Sample records for remote site locations

  1. V-012: Mozilla Firefox 'window.location' Bugs Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks and May Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PROBLEM: Mozilla Firefox 'window.location' Bugs Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks and May Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code

  2. Siting Study for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; Joan Connolly; Lance Peterson; Brennon Orr; Bob Starr

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy has identified a mission need for continued disposal capacity for remote-handled low-level waste (LLW) generated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). An alternatives analysis that was conducted to evaluate strategies to achieve this mission need identified two broad options for disposal of INL generated remote-handled LLW: (1) offsite disposal and (2) onsite disposal. The purpose of this study is to identify candidate sites or locations within INL boundaries for the alternative of an onsite remote handled LLW disposal facility and recommend the highest-ranked locations for consideration in the National Environmental Policy Act process. The study implements an evaluation based on consideration of five key elements: (1) regulations, (2) key assumptions, (3) conceptual design, (4) facility performance, and (5) previous INL siting study criteria, and uses a five-step process to identify, screen, evaluate, score, and rank 34 separate sites located across INL. The result of the evaluation is identification of two recommended alternative locations for siting an onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility. The two alternative locations that best meet the evaluation criteria are (1) near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex and (2) west of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Disposal Facility.

  3. Conceptual design analyses for Hanford Site deployable remote spectroscopy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philipp, B.L.; Reich, F.R.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document identifies potential remote, NIR spectroscopic waste surface moisture monitoring system design alternatives to be operated inside one of the Hanford Site, high level, nuclear waste storage tanks. Potential tank waste moisture data impacts from the remote NIR signal transfer through high humidity vapor space is evaluated.

  4. Remote/New sites: Many Field

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 c/) ReleaseRemote

  5. Adjusting flow station job to remote Nigerian location yields savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wooten, R.; Williams, E.C. (OPI International Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1991, Chevron Nigeria Ltd. and Nigerian National Petroleum Crop. contracted Offshore Pipelines to design, procure, construct, install, and commission the Opuekeba 30,000 b/d crude-oil flow station on an offshore platform near Olero Creek, Nigeria, approximately 22 miles from the nearest deepwater access. Chevron's original project plan included bringing the flow station to the site in small packages and then assembling it in a lengthy field hook-up process. Offshore Pipelines developed a plan early in the project to maximize construction and hook-up in the fabrication yard, then transport the nearly complete structures to site by way of a newly dredged canal. What proved to be most difficult was the site location in Nigeria. Job planning and communication were important in the successful completion of the project. Keeping the components of the large and complex facility simple proved to be effective and efficient and played a key role in completing the project on time and within budget. The paper discusses overcoming obstacles, lift and depth constraints, dredging, fabrication, installation, and large-time problems.

  6. Research Site Locations for Current and Former EERE Postdoctoral...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Research Site Locations for Current and Former EERE Postdoctoral Awards, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. eeremap2015.pdf...

  7. Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow potential with on-site surveys to drill deep resource wells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Technologies Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objectives: A cost effective three (3) Phased Program to locate and confirm up to Five (5) commercial geothermal resources in Colorado. The heat resources to be prioritized will be those able to support a minimum electrical generation capacity of 10 MW by location.

  8. Comparison of costs for solar electric sources with diesel generators in remote locations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    369 Comparison of costs for solar electric sources with diesel generators in remote locations F. K alternative sources for generating power in remote regions of the world. These include diesel electric-10 years are gasoline or diesel generators [1]. This merely touches the surface of the worldwide interest

  9. A Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor for Deployment at Remote Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J .J.; Smith, M.A.; Mosseytsev, A.V.; Yang, W.S.; Wade, D.C.

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses a small secure transportable autonomous lead-cooled fast reactor for deployment at remote sites.

  10. Apparatus for detecting a magnetic anomaly contiguous to remote location by squid gradiometer and magnetometer systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Overton, Jr., William C. (Los Alamos, NM); Steyert, Jr., William A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic detection apparatus detects magnetic fields, signals, and anomalies at remote locations. Two remotely rotatable SQUID gradiometers may be housed in a cryogenic environment to search for and locate unambiguously magnetic anomalies. The SQUID magnetic detection apparatus can be used to determine the azimuth of a hydrofracture by first flooding the hydrofracture with a ferrofluid to create an artificial magnetic anomaly therein.

  11. Supplementary materials: Site location and visiting time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    sites during the mobile deployment of CRUISER on June 25, 2007. FL=Fletcher, MB=Mitchell's Bay, BCr=Bear;60 50 40 30 20 10 0 PPS(nm) Transient 80 km/hr 110 km/hr SAAB Chevy Chrysler 300 Smoker Diesel truck Gasoline cars (transient) Grand diesel average: 51.9 (s.d.=6.5; N=418) Grand gasoline average: 30.0 (s

  12. Remote video radioactive process evaluation, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heckendorn, F.M.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Specialized miniature low cost video equipment has been effectively used in a number of remote, radioactive, and contaminated environments at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The equipment and related techniques have reduced the potential for personnel exposure to both radiation and physical hazards. The valuable process information thus provided would not have otherwise been available for use in improving the quality of operation at SRS.

  13. Remote video radioactive process evaluation, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heckendorn, F.M.

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Specialized miniature low cost video equipment has been effectively used in a number of remote, radioactive, and contaminated environments at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The equipment and related techniques have reduced the potential for personnel exposure to both radiation and physical hazards. The valuable process information thus provided would not have otherwise been available for use in improving the quality of operation at SRS.

  14. U-093: Mozilla Firefox Multiple Flaws Permit Remote Code Execution, Information Disclosure, and Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mozilla Firefox Multiple Flaws Permit Remote Code Execution, Information Disclosure, and Cross-Site Scripting.

  15. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Techniques For Locating Geothermal Resources |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9Moat of Long| Open EnergyLake PaiuteOpen

  16. U-217: Red Hat Certificate System Bugs Let Remote Users Conduct Cross-Site Scripting and Denial of Service Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two vulnerabilities were reported in Red Hat Certificate System. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks. A remote authenticated user can revoke the CA certificate.

  17. Remote-site power generation opportunities for Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.L.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been working with the Federal Energy Technology Center in Morgantown, West Virginia, to assess options for small, low-cost, environmental acceptable power generation for application in remote areas of Alaska. The goal of this activity was to reduce the use of fuel in Alaskan villages by developing small, low-cost power generation applications. Because of the abundance of high-quality coal throughout Alaska, emphasis was placed on clean coal applications, but other energy sources, including geothermal, wind, hydro, and coalbed methane, were also considered. The use of indigenous energy sources would provide cheaper cleaner power, reduce the need for PCE (Power Cost Equalization program) subsidies, increase self-sufficiency, and retain hard currency in the state while at the same time creating jobs in the region. The introduction of economical, small power generation systems into Alaska by US equipment suppliers and technology developers aided by the EERC would create the opportunities for these companies to learn how to engineer, package, transport, finance, and operate small systems in remote locations. All of this experience would put the US developers and equipment supply companies in an excellent position to export similar types of small power systems to rural areas or developing countries. Thus activities in this task that relate to determining the generic suitability of these technologies for other countries can increase US competitiveness and help US companies sell these technologies in foreign countries, increasing the number of US jobs. The bulk of this report is contained in the two appendices: Small alternative power workshop, topical report and Global market assessment of coalbed methane, fluidized-bed combustion, and coal-fired diesel technologies in remote applications.

  18. Remote observing with the Keck Telescopes from multiple sites in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Remote observing with the Keck Telescopes from multiple sites in California Robert Kibricka, Brian 95064 USA bW. M. Keck Observatory, Kamuela, HI 96743 USA ABSTRACT Remote observing is now the dominant observations are carried out remotely from the Keck Headquarters in Waimea, Hawaii. The majority of Keck

  19. Apparatus and method for maintaining low temperatures about an object at a remote location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steyert, Jr., William A. (Los Alamos, NM); Overton, Jr., William C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for maintaining a body at cryogenic temperatures at a remote location such as down a borehole for an extended period of time. A housing contains a body comprising a material having a high specific heat at cryogenic temperatures such as between about 2 and 15 K. The body contains an orifice for containing an instrument or instruments operable at superconducting temperatures. The apparatus is precooled at the surface and lowered into a borehole to a desired depth, such as 2 to 3 miles. The instruments are operated, and the apparatus withdrawn, the material of the body maintaining the very low temperatures at which the instrument(s) operate for a sufficient period of time at the remote or downhole location. The material may comprise a rare earth compound, such as Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 Se.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 O.sub.2 S or GdAlO.sub.3. Monoclinic and C-phase gadolinium oxides work well. A low temperature is maintainable at a remote location for several hours.

  20. Apparatus and method for maintaining low temperatures about an object at a remote location. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steyert, W.A. Jr.; Overton, W.C. Jr.

    1980-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for maintaining a body at cryogenic temperatures at a remote location such as down a borehole for an extended period of time. A housing contains a body comprising a material having a high specific heat at cryogenic temperatures such as between about 2 and 15 K. The body contains an orifice for containing an instrument or instruments operable at superconducting temperatures. The apparatus is precooled at the surface and lowered into a borehole to a desired depth, such as 2 to 3 miles. The instruments are operated, and the apparatus withdrawn, the material of the body maintaining the very low temperatures at which the instrument(s) operate for a sufficient period of time at the remote or downhole location. The material may comprise a rare earth compound, such as Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Gd/sub 2/Se/sub 3/, Gd/sub 2/O/sub 2/S or GdAlO/sub 3/. Monoclinic and C-phase gadolinium oxides work well. A low temperature is maintainable at a remote location for several hours.

  1. Fuel Cell Demonstration Program - Central and Remote Sites 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Brun

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies, the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 25 Lorax 4.5 units operated under this Award from April 2003 to December 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government, commercial, and residential customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. The deployment of the 20 Lorax 4.5 units for the Remote Sites phase of the project began in October 2004. To date, 10 fuel cells have completed their demonstrations while 10 fuel cells are currently being monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. As of June 30, 2006 the 45 fuel cells operating under this Award produced a total of 1,585,093 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included increases in system efficiency and availability. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance, installation, and decommissioning the total project budget was approximately $3.7 million.

  2. Apparatus and method for detecting a magnetic anomaly contiguous to remote location by SQUID gradiometer and magnetometer systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Overton, W.C. Jr.; Steyert, W.A. Jr.

    1981-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic detection apparatus detects magnetic fields, signals, and anomalies at remote locations. Two remotely rotatable SQUID gradiometers may be housed in a cryogenic environment to search for and locate unambiguously magnetic anomalies. The SQUID magnetic detection apparatus can be used to determine the azimuth of a hydrofracture by first flooding the hydrofracture with a ferrofluid to create an artificial magnetic anomaly therein.

  3. uCom : spatial displays for visual awareness of remote locations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araujo Santos, Ana Luisa de

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uCom enables remote users to be visually aware of each other using "spatial displays" - live views of a remote space assembled according to an estimate of the remote space's layout. The main elements of the system design ...

  4. IpNose: Electronic nose for remote bad odour monitoring system in landfill sites Alex Perera*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez-Osuna, Ricardo

    IpNose: Electronic nose for remote bad odour monitoring system in landfill sites Alex Perera to classify and quantify different gas/odours. Here we suggest the integration of a small form factor computer of bad odours in landfill sites. Preliminary approach to this application using commercial sensors

  5. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano: Drill Site Location Map 2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jaffe, Todd

    Newberry project drill site location map 2010. Once the exploration mythology is validated, it can be applied throughout the Cascade Range and elsewhere to locate and develop “blind” geothermal resources.

  6. Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow potential with on-site surveys to drill...

  7. EIS-0243: Nevada Test Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the management of low-level waste (LLW) at all sites and continue, to the extent practicable, disposal of on- site LLW at the Idaho...

  8. Stratigraphic Profiles for Selected Hanford Site Seismometer Stations and Other Locations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stratigraphic profiles were constructed for eight selected Hanford Site seismometer stations, five Hanford Site facility reference locations, and seven regional three-component broadband seismometer stations. These profiles provide interpretations of the subsurface layers to support estimation of ground motions from past earthquakes, and the prediction of ground motions from future earthquakes. In most cases these profiles terminated at the top of the Wanapum Basalt, but at selected sites profiles were extended down to the top of the crystalline basement. The composite one-dimensional stratigraphic profiles were based primarily on previous interpretations from nearby boreholes, and in many cases the nearest deep borehole is located kilometers away.

  9. VEGETATION COVER ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES IN UTAH AND ARIZONA USING HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M.; Jungho, I.; Jensen, J.; Jensen, R.; Gladden, J.; Waugh, J.

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote sensing technology can provide a cost-effective tool for monitoring hazardous waste sites. This study investigated the usability of HyMap airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data (126 bands at 2.3 x 2.3 m spatial resolution) to characterize the vegetation at U.S. Department of Energy uranium processing sites near Monticello, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Grass and shrub species were mixed on an engineered disposal cell cover at the Monticello site while shrub species were dominant in the phytoremediation plantings at the Monument Valley site. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate leaf-area-index (LAI) of the vegetation using three different methods (i.e., vegetation indices, red-edge positioning (REP), and machine learning regression trees), and (2) map the vegetation cover using machine learning decision trees based on either the scaled reflectance data or mixture tuned matched filtering (MTMF)-derived metrics and vegetation indices. Regression trees resulted in the best calibration performance of LAI estimation (R{sup 2} > 0.80). The use of REPs failed to accurately predict LAI (R{sup 2} < 0.2). The use of the MTMF-derived metrics (matched filter scores and infeasibility) and a range of vegetation indices in decision trees improved the vegetation mapping when compared to the decision tree classification using just the scaled reflectance. Results suggest that hyperspectral imagery are useful for characterizing biophysical characteristics (LAI) and vegetation cover on capped hazardous waste sites. However, it is believed that the vegetation mapping would benefit from the use of 1 higher spatial resolution hyperspectral data due to the small size of many of the vegetation patches (< 1m) found on the sites.

  10. Remote site survey and characterization for the National ER WM Program using the SRIP (Solider Robot Interface Project) vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, B.S.; Killough, S.M.; Emery, M.D.; Herndon, J.N.; Hamel, W.R.; Burks, B.L.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant number of Department of Energy (DOE) production and research sites will require remediation of buried waste sites during the coming years. An important first step in cleanup, restoration, and decontamination activities is burial site characterization. An early field demonstration of buried waste site survey and characterization will be conducted using a remotely operated vehicle equipped with sensors, a manipulator system, and a vision system. This demonstration will be conducted in July 1990. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Development and operation of a photovoltaic power system for use at remote Antarctic sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piszczor, M.F.; Kohout, L.L.; Manzo, M. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Colozza, A.J. [NYMA, Brook Park, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic power system, designed and built at the NASA Lewis Research Center, has successfully operated over the past two summer seasons at a remote site in Antarctica, providing utility-type power for a six-person field team. The system was installed at the Lake Hoare site for approximately five weeks during late 1992, put into storage for the Antarctic winter, and then used again during the 1993 season. The photovoltaic power system consists of three silicon photovoltaic sub-arrays delivering a total of 1.5 kWe peak power, three lead-acid gel battery modules supplying 2.4 kWh, and an electrical distribution system which delivers 120 Vac and 12 Vdc to the user. The system worked extremely well in providing quiet, reliable power. The experience gained from early system demonstrations such as this should be beneficial in accelerating the transition toward future PV systems in Antarctica and other similar areas.

  12. Seismic Characterization of Basalt Topography at Two Candidate Sites for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Sondrup; Gail Heath; Trent Armstrong; Annette Shafer; Jesse Bennett; Clark Scott

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the seismic refraction results from the depth to bed rock surveys for two areas being considered for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (RH-LLW) disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. The first area (Site 5) surveyed is located southwest of the Advanced Test Reactor Complex and the second (Site 34) is located west of Lincoln Boulevard near the southwest corner of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). At Site 5, large area and smaller-scale detailed surveys were performed. At Site 34, a large area survey was performed. The purpose of the surveys was to define the topography of the interface between the surficial alluvium and underlying basalt. Seismic data were first collected and processed using seismic refraction tomographic inversion. Three-dimensional images for both sites were rendered from the data to image the depth and velocities of the subsurface layers. Based on the interpreted top of basalt data at Site 5, a more detailed survey was conducted to refine depth to basalt. This report briefly covers relevant issues in the collection, processing and inversion of the seismic refraction data and in the imaging process. Included are the parameters for inversion and result rendering and visualization such as the inclusion of physical features. Results from the processing effort presented in this report include fence diagrams of the earth model, for the large area surveys and iso-velocity surfaces and cross sections from the detailed survey.

  13. How to Connect to a Web Site using Dreamweaver 1. Make sure you have a network location established to your Web Site. If you do not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    How to Connect to a Web Site using Dreamweaver 1. Make sure you have a network location established to your Web Site. If you do not have one, see the document, How to create a network location. 2. Make sure you have a local copy of your Web Site that is saved to your computer's hard drive (preferably

  14. Remote Sensing Applications for Sustainable Aquaculture in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Wen

    Remote Sensing Applications for Sustainable Aquaculture in Africa Joseph E. Quansah1 , Gilbert L of the science with respect to remote sensing applications for aquaculture, including site location, aquaculture for multi-sensor remote sensing deployment to support sustainable fish production in these environments

  15. Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

  16. Remote Sensing Analysis of the Sierra Blanca (Faskin Ranch) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site, Hudspeth County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeMone, D. V.; Dodge, R.; Xie, H.; Langford, R. P.; Keller, G. R.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote sensing images provide useful physical information, revealing such features as geological structure, vegetation, drainage patterns, and variations in consolidated and unconsolidated lithologies. That technology has been applied to the failed Sierra Blanca (Faskin Ranch) shallow burial low-level radioactive waste disposal site selected by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority. It has been re-examined using data from LANDSAT satellite series. The comparison of the earlier LANDSAT V (5/20/86) (30-m resolution) with the later new, higher resolution ETM imagery (10/23/99) LANDSAT VII data (15-m resolution) clearly shows the superiority of the LANDSAT VII data. The search for surficial indications of evidence of fatal flaws at the Sierra Blanca site utilizing was not successful, as it had been in the case of the earlier remote sensing analysis of the failed Fort Hancock site utilizing LANDSAT V data. The authors conclude that the tectonic activity at the Sierra Blanca site is much less recent and active than in the previously studied Fort Hancock site. The Sierra Blanca site failed primarily on the further needed documentation concerning a subsurface fault underneath the site and environmental justice issues. The presence of this fault was not revealed using the newer LANDSAT VII data. Despite this fact, it must be remembered that remote sensing provides baseline documentation for determining future physical and financial remediation responsibilities. On the basis of the two sites examined by LANDSAT remote sensing imaging, it is concluded that it is an essential, cost-effective tool that should be utilized not only in site examination but also in all nuclear-related facilities.

  17. Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars coordinating the logistics and resupply of far-flung planetary bases. A number of logistics methods have been terrestrial logistics methods were tested in the context of (analog) planetary exploration. A comprehensive

  18. Preliminary geohydrologic site characterization and proposed water quality well locations for WAG 4, WAG 5, WAG 3, and SWSA 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baughn, D.C. (MCI/Consulting Engineers, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to assess general site conditions and to recommend water quality well locations at Waste Area Groupings (WAGs) 4, 5 and 3 and Solid Waste Storage Area 1 (SWSA 1) within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) complex. The subject sites are identified on the general site location map. For reference, the relationship of the subject sites to other WAGs are shown. WAGs are regions prescribed by Martin Marietta throughout the ORNL complex that require environmental assessment which will include design and installation of ground water monitoring systems. WAGs contain solid waste management units such as SWSAs, as well as pipelines, spill sites, buildings, ponds and experimental test sites. These solid waste management units are considered to be potential sources of contamination requiring further evaluation. This report recommends locations for water quality wells which will be installed at WAG boundaries in order to gather water quality data.

  19. Electro-Mechanical Manipulator for Use in the Remote Equipment Decontamination Cell at the Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River Site - 12454

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambrecht, Bill; Dixon, Joe [Par Systems, Shoreview, Minnesota, 55126 (United States); Neuville, John R. [Savannah River Remediation, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina, 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the legacies of the cold war is millions of liters of radioactive waste. One of the locations where this waste is stored is at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. A major effort to clean up this waste is on-going at the defense waste processing facility (DWPF) at SRS. A piece of this effort is decontamination of the equipment used in the DWPF to process the waste. The remote equipment decontamination cell (REDC) in the DWPF uses electro-mechanical manipulators (EMM) arms manufactured and supplied by PaR Systems to decontaminate DWPF process equipment. The decontamination fluid creates a highly corrosive environment. After 25 years of operational use the original EMM arms are aging and need replacement. To support continued operation of the DWPF, two direct replacement EMM arms were delivered to the REDC in the summer of 2011. (authors)

  20. Remote Handled TRU Waste Status and Activities and Challenges at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCKENNEY, D.E.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant portion of the Department of Energy's forecast volume of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste will originate from the Hanford Site. The forecasted Hanford RH-TRU waste volume of over 2000 cubic meters may constitute over one-third of the forecast inventory of RH-TRU destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). To date, the Hanford TRU waste program has focused on the retrieval, treatment and certification of the contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes. This near-term focus on CH-TRU is consistent with the National TRU Program plans and capabilities. The first shipment of CH-TRU waste from Hanford to the WIPP is scheduled early in Calendar Year 2000. Shipments of RH-TRU from Hanford to the WIPP are scheduled to begin in Fiscal Year 2006 per the National TRU Waste Management Plan. This schedule has been incorporated into milestones within the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). These Tri-Party milestones (designated the ''M-91'' series of milestones) relate to development of project management plans, completion of design efforts, construction and contracting schedules, and initiation of process operations. The milestone allows for modification of an existing facility, construction of a new facility, and/or commercial contracting to provide the capabilities for processing and certification of RH-TRU wastes for disposal at the WIPP. The development of a Project Management Plan (PMP) for TRU waste is the first significant step in the development of a program for disposal of Hanford's RH-TRU waste. This PMP will address the path forward for disposition of waste streams that cannot be prepared for disposal in the Hanford Waste Receiving and Processing facility (a contact-handled, small container facility) or other Site facilities. The PMP development effort has been initiated, and the PMP will be provided to the regulators for their approval by June 30, 2000. This plan will detail the path forward for the Hanford RH-TRU program.

  1. EA-1793: Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-handled Low-level Waste Generated at the Department of Energy's Idaho Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of replacement capability for disposal of remote-handled low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site beginning in October 2017.

  2. Remote administration and user experience evaluation of the iLab Heat Transfer Project site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Rodney K

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The iLab Heat Transfer Project provides a means for students to remotely execute, via a web interface, experiments related to the topic of heat transfer. The website associated with this project provides instructors with ...

  3. Remote bond breaking by interacting temporary anion states P. D. Burrowa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Remote bond breaking by interacting temporary anion states P. D. Burrowa and G. A. Gallupb negative ion state elsewhere in the molecule, even one quite remote from the first. In a series place at a site that is remote from the location of the original resonance is the topic of this present

  4. Lattice site location and annealing behaviour of Ca and Sr implanted GaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Vries, Bart; Wahl, Ulrich; Correia, J G; Araújo, Joăo Pedro; Lojkowski, W; Kolesnikov, D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the lattice location of ion-implanted Ca and Sr in thin films of single-crystalline wurtzite GaN. Using the emission channeling technique the angular distributions of $\\beta\\!^{-}$?particles emitted by the radioactive isotopes $^{45}$Ca(t$_{ 1/2}$=163.8 d) and $^{89}$Sr(t$_{ 1/2}$=50.53 d) were monitored with a position-sensitive detector following 60 keV room-temperature implantation. Our experiments give direct evidence that $\\sim$90% of Ca and > 60% of Sr atoms were occupying substitutional Ga sites with root mean square displacements of the order of 0.15–0.30 Ĺ, i.e., larger than the expected thermal vibration amplitude of 0.074 Ĺ. Annealing the Ca implanted samples at 1100–1350 °C in high-pressure N$_{2}$ atmosphere resulted in a better incorporation into the substitutional Ga site. The Sr implanted sample showed a small decrease in rms displacements for vacuum annealing up to 900 °C, while the substitutional fraction remained nearly constant. The annealing behavior of the rms disp...

  5. A demonstration of remote survey and characterization of a buried waste site using the SRIP (Soldier Robot Interface Project) testbed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burks, B.L.; Richardson, B.S.; Armstrong, G.A.; Hamel, W.R.; Jansen, J.F.; Killough, S.M.; Thompson, D.H.; Emery, M.S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY 1990, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) supported the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER WM) Office of Technology Development through several projects including the development of a semiautonomous survey of a buried waste site using a remotely operated all-terrain robotic testbed borrowed from the US Army. The testbed was developed for the US Army's Human Engineering Laboratory (HEL) for the US Army's Soldier Robot Interface Project (SRIP). Initial development of the SRIP testbed was performed by a team including ORNL, HEL, Tooele Army Depot, and Odetics, Inc., as an experimental testbed for a variety of human factors issues related to military applications of robotics. The SRIP testbed was made available to the DOE and ORNL for the further development required for a remote landfill survey. The robot was modified extensively, equipped with environmental sensors, and used to demonstrate an automated remote survey of Solid Waste Storage Area No. 3 (SWSA 3) at ORNL on Tuesday, September 18, 1990. Burial trenches in this area containing contaminated materials were covered with soil nearly twenty years ago. This paper describes the SRIP testbed and work performed in FY 1990 to demonstrate a semiautonomous landfill survey at ORNL. 5 refs.

  6. DOE issues Finding of No Significant Impact on Environmental Assessment for Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low Level Radioactive Waste Generated at Idaho Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Idaho Falls, ID – After completing a careful assessment, the U.S. Department of Energy has determined that building a new facility at its Idaho National Laboratory site for continued disposal of remote-handled low level radioactive waste generated by operations at the site will not have a significant impact on the environment.

  7. Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartmentDepartment of Energy Photo of aRemote Sens. 2012,

  8. Bear Creek: a case study in locating historic site remains in southeast Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stahman, Andrea Renee

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Gulf Coastal Prairie and Marsh region of Texas, historic archaeological sites are often obscured by dense vegetation resulting in extremely limited surface visibility. In an environment such as this, historic sites can only be detected...

  9. Bear Creek: a case study in locating historic site remains in southeast Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stahman, Andrea Renee

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Gulf Coastal Prairie and Marsh region of Texas, historic archaeological sites are often obscured by dense vegetation resulting in extremely limited surface visibility. In an environment such as this, historic sites ...

  10. Analysis Of Microseismic Location Accuracy For Hydraulic Fracturing At The DWTI Site, Jasper, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieven, Shirley

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a feasibility study designed to assess whether microseismic location techniques can provide enough accuracy and precision to enable a

  11. Conversion of Hanford site well locations to Washington coordinate system of 1983, South Zone 1991 (WCS83S)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, R.A.; Tzemos, S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Dietz, L.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past construction and survey practices have resulted in the use of multiple local coordinate systems for measuring and reporting the horizontal position of wells and other facilities and locations on the Hanford Site. This report describes the development of a coordinate transformation process and algorithm and its application to the conversion of the horizontal coordinates of Hanford site wells from the various local coordinate systems and datums to a single standard coordinate system, the Washington Coordinate system of 1983, South Zone 1991 (WCS83S). The coordinate transformation algorithm, implemented as a computer program called CTRANS, uses standard two-dimensional translation, rotation, and scaling transformation equations and can be applied to any set of horizontal point locations. For each point to be transformed, the coefficients of the transformation equations are calculated locally, using the coordinates of the three nearest registration points (points with known locations in both coordinate systems). The report contains a discussion of efforts to verify and validate both the software and the well location data, a description of the methods used to estimate transformation and registration point accuracy, instructions for using the computer program, and a summary of the Hanford well conversion results for each local coordinate system and datum. Also included are the results of using recent U.S. Army Corps of Engineers survey data to obtain estimated measures of location errors in wells for which the local coordinate data source is undocumented, unverified, and therefore of unknown accuracy.

  12. Imaging Hydraulic Fractures: Source Location Uncertainty Analysis At The UPRC Carthage Test Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yingping

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing is a useful tool for enhancing gas and oil production. High-resolution seismic imaging of the fracture geometry and fracture growth process is the key in determining optimal spacing and location of ...

  13. The effectiveness of an indirect control message in decreasing the depreciative behavior of remote camping location users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barget, Robert George

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the number of visitors utilizing these resources and the ever expanding variety of activities in which people participate when they visit a particular natural resource setting. According to vernon D. Dame (Dame 1977), past chief of Interpretation..., a 12% increase over the previous year (Clark et al. 1972). Less tangible, but equally important are the indirect costs of depreciative behaviors (Clark et al. 1971). Cole 10 (1982) concluded that most site impacts do not appear to sharply reduce...

  14. Tables of co-located geothermal-resource sites and BLM Wilderness Study Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, D.; Dorscher, M.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Matched pairs of known geothermal wells and springs with BLM proposed Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs) were identified by inspection of WSA and Geothermal resource maps for the states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. A total of 3952 matches, for geothermal sites within 25 miles of a WSA, were identified. Of these, only 71 (1.8%) of the geothermal sites are within one mile of a WSA, and only an additional 100 (2.5%) are within one to three miles. Approximately three-fourths of the matches are at distances greater than ten miles. Only 12 of the geothermal sites within one mile of a WSA have surface temperatures reported above 50/sup 0/C. It thus appears that the geothermal potential of WSAs overall is minimal, but that evaluation of geothermal resources should be considered in more detail for some areas prior to their designation as Wilderness.

