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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Remedial System Performance Improvement for the 200-ZP-1_PW-1 Operable Units at Hanford  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Operations Review Report: Feasibility Study Strategies and Remedial System Performance Improvement for the 200- ZP-1/PW-1 Operable Units at Hanford Prepared for Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation Office of Environmental Management February 9, 2007 i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, Headquarters' Office of Environmental Management, the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-22), performed a Remediation System Evaluation (RSE) of the 200-ZP-1/PW-1 groundwater pump and treat (P&T) system, as well as the vadose zone Soil Vapor Extraction (SVE) system at the Hanford

2

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

General Motors Site in General Motors Site in Adrian, Michigan Department of Energy OiZce of Assistant Manager for Environmental Management Oak Ridge Operations January 2001 69 Printed on recycledhcydable paper. CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE GENERAL MOTORS SITE ADRIAN, MICHIGAN JANUARY 200 1 Prepared for United States Army Corps of Engineers Under Contract No. DACW45-98-D-0028 BY Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 CONTENTS FIGURES .............................................................................................................................................. TABLES ...............................................................................................................................................

3

Page 1 of 8 I. Introduction: Why perform RSEs? There are several reasons to be excited about the Remediation System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

checklist and the various subsurface performance evaluation checklists (e.g., ground water extraction, air about the Remediation System Evaluation (RSE) initiative. This is a small effort, in cost and time of the protectiveness and performance of the remedy; D. Verifying that there are clear goals and realistic closure

US Army Corps of Engineers

4

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Baker and Williams Baker and Williams Warehouses Site in New York, New York, 7997 - 7993 Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office November 7 995 CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES SITE IN NEW YORK, NEW YORK, 1991-1993 NOVEMBER 1995 Prepared for United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-AC05-910R21949 BY Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 __ CONTENTS .- ~_- _- ..- ^_ FIGURES . ...,.,.....,,........,,.,_.....,.,.,.__,....,,,,, v TABLES ,.,__...,,....,..._._..,,,,_._...,.,.,,.,,,..._,,,, vi ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..v~

5

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' at the C. H. Schnoor Site, Springdale, Pennsylvania, in 1 994 Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office November 1996 CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE C. H. SCHNOOR SITE SPRINGDALE, PENNSYLVANIA, IN 1994 NOVEMBER 1996 prep&ed for United States Department of ~nergy Oak Ridge Operations Off= r Under Contract No. DE-AC05-910R21949 Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. '14501 CONTENTS FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi UNITS OF MEASURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii

6

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alba Craft Laboratory and Alba Craft Laboratory and Vicinity Properties Site in Oxford, Ohio C Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office January 1997 $$@T Op% 3 @!B . i~d!l Ab Printed on recycled/recyclable paper. CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE FORMER ALBA CRAFT LABORATORY AND VICINITY PROPERTIES SITE IN OXFORD, OHIO JANUARY 1997 Prepared for United States Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-AC0591 OR2 1949 Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 CONTENTS Page FIGURES .............................................................................................................................................. v TABLES.. .............................................................................................................................................. vi

7

Remedial Action Performed  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Aliquippa Forge Site Aliquippa Forge Site in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations Office November 1996 CERTIFICATION DOCKE.~ FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE ALIQUIPPA FORGE SITE IN ALIQUIPPA, PENNSYLVANIA NOVEMBER 1996 Prepared for . UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Oak Ridge Operations Office Under Contract No. DE-AC05-9 1 OR2 1949 Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 CONTENTS Page FIGURES v . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TABLES vii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii UNITSOFMEASURE ix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . INTRODUCTION xi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8

Residential radon remediation: performance over 17 years  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......covering about 1000 m2. Water drains into the basin...sub-slab ventilation remediation system installed, i...sub-slab ventilation remediation (Bq mSE). Measured...concentration with height above ground level. For example...had a sub-slab radon remediation system installed that......

Naomi H. Harley; Passaporn Chittaporn; Anthony Marsicano

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Remedial System Performance Improvement for the 200-ZP-1_PW-1...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of work. Recent increases of Tc-99 have been noted in monitoring wells near the TX tanks, northeast of the CT sources. The current interim groundwater extraction system...

10

Toxic Remediation System And Method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

Matthews, Stephen M. (Alameda County, CA); Schonberg, Russell G. (Santa Clara County, CA); Fadness, David R. (Santa Clara County, CA)

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

11

WASTE PACKAGE REMEDIATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Package Remediation System remediates waste packages (WPs) and disposal containers (DCs) in one of two ways: preparation of rejected DC closure welds for repair or opening of the DC/WP. DCs are brought to the Waste Package Remediation System for preparation of rejected closure welds if testing of the closure weld by the Disposal Container Handling System indicates an unacceptable, but repairable, welding flaw. DC preparation of rejected closure welds will require removal of the weld in such a way that the Disposal Container Handling System may resume and complete the closure welding process. DCs/WPs are brought to the Waste Package Remediation System for opening if the Disposal Container Handling System testing of the DC closure weld indicates an unrepairable welding flaw, or if a WP is recovered from the subsurface repository because suspected damage to the WP or failure of the WP has occurred. DC/WP opening will require cutting of the DC/WP such that a temporary seal may be installed and the waste inside the DC/WP removed by another system. The system operates in a Waste Package Remediation System hot cell located in the Waste Handling Building that has direct access to the Disposal Container Handling System. One DC/WP at a time can be handled in the hot cell. The DC/WP arrives on a transfer cart, is positioned within the cell for system operations, and exits the cell without being removed from the cart. The system includes a wide variety of remotely operated components including a manipulator with hoist and/or jib crane, viewing systems, machine tools for opening WPs, and equipment used to perform pressure and gas composition sampling. Remotely operated equipment is designed to facilitate DC/WP decontamination and hot cell equipment maintenance, and interchangeable components are provided where appropriate. The Waste Package Remediation System interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System for the receipt and transport of WPs and DCs. The Waste Handling Building System houses the system, and provides the facility, safety, and auxiliary systems required to support operations. The system receives power from the Waste Handling Building Electrical System. The system also interfaces with the various DC systems.

N.D. Sudan

2000-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

12

VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH WATERSHED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH their environmental impact, innovative practices must be developed that replace ecosystem services lost during systems for urban ecosystem remediation. The stormwater retention performance of a thin-layer green roof

Rosemond, Amy Daum

13

Consideration of Reliability in System Design for Ground Water Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A remedial action design system is described that may be used to evaluate candidate remediation systems and select the preferred alternative under conditions of uncertainty. The remedial action design method i...

W. Woldt; I. Bogardi; L. Duckstein

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Tank waste remediation system engineering plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Engineering Plan describes the engineering process and controls that will be in place to support the Technical Baseline definition and manage its evolution and implementation to the field operations. This plan provides the vision for the engineering required to support the retrieval and disposal mission through Phase 1 and 2, which includes integrated data management of the Technical Baseline. Further, this plan describes the approach for moving from the ``as is`` condition of engineering practice, systems, and facilities to the desired ``to be`` configuration. To make this transition, Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Engineering will become a center of excellence for TWRS which,will perform engineering in the most effective manner to meet the mission. TWRS engineering will process deviations from sitewide systems if necessary to meet the mission most effectively.

Rifaey, S.H.

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

15

Integrated Systems-Based Approach to Monitoring Environmental Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for risk reduction and cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex. Remediation strategies for some of the existing contamination use techniques that mitigate risk, but leave contaminants in place. Monitoring to verify remedy performance and long-term mitigation of risk is a key element for implementing these strategies and can be a large portion of the total cost of remedy implementation. Especially in these situations, there is a need for innovative monitoring approaches that move away from the cost and labor intensive point-source monitoring. A systems-based approach to monitoring design focuses monitoring on controlling features and processes to enable effective interpretation of remedy performance.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

16

Integrated Systems-Based Approach to Monitoring Environmental Remediation - 13211  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for risk reduction and cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex. Remediation strategies for some of the existing contamination use techniques that mitigate risk, but leave contaminants in place. Monitoring to verify remedy performance and long-term mitigation of risk is a key element for implementing these strategies and can be a large portion of the total cost of remedy implementation. Especially in these situations, there is a need for innovative monitoring approaches that move away from the cost and labor intensive point-source monitoring. A systems-based approach to monitoring design focuses monitoring on controlling features and processes to enable effective interpretation of remedy performance. (authors)

Truex, Mike; Oostrom, Mart; Carroll, K.C.; Bunn, Amoret; Wellman, Dawn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Washington (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Washington (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The three most frequently used remediation technologies are discussed: (1) NAPL removal, (2) Pump-and-Treat, (3) Soil Vapor Extraction.

Oostrom, Mart; Falta, Ron W.; Mayer, Alex S.; Javandel, I.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

18

Environmental remediation and waste management information systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to document a few of the many environmental information systems that currently exist worldwide. The paper is not meant to be a comprehensive list; merely a discussion of a few of the more technical environmental database systems that are available. Regulatory databases such as US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) RODS (Records of Decision System) database [EPA, 1993] and cost databases such as EPA`s CORA (Cost of Remedial Action) database [EPA, 1993] are not included in this paper. Section 2 describes several US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) information systems and databases. Section 3 discusses several US EPA information systems on waste sites and technologies. Section 4 summarizes a few of the European Community environmental information systems, networks, and clearinghouses. And finally, Section 5 provides a brief overview of Geographical Information Systems. Section 6 contains the references, and the Appendices contain supporting information.

Harrington, M.W.; Harlan, C.P.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Tank waste remediation system systems engineering management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) describes the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) implementation of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Systems Engineering (SE) policy provided in Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Policy, DOE/RL letter, 95-RTI-107, Oct. 31, 1995. This SEMP defines the products, process, organization, and procedures used by the TWRS Program to accomplish SE objectives. This TWRS SEMP is applicable to all aspects of the TWRS Program and will be used as the basis for tailoring SE to apply necessary concepts and principles to develop and mature the processes and physical systems necessary to achieve the desired end states of the program.

Peck, L.G.

1996-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

20

INVESTIGATION OF REMEDIAL EDUCATION COURSE SCORES AS A PREDICTOR OF FRESHMAN-LEVEL COURSE PERFORMANCES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study sought to determine the relationship between the performance in remedial courses (English and math) and college-level course performances among students in a large… (more)

Ulmer, Larry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Tank waste remediation system systems engineering management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) describes the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) implementation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) systems engineering policy provided in 97-IMSD-193. The SEMP defines the products, process, organization, and procedures used by the TWRS Project to implement the policy. The SEMP will be used as the basis for tailoring the systems engineering applications to the development of the physical systems and processes necessary to achieve the desired end states of the program. It is a living document that will be revised as necessary to reflect changes in systems engineering guidance as the program evolves. The US Department of Energy-Headquarters has issued program management guidance, DOE Order 430. 1, Life Cycle Asset Management, and associated Good Practice Guides that include substantial systems engineering guidance.

