005 [Facility News]28,One

  3. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15, 2005 [Facility

  4. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15, 2005 [FacilityNew

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15, 2005 [FacilityNewMobile

  6. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15, 2005 [FacilityNewMobile15,

  7. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15, 200515, 2004 [Facility

  8. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15, 200515, 2004 [FacilityNew

  9. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15,15, 2004 [Facility News]

  10. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15,15, 2004 [Facility

  11. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch 15,15, 2004 [FacilityAugust

  12. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility News] Data

  13. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility News] Data23,

  14. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility News]

  15. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility News]31, 2004

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility News]31,

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility30, 2004

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility30, 2004New

  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility30,

  1. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility30,October 27,

  2. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility30,October

  3. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility30,OctoberNew

  4. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 2011 [Facility30,OctoberNew,

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 201122, 2011 [Facility News]

  6. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 201122, 2011 [Facility

  7. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 201122, 2011 [Facility22,

  8. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1, 201122, 2011 [Facility22,14,

  9. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1,October 16, 2007 [Facility

  10. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1,October 16,13, 2012 [Facility

  11. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM Education TeamARMMarch1,OctoberAprilStaging Facility

  12. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News] Beat Schmid

  13. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News] Beat

  14. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News] Beat30, 2008

  15. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News] Beat30,

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News]

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News]June 28, 2013

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News]June 28,

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News]June 28,July

  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News]June

  1. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility News]JuneDecember

  2. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [Facility

  3. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityApril 30, 2008

  4. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityApril 30, 200815,

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityApril 30, 200815,31,

  6. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityApril 30,

  7. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityApril 30,Farewell to

  8. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityApril 30,Farewell

  9. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityApril 30,Farewell15,

  10. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityApril

  11. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityAprilApril 30, 2008

  12. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityAprilApril 30,

  13. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityAprilApril

  14. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007 [FacilityAprilAprilFebruary

  15. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007April 15, 2008 [Facility News]

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007April 15, 2008 [Facility

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007April 15, 2008 [FacilityJune

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007April 15,23, 2007 [Facility

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007April 15,23, 2007 [Facility21,

  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007April 15,23,, 2009 [Facility

  1. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3, 2007April 15,23,, 2009 [Facility5,

  2. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3,January 11, 2007 [Facility News]

  3. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3,January 11, 2007 [Facility

  4. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3,January 11, 2007 [Facility3, 2015

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3,January 11, 2007 [Facility3,

  6. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3,January 11, 2007 [Facility3,3, 2015

  7. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3,January 11, 2007 [Facility3,3,

  8. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3,January 11, 2007 [Facility3,3,April

  9. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugust 3,JanuarySeptember 30, 2009 [Facility

  10. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM EducationAugustMultifilterAugust 31, 2008 [Facility

  11. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA Site Manager Named;

  12. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA Site Manager

  13. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA Site ManagerFebruary

  14. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA Site

  15. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA SiteSeptember 15, 2008

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA SiteSeptember 15,

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA SiteSeptember 15,7,

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA SiteSeptember

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA SiteSeptemberDiffuse

  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSA

  1. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping It Up With

  2. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping It Up With15,

  3. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping It Up

  4. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping It Up15, 2006

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping It Up15,

  6. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping It Up15,New

  7. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping It

  8. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping ItJanuary 15,

  9. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping ItJanuary

  10. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping

  11. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping31, 2006

  12. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping31,

  13. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New NSAMapping31,Preparations

  14. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] New

  15. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared Sky Imager Takes a

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared Sky Imager Takes

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared Sky Imager

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared Sky ImagerFebruary

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared Sky

  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [Facility News] NewInfrared SkyMay 31, 2006