  15. Risk assessment of soil-based exposures to plutonium at experimental sites located on the Nevada Test Site and adjoining areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, D.W.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Bogen, K.T.; Straume, T.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1950s and early 1960s, a series of tests was conducted at or near the Nevada Test Site to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of {sup 239,240}Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Access to the sites is strictly controlled; therefore, it does not constitute a threat to human health at the present time. However, because the residual {sup 239} Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), the sites could indeed represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, we defined three basic exposure scenarios that could bring individuals in contact with {sup 239,240}Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision located at a test site, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility. Our screening analyses indicated that doses to organs are dominated by the intemal deposition of Pu via the inhalation pathway, and thus our risk assessment focused on those factors that affect inhalation exposures and associated doses, including inhalation rates, activity patterns, tenure at a residence or occupation, indoor/outdoor air relationships, and resuspension outdoors. Cancer risks were calculated as a function of lifetime cumulative doses to the key target organs (i.e., bone surface, liver, and lungs) and risk factors for those organs. Uncertainties in the predicted cancer risks were analyzed using Monte-Carlo simulations of the probability distributions used to represent assessment parameters. The principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

  16. Performance of a Remotely Located Muon Radiography System to Identify the Inner Structure of a Nuclear Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujii, H; Hashimoto, S; Ito, F; Kakuno, H; Kim, S H; Kochiyama, M; Nagamine, K; Suzuki, A; Takada, Y; Takahashi, Y; Takasaki, F; Yamashita, S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of a muon radiography system designed to image the inner structure of a nuclear plant located at a distance of 64 m was evaluated. We concluded absence of the fuel in the pressure vessel during the measurement period and succeeded in profiling the fuel material placed in the storage pool. The obtained data also demonstrated the sensitivity of the system to water level changes in the reactor well and the dryer-separator pool. It is expected that the system could reconstruct a 2 m cubic fuel object easily. By operating multiple systems, typically four identical systems, viewing the reactor from different directions simultaneously, detection of a 1 m cubic object should also be achievable within a few month period.

  17. Performance of a Remotely Located Muon Radiography System to Identify the Inner Structure of a Nuclear Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Fujii; K. Hara; S. Hashimoto; F. Ito; H. Kakuno; S. H. Kim; M. Kochiyama; K. Nagamine; A. Suzuki; Y. Takada; Y. Takahashi; F. Takasaki; S. Yamashita

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of a muon radiography system designed to image the inner structure of a nuclear plant located at a distance of 64 m was evaluated. We concluded absence of the fuel in the pressure vessel during the measurement period and succeeded in profiling the fuel material placed in the storage pool. The obtained data also demonstrated the sensitivity of the system to water level changes in the reactor well and the dryer-separator pool. It is expected that the system could reconstruct a 2 m cubic fuel object easily. By operating multiple systems, typically four identical systems, viewing the reactor from different directions simultaneously, detection of a 1 m cubic object should also be achievable within a few month period.

  18. Determining the best source of renewable electricity to power a remote site for the National Park Service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azerbegl, R.; Mas, C.; Walker, A.; Morris, R.; Christensen, J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy technologies have economic and environmental advantages in many remote applications. They can provide most of the power to off-grid loads, where batteries and another power source such as a generator or a fuel cell may be required to ensure availability and feasibility. In support of the National Park Service, the Federal Energy Management Program Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has evaluated several methods for providing a renewable source of electricity to a beach campsite at Kirby Cove, Marin County, California. This site requires 2 kWh per day to power a campground host in a motor home five months power year. The existing electricity line to the site is in need of replacement and the NPS is interested in evaluating more cost-effective and environmentally sensitive alternatives. Photovoltaics, tidal current, and wind power systems in combination with a back-up electric system (standard, thermoelectric, and Stirling generator and fuel cell) and an energy storage medium (battery, flywheel, and hydrogen) were analyzed. Multi-objective optimization criteria include initial cost, operating cost, emissions, maintenance requirements, and to be consistent with the NPS requirements, the system must be clean, silent, and sustainable. The best system combination was designed according to these evaluation criteria and a demonstration system is to be constructed. This paper describes the optimization procedure and design. Results indicate that a 800 Watt photovoltaic array with a hydrogen fuel cell best serves the requirements for clean, silent power. Since fuel cells are developmental, a propane generator is recommended as an alternative.

  19. Optimization of a Small Modular Lead Fast Reactor with Steam Cycle for Remote Siting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, Earl E.; Wei, Thomas Y. C.; Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametric thermal-hydraulic studies needed to develop and optimize the design of a small modular 25 MWt lead-bismuth reactor plant have been performed. The starting point was the design of a liquid metal version of the secure transportable autonomous reactor (STAR-LM) plant of 300 to 400 MWt with a steam power cycle.1 The primary flow is driven entirely by natural convection. The new plant is to be extremely small so that its main components can be transported to the reactor site by truck. The analytical model includes the two major components of the primary loop, the reactor and a once-through steam generator, which is a shell-and-tube heat exchanger with straight vertical tubes. The modeling includes the changes between the beginning and the end of plant life due to the gradual buildup of a layer of magnetite on the surfaces of the fuel pins and on the outer surfaces of the steam generator tubes. Three reactor parametric studies were performed-one for each of three sets of reactor geometric parameters. In each study the pin-bundle pressure drop, the vertical height of the primary loop, the hydraulic diameter of the core, the number of fuel pins, and peak fuel and cladding temperatures were determined for a range of values of fuel pin linear power. Four steam generator parametric studies were performed. The first three have fixed tube inner diameters of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 cm, respectively. In the fourth study the tube inner diameter was allowed to vary and the margin to critical heat flux, CHF, was maintained at 20%. In the steam generator studies the independent parameters include tube length and tube-bundle pitch-to-diameter ratio and the dependent variables include steam generator cross-sectional area, the number of tubes, the vertical height of the primary loop, and the steam generator pressure drop. The results show that an acceptable optimum thermal-hydraulic design for a 25 MWt STAR-LM is feasible. (authors)

  20. Screening of remote charge scattering sites from the oxide/silicon interface of strained Si two-dimensional electron gases by an intermediate tunable shielding electron layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Chiao-Ti, E-mail: chiaoti@princeton.edu; Li, Jiun-Yun; Chou, Kevin S.; Sturm, James C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the strong screening of the remote charge scattering sites from the oxide/semiconductor interface of buried enhancement-mode undoped Si two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs), by introducing a tunable shielding electron layer between the 2DEG and the scattering sites. When a high density of electrons in the buried silicon quantum well exists, the tunneling of electrons from the buried layer to the surface quantum well can lead to the formation of a nearly immobile surface electron layer. The screening of the remote charges at the interface by this newly formed surface electron layer results in an increase in the mobility of the buried 2DEG. Furthermore, a significant decrease in the minimum mobile electron density of the 2DEG occurs as well. Together, these effects can reduce the increased detrimental effect of interface charges as the setback distance for the 2DEG to the surface is reduced for improved lateral confinement by top gates.

  1. Engineering study of 50 miscellaneous inactive underground radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1994-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This engineering study addresses 50 inactive underground radioactive waste tanks. The tanks were formerly used for the following functions associated with plutonium and uranium separations and waste management activities in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site: settling solids prior to disposal of supernatant in cribs and a reverse well; neutralizing acidic process wastes prior to crib disposal; receipt and processing of single-shell tank (SST) waste for uranium recovery operations; catch tanks to collect water that intruded into diversion boxes and transfer pipeline encasements and any leakage that occurred during waste transfer operations; and waste handling and process experimentation. Most of these tanks have not been in use for many years. Several projects have, been planned and implemented since the 1970`s and through 1985 to remove waste and interim isolate or interim stabilize many of the tanks. Some tanks have been filled with grout within the past several years. Responsibility for final closure and/or remediation of these tanks is currently assigned to several programs including Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Environmental Restoration and Remedial Action (ERRA), and Decommissioning and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure (D&RCP). Some are under facility landlord responsibility for maintenance and surveillance (i.e. Plutonium Uranium Extraction [PUREX]). However, most of the tanks are not currently included in any active monitoring or surveillance program.

  2. EA-1924: Consolidation and Relocation of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) OffSite Research Programs to a New Off-Site Location that also Allows for Future Growth, San Francisco East Bay Area, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to consolidate and relocate LBNL research programs that are currently in leased off-site buildings at various locations around the San Francisco East Bay Area in California, to a new single location that also provides room for future growth of LBNL research programs.

  3. Remotely Controlled, Continuous Observations of Infrared Radiance with the CSIRO/ARM Mark II Radiometer at the SGP CART Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 c/) ReleaseRemoteRemotely Controlled,

  4. Interpreting Remote Sensing NOx Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Interpreting Remote Sensing NOx Measurements Robert Slott, Consultant, Donald Stedman and Saj tailpipe emissions (HC, CO, NOx) are changing with time hUse remote sensing hMeasurements in at least 4 of the year at each location hUniform QC/QA and data reporting Paper # 2001-01-3640 #12;Remote Sensing

  5. A Single-Site Platinum CO Oxidation Catalyst in Zeolite KLTL: Microscopic and Spectroscopic Determination of the Locations of the Platinum Atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kistler, Joseph D.; Chotigkrai, Nutchapon; Xu, Pinghong; Enderle, Bryan; Praserthdam, Piyasan; Chen, Cong-Yan; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A stable site-isolated mononuclear platinum catalyst with a well-defined structure is presented. Platinum complexes supported in zeolite KLTL were synthesized from [Pt(NH3)4](NO3)2, oxidized at 633?K, and used to catalyze CO oxidation. IR and X-ray absorption spectra and electron micrographs determine the structures and locations of the platinum complexes in the zeolite pores, demonstrate the platinum-support bonding, and show that the platinum remained site isolated after oxidation and catalysis.

  6. "Goodbye Doesn’t Mean Forever:" Selection Strategies for the Transfer of Slavic to Off-Site Remote Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giullian, Jon C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the storage crisis, several of the nation’s top research libraries have constructed off-site, high-density shelving facilities. This paper first summarizes the discussion about the nature and function of these facilities. The paper goes on to document a case...

  7. Public Invited to Comment on Draft Environmental Assessment for Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low Level Radioactive Waste Generated at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy invites the public to read and comment on a draft environmental assessment it has prepared, for a proposal to provide a replacement capability for continued disposal of remote-handled low-level radioactive waste that is generated at the Idaho National Laboratory site.

  8. Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Testing and Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) has completed an Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Test. Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, the Department has determined that the proposed action, the relocation of the Department's heat source and radioisotope power system operations, does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  9. Remote Food Shopping Robot System in a Supermarket Realization of the shopping task from remote places

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohya, Akihisa

    Remote Food Shopping Robot System in a Supermarket ­Realization of the shopping task from remote- ulating remote objects. This system attempts to answer the challenge of extending mobile robot potentials in a supermarket from a remote location using the Internet. We built the prototype system by integrating custom

  10. EIS-0426: Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Department of Energy / National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada National Security Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Site-Wide EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of proposed alternatives for continued management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site) and other U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA)-managed sites in Nevada.

  11. Experience in Remote Demolition of the Activated Biological Shielding of the Multi Purpose Research Reactor (MZFR) on the German Karlsruhe Site - 12208

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenmann, Beata; Fleisch, Joachim; Prechtl, Erwin; Suessdorf, Werner; Urban, Manfred [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, WAK Decommissioning and Waste Management GmbH (WAK) became owner and operator of the waste treatment facilities of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) as well as of the prototype reactors, the Compact Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (KNK) and Multi-Purpose Reactor (MZFR), both being in an advanced stage of dismantling. Together with the dismantling and decontamination activities of the former WAK reprocessing facility since 1990, the envisaged demolishing of the R and D reactor FR2 and a hot cell facility, all governmentally funded nuclear decommissioning projects on the Karlsruhe site are concentrated under the WAK management. The small space typical of prototype research reactors represented a challenge also during the last phase of activated dismantling, dismantling of the activated biological shield of the MZFR. Successful demolition of the biological shield required detailed planning and extensive testing in the years before. In view of the limited space and the ambient dose rate that was too high for manual work, it was required to find a tool carrier system to take up and control various demolition and dismantling tools in a remote manner. The strategy formulated in the concept of dismantling the biological shield by means of a modified electro-hydraulic demolition excavator in an adaptable working scaffolding turned out to be feasible. The following boundary conditions were essential: - Remote exchange of the dismantling and removal tools in smallest space. - Positioning of various supply facilities on the working platform. - Avoiding of interfering edges. - Optimization of mass flow (removal of the dismantled mass from the working area). - Maintenance in the surroundings of the dismantling area (in the controlled area). - Testing and qualification of the facilities and training of the staff. Both the dismantling technique chosen and the proceeding selected proved to be successful. Using various designs of universal cutters developed on the basis of wall saws, both the activated steel liner and the inner reinforcing layer were cut remotely in one process. This allowed for the efficient execution of the following remote concrete removal steps using mining techniques. The electro-hydraulic demolition excavator that was purchased and then modified turned out to be an ideal tool carrier system with rapid-exchange coupling. Due to the high availability, no major delays occurred. This also was a result of the consistently implemented maintenance and repair concept. With the excavator installed in a modifiable scaffolding suspended from a rotating carrier ring, all dismantling areas could be reached and treated in spite of the small space. Thanks to an optimum organization of work-flows, routine change of dismantling work, and maintenance or repair, the iterative radiological measurement campaigns could be integrated in the whole activity without the dismantling work being disturbed significantly. The ventilation system with pressure grading and pre-filtration units ensured a low contamination level in the dismantling area. It was also possible to manage the dust formed by the milling of concrete surfaces. As it was possible to further cut metal parts and crushed concrete later on, residue flows were optimized. The planned overall period for testing, dismantling the bio-shield and removing the equipment was 36 months. The final duration was 39 months. (authors)

  12. University of Northern British Columbia & BC Rural & Remote Health Research Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolch, Tobias

    University of Northern British Columbia & BC Rural & Remote Health Research Network Provincial in the province. The University of Northern British Columbia is the secretariat for the BCRRHRN and satellite sites are located at the University of British Columbia and the University of Victoria. Duties

  13. U-073: Bugzilla Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting and Cross-Site Request Forgery Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several vulnerabilities were reported in Bugzilla. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks.

  14. Remote sensing for the geobotanical and biogeochemical assessment of environmental contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickham, J.; Chesley, M.; Lancaster, J.; Mouat, D.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Contract Number DE-AC08-90NV10845, the DOE has funded the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to examine several aspects of remote sensing, specifically with respect to how its use might help support Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) activities at DOE sites located throughout the country. This report represents partial fulfillment of DRI`s obligations under that contract and includes a review of relevant literature associated with remote sensing studies and our evaluation and recommendation as to the applicability of various remote sensing techniques for DOE needs. With respect to DOE ERWM activities, remote sensing may be broadly defined as collecting information about a target without actually being in physical contact with the object. As the common platforms for remote sensing observations are aircraft and satellites, there exists the possibility to rapidly and efficiently collect information over DOE sites that would allow for the identification and monitoring of contamination related to present and past activities. As DOE sites cover areas ranging from tens to hundreds of square miles, remote sensing may provide an effective, efficient, and economical method in support of ERWM activities. For this review, remote sensing has been limited to methods that employ electromagnetic (EM) energy as the means of detecting and measuring target characteristics.

  15. DOE Media Advisory- DOE extends public comment period on Draft Environmental Assessment for Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Generated at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In response to requests from people interested in National Environmental Policy Act activities occurring at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho Operations Office, the department has extended the public comment period that began September 1 on the Draft Environmental Assessment for Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Generated at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho Site.

  16. Remote sensing for wind power potential: a prospector's handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade, J.E.; Maule, P.A.; Bodvarsson, G.; Rosenfeld, C.L.; Woolley, S.G.; McClenahan, M.R.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote sensing can aid in identifying and locating indicators of wind power potential from the terrestrial, marine, and atmospheric environments (i.e.: wind-deformed trees, white caps, and areas of thermal flux). It is not considered as a tool for determining wind power potential. A wide variety of remotely sensed evidence is described in terms of the scale at which evidence of wind power can be identified, and the appropriate remote sensors for finding such evidence. Remote sensing can be used for regional area prospecting using small-scale imagery. The information from such small-scale imagery is most often qualitative, and if it is transitory, examination of a number of images to verify presistence of the feature may be required. However, this evidence will allow rapid screening of a large area. Medium-scale imagery provides a better picture of the evidence obtained from small-scale imagery. At this level it is best to use existing imagery. Criteria relating to land use, accessibility, and proximity of candidate sites to nearby transmission lines can also be effectively evaluated from medium-scale imagery. Large-scale imagery provides the most quantitative evidence of the strength of wind. Wind-deformed trees can be identified at a large number of sites using only a few hours in locally chartered aircraft. A handheld 35mm camera can adequately document any evidence of wind. Three case studies that employ remote sensing prospecting techniques are described. Based on remotely sensed evidence, the wind power potential in three geographically and climatically diverse areas of the United States is estimated, and the estimates are compared to actual wind data in those regions. In addition, the cost of each survey is discussed. The results indicate that remote sensing for wind power potential is a quick, cost effective, and fairly reliable method for screening large areas for wind power potential.

  17. Analysis of the effects of ionospheric sampling of reflection points near-path, for high-frequency single-site-location direction finding systems. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filho, C.A.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis suggests a method to estimate the current value of an ionospheric parameter. The proposed method is based on the known variability of the observed current values near path and utilizes data derived from ionospheric sampling measurements. Analysis of errors is provided in Single-Site-Location High-Frequency Direction Finding (SSL-HFDF), arising from ionospheric irregularities such as Es (sporadic E), ionospheric tilts, and traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). The characteristics of Es, tilts and TIDs for mid-latitudes are summarized in tables. The spatial and temporal coherence of ionospheric variabilities and irregularities is analyzed over the electron density. Practical results, measurements, and studies are presented on SSL-HFDF. A survey of characteristics of the ionosphere in the equatorial region is also provided. Finally, some recommendations are given to maximize the applicability of the proposed method.

  18. QUANTITATIVE REMOTE SENSING: HORNS REV WIND FARM CASE STUDY C. B. Hasager, M. Nielsen, M. B. Christiansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUANTITATIVE REMOTE SENSING: HORNS REV WIND FARM CASE STUDY C. B. Hasager, M. Nielsen, M. B at IFREMER/CERSAT are used to estimate wind patterns near the Horns Rev wind farm located in the North Sea, Denmark. At this site a large offshore wind farm (80 2MW-turbines) is in operation. The study includes

  19. Combined use of geophysical methods and remote techniques for characterizing the fracture network of a potential unstable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Combined use of geophysical methods and remote techniques for characterizing the fracture network of the site. Geophysical experiments were also conducted on the plateau and on the cliff face in order to be located in the vicinity of the surface. Best geophysical results in terms of penetration and resolution

  20. Remote Book Browsing System using a Mobile Manipulator Tetsuo Tomizawa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohya, Akihisa

    Remote Book Browsing System using a Mobile Manipulator Tetsuo Tomizawa , Akihisa Ohya and Shin manipu- lator as a teleoperated tool for accessing and manipulating remote objects, in our challenge in this research is to help humans browse books located in a library from a remote location via the Internet

  1. Remote connector development study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) connectors, the most common connectors used at the Hanford site, offer a certain level of flexibility in pipe routing, process system configuration, and remote equipment/instrument replacement. However, these desirable features have inherent shortcomings like leakage, high pressure drop through the right angle bends, and a limited range of available pipe diameters that can be connect by them. Costs for construction, maintenance, and operation of PUREX connectors seem to be very high. The PUREX connector designs include a 90{degree} bend in each connector. This increases the pressure drop and erosion effects. Thus, each jumper requires at least two 90{degree} bends. PUREX connectors have not been practically used beyond 100 (4 in.) inner diameter. This study represents the results of a survey on the use of remote pipe-connection systems in US and foreign plants. This study also describes the interdependence between connectors, remote handling equipment, and the necessary skills of the operators.

  2. Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 2857-2882; doi:10.3390/rs5062857 Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 2857-2882; doi:10.3390/rs5062857 Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292 www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing Article Evaluation of CLM4 Solar Radiation Partitioning Scheme Using Remote Sensing and Site Level FPAR.e., that of the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) with coupled carbon and nitrogen cycles. Taking advantage of a unique

  3. Remote switch actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Edwin Gerard; Beauman, Ronald; Palo, Jr., Stefan

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a device and method for actuating electrical switches remotely. The device is removably attached to the switch and is actuated through the transfer of a user's force. The user is able to remain physically removed from the switch site obviating need for protective equipment. The device and method allow rapid, safe actuation of high-voltage or high-current carrying electrical switches or circuit breakers.

  4. Remote File Access 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    Remote File Access 2010 Mac Users Guide #12;Remote File Access: MAC Users Guide 2010 2 Table Remote File Access 11 Part IV: Using Remote File Access 15 Part V: FAQ 24 #12;Remote File Access: MAC Users Guide 2010 3 1. What is Remote File Access? UTS Remote File Access service is provided to enable

  5. Remote repair appliance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heumann, F.K.; Wilkinson, J.C.; Wooding, D.R.

    1997-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote appliance for supporting a tool for performing work at a work site on a substantially circular bore of a work piece and for providing video signals of the work site to a remote monitor comprises: a base plate having an inner face and an outer face; a plurality of rollers, wherein each roller is rotatably and adjustably attached to the inner face of the base plate and positioned to roll against the bore of the work piece when the base plate is positioned against the mouth of the bore such that the appliance may be rotated about the bore in a plane substantially parallel to the base plate; a tool holding means for supporting the tool, the tool holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the base plate such that the working end of the tool is positioned on the inner face side of the base plate; a camera for providing video signals of the work site to the remote monitor; and a camera holding means for supporting the camera on the inner face side of the base plate, the camera holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the base plate. In a preferred embodiment, roller guards are provided to protect the rollers from debris and a bore guard is provided to protect the bore from wear by the rollers and damage from debris. 5 figs.

  6. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009, Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009. Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  7. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2009a). Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  8. Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    City - May 19, 2010 * Project Title - "Use Remote Sensing Data (selected visible and infrared spectrums) to locate high temperature ground anomalies in Colorado. Confirm heat flow...

  9. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005, Attachment A - Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix to the ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005'', dated October 2006 (DOE/NV/11718--1214; DOE/NV/25946--007) expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction. Included are subsections that summarize the site?s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This appendix complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  10. INTERVAL METHODS IN REMOTE SENSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    INTERVAL METHODS IN REMOTE SENSING: RELIABLE SUB­DIVISION OF GEOLOGICAL AREAS David D. Coblentz, G of the locations which weren't that thoroughly analyzed. 1 #12; 2 The subdivision of a geological zone TOPOGRAPHIC INFORMATION One reason for subjectivity of the geological subdivision is the fact

  11. Remote Method Invocation Remote Method Invocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Jin-Kao

    Remote Method Invocation Remote Method Invocation Jean-Michel Richer jean-michel.richer@univ-angers.fr http://www.info.univ-angers.fr/pub/richer M2 Informatique 2010-2011 1 / 22 #12;Remote Method Invocation Plan Plan 1 Introduction 2 RMI en d´etails 3 Exemple 4 Application 2 / 22 #12;Remote Method Invocation

  12. U-074: Microsoft.NET Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Commands, Access User Accounts, and Redirect Users

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A remote user can execute arbitrary commands on the target system. A remote user can access a target user's account. A remote user can redirect users to arbitrary sites.

  13. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 2008). Included are subsections that summarize the site's geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  14. Handleiding Remote Desktop Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galis, Frietson

    Handleiding Remote Desktop Service Versie: 1.3 Remote Desktop Datum: 29-08-2013 #12;2 Configureren Remote Desktop Connection 1) Type in de zoekbalk van Windows 7: "remote" of "mstsc" en start de applicatie "Remote Desktop Connection" zoals in onderstaand voorbeeld wordt getoond. 2) Selecteer "Show

  15. Remote Access

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliability Technology earnsRemembering 9-11'sRemote

  16. A Self-Calibrating Remote Control Chemical Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessica Croft

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Susie Mine, part of the Upper Tenmile Mining Area, is located in Rimini, MT about 15 miles southwest of Helena, MT. The Upper Tenmile Creek Mining Area is an EPA Superfund site with 70 abandoned hard rock mines and several residential yards prioritized for clean up. Water from the Susie mine flows into Tenmile Creek from which the city of Helena draws part of its water supply. MSE Technology Applications in Butte, Montana was contracted by the EPA to build a treatment system for the Susie mine effluent and demonstrate a system capable of treating mine waste water in remote locations. The Idaho National Lab was contracted to design, build and demonstrate a low maintenance self-calibrating monitoring system that would monitor multiple sample points, allow remote two-way communications with the control software and allow access to the collected data through a web site. The Automated Chemical Analysis Monitoring (ACAM) system was installed in December 2006. This thesis documents the overall design of the hardware, control software and website, the data collected while MSE-TA’s system was operational, the data collected after MSE-TA’s system was shut down and suggested improvements to the existing system.

  17. Remotely operated pipe connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Josefiak, Leonard J. (Scotia, NY); Cramer, Charles E. (Guilderford, NY)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for remotely assembling and disassembling a Graylock type coctor between a pipe and a closure for the pipe includes a base and a receptacle on the base for the closure. The pipe is moved into position vertically above the closure by a suitable positioning device such that the flange on the pipe is immediately adjacent and concentric with the flange on the closure. A moving device then moves two semicircular collars from a position free of the closure to a position such that the interior cam groove of each collar contacts the two flanges. Finally, a tensioning device automatically allows remote tightening and loosening of a nut and bolt assembly on each side of the collar to cause a seal ring located between the flanges to be compressed and to seal the closure. Release of the pipe and the connector is accomplished in the reverse order. Preferably, the nut and bolt assembly includes an elongate shaft portion on which a removable sleeve is located.

  18. Cost reduction performance enhancements of multiple site cooling water systems, enabled by remote system monitoring/control and multifaceted data management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, B. [BetzDearborn Water Management Group, Horsham, PA (United States); Young, D. [BetzDearborn Water Management Group, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Tari, K. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, New York, NY (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An outsourced cooling water treatment automated control and data acquisition package, has been designed, installed, and commissioned in over 70 sites in North America and offshore. The standard package consists of a controller, sensors, human-machine interface software, data acquisition and management software, communications, and reporting. Significant challenges to applying this standard package in multiple sites arose from variations in cooling system design and makeup water quality as well as operations, environmental considerations, metrics, and language. A standard approach has met these challenges and overcome effects of downsizing through significant reduction in non-value-added, manual activities. Overall system reliability has been improved by migration to best practice throughout the organizations involved and immediate proactive response to out-of-specification conditions. This paper documents the evolution of a standard cooling water automation and data management package from its inception to current practice.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: REMOTE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REMOTE Sandia to Partner with MOgene Green Chemicals on ARPA-E REMOTE Project On October 2, 2013, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Research & Capabilities,...

  20. Multiple node remote messaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton on Hudson, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Ohmacht, Martin (Yorktown Heights, NY); Salapura, Valentina (Chappaqua, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard (Esslingen, DE); Vranas, Pavlos (Danville, CA)

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for passing remote messages in a parallel computer system formed as a network of interconnected compute nodes includes that a first compute node (A) sends a single remote message to a remote second compute node (B) in order to control the remote second compute node (B) to send at least one remote message. The method includes various steps including controlling a DMA engine at first compute node (A) to prepare the single remote message to include a first message descriptor and at least one remote message descriptor for controlling the remote second compute node (B) to send at least one remote message, including putting the first message descriptor into an injection FIFO at the first compute node (A) and sending the single remote message and the at least one remote message descriptor to the second compute node (B).

  1. Remote monitoring for international safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupree, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sonnier, C.S. [Jupiter Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote monitoring is not a new technology, and its application to safeguards relevant activities has been examined for a number of years. On behalf of the US Department of Energy and international partners, remote monitoring systems have been emplaced in nuclear facilities and laboratories in various parts of the world. The experience gained from these field trials of remote monitoring systems has shown the viability of the concept of using integrated monitoring systems. Although a wide variety of sensors has been used in the remote monitoring field trials conducted to date, the possible range of instrumentation that might be used has scarcely been touched. As the technology becomes widespread, large amounts of data will become available to inspectors responsible for safeguards activities at the sites. Effective use of remote monitoring will require processing, archiving, presenting, and assessing of these data. To provide reasonable efficiency in the application of this technology, data processing should be done in a careful and organized manner. The problem will be not an issue of poring over scant records but of surviving under a deluge of information made possible by modern technology. Fortunately, modern technology, which created the problem of the data glut, is available to come to the assistance of those inundated by data. Apart from the technological problems, one of the most important aspects of remote monitoring is the potential constraint related to the transmission of data out of a facility or beyond national borders. Remote monitoring across national borders can be seriously considered only in the context of a comprehensive, transparent, and open implementation regime.