Peck, L.G.

1998-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

22

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. In particular the present invention relates to stabilizing toxic metals in groundwater and soil. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Groundwater Remediation Systems Quarterly Operations Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................... 5-1 6. OU III Carbon Tetrachloride Pump and Treat System ........................................ 6 = ethylene dibromide * System dismantlement for the Carbon Tetrachloride system was completed in 2010. ** EDB% NA 180 Industrial Park Recirculation/ In-Well (AS/Carbon) VOC 7 Operate- 14 Standby-

24

Groundwater Remediation Systems Quarterly Operations Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................... 5-1 6. OU III Carbon Tetrachloride Pump and Treat System........................................ 6 = ethylene dibromide * System dismantlement for the Carbon Tetrachloride system was completed in 2010. ** EDB Standby NA 180 Industrial Park Recirculation/ In-Well (AS/Carbon) VOC 7 Operate- 14 Standby- 1 100% 1 1063

25

Groundwater Remediation Systems Quarterly Operations Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................... 5-1 6. OU III Carbon Tetrachloride Pump and Treat System ........................................ 6 = ethylene dibromide * System dismantlement for the Carbon Tetrachloride system was completed in 2010. ** EDB Standby NA 180 Industrial Park Recirculation/ In-Well (AS/Carbon) VOC 7 Operate- 14 Standby- 1 Standby NA

26

Groundwater Remediation Systems Quarterly Operations Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................... 5-1 6. OU III Carbon Tetrachloride Pump and Treat System........................................ 6 = ethylene dibromide * System dismantlement for the Carbon Tetrachloride system was completed in 2010. ** EDB Standby NA 180 Industrial Park Recirculation/ In-Well (AS/Carbon) VOC 7 Operate- 14 Standby- 1 30% NA 1062

27

Groundwater Remediation Systems Quarterly Operations Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................... 5-1 6. OU III Carbon Tetrachloride Pump and Treat System ........................................ 6 for the Carbon Tetrachloride system was completed in 2010. ** EDB has only been detected in the influent at trace and Recirculate Tritium 4 Operate- 9 Standby- 7 100% NA 180 Industrial Park Recirculation/ In-Well (AS/Carbon) VOC

28

Tandem microwave waste remediation and decontamination system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention discloses a tandem microwave system consisting of a primary chamber in which microwave energy is used for the controlled combustion of materials. A second chamber is used to further treat the off-gases from the primary chamber by passage through a susceptor matrix subjected to additional microwave energy. The direct microwave radiation and elevated temperatures provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the treated off gases. The tandem microwave system can be utilized for disinfecting wastes, sterilizing materials, and/or modifying the form of wastes to solidify organic or inorganic materials. The simple design allows on-site treatment of waste by small volume waste generators.

Wicks, George G. (North Aiken, SC); Clark, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Schulz, Rebecca L. (Gainesville, FL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Tank waste remediation system program plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This TWRS Program plan presents the planning requirements and schedules and management strategies and policies for accomplishing the TWRS Project mission. It defines the systems and practices used to establish consistency for business practices, engineering, physical configuration and facility documentation, and to maintain this consistency throughout the program life cycle, particularly as changes are made. Specifically, this plan defines the following: Mission needs and requirements (what must be done and when must it be done); Technical objectives/approach (how well must it be done); Organizational structure and philosophy (roles, responsibilities, and interfaces); and Operational methods (objectives and how work is to be conducted in both management and technical areas). The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and supports the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing contracts with private contractors for the treatment (immobilization) of Hanford tank high-level radioactive waste.

Powell, R.W.

1998-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

30

Assessing Soil Vapor Extraction Remediation Performance and Closure: A Review - 12188  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a baseline remediation approach for volatile contaminants. While SVE is generally effective for removal of contaminants from higher permeability portions of the vadose zone, contamination in low-permeability zones can persist due to mass transfer processes that limit the removal effectiveness. Thus, a diminishing rate of contaminant extraction over time is typically observed, yet contamination may remain in low-permeability zones. Under these conditions, SVE performance needs to be evaluated to determine whether the system should be optimized, terminated, or transitioned to another technology to replace or augment SVE. Methodologies have been developed to quantify SVE performance over time and to evaluate the impact of persistent vadose zone contamination sources on groundwater quality. Recently, these methods have applied mass flux/discharge concepts to quantify contaminant source strength. Methods include field measurement techniques using the SVE system to quantify source strength and predictive analyses with analytical and numerical models to evaluate the impact of the contaminant source on groundwater. (authors)

Truex, M.J.; Carroll, K.C.; Oostrom, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Tank waste remediation system privatization phase 1 infrastructure project, systems engineering implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Systems Engineering Implementation Plan (SEIP) describes the processes, products, and organizational responsibilities implemented by Project W-519 to further define how the project`s mission, defined initially by the Tank Waste Remediation System Phase 1 Privatization Infrastructure Project W-503 Mission Analysis Report (Hoertkorn 1997), will be accomplished using guidance provided by the Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) (Peck 1998). This document describes the implementation plans for moving from a stated mission to an executable cost, schedule, and technical baseline and to help ensure its successful completion of those baselines.

Schaus, P.S.

1998-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

32

Vibration diagnosis and remediation design for an x-ray optics stitching interferometer system.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) x-ray optics Metrology Laboratory currently operates a small-aperture Wyko laser interferometer in a stitching configuration. While the stitching configuration allows for easier surface characterization of long x-ray substrates and mirrors, the addition of mechanical components for optic element translation can compromise the ultimate measurement performance of the interferometer. A program of experimental vibration measurements, quantifying the laboratory vibration environment and identifying interferometer support-system behavior, has been conducted. Insight gained from the ambient vibration assessment and modal analysis has guided the development of a remediation technique. Discussion of the problem diagnosis and possible solutions are presented in this paper.

Preissner, C.; Assoufid, L.; Shu, D.; Experimental Facilities Division (APS)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

PCB Concentration in Fish in a River System after Remediation of Contaminated Sediment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An 1991 investigation of PCB concentrations in water and fish along a river was repeated in 1996 after the completion of a remediation of PCB-containing sediment in a lake within the river system. ... The results indicated, that changes in background exposure must be taken into account when evaluating the success of remedial actions measures carried out over several years. ...

Gudrun Bremle; Per Larsson

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants.

Corey, John C. (212 Lakeside Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Kaback, Dawn S. (1932 Cottonwood Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Looney, Brian B. (1135 Ridgemont Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system are presented for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil where the contaminants, such as toxic metals, are carried in a subsurface plume. The method comprises selection and injection into the soil of a fluid that will cause the contaminants to form stable, non-toxic compounds either directly by combining with the contaminants or indirectly by creating conditions in the soil or changing the conditions of the soil so that the formation of stable, non-toxic compounds between the contaminants and existing substances in the soil are more favorable. In the case of non-toxic metal contaminants, sulfides or sulfates are injected so that metal sulfides or sulfates are formed. Alternatively, an inert gas may be injected to stimulate microorganisms in the soil to produce sulfides which, in turn, react with the metal contaminants. Preferably, two wells are used, one to inject the fluid and one to extract the unused portion of the fluid. The two wells work in combination to create a flow of the fluid across the plume to achieve better, more rapid mixing of the fluid and the contaminants. 4 figures.

Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

1993-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

36

Tank waste remediation system process engineering instruction manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Process Engineering Instruction Manual is to provide guidance and direction to TWRS Process Engineering staff regarding conduct of business. The objective is to establish a disciplined and consistent approach to business such that the work processes within TWRS Process Engineering are safe, high quality, disciplined, efficient, and consistent with Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation Policies and Procedures. The sections within this manual are of two types: for compliance and for guidance. For compliance sections are intended to be followed per-the-letter until such time as they are formally changed per Section 2.0 of this manual. For guidance sections are intended to be used by the staff for guidance in the conduct of work where technical judgment and discernment are required. The guidance sections shall also be changed per Section 2.0 of this manual. The required header for each manual section is illustrated in Section 2.0, Manual Change Control procedure. It is intended that this manual be used as a training and indoctrination resource for employees of the TWRS Process Engineering organization. The manual shall be required reading for all TWRS Process Engineering staff, matrixed, and subcontracted employees.

ADAMS, M.R.

1998-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

37

REMEDIATION OF HIGH WATER CONTENT GEOMATERIALS: A REVIEW OF GEOTEXTILE FILTER PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

costly remediation alternatives is capping of surface impoundments such as lagoons, ponds or old quarries

Aydilek, Ahmet

38

Tank waste remediation system multi-year work plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP) documents the detailed total Program baseline and was constructed to guide Program execution. The TWRS MYWP is one of two elements that comprise the TWRS Program Management Plan. The TWRS MYWP fulfills the Hanford Site Management System requirement for a Multi-Year Program Plan and a Fiscal-Year Work Plan. The MYWP addresses program vision, mission, objectives, strategy, functions and requirements, risks, decisions, assumptions, constraints, structure, logic, schedule, resource requirements, and waste generation and disposition. Sections 1 through 6, Section 8, and the appendixes provide program-wide information. Section 7 includes a subsection for each of the nine program elements that comprise the TWRS Program. The foundation of any program baseline is base planning data (e.g., defendable product definition, logic, schedules, cost estimates, and bases of estimates). The TWRS Program continues to improve base data. As data improve, so will program element planning, integration between program elements, integration outside of the TWRS Program, and the overall quality of the TWRS MYWP. The MYWP establishes the TWRS baseline objectives to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The TWRS Program will complete the baseline mission in 2040 and will incur costs totalling approximately 40 billion dollars. The summary strategy is to meet the above objectives by using a robust systems engineering effort, placing the highest possible priority on safety and environmental protection; encouraging {open_quotes}out sourcing{close_quotes} of the work to the extent practical; and managing significant but limited resources to move toward final disposition of tank wastes, while openly communicating with all interested stakeholders.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Facility design philosophy: Tank Waste Remediation System Process support and infrastructure definition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the current facility design philosophy for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process support and infrastructure definition. The Tank Waste Remediation System Facility Configuration Study (FCS) initially documented the identification and definition of support functions and infrastructure essential to the TWRS processing mission. Since the issuance of the FCS, the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has proceeded to develop information and requirements essential for the technical definition of the TWRS treatment processing programs.