  2. Remote controlled-NOT gate of d-dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui-Fang Dang; Heng Fan

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Single qubit rotation gate and the controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate constitute a complete set of gates for universal quantum computation. In general the CNOT gate are only for two nearby qubits. For two qubits which are remote from each other, we need a series of swap gates to transfer these two qubits to the nearest neighboring sites, and then after the CNOT gate we should transfer them to their original sites again. However, a series of swap gates are resource for quantum information processing. One economy way which does not consume so much resource is to implement CNOT gate remotely. The remote CNOT gate is to implement the CNOT gate for two remotely separated qubits with the help of one additional maximally entangled state. The original remote CNOT gate is for two qubits, here we will present the d-dimensional remote CNOT gate. The role of quantum teleportation is identified in the process of the remote CNOT gate.

  3. Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document representsthe development of a uniform content code system for RH-TRU waste to be transported in the 72-Bcask. It will be used to convert existing waste form numbers, content codes, and site-specificidentification codes into a system that is uniform across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.The existing waste codes at the sites can be grouped under uniform content codes without any lossof waste characterization information. The RH-TRUCON document provides an all-encompassing|description for each content code and compiles this information for all DOE sites. Compliance withwaste generation, processing, and certification procedures at the sites (outlined in this document foreach content code) ensures that prohibited waste forms are not present in the waste. The contentcode gives an overall description of the RH-TRU waste material in terms of processes and|packaging, as well as the generation location. This helps to provide cradle-to-grave traceability ofthe waste material so that the various actions required to assess its qualification as payload for the72-B cask can be performed. The content codes also impose restrictions and requirements on themanner in which a payload can be assembled.The RH-TRU Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC), Appendix 1.3.7of the 72-B Cask Safety Analysis Report (SAR), describes the current governing procedures|applicable for the qualification of waste as payload for the 72-B cask. The logic for this|classification is presented in the 72-B Cask SAR. Together, these documents (RH-TRUCON,|RH-TRAMPAC, and relevant sections of the 72-B Cask SAR) present the foundation and|justification for classifying RH-TRU waste into content codes. Only content codes described in thisdocument can be considered for transport in the 72-B cask. Revisions to this document will be madeas additional waste qualifies for transport. |Each content code uniquely identifies the generated waste and provides a system for tracking theprocess and packaging history. Each content code begins with a two-letter site abbreviation thatindicates the shipper of the RH-TRU waste. The site-specific letter designations for each of the|DOE sites are provided in Table 1. Not all of the sites listed in Table 1 have generated/stored RH-|TRU waste.

  4. Portable housing : an exploration into lightweight housing for remote scientific research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Keith V. (Keith Vincent), 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis proposes the design of portable housing for use in scientific research applications in remote locations. Currently, remote research is conducted from tents or other portable shelters. Larger, more hospitable ...

  5. Estimating Groundwater Concentrations from Mass Releases to the Aquifer at Integrated Disposal Facility and Tank Farm Locations Within the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, Marcel P.; Freeman, Eugene J.

    2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes groundwater-related numerical calculations that will support groundwater flow and transport analyses associated with the scheduled 2005 performance assessment of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site. The report also provides potential supporting information to other ongoing Hanford Site risk analyses associated with the closure of single-shell tank farms and related actions. The IDF 2005 performance assessment analysis is using well intercept factors (WIFs), as outlined in the 2001 performance assessment of the IDF. The flow and transport analyses applied to these calculations use both a site-wide regional-scale model and a local-scale model of the area near the IDF. The regional-scale model is used to evaluate flow conditions, groundwater transport, and impacts from the IDF in the central part of the Hanford Site, at the core zone boundary around the 200 East and 200 West Areas, and along the Columbia River. The local-scale model is used to evaluate impacts from transport of contaminants to a hypothetical well 100 m downgradient from the IDF boundaries. Analyses similar to the regional-scale analysis of IDF releases are also provided at individual tank farm areas as additional information. To gain insight on how the WIF approach compares with other approaches for estimating groundwater concentrations from mass releases to the unconfined aquifer, groundwater concentrations were estimated with the WIF approach for two hypothetical release scenarios and compared with similar results using a calculational approach (the convolution approach). One release scenario evaluated with both approaches (WIF and convolution) involved a long-term source release from immobilized low-activity waste glass containing 25,550 Ci of technetium-99 near the IDF; another involved a hypothetical shorter-term release of {approx}0.7 Ci of technetium over 600 years from the S-SX tank farm area. In addition, direct simulation results for both release scenarios were provided to compare with the results of the WIF and convolution approaches.

  6. U-222: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A remote user can exploit this to spoof content on the target server, attempt to poison any intermediate web caches, or conduct cross-site scripting attacks. A remote user...

  7. U-121: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    21: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks, and Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information U-121: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote...

  8. Decommissioning of the Dragon High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Located at the Former United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) Research Site at Winfrith - 13180

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Anthony A. [Research Sites Restoration Ltd, Winfrith, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [Research Sites Restoration Ltd, Winfrith, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dragon Reactor was constructed at the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Winfrith in Dorset through the late 1950's and into the early 1960's. It was a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR) with helium gas coolant and graphite moderation. It operated as a fuel testing and demonstration reactor at up to 20 MW (Thermal) from 1964 until 1975, when international funding for this project was terminated. The fuel was removed from the core in 1976 and the reactor was put into Safestore. To meet the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) objective to 'drive hazard reduction' [1] it is necessary to decommission and remediate all the Research Sites Restoration Ltd (RSRL) facilities. This includes the Dragon Reactor where the activated core, pressure vessel and control rods and the contaminated primary circuit (including a {sup 90}Sr source) still remain. It is essential to remove these hazards at the appropriate time and return the area occupied by the reactor to a safe condition. (author)

  9. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2013 Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, C.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2012 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2013). Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting and the cultural resources of the NNSS. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NNSS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NNSS. The NNSS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NNSS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NNSS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  10. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2012 Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, Cathy A

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2012 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2013). Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting and the cultural resources of the NNSS. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NNSS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NNSS. The NNSS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NNSS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NNSS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  11. ENGO 435 Remote Sensing LAB 1: INTRODUCTION TO REMOTE SENSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    ENGO 435 ­ Remote Sensing Fall 2003 LAB 1: INTRODUCTION TO REMOTE SENSING Due: By 4:30 pm on September 30th Objectives: To familiarize you with: Remote sensing resources on the Internet. Some remote (Metadata). Part A: Remote Sensing Resources There is a wealth of remote sensing information and data

  12. Remote Desktop | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remote Desktop Use a remote desktop connection to access your work computer from home. Using Remote Desktop to Connect to Your Work Computer With Remote Desktop, you can have...

  13. Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Alternative Fueling Station Locator is available on-the-go via cell phones, BlackBerrys, or other personal handheld devices. The mobile locator allows users to find the five closest biodiesel, electricity, E85, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane fueling sites using Google technology.

  14. An Integrated Mapping And Remote Sensing Investigation Of The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Remote Sensing Investigation Of The Structural Control For Fumarole Location In The Eburru Volcanic Complex, Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  15. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2010, Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Wills, ed.

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction to the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2010. Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting and the cultural resources of the NNSS. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NNSS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NNSS. The NNSS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NNSS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NNSS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  16. Remote multi-color excitation using femtosecond propagating surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potma, Eric Olaf

    Remote multi-color excitation using femtosecond propagating surface plasmon polaritons in gold away from a micrometer sized focused laser spot. We attribute the observed remote nonlinear signal of unwanted heating effects at the target site and represents an attractive approach for surface

  17. Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods Method of handling foods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohya, Akihisa

    Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods ­ Method of handling foods ­ Tetsuo TOMIZAWA, Akihisa a mobile manipulator as a teleoperated tool for accessing and manipulating remote objects. A human uses the system to select and buy fresh foods of a super market from a remote location via the Internet. We

  18. Remote Console for Virtual Telerehabilitation Jeffrey A. LEWIS1,2,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Jersey, University of Medicine and Dentistry of

    Remote Console for Virtual Telerehabilitation Jeffrey A. LEWIS1,2,* , Rares F. BOIAN2 , Grigore, Rutgers University * Contact Author: lewisje@umdnj.edu Abstract. The Remote Console (ReCon) telerehabilitation system provides a platform for therapists to guide rehabilitation sessions from a remote location

  19. Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods Development of the foods grasping mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohya, Akihisa

    Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods ­Development of the foods grasping mechanism­ Tetsuo) Abstract-- Our purpose is developing the remote shopping system as a concrete application. A human uses the system to select and buy fresh foods of a supermarket from a remote location via the Internet. We

  20. Radioactive Waste Management Site located in

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNL 2001a,Summary; i-C C1 1 1

  1. Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Site Locator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A. Revised:7,AMission

  2. T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in Blue Coat Director. A remote user can conduct cross-site scripting attacks.

  3. Remote File PC Users Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    UTS: ITD Remote File Access 2010 PC Users Guide V3.0 #12;UTS:ITD Remote File Access: PC Users Guide Part III: Accessing Remote File Access 8 Part IV: Using Remote File Access 14 Part V: FAQ 25 #12;UTS:ITD Remote File Access: PC Users Guide v3.0 2010 3 1. What is Remote File Access? UTS Remote File Access

  4. Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1987-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

  5. Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddard, P.L.; Legeay, A.J.; Pesce, D.S.; Stanley, A.M.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Site Descriptions of Environmental Restoration Units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is being prepared to assimilate information on sites included in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of the K-25 Site, one of three major installations on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) built during World War III as part of the Manhattan Project. The information included in this report will be used to establish program priorities so that resources allotted to the K-25 ER Program can be best used to decrease any risk to humans or the environment, and to determine the sequence in which any remedial activities should be conducted. This document will be updated periodically in both paper and Internet versions. Units within this report are described in individual data sheets arranged alphanumerically. Each data sheet includes entries on project status, unit location, dimensions and capacity, dates operated, present function, lifecycle operation, waste characteristics, site status, media of concern, comments, and references. Each data sheet is accompanied by a photograph of the unit, and each unit is located on one of 13 area maps. These areas, along with the sub-area, unit, and sub-unit breakdowns within them, are outlined in Appendix A. Appendix B is a summary of information on remote aerial sensing and its applicability to the ER program.

  6. Remote Sensing ENGO 435 Introduction to Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    1 Remote Sensing ENGO 435 Introduction to Remote Sensing Fall 2003 #12;2 Remote Sensing ENGO 435://www.geomatics.ucalgar.ca/~habib/courses.html #12;3 Remote Sensing ENGO 435 Grading Scheme · Lab Assignments (5 labs): (25% of Total Grade will be reduced by 10% per day for each day overdue. #12;4 Remote Sensing ENGO 435 Programming & Software

  7. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2011 Attachment A: Site Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2011. Included are subsections that summarize the site's geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting and the cultural resources of the NNSS. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NNSS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NNSS. The NNSS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NNSS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NNSS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

  8. REMOTE SURVEILLANCE OF FACILITIES AWAITING D AND D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this investigation is to compile the remote surveillance needs of different DOE facilities and to design and build a system that can measure the required parameters (such as radiation field, temperature, roof leakage), and transmit the data to a base location. The base station with its transceiver, computer, and software will receive, store, retrieve, and manipulate the data so that the values can be graphically represented and trends predicted. It is also important that the components should be commercially available, so that they can be configured into a user-friendly system. Since the measurements need to be performed over extended periods, mostly unattended, the components and system should be able to withstand adverse conditions, such as varying temperatures and relative humidities, and corrosive and radioactive atmospheres. The integrated system will be tested at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) and at a DOE site. Based on these tests, and cost-benefit analysis, plans for deployment of the system will be made. The closed facilities may not have main power and telephone lines. An alternative method of solar-powering the system with storage batteries has been considered, which would be capable of supplying power to the system for a week in cloudy conditions. RF module and RF radio will be used for transmission of data to the remote station and receipt at the base station.

  9. Remote reset circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gritzo, Russell E. (West Melbourne, FL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote reset circuit acts as a stand-alone monitor and controller by clocking in each character sent by a terminal to a computer and comparing it to a given reference character. When a match occurs, the remote reset circuit activates the system's hardware reset line. The remote reset circuit is hardware based centered around monostable multivibrators and is unaffected by system crashes, partial serial transmissions, or power supply transients.

  10. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  11. Remote Belief: Preserving Volition 2 Remote Belief: Preserving Volition 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivilotti, Paul

    1 ! " Remote Belief: Preserving Volition 2 # $ % & # ' # (& #) & $ $ $ $ $ & $ * # # $ $ * # * # $ $ # $ & # * & & %+ $ ' # & $ Remote Belief: Preserving Volition 3 , $ (- ). / $ / $ / 0 1/ / & $ / 0 $ $ & (1 - & ) 2 & # & $ & / 3 & / * # $ / 4 & Remote Belief: Preserving Volition 4 ! All possible scenarios Equivalence classes of scenarios

  12. Impact of Increasing Distributed Wind Power and Wind Turbine Siting on Rural Distribution Feeder Voltage Profiles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, A.; Zhang, Y. C.; Hodge, B. M.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many favorable wind energy resources in North America are located in remote locations without direct access to the transmission grid. Building transmission lines to connect remotely-located wind power plants to large load centers has become a barrier to increasing wind power penetration in North America. By connecting utility-sized megawatt-scale wind turbines to the distribution system, wind power supplied to consumers could be increased greatly. However, the impact of including megawatt-scale wind turbines on distribution feeders needs to be studied. The work presented here examined the impact that siting and power output of megawatt-scale wind turbines have on distribution feeder voltage. This is the start of work to present a general guide to megawatt-scale wind turbine impact on the distribution feeder and finding the amount of wind power that can be added without adversely impacting the distribution feeder operation, reliability, and power quality.

  13. Anywhere But Here: An Introduction to State Control of Hazardous Waste Facility Location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarlock, Dan A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State Control Of Hazardous- Waste Facility Location A. Danautonomy over the location of hazardous-waste managementa hazardous-waste facility-siting process is the location of

  14. Remote USB Ports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshan, Rakesh

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or actuator placed in fields can be accessed by a system remotely and securely. In this thesis, we propose a remote USB port, which is an abstraction of a USB port. In the USB core driver of the server machine, with the hub information, port status of all...

  15. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  16. Building Faculty Support for Remote Storage: A Survey of Collection Behaviors and Preferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Eunice; Martorana, Janet; Granatino, Chris

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Library Off- Site Shelving: Guide for High-DensityWendy P. 1992. "Remote Shelving Comes of Age: StorageIn Library Off-Site Shelving: Guide for High-Density

  17. Location logistics of industrial facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, William Eugene

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of company intent1ons is not made at the correct time and in the correct manner. 6. Recommend Best Areas for Further Invest1 ations. Once the on-site evaluations have been completed, the 11st of possibilities is reduced still further and only the best... location and site selection. This data was gathered through library research, atten- dance of various industr1al development conferences, sol1citation of mater1als from individuals currently involved with industrial facil1ties location, and various...

  18. Safety assessment document for the environmental test complex (Building 834) at Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odell, B.N.; Pfeifer, H.E.

    1981-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A safety assessment was performed to determine if accidents occurring at the 834 Complex at Site 300 could present undue hazards to the general public, personnel at Site 300, or have an adverse effect on the environment. The credible accidents that might have an effect on these facilities or have off-site consequences were considered. These were earthquake, extreme wind (including missiles), lightning, flood, criticality, high explosive (HE) detonation that disperses uranium and beryllium, spontaneous oxidation of plutonium, explosions due to finely divided particles, and a fire. Seismic and extreme wind (including missiles) analyses indicate that the buildings are basically sound. (However, there are a few recommendations to further enhance the structural integrity of these facilities). Additional lightning protection for these facilities is being installed. These buildings are located high above the dry creek bed so that a flood is improbable. A criticality or a high explosive detonation involving plutonium is very remote since the radioactive materials are encased and plutonium and HE are not permitted concurrently in the same area at Site 300. (The exceptions to this policy are that explosive actuating devices are sometimes located in assemblies containing fissile materials. However, a planned or accidental actuation will not effect the safe containment of the fissile material within the assembly). Even though the possibility of an HE explosion involving uranium and beryllium is remote, the off-site lung doses were calculated and found to be below the accepted standards. It was determined that a fire was unlikely due to the low fire loading and the absence of ignition sources. It was also determined that the consequences of any accidents were reduced by the remote location of these facilities, their design, and by administrative controls.

  19. Center for Remote Sensing Remote Sensing Seminar Series 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Feili Li Center for Remote Sensing 10-20-2009 Remote Sensing Seminar Series 2009 #12;Outline for Meteorological Satellite Studies · University of South Florida - Institute for Marine Remote Sensing · Rutgers MODIS Today Real-Time Polar Remote Sensing Products #12;Software Visualization FlAniS AniS is still

  20. Remote foods shopping robot system in a supermarket Tetsuo TOMIZAWA, National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohya, Akihisa

    Remote foods shopping robot system in a supermarket Tetsuo TOMIZAWA, National Inst as a teleoperated tool for accessing and manipulating remote objects. This system attempts to answer the challenge in this research is to help people buy fresh food in a supermarket from a remote location using the Internet. We

  1. SITE ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.P. McCann

    1999-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Site Electrical Power System receives and distributes utility power to all North Portal site users. The major North Portal users are the Protected Area including the subsurface facility and Balance of Plant areas. The system is remotely monitored and controlled from the Surface Operations Monitoring and Control System. The system monitors power quality and provides the capability to transfer between Off-Site Utility and standby power (including dedicated safeguards and security power). Standby power is only distributed to selected loads for personnel safety and essential operations. Security power is only distributed to essential security operations. The standby safeguards and security power is independent from all other site power. The system also provides surface lighting, grounding grid, and lightning protection for the North Portal. The system distributes power during construction, operation, caretaker, and closure phases of the repository. The system consists of substation equipment (disconnect switches, breakers, transformers and grounding equipment) and power distribution cabling from substation to the north portal switch gear building. Additionally, the system includes subsurface facility substation (located on surface), switch-gear, standby diesel generators, underground duct banks, power cables and conduits, switch-gear building and associated distribution equipment for power distribution. Each area substation distributes power to the electrical loads and includes the site grounding, site lighting and lightning protection equipment. The site electrical power system distributes power of sufficient quantity and quality to meet users demands. The Site Electrical Power System interfaces with the North Portal surface systems requiring electrical power. The system interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical Distribution System which will supply power to the underground facilities from the North Portal. Power required for the South Portal and development side activities of the subsurface facility will be provided at the South Portal by the Subsurface Electrical Distribution System. The Site Electrical Power System interfaces with the Off-Site Utility System for the receipt of power. The System interfaces with the Surface Operations Monitoring and Control System for monitoring and control. The System interfaces with MGR Site Layout System for the physical location of equipment and power distribution.

  2. REMOTE SENSING OF THE ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    1 CHAPTER 1: REMOTE SENSING OF THE ENVIRONMENT REFERENCE: Remote Sensing of the Environment John R. Jensen (2007) Second Edition Pearson Prentice Hall What is Remote Sensing? #12;2 Photogrammetry ­ the art of identifying objects and judging their significance (Colwell, 1966). Remote Sensing ­ the measurement

  3. Solid state laser media driven by remote nuclear powered fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prelas, Mark A. (Columbia, MO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is provided for driving a solid state laser by a nuclear powered fluorescence source which is located remote from the fluorescence source. A nuclear reaction produced in a reaction chamber generates fluorescence or photons. The photons are collected from the chamber into a waveguide, such as a fiber optic waveguide. The waveguide transports the photons to the remote laser for exciting the laser.

  4. Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing #12;0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4 and x-ray Ultraviolet Infrared Microwave and radio waves Wavelength in meters (m) Electromagnetic.77 700 red limit 30k0.041 2.48 green500 near-infrared far infrared ultraviolet Thermal Infrare refers

  5. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris (Richland, WA); Larson, David (Las Cruces, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

  6. Siting the International Linear Collider at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Asner, David M.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Fast, James E.; Miley, Harry S.

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Review of the proposed International Linear Collider, applications in high energy physics, and evaluation of the Hanford Site as a possible location for siting the facilityl.

  7. Siting the International Linear Collider at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Asner, David M.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Fast, James E.; Miley, Harry S.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review of the proposed International Linear Collider, applications in high energy physics, and evaluation of the Hanford Site as a possible location for siting the facility.

  8. Remote Chemical Sensing Using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, Warren W.; Strasburg, Jana D.; Aker, Pam M.; Schultz, John F.

    2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Research done by the IR sensors team at PNNL is focused on developing advanced spectroscopic methods for detecting signatures of nuclear, chemical, biological and explosives weapons or weapons production. The sensors we develop fall into two categories: remote sensors that can be operated at distances ranging from 150 m to 10 km, and point sensors that are used for in-situ inspection and detection. FY03 has seen an explosion in FM DIAL progress with the net result being solid confirmation that FM DIAL is a technique capable of remote chemical monitoring in a wide variety of venues. For example, FM DIAL was used to detect a small plume of hydrogen sulfide, a candidate CW agent, released in the desert environment of the Hanford 200 Area site. These experiments were conducted over a range of physical conditions including outside temperatures ranging from 70 F to 105 F and turbulence conditions ranging from quiescent to chaotic. We are now rapidly developing the information needed to design prototype FM DIAL systems that are optimized for specific applications that include scenarios such as fixed position stand-off detection and mobile UAV mounted remote monitoring. Just as an example, in FY04 we will use FM DIAL to detect both in-facility and outdoor release of enriched UF6. The rapid progress in FM DIAL research made in FY03 is attributed to several advances. First, final construction of a custom-designed trailer allowed the instrument to be housed in a mobile temperature-controlled environment. This allowed the experiment to be transported to several locations so that data could be collected under a range of physical conditions. This has led to a better understanding of a variety of experimental noise sources. With this knowledge, we have been able to implement several changes in the way the FM DIAL data is collected and processed, with the net result being a drastic improvement in our confidence of analyte concentration measurement and an improvement i n the instrument detection limit. The range of chemicals detectable by FM DIAL has also been extended. Prior to FY03 only water and nitrous oxide (N2O) had been seen. Experiments on extending the tuning range of the quantum cascade laser (QCL) currently used in the experiments demonstrate that many more species are now accessible including H2S, C2F4H2, and CH4. We additionally demonstrated that FM DIAL measurements can be made using short wave infrared (SWIR) telecommunications lasers. While measurements made using these components are noisier because turbulence and particulate matter cause more interference in this spectral region, monitoring in this region enables larger species to be detected simply because these lasers have a greater tuning range. In addition, SWIR monitoring also allows for the detection of second-row hydride species such as HF and HCl, which are important nuclear and CWA proliferation signatures.

  9. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

    1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

  10. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Shiprock uranium mill tailings site, Shiprock, New Mexico: Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the shiprock uranium mill tailings site located on the Navajo Indian Reservation, one mile south of Shiprock, New Mexico. The site contains 72 acres of tailings and four of the original mill buildings. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for the remedial actions (40 CFR 192). Remedial actions must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The proposed action is to stabilize the tailings at their present location by consolidating the tailings and associated contaminated soils into a recontoured pile. A seven-foot-thick radon barrier would be constructed over the pile and various erosion control measures would be taken to assure the long-term integrity of the pile. Three other alternatives which involve moving the tailings to new locations are assessed in this document. These alternatives which involve moving the tailings to new locations are assessed in this document. These alternatives generally involve greater short-term impacts and are more costly but would result in the tailings being stabilized in a more remote location. The no action alternative is also assessed. 99 refs., 40 figs., 58 tabs.

  11. Assessment of the facilities on Jackass Flats and other Nevada test site facilities for the new nuclear rocket program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, G.; Collins, D.; Dye, K.; Eberhart, C.; Hynes, M.; Kovach, R.; Ortiz, R.; Perea, J.; Sherman, D. (Field Test Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

    1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent NASA/DOE studies for the Space Exploration Initiative have demonstrated a critical need for the ground-based testing of nuclear rocket engines. Experience in the ROVER/NERVA Program, experience in the Nuclear Weapons Testing Program, and involvement in the new nuclear rocket program has motivated our detailed assessment of the facilities used for the ROVER/NERVA Program and other facilities located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The ROVER/NERVA facilities are located in the Nevada Research Development Area (NRDA) on Jackass Flats at NTS, approximately 85 miles northwest of Las Vegas. To guide our assessment of facilities for an engine testing program we have defined a program goal, scope, and process. In particular we have assumed that the program goal will be to certify a full engine system design as flight test ready. All nuclear and non-nuclear components will be individually certified as ready for such a test at sites remote from the NRDA facilities, the components transported to NRDA, and the engine assembled. We also assume that engines of 25,000--100,000 lb thrust levels will be tested with burn times of 1 hour or longer. After a test, the engine will be disassembled, time critical inspections will be executed, and a selection of components will be transported to remote inspection sites. The majority of the components will be stored for future inspection at Jackass Flats. To execute this program scope and process will require ten facilities. We considered the use of all relevant facilities at NTS including existing and new tunnels as well as the facilities at NRDA. Aside from the facilities located at remote sites and the inter-site transportation system, all of the required facilities are available at NRDA. In particular we have studied the refurbishment of E-MAD, ETS-1, R-MAD, and the interconnecting railroad.

  12. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

    1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

  13. rfs Remote File System Softwarepraktikum fur Fortgeschrittene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rfs ­ Remote File System Softwarepraktikum f¨ur Fortgeschrittene Parallele und Verteilte Systeme. Overview 5 2.1. Remote File System Daemon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.2. Remote File System Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.3. Global Remote

  14. IEEE GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING LETTERS 1 Assessment of Temperature and Humidity Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher, Sundar A.

    IEEEProof IEEEProof IEEE GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING LETTERS 1 Assessment of Temperature multiple satellite7 remote sensing data sets and meteorological information, we assess8 the distribution observed at some15 locations. Between the surface and 2-km level, temperature data16 show a cooling of 10

  15. Portsmouth X300 remote assay monitor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.E.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Personnel in the Instrumentation and Controls Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in association with the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) have recently developed a system for monitoring and tracking the assay of enriched uranium from the production facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). This work was sponsored by the USEC and has involved the expansion and improvement of an existing system that was developed by ORNL. The system provides control room operators with real-time information on the withdrawal operations of uranium hexafluoride at the withdrawal stations at PORTS. An additional system was developed to display the real-time information from each of the three withdrawal stations at a remotely located building. This report describes the remote assay monitor and display system that has been developed and installed at PORTS Building X300.

  16. Remote Implementation of Quantum Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Susana F. Huelga; Martin B. Plenio; Guo-Yong Xiang; Jian Li}and Guang-Can Guo

    2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Shared entanglement allows, under certain conditions, the remote implementation of quantum operations. We revise and extend recent theoretical results on the remote control of quantum systems as well as experimental results on the remote manipulation of photonic qubits via linear optical elements.

  17. Vacuum Vessel Remote Handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Remote Handling 4 Vacuum vessel functions · Plasma vacuum environment · Primary tritium confinement, incl ports 65 tonnes - Weight of torus shielding 100 tonnes · Coolant - Normal Operation Water, Handling 12 Vessel octant subassembly fab. (3) · Octant-to-octant splice joint requires double wall weld

  18. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 1 Introduction #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 2 Overview · Remote sensing: definition. · Remote sensing versus photogrammetry. · Elements of remote sensing. · Key;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Overview · Acquisition platforms: ­ Historical overview. ­ Terrestrial

  19. Remote Viewing End Effectors for Light Duty Utility Arm Robot (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heckendorn, F.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Robinson, C.W.; Haynes, H.B.; Anderosn, E.K.; Pardini, A.F. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Robotics Development Groups at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the Hanford site have developed remote video and photography systems for deployment in underground radioactive-waste storage tanks at the Department of Energy (DOE) sites as a part of the Office of Science and Technology (OST) program within DOE. Viewing and documenting the tank interiors and their associated annular spaces is an extremely valuable tool in characterizing their condition and contents and in controlling their remediation. Several specialized video/photography systems and robotic End Effectors have been fabricated that provide remote viewing and lighting. All are remotely deployable into and out of the tank, with all viewing functions remotely operated. Positioning all control components away from the facility prevents the potential for personnel exposure to radiation and contamination. Only the remote video systems are discussed in this paper.

  20. Site Energy Reduction Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagen, P. R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DuPont’s Sabine River Works site is the largest energy consuming location within DuPont. In the year 2000, each production area was encouraged to reduce energy costs. By 2003 site energy consumption was down 16% on an absolute basis and 12% on a BTU...

  1. Published in Proceedings of the ANS 7th Topical Meeting on Robotics & Remote Systems, Augusta GA, April 27-May 1, 1997 EVALUATION OF AN INTERACTIVE TECHNIQUE FOR CREATING SITE MODELS FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoff, William A.

    .S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office, under Contract No. DE-AC07-94ID13223 II. INTRODUCTION The use waste has become a necessity due to the risk to humans in such environments. Control schemes for robots in the scene is used in conjunction with a graphical user interface or CAD software to produce a site model

  2. Hyperspectral remote sensing analysis of short rotation woody crops grown with controlled nutrient and irrigation treatments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Jungho; Jensen, John R.; Coleman, Mark; Nelson, Eric

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract - Hyperspectral remote sensing research was conducted to document the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of controlled forest plots subjected to various nutrient and irrigation treatments. The experimental plots were located on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC. AISA hyperspectral imagery were analysed using three approaches, including: (1) normalized difference vegetation index based simple linear regression (NSLR), (2) partial least squares regression (PLSR) and (3) machine-learning regression trees (MLRT) to predict the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of the crops (leaf area index, stem biomass and five leaf nutrients concentrations). The calibration and cross-validation results were compared between the three techniques. The PLSR approach generally resulted in good predictive performance. The MLRT approach appeared to be a useful method to predict characteristics in a complex environment (i.e. many tree species and numerous fertilization and/or irrigation treatments) due to its powerful adaptability.

  3. Library Locations Locations other than Main Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Library Locations Locations other than Main Library Example: Feminist Studies HQ1410 .U54 2009 University of California, Santa Barbara Library www.library.ucsb.edu Updated 3-2014 A - B.......................................6 Central M - N..................................................Arts Library (Music Building) P

  4. audio-magnetotelluric station location: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Chicago ATLAS HEP, Enrico Fermi Institute 5640 S. Ellis Ave Chicago, IL 60637 October 15, 2007 Abstract A remote monitoring station located at the University of Chicago is...

  5. Reactor Decommissioning - Balancing Remote and Manual Activities - 12159

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Matt [S.A. Technology (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactors come in a wide variety of styles, size, and ages. However, during decommissioned one issue they all share is the balancing of remotely and manually activities. For the majority of tasks there is a desire to use manual methods because remote working can be slower, more expensive, and less reliable. However, because of the unique hazards of nuclear reactors some level of remote activity will be necessary to provide adequate safety to workers and properly managed and designed it does not need to be difficult nor expensive. The balance of remote versus manual work can also affect the amount and types of waste that is generated. S.A.Technology (SAT) has worked on a number of reactor decommissioning projects over the last two decades and has a range of experience with projects using remote methods to those relying primarily on manual activities. This has created a set of lessons learned and best practices on how to balance the need for remote handling and manual operations. Finding a balance between remote and manual operations on reactor decommissioning can be difficult but by following certain broad guidelines it is possible to have a very successfully decommissioning. It is important to have an integrated team that includes remote handling experts and that this team plans the work using characterization efforts that are efficient and realistic. The equipment need to be simple, robust and flexible and supported by an on-site team committed to adapting to day-to-day challenges. Also, the waste strategy needs to incorporate the challenges of remote activities in its planning. (authors)

  6. Remote sensing at the Speer off ramp, Denver, CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slott, R. [Shell Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote sensing under controlled driving conditions predicts failed FTP CO and HC emissions similarly to the IM240 test. Careful selection of on-road, remote sensing measurement sites can constrain driving modes. At one such site, the Speer Boulevard I-25 off ramp in Denver, Don Stedman and his co-workers made remote sensing measurements from 1989 to 1995. Studies were performed during five of these seven years. This talk will discuss the results of these studies including (1) the relative importance of new vehicle technology and vehicle deterioration for on-road Co emissions, and (2) an early estimate of additional on-road HC and CO emission reductions from Denver`s Enhanced I/M program.

  7. Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

  8. Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

  9. PV Charging System for Remote Area Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilsemann, Frederick; Thompson, Roger

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to provide the public with a study of new as well existing technology to recharge batteries used in the field. A new product(s) will also be built based upon the information ascertained. American Electric Vehicles, Inc. (AEV) developed systems and methods suitable for charging state-of-the-art lithium-ion batteries in remote locations under both ideal and cloudy weather conditions. Conceptual designs are described for existing and next generation technology, particularly as regards solar cells, peak power trackers and batteries. Prototype system tests are reported.

  10. U-142: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain Access U-212: RSA Authentication Manager Flaws Permit Cross-Site and Cross-Frame Scripting and URL Redirection Attacks U-026: Cisco Small...

  11. V-171: Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Apple Safari Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks PLATFORM: Apple Safari prior to 6.0.5 ABSTRACT: Several vulnerabilities were...

  12. Remote repair appliance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heumann, Frederick K. (Ballston Spa, NY); Wilkinson, Jay C. (Ballston Spa, NY); Wooding, David R. (Saratoga Springs, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote appliance for supporting a tool for performing work at a worksite on a substantially circular bore of a workpiece and for providing video signals of the worksite to a remote monitor comprising: a baseplate having an inner face and an outer face; a plurality of rollers, wherein each roller is rotatably and adjustably attached to the inner face of the baseplate and positioned to roll against the bore of the workpiece when the baseplate is positioned against the mouth of the bore such that the appliance may be rotated about the bore in a plane substantially parallel to the baseplate; a tool holding means for supporting the tool, the tool holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the baseplate such that the working end of the tool is positioned on the inner face side of the baseplate; a camera for providing video signals of the worksite to the remote monitor; and a camera holding means for supporting the camera on the inner face side of the baseplate, the camera holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the baseplate. In a preferred embodiment, roller guards are provided to protect the rollers from debris and a bore guard is provided to protect the bore from wear by the rollers and damage from debris.

  13. Automating Inspection and Documentation of Remote Building Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Ken

    construction sites. Index Terms-- automation, construction, networked robots, pan-tilt-zoom camera, panoramic of the construction process over time to reduce travel costs and human risk. Recent developments in wireless1 Automating Inspection and Documentation of Remote Building Construction using a Robotic Camera

  14. T-590: HP Diagnostics Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A potential security vulnerability has been identified in HP Diagnostics. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely resulting in cross site scripting (XSS).

  15. Remotely releasable template and dome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, G.G. Jr.

    1986-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a remotely releasable template assembly for precision placement of a template of the type having at least one sleeve member for placing about a well casing stub extending from the sea floor, comprising: mating means mounted with the template for demountably coupling the template to a complementary end of a drill string extending from a support structure located above the well casing stub. The mating means is positioned near the template assembly center of balance when the template assembly is demountably coupled to the drill string; the vertical axis of the drill string being essentially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the sleeve member when the drill string is demountably couple to the template assembly; the end of the drill string includes a gyroscopic orientation means for detecting the deviation of the template from a desired bearing; and the mating means maintains the template semi-ridgidly coupled to the drill string until the template is controllably released from the drill string; whereby the rotation of the drill string about the vertical axis of the drill string rotates the template assembly into the desired orientation.

  16. Remote state preparation: arbitrary remote control of photon polarization Nicholas A. Peters,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwiat, Paul

    Remote state preparation: arbitrary remote control of photon polarization Nicholas A. Peters,1 University, Kirksville, MO 63501 (Dated: October 22, 2004) We experimentally demonstrate the first remote, we remotely prepare arbitrary states at two wavelengths. Further, we derive theoretical bounds

  17. REMOTE AND RURAL ENTERPRISE (RARE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viglas, Anastasios

    in remote central Australia is establishing a commercial aquaponics enterprise, a social entrepreneur, hospitality and horticulture. The current focus is on a commercial aquaponics enterprise and a cultural

  18. Remote Sensor Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 c/) ReleaseRemote AccessSpectrum

  19. Remote-State Prparation eines einzelnen Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinfurter, Harald

    Remote-State Präparation eines einzelnen Atoms Diplomarbeit am Department für Physik der Ludwig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.3.3 Remote-State-Präparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.3.4 Zusammenfassung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 3 Remote-State-Präparation 31 3.1 Einleitung

  20. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoff, D.L.; Mitchell, R.G.; Bowman, G.C.; Moore, R.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To verify that exposures resulting from operations at the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities have remained very small, each site at which nuclear activities are underway operates an environmental surveillance program to monitor the air, water and any other pathway where radionuclides from operations might conceivably reach workers or members of the public. This report presents data collected in 1989 for the routine environmental surveillance program conducted by the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL) of DOE and the US Geological Survey (USGS) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site. The environmental surveillance program for the INEL and vicinity for 1989 included the collection and analysis of samples from potential exposure pathways. Three basic groups of samples were collected. Those collected within the INEL boundaries will be referred to as onsite samples. Samples collected outside, but near, the Site boundaries will be referred to as boundary samples or part of a group of offsite samples. Samples collected from locations considerably beyond the Site boundaries will be referred to as distant samples or part of the offsite group. With the exception of Craters of the Moon National Monument, the distant locations are sufficiently remote from the Site to ensure that detectable radioactivity is primarily due to natural background sources or sources other than INEL operations. 35 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs.

  1. Preliminary siting characterization Salt Disposition Facility - Site B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyatt, D.

    2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A siting and reconnaissance geotechnical program has been completed in S-Area at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This program investigated the subsurface conditions for the area known as ``Salt Disposition Facility (SDF), Site B'' located northeast of H-Area and within the S-Area. Data acquired from the Site B investigation includes both field exploration and laboratory test data.

  2. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, L.J.; Foreman, L.R.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved. 7 figs.

  3. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, Leander J. (Los Alamos, NM); Foreman, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved.

  4. Structure of the complex of a yeast glucoamylase with acarbose reveals the presence of a raw starch binding site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , shows clearly the influence of cryo-cooling, which is manifested in shrinkage of the mole- cule, one at the active site and the second at a site remote from the active site, curved around Tyr464. fibuligera IFO 0111, a raw starch-degrading enzyme, it is reason- able to expect the presence of the remote

  5. Results of the remote sensing feasibility study for the uranium hexafluoride storage cylinder yard program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balick, L.K.; Bowman, D.R. [Bechtel Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Remote Sensing Lab.; Bounds, J.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE manages the safe storage of approximately 650,000 tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride remaining from the Cold War. This slightly radioactive, but chemically active, material is contained in more than 46,000 steel storage cylinders that are located at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. Some of the cylinders are more than 40 years old, and approximately 17,500 are considered problem cylinders because their physical integrity is questionable. These cylinders require an annual visual inspection. The remainder of the 46,000-plus cylinders must be visually inspected every four years. Currently, the cylinder inspection program is extremely labor intensive. Because these inspections are accomplished visually, they may not be effective in the early detection of leaking cylinders. The inspection program requires approximately 12--14 full-time-equivalent (FTE) employees. At the cost of approximately $125K per FTE, this translates to $1,500K per annum just for cylinder inspection. As part of the technology-development portion of the DOE Cylinder Management Program, the DOE Office of Facility Management requested the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) to evaluate remote sensing techniques that have potential to increase the effectiveness of the inspection program and, at the same time, reduce inspection costs and personnel radiation exposure. During two site visits (March and May 1996) to the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, TN, RSL personnel tested and characterized seven different operating systems believed to detect leakage, surface contamination, thickness and corrosion of cylinder walls, and general area contamination resulting from breached cylinders. The following techniques were used and their performances are discussed: Laser-induced fluorescent imaging; Long-range alpha detection; Neutron activation analysis; Differential gamma-ray attenuation; Compton scatterometry; Active infrared inspection; and Passive thermal infrared imaging.

  6. GTRI Remote Monitoring System: Training and Operational Needs Assessment Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day, Debra E.; Fox, Sorcha

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA's) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to identify, secure, recover and facilitate the disposition of vulnerable nuclear and high-risk radioactive materials around the world that pose a threat to the United States and the international community. The GTRI's unique mission to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide directly addresses recommendations of the 9/11 Commission1, and is a vital part of the President's National Security Strategy and the Global Initiative. The GTRI Remote Monitoring System (RMS) is a standalone security system that includes radiation and tamper alarms, and CCTV; which can be transmitted securely over the Internet to multiple on-site and off-site locations. Through our experiences during installation of the system at 162 sites, plus feedback received from Alarm Response Training course participants, site input to project teams and analysis of trouble calls; indications were that current system training was lacking and inconsistent. A survey was undertaken to gather information from RMS users across the nation, to evaluate the current level of training and determine what if any improvements needed to be made. Additional questions were focused on the operation of the RMS software. The training survey was initially sent electronically to 245 users at the RMS sites and achieved a 37.6% return rate. Analysis of the resulting data revealed that 34.6% of the respondents had not received training or were unsure if they had, despite the fact that vendor engineers provide training at installation of the system. Any training received was referred to as minimal, and brief, not documented, and nothing in writing. 63.7% of respondents said they were either not at all prepared or only somewhat prepared to use the RMS software required to effectively operate the system. As a result of this analysis, a formal training curriculum will be designed and implemented to include several blended learning delivery options. This training will be piloted at RMS sites; initial training will become a required element of RMS installation and refresher training will be considered for sustainability of operations.

  7. Remote-Handled Low Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  8. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, Leander J. (Los Almos, NM); Foreman, Larry R. (late of Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A locator with a part support is used to hold a part onto the kinematic mount of a tooling machine so that the part can be held in or replaced in exactly the same position relative to the cutting tool for machining different surfaces of the part or for performing different machining operations on the same or different surfaces of the part. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls placed at equidistant positions around the planar surface of the locator and the kinematic mount has a plurality of magnets which alternate with grooves which accommodate the portions of the steel balls projecting from the locator. The part support holds the part to be machined securely in place in the locator. The locator can be easily detached from the kinematic mount, turned over, and replaced onto the same kinematic mount or another kinematic mount on another tooling machine without removing the part to be machined from the locator so that there is no need to touch or reposition the part within the locator, thereby assuring exact replication of the position of the part in relation to the cutting tool on the tooling machine for each machining operation on the part.

  9. Remote community drinking water supply : mechanisms of uranium retention and adsorption by ultrafiltration, nanofiltration and reverse osmosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulte-Herbruggen, Helfrid Maria Albertina

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Worldwide, around 884 million people lack access to safe drinking water. To address this, groundwater sources such as boreholes and wells are often installed in remote locations especially in developing countries. However, ...

  10. Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium Production Reactors at the US DOE Hanford Site - 13438

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schilperoort, Daryl L.; Faulk, Darrin [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine plutonium production reactors located on DOE's Hanford Site are being placed into an Interim Safe Storage (ISS) period that extends to 2068. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for ISS [1] was completed in 1993 and proposed a 75-year storage period that began when the EIS was finalized. Remote electronic monitoring of the temperature and water level alarms inside the safe storage enclosure (SSE) with visual inspection inside the SSE every 5 years are the only planned operational activities during this ISS period. At the end of the ISS period, the reactor cores will be removed intact and buried in a landfill on the Hanford Site. The ISS period allows for radioactive decay of isotopes, primarily Co-60 and Cs-137, to reduce the dose exposure during disposal of the reactor cores. Six of the nine reactors have been placed into ISS by having an SSE constructed around the reactor core. (authors)

  11. Site Index - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariate Metal-OrganicPulseSimulation,Site Index

  12. An advanced unmanned vehicle for remote applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletta, J.B.; Sackos, J.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An autonomous mobile robotic capability is critical to developing remote work applications for hazardous environments. A few potential applications include humanitarian demining and ordnance neutralization, extraterrestrial science exploration, and hazardous waste cleanup. The ability of the remote platform to sense and maneuver within its environment is a basic technology requirement which is currently lacking. This enabling technology will open the door for force multiplication and cost effective solutions to remote operations. The ultimate goal of this work is to develop a mobile robotic platform that can identify and avoid local obstacles as it traverses from its current location to a specified destination. This goal directed autonomous navigation scheme uses the Global Positioning System (GPS) to identify the robot`s current coordinates in space and neural network processing of LADAR range images for local obstacle detection and avoidance. The initial year funding provided by this LDRD project has developed a small exterior mobile robotic development platform and a fieldable version of Sandia`s Scannerless Range Imager (SRI) system. The robotic testbed platform is based on the Surveillance And Reconnaissance ground Equipment (SARGE) robotic vehicle design recently developed for the US DoD. Contingent upon follow-on funding, future enhancements will develop neural network processing of the range map data to traverse unstructured exterior terrain while avoiding obstacles. The SRI will provide real-time range images to a neural network for autonomous guidance. Neural network processing of the range map data will allow real-time operation on a Pentium based embedded processor board.

  13. Remote Method Invocations 13.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    Chapter 13 Remote Method Invocations 13.1 Introduction A popular way of developing distributed applications is based on the concept of remote procedure calls (RPC's) or remote method invocations (RMI's). Here the main idea is that a process can make calls to methods of a remote object as if it were

  14. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Image Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    1 Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 6 Image Classification Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 2. ­ Unsupervised classification. · Accuracy assessment. #12;2 Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Image Classification of image pixels is based on their digital numbers/grey values in one or more spectral bands. Remote Sensing

  15. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Radiometric Processing of Remote Sensing Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 4 Radiometric Processing of Remote Sensing Data #12;Remote. · Noise removal. · Point and edge detection. ­ Frequency domain. #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Radiometric Calibration #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 4 Recorded Digital Numbers (DN) · Recorded grey

  16. Locating Heat Recovery Opportunities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterland, A. F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic concepts of heat recovery are defined as they apply to the industrial community. Methods for locating, ranking, and developing heat recovery opportunities are presented and explained. The needs for useful heat 'sinks' are emphasized as equal...

  17. Locating Heat Recovery Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterland, A. F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic concepts of heat recovery are defined as they apply to the industrial community. Methods for locating, ranking, and developing heat recovery opportunities are presented and explained. The needs for useful heat 'sinks' are emphasized as equal...

  18. Chit-based Remote Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paluska, Justin Mazzola

    We propose a model for reliable remote storage founded on contract law. Consumers submit their bits to storage providers in exchange for a chit. A chit is a cryptographically secure, verifiable contract between a consumer ...

  19. Remote control for anode-cathode adjustment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roose, Lars D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for remotely adjusting the anode-cathode gap in a pulse power machine has an electric motor located within a hollow cathode inside the vacuum chamber of the pulse power machine. Input information for controlling the motor for adjusting the anode-cathode gap is fed into the apparatus using optical waveguides. The motor, controlled by the input information, drives a worm gear that moves a cathode tip. When the motor drives in one rotational direction, the cathode is moved toward the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is diminished. When the motor drives in the other direction, the cathode is moved away from the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is increased. The motor is powered by batteries housed in the hollow cathode. The batteries may be rechargeable, and they may be recharged by a photovoltaic cell in combination with an optical waveguide that receives recharging energy from outside the hollow cathode. Alternatively, the anode-cathode gap can be remotely adjusted by a manually-turned handle connected to mechanical linkage which is connected to a jack assembly. The jack assembly converts rotational motion of the handle and mechanical linkage to linear motion of the cathode moving toward or away from the anode.

  20. Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the PNNL Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.; Antonio, Ernest J.

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of developing a radiological air monitoring program for the PNNL Site that is distinct from that of the nearby Hanford Site. The original DQO (PNNL-19427) considered radiological emissions at the PNNL Site from Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) major emissions units. This first revision considers PNNL Site changes subsequent to the implementation of the original DQO. A team was established to determine how the PNNL Site changes would continue to meet federal regulations and address guidelines developed to monitor air emissions and estimate offsite impacts of radioactive material operations. The result is an updated program to monitor the impact to the public from the PNNL Site. The team used the emission unit operation parameters and local meteorological data as well as information from the PSF Potential-to-Emit documentation and Notices of Construction submitted to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The locations where environmental monitoring stations would most successfully characterize the maximum offsite impacts of PNNL Site emissions from the three PSF buildings with major emission units were determined from these data. Three monitoring station locations were determined during the original revision of this document. This first revision considers expanded Department of Energy operations south of the PNNL Site and relocation of the two offsite, northern monitoring stations to sites near the PNNL Site fenceline. Inclusion of the southern facilities resulted in the proposal for a fourth monitoring station in the southern region. The southern expansion added two minor emission unit facilities and one diffuse emission unit facility. Relocation of the two northern stations was possible due to the use of solar power, rather than the previous limitation of the need for access to AC power, at these more remote locations. Addendum A contains all the changes brought about by the revision 1 considerations. This DQO report also updates the discussion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the PNNL Site air samples and how existing Hanford Site monitoring program results could be used. This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006) as well as several other published DQOs.

  1. Remote direct memory access

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, parallel computers, and computer program products are disclosed for remote direct memory access. Embodiments include transmitting, from an origin DMA engine on an origin compute node to a plurality target DMA engines on target compute nodes, a request to send message, the request to send message specifying a data to be transferred from the origin DMA engine to data storage on each target compute node; receiving, by each target DMA engine on each target compute node, the request to send message; preparing, by each target DMA engine, to store data according to the data storage reference and the data length, including assigning a base storage address for the data storage reference; sending, by one or more of the target DMA engines, an acknowledgment message acknowledging that all the target DMA engines are prepared to receive a data transmission from the origin DMA engine; receiving, by the origin DMA engine, the acknowledgement message from the one or more of the target DMA engines; and transferring, by the origin DMA engine, data to data storage on each of the target compute nodes according to the data storage reference using a single direct put operation.

  2. Algorithms, Protocols & Systems for Remote Observation Using Networked Robotic Cameras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Ni

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    assist in waste cleanup using Point- and-Direct (PAD) commands. Users point to cleanup locations in a shared image and a robot excavates each location in turn. Recent developments in MOSR systems can be found in [26,27]. In [27] Goldberg et al. propose...ALGORITHMS, PROTOCOLS AND SYSTEMS FOR REMOTE OBSERVATION USING NETWORKED ROBOTIC CAMERAS A Dissertation by NI QIN Submitted to the O?ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulflllment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR...

  3. CSMRI Site Proposed Plan Proposed Plan for CSMRI Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    also includes summaries of other alternatives that were evaluated for use at the Site. This document participation responsibilities under the Section 300.430(f)(2) of the National Oil and Hazardous Substances on the Site that were removed in the mid-1990s. A settling pond, located between the building complex

  4. Remote shock sensing and notification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Britton, Charles L. (Alcoa, TN) [Alcoa, TN; Pearce, James (Lenoir City, TN) [Lenoir City, TN; Jagadish, Usha (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-power shock sensing system includes at least one shock sensor physically coupled to a chemical storage tank to be monitored for impacts, and an RF transmitter which is in a low-power idle state in the absence of a triggering signal. The system includes interface circuitry including or activated by the shock sensor, wherein an output of the interface circuitry is coupled to an input of the RF transmitter. The interface circuitry triggers the RF transmitter with the triggering signal to transmit an alarm message to at least one remote location when the sensor senses a shock greater than a predetermined threshold. In one embodiment the shock sensor is a shock switch which provides an open and a closed state, the open state being a low power idle state.

  5. Remote shock sensing and notification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan (Knoxville, TN); Britton, Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Pearce, James (Lenoir City, TN); Jagadish, Usha (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-power shock sensing system includes at least one shock sensor physically coupled to a chemical storage tank to be monitored for impacts, and an RF transmitter which is in a low-power idle state in the absence of a triggering signal. The system includes interference circuitry including or activated by the shock sensor, wherein an output of the interface circuitry is coupled to an input of the RF transmitter. The interface circuitry triggers the RF transmitting with the triggering signal to transmit an alarm message to at least one remote location when the sensor senses a shock greater than a predetermined threshold. In one embodiment the shock sensor is a shock switch which provides an open and a closed state, the open state being a low power idle state.

  6. Considerations for PV Site Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    array. #12;Conductor Routing & Inverter Location The location of the inverter in relation to the PV of the conductors between the PV array and the inverter, and between the inverter and the AC load centerConsiderations for PV Site Surveys John Wiles Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy this loss

  7. Alaska Open-file Report 144 Assessment of Thermal Springs Sites Aleutian Arc, Atka Island to Becherof Lake -- Preliminary Results and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motyka, R.J.; Moorman, M.A.; Liss, S.A.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Twenty of more than 30 thermal spring areas reported to exist in the Aleutian arc extending from Atka Island to Becherof Lake were investigated during July and August, 1980. Thermal activity of three of these sites had diminished substantially or no longer existed. At least seven more sites where thermal-spring activity is probable or certain were not visited because of their remoteness or because of time constraints. The existence of several other reported thermal spring sites could not be verified; these sites are considered questionable. On the basis of geothermometry, subsurface reservoir temperatures in excess of 150 C are estimated for 10 of the thermal spring sites investigated. These sites all occur in or near regions of Recent volcanism. Five of the sites are characterized by fumaroles and steaming ground, indicating the presence of at least a shallow vapor-dominated zone. Two, the Makushin Valley and Glacier Valley thermal areas, occur on the flanks of active Mukushin Volcano located on Unalaska Island, and may be connected to a common source of heat. Gas geothermometry suggests that the reservoir feeding the Kliuchef thermal field, located on the flanks of Kliuchef volcano of northeast Atka Island, may be as high as 239 C.

  8. Power plant emissions verified remotely at Four Corners sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measurements can support Clean Air Act regulations LOS ALAMOS, N.M., May 19, 2014-Air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from two coal-fired power plants in the Four...

  9. Power plant emissions verified remotely at Four Corners sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical Information STIP Map DocumentRates >Power plant

  10. Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N.JuneAsPipeline FirstLuncheon

  11. Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18,new2004_v1.3_5.0.zipFlorida4Visitors ChapterRequirements

  12. Expert operator preferences in remote manipulator control systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundstrom, E. [Human Machine Interfaces, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Draper, J.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Fausz, A.; Woods, H. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a survey of expert remote manipulator operators designed to identify features of control systems related to operator efficiency and comfort. It provides information for designing the control center for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System (TWRMS) Test Bed, described in a separate report. Research questions concerned preferred modes of control, optimum work sessions, sources of operator fatigue, importance of control system design features, and desired changes in control rooms. Participants comprised four expert remote manipulator operators at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who individually have from 9 to 20 years of experience using teleoperators. The operators had all used rate and position control, and all preferred bilateral (force-reflecting) position control. They reported spending an average of 2.75 h in control of a teleoperator system during a typical shift. All were accustomed to working in a crew of two and alternating control and support roles in 2-h rotations in an 8-h shift. Operators reported that fatigue in using remote manipulator systems came mainly from watching TV monitors and making repetitive motions. Three of four experienced symptoms, including headaches and sore eyes, wrists, and back. Of 17 features of control rooms rated on importance, highest ratings went to comfort and support provided by the operator chair, location of controls, location of video monitors, video image clarity, types of controls, and control modes. When asked what they wanted to change, operators said work stations designed for comfort; simpler, lighter hand-controls; separate controls for each camera; better placement of remote camera; color monitors; and control room layouts that support crew interaction. Results of this small survey reinforced the importance of ergonomic factors in remote manipulation.

  13. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Rynes, N.J. (Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States)); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA's characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL's RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rynes, N.J. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA`s characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL`s RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Vol. 48 No. SIG 0(PRO 35) 2007 Java Remote GluonJ Remote GluonJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiba, Shigeru

    Vol. 48 No. SIG 0(PRO 35) 2007 Java Remote GluonJ Remote GluonJ Remote GluonJ Remote GluonJ Java Remote GluonJ Remote GluonJ An AOP based Agile Development Environment for Distributed Software Muga/from the existing program easily. To support software development for Java with our method, we developed Remote

  16. T-573: Windows Remote Desktop Client DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in Windows Remote Desktop Client. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system.

  17. TRACKING SITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003235MLTPL00 AASG Geothermal Data submissions tracking application and site.  https://github.com/usgin/aasgtrack 

  18. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Revision 0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Burmeister

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 484 Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) activities called for the identification and remediation of surface hot spot depleted uranium (DU) with some excavation to determine the vertical extent of contamination (NNSA/NSO, 2004). During the CAU 484 SAFER investigation (conducted November 2003 through August 2007), approximately 50 locations containing DU were identified on Antelope Lake. All but four locations (CA-1, SA-5-9, SA-12-15, and SA-4) were remediated. Figure 1-1 shows locations of the four use restriction (UR) sites. The four locations were determined to have failed the SAFER conceptual site model assumption of a small volume hot spot. Two of the locations (CA-1 and SA-5-9) were excavated to depths of 3.5 to 7 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs), and a third location (SA-12-15) with a footprint of 30 by 60 ft was excavated to a depth of 0.5 ft. At the fourth site (SA-4), the discovery of unexploded ordnance (UXO) halted the excavation due to potential safety concerns. Remediation activities on Antelope Lake resulted in the removal of approximately 246 cubic yards (yd3) of DU-impacted soil from the four UR sites; however, Kiwi surveys confirmed that residual DU contamination remained at each of the four sites. (The Kiwi was a Remote Sensing Laboratory [RSL] vehicle equipped with a data-acquisition system and four sodium iodide gamma detectors. Surveys were conducted with the vehicle moving at a rate of approximately 10 miles per hour with the gamma detectors positioned 14 to 28 inches [in.] above the ground surface [NNSA/NSO, 2004]).