Leach, C.E.; Galbraith, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Grant, P.R.; Francuz, D.J.; Schroeder, P.J. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

Lee Davison

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Request  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.

L. Davison

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

42

Remediation of asbestos containing materials by Joule heating vitrification performed in a pre-pilot apparatus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A remediation method for asbestos containing materials based on vitrification by Joule heating is presented. Crystal phase transformations of several asbestos minerals were investigated. The vitrification technology on a pre-pilot scale was applied to cement-asbestos pipes containing simultaneously chrysotile and crocidolite. The progressive heating up to 1600 °C led to the complete melting of fibrous minerals and the rapid cooling of the melt formed a monolithic glass. Mineralogical (XRD) and morphological (SEM) analysis showed absence of crystalline phases within the glass. The external part of the Joule heated volume was not melted but lacked asbestos because of an irreversible thermal conversion of asbestos and silicate minerals into high temperature silicates (enstatite and diopside). An absolute filter integrated in the gas effluent treatment system avoided the release of asbestos fibres during the vitrification process. This process assured the complete remediation of asbestos containing materials and its scaling up to the field application could be a suitable industrial treatment of tons of material.

Francesco Dellisanti; Piermaria L. Rossi; Giovanni Valdrè

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Performance Tested Comfort Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Showerheads Residential Weatherization Performance Tested Comfort Systems Ductless Heat Pumps New Construction Residential Marketing Toolkit Retail Sales Allocation Tool...

44

Value tradeoffs for the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program at the Hanford Site of the Department of Energy has adopted a logical approach to making decisions that uses decision analysis to structure and analyze decision alternatives and public values to evaluate them. This report is the third in a series to support this effort. The first identified a set of objectives (called {open_quotes}ends objectives{close_quotes}) that characterize the ultimate goals and desires of Hanford decision makers and stakeholders. The second report developed operational measures for these ends objectives (called {open_quotes}ends measures{close_quotes}) and it also developed a set of performance objectives and associated performance measures that are more directly related to how well decision alternatives in the TWRS program perform to achieve the ends objectives. The present report describes the development of quantitative value tradeoffs for both the ends measures and the performance measures. First, five national value experts were interviewed to obtain value tradeoffs for units of the ends measures identified in Keeney and von Winterfeldt (1996). The results of this assessment are shown in Table S1. Second, the implied value tradeoffs for the units of the performance measures were calculated from the value tradeoffs for units of the ends measures provided by the national experts. When calculating the value tradeoffs for the units of the performance measures, very simple quantitative relationships between ends and performance measures were assumed. The results of this calculation are shown in Table S2. The results of this report shown in Tables S1 and S2 should be considered preliminary and largely illustrative of the principles for developing value tradeoffs. The report lists several important caveats and recommendations for how future work can improve on the assessment of value tradeoffs.

Keeney, R.L.; Winterfeldt, D. von [Decision Insights, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Operations to be Performed in the Waste Package Dry Remediation Cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Describes planned and proposed operations for remediating damaged and/or out-of-compliance waste packages, casks, DPCs, overpacks, and containers at the Yucca Mountain Dry Transfer Facility.

Norman E. Cole; Randy K. Elwood

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

The Effects of Behaviorist and Constructivist Instruction on Student Performance in College-level Remedial Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effective mathematical remediation techniques. This study examines the effect of pedagogical style for college-level remedial mathematics students and the effect of the chosen assessment method in determining student success. Specifically, this study.... Furthermore, consideration of student self- efficacy is investigated in order to account for any variation in instructional method. Ultimately, this study describes the effects of both instruction type and assessment method on the success of college...

Cox, Murray William

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

47

Tank waste remediation system characterization project quality policies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quality plan describes the system used by Characterization Project management to achieve quality. This plan is comprised of eleven quality policies which, when taken together, form a management system deployed to achieve quality. This quality management system is based on the customer`s quality requirements known as the `RULE`, 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance.

Board, D.C.

1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

48

Tank waste remediation system characterization project quality policies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quality plan describes the system used by Characterization Project management to achieve quality. This plan is comprised on eleven quality policies which, when taken together, form a management system deployed to achieve quality. This quality management system is based on the customer`s quality requirements known as the `RULE`, 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance.

Trible, T.C., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

IMPROVING THE EFFICIENCY OF AN EXISTING GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.9 kilowatt total) 14 #12;ENERGY IMPROVEMENT BENEFITS 15 #12;RETURN ON INVESTMENT: SOLAR PANELS 16 #12 of grid energy with solar panel arrays Long-term operations and maintenance costs were significantly.7 kilowatt total) 13 #12;GROUNDWATER SYSTEM ENERGY IMPROVEMENTS ­ Northern Solar Array: 56 panel system (10

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

50

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington file:///I|/Data%20Migration%20Task/EIS-0189-FEIS-Summary-1996.HTM[6/27/2011 11:21:59 AM] The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires Federal agencies to analyze the potential environmental impacts of their proposed actions to assist them in making informed decisions. A similar Washington State law, the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), requires State agencies, including the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), to analyze environmental impacts before making decisions that could impact the environment. A major emphasis of both laws is to promote public awareness of these actions and provide opportunities for public involvement. Because NEPA and SEPA requirements are similar, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Ecology

51

USE OF THE AERIAL MEASUREMENT SYSTEM HELICOPTER EMERGENCY RESPONSE ACQUISITION SYSTEMS WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR RADIOACTIVE SOIL REMEDIATION - [11504  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Aerial Measurement System (AMS) Helicopter Emergency Response Acquisition System provides a thorough and economical means to identify and characterize the contaminants for large area radiological surveys. The helicopter system can provide a 100-percent survey of an area that qualifies as a scoping survey under the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) methodology. If the sensitivity is adequate when compared to the clean up values, it may also be used for the characterization survey. The data from the helicopter survey can be displayed and manipulated to provide invaluable data during remediation activities.

BROCK CT

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Summary - Remedial System Performance Improvement for the 200...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

The 200-ZP-1 OU and PW-1 OU are pump and treat operating units (OU) designed to remove carbon tetrachloride (CT) from the groundwater and vadose zone, respectively. The units...

53

Tank waste remediation system vadose zone program plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the vadose zone characterization under this program is to develop a better conceptual geohydrologic model of identified tank farms which will be characterized so that threats to human health and the environment from past leaks and spills, intentional liquid discharges, potential future leaks during retrieval, and from residual contaminants that may remain in tank farms at closure can be explicitly addressed in decision processes. This model will include geologic, hydrologic, and hydrochemical parameters as defined by the requirements of each of the TWRS programs identified here. The intent of this TWRS Vadose Zone Program Plan is to provide justification and an implementation plan for the following activities: Develop a sufficient understanding of subsurface conditions and transport processes to support decisions on management, cleanup, and containment of past leaks, spills, and intentional liquid discharges; Develop a sufficient understanding of transport processes to support decisions on controlling potential retrieval leaks; Develop a sufficient understanding of transport processes to support decisions on tank farm closure, including allowable residual waste that may remain at closure; and Provide new information on geotechnical properties in the 200 Area to supplement data used for design and performance assessment for immobilized low-activity waste disposal facilities.

Fredenburg, E.A.

1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

54

In-situ remediation system and method for contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for removing volatile contaminants from a subsurface plume of contamination comprising two sets of wells, a well for injecting a fluid into a saturated zone on one side of the plume and an extracting well for collecting the fluid together with volatilized contaminants from the plume on the other side of the plume. The fluid enables the volatile contaminants to be volatilized and carried therewith through the ground to the extracting well. Injecting and extracting wells are preferably horizontal wells positioned below the plume in the saturated zone and above the plume in the vadose zone, respectively. The fluid may be air or other gas or a gas and liquid mixture depending on the type of contaminant to be removed and may be preheated to facilitate volatilization. Treatment of the volatilized contamination may be by filtration, incineration, atmospheric dispersion or the like. 3 figs.

Corey, J.C.; Looney, B.B.; Kaback, D.S.

1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

55

EIS-0189: Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), Richland, WA (Programmatic)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This environmental impact statement evaluates the Department of Energy (DOE)'s, in cooperation with the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), decisions on how to properly manage and dispose of Hanford Site tank waste and encapsulated cesium and strontium to reduce existing and potential future risk to the public, Site workers, and the environment. The waste includes radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste currently stored in 177 underground storage tanks, approximately 60 other smaller active and inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (MUSTs), and additional Site waste likely to be added to the tank waste, which is part of the tank farm system. In addition, DOE proposes to manage and dispose of approximately 1,930 cesium and strontium capsules that are by-products of tank waste. The tank waste and capsules are located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

56

Decommissioning of the remediation systems at Waverly, Nebraska, in 2011-2012.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility in Waverly, Nebraska, from 1952 to 1974. During this time, the grain fumigant '80/20' (carbon tetrachloride/carbon disulfide) was used to preserve stored grain. In 1982, sampling by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) found carbon tetrachloride contamination in the town's groundwater. After an investigation of the contaminant distribution, the site was placed on the National Priority List (NPL) in 1986, and the CCC/USDA accepted responsibility for the contamination. An Interagency Compliance Agreement between the EPA and the CCC/USDA was finalized in May 1988 (EPA 1990). The EPA (Woodward-Clyde Consultants, contractor) started immediate cleanup efforts in 1987 with the installation of an air stripper, a soil vapor extraction system, a groundwater extraction well, and groundwater and soil gas monitoring wells (Woodward-Clyde 1986, 1988a,b). After the EPA issued its Record of Decision (ROD; EPA 1990), the CCC/USDA (Argonne National Laboratory, contractor) took over operation of the treatment systems. The CCC/USDA conducted a site investigation (Argonne 1991, 1992a,b), during which a carbon tetrachloride plume in groundwater was discovered northeast of the former facility. This plume was not being captured by the existing groundwater extraction system. The remediation system was modified in 1994 (Argonne 1993) with the installation of a second groundwater extraction well to contain the contamination further. Subsequently, a detailed evaluation of the system resulted in a recommendation to pump only the second well to conserve water in the aquifer (Argonne 1995). Sampling and analysis after implementation of this recommendation showed continued decreases in the extent and concentrations of the contamination with only one well pumping (Argonne 1999). The CCC/USDA issued quarterly monitoring reports from 1988 to 2009. Complete documentation of the CCC/USDA characterization and remediation efforts, including the quarterly monitoring reports, is on the compact disc inside the back cover of this report. The EPA reported on the progress of the remediation systems in a series of five-year reviews (EPA 1993, 1999, 2004, 2009). These reports and other EPA documentation are also on the compact disc inside the back cover of this report, along with the Woodward-Clyde (1986, 1988a,b) documentation cited. Starting in 2006, the analytical results for groundwater (the only medium still being monitored) showed no carbon tetrachloride concentrations above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5.0 g/L. Because the cleanup goals specified in the ROD (EPA 1990) had been met, the EPA removed the site from the NPL in November 2006 (Appendix A). In 2008 the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for the remediation system was deactivated, and a year later the EPA released its fourth and final five-year report (EPA 2009), indicating that no further action was required for the site and that the site was ready for unlimited use. In 2011-2012, the CCC/USDA decommissioned the remediation systems at Waverly. This report documents the decommission process and closure of the site.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

57

Field demonstration of a full-scale in situ thermal desorption system for the remediation of soil containing PCBS and other hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field demonstration of a full-sale, innovative and cost-effective remediation system using in situ thermal description (ISTD) was conducted at a state Superfund site in the northeastern United States in early 1996. The Demonstration was performed as part of the regulatory process to obtain a nationwide Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) permit for the remediation of soils containing PCBs at concentrations up to 5,000 ppm. An area of approximately 4800 square feet was remediated during six applications of an in situ Thermal Blanket covering an area of 800 square feet. Each application utilized five 160 square foot, electrically heated, 100-kilowatt modules. The Thermal Blanket heaters were operated at temperatures as high as 925 C. The modules contain 10 in. of vermiculite insulation to reduce upward heat losses to less than 10% of total power. The modules are covered with an impermeable silicone sheet and the in situ process is run at negative pressure to collect contaminants, prevent contaminant migration and eliminate odors. Off-gas emissions are controlled by a vapor extraction system comprised of a cyclonic separator for particulate removal, a flameless thermal oxidizer for destruction of residual contaminants, and a carbon polishing unit. Treatment times ranged from slightly more than 24 hours to treat the upper six inches to approximately four days to treat soil 12 to 18 inches deep. Temperature profiles and remedial efficiency are consistent with results from a computer thermal simulator. Post-treatment soil samples demonstrated the capability to achieve stringent soil cleanup levels of less than 2 ppm for PCBs while concurrently meeting ambient air quality standards with respect to air emissions and worker exposure limits. The Thermal Blanket is less intrusive than other permanent remedies and produces less noise, generates less dust and has a minimum of other impacts on the surrounding community.

Sheldon, R.B.; Iben, I.E.T.; Edelstein, W.A. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Remediation - July 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 July 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Integrated Safety Management System Phase II...

59

Effective System Performance (ESP) Benchmark  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effective System Effective System Performance (ESP) Benchmark Effective System Performance (ESP) Benchmark It is now generally recognized in the high performance computing community that peak performance does not adequately predict the usefulness of a system for a given set of applications. One of the first benchmarks designed to measure system performance in a real-world operational environment was NERSC's Effective System Performance (ESP) test. NERSC introduced ESP in 1999 with the hope that this test would be of use to system managers and would help to spur the community (both researchers and vendors) to improve system efficiency. The discussion below uses examples from the Cray T3E system that NERSC was operating in 1999. Improved MPP System Efficiency Equals Million-Dollar Savings

60

Monitoring System Performance (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Requirements for a standard test to rate the durability of photovoltaic (PV) modules at system voltage are discussed.

Emery, K.; Smith, R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

OMEGA Extended Performance Laser System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at UR-LLE is close to that required for ignition to occur. #12;The OMEGA Extended Performance (EP) laserOMEGA Extended Performance Laser System R. L. McCrory University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser­18 February 2008 #12;OMEGA Extended Performance Laser System R.L. McCrory Laboratory for Laser Energetics

62

Tank Waste Remediation System fiscal year 1996 multi-year program plan WBS 1.1. Revision 1, Appendix A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of data relating to the Tank Waste Remediation System Multi-Year Program. Topics discussed include: management systems; waste volume, transfer and evaporation management; transition of 200 East and West areas; ferricyanide, volatile organic vapor, and flammable gas management; waste characterization; retrieval from SSTs and DSTs; heat management; interim storage; low-level and high-level radioactive waste management; and tank farm closure.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Optimizing performance of energy systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book discusses optimizing performance of energy systems. Topics covered include a test station, heat flow integrator, microcomputer control of MIMIC operation, and microcomputer control of simulation operation.

Stricker, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Session 6: Systems operational performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three contributions were presented in this session: Tune and Orbit Feedbacks Performances: A User Perspective by Laurette Ponce , Beam Instrumentation Performance Overview by Mariusz Sapinski and LHC RF 2011 and beyond by Philippe Baudrenghien . This contribution recapitulates the outlooks given for 2012, the points to be followed up and the discussions originating in the “Systems Operational Performance” session.

Holzer, E B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

SES Performance Management System Plan Training | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management System Plan Training SES Performance Management System Plan Training Overview of the DOE SES Performance Management System. Senior Executive Service Performance...

66

Follow-up study of workers in a nylon carpet yarn plant after remedial actions taken against a contaminated humidification system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of remedial actions taken against a contaminated humidification system,...Methods:...Two and 6?years after modification, a follow-up investigation of a...

T. M. Pal; J. W. Groothoff; D. Post…

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Tank waste remediation system operation and utilization plan,vol. I {ampersand} II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL) is in the first stages of contracting with private companies for the treatment and immobilization of tank wastes. The components of tank waste retrieval, treatment, and immobilization have been conceived in two phases (Figure 1.0-1). To meet RL's anticipated contractual requirements, the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC) companies will be required to provide waste feeds to the private companies consistent with waste envelopes that define the feeds in terms of quantity, and concentration of both chemicals and radionuclides. The planning that supports delivery of the feed must be well thought out in four basic areas: (1) Low-activity waste (LAW)/high-level waste (HLW) feed staging plans. How is waste moved within the existing tanks to deliver waste that corresponds to the defined feed envelopes to support the Private Contractor's processing schedule and processing rate? (2) Single-shell tank (SST) retrieval sequence. How are Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1994) milestones for SST retrieval integrated into the Phase I processing to set the stage for Phase II processing to complete the mission? (3) Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flowsheet. How do materials flow from existing tank inventories through: (1) blending and pretreatment functions in the double-shell tanks (DSTs), (2) contractor processing facilities, and (3) stored waste forms (Figure 1.0-2); (4) Storage and disposal of the immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) and immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) product. How is the ILAW and IHLW product received from the private companies, the ILAW disposed onsite, and the IHLW stored onsite until final disposal?

Kirkbride, R.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Sustained System Performance (SSP) Benchmark  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sustained System Sustained System Performance (SSP) Benchmark Sustained System Performance (SSP) Benchmark William T.C. Kramer, John M. Shalf, and Erich Strohmaier Background The NERSC Approach to Procurement Benchmarks The NERSC-5 SSP The NERSC-6 SSP The Effective System Performance (ESP) Metric Conclusion Notes Formal description of SSP A formal description of the SSP, including detailed formulae, is now available. This is a portion of the soon-to-be-published Ph.D. dissertation, Kramer, W.T.C., 2008, "PERCU: A Holistic Method for Evaluating High End Computing Systems," Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley. Background Most plans and reports recently discuss only one of four distinct purposes benchmarks are used. The obvious purpose is selection of a system from

69

Call for Papers The 2010 Performance Metrics for Intelligent Systems workshop will be the tenth in a series dedicated to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a series dedicated to defining measures and methodologies of evaluating performance of intelligent systems systems for Hazardous Environments (e.g. nuclear remediation) - Smart Grid - Space Robotics - Medical. Started in 2000, the PerMIS series focuses on applications of performance measures to applied problems

Magee, Joseph W.

70

Predicting System Performance with Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inexpensive way. We propose using Gaussian Processes for system performance predictions and explain the types of uncertainties included. As an example, we use a Gaussian Process to predict chilled water use and compare the results with Neural Network...

Yan, B.; Malkawi, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Tank waste remediation system immobilized high-level waste storage project configuration management implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Configuration Management Implementation Plan was developed to assist in the management of systems, structures, and components, to facilitate the effective control and statusing of changes to systems, structures, and components; and to ensure technical consistency between design, performance, and operational requirements. Its purpose is to describe the approach Project W-464 will take in implementing a configuration management control, to determine the rigor of control, and to identify the mechanisms for imposing that control.This Configuration Management Implementation Plan was developed to assist in the management of systems, structures, and components, to facilitate the effective control and statusing of changes to systems, structures, and components; and to ensure technical consistency between design, performance, and operational requirements. Its purpose is to describe the approach Project W-464 will take in implementing a configuration management control, to determine the rigor of control, and to identify the mechanisms for imposing that control.

Burgard, K.G.

1998-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

72

Tank waste remediation system privatization infrastructure program, configuration management implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Configuration Management Implementation Plan (CMIP) was developed to assist in managing systems, structures, and components (SSCS), to facilitate the effective control and statusing of changes to SSCS, and to ensure technical consistency between design, performance, and operational requirements. Its purpose is to describe the approach Privatization Infrastructure will take in implementing a configuration management program, to identify the Program`s products that need configuration management control, to determine the rigor of control, and to identify the mechanisms for that control.

Schaus, P.S.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

73

Battery systems performance studies - HIL components testing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

systems performance studies - HIL components testing Battery systems performance studies - HIL components testing 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

74

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

75

Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational approach. The WCH project team is working closely with stakeholders and taking a number of steps to meet these challenges in a continuing effort to remediate chromium contaminated soil in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (authors)

Scott Myers, R. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

A demonstration of the applicability of implementing the enhanced Remedial Action Priority System (RAPS) for environmental releases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remedial Action Priority System (RAPS) and the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) were developed to prioritize problems associated with potential releases of hazardous chemical and radioactive materials in a scientific and objective manner based on limited site information. This report documents the model testing efforts of the RAPS/MEPAS methodology for the atmospheric, surface water, groundwater, and exposure components. Comparisons are given of model outputs with measured data at three sites: the US Department of Energy's Mound facility in Ohio and Hanford facility in Washington, and a chromium-cadmium plating site in New York. The results show that the simulated magnitudes, spacial and temporal trends, and distributions of contaminants corresponded well with the measured data. 25 refs., 86 figs., 26 tabs.