  19. Research Site Locations for Current EERE Postdoctoral Awards | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuickEnergyfor aDepartment ofDepartmentofProposalof

  20. Research Site Locations for Current and Former EERE Postdoctoral Awards |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9,Award RecipientsActMission toResearch Mentors Research

  1. On-Site Notaries Public * Name Location Phone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearch &CEATOmar The

  2. Use of Remote Technology in the Surface Water Environmental Monitoring Program at SRS Reducing Measurements in the Field - 13336

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy, T.; Terry, B.; Meyer, A.; Hall, J.; Allen, P.; Hughey, D.; Hartley, T. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are a wide range of sensor and remote technology applications available for use in environmental monitoring programs. Each application has its own set of limitations and can be challenging when attempting to utilize it under diverse environmental field conditions. The Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Program has implemented several remote sensing and surface water flow technologies that have increased the quality of the data while reducing the number of field measurements. Implementation of this technology reduced the field time for personnel that commute across the Savannah River Site (SRS) over a span of 310 square miles. The wireless surface water flow technology allows for immediate notification of changing field conditions or equipment failure thus reducing data-loss or erroneous field data and improving data-quality. This wireless flow technology uses the stage-to-flow methodology coupled with implementation of a robust highly accurate Acoustic Doppler Profiler system for measuring discharge under various field conditions. Savings for implementation of the wireless flow application and Flowlink{sup R} technology equates to approximately 1175 hours annually for the radiological liquid effluent and surveillance programs. The SonTek River Suveyor and Flowtracker technologies are utilized for calibration of the wireless flow monitoring devices in the site streams and validation of effluent flows at the SRS. Implementation of similar wireless devices is also planned in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm-water Monitoring Program. SRS personnel have been developing a unique flow actuator device. This device activates an ISCO{sup TM} automated sampler under flowing conditions at storm-water outfall locations across the site. This technology is unique in that it was designed to be used under field conditions with rapid changes in flow and sedimentation where traditional actuators have been unsuccessful in tripping the automated sampler. In addition, automated rain gauges will be tied into this technology for immediate notification of rain at storm-water locations further enhancing the automation of environmental data collection. These technological improvements at SRS have led to data-quality improvements while reducing the field technician time in the field and costs for maintaining the traditional environmental monitoring applications. (authors)

  3. Fuel cell power systems for remote applications. Phase 1 final report and business plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Fuel Cell Power Systems for Remote Applications project is to commercialize a 0.1--5 kW integrated fuel cell power system (FCPS). The project targets high value niche markets, including natural gas and oil pipelines, off-grid homes, yachts, telecommunication stations and recreational vehicles. Phase 1 includes the market research, technical and financial analysis of the fuel cell power system, technical and financial requirements to establish manufacturing capability, the business plan, and teaming arrangements. Phase 1 also includes project planning, scope of work, and budgets for Phases 2--4. The project is a cooperative effort of Teledyne Brown Engineering--Energy Systems, Schatz Energy Research Center, Hydrogen Burner Technology, and the City of Palm Desert. Phases 2 through 4 are designed to utilize the results of Phase 1, to further the commercial potential of the fuel cell power system. Phase 2 focuses on research and development of the reformer and fuel cell and is divided into three related, but potentially separate tasks. Budgets and timelines for Phase 2 can be found in section 4 of this report. Phase 2 includes: Task A--Develop a reformate tolerant fuel cell stack and 5 kW reformer; Task B--Assemble and deliver a fuel cell that operates on pure hydrogen to the University of Alaska or another site in Alaska; Task C--Provide support and training to the University of Alaska in the setting up and operating a fuel cell test lab. The Phase 1 research examined the market for power systems for off-grid homes, yachts, telecommunication stations and recreational vehicles. Also included in this report are summaries of the previously conducted market reports that examined power needs for remote locations along natural gas and oil pipelines. A list of highlights from the research can be found in the executive summary of the business plan.

  4. Dual-Remote Raman Technology for In-Situ Identification of Tank Waste - 13549

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Sam; Levitskaia, Tatiana; Lines, Amanda; Smith, Frannie; Josephson, Gary [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA, 99352 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA, 99352 (United States); Bello, Job [EIC, Inc., Norwood, MA 02062 (United States)] [EIC, Inc., Norwood, MA 02062 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new Raman spectroscopic system for in-situ identification of the composition of solid nuclear tank waste is being developed by collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and EIC Laboratories, Inc. The recent advancements in Raman technology allow probing the chemical composition of the tank waste without sample collection. In the newly tested configuration, the Raman probe is installed on the top of the tank riser and sends the incident laser beam to the bottom of the tank, 10 - 70 feet away. The returning light containing chemical information is collected by the Raman probe and is transmitted via fiber optic cable to the spectrometer located outside the tank farm area. This dual remote technology significantly expands currently limited options for the safe rapid in-situ identification of the solid tank waste needed for the retrieval decisions. The developed Raman system was extensively tested for acceptability prior to tank farm deployment. This testing included calibration of the system with respect of the distance between the Raman probe and the sample, incident laser beam angle, and presence of the optical interferences. The Raman system was successfully deployed on Tank C-111 at the US DOE Hanford site. As the result of this deployment, the composition of the hardpan at the bottom of C-111 tank was identified. Further development of the dual-remote Raman technology will provide a significant safety enhancement eliminating the potential of personnel radiation exposure associated with the grab sample collection and expands options of the rapid and cost-effective in-situ chemical analysis of the tank waste. (authors)

  5. Dual-Remote Raman Technology for In-Situ Identification of Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lines, Amanda M.; Smith, Frances N.; Josephson, Gary B.; Bello, Job M.

    2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new Raman spectroscopic system for in-situ identification of the composition of the solid nuclear tank waste is being developed by collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and EIC, Inc. The recent advancements in the Raman technology allow probing the chemical composition of the tank waste without sample collection. In the newly tested configuration, the Raman probe is installed on the top of the tank riser and sends the incident laser beam to the bottom of the tank, 10 – 70 feet away. The returning light containing chemical information is collected by the Raman probe and transmits it via fiber optic cable to the spectrometer located outside the tank farm area. This dual remote technology significantly expands currently limited options for the safe rapid in-situ identification of the solid tank waste needed for the retrieval decisions. The developed Raman system was extensively tested for acceptability prior tank farm deployment. This testing included calibration of the system with the respect of the distance between the Raman probe and the sample, incident laser beam angle, and presence of the optical interferences. The Raman system was successfully deployed to C-111 tank at the US DOE Hanford site. As the result of this deployment, the composition of the hardpan at the bottom of C-111 tank was identified. Further development of the dual-remote Raman technology will provide a significant safety enhancement eliminating the potential of personnel radiation exposure associated with the grab sample collection and expands options of the rapid and cost-effective in-situ chemical analysis of the tank waste.

  6. Electric current locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Paul E. (Corvallis, OR); Woodside, Charles Rigel (Corvallis, OR)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure herein provides an apparatus for location of a quantity of current vectors in an electrical device, where the current vector has a known direction and a known relative magnitude to an input current supplied to the electrical device. Mathematical constants used in Biot-Savart superposition equations are determined for the electrical device, the orientation of the apparatus, and relative magnitude of the current vector and the input current, and the apparatus utilizes magnetic field sensors oriented to a sensing plane to provide current vector location based on the solution of the Biot-Savart superposition equations. Description of required orientations between the apparatus and the electrical device are disclosed and various methods of determining the mathematical constants are presented.

  7. Optimal fault location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knezev, Maja

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    are triggered. Protection system consisting of protection relays and circuit breakers (CBs) will operate in order to de-energize faulted line. Different Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs) located in substations for the purpose of monitoring... in the control center by an operator who will mark fault event in a spreadsheet and inform other staff responsible for dealing with fault analysis and repair such as protection group or maintenance respectively. Protective relaying staff will be ready...

  8. Optimal fault location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knezev, Maja

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    are triggered. Protection system consisting of protection relays and circuit breakers (CBs) will operate in order to de-energize faulted line. Different Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs) located in substations for the purpose of monitoring... in the control center by an operator who will mark fault event in a spreadsheet and inform other staff responsible for dealing with fault analysis and repair such as protection group or maintenance respectively. Protective relaying staff will be ready...

  9. Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStation LocationsGeneseeValleyPerformance

  10. Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStation LocationsGeneseeValleyPerformance

  11. Remote Store Programming: Mechanisms and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wentzlaff, David

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents remote store programming (RSP). This paradigm combines usability and efficiency through the exploitation of a simple hardware mechanism, the remote store, which can easily be added to existing ...

  12. Assessment of the facilities on Jackass Flats and other Nevada Test Site facilities for the new nuclear rocket program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, G.; Collins, D.; Dye, K.; Eberhart, C.; Hynes, M.; Kovach, R.; Ortiz, R.; Perea, J.; Sherman, D.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent NASA/DOE studies for the Space Exploration Initiative have demonstrated a critical need for the ground-based testing of nuclear rocket engines. Experience in the ROVER/NERVA Program, experience in the Nuclear Weapons Testing Program, and involvement in the new nuclear rocket program has motivated our detailed assessment of the facilities used for the ROVER/NERVA Program and other facilities located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The ROVER/NERVA facilities are located in the Nevada Research L, Development Area (NRDA) on Jackass Flats at NTS, approximately 85 miles northwest of Las Vegas. To guide our assessment of facilities for an engine testing program we have defined a program goal, scope, and process. To execute this program scope and process will require ten facilities. We considered the use of all relevant facilities at NTS including existing and new tunnels as well as the facilities at NRDA. Aside from the facilities located at remote sites and the inter-site transportation system, all of the required facilities are available at NRDA. In particular we have studied the refurbishment of E-MAD, ETS-1, R-MAD, and the interconnecting railroad. The total cost for such a refurbishment we estimate to be about $253M which includes additional contractor fees related to indirect, construction management, profit, contingency, and management reserves. This figure also includes the cost of the required NEPA, safety, and security documentation.

  13. Technical guidance for siting criteria development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, D.C.; Sprung, J.L.; Alpert, D.J.; Diegert, K.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Ritchie, L.T.; Strip, D.R.; Johnson, J.D.; Hansen, K.; Robinson, J.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical guidance to support the formulation and comparison of possible siting criteria for nuclear power plants has been developed in four areas: (1) consequences of hypothetical severe nuclear-power-plant accidents, (2) characteristics of population distributions about current reactor sites, (3) site availability within the continental United States, and (4) socioeconomic impacts of reactor siting. The impact on consequences of source-term magnitude, meteorology, population distribution, and emergency response have been analyzed. Population distributions about current sites were analyzed to identify statistical characteristics, time trends, and regional differences. A site-availability data bank was constructed for the continential United States. The data bank contains information about population densities, seismicity, topography, water availability, and land-use restrictions. Finally, the socioeconomic impacts of rural-industrialization projects, energy boomtowns, and nuclear power plants were examined to determine their nature, magnitude, and dependence on site demography and remoteness.

  14. Final Exam Location and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Final Exam Location and Time. Math 162 Fall 2001. Date: Wednesday December 12, 2001. Time: 7:00 pm -9:00 pm. Location: Lambert Fieldhouse ...

  15. Final Exam Location and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Final Exam Location and Time. Math 161 Fall 2001. Date: Friday December 14, 2001. Time: 8:00 am -10:00 am. Location: Lambert Fieldhouse ...

  16. Remote State Preparation: Arbitrary remote control of photon polarizations for quantum communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwiat, Paul

    Remote State Preparation: Arbitrary remote control of photon polarizations for quantum measurement to one photon of a polarization- entangled pair, we remotely prepare single photons in arbitrary. Finally, we discuss the states remotely preparable given a particular two-qubit resource state. Keywords

  17. Remote Sens. 2011, 3, 2529-2551; doi:10.3390/rs3112529 Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remote Sens. 2011, 3, 2529-2551; doi:10.3390/rs3112529 Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292 www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing Article Multispectral Remote Sensing from Unmanned Aircraft: Image Processing Workflows and Applications Abstract: Using unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) as remote sensing platforms offers the unique ability

  18. Remote Sens. 2009, 1, 519-533; doi:10.3390/rs1030519 Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    Remote Sens. 2009, 1, 519-533; doi:10.3390/rs1030519 Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292 www of Remotely Sensed Data Paul H. Evangelista 1, *, Thomas J. Stohlgren 2 , Jeffrey T. Morisette 2 and Sunil model (Maxent) for its application and performance in remotely sensing invasive Tamarix sp. Six Landsat

  19. 10 January 2009 PHOTOGRAMMETRIC ENGINEERING & REMOTE SENSING High Performance Computing in Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    10 January 2009 PHOTOGRAMMETRIC ENGINEERING & REMOTE SENSING High Performance Computing in Remote Book ReviewBook Review High Performance Computing in Remote Sensing introduces the most recent advances in the incorporation of the high-performance computing (HPC) paradigm in remote sensing missions. Eighteen well

  20. Remote vacuum or pressure sealing device and method for critical isolated systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brock, James David (Newport News, VA); Keith, Christopher D. (Newport News, VA)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote vacuum or pressure sealing apparatus and method for making a radiation tolerant, remotely prepared seal that maintains a vacuum or pressure tight seal throughout a wide temperature range. The remote sealing apparatus includes a fixed threaded sealing surface on an isolated system, a gasket, and an insert consisting of a plug with a protruding sample holder. An insert coupling device, provided for inserting samples within the isolated system, includes a threaded fastener for cooperating with the fixed threaded sealing surface on the isolated system. The insert coupling device includes a locating pin for azimuthal orientation, coupling pins, a tooted coaxial socket wrench, and an insert coupling actuator for actuating the coupling pins. The remote aspect of the sealing apparatus maintains the isolation of the system from the user's environment, safely preserving the user and the system from detrimental effect from each respectively.

  1. The Fermilab CMTF cryogenic distribution remote control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Batavia, IL, 60510 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) is able to provide the necessary test bed for measuring the performance of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities in a cryomodule (CM). The CMTF have seven 300 KW screw compressors, two liquid helium refrigerators, and two Cryomodule Test Stands (CMTS). CMTS1 is designed for 1.3 GHz cryomodule operating in a pulsed mode (PM) and CMTS2 is for cryomodule operating in Half-Wave (HW) and Continuous Wave (CW) mode. Based on the design requirement, each subsystem has to be far away from each other and be placed in distant locations. Therefore choosing Siemens Process Control System 7-400, DL205 PLC, Synoptic and Fermilab ACNET are the ideal choices for CMTF cryogenic distribution real-time remote control system. This paper presents a method which has been successfully used by many Fermilab distribution cryogenic real-time remote control systems.

  2. Remote Laboratory Towards an integrated training system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Remote Laboratory Towards an integrated training system Arnaud LELEVE, Hcene BENMOHAMED, Patrick.Meyer@ictt.ec-lyon.fr Abstract ­ Remote laboratories are essential to e-learning platforms in scientific and technical with the aim of giving means to instructors to build generic remote laboratory environments, homogeneously melt

  3. Remote Sensing for Water Quality Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remote Sensing for Water Quality Applications #12;Objective Give a brief update on GEO Inland and Nearshore Coastal Water Quality Remote Sensing Workshop (GEO Work Task WA-06-01)) Held in Geneva and Nearshore Coastal Water Quality Remote Sensing Workshop (GEO Work Task WA-06-01)) Organizing committee

  4. Remote Batch Invocation for Compositional Object Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryder, Barbara G.

    Remote Batch Invocation for Compositional Object Services Ali Ibrahim2 , Yang Jiao1 , Eli Tilevich1 Remote Procedure Calls do not compose efficiently, design- ers of distributed object systems use Data Transfer and Remote Fac¸ade patterns to create large-granularity interfaces, hard-coded for particular

  5. A REMOTE CONTROLLED UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHIC SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A REMOTE CONTROLLED UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHIC SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM by Paul J. Kruse, Jr. MarineKernan, Director A Remote Controlled Underwater Photographic Surveillance System by Paul J. Kruse, Jr. United. September 1964 #12;#12;CONTENTS Page Introduction 1 Remote controlled photographic system and accessories 1

  6. The Remote Media Immersion (RMI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    the ultimate digital media delivery platform. Its streaming media server delivers multiple high- bandwidth aspects). The hope is that our advances in digital media delivery will enable new applicationsThe Remote Media Immersion (RMI) system blends multiple cutting- edge media technologies to create

  7. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Electro-Magnetic Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 2 Electro-Magnetic Radiation #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 2 Elements of Remote Sensing #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Chapter 2 Radiation: nature & source #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 4 Chapter 2 Interaction with the atmosphere #12;Remote Sensing

  8. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Electro-Magnetic Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 2 Electro-Magnetic Radiation Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 2 Elements of Remote Sensing #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Chapter 2 Radiation: nature & source Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 4 Chapter 2 Interaction with the atmosphere #12;Remote Sensing Ayman

  9. Further Development at JET of Remote Digital Photogrammetry Techniques and Remote Welding Under Conditions of Restricted Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Further Development at JET of Remote Digital Photogrammetry Techniques and Remote Welding Under Conditions of Restricted Access

  10. T-606: Sun Java System Access Manager Lets Remote Users Partially Modify Data and Remote Authenticated Users Partially Access Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sun Java System Access Manager Lets Remote Users Partially Modify Data and Remote Authenticated Users Partially Access Data.

  11. The Remote Photogrammetric Survey and Engineering Analysis of the Divertor Structure during JET’s Remote Tile Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Remote Photogrammetric Survey and Engineering Analysis of the Divertor Structure during JET’s Remote Tile Exchange

  12. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cleanup Document Date: 10162009 Keywords: recovery, waste site, BC Control, soil, contamination Area: BC Control Area Description: Using Recovery Act funding, contractors are...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratorySoftware100LifeAnnouncementsLocations

  14. Remote Sensing of In-Use Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Remote Sensing of In-Use Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks D A N I E L A . B U R G A R D , G A R Y A . B I from 1641 individually identified heavy-duty diesel trucks at two locations in Colorado are reported- duty diesel trucks. Ammonia emissions from this study were below the detection limit of the instrument

  15. Site survey method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oldham, J.G.; Spencer, C.R.; Begley, C.L.; Meyer, H.R.

    1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure of the invention is directed to a site survey ground vehicle based apparatus and method for automatically detecting source materials, such as radioactivity, marking the location of the source materials, such as with paint, and mapping the location of the source materials on a site. The apparatus of the invention is also useful for collecting and analyzing samples. The apparatus includes a ground vehicle, detectors mounted at the front of the ground vehicle, and individual detector supports which follow somewhat irregular terrain to allow consistent and accurate detection, and autolocation equipment. 19 figures.

  16. Site survey method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oldham, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Spencer, Charles R. (Boise, ID); Begley, Carl L. (Albuquerque, NM); Meyer, H. Robert (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure of the invention is directed to a site survey ground vehicle based apparatus and method for automatically detecting source materials, such as radioactivity, marking the location of the source materials, such as with paint, and mapping the location of the source materials on a site. The apparatus of the invention is also useful for collecting and analyzing samples. The apparatus includes a ground vehicle, detectors mounted at the front of the ground vehicle, and individual detector supports which follow somewhat irregular terrain to allow consistent and accurate detection, and autolocation equipment.

  17. The remote Maxwell demon as energy down-converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Hossenfelder

    2014-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    It is demonstrated that Maxwell's demon can be used to allow a machine to extract energy from a heat bath by use of information that is processed by the demon at a remote location. The model proposed here effectively replaces transmission of energy by transmission of information. For that we use a feedback protocol that enables a net gain by stimulating emission in selected fluctuations around thermal equilibrium. We estimate the down conversion rate and the efficiency of energy extraction from the heat bath.

  18. Disposable remote zero headspace extractor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hand, Julie J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Roberts, Mark P. (Arco, ID)

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The remote zero headspace extractor uses a sampling container inside a stainless steel vessel to perform toxicity characteristics leaching procedure to analyze volatile organic compounds. The system uses an in line filter for ease of replacement. This eliminates cleaning and disassembly of the extractor. All connections are made with quick connect fittings which can be easily replaced. After use, the bag can be removed and disposed of, and a new sampling container is inserted for the next extraction.

  19. Remote Sensing R. E. Mcintosh

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 c/) ReleaseRemote Access

  20. Experience with Remote Job Execution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; Cobb, John W [ORNL; Green, Mark L [ORNL; Kohl, James Arthur [ORNL; Miller, Stephen D [ORNL; Ren, Shelly [ORNL; Smith, Bradford C [ORNL; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutron Science Portal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory submits jobs to the TeraGrid for remote job execution. The TeraGrid is a network of high performance computers supported by the US National Science Foundation. There are eleven partner facilities with over a petaflop of peak computing performance and sixty petabytes of long-term storage. Globus is installed on a local machine and used for job submission. The graphical user interface is produced by java coding that reads an XML file. After submission, the status of the job is displayed in a Job Information Service window which queries globus for the status. The output folder produced in the scratch directory of the TeraGrid machine is returned to the portal with globus-url-copy command that uses the gridftp servers on the TeraGrid machines. This folder is copied from the stage-in directory of the community account to the user's results directory where the output can be plotted using the portal's visualization services. The primary problem with remote job execution is diagnosing execution problems. We have daily tests of submitting multiple remote jobs from the portal. When these jobs fail on a computer, it is difficult to diagnose the problem from the globus output. Successes and problems will be presented.

  1. A generalizable method for remote sensing of canopy nitrogen across a wide range of forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Brenden

    spectroscopy, or hyperspectral remote sensing, from satellite or airborne sensors. Development of this approach's Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and/or Hyperion instruments. The combined dataset was used to evaluate site-specific calibration results as well as results obtained with data pooled across

  2. Remote Sensing of Mobile Source Air Pollutant Emissions: Variability and Uncertainty in On-Road Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    Remote Sensing of Mobile Source Air Pollutant Emissions: Variability and Uncertainty in On.0 INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Mobile Source Emissions 2 1.2 Emission Regulations 2 1.3 Emissions Contributions of "Non Estimates 70 6.3 Fuel Economy Data for School Buses Observed at the Rock Quarry Road Site 75 6.4 Diesel

  3. Remote-handled transuranic system assessment. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document identifies the necessary actions for addressing current questions concerning the safe and efficient disposal of remote-handled transuranic wastes that have been generated through Department of Energy activities. In addition, this document presents summaries of existing information and analyses regarding the potential alternatives for disposing of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste at the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A further discussion of DOE`s approach for addressing RH-TRU issues is contained in the document, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Disposal Strategy, DOE/WIPP-95-1090 (DOE, 1995a). Of this stored and projected inventory, approximately 30% can be characterized with current technology and subsequently certified to meet the waste acceptance criteria for disposal at WIPP; characterization of the remaining 70% will require the use of alternative techniques. At most of the generator sites, characterization equipment and facilities need to be procured in order for the sites to certify waste for shipment either to WIPP or to an interim site. If surface dose rates are too high, the use of non-invasive techniques such as non-destructive examination (NDE) and non-destructive assay (NDA) may be precluded. Characterization methods using NDA can be effectively used on RH-TRU wastes with surface dose rates of less than 1.0 rem/hr (neutron); NDE methods are effective on waste with surface dose rates of less than 10 rem/hr (gamma). The ability to use current NDE technology on waste with surface dose rates above 10 rem/hr will need to be demonstrated. Alternate characterization techniques, such as examination within a hot cell, could be used for the remaining waste; however, such techniques are labor intensive and would require additional effort to gather assay data. Improvements in characterization capabilities are being pursued through future technology development initiatives.

  4. The Cricket indoor location system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priyantha, Nissanka Bodhi, 1968-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indoor environments present opportunities for a rich set of location-aware applications such as navigation tools for humans and robots, interactive virtual games, resource discovery, asset tracking, location-aware sensor ...

  5. Remote Chemical Sensing Using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, Warren W.; Schultz, John F.

    2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic chemical sensing research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing advanced sensors for detecting the production of nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons; use of chemical weapons; or the presence of explosives, firearms, narcotics, or other contraband of significance to homeland security in airports, cargo terminals, public buildings, or other sensitive locations. For most of these missions, the signature chemicals are expected to occur in very low concentrations, and in mixture with ambient air or airborne waste streams that contain large numbers of other species that may interfere with spectroscopic detection, or be mistaken for signatures of illicit activity. PNNL’s emphasis is therefore on developing remote and sampling sensors with extreme sensitivity, and resistance to interferents, or selectivity. PNNL’s research activities include: 1. Identification of signature chemicals and quantification of their spectral characteristics, 2. Identification and development of laser and other technologies that enable breakthroughs in sensitivity and selectivity, 3. Development of promising sensing techniques through experimentation and modeling the physical phenomenology and practical engineering limitations affecting their performance, and 4. Development and testing of data collection methods and analysis algorithms. Close coordination of all aspects of the research is important to ensure that all parts are focused on productive avenues of investigation. Close coordination of experimental development and numerical modeling is particularly important because the theoretical component provides understanding and predictive capability, while the experiments validate calculations and ensure that all phenomena and engineering limitations are considered.

  6. U-229: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Potential security vulnerabilities have been identified with HP Network Node Manager i (NNMi) for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows. The vulnerabilities could be remotely exploited resulting in cross site scripting (XSS).

  7. U-204: HP Network Node Manager i Input Validation Hole Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Potential security vulnerabilities have been identified with HP Network Node Manager I (NNMi) for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris, and Windows. The vulnerabilities could be remotely exploited resulting in cross site scripting (XSS).

  8. T-715: Microsoft SharePoint Multiple Flaws Permit Cross-Site...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A remote user can create a specially crafted URL or web site that, when loaded by a target user, will cause arbitrary scripting code to be...

  9. V-084: RSA Archer eGRC Permits Cross-Site Scripting, Cross-Domain...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Users Upload Files and Let Remote Users Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-234: EMC RSA Archer GRC Open Redirection Weakness and Security Bypass Security Issue U-129: RSA...

  10. Remote State Preparation for Quantum Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ran Ber; Erez Zohar

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote state preparation is generation of a desired state by a remote observer. In spite of causality, it is well known, according to the Reeh-Schlieder theorem, that it is possible for relativistic quantum field theories, and a "physical" process achieving this task, involving superoscillatory functions, has recently been introduced. In this work we deal with non-relativistic fields, and show that remote state preparation is also possible for them, hence generalizing the Reeh-Schlieder theorem.

  11. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Image Registration & Rectification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 5 Image Registration & Rectification #12;Remote Sensing: Resampling techniques. #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Image Registration #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F be integrated/fused. Object Space Left Image Right Image Image Registration: Objective #12;Remote Sensing Ayman

  12. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Image Registration & Rectification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    1 Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 5 Image Registration & Rectification Remote Sensing Ayman: Resampling techniques. #12;2 Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Image Registration Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib be integrated/fused. Object Space Left Image Right Image Image Registration: Objective #12;3 Remote Sensing

  13. Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib Data Acquisition Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 1 Chapter 3 Data Acquisition Systems #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. ­ Electro-mechanical scanners. #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 3 Overview · LIDAR operational principles for recognition and classification purposes. #12;Remote Sensing Ayman F. Habib 4 Remote Sensing Systems Utilized

  14. Preliminary Safety Design Report for Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Solack; Carol Mason

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new onsite, remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled low-level waste disposal for remote-handled low-level waste from the Idaho National Laboratory and for nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled low-level waste in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This preliminary safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by discussing site characteristics that impact accident analysis, by providing the facility and process information necessary to support the hazard analysis, by identifying and evaluating potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled low-level waste, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  15. System, method, and apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Patrick W (Jefferson, MD)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A system, method, and/or apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass contained in vegetative elements, such as large tree boles or trunks present in an area of interest, are provided. The method includes providing an airborne VHF radar system in combination with a LiDAR system, overflying the area of interest while directing energy toward the area of interest, using the VHF radar system to collect backscatter data from the trees as a function of incidence angle and frequency, and determining a magnitude of the biomass from the backscatter data and data from the laser radar system for each radar resolution cell. A biomass map is generated showing the magnitude of the biomass of the vegetative elements as a function of location on the map by using each resolution cell as a unique location thereon. In certain preferred embodiments, a single frequency is used with a linear array antenna.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of living systems by remote detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander; Bouchard, Louis; Xu, Shoujun; Harel, Elad; Budker, Dmitry; Lowery, Thomas; Ledbetter, Micah

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel approach to magnetic resonance imaging is disclosed. Blood flowing through a living system is prepolarized, and then encoded. The polarization can be achieved using permanent or superconducting magnets. The polarization may be carried out upstream of the region to be encoded or at the place of encoding. In the case of an MRI of a brain, polarization of flowing blood can be effected by placing a magnet over a section of the body such as the heart upstream of the head. Alternatively, polarization and encoding can be effected at the same location. Detection occurs at a remote location, using a separate detection device such as an optical atomic magnetometer, or an inductive Faraday coil. The detector may be placed on the surface of the skin next to a blood vessel such as a jugular vein carrying blood away from the encoded region.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: remote sensing devices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    remote sensing devices Sandia, Endicott Interconnect Technologies, EMCORE, International Micro Industries, NREL, Universal Instruments: Solar Glitter On March 21, 2013, in...

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. 0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 409 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 409 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-53-001-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.1; TA-53-002-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.2; and RG-24-001-RGCR, Battery Dump Site. The Septic Sludge Disposal Pits are located near Bunker Two, close to Area 3, on the Tonopah Test Range. The Battery Dump Site is located at the abandoned Cactus Repeater Station on Cactus Peak. The Cactus Repeater Station was a remote, battery-powered, signal repeater station. The two Septic Sludge Disposal Pits were suspected to be used through the late 1980s as disposal sites for sludge from septic tanks located in Area 3. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern are the same for the disposal pits and include: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) as gasoline- and diesel-range organics, polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides (including plutonium and depleted uranium). The Battery Dump Site consists of discarded lead-acid batteries and associated construction debris, placing the site in a Housekeeping Category and, consequently, no contaminants are expected to be encountered during the cleanup process. The corrective action the at this CAU will include collection of discarded batteries and construction debris at the Battery Dump Site for proper disposal and recycling, along with photographic documentation as the process progresses. The corrective action for the remaining CASs involves the collection of background radiological data through borings drilled at undisturbed locations near the area of the disposal pits; field screening samples for radiological constituents; analysis for geotechnical/hydrologic parameters of samples beneath the disposal pits; and bioassessment samples, if VOC or TPH contamination concentrations exceed field-screening levels. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- St Louis Airport Site Vicinity...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: These properties are located in Hazelwood and Berkeley, Missouri,...

  20. Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 1,470-acre Salmon, Mississippi, Site is located in Lamar County, approximately 20 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, in southwestern Mississippi. It is roughly square in shape, and each side is...