Whelan, G.; Droppo, J.G. Jr.; Strenge, D.L.; Walter, M.B.; Buck, J.W.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

SGDP Storage System Performance Supplement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Analysis for the ARRA SGDP Analysis for the ARRA SGDP Energy Storage Projects Update Conference - DOE 2010 Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) November 3, 2010 Presenter: Jacquelyn Bean Organization: DOE-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through National Energy Technology Laboratory 1 Background 2 Metrics and Benefits Data Flow 3 Contact Information Table of Contents 1 4 Appendix NETL's role in SGDP metrics and benefits reporting 2 NETL Energy Delivery Technologies Division SGDP Technical Project Officers (TPOs) SGDP Principal Investigators (PIs) Project Management and Performance Data Analysis NETL Project Management Center's Analysis & Support Team Data Analysis Team (DAT) Lead Contractors: Booz Allen

78

Acoustically enhanced remediation, Phase 2: Technology scaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Weiss Associates is conducting the following three phase program investigating the in-situ application of acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) of contaminated unconsolidated soil and ground water under both saturated and unsaturated conditions: Phase I-- laboratory scale parametric investigation; Phase II--technology Scaling; and Phase III--large scale field tests. AER addresses the need for NAPL (either lighter or denser than water: LNAPL or DNAPL, respectively) in high and low permeability sediments, and the remediation of other types of subsurface contaminants (e.g., metals, radionuclides) in low permeability soils. This program has been placed in the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) DNAPL product. Phase I indicated that AER could be used to effectively remediate NAPL in high permeability soil, and that removal of NAPL from low permeability soil could be increased since the water flux through these soils was significantly increased. Phase II, Technology Scaling, the subject of this paper, focused on (1) evaluating the characteristics of an AER field deployment system, (2) developing DNAPL flow and transport performance data under acoustic excitation, (3) predicting the effect of acoustic remediation in three-dimensional unconsolidated hydrogeologic conditions, (4) conducting an engineering analysis of acoustical sources, and (5) identifying candidate field site(s) for large-scale field testing of the technology.

Iovenitti, J.L.; Hill, D.G. [Weiss Associates, Emeryville, CA (United States); Rynne, T.M.; Spadaro, J.F.; Hutchinson, W. [Scientific Applications and Research Associates, Inc., Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Illangasakere, T. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Duct Remediation Program: Material characterization and removal/handling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Remediation efforts were successfully performed at Rocky Flats to locate, characterize, and remove plutonium holdup from process exhaust ducts. Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) techniques were used to determine holdup locations and quantities. Visual characterization using video probes helped determine the physical properties of the material, which were used for remediation planning. Assorted equipment types, such as vacuum systems, scoops, brushes, and a rotating removal system, were developed to remove specific material types. Personnel safety and material handling requirements were addressed throughout the project.

Beckman, T.d.; Davis, M.M.; Karas, T.M.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Performance Assessment Report Domain CHP System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance Assessment Report for the Domain CHP System November 2005 By Burns & McDonnell Engineering #12;Domain CHP System Performance Assessment Report for the Packaged Cooling, Heating and Power

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Solar Resource and PV Systems Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Resource and PV Systems Performance at Selected Test Sites Prepared for the U.S. Department Subtask 11.1 Deliverables 2 and 4: Report on Solar Resource and PV Systems Performance at Selected Test agency thereof. #12;1 Solar Resource and PV Systems Performance at Selected Test Sites Contents 1

82

Enhanced remedial amendment delivery through fluid viscosity modifications: Experiments and numerical simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low-permeability zones are typically bypassed when remedial fluids are injected into subsurface heterogeneous aquifer systems. Therefore, contaminants in the bypassed areas may not be contacted by the amendments in the remedial fluid, which may significantly prolong remediation operations. Laboratory experiments and numerical studies have been conducted to investigate the use of a shear-thinning polymer (Xanthan gum) to improve access to low-permeability zones in heterogeneous systems. The chemicals sodium mono-phosphate and the surfactant MA-80 were used as the remedial amendments. The impact of polymer concentration, fluid injection rate, and permeability contrast in the heterogeneous systems has been studied in a series of eleven two-dimensional flow cell experiments. The Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator was modified to include polymer-induced shear-thinning effects. The experimental and simulation results clearly show that using the polymer leads to an enhanced delivery of remedial amendments to lower-permeability zones and an increased sweeping efficiency. An added benefit of using the polymer is the stabilization of the displacing front when density differences exist between displaced and displacing fluids. The modified STOMP simulator was able to predict the experimental observed fluid displacing behavior well and might be used to predict subsurface remediation performance when a shear-thinning fluid is used to remediate a heterogeneous system at larger scales.

L. Zhong; M. Oostrom; T.W. Wietsma; M.A. Covert

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Contaminated soil and sediments in a highly developed catchment-estuary system (Sydney estuary, Australia): an innovative stormwater remediation strategy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of the current research was to provide a strategy to remediate stormwater from an old, high-developed catchment dominated (94%) by diffuse sources. Contaminated catchment soils, a dense road netw...

Gavin F. Birch

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Phyto remediation groundwater trends at the DOE portsmouth gaseous  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the progress of a phyto-remediation action being performed at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) X-740 Waste Oil Handling Facility to remediate contaminated groundwater under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure action. This action was effected by an Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) decision to use phyto-remediation as the preferred remedy for the X-740 groundwater contamination. This remedy was recognized as a cost-effective, low-maintenance, and promising method to remediate groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE). During 1999, prior to the tree installation at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in the area were collected from 10 monitoring wells completed in the Gallia Formation. The Gallia is the uppermost water-bearing zone and contains most of the groundwater contamination at PORTS. During the tree installation which took place during the summer of 1999, four new Gallia monitoring wells were installed at the X-740 Area in addition to the 10 Gallia wells which had been installed in the same area during the early 1990's. Manual water level measurements were collected quarterly from these 14 Gallia monitoring wells between 1998 and 2001. These manual water level measurements were collected to monitor the combined impact of the trees on the groundwater prior to root development. Beginning in 2001, water level measurements were collected monthly during the growing season (April-September) and quarterly during the dormant season (October-March). A total of eight water level measurements were collected annually to monitor the phyto-remediation system's effect on the groundwater in the X- 740 Area. The primary function of the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area is to hydraulically prevent further spreading of the TCE plume. This process utilizes deep-rooted plants, such as poplar trees, to extract large quantities of water from the saturated zone. The focus of any phyto-remediation system is to develop a cone of depression under the entire plantation area. This cone of depression can halt migration of the contaminant plume and can create a hydraulic barrier, thereby maintaining plume capture. While a cone of depression is not yet evident at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in 2004 and 2005 differed from measurements taken in previous years, indicating that the now mature trees are influencing groundwater flow direction and gradient at the site. Water level measurements taken from 2003 through 2005 indicate a trend whereby groundwater elevations steadily decreased in the X-740 Phyto-remediation System. During this time, an average groundwater table drop of 0.30 feet was observed. Although the time for the phyto-remediation system to mature had been estimated at two to three years, these monitoring data indicate a period of four to five years for the trees to reach maturity. Although, these trends are not apparent from analysis of the potentiometric surface contours, it does appear that the head gradient across the site is higher during the spring and lower during the fall. It is not clear, however, whether this trend was initiated by the installation of the phyto-remediation system. This paper will present the groundwater data collected to date to illustrate the effects of the trees on the groundwater table. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Shared performance monitor in a multiprocessor system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A performance monitoring unit (PMU) and method for monitoring performance of events occurring in a multiprocessor system. The multiprocessor system comprises a plurality of processor devices units, each processor device for generating signals representing occurrences of events in the processor device, and, a single shared counter resource for performance monitoring. The performance monitor unit is shared by all processor cores in the multiprocessor system. The PMU is further programmed to monitor event signals issued from non-processor devices.

Chiu, George; Gara, Alan G; Salapura, Valentina

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

86

Innovative vitrification for soil remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB`s as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology.

Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hart, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Photovoltaic System Performance Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

System Performance Basics System Performance Basics Photovoltaic System Performance Basics August 20, 2013 - 4:17pm Addthis Photovoltaic (PV) systems are usually composed of numerous solar arrays, which in turn, are composed of numerous PV cells. The performance of the system is therefore dependent on the performance of its components. Reliability The reliability of PV arrays is an important factor in the cost of PV systems and in consumer acceptance. However, the building blocks of arrays, PV cells, are considered "solid-state" devices with no moving parts and, therefore, are highly reliable and long-lived. Therefore, reliability measurements of PV systems are usually focused not on cells but on modules and whole systems. Reliability can be improved through fault-tolerant circuit design, which

88

Traffic Management System Performance November 11, 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traffic Management System Performance November 11, 2002 David Levinson1 Wei Chen2 Department uses regression analysis to evaluate long-run traffic management system performance. Three important traffic management systems in the Twin Cities metro area - Ramp Metering, Variable Message Signs (VMS

Levinson, David M.

89

INTEGRATED WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the results of an evaluation of the current Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) operation against design performance and a determination of short term and long term actions recommended to sustain IWTS performance.

SEXTON RA; MEEUWSEN WE

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

90

Tank waste remediation system privatization phase 1 infrastructure project W-519, project execution plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Project Execution Plan (PEP) defines the overall strategy, objectives, and contractor management requirements for the execution phase of Project W-519 (98-D403), Privatization Phase 1 Infrastructure Support, whose mission is to effect the required Hanford site infrastructure physical changes to accommodate the Privatization Contractor facilities. This plan provides the project scope, project objectives and method of performing the work scope and achieving objectives. The plan establishes the work definitions, the cost goals, schedule constraints and roles and responsibilities for project execution. The plan also defines how the project will be controlled and documented.

Parazin, R.J.

1998-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

91

Glass melter off-gas system pluggages: Cause, significance, and remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be produced in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) where the glass will be poured into stainless steel canisters for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. Experimental glass melters used to develop the vitrification process for immobilization of the waste have experienced problems with pluggage of the off-gas line with solid deposits. Off-gas deposits from the DWPF 1/2 Scale Glass Melter (SGM) and the 1/10th scale Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) were determined to be mixtures of alkali rich chlorides, sulfates, borates, and fluorides with entrained Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, spinel, and frit particles. The distribution and location of the alkali deposits throughout the off-gas system indicate that the deposits form by vapor-phase transport and condensation. Condensation of the alkali-rich phases cement the entrained particulates causing off-gas system pluggages. The identification of vapor phase transport as the operational mechanism causing off-gas system pluggage indicates that deposition can be effectively eliminated by increasing the off-gas velocity. Scale glass melter operating experience indicates that a velocity of >50 fps is necessary in order to transport the volatile species to the quencher to prevent having condensation occur in the off-gas line. Hotter off-gas line temperatures would retain the alkali compounds as vapors so that they would remain volatile until they reach the quencher. However, hotter off-gas temperatures can only be achieved by using less air/steam flow at the off-gas entrance, e.g. at the off-gas film cooler (OGFC). This would result in lower off-gas velocities. Maintaining a high velocity is, therefore, considered to be a more important criterion for controlling off-gas pluggage than temperature control. 40 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

Jantzen, C.M.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Remediation Experiences in Finland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter discusses remediation practices for addressing gasoline-impacted soil and ground water at several hundred Neste Marketing Limited (Neste ... in Finland. The first systematic investigation and remediation

Martti R. Suominen; Nancy E. Milkey P.G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Pholtovoltaic System Performance...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pholtovoltaic System Performance Data Photo looking north-northwest at solar panels aligned in rows on the roof of a commercial building. The Terry Sanford Federal Building in...

94

Scientific Opportunities for Monitoring at Environmental Remediation Sites (SOMERS): Integrated Systems-Based Approaches to Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through an inter-disciplinary effort, DOE is addressing a need to advance monitoring approaches from sole reliance on cost- and labor-intensive point-source monitoring to integrated systems-based approaches such as flux-based approaches and the use of early indicator parameters. Key objectives include identifying current scientific, technical and implementation opportunities and challenges, prioritizing science and technology strategies to meet current needs within the DOE complex for the most challenging environments, and developing an integrated and risk-informed monitoring framework.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Truex, Michael J.; Peterson, Mark; Freshley, Mark D.; Pierce, Eric M.; McCord, John; Young, Michael H.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Miller, Rick; Miracle, Ann L.; Kaback, Dawn; Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Rossabi, Joe; Lee, Michelle H.; Bush, Richard P.; Beam , Paul; Chamberlain, G. M.; Marble, Justin; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Collazo, Yvette

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Evaluation of DMDOHEMA based supported liquid membrane system for high level waste remediation under simulated conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract N,N?-dimethyl-N,N?-dioctyl-2,(2?-hexyloxyethyl) malonamide (DMDOHEMA) has been proposed as solvent for the partitioning of radiotoxic minor actinides from high-level waste (HLW) solutions. The facilitated transport of 241Am(III), 239Pu(IV), 233U(VI), 237Np(V) across supported liquid membrane (SLM) impregnated with DMDOHEMA solution in n-dodecane was investigated under varying conditions of feed acidity, receiver phase composition, carrier concentration, and membrane thickness. Micro porous PTFE membrane was used as the polymeric support. There was a decrease in the transport of metal ions under the pressurized heavy water reactor simulated HLW (PHWR-SHLW) conditions. The physical stability of the SLM impregnated with the carrier was investigated for ~60 days by performing Am(III) permeation studies. Marginal variation in the transport behavior suggested reasonably good stability of the impregnated carrier in the membrane pores. A simple mathematical model has been developed to simulate experimental data and to explain quantitatively the role of different parameters.

Ajay B. Patil; Pankaj Kandwal; V.S. Shinde; P.N. Pathak; P.K. Mohapatra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Status Report on Transfer of Physical and Hydraulic Properties Databases to the Hanford Environmental Information System - PNNL Remediation Decision Support Project, Task 1, Activity 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a status report on efforts to transfer physical and hydraulic property data from PNNL to CHPRC for incorporation into HEIS. The Remediation Decision Support (RDS) Project is managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support Hanford Site waste management and remedial action decisions by the U.S. Department of Energy and their contractors. The objective of Task 1, Activity 6 of the RDS project is to compile all available physical and hydraulic property data for sediments from the Hanford Site, to port these data into the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS), and to make the data web-accessible to anyone on the Hanford Local Area Network via the so-called Virtual Library. These physical and hydraulic property data are used to estimate parameters for analytical and numerical flow and transport models that are used for site risk assessments and evaluation of remedial action alternatives. In past years efforts were made by RDS project staff to compile all available physical and hydraulic property data for Hanford sediments and to transfer these data into SoilVision{reg_sign}, a commercial geotechnical software package designed for storing, analyzing, and manipulating soils data. Although SoilVision{reg_sign} has proven to be useful, its access and use restrictions have been recognized as a limitation to the effective use of the physical and hydraulic property databases by the broader group of potential users involved in Hanford waste site issues. In order to make these data more widely available and useable, a decision was made to port them to HEIS and to make them web-accessible via a Virtual Library module. In FY08 the original objectives of this activity on the RDS project were to: (1) ensure traceability and defensibility of all physical and hydraulic property data currently residing in the SoilVision{reg_sign} database maintained by PNNL, (2) transfer the physical and hydraulic property data from the Microsoft Access database files used by SoilVision{reg_sign} into HEIS, which is currently being maintained by CH2M-Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHRPC), (3) develop a Virtual Library module for accessing these data from HEIS, and (4) write a User's Manual for the Virtual Library module. The intent of these activities is to make the available physical and hydraulic property data more readily accessible and useable by technical staff and operable unit managers involved in waste site assessments and remedial action decisions for Hanford. In FY08 communications were established between PNNL and staff from Fluor-Hanford Co. (who formerly managed HEIS) to outline the design of a Virtual Library module that could be used to access the physical and hydraulic property data that are to be transferred into HEIS. Data dictionaries used by SoilVision{reg_sign} were also provided to Fluor-Hanford personnel who are now with CHPRC. During ongoing work to ensure traceability and defensibility of all physical and hydraulic property data that currently reside in the SoilVision{reg_sign} database, it was recognized that further work would be required in this effort before the data were actually ported into HEIS. Therefore work on the Virtual Library module development and an accompanying User's Guide was deferred until an unspecified later date. In FY09 efforts have continued to verify the traceability and defensibility of the physical and hydraulic property datasets that are currently being maintained by PNNL. Although this is a work in progress, several of these datasets are now ready for transfer to CHRPC for inclusion in HEIS. The actual loading of data into HEIS is performed by CHPRC staff, so after the data are transferred from PNNL to CHPRC, it will be the responsibility of CHPRC to ensure that these data are loaded and made accessible. This document provides a status report on efforts to transfer physical and hydraulic property data from PNNL to CHPRC for incorporation into HEIS.

Rockhold, Mark L.; Middleton, Lisa A.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Performance estimates for personnel access control systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current performance estimates for personnel access control systems use estimates of Type I and Type II verification errors. A system performance equation which addresses normal operation, the insider, and outside adversary attack is developed. Examination of this equation reveals the inadequacy of classical Type I and II error evaluations which require detailed knowledge of the adversary threat scenario for each specific installation. Consequently, new performance measures which are consistent with the performance equation and independent of the threat are developed as an aid in selecting personnel access control systems.

Bradley, R. G.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

AGILA: The Ateneo High Performance Computing System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Beowulf cluster is a low-cost parallel high performance computing system that uses commodity hardware components such as personal computers and standard Ethernet adapters and switches and runs on freely available software such as Linux and LAM-MPI. In this paper the development of the AGILA HPCS, which stands for the Ateneo GigaflopsRange Performance, Linux OS, and Athlon Processors High Performance Computing System, is discussed including its hardware and software configurations and performance evaluation. Keywords High-performance computing, commodity cluster computing, parallel computing, Beowulf-class cluster 1.

Rafael Salda Na; Felix P. Muga Ii; Jerrold J. Garcia; William Emmanuel; S. Yu

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Surfactants for ground water remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ground water contamination is a most intractable form of pollution. Spilled solvent or fuel liquids are trapped below the water table by colloidal forces. Surfactants may be used to dramatically improve contaminated aquifer remediation rates. Principal remediation mechanisms include micellar solubilization and mobilization of the trapped liquids by lowering of the oil/water interfacial tension. Surfactant selection is a key to the successful design of a remediation effort, and involves consideration of factors including Krafft Point, surfactant adsorption onto the aquifer solids, and the phase behavior of the oil/water/surfactant system. Successful field demonstrations have occurred in recent months and the technology is moving rapidly toward commercialization. Critical research issues remain including acceptable clean-up levels, surfactant/contaminant in situ biodegradation rates, and surfactant decontamination and reuse.

Jeffrey H. Harwell; David A. Sabatini; R.C. Knox

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Pinellas Remediation Agreement Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pinellas Pinellas Agreement Name Remediation Agreement for the Four and One-Half Acre Site in Largo, Pinellas County, Florida State Florida Agreement Type Remediation Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA/ Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended/ Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act Scope Summary Remediation of property adjacent to the former Pinellas Plant Parties DOE; Florida Department of Environmental Protection Date 3/12/2001 SCOPE * Remediate the groundwater under a parcel of property adjacent to DOE's former Pinellas Plant to levels consistent with industrial use. * Complete remedial actions at the site in accordance with a Remedial Action Plan prepared by DOE and approved by FDEP. * Submit quarterly reports of interim remedial actions at the Site.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High-performance computer system installed at Lab High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory New high-performance computer system, called Wolf,...

102

AGILA: The Ateneo High Performance Computing System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Beowulf cluster is a low-cost parallel high performance computing system that uses commodity hardware components such as personal computers and standard Ethernet adapters and switches and runs on freely available software such as Linux and LAM-MPI. In this paper the development of the AGILA HPCS, which stands for the Ateneo GigaflopsRange Performance, Linux OS, and Athlon Processors High Performance Computing System, is discussed including its hardware and software configurations and performance evaluation. Keywords High-performance computing, commodity cluster computing, parallel computing, Beowulf-class cluster 1. INTRODUCTION In the Philippines today, computing power in the range of gigaflops is not generally available for use in research and development. Conventional supercomputers or high performance computing systems are very expensive and are beyond the budgets of most university research groups especially in developing countries such as the Philippines. A lower cost option...

Rafael P. Saldaña; Felix P. Muga; II; Jerrold J. Garcia; William Emmanuel S. Yu; S. Yu

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Delivered Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Delivered Performance Predictions and Trends for RISC Applications Luke Cico (lcico@mc.com) Mark Merritt (mmerritt@mc.com) Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Chelmsford, MA 01824 #12;© 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Goals of PresentationGoals of Presentation

Kepner, Jeremy

104

SIMULATION OF RESIDENTIAL HVAC SYSTEM PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 LBNL-47622 SIMULATION OF RESIDENTIAL HVAC SYSTEM PERFORMANCE Walker, I., Siegel, J ..................................................... 9 #12;3 ABSTRACT In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside of the simulations is that they are dynamic - which accounts for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect

105

Designing the lean enterprise performance measurement system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research contained in this thesis explores design attributes of the enterprise performance measurement system required for the transformation to the lean enterprise and its management. Arguments are made from the ...