  1. Multi-Site Energy Reduction Through Teamwork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theising, T

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Teams have been established at seven BASF locations to facilitate implementation of the findings from the 2003 and 2004 Energy Audits conducted at these Sites. These Teams were charged with implementation, progress tracking, and management...

  2. Site Risks:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan McCorkleSingin' in theCleanup SiteSite

  3. Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 5969-5998; doi:10.3390/rs5115969 Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 5969-5998; doi:10.3390/rs5115969 Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292 www, the technique presented in this paper would help them to quantify the impacts of OPEN ACCESS #12;Remote Sens; urban heat island effect; NDVI; artificial neural network; Markov chain; Dhaka 1. Introduction Urban

  4. Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 5173-5192; doi:10.3390/rs5105173 Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Scott L.

    Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 5173-5192; doi:10.3390/rs5105173 Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292 www for a geosynchronous OPEN ACCESS #12;Remote Sens. 2013, 5 5174 satellite with modern imaging detectors, software, and algorithms able to detect heat from early and small fires, and yield minute-scale detection times. Keywords

  5. Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 1484-1497; doi:10.3390/rs5031484 Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 1484-1497; doi:10.3390/rs5031484 Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292 www.mdpi.com/journal and the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), we investigated percent changes and controlling factors of global vegetation growth for the period 1982 to 2009. Over that 28-year period, both the remote-sensing estimate

  6. CHAPTER 12:CHAPTER 12: Remote Sensing ofRemote Sensing of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    - and middle-infrared regions, water bodies appear very dark even black becausebodies appear very dark, even and pure and contains little suspended sediment or organic matter. Water Penetration Cozumel Island1 CHAPTER 12:CHAPTER 12: Remote Sensing ofRemote Sensing of WaterWaterWaterWater REFERENCE: Remote

  7. Remote imaging of concealed objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lev, Aner, E-mail: lev@soreq.gov.il; Sfez, Bruno, E-mail: lev@soreq.gov.il [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical detection of objects hidden behind opaque screening layers is a challenging problem. We demonstrate an optically detected echographic-like method that combines collimated acoustic and laser beams. The acoustic waves cross the screening layers and their back-reflection from the hidden objects is detected through the analysis of a dynamic laser speckle pattern created at the outer surface of the screening layer. Real-time remote detection of moving targets 15 meters away, with a few mm resolutions is demonstrated using a very sensitive camera detection scheme.

  8. Remote Access | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 c/) ReleaseRemote Access Ames Laboratory

  9. Characterization of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) waste tanks located at ORNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.M.; Giaquinto, J.M.; Meeks, A.M.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) is located in Melton Valley within Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 and includes five underground storage tanks (T1, T2, T3, T4, and T9) ranging from 13,000 to 25,000 gal. capacity. During the period of 1996--97 there was a major effort to re-sample and characterize the contents of these inactive waste tanks. The characterization data summarized in this report was needed to address waste processing options, examine concerns dealing with the performance assessment (PA) data for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), evaluate the waste characteristics with respect to the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for WIPP and Nevada Test Site (NTS), address criticality concerns, and to provide the data needed to meet DOT requirements for transporting the waste. This report discusses the analytical characterization data collected on both the supernatant and sludge samples taken from three different locations in each of the OHF tanks. The isotopic data presented in this report supports the position that fissile isotopes of uranium ({sup 233}U and {sup 235}U) do not satisfy the denature ratios required by the administrative controls stated in the ORNL LLLW waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The fissile isotope of plutonium ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu) are diluted with thorium far above the WAC requirements. In general, the OHF sludge was found to be hazardous (RCRA) based on total metal content and the transuranic alpha activity was well above the 100 nCi/g limit for TRU waste. The characteristics of the OHF sludge relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU) requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP.

  10. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.M. Simmons

    2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  11. An Introduction to the Site... The site is located off of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyte, Michael

    Analysis #12;3 Shadow Analysis Sustainable Ideas to Consider o Photovotaic Panels, Solar Energy o High-efficiency Lighting o Recycled Building Materials o Natural Daylight o Passive Solar Heating o Water Treatment o

  12. Inorganic and organic carbon variations in surface water, Konza prairie LTER site, USA, and Maolan karst experimental site, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Huan

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    at the Maolan Karst Experimental (Maolan) Site, China. For the stream at the Konza LTER site, little variation in water chemistry was observed among the upstream, midstream and downstream locations, indicating the groundwater and stream water chemistry...

  13. Sites for Gamma-ray Astronomy in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Rovero; G. E. Romero; I. Allekotte; X. Bertou; E. Colombo; A. Etchegoyen; B. Garcia; D. Garcia-Lambas; H. Levato; M. C. Medina; H. Muriel; P. Recabarren

    2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for possible sites in Argentina for the installation of large air Cherenkov telescope arrays and water Cherenkov systems. At present seven candidates are identified at altitudes from 2500 to 4500 m. The highest sites are located at the Northwest of the country, in La Puna. Sites at 2500 and 3100 m are located in the West at El Leoncito Observatory, with excellent infrastructure. A description of these candidate sites is presented with emphasis on infrastructure and climatology.

  14. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Siting Guide, Site selection and evaluation criteria for an early site permit application. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 1991, the Joint Contractors came to agreement with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Department of Energy (DOE) on a workscope for the cost-shared Early Site Permit Demonstration Program. One task within the scope was the development of a guide for site selection criteria and procedures. A generic Siting Guide his been prepared that is a roadmap and tool for applicants to use developing detailed siting plans for their specific region of the country. The guide presents three fundamental principles that, if used, ensure a high degree of success for an ESP applicant. First, the site selection process should take into consideration environmentally diverse site locations within a given region of interest. Second, the process should contain appropriate opportunities for input from the public. Third, the process should be applied so that it is clearly reasonable to an impartial observer, based on appropriately selected criteria, including criteria which demonstrate that the site can host an advanced light water reactor (ALWR). The Siting Guide provides for a systematic, comprehensive site selection process in which three basic types of criteria (exclusionary, avoidance, and suitability) are presented via a four-step procedure. It provides a check list of the criteria for each one of these steps. Criteria are applied qualitatively, as well as presented numerically, within the guide. The applicant should use the generic guide as an exhaustive checklist, customizing the guide to his individual situation.

  15. V-202: Cisco Video Surveillance Manager Bugs Let Remote Users...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TE Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service and Remote Adjacent Authenticated Users Gain Root Shell Access V-076: Cisco Wireless LAN Controller Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service and...

  16. User Guide Remote Workplace to VDI Using RSA | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    User Guide Remote Workplace to VDI Using RSA User Guide Remote Workplace to VDI Using RSA Last updated on March 17, 2015 This document provides instructions for logging onto Remote...

  17. Remotely readable fiber optic compass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM); Garrett, Steven L. (Pebble Beach, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remotely readable fiber optic compass. A sheet polarizer is affixed to a magnet rotatably mounted in a compass body, such that the polarizer rotates with the magnet. The optical axis of the sheet polarizer is preferably aligned with the north-south axis of the magnet. A single excitation light beam is divided into four identical beams, two of which are passed through the sheet polarizer and through two fixed polarizing sheets which have their optical axes at right angles to one another. The angle of the compass magnet with respect to a fixed axis of the compass body can be determined by measuring the ratio of the intensities of the two light beams. The remaining ambiguity as to which of the four possible quadrants the magnet is pointing to is resolved by the second pair of light beams, which are passed through the sheet polarizer at positions which are transected by two semicircular opaque strips formed on the sheet polarizer. The incoming excitation beam and the four return beams are communicated by means of optical fibers, giving a remotely readable compass which has no electrical parts.

  18. Remotely readable fiber optic compass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Migliori, A.; Swift, G.W.; Garrett, S.L.

    1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A remotely readable fiber optic compass. A sheet polarizer is affixed to a magnet rotatably mounted in a compass body, such that the polarizer rotates with the magnet. The optical axis of the sheet polarizer is preferably aligned with the north-south axis of the magnet. A single excitation light beam is divided into four identical beams, two of which are passed through the sheet polarizer and through two fixed polarizing sheets which have their optical axes at right angles to one another. The angle of the compass magnet with respect to a fixed axis of the compass body can be determined by measuring the ratio of the intensities of the two light beams. The remaining ambiguity as to which of the four possible quadrants the magnet is pointing to is resolved by the second pair of light beams, which are passed through the sheet polarizer at positions which are transected by two semicircular opaque strips formed on the sheet polarizer. The incoming excitation beam and the four return beams are communicated by means of optical fibers, giving a remotely readable compass which has no electrical parts.

  19. Strategic plan for the utilization of remote sensing technologies in the environmental restoration program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, A.D.; Doll, W.E.; Durfee, R.C.; Luxmoore, R.J.; Conder, S.R.; Nyquist, J.E.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Remote Sensing and Special Surveys Program are to apply state-of-the-art remote sensing and geophysical technologies and to manage routine and remotely-sensed examinations of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), and their adjacent off-site areas. Repeated multispectral scanner (MSS) imagery, gamma, and photographic surveys will allow monitoring of the degradation that might occur in waste containment vessels and monitoring (at a later stage in the remediation life cycle) of improvements from restoration efforts and cleanup. These technologies, in combination with geophysical surveys, will provide an effective means for identifying unknown waste sites and contaminant transport pathways. All of the data will be maintained in a data base that will be accessible to site managers in the ER Program. The complete analysis of collected data will provide site-specific data to the ER Program for characterizing and monitoring ER Program hazardous waste sites.

  20. U-137: HP Performance Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7: HP Performance Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Codes U-137: HP Performance Manager Unspecified Bug Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Codes March...

  1. V-149: Microsoft Internet Explorer Object Access Bug Lets Remote...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CDwnBindInfo Object Reuse Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-047: Siemens Automation License Manager Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service or Execute Arbitrary...

  2. Equitable Access: Remote and Rural Communities 'Transport Needs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Equitable Access: Remote and Rural Communities 'Transport Needs' Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Equitable Access: Remote and Rural Communities...

  3. automated remote plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Siegel, Mel 15 Use of remote sensing data to enhance the performance of a hydrodynamic simulation of a partially frozen power plant Engineering Websites Summary: Use of remote...

  4. U-074: Microsoft .NET Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4: Microsoft .NET Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Commands, Access User Accounts, and Redirect Users U-074: Microsoft .NET Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Commands,...

  5. V-150: Apache VCL Input Validation Flaw Lets Remote Authenticated...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tomcat FORM Authenticator Lets Remote Users Conduct Session Fixation Attacks U-084: Cisco Digital Media Manager Lets Remote Authenticated Users Gain Elevated Privileges U-233:...

  6. U-010:HP Onboard Administrator Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HP Service Manager Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain Unauthorized Access V-120: EMC Smarts Network Configuration Manager Java RMI Access Control Flaw Lets Remote Users...

  7. availiable remote sensing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remote SensingThermal Infrared Remote Sensing Thermal infrared) and thermal infrared energy (3.0 - 14 m). However, thermal infrared sensors allow humans to sense 2 Thermal...

  8. atmospheric remote sensing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrared Remote SensingThermal Infrared Remote Sensing Thermal infrared) and thermal infrared energy (3.0 - 14 m). However, thermal infrared sensors allow humans to...

  9. aerospace remote sensing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remote SensingThermal Infrared Remote Sensing Thermal infrared) and thermal infrared energy (3.0 - 14 m). However, thermal infrared sensors allow humans to sense 2 Thermal...

  10. Sensor test facilities and capabilities at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, W.B.; Burke, L.J.; Gomez, B.J.; Livingston, L.; Nelson, D.S.; Smathers, D.C.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently developed two major field test capabilities for unattended ground sensor systems at the Department of energy`s Nevada Test Site (NTS). The first capability utilizes the NTS large area, varied terrain, and intrasite communications systems for testing sensors for detecting and tracking vehicular traffic. Sensor and ground truth data can be collected at either of two secure control centers. This system also includes an automated ground truth capability that consists of differential Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) receivers on test vehicles and live TV coverage of critical road sections. Finally there is a high-speed, secure computer network link between the control centers and the Air Force`s Theater Air Command and Control Simulation Facility in Albuquerque NM. The second capability is Bunker 2-300. It is a facility for evaluating advanced sensor systems for monitoring activities in underground cut-and-cover facilities. The main part of the facility consists of an underground bunker with three large rooms for operating various types of equipment. This equipment includes simulated chemical production machinery and controlled seismic and acoustic signal sources. There has been a thorough geologic and electromagnetic characterization of the region around the bunker. Since the facility is in a remote location, it is well-isolated from seismic, acoustic, and electromagnetic interference.

  11. Robotics and remote systems developments and applications, FY96. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, W.I. III; Teese, G.D.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the contributions that the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has made during Fiscal Year 1996 in the Robotics and Remote Systems Technology arena. The contributions originated from the Applied Science and Engineering Technology (ASET) Department`s Equipment Engineering Section (EES). Activities and deliverables for the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) main operating divisions as well as contributions to new mission activities, other Department of Energy (DOE) sites and programs, intellectual property development and professional societies are described.

  12. The remote and exposed location of Gorno Badakhshan, combined with the loss of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    by fossil energy sources. With the dis- integration of the Soviet Union, fuel deliv- eries abruptly came in fuel and coal consumption. Although fossil fuels accounted for more than 60% of total fuel consumption subsidies after the disinte- gration of the Soviet Union, led to a consid- erable shortage of energy

  13. The Application of Microhole Technology to the Development of Coalbed Methane Resources at Remote Locations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gas and Oil Recovery Partnership Program with American industry, has undertaken an integrated program of development to show that the cost of obtaining subsurface information can be drastically reduced through microhole technologies specifically developed to obtain that information. Collectively termed "Microhole

  14. Low Cost Indoor Location Management System using Infrared Leds and Wii Remote Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tosun, Ali Saman

    , Nihat Altiparmak and Ali S¸aman Tosun Department of Computer Science University of Texas at San Antonio

  15. Precision zero-home locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, W.J.

    1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A zero-home locator includes a fixed phototransistor switch and a moveable actuator including two symmetrical, opposed wedges, each wedge defining a point at which switching occurs. The zero-home location is the average of the positions of the points defined by the wedges.

  16. Environmental characterization of two potential locations at Hanford for a new production reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, E.C.; Becker, C.D.; Fitzner, R.E.; Gano, K.A.; Imhoff, K.L.; McCallum, R.F.; Myers, D.A.; Page, T.L.; Price, K.R.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Rice D.G.; Schreiber D.L.; Skumatz L.A.; Sommer D.J.; Tawil J.J.; Wallace R.W.; Watson D.G.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes various environmental aspects of two areas on the Hanford Site that are potential locations for a New Production Reactor (NPR). The area known as the Skagit Hanford Site is considered the primary or reference site. The second area, termed the Firehouse Site, is considered the alternate site. The report encompasses an environmental characterization of these two potential NPR locations. Eight subject areas are covered: geography and demography; ecology; meteorology; hydrology; geology; cultural resources assessment; economic and social effects of station construction and operation; and environmental monitoring. 80 refs., 68 figs., 109 tabs.

  17. Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer, Arthur S. Rood, A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility. The analysis was prepared to support the National Environmental Policy Act environmental assessment for the top two ranked sites for the proposed disposal facility. A four-phase screening and analysis approach was documented and applied. Phase I screening was site independent and applied a radionuclide half-life cut-off of 1 year. Phase II screening applied the National Council on Radiation Protection analysis approach and was site independent. Phase III screening used a simplified transport model and site-specific geologic and hydrologic parameters. Phase III neglected the infiltration-reducing engineered cover, the sorption influence of the vault system, dispersion in the vadose zone, vertical dispersion in the aquifer, and the release of radionuclides from specific waste forms. These conservatisms were relaxed in the Phase IV analysis which used a different model with more realistic parameters and assumptions. Phase I screening eliminated 143 of the 246 radionuclides in the inventory from further consideration because each had a half-life less than 1 year. An additional 13 were removed because there was no ingestion dose coefficient available. Of the 90 radionuclides carried forward from Phase I, 57 radionuclides had simulated Phase II screening doses exceeding 0.4 mrem/year. Phase III and IV screening compared the maximum predicted radionuclide concentration in the aquifer to maximum contaminant levels. Of the 57 radionuclides carried forward from Phase II, six radionuclides were identified in Phase III as having simulated future aquifer concentrations exceeding maximum contaminant limits. An additional seven radionuclides had simulated Phase III groundwater concentrations exceeding 1/100th of their respective maximum contaminant levels and were also retained for Phase IV analysis. The Phase IV analysis predicted that none of the thirteen remaining radionuclides would exceed the maximum contaminant levels for either site location. The predicted cumulative effective dose equivalent from all 13 radionuclides also was less than the dose criteria set forth in Department of Energy Order 435.1 for each site location. An evaluation of composite impacts showed one site is preferable over the other based on the potential for commingling of groundwater contamination with other facilities.

  18. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  19. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  20. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  1. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Duncan

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.

  2. Using Downhole Probes to Locate and Characterize Buried Transuranic and Mixed Low Level Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinman, Donald K; Bramblett, Richard L; Hertzog, Russel C

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole logging probes were developed and tested to locate and quantify transuranic elements in subsurface disposal areas and in contaminated sites at USDOE Weapons Complex sites. A new method of measuring very high levels of chlroine in the subsurface was developed using pulsed neutron technology from oilfield applications. The probes were demonstrated at the Hanford site in wells containing plutonium and other contaminants.

  3. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic EngineHIVDecember> About Us > Hanford Site

  4. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic EngineHIVDecember> About Us > Hanford SiteW

  5. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic EngineHIVDecember> About Us > Hanford SiteW

  6. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site Cleanup 100K Area

  7. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site Cleanup 100K

  8. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site Cleanup

  9. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site Cleanupwaste

  10. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site Cleanupwastewaste

  11. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site Cleanupwastewaste

  12. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site CleanupwastewasteB

  13. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site

  14. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site

  15. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site

  16. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site

  17. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site

  18. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOE office of river

  19. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOE office of

  20. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOE office ofF

  1. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOE office ofF

  2. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOE office

  3. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOE

  4. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOE

  5. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOE

  6. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress Conference

  7. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress

  8. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress

  9. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress

  10. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress

  11. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress

  12. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress

  13. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress

  14. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress

  15. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPressdepartment

  16. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery WasteSite Public Tours

  17. Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3 Outlook forSDPPP Individual Permit:Site Map TUNL

  18. Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariate Metal-OrganicPulseSimulation,Site

  19. Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariateSite Map Main Menu About the ALS ALS@20

  20. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpg Gallery: VPPCompanyFebruary 2005GloveSite visit EdBoard3

  1. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpg Gallery: VPPCompanyFebruary 2005GloveSite visit

  2. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpg Gallery: VPPCompanyFebruary 2005GloveSite visitARRA Funded

  3. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpg Gallery: VPPCompanyFebruary 2005GloveSite visitARRA

  4. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpg Gallery: VPPCompanyFebruary 2005GloveSite

  5. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpg Gallery: VPPCompanyFebruary 2005GloveSite03080006-010df

  6. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpg Gallery: VPPCompanyFebruary4155-8HoursBasin Waste Site

  7. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanford LEED&soil PRC Soildumptoolstrack hoe Waste Site

  8. Site C

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1 ~(3JlpV Project Proposal -Site40s'

  9. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

  10. 1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ENGEL-COX,J.; ZIMMERMAN,E.; LEE,R.; WILLIAMS,J.; GREEN,T.; PAQUETTE,D.; HOODA,B.; SCARPITTA,S.; GENZER,P.; ET AL

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the scientific community, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is renowned for its leading-edge research in physics, medicine, chemistry, biology, materials, and the environment. BNL is committed to supporting its world-class scientific research with an internationally recognized environmental protection program. The 1999 Site Environmental Report (SER) summarizes the status of the Laboratory's environmental programs and performance, including the steady progress towards cleaning up the site and fully integrating environmental stewardship into all facets of the Laboratory's mission. BNL is located on 5,265 acres of pine barrens in Suffolk County in the center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated above a sole source aquifer at the headwaters of the Peconic River; therefore, protecting ground and surface water quality is a special concern. Approximately 3,600 acres of the site are undeveloped and serve as habitat for a wide variety of animals and plants, including one New York State endangered species, the tiger salamander, and two New York State threatened species, the banded sunfish and the stiff goldenrod. Monitoring, preserving, and restoring these ecological resources is a high priority for the Laboratory.

  11. Implications of ESnet Site Reliance on Cloud Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · summary of Phil's ESCC survey · questions and open discussion 7/19/2010 ESnet Template Examples 2 #12/19/2010 ESnet Template Examples 3 #12;Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office Reviewing ESCC Survey Results 1) Does your site currently [or plan to] depend on cloud-based / remotely

  12. Selecting the Best Location for a Meteorological Tower: A Case Study of Multi-Objective Constraint Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magoc, Tanja

    ]. · For example, the station should not be located too close to a road, so that the gas flux generated by the cars landing sites for the Apollo missions [1] to selecting landfill sites [3]. Additional requirement. In our

  13. A Taylor & Francis Journal: International Journal of Remote Sensings-E... http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/boards/tres-edbrd.asp 1 of 1 1/24/2005 5:21 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    A Taylor & Francis Journal: International Journal of Remote Sensings- E... http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals Listing Journals by Subject New Journals Advertising Copyright Transfer FAQs Customer Services Email Preview LibSite Books eBooks Editor-in-Chief: A. P. Cracknell - International Journal of Remote Sensing

  14. Method for remote detection of trace contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simonson, Robert J.; Hance, Bradley G.

    2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for remote detection of trace contaminants in a target area comprises applying sensor particles that preconcentrate the trace contaminant to the target area and detecting the contaminant-sensitive fluorescence from the sensor particles. The sensor particles can have contaminant-sensitive and contaminant-insensitive fluorescent compounds to enable the determination of the amount of trace contaminant present in the target are by relative comparison of the emission of the fluorescent compounds by a local or remote fluorescence detector. The method can be used to remotely detect buried minefields.

  15. Heating remote rooms in passive solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote rooms can be effectively heated by convection through a connecting doorway. A simple steady-state equation is developed for design purposes. Validation of a dynamic model is achieved using data obtained over a 13-day period. Dynamic effects are investigated using a simulation analysis for three different cases of driving temperature; the effect is to reduce the temperature difference between the driving room and the remote room compared to the steady-state model. For large temperature swings in the driving room a strategy which uses the intervening door in a diode mode is effective. The importance of heat-storing mass in the remote room is investigated.

  16. U-203: HP Photosmart Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in HP Photosmart. A remote user can cause denial of service conditions.

  17. Can remote sensing of land cover improve species distribution modelling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Bethany

    COMMENTARY Can remote sensing of land cover improve species distribution modelling? Remote sensing- guish among broad classes of vegetation. However, the applicability of remote sensing to classification like from remote sensing ­ a map of tree species ­ and what can be delivered ­ a map of forest types

  18. applied remote sensing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing 12;0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4 Infrared Remote SensingThermal Infrared Remote SensingThermal Infrared...

  19. Site Selection for Surplus Plutonium Disposition Facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L.D.

    2000-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A site selection study was conducted to evaluate locations for the proposed Surplus Plutonium Disposition Facilities. Facilities to be located include the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility, the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF), and the Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) facility. Objectives of the study include: (1) Confirm that the Department of Energy (DOE) selected locations for the MOX and PDCF were suitable based on selected siting criteria, (2) Recommend a site in the vicinity of F Area that is suitable for the PIP, and (3) Identify alternative suitable sites for one or more of these facilities in the event that further geotechnical characterization or other considerations result in disqualification of a currently proposed site.

  20. U-067:WebSVN Input Validation Flaw in getLog() Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A remote user can access the target user's cookies (including authentication cookies), if any, associated with the site running the WebSVN software, access data recently submitted by the target user via web form to the site, or take actions on the site acting as the target user.

  1. Radio frequency security system, method for a building facility or the like, and apparatus and methods for remotely monitoring the status of fire extinguishers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Runyon, Larry (Richland, WA); Gunter, Wayne M. (Richland, WA); Gilbert, Ronald W. (Gilroy, CA)

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for remotely monitoring the status of one or more fire extinguishers includes means for sensing at least one parameter of each of the fire extinguishers; means for selectively transmitting the sensed parameters along with information identifying the fire extinguishers from which the parameters were sensed; and means for receiving the sensed parameters and identifying information for the fire extinguisher or extinguishers at a common location. Other systems and methods for remotely monitoring the status of multiple fire extinguishers are also provided.

  2. User Guide Remote PIV to VDI Using ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Click here to view certificate properties. Select the Detail tab. U. S. Department of Energy | Remote PIV to VDI Using a PIV Card 7 a. Select Enhanced Key Usage to display the...

  3. The Remote distractor effect in manual responses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricketts, Katie

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The remote distracter effect (RDE) has previously only been studied in relation to the saccadic system. Given the hypothesis of the premotor theory (Rizzolatti et al, 1987) that a covert shift of attention is a programmed ...

  4. Remote Welding, NDE and Repair of DOE Standardized Canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric Larsen; Art Watkins; Timothy R. McJunkin; Dave Pace; Rodney Bitsoi

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) to manage DOE’s spent nuclear fuel (SNF). One of the NSNFP’s tasks is to prepare spent nuclear fuel for storage, transportation, and disposal at the national repository. As part of this effort, the NSNFP developed a standardized canister for interim storage and transportation of SNF. These canisters will be built and sealed to American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section III, Division 3 requirements. Packaging SNF usually is a three-step process: canister loading, closure welding, and closure weld verification. After loading SNF into the canisters, the canisters must be seal welded and the welds verified using a combination of visual, surface eddy current, and ultrasonic inspection or examination techniques. If unacceptable defects in the weld are detected, the defective sections of weld must be removed, re-welded, and re-inspected. Due to the high contamination and/or radiation fields involved with this process, all of these functions must be performed remotely in a hot cell. The prototype apparatus to perform these functions is a floor-mounted carousel that encircles the loaded canister; three stations perform the functions of welding, inspecting, and repairing the seal welds. A welding operator monitors and controls these functions remotely via a workstation located outside the hot cell. The discussion describes the hardware and software that have been developed and the results of testing that has been done to date.

  5. Remote Access Policy COERAPAD20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    's on-site connection to the College of Engineering. 2. Please review the following policies for details for connecting to the College of Engineering's network from any host. These standards are designed to minimize the potential exposure to the College of Engineering from damages which may result from unauthorized use

  6. REMOTE SENSING ACTIVITIES Caiti Steele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECOLOGICAL STATES SSURGO: 3rd order soil map unit (SMU) polygons obtained for study area Ecological site attributes added to SMU polygons SMU polygons overlain on DOQQs / NAIP imagery SMU polygons cut to delineate ECOLOGICAL STATES Object-based image analysis, particularly promising for state-mapping: Preserves SMU

  7. Remote sensing, imaging, and signal engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brase, J.M.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering (RISE) trust area which has been very active in working to define new directions. Signal and image processing have always been important support for existing programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), but now these technologies are becoming central to the formation of new programs. Exciting new applications such as high-resolution telescopes, radar remote sensing, and advanced medical imaging are allowing us to participate in the development of new programs.

  8. REMOTE OPERATION PATTERN Class Structural Enable clients to invoke operations on remote objects as if they were local. This pattern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Rudolf K.

    1 / 7 REMOTE OPERATION PATTERN Class Structural Intent Enable clients to invoke operations on remote objects as if they were local. This pattern decouples the client from the network calls needed to access the remote object. Also Known As Remote Procedure Call Motivation This pattern applies

  9. Fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, M.A.

    1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission systems described wherein optical data may be transmitted over an optical data fiber from a remote source which includes a data transmitter and a power supply at the remote source. The transmitter may be remotely calibrated and stabilized via an optical control fiber, and the power source may be remotely cycled between duty and standby modes via an optical control fiber. 3 figs.

  10. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

  11. Final Report for the MANNRRSS II Program Management of Nevada's Natural Resources with Remote Sensing Systems, Beatty, NV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester Miller; Brian Horowitz; Chris Kratt; Tim Minor; Stephen F. Zitzer; James. V. Taranik; Zan L. Aslett; Todd O. Morken

    2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the Final Report on the Management of Nevada’s Natural Resources with Remote Sensing Systems (MANNRRSS) II program. This is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project tasked with utilizing hyperspectral and ancillary electro-optical instrumentation data to create an environmental characterization of an area directly adjacent to the Nevada Test Site (NTS).

  12. Synchronized sampling improves fault location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kezunovic, M. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Perunicic, B. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)] [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transmission line faults must be located accurately to allow maintenance crews to arrive at the scene and repair the faulted section as soon as possible. Rugged terrain and geographical layout cause some sections of power transmission lines to be difficult to reach. In the past, a variety of fault location algorithms were introduced as either an add-on feature in protective relays or stand-alone implementation in fault locators. In both cases, the measurements of current and voltages were taken at one terminal of a transmission line only. Under such conditions, it may become difficult to determine the fault location accurately, since data from other transmission line ends are required for more precise computations. In the absence of data from the other end, existing algorithms have accuracy problems under several circumstances, such as varying switching and loading conditions, fault infeed from the other end, and random value of fault resistance. Most of the one-end algorithms were based on estimation of voltage and current phasors. The need to estimate phasors introduces additional difficulty in high-speed tripping situations where the algorithms may not be fast enough in determining fault location accurately before the current signals disappear due to the relay operation and breaker opening. This article introduces a unique concept of high-speed fault location that can be implemented either as a simple add-on to the digital fault recorders (DFRs) or as a stand-alone new relaying function. This advanced concept is based on the use of voltage and current samples that are synchronously taken at both ends of a transmission line. This sampling technique can be made readily available in some new DFR designs incorporating receivers for accurate sampling clock synchronization using the satellite Global Positioning System (GPS).