Mahidhar, Vikram

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Groundwater Remediation and Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of the author’s vantage point, this chapter is necessarily based on experience in ground-water remediation in the United States. Much of that...

Peter Shanahan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Performance evaluation of multiagent systems: communication criterion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many MultiAgent Systems (MAS) have been developed in various application domains such as computer networks, Internet, industrial applications, automation, process control, air traffic, robotic, simulation, etc. In spite of the rapid growth of the international ... Keywords: communication, graph theory, measurement, methodology, multiagent systems, performance evaluation

Faten Ben Hmida; Wided Lejouad Chaari; Moncef Tagina

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Engineered Polymeric Nanoparticles for Soil Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

compds. in soil-water systems in which surfactants play a role in contaminant remediation or facilitated transport. ... (9)?Abdul, A. S.; Ang, C. C. Ground Water 1994, 32, 727. ...

Warapong Tungittiplakorn; Leonard W. Lion; Claude Cohen; Ju-Young Kim

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

109

Managing Complex Environmental Remediation amidst Aggressive Facility Revitalization Milestones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unlike the final closure projects at Rocky Flats and Fernald, many of the Department of Energy's future CERCLA and RCRA closure challenges will take place at active facilities, such as the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) central campus. ORNL has aggressive growth plans for a Research Technology Park and cleanup must address and integrate D and D, soil and groundwater remediation, and on-going and future business plans for the Park. Different planning and tracking tools are needed to support closures at active facilities. To support some large Airport redevelopment efforts, we created tools that allowed the Airline lease-holder to perform environmental remediation on the same schedule as building D and D and new building construction, which in turn allowed them to migrate real estate from unusable to usable within an aggressive schedule. In summary: The FIM and OpenGate{sup TM} spatial analysis system were two primary tools developed to support simultaneous environmental remediation, D and D, and construction efforts at an operating facility. These tools helped redevelopers to deal with environmental remediation on the same schedule as building D and D and construction, thereby meeting their goals of opening gates, restarting their revenue streams, at the same time complying with all environmental regulations. (authors)

Richter Pack, S. [PMP Science Applications International Corporation, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer, LNT, and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirement Improved System Performance and...

111

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project- March 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP recognition.

112

Overview of Green and Sustainable Remediation for Soil and Groundwater Remediation - 12545  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Making remediation efforts more 'sustainable' or 'green' is a topic of great interest in the remediation community. It has been spurred on by Executive Orders from the White House, as well as Department of Energy (DOE) sustainability plans. In private industry, it is motivated by corporate sustainability goals and corporate social responsibility. It has spawned new organizations, areas of discussion, tools and practices, and guidance documents around sustainable remediation or green remediation. Green remediation can be thought of as a subset of sustainable remediation and is mostly focused on reducing the environmental footprint of cleanup efforts. Sustainable remediation includes both social and economic considerations, in addition to environmental. Application of both green and sustainable remediation (GSR) may involve two primary activities. The first is to develop technologies and alternatives that are greener or more sustainable. This can also include making existing remediation approaches greener or more sustainable. The second is to include GSR criteria in the evaluation of remediation alternatives and strategies. In other words, to include these GSR criteria in the evaluation of alternatives in a feasibility study. In some cases, regulatory frameworks allow the flexibility to include GSR criteria into the evaluation process (e.g., state cleanup programs). In other cases, regulations allow less flexibility to include the evaluation of GSR criteria (e.g., Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)). New regulatory guidance and tools will be required to include these criteria in typical feasibility studies. GSR provides a number of challenges for remediation professionals performing soil and groundwater remediation projects. Probably the most significant is just trying to stay on top of the ever changing landscape of products, tools, and guidance documents coming out of various groups, the US EPA, and states. However, this process also provides new opportunities to think differently and look at the bigger picture of the overall benefit we are providing with our remediation projects. The opportunities from the move towards GSR are very real. They will help us make remedial actions truly more beneficial to the environment and to society. They will also allow (or force) remediation practitioners to think outside of the usual realm of approaches to find newer and more beneficial technologies. (authors)

Simpkin, Thomas J. [CH2M HILL, Denver, Colorado (United States); Favara, Paul [CH2M HILL, Gainesville, Florida (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is currently evaluating hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation technologies in existence and under development to determine applicability to remediation needs of the DOE facilities under the Albuquerque Operations Office and to determine areas of research need. To assist LANL is this effort, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) conducted an assessment of technologies and monitoring methods that have been demonstrated or are under development. The focus of this assessment is to: (1) identify existing technologies for hazardous waste treatment and environmental remediation of old waste sites; (2) identify technologies under development and the status of the technology; (3) assess new technologies that need development to provide adequate hazardous waste treatment and remedial action technologies for DOD and DOE sites; and (4) identify hazardous waste and remediation problems for environmental research and development. There are currently numerous research and development activities underway nationwide relating to environmental contaminants and the remediation of waste sites. To perform this effort, SAIC evaluated current technologies and monitoring methods development programs in EPA, DOD, and DOE, as these are the primary agencies through which developmental methods are being demonstrated. This report presents this evaluation and provides recommendations as to pertinent research needs or activities to address waste site contamination problems. The review and assessment have been conducted at a programmatic level; site-specific and contaminant-specific evaluations are being performed by LANL staff as a separate, related activity.

Not Available

1989-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

114

Forced Air Systems in High Performance Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FORCED AIR SYSTEMS IN FORCED AIR SYSTEMS IN HIGH PERFORMANCE HOMES Iain Walker (LBNL) Building America Meeting 2013 What are the issues? 1. Sizing  When is too small too small? 2. Distribution  Can we get good mixing at low flow? 3. Performance  Humidity Control  Part load efficiency  Blowers & thermal losses Sizing  Part-load - not an issue with modern equipment  Careful about predicted loads - a small error becomes a big problem for tightly sized systems  Too Low Capacity = not robust  Extreme vs. design days  Change in occupancy  Party mode  Recovery from setback Sizing  Conventional wisdom - a good envelope = easy to predict and not sensitive to indoor conditions  But..... Heating and cooling become discretionary - large variability depending on occupants

115

Modeling Topaz-II system performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US acquisition of the Topaz-11 in-core thermionic space reactor test system from Russia provides a good opportunity to perform a comparison of the Russian reported data and the results from computer codes such as MCNP (Ref. 3) and TFEHX (Ref. 4). The comparison study includes both neutronic and thermionic performance analyses. The Topaz II thermionic reactor is modeled with MCNP using actual Russian dimensions and parameters. The computation of the neutronic performance considers several important aspects such as the fuel enrichment and location of the thermionic fuel elements (TFES) in the reactor core. The neutronic analysis included the calculation of both radial and axial power distribution, which are then used in the TFEHX code for electrical performance. The reactor modeled consists of 37 single-cell TFEs distributed in a 13-cm-radius zirconium hydride block surrounded by 8 cm of beryllium metal reflector. The TFEs use 90% enriched [sup 235]U and molybdenum coated with a thin layer of [sup 184]W for emitter surface. Electrons emitted are captured by a collector surface with a gap filled with cesium vapor between the collector and emitter surfaces. The collector surface is electrically insulated with alumina. Liquid NaK provides the cooling system for the TFEs. The axial thermal power distribution is obtained by dividing the TFE into 40 axial nodes. Comparison of the true axial power distribution with that produced by electrical heaters was also performed.

Lee, H.H.; Klein, A.C. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Engineered Barrier System performance requirements systems study report. Revision 02  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates the current design concept for the Engineered Barrier System (EBS), in concert with the current understanding of the geologic setting to assess whether enhancements to the required performance of the EBS are necessary. The performance assessment calculations are performed by coupling the EBS with the geologic setting based on the models (some of which were updated for this study) and assumptions used for the 1995 Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The need for enhancements is determined by comparing the performance assessment results against the EBS related performance requirements. Subsystem quantitative performance requirements related to the EBS include the requirement to allow no more than 1% of the waste packages (WPs) to fail before 1,000 years after permanent closure of the repository, as well as a requirement to control the release rate of radionuclides from the EBS. The EBS performance enhancements considered included additional engineered components as well as evaluating additional performance available from existing design features but for which no performance credit is currently being taken.

Balady, M.A.

1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

117

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity July 9, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Maddie M. Blair Public Affairs Intern, Savannah River Remediation Why does she keep coming back? "There are so many fascinating processes, people, and work

118

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity Savannah River Remediation Intern Sees Nuclear Industry as Job Opportunity July 9, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Spencer Isom, second year engineering intern for Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and fourth summer at Savannah River Site (SRS), performs a standard equipment check at Saltstone Production Facility. | Photo courtesy of Savannah River Site Maddie M. Blair Public Affairs Intern, Savannah River Remediation Why does she keep coming back? "There are so many fascinating processes, people, and work

119

A Framework for Sustainable Remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, after more than 30 years of experience with remediation projects, it is now clear that remedial actions are frequently energy intensive, may produce their own pollutant emissions, and may disturb and cause controversy in neighboring communities. ... Regulators, industry, and communities recognize that sustainability principles must be integrated into remediation activities, and various sustainable remediation guidance documents have been developed. ...

Karin S. Holland

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

120

Attenuation Based Remedies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The mission of the Attenuation Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative is to seek holistic solutions to DOE’s groundwater contamination problems that consider not only...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Even though new homes constructed with hydronic heat comprise only 3% of the market (US Census Bureau 2009), of the 115 million existing homes in the United States, almost 14 million of those homes (11%) are heated with steam or hot water systems according to 2009 US Census data. Therefore, improvements in hydronic system performance could result in significant energy savings in the US. When operating properly, the combination of a gas-fired condensing boiler with baseboard convectors and an indirect water heater is a viable option for high-efficiency residential space heating in cold climates. Based on previous research efforts, however, it is apparent that these types of systems are typically not designed and installed to achieve maximum efficiency. Furthermore, guidance on proper design and commissioning for heating contractors and energy consultants is hard to find and is not comprehensive. Through modeling and monitoring, CARB sought to determine the optimal combination(s) of components - pumps, high efficiency heat sources, plumbing configurations and controls - that result in the highest overall efficiency for a hydronic system when baseboard convectors are used as the heat emitter. The impact of variable-speed pumps on energy use and system performance was also investigated along with the effects of various control strategies and the introduction of thermal mass.