  13. 2007 Urban Remote Sensing Joint Event Application of satellite Remote Sensing for Urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2007 Urban Remote Sensing Joint Event Application of satellite Remote Sensing for Urban Risk Analysis: a case study of the 2003 extreme heat wave in Paris Bénédicte Dousset Hawaii Institute@ogs.trieste.it Abstract ­ Satellite observations are used to monitor the August 2003 heat wave in Paris

  14. Medical Remote Monitoring using sound environment analysis and wearable sensors 1 Medical Remote Monitoring using sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Medical Remote Monitoring using sound environment analysis and wearable sensors 1 X Medical Remote Monitoring using sound environment analysis and wearable sensors Dan Istrate1, Jérôme Boudy2, Hamid Medjahed1. In Europe, for example, the life expectancy for men is about 71 years and for women about 79 years

  15. REMOTE LABORATORIES IN AUTOMATION: AIP-PRIMECA RAO ARI PLATFORM Remote Laboratories in Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for thorough trainings in industrial We thank our sponsors : Schneider Electric which provided the automationREMOTE LABORATORIES IN AUTOMATION: AIP-PRIMECA RAO ARI PLATFORM Remote Laboratories in Automation of resources and competencies about industrial topics for many universities in Rhône-Alpes french Region. Due

  16. Chariot, Alaska Site Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chariot site is located in the Ogotoruk Valley in the Cape Thompson region of northwest Alaska. This region is about 125 miles north of (inside) the Arctic Circle and is bounded on the southwest by the Chukchi Sea. The closest populated areas are the Inupiat villages of Point Hope, 32 miles northwest of the site, and Kivalina,41 miles to the southeast. The site is accessible from Point Hope by ATV in the summer and by snowmobile in the winter. Project Chariot was part of the Plowshare Program, created in 1957 by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to study peaceful uses for atomic energy. Project Chariot began in 1958 when a scientific field team chose Cape Thompson as a potential site to excavate a harbor using a series of nuclear explosions. AEC, with assistance from other agencies, conducted more than40 pretest bioenvironmental studies of the Cape Thompson area between 1959 and 1962; however, the Plowshare Program work at the Project Chariot site was cancelled because of strong public opposition. No nuclear explosions were conducted at the site.

  17. Building Address Locations -Assumes entire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, Frank

    Building Address Locations - Assumes entire building unless noted Designation Submit through* 560, 4 BU Crosstown Center 801 Massachusetts Ave Floor 1, 2 BMC BCD Building 800 Harrison Avenue BCD BMC Biosquare III 670 Albany Floors 2, 3, 6, 7 BMC Biosquare III 670 Albany Floors 1, 4, 5, 8 BU Building

  18. Boston, Massachusetts Location: Boston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    -recovery ventilation and water-source heat pumps Each unit has fresh air ducted independently. Each residence is warmed by a heat pump that taps the Trigen Energy Corporation steam lines that run underneath the street. #12;WallsBoston, Massachusetts #12;Location: Boston, MA Building type(s): Multi-unit residential, Retail 350

  19. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy: Human error and critical tasks in remote afterloading brachytherapy and approaches for improved system performance. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callan, J.R.; Kelly, R.T.; Quinn, M.L. [Pacific Science and Engineering Group, San Diego, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote Afterloading Brachytherapy (RAB) is a medical process used in the treatment of cancer. RAB uses a computer-controlled device to remotely insert and remove radioactive sources close to a target (or tumor) in the body. Some RAB problems affecting the radiation dose to the patient have been reported and attributed to human error. To determine the root cause of human error in the RAB system, a human factors team visited 23 RAB treatment sites in the US The team observed RAB treatment planning and delivery, interviewed RAB personnel, and performed walk-throughs, during which staff demonstrated the procedures and practices used in performing RAB tasks. Factors leading to human error in the RAB system were identified. The impact of those factors on the performance of RAB was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance. Finally, the project identified and evaluated alternative approaches for resolving the safety significant problems related to human error.

  20. Topographic and Air-Photo Lineaments in Various Locations Related to Geothermal Exploration in Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Zehner, Richard

    These shapefiles was constructed as an aid to geothermal exploration in preparation for a site visit for field checking. We make no claims as to the existence of the lineaments, their location, orientation, and/or nature.

  1. REMOTE INTERVENTION TOWER ELIMINATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dave Murnane; Renauld Washington

    2002-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report is presented to satisfy reporting requirements in the Statement of work section J.5 page 120 per Department of Energy contract DE-AC26-01NT41093. The project does not contain any imperial research data. This report describes the assembly of Commercial off the shelf (COTS) items configured in a unique manner to represent new and innovative technology in the service of size reduction and material handling at DOE sites, to assist in the D&D effort currently underway at the designated DOE Facilities.

  2. Wellsite Geologist/ Mudlogger Job Location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    Description: Entry level positions are available for persons in oil and gas exploration. Mud Loggers required for logger and well site geology positions under direction of experienced personnel. All training.S./B.A. Degree in Geology, Earth Science, Engineering, or Applied Science Exceptional problem solving skills

  3. Geophysical investigation, Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geophysical surveys were conducted in 1992 and 1993 on 21 sites at the Salmon Site (SS) located in Lamar County, Mississippi. The studies are part of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) being conducted by IT Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). During the 1960s, two nuclear devices and two chemical tests were detonated 826 meters (in) (2710 feet [ft]) below the ground surface in the salt dome underlying the SS. These tests were part of the Vela Uniform Program conducted to improve the United States capability to detect, identify, and locate underground nuclear detonations. The RI/FS is being conducted to determine if any contamination is migrating from the underground shot cavity in the salt dome and if there is any residual contamination in the near surface mud and debris disposal pits used during the testing activities. The objective of the surface geophysical surveys was to locate buried debris, disposal pits, and abandoned mud pits that may be present at the site. This information will then be used to identify the locations for test pits, cone penetrometer tests, and drill hole/monitor well installation. The disposal pits were used during the operation of the test site in the 1960s. Vertical magnetic gradient (magnetic gradient), electromagnetic (EM) conductivity, and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were used to accomplish these objectives. A description of the equipment used and a theoretical discussion of the geophysical methods are presented Appendix A. Because of the large number of figures relative to the number of pages of text, the geophysical grid-location maps, the contour maps of the magnetic-gradient data, the contour maps of the EM conductivity data, and the GPR traverse location maps are located in Appendix B, Tabs I through 22. In addition, selected GPR records are located in Appendix C.

  4. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Maybell, Colorado. Final report, Appendixes to attachment 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains supporting appendices to attachment 3 for the remedial action and site stabilization plan for Maybell, Colorado UMTRA site. Appendix A includes the Hydrological Services Calculations and Appendix B contains Ground Water Quality by Location data.

  5. Overview of Remote Handling Equipment Used for the NPP A1 Decommissioning - 12141

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravarik, K.; Medved, J.; Pekar, A.; Stubna, M. [VUJE, Inc., Okruzna 5, 918 64 Trnava (Slovakia); Michal, V. [IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O.Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Vargovcik, L. [ZTS VVU Kosice, Inc., Juzna Trieda 95, 041 24 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first Czechoslovak NPP A1 was in operation from 1972 to 1977 and it was finally shutdown due to an accident (level 4 according to the INES). The presence of radioactive, toxic or hazardous materials limits personnel access to facilities and therefore it is necessary to use remote handling technologies for some most difficult characterization, retrieval, decontamination and dismantling tasks. The history of remote handling technologies utilization started in nineties when the spent nuclear fuel, including those fuel assemblies damaged during the accident, was prepared for the transport to Russia. Subsequent significant development of remote handling equipment continued during implementation of the NPP A1 decommissioning project - Stage I and ongoing Stage II. Company VUJE, Inc. is the general contractor for both mentioned stages of the decommissioning project. Various remote handling manipulators and robotics arms were developed and used. It includes remotely controlled vehicle manipulator MT-15 used for characterisation tasks in hostile and radioactive environment, special robust manipulator DENAR-41 used for the decontamination of underground storage tanks and multi-purposes robotics arms MT-80 and MT-80A developed for variety of decontamination and dismantling tasks. The heavy water evaporator facility dismantling is the current task performed remotely by robotics arm MT-80. The heavy water evaporator is located inside the main production building in the room No. 220 where loose surface contamination varies from 10 Bq/cm{sup 2} to 1x10{sup 3} Bq/cm{sup 2}, dose rate is up to 1.5 mGy/h and the feeding pipeline contained liquid RAW with high tritium content. Presented manipulators have been designed for broad range of decommissioning tasks. They are used for recognition, sampling, waste retrieval from large underground tanks, decontamination and dismantling of technological equipments. Each of the mentioned fields claims specific requirements on design of manipulator, their operation and control systems as well as tools of manipulators. Precise planning of decontamination and dismantling tasks is necessary for its successful performance by remotely controlled manipulator. The example of the heavy water evaporator demonstrates typical procedure for decommissioning of contaminated technological equipment by remotely controlled manipulators - planning of decommissioning tasks, preparatory tasks, modification of applied tools and design of specific supporting constructions for manipulator and finally decontamination and dismantling themselves. Due to the particularly demanding conditions in highly contaminated A1 NPP, a team of experts with special know-how in the field of decommissioning has grown up, and unique technological equipment enabling effective and safe work in environment with a high radiation level has been developed. (authors)

  6. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  7. Remote Sensing and Sea-Truth Measurements of Methane Flux to the Atmosphere (HYFLUX project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian MacDonald

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-disciplinary investigation of distribution and magnitude of methane fluxes from seafloor gas hydrate deposits in the Gulf of Mexico was conducted based on results obtained from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) remote sensing and from sampling conducted during a research expedition to three sites where gas hydrate occurs (MC118, GC600, and GC185). Samples of sediments, water, and air were collected from the ship and from an ROV submersible using sediments cores, niskin bottles attached to the ROV and to a rosette, and an automated sea-air interface collector. The SAR images were used to quantify the magnitude and distribution of natural oil and gas seeps that produced perennial oil slicks on the ocean surface. A total of 176 SAR images were processed using a texture classifying neural network algorithm, which segmented the ocean surface into oil-free and oil-covered water. Geostatistical analysis indicates that there are a total of 1081 seep formations distributed over the entire Gulf of Mexico basin. Oil-covered water comprised an average of 780.0 sq. km (sd 86.03) distributed with an area of 147,370 sq. km. Persistent oil and gas seeps were also detected with SAR sampling on other ocean margins located in the Black Sea, western coast of Africa, and offshore Pakistan. Analysis of sediment cores from all three sites show profiles of sulfate, sulfide, calcium and alkalinity that indicated anaerobic oxidation of methane with precipitation of authigenic carbonates. Difference among the three sampling sites may reflect the relative magnitude of methane flux. Methane concentrations in water column samples collected by ROV and rosette deployments from MC118 ranged from {approx}33,000 nM at the seafloor to {approx}12 nM in the mixed layer with isolated peaks up to {approx}13,670 nM coincident with the top of the gas hydrate stability field. Average plume methane, ethane, and propane concentrations in the mixed layer are 7, 630, and 9,540 times saturation, respectively. Based on the contemporaneous wind speeds at this site, contemporary estimates of the diffusive fluxes from the mixed layer to the atmosphere for methane, ethane, and propane are 26.5, 2.10, and 2.78 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}d, respectively. Continuous measurements of air and sea surface concentrations of methane were made to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution of the diffusive net sea-to-air fluxes. The atmospheric methane fluctuated between 1.70 ppm and 2.40 ppm during the entire cruise except for high concentrations (up to 4.01 ppm) sampled during the end of the occupation of GC600 and the transit between GC600 and GC185. Results from interpolations within the survey areas show the daily methane fluxes to the atmosphere at the three sites range from 0.744 to 300 mol d-1. Considering that the majority of seeps in the GOM are deep (>500 m), elevated CH{sub 4} concentrations in near-surface waters resulting from bubble-mediated CH4 transport in the water column are expected to be widespread in the Gulf of Mexico.

  8. Joint microseismic event location with uncertain velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poliannikov, Oleg V.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the problem of the joint location of seismic events using an array of receivers. We show that locating multiple seismic events simultaneously is advantageous compared to the more traditional approaches of locating ...

  9. Development of remote crane system for use inside small argon hot-cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jong Kwang; Park, Byung Suk; Yu, Seung-Nam; Kim, Kiho; Cho, Ilje [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Process Technology Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we describe the design of a novel crane system for the use in a small argon hot-cell where only a pair of master-slave manipulators (MSM) is available for the remote maintenance of the crane. To increase the remote maintainability in the space-limited environment, we devised a remote actuation mechanism in which electrical parts consisting of a servo-motor, a position sensor, and two limit switches located inside the workspace of the MSM transmit power to the mechanical parts located in the ceiling. Even though the design concept does not provide thoroughly sufficient solution because the mechanical parts are placed out of the MSM's workspace, the durability of mechanical parts can be easily increased if they have a high safety margin. Therefore, the concept may be one of the best solutions for our special crane system. In addition, we developed a servo-control system based on absolute positioning technology; therefore, it is possible for us to perform the given tasks more safely through an automatic operation. (authors)

  10. Valve assembly having remotely replaceable bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Evan R. (San Diego, CA); Tanner, David E. (Poway, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A valve assembly having remotely replaceable bearings is disclosed wherein a valve disc is supported within a flow duct for rotation about a pair of axially aligned bearings, one of which is carried by a spindle received within a diametral bore in the valve disc, and the other of which is carried by a bearing support block releasably mounted on the duct circumferentially of an annular collar on the valve disc coaxial with its diametrical bore. The spindle and bearing support block are adapted for remote removal to facilitate servicing or replacement of the valve disc support bearings.

  11. Multi-Site Energy Reduction Through Teamwork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tutterow, V.; Walters, T.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-Site Energy Reduction Through Teamwork Thomas R. Theising Energy/Waste Management and Procurement Manager BASF Corporation Freeport, Texas ABSTRACT Energy Teams were established at seven locations in Tennessee, Texas... to the business. The completion of an energy audit will leave a laundry list of ideas to be considered. The energy management process, at the Site level, begins at this point. At BASF, we have found the most successful method of evaluating...

  12. Evaluation of Location-Specific Predictions by a Detailed Simulation Model of Aedes aegypti Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lloyd, Alun

    specific locations, the cities of Iquitos, Peru, and Buenos Aires, Argentina. These two sites differ that was averaged across all locations. In the Argentina case Skeeter Buster provides a satisfactory simulation from the Research and Policy for Infectious Disease Dynamics (RAPIDD) program of the Science

  13. Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App Energy Department Launches Alternative Fueling Station Locator App November 7, 2013 - 11:16am Addthis As part of...

  14. Asymptotic analysis of an optimal location problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Asymptotic analysis of an optimal location problem. One considers the problem of optimal location of masses(say production centers) in order to approximate a ...

  15. Geothermal Exploration Using Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aviris Remote Sensing Data Over Fish Lake Valley, Nv Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Exploration Using Aviris Remote...

  16. EAST TEXAS FOREST INVENTORY (ETFI) PILOT PROJECT REMOTE SENSING PHASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    EAST TEXAS FOREST INVENTORY (ETFI) PILOT PROJECT REMOTE SENSING PHASE Dr. Daniel R. Unger, Remote) or the United States Forest Service (USFS) via the Southern Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (SFIA

  17. U-277: Google Chrome Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7: Google Chrome Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code U-277: Google Chrome Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code October 9, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis...

  18. T-574: Google Chrome Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Execute...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Multiple vulnerabilities were reported in Google Chrome. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. A remote user can bypass the pop-up...

  19. Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites M I Mishchenko1 instruments suitable for aerosol remote sensing and give examples of aerosol retrievals obtained forcing directly by absorbing and reflecting sunlight, thereby cooling or heating the atmosphere

  20. User authentication and remote execution across administrative domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Michael, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) selectively delegates authority to processes running on remote machines that need to access other resources. The delegation mechanism lets users incrementally construct trust policies for remote machines. Measurements ...

  1. U-047: Siemens Automation License Manager Bugs Let Remote Users...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U-048: HP LaserJet Printers Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Update Firmware with Arbitrary Code T-699: EMC AutoStart Buffer Overflows Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code...

  2. Virtual Reality to Improve Remote Control in Presence of Delays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    or domotics. I. VIRTUAL REALITY AND REMOTE CONTROL One of the aims of virtual reality is to reproduce real

  3. U-231: Cisco ASA SIP and WebVPN Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two vulnerabilities were reported in Cisco ASA. A remote or remote authenticated user can cause denial of service conditions.

  4. "Non-Reflective" Boundary Design via Remote Sensing and PID Control Valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Qin Fen [ORNL] [ORNL; Karney, Professor Byran W. [University of Toronto, Canada] [University of Toronto, Canada; Pejovic, Dr. Stanislav [University of Toronto, Canada] [University of Toronto, Canada

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper develops the concept of a nonreflective (or semireflective) boundary condition using the combination of a remote sensor and a control system to modulate a relief valve. The essential idea is to sense the pressure change at a remote location and then to use the measured data to adjust the opening of an active control valve at the end of the line to eliminate or attenuate the wave reflections at the valve, thus controlling system transient pressures. This novel idea is shown here through numerical simulation to have considerable potential for transient protection. Using this model, wave reflections and resonance can be effectively eliminated for frictionless pipelines or initial no-flow conditions and can be better controlled in more realistic pipelines for a range of transient disturbances. In addition, the features of even-order harmonics and nonreflective boundary conditions during steady oscillation, obtained through time domain transient analysis, are verified by hydraulic impedance analysis in the frequency domain.

  5. Remote sensing and forest damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, N.J.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, damage to North American forests caused by insects, diseases, pollution, and fire results in multibillion dollar losses of revenue and resources. To respond to these losses effectively, forest managers need timely information on the location, extent, and spread of the damage. Traditional techniques for monitoring forest damage include high-resolution aerial photography, color infrared photography, and visual reconnaissance mapping. These techniques require visual interpretation of the data and often are somewhat subjective. In addition, because such analyses are time-consuming and costly, many areas of forest are never mapped, and in cases where maps exist, they often are obsolete or incomplete. An airborne imager has been developed to solve the problems of time-consuming visual analysis and interpretations. The Programmable Multispectral Imager measures small changes - invisible by conventional detection methods - in light reflected by the forest canopy. The PMI measures the color an intensity of reflected light and records this information digitally in computer tape aboard an aircraft. This information is then available for later entry into a computer for processing and enhancement. Although airborne imagers have been available for nearly three decades, they have not been used extensively for forest damage assessment or other forestry applications because of their poor sensitivity and their limited number of fixed spectral channels. The PMI is the first of a new generation of imagers that combine high sensitivity with the flexibility of continuous spectral coverage. This allows scientists to evaluate the potential causes and effects of stress on vegetation.

  6. Remote Health Monitoring Using Online Social Media Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatti, Saleem N.

    Remote Health Monitoring Using Online Social Media Systems Chonlatee Khorakhun University of St@cs.st-andrews.ac.uk Abstract--Remote monitoring is considered an essential part of future eHealth systems to enable the general requirements of a remote monitoring scenario and the process of building and using a Facebook

  7. Remote Sensing Data and Information for Hydrological Monitoring and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krakauer, Nir Y.

    1 Remote Sensing Data and Information for Hydrological Monitoring and Modeling Reza Khanbilvardi Springs, MD, USA 1 Introduction Remote sensing data and information are shown great potential in supplying measurements, remote sensing based measurements are spatially averages over the pixels can appropriate

  8. Remote Sensing in Support of Multilateral Environmental Agreements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Remote Sensing in Support of Multilateral Environmental Agreements Alex de Sherbinin CIESIN, from 172 in 1970 to more than 475 today · the sophistication of remote sensing and geospatial sets · the number of global and regional initiatives attempting to apply remote sensing (RS

  9. Remote Sensing for Biodiversity Conservation of the Albertine Rift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    183 10 Remote Sensing for Biodiversity Conservation of the Albertine Rift in Eastern Africa Samuel 2003). The rapidly developing field of remote sensing has been invaluable to biodiversity conservation distribution depend (Debinski et al. 1999). The field of remote sens- ing complements traditional field

  10. UAS remote sensing missions for rangeland applications Andrea S. Lalibertea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UAS remote sensing missions for rangeland applications Andrea S. Lalibertea *, Craig Wintersb surface, are in remote areas and have low population densities, all of which provide an ideal opportunity for remote sensing applications from unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). In this article, we describe a proven

  11. Remote Homolog Detection Using Local SequenceStructure Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bystroff, Chris

    Remote Homolog Detection Using Local Sequence­Structure Correlations Yuna Hou,1* Wynne Hsu,1 Mong 2 Department of Biology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York ABSTRACT Remote homology similarity. In this article, we present a remote homolog detection method called SVM-HMMSTR that overcomes

  12. Remote Sensing Messungen zur on-road Bestimmung der

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    LUBETRAX Remote Sensing Messungen zur on-road Bestimmung der Abgase von schweren Motorfahrzeugen, Chur, Zürich, Brugg Dr. Peter Maly (Projektleitung) Dr. Stefan Scherer Dr. G.A. Bishop (Remote Sensing;Inhaltsverzeichnis Zusammenfassung 1 1. Einleitung und Zielsetzung 3 1.1 Remote Sensing Messungen (FEAT) 4 1

  13. Remote-Spanners: What to Know beyond Neighbors Philippe Jacquet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Remote-Spanners: What to Know beyond Neighbors Philippe Jacquet INRIA Rocquencourt, France philippe are generally known in practical routing algorithms, we introduce the notion of remote-spanner. Given an unweighted graph G, a sub-graph H with vertex set V (H) = V (G) is an (, )-remote-spanner if for each pair

  14. Remote Control and Receiver-Transceiver Specifications and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajamani, Sriram K.

    Remote Control and Receiver- Transceiver Specifications and Requirements for Windows Media Center hardware vendors (IHVs) and PC OEM partners who want to create remote control and receiver device combinations that decode input from the remote control for Windows Media Center. This document provides details

  15. Remote Stabilization via Communication Networks with a Distributed Control Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Remote Stabilization via Communication Networks with a Distributed Control Law Emmanuel Witrant the problem of remote stabilization via communication networks involving some time- varying delays of known average dynamics. This problem arises when the control law is remotely implemented and leads

  16. Remote Sensing of Natural Areas: Procedures and Considerations for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Remote Sensing of Natural Areas: Procedures and Considerations for Assessing Stress and Pollution Jason Goldberg, James Perry, and John Anderson Coastal Ecosystems and Remote Sensing Program Introduction Remote sensing can be defined as the acquisi- tion and measurement of data/information on some

  17. Remote Sensing of Western-Caribbean Coral Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Remote Sensing of Western-Caribbean Coral Communities Introduction: Despite the fact that coral. Remote sensing has been suggested as a potential tool for monitoring the spatial extent, health the Spectral Reflectance of Corals In-Situ. GIScience and Remote Sensing. Maeder, J., Narumalani, S., Rundquist

  18. Storage and retrieval of single photons transmitted between remote quantum memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Chaneliere; D. N. Matsukevich; S. D. Jenkins; S. -Y. Lan; T. A. B. Kennedy; A. Kuzmich

    2005-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An elementary quantum network operation involves storing a qubit state in an atomic quantum memory node, and then retrieving and transporting the information through a single photon excitation to a remote quantum memory node for further storage or analysis. Implementations of quantum network operations are thus conditioned on the ability to realize such matter-to-light and/or light-to-matter quantum state mappings. Here, we report generation, transmission, storage and retrieval of single quanta using two remote atomic ensembles. A single photon is generated from a cold atomic ensemble at Site A via the protocol of Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) [Nature v.414, 413 (2001)] and is directed to Site B through a 100 meter long optical fiber. The photon is converted into a single collective excitation via the dark-state polariton approach of Fleischhauer and Lukin [Phys. Rev. Lett. v.84, 5094 (2000)]. After a programmable storage time the atomic excitation is converted back into a single photon. This is demonstrated experimentally, for a storage time of 500 nanoseconds, by measurement of an anticorrelation parameter a. Storage times exceeding ten microseconds are observed by intensity cross-correlation measurements. The length of the storage period is two orders of magnitude longer than the time to achieve conversion between photonic and atomic quanta. The controlled transfer of single quanta between remote quantum memories constitutes an important step towards distributed quantum networks.

  19. T-704: RSA enVision Lets Remote Users View Files and Remote Authentica...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Allows remote attackers to obtain sensitive information by sniffing the network or leveraging access to a recipient mailbox. PLATFORM: RSA enVision Version(s): 3.x, 4.x ABSTRACT:...

  20. Remote Sens. 2013, 5, 927-948; doi:10.3390/rs5020927 Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    Active Radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR) are critical to OPEN ACCESS #12;Remote Sens. 2013, 5 928) correlations of dominant modes of interannual variability with large-scale circulation anomalies such as the EI

  1. REFERENCE: Introduction to Remote Sensing. James B.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    -viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Advance Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Synthetic Temperature #12;ACTIVE REMOTE SENSING The sensor illuminates the terrain with its own energy, then records the reflected energy as it has been altered by the earth's surface. #12;SIDE-LOOKING AIRBORNE RADAR SLAR #12

  2. Double tracks test site characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of site characterization activities performed at the Double Tracks Test Site, located on Range 71 North, of the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) in southern Nevada. Site characterization activities included reviewing historical data from the Double Tracks experiment, previous site investigation efforts, and recent site characterization data. The most recent site characterization activities were conducted in support of an interim corrective action to remediate the Double Tracks Test Site to an acceptable risk to human health and the environment. Site characterization was performed using a phased approach. First, previously collected data and historical records sere compiled and reviewed. Generalized scopes of work were then prepared to fill known data gaps. Field activities were conducted and the collected data were then reviewed to determine whether data gaps were filled and whether other areas needed to be investigated. Additional field efforts were then conducted, as required, to adequately characterize the site. Characterization of the Double Tracks Test Site was conducted in accordance with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER).

  3. Geothermal: Site Map

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Site Map Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links Site Map...

  4. SITE OFFICE CONSOLIDATION

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Paul Golan, Site Office Manager, SLAC/LBNL, will present on the role of the DOE Site Office. We anticipate that Paul will cover the role of the DOE Site Office, operating model, and vision.

  5. Hanford Site Regional Population - 2010 Census

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Erin L.; Snyder, Sandra F.

    2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy conducts radiological operations in south-central Washington State. Population dose estimates must be performed to provide a measure of the impact from site radiological releases. Results of the U.S. 2010 Census were used to determine counts and distributions for the residential population located within 50-miles of several operating areas of the Hanford Site. Year 2010 was the first census year that a 50-mile population of a Hanford Site operational area exceeded the half-million mark.

  6. Short range radio locator system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radio location system comprises a wireless transmitter that outputs two megahertz period bursts of two gigahertz radar carrier signals. A receiver system determines the position of the transmitter by the relative arrival of the radar bursts at several component receivers set up to have a favorable geometry and each one having a known location. One receiver provides a synchronizing gating pulse to itself and all the other receivers to sample the ether for the radar pulse. The rate of the synchronizing gating pulse is slightly offset from the rate of the radar bursts themselves, so that each sample collects one finely-detailed piece of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver each pulse period. Thousands of sequential pulse periods provide corresponding thousand of pieces of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver, in expanded, not real time. Therefore the signal processing can be done with relatively low-frequency, inexpensive components. A conventional microcomputer is then used to find the position of the transmitter by geometric triangulation based on the relative time-of-flight information.

  7. Hanford Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

  8. Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills, ed

    2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years reports, called Annual Site Environmental Reports (ASERs), Nevada Test Site Environmental Reports (NTSERs), and, beginning in 2010, Nevada National Security Site Environmental Reports (NNSSERs), are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.energy.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx. This NNSSER was prepared to satisfy DOE Order DOE O 231.1B, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting.' Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NNSA/NSO Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts. This NNSSER summarizes data and compliance status for calendar year 2011 at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) and its two support facilities, the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF) and the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis). It also addresses environmental restoration (ER) projects conducted at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). Through a Memorandum of Agreement, NNSA/NSO is responsible for the oversight of TTR ER projects, and the Sandia Site Office of NNSA (NNSA/SSO) has oversight of all other TTR activities. NNSA/SSO produces the TTR annual environmental report available at http://www.sandia.gov/news/publications/environmental/index.html.

  9. The use of NTA and EDTA for lead phytoextraction from soil from a battery recycling site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freitas, Eriberto; Nascimento, Clistenes; Silva, Airon

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are lead mining, lead smelting and battery recycling.Areas near Pb recycling facilities may be enriched bysoil with lead. A battery recycling site is a location where

  10. a-site substituted perovskite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Considerations The controlling contractor must consider many factors when laying out a site Engineering Websites Summary: and schedule Location of underground utilities...

  11. Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used...

  12. Section S Summary of the Site-Wide Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Degradation Due to the Locations and Designs of New Facilities and Associated Lighting, Especially on Top of South Table Mountain. Final EA Page S-4 July 2003 Site-Wide...

  13. Site environmental report. CY 1994, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the CY 1994 Site Environmental report and compliance summary for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), located at Teapot Dome, north of Casper, Wyoming.

  14. Commercial Scale Photovoltaic Development at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bluewater Disposal Site is located about 9 air miles northwest of Grants, New Mexico, in Cibola County (approximately 80 miles west of Albuquerque). Anaconda Copper Company constructed the...

  15. Subsurface characterization of the San Jacinto River Research site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leik, Jason Allan

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to develop an effective petroleum repudiation ics. strategy, the interaction between surface and shallow subsurface water was determined for the San Jacinto River Oi1 Spill Remediation Research site. The ten-acre wetland is located...

  16. Site monitoring from soil sample analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illsley, C.T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil samples have been collected for the past three years as part of a long range monitoring program. The program was designed to provide information on possible migration of plutonium in soil and to provide data for comparison with the EPA proposed guidance on transuranium elements in the environment. Samples have been collected at six locations west of Indiana Street within the eastern boundaries of the Rocky Flats Plant site. The EPA comparison study has been performed at five sites and the plutonium migration study is underway at the sixth site. The data on plutonium analyses will be compared to the EPA screening level of 0.20 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/ (74 x 10/sup 8/ Bq/km/sup 2/) in the five boundary sites. Possible migration trends will be examined for the plutonium data on soils from the other site.

  17. Environmental aspects of the Brandywine ash site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simek, E.; Potera, G.; Schuller, R.; Herritt, M.; Wagner, R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Brandywine ash site, located in Prince Georges County, Maryland, is owned and operated by the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO). This site was designed specifically for the storage of the large quantities of coal ash produced at PEPCO's nearby Chalk Point Generating Station. Environmental Resources Management, Inc. (ERM), with assistance from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Tidewater Administration, conducted a study of this site for the Maryland Power Plant Siting Program (PPSP) to determine if ash constituents are adversely affecting the environment. Section 1 of this report is an introduction to coal ash and its physical/chemical characteristics. Section 2 describes the environment at the site and in adjacent areas. Within this setting, a description of the facility is presented as Section 3. Section 4 relies on the previous sections to point out any likely effects of the facility on the environment and to discount unlikely interactions. Key conclusions are presented in Section 5.

  18. Task 3.14 - demonstration of technologies for remote power generation in Alaska. Semi-annual report, July 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.L.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper very briefly summarizes progress in the demonstration of a small (up to 6 MWe), environmentally acceptable electric generating system fueled by indigenous fuels and waste materials to serve power distribution systems typical of Alaskan Native communities. Two detailed appendices supplement the report. The project is focused on two primary technologies: (1) atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC), and (2) coalbed methane and coal-fired diesel technologies. Two sites have been selected as possible locations for an AFBC demonstration, and bid proposals are under review. The transfer of a coal-fired diesel clean coal demonstration project from Maryland to Fairbanks, Alaska was approved, and the environmental assessment has been initiated. Federal support for a fuel cell using coalbed methane is also being pursued. The appendices included in the report provide: (1) the status of the conceptual design study for a 600-kWe coal-fired cogeneration plant in McGrath, Alaska; and (2) a global market assessment of coalbed methane, fluidized-bed combustion, and coal-fired diesel technologies in remote applications.

  19. Geoarchaeological Investigation of the Coats-Hines Site (40WM31), Williamson County, Tennessee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalle, Kayla Anne

    2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coats-Hines site (40WM31) is a potential pre-Clovis site located in Franklin, Tennessee. The site rests, geographically, at the convergence of the Central Basin and Western Highland Rim. The site was discovered during the construction of a...

  20. Navy aquatic hazardous waste sites: the problem and possible solutions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, R.K.; Wild, W.J.; Richter, K.E.; Lapota, D.; Stang, P.M.

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data on 367 hazardous waste disposal sites at 58 Navy Marine Corps activities, located in the coastal zone, were reviewed to characterize the contaminants, disposal methods, and potentially impacted environments present at navy aquatic hazardous waste sites. This report identifies Navy aquatic hazardous waste site problems, assesses technology requirements, and describes remedial pilot projects being initiated at impacted aquatic sites.

  1. Transmission Benefits of Co-Locating Concentrating Solar Power and Wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In some areas of the U.S. transmission constraints are a limiting factor in deploying new wind and concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Texas is an example of one such location, where the best wind and solar resources are in the western part of the state, while major demand centers are in the east. The low capacity factor of wind is a compounding factor, increasing the relative cost of new transmission per unit of energy actually delivered. A possible method of increasing the utilization of new transmission is to co-locate both wind and concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage. In this work we examine the benefits and limits of using the dispatachability of thermal storage to increase the capacity factor of new transmission developed to access high quality solar and wind resources in remote locations.

  2. Remotely controlled sensor apparatus for use in dig-face characterization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Josten, N.E.; Svoboda, J.M.

    1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A remotely controlled sensor platform apparatus useful in a dig-face characterization system is deployed from a mobile delivery device such as standard heavy construction equipment. The sensor apparatus is designed to stabilize sensors against extraneous motions induced by heavy equipment manipulations or other outside influences, and includes a terrain sensing and sensor elevation control system to maintain the sensors in close ground proximity. The deployed sensor apparatus is particularly useful in collecting data in work environments where human access is difficult due to the presence of hazardous conditions, rough terrain, or other circumstances that prevent efficient data collection by conventional methods. Such work environments include hazardous waste sites, unexploded ordnance sites, or construction sites. Data collection in these environments by utilizing the deployed sensor apparatus is desirable in order to protect human health and safety, or to assist in planning daily operations to increase efficiency. 13 figs.

  3. Remotely controlled sensor apparatus for use in dig-face characterization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Josten, Nicholas E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Svoboda, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remotely controlled sensor platform apparatus useful in a dig-face characterization system is deployed from a mobile delivery device such as standard heavy construction equipment. The sensor apparatus is designed to stabilize sensors against extraneous motions induced by heavy equipment manipulations or other outside influences, and includes a terrain sensing and sensor elevation control system to maintain the sensors in close ground proximity. The deployed sensor apparatus is particularly useful in collecting data in work environments where human access is difficult due to the presence of hazardous conditions, rough terrain, or other circumstances that prevent efficient data collection by conventional methods. Such work environments include hazardous waste sites, unexploded ordnance sites, or construction sites. Data collection in these environments by utilizing the deployed sensor apparatus is desirable in order to protect human health and safety, or to assist in planning daily operations to increase efficiency.

  4. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 396: Area 20 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 396, Area 20 Spill Sites, is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 396 is listed in Appendix II of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 and consists of the following four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 20 of the Nevada Test Site: CAS 20-25-01, Oil Spills (2); CAS 20-25-02, Oil Spills; CAS 20-25-03, Oil Spill; CAS 20-99-08, Spill. Closure activities for CAU 396 were conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 396.

  5. Self-referencing remote optical probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, P.E.; Prather, W.S.; Livingston, R.R.

    1991-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A probe is described for remote spectrometric measurements of fluid samples having a hollow probe body with a sliding reflective plug therein and a lens at one end, ports for admitting and expelling the fluid sample and a means for moving the reflector so that reference measurement can be made with the reflector in a first position near the lens and a sample measurement can be made with the reflector away from the lens and the fluid sample between the reflector and the lens. Comparison of the two measurements will yield the composition of the fluid sample. The probe is preferably used for remote measurements and light is carried to and from the probe via fiber optic cables. 3 figures.

  6. Remote State Preparation of Mental Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrizio E. Tressoldi; Andrei Khrennikov

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to define in theoretical terms and summarise the available experimental evidence that physical and mental "objects", if considered "information units", may present similar classical and quantum models of communication beyond their specific characteristics. Starting with the Remote State Preparation protocol, a variant of the Teleportation protocol, for which formal models and experimental evidence are already available in quantum mechanics, we outline a formal model applied to mental information we defined Remote State Preparation of Mental Information (RSPMI), and we summarise the experimental evidence supporting the feasibility of a RSPMI protocol. The available experimental evidence offers strong support to the possibility of real communication at distance of mental information promoting the integration between disciplines that have as their object of knowledge different aspects of reality, both physical and the mental, leading to a significant paradigm shift in cognitive and information science.

  7. RECOGNITION OF POLYADENYLATION SITES FROM ARABIDOPSIS GENOMIC SEQUENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Limsoon

    ) and cleavage elements (CE). The far upstream elements span a region of 60-130 nucleotides, resides at a location 18 to 22 nucleotides upstream of the cleavage site and has a high U content. The near upstream elements spans a region of 6-10 nucleotides, resides at a location 12 nucleotides upstream of the cleavage

  8. The Potential Impacts of OTEC Intakes on Aquatic Organisms at an OTEC Site under Development on Kauai, HI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oney, Stephen K. [OTE Corporation; Hogan, Timothy [Alden Research Laboratory; Steinbeck, John [Tenera Environmental

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a marine renewable energy technology with the potential to contribute significantly to the baseload power needs of tropical island communities and remote U.S. military installations. As with other renewable energy technologies, however, there are potential challenges to its commercialization: technological, financial, social, and environmental. Given the large volumes of seawater required to drive the electricity-producing cycle, there is potential for the intakes to negatively impact the marine resources of the source waterbody through the impingement and entrainment of marine organisms. The goal of this project was to identify feasible warm water intake designs for a land-based OTEC facility proposed for development in Port Allen, Kauai and to characterize the populations of ichthyoplankton near the proposed warm water intake location that could be at risk of entrainment. The specific objectives of this project were to: • Complete a site-specific assessment of available and feasible warm water intake technologies to determine the best intake designs for minimizing impacts to aquatic organisms at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. • Complete a field sampling program to collect biological data to characterize the baseline populations of ichthyoplankton near the sites being considered for the warm water intake at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. Various intake design options are presented with the focus on providing adequate environmental protection to the local ichthyoplankton population while providing an economically viable intake option to the OTEC developer. Further definition by NOAA and other environmental regulators is required to further refine the designs presented to meet all US regulations for future OTEC development.

  9. The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: Third quarter 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1992, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. Table 1 lists those well series with constituents in the groundwater above Flag 2 during third quarter 1992, organized by location. Results from all laboratory analyses are used to generate this table. Specific conductance and pH data from the field also are included in this table.

  10. CORRECTIVE ACTION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 536: AREA 3 RELEASE SITE, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAU 536 consists of CAS 03-44-02, Steam Jenny Discharge, located in Area 3 of the NTS. The site was characterized in 2004 according to the approved CAIP and the site characterization results are reported in the CAU 536 CADD. The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in the approved CAU 536 CADD.

  11. Remote quantum gates mediated by spin chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Ronke; I. D'Amico; T. P. Spiller

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been much recent study on the application of spin chains to quantum state transfer and communication. Here we demonstrate that spin chains set up for perfect quantum state transfer can be utilised to generate remote quantum gates, between spin qubits injected at the ends of the chain. The natural evolution of the system across different excitation number sectors generates a maximally-entangling and universal gate between the injected qubits, independent of the length of the chain.

  12. Techniques for remotely sensing watershed runoff potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jerry Don

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques for Remotely Sensing Watershed Runoff Potential. (August 1978) Jerry Don Walker, B. S. , Texas ASM University Directed by: Dr. Bruce J. Blanchard The Soil Conservation Service runoff equation is widely used for predicting the watershed runoff... cases, no outflow occurs through the spillway of an overdes1gned structure. Since evaporation losses are high 1n these areas, the salinity of the water stored in the structure gradually increases with time. With insufficient flow through...

  13. Remote controlled vacuum joint closure mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doll, David W. (San Diego, CA); Hager, E. Randolph (La Jolla, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remotely operable and maintainable vacuum joint closure mechanism for a noncircular aperture is disclosed. The closure mechanism includes an extendible bellows coupled at one end to a noncircular duct and at its other end to a flange assembly having sealed grooves for establishing a high vacuum seal with the abutting surface of a facing flange which includes an aperture forming part of the system to be evacuated. A plurality of generally linear arrangements of pivotally coupled linkages and piston combinations are mounted around the outer surface of the duct and aligned along the length thereof. Each of the piston/linkage assemblies is adapted to engage the flange assembly by means of a respective piston and is further coupled to a remote controlled piston drive shaft to permit each of the linkages positioned on a respective flat outer surface of the duct to simultaneously and uniformly displace a corresponding piston and the flange assembly with which it is in contact along the length of the duct in extending the bellows to provide a high vacuum seal between the movable flange and the facing flange. A plurality of latch mechanisms are also pivotally mounted on the outside of the duct. A first end of each of the latch mechanisms is coupled to a remotely controlled latch control shaft for displacing the latch mechanism about its pivot point. In response to the pivoting displacement of the latch mechanism, a second end thereof is displaced so as to securely engage the facing flange.

  14. Remote state preparation of spatial qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Solís-Prosser; L. Neves

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the quantum communication protocol of remote state preparation (RSP) for pure states of qubits encoded in single photons transmitted through a double slit, the so-called spatial qubits. Two measurement strategies that one can adopt to remotely prepare the states are discussed. The first strategy is the well-known spatial postselection, where a single-pixel detector measures the transverse position of the photon between the focal and the image plane of a lens. The second strategy, proposed by ourselves, is a generalized measurement divided into two steps: the implementation of a two-outcome positive operator-valued measurement (POVM) followed by the spatial postselection at the focal plane of the lens by a two-pixel detector in each output of the POVM. In both cases we analyze the effects of the finite spatial resolution of the detectors over three figures of merit of the protocol, namely, the probability of preparation, the fidelity and purity of the remotely prepared states. It is shown that our strategy improves these figures compared with spatial postselection, at the expense of increasing the classical communication cost as well as the required experimental resources. In addition, we present a modified version of our strategy for RSP of spatial qudits which is able to prepare arbitrary pure states, unlike spatial postselection alone. We expect that our study may also be extended for RSP of the angular spectrum of a single-photon field as an alternative for quantum teleportation which requires very inefficient nonlinear interactions.

  15. Site recycling: From Brownfield to football field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.; Haas, W.L. [HDR Engineering Inc., Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carolina Panther`s new home, Carolinas Stadium, will be impressive. It will include a 75,000-seat stadium, about 2,000 parking spaces, and a practice facility equipped with three full-sized football fields, all located on 30 acres bordering the central business district of Charlotte, NC. Fans of the NFL expansion team may never know that, until recently, 13 of those 30 acres were a former state Superfund site contaminated by a commercial scrapyard that had operated from the early 1930s to 1983. The salvage of nonferrous metals from lead-acid batteries, copper from transformers and other electrical equipment, and ferrous metal scrap from junk automobiles at the Smith Metal and Iron (SMI) site had left a complex contamination legacy. The soil contained lead, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), lesser amounts of semivolatiles (polyaromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs), and volatile organic compounds and petroleum hydrocarbons. The site had remained dormant, like many former industrial sites that have come be called {open_quotes}brownfields,{close_quotes} for nearly a decade when in 1993, Charlotte was selected as the future home of the Carolina Panthers, a National Football League expansion team. The city was able to attract the team in part by offering to redevelop the site, a prime location adjacent to the downtown area. An eight-month-long site remediation effort by HDR Engineering Inc. was completed March 31, on schedule for a June 1996 unveiling of the team`s new facility.

  16. NGNP SITE 2 HAZARDS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Moe

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project initiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act, is based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is a helium-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor that can operate at temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, to generate process heat in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. Nuclear energy in the form of LWRs has been used in the U.S. and internationally principally for the generation of electricity. However, because the HTGR operates at higher temperatures than LWRs, it can be used to displace the use of fossil fuels in many industrial applications. It also provides a carbon emission-free energy supply. For example, the energy needs for the recovery and refining of petroleum, for the petrochemical industry and for production of transportation fuels and feedstocks using coal conversion processes require process heat provided at temperatures approaching 800 C. This temperature range is readily achieved by the HTGR technology. This report summarizes a site assessment authorized by INL under the NGNP Project to determine hazards and potential challenges that site owners and HTGR designers need to be aware of when developing the HTGR design for co-location at industrial facilities, and to evaluate the site for suitability considering certain site characteristics. The objectives of the NGNP site hazard assessments are to do an initial screening of representative sites in order to identify potential challenges and restraints to be addressed in design and licensing processes; assure the HTGR technology can be deployed at variety of sites for a range of applications; evaluate potential sites for potential hazards and describe some of the actions necessary to mitigate impacts of hazards; and, provide key insights that can inform the plant design process. The report presents a summary of the process methodology and the results of an assessment of hazards typical of a class of candidate sites for the potential deployment of HTGR reactor technology. The assessment considered health and safety, and other important siting characteristics to determine the potential impact of identified hazards and potential challenges presented by the location for this technology. A four reactor module nuclear plant (2000 to 2400 MW thermal), that co-generates steam, electricity for general use in the plant, and hot gas for use in a nearby chemical processing facility, to provide the requisite performance and reliability was assumed for the assessment.

  17. Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Alexandra DeVisser, NAVFAC-EXWC Brian June 10, 2013 #12;Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Objective: Provide location for year-long in Cable, Sound & Sea Technology (SST) Luis A. Vega, HNEI-University of Hawaii Energy Ocean International

  18. Appendix E: Underground Storage Annual Site Environmental Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Appendix E: Underground Storage Tank Data #12;Annual Site Environmental Report Appendix E: Underground Storage Tank Data E-3 Table E.1. Underground storage tanks (USTs) at the Y-12 Plant Location/95) NA Closure approval 3/95 (6/96) 9714 2334-U 1987 In use 6,000 Gasoline Full Site check NA NA

  19. Appendix C: Underground Storage Annual Site Environmental Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Appendix C: Underground Storage Tank Data #12;#12;Annual Site Environmental Report Appendix C: Underground Storage Tank Data C-3 Table C.1. Underground storage tanks (USTs) at the Y-12 Plant Location/95) NA Closure approval 3/95 (6/96) 9714 2334-U 1987 In use 6,000 Gasoline Full Site check NA Case closed

  20. Appendix C: Underground Storage Annual Site Environmental Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Appendix C: Underground Storage Tank Data #12;#12;Annual Site Environmental Report Appendix C: Underground Storage Tank Data C-3 Table C.1. Underground storage tanks (USTs) at the Y-12 Complex Location/95) NA Closure approval 3/95 (6/96) 9714 2334-U 1987 In use 6,000 Gasoline Full Site check NA Case closed

  1. Analysis of the AirTouch automatic vehicle location system's ability to locate moving vehicles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Tracy Lynn

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Automatic vehicle location systems are becoming more prevalent in diverse transportation applications. Their ability to locate vehicles can assist in locating emergency and public transit vehicles for better real-time dispatching as well...

  2. Analysis of the AirTouch automatic vehicle location system's ability to locate moving vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Tracy Lynn

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Automatic vehicle location systems are becoming more prevalent in diverse transportation applications. Their ability to locate vehicles can assist in locating emergency and public transit vehicles for better real-time dispatching as well...

  3. NMR analysis on microfluidic devices by remote detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonnell, Erin E.; Han, SongI; Hilty, Christian; Pierce,Kimberly; Pines, Alexander

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel approach to perform high-sensitivity NMR imaging and spectroscopic analysis on microfluidic devices. The application of NMR, the most information rich spectroscopic technique, to microfluidic devices remains a challenge because the inherently low sensitivity of NMR is aggravated by small fluid volumes leading to low NMR signal, and geometric constraints resulting in poor efficiency for inductive detection. We address the latter by physically separating signal detection from encoding of information with remote detection. Thereby, we use a commercial imaging probe with sufficiently large diameter to encompass the entire device, enabling encoding of NMR information at any location on the chip. Because large-diameter coils are too insensitive for detection, we store the encoded information as longitudinal magnetization and flow it into the outlet capillary. There, we detect the signal with optimal sensitivity using a solenoidal microcoil, and reconstruct the information encoded in the fluid. We present a generally applicable design for a detection-only microcoil probe that can be inserted into the bore of a commercial imaging probe. Using hyperpolarized 129Xe gas, we show that this probe enables sensitive reconstruction of NMR spectroscopic information encoded by the large imaging probe while keeping the flexibility of a large coil.

  4. Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. Hulstrom

    2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCH’s Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

  5. Field Summary Report for Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Coumbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. Hulstrom

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes field sampling activities conducted in support of WCH’s Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River. This work was conducted form 2008 through 2010. The work included preliminary mapping and measurement of Hanford Site contaminants in sediment, pore water, and surface water located in areas where groundwater upwelling were found.

  6. Joint Working Group-39, Manufacturing Technology Subworking Group-F, remote handling and automation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, R.D.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terms of reference were reviewed and continue to encompass the scope of activities of the SUBWOG. No revisions to the terms of reference were proposed. The list of site contacts who should receive copies of SUBWOG correspondence and meeting minutes was reviewed and updated. Documents exchanged related to the meeting include: Minutes of the sixth SUBOG 39F meeting; transactions of the fifth topical meeting on robotics and remote handling; data on manipulators was forwarded to LLNL from the robotics group at AEA Harwell; and the specifications of the duct remediation robot from the Rocky Flats Plant.

  7. Solar in Remote Applications in the United States | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of EnergySite Screening Decision Treein Remote Applications

  8. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 573: Alpha Contaminated Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 573 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 573 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with non-nuclear experiments and nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 573, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area • 05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives.

  9. Review of remote-sensor potential for wind-energy studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooke, W.H.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates a number of remote-sensing systems such as radars, lidars, and acoustic echo sounders which are potential alternatives to the cup- and propeller anemometers routinely used in wind energy siting. The high costs and demanding operational requirements of these sensors currently preclude their use in the early stages of a multi-phase wind energy siting strategy such as that recently articulated by Hiester and Pennell (1981). Instead, these systems can be used most effectively in the lattermost stages of the siting process - what Hiester and Pennell (1981) refer to as the site development phase, necessary only for the siting of large wind-energy conversion systems (WECS) or WECS clusters. Even for this particular application only four techniques appear to be operational now; that is, if used properly, these techniques should provide the data sets currently considered adequate for wind-energy siting purposes. They are, in rough order of increasing expense and operating demands: optical transverse wind sensors; acoustic Doppler sounders; time-of-flight and continuous wave (CW) Doppler lidar; and frequency-modulated, continuous wave (FM-CW) Doppler radar.

  10. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years’ Nevada Test Site Environmental Reports (NTSERs) are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx. This NTSER was prepared to satisfy DOE Order DOE O 231.1A, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting.” Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NNSA/NSO Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts. This NTSER summarizes data and compliance status for calendar year 2009 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and its two support facilities, the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF) and the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL)-Nellis. It also addresses environmental restoration (ER) projects conducted at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). Through a Memorandum of Agreement, NNSA/NSO is responsible for the oversight of TTR ER projects, and the Sandia Site Office of NNSA (NNSA/SSO) has oversight of all other TTR activities. NNSA/SSO produces the TTR annual environmental report available at http://www.sandia.gov/news/publications/environmental/index.html.

  11. Benchmarking the Remote-Handled Waste Facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O. P. Mendiratta; D. K. Ploetz

    2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Facility decontamination activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), the site of a former commercial nuclear spent fuel reprocessing facility near Buffalo, New York, have resulted in the removal of radioactive waste. Due to high dose and/or high contamination levels of this waste, it needs to be handled remotely for processing and repackaging into transport/disposal-ready containers. An initial conceptual design for a Remote-Handled Waste Facility (RHWF), completed in June 1998, was estimated to cost $55 million and take 11 years to process the waste. Benchmarking the RHWF with other facilities around the world, completed in November 1998, identified unique facility design features and innovative waste pro-cessing methods. Incorporation of the benchmarking effort has led to a smaller yet fully functional, $31 million facility. To distinguish it from the June 1998 version, the revised design is called the Rescoped Remote-Handled Waste Facility (RRHWF) in this topical report. The conceptual design for the RRHWF was completed in June 1999. A design-build contract was approved by the Department of Energy in September 1999.

  12. WIPP Remote Handled Waste Facility: Performance Dry Run Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrington, T. P.; Britain, R. M.; Cassingham, S. T.

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Handled (RH) TRU Waste Handling Facility at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was recently upgraded and modified in preparation for handling and disposal of RH Transuranic (TRU) waste. This modification will allow processing of RH-TRU waste arriving at the WIPP site in two different types of shielded road casks, the RH-TRU 72B and the CNS 10-160B. Washington TRU Solutions (WTS), the WIPP Management and Operation Contractor (MOC), conducted a performance dry run (PDR), beginning August 19, 2002 and successfully completed it on August 24, 2002. The PDR demonstrated that the RHTRU waste handling system works as designed and demonstrated the handling process for each cask, including underground disposal. The purpose of the PDR was to develop and implement a plan that would define in general terms how the WIPP RH-TRU waste handling process would be conducted and evaluated. The PDR demonstrated WIPP operations and support activities required to dispose of RH-TRU waste in the WIPP underground.

  13. Using Remote Desktop with the Cisco AnyConnect VPN Client in Windows Vista 1. In order to use Remote Desktop and the VPN client, users must first complete the Blackboard Remote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Remote Desktop with the Cisco AnyConnect VPN Client in Windows Vista 1. In order to use Remote Desktop and the VPN client, users must first complete the Blackboard Remote Users training course and then download and install the VPN client on the workstation that they will use to remote to their office

  14. Using Remote Desktop with the Cisco AnyConnect VPN Client in Windows XP 1. In order to use Remote Desktop and the VPN client, users must first complete the Blackboard Remote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Remote Desktop with the Cisco AnyConnect VPN Client in Windows XP 1. In order to use Remote Desktop and the VPN client, users must first complete the Blackboard Remote Users training course and then download and install the VPN client on the workstation that they will use to remote to their office

  15. Reduction of Ground-Based Sensor Sites for Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vucetic, Slobodan

    Reduction of Ground-Based Sensor Sites for Spatio- Temporal Analysis of Aerosols Vladan in this study is estimation of an important property of atmosphere, called Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). Remote of spatio- temporal aerosol patterns on a global scale. Ground-based AOD estimation is more accurate

  16. U-238: HP Service Manager Input Validation Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in HP Service Manager Web Tier 7.11, 9.21, and 9.30, and HP Service Center Web Tier 6.28, allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via unspecified vectors.

  17. Annual Site Environmental Report Paducah Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of U. S. Department of Energy Order 231.1A. The data and information contained in this report were collected in accordance with the Paducah Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (LATA...

  18. Site Selection for the Salt Disposition Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gladden, J.B.; Rueter, K.J.; Morin, J.P.

    2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A site selection study was conducted to identify a suitable location for the construction and operation of a new Salt Disposition Facility (SDF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The facility to be sited is a single processing facility and support buildings that could house either of three technology alternatives being developed by the High Level Waste Systems Engineering Team: Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation, Crystalline Silicotitanate Non-Elutable Ion Exchange or Caustic Side Solvent Extraction. A fourth alternative, Direct Disposal in grout, is not part of the site selection study because a location has been identified that is unique to this technology (i.e., Z-Area). Facility site selection at SRS is a formal, documented process that seeks to optimize siting of new facilities with respect to facility-specific engineering requirements, sensitive environmental resources, and applicable regulatory requirements. In this manner, the prime objectives of cost minimization, environmental protection, and regulatory compliance are achieved. The results from this geotechnical characterization indicated that continued consideration be given to Site B for the proposed SDF. Suitable topography, the lack of surface hydrology and floodplain issues, no significant groundwater contamination, the presence of minor soft zones along the northeast portion of footprint, and no apparent geological structure in the Gordon Aquitard support this recommendation.

  19. Managing Legacy Records for Formerly Utilized Sites. Remedial Action Program Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, C. [DOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Gueretta, J. [Lead DOE Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, CO (United States); Tack, J. [Source One Management, Inc., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Widdop, M. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracted for support work through private and academic parties through the early 1960's. The work often involved radioactive materials. Residual radioactive contamination was left at some of more than 600 potentially contaminated (candidate) sites, and worker health and safety concerns remain from the site operations and subsequent remediation activities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a program to identify and protect records of MED/AEC activities and of remediation work conducted under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) to aid in resolving questions about site conditions, liability, and worker health and safety and to ensure ongoing protectiveness of human health and the environment. This paper discusses DOE activities undertaken to locate records collections, confirm retention schedules and access requirements, and document information about the collections for use by future stewards. In conclusion: DOE-LM recognizes that records and information management is a critical component of effective LTS and M. Records are needed to answer questions about site conditions and demonstrate to the public in the future that the sites are safe. DOE-LM is working to satisfy present needs and anticipate future uses for FUSRAP records, and compile a collection of site and program information from which future stewards can readily locate and retrieve needed information. (authors)

  20. USING A CONTAINMENT VESSEL LIFTING APPARATUS FOR REMOTE OPERATIONS OF SHIPPING PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftin, Bradley [Savannah River National Laboratory; Koenig, Richard [Savannah River National Laboratory

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The 9977 and the 9975 shipping packages are used in various nuclear facilities within the Department of Energy. These shipping packages are often loaded in designated areas with designs using overhead cranes or A-frames with lifting winches. However, there are cases where loading operations must be performed in remote locations where these facility infrastructures do not exist. For these locations, a lifting apparatus has been designed to lift the containment vessels partially out of the package for unloading operations to take place. Additionally, the apparatus allows for loading and closure of the containment vessel and subsequent pre-shipment testing. This paper will address the design of the apparatus and the challenges associated with the design, and it will describe the use of the apparatus.