Arena, L.; Faakye, O.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

RHIC BPM SYSTEM MODIFICATIONS AND PERFORMANCE.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RHIC beam position monitor (BPM) system provides independent average orbit and turn-by-turn (TBT) position measurements. In each ring, there are 162 measurement locations per plane (horizontal and vertical) for a total of 648 BPM planes in the RHIC machine. During 2003 and 2004 shutdowns, BPM processing electronics were moved from the RHIC tunnel to controls alcoves to reduce radiation impact, and the analog signal paths of several dozen modules were modified to eliminate gain-switching relays and improve signal stability. This paper presents results of improved system performance, including stability for interaction region beam-based alignment efforts. We also summarize performance of recently-added DSP profile scan capability, and improved million-turn TBT acquisition channels for 10 Hz triplet vibration, nonlinear dynamics, and echo studies.

SATOGATA, T.; CALAGA, R.; CAMERON, P.; ET AL.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

123

Fact Sheet: Codes and Standards for Energy Storage System Performance...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Codes and Standards for Energy Storage System Performance and Safety (June 2014) Fact Sheet: Codes and Standards for Energy Storage System Performance and Safety (June 2014) The...

124

Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes This presentation is from the Building America...

125

Improving Process Heating System Performance: A Sourcebook for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Process Heating System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Second Edition Improving Process Heating System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Second Edition This...

126

HPXML: A Standardized Home Performance Data Sharing System -...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

HPXML: A Standardized Home Performance Data Sharing System - Building America Top Innovation HPXML: A Standardized Home Performance Data Sharing System - Building America Top...

127

Performance prediction for short plant length systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plant length dependent performance is commonly observed when performing feedforward active noise control for broadband disturbances. This is primarily due to high levels of low?frequency noise and limited coherence between input and error sensors. These types of systems present trade?offs in choosing between performance output power requirements and plant length. An additional design opportunity exists in terms of balancing the levels of cancellation achieved over frequency. The selection of an error signal emphasis filter determining the frequency dependence of the cost function being minimized by the controller adaptation can be of critical importance. While several explanations for this type of behavior have been offered little work has been presented for quantifying performance limitations. A method based on calculation of Lagrange multipliers is presented for determining the optimal power limited solution of an FIR filter?based controller. This provides a useful tool for predicting the effects of emphasis filter design actuator limitations and plant length on performance. This prediction method and the associated trade?offs are illustrated using data from an HVAC fan.

Steven R. Popovich

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Resource characterization and residuals remediation, Task 1.0: Air quality assessment and control, Task 2.0: Advanced power systems, Task 3.0: Advanced fuel forms and coproducts, Task 4.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses three subtasks related to the Resource Characterization and Residuals Remediation program: (1) sulfur forms in coal and their thermal transformations, (2) data resource evaluation and integration using GIS (Geographic Information Systems), and (3) supplementary research related to the Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) UCG (Underground Coal Gasification) test program.

Hawthorne, S.B.; Timpe, R.C.; Hartman, J.H. [and others

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics :soldier fatigue.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The military has identified Human Performance Modeling (HPM) as a significant requirement and challenge of future systems modeling and analysis initiatives as can be seen in the Department of Defense's (DoD) Defense Modeling and Simulation Office's (DMSO) Master Plan (DoD 5000.59-P 1995). To this goal, the military is currently spending millions of dollars on programs devoted to HPM in various military contexts. Examples include the Human Performance Modeling Integration (HPMI) program within the Air Force Research Laboratory, which focuses on integrating HPMs with constructive models of systems (e.g. cockpit simulations) and the Navy's Human Performance Center (HPC) established in September 2003. Nearly all of these initiatives focus on the interface between humans and a single system. This is insufficient in the era of highly complex network centric SoS. This report presents research and development in the area of HPM in a system-of-systems (SoS). Specifically, this report addresses modeling soldier fatigue and the potential impacts soldier fatigue can have on SoS performance.

Lawton, Craig R.; Campbell, James E.; Miller, Dwight Peter

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Flight Performance of the AKARI Cryogenic System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the flight performance of the cryogenic system of the infrared astronomical satellite AKARI, which was successfully launched on 2006 February 21 (UT). AKARI carries a 68.5 cm telescope together with two focal plane instruments, Infrared Cameras (IRC) and Far Infrared Surveyor (FIS), all of which are cooled down to cryogenic temperature to achieve superior sensitivity. The AKARI cryogenic system is a unique hybrid system, which consists of cryogen (liquid helium) and mechanical coolers (2-stage Stirling coolers). With the help of the mechanical coolers, 179 L (26.0 kg) of super-fluid liquid helium can keep the instruments cryogenically cooled for more than 500 days. The on-orbit performance of the AKARI cryogenics is consistent with the design and pre-flight test, and the boil-off gas flow rate is as small as 0.32 mg/s. We observed the increase of the major axis of the AKARI orbit, which can be explained by the thrust due to thermal pressure of vented helium gas.

Takao Nakagawa; Keigo Enya; Masayuki Hirabayashi; Hidehiro Kaneda; Tsuneo Kii; Yoshiyuki Kimura; Toshio Matsumoto; Hiroshi Murakami; Masahide Murakami; Katsuhiro Narasaki; Masanao Narita; Akira Ohnishi; Shoji Tsunematsu; Seiji Yoshida

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

131

Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures Christian Engelmann, Hong Ong trend in modern high performance computing (HPC) system architectures employs "lean" compute nodes) continue to reside on compute nodes. Key words: High Performance Computing, Middleware, Lean Compute Node

Engelmann, Christian

132

Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project was initiated in 2005 to investigate Human Performance Modeling in a System of Systems analytic environment. SAND2006-6569 and SAND2006-7911 document interim results from this effort; this report documents the final results. The problem is difficult because of the number of humans involved in a System of Systems environment and the generally poorly defined nature of the tasks that each human must perform. A two-pronged strategy was followed: one prong was to develop human models using a probability-based method similar to that first developed for relatively well-understood probability based performance modeling; another prong was to investigate more state-of-art human cognition models. The probability-based modeling resulted in a comprehensive addition of human-modeling capability to the existing SoSAT computer program. The cognitive modeling resulted in an increased understanding of what is necessary to incorporate cognition-based models to a System of Systems analytic environment.

Dixon, Kevin R.; Lawton, Craig R.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Longsine, Dennis E. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX); Forsythe, James Chris; Gauthier, John Henry; Le, Hai D.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Performance tuned radioisotope thermophotovoltaic space power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The trend in space exploration is to use many small, low-cost, special-purpose satellites instead of the large, high-cost, multipurpose satellites used in the past. As a result of this new trend, there is a need for lightweight, efficient, and compact radioisotope fueled electrical power generators. This paper presents an improved design for a radioisotope thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) space power system in the 10 W to 20 W class which promises up to 37.6 watts at 30.1{percent} efficiency and 25 W/kg specific power. The RTPV power system concept has been studied and compared to radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) radioisotope, Stirling generators and alkali metal thermal electric conversion (AMTEC) generators (Schock, 1995). The studies indicate that RTPV has the potential to be the lightest weight, most efficient and most reliable of the three concepts. However, in spite of the efficiency and light weight, the size of the thermal radiator required to eliminate excess heat from the PV cells and the lack of actual system operational performance data are perceived as obstacles to RTPV acceptance for space applications. Between 1994 and 1997 EDTEK optimized the key converter components for an RTPV generator under Department of Energy (DOE) funding administered via subcontracts to Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC) and EG&G Mound Applied Technologies Laboratory (Horne, 1995). The optimized components included a resonant micromesh infrared bandpass filter, low-bandgap GaSb PV cells and cell arrays. Parametric data from these components were supplied to OSC who developed and analyzed the performance of 100 W, 20 W, and 10 W RTPV generators. These designs are described in references (Schock 1994, 1995 and 1996). Since the performance of each class of supply was roughly equivalent and simply scaled with size, this paper will consider the OSC 20 W design as a baseline. The baseline 20-W RTPV design was developed by Schock, et al of OSC and has been presented elsewhere. The baseline design, centered around components and measured parametric data developed by EDTEK, Inc., promised an overall thermal-to-electric system output of 23 W at a conversion efficiency of 19{percent}, 1.92 kg system weight, and a specific power of 13.3 W/kg. The improved design reported herein promises up to 37.6 W at 30.1{percent} efficiency, 1.5 kg system weight, up to 25 W/kg specific power, a six-fold reduction in thermal radiator size over the baseline design, as well as a lower isotope temperature for greater safety. The six-fold reduction in thermal radiator size removes one of the greatest obstacles to applying RTPV in space missions. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Horne, W.E.; Morgan, M.D.; Saban, S.B. [EDTEK, Inc., 7082 South 220th Street, Kent, Washington 98032-1910 (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Wall System Innovations: Familiar Materials, Better Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 Wall System Innovation Vladimir Kochkin Joseph Wiehagen April 2013 Wall Innovation Metrics  High R (thermal and air barrier)  High Performance  Durable, structural  Build-able  Low transition risk to builders  50% Building America Goal  ≈ R25+ (CZ 4 and higher) 2 Background  Technologies for high-R walls have been proposed and used for over 25 years  But real market penetration is very low  Often the last EE measure implemented by builders (e.g. E*) 3 Background  High-R wall solutions have not achieved a broad level of standardization and commonality  A large set of methods and materials entered the market  Multiple and conflicting details  Wall characteristics are more critical = RISK 4 New Home Starts -

135

DEVELOPMENT OF A LONG-TERM MONITORING SYSTEM TO EVALUATE COVER SYSTEM PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental remediation at the Fernald Environmental Management Project is nearing completion, but long-term technology needs continue to emerge at the site. Remote, real-time, autonomous monitoring technologies are needed to ensure the integrity of the site and its remedy systems once cleanup is complete. The Fernald Post Closure Stewardship Technology Project (PCSTP), through the work of the Integrating Stewardship Technology Team (ISTT), has selected technologies to address initial site needs. This paper will explore the monitoring requirements of the Fernald On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF), the parameters selected as critical for comprehensive long-term monitoring of the facility, and the process by which technologies were chosen to monitor those parameters.

Kumthekar, U.; Chiou, J. D.; Prochaska, M.; Benson, C. H.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

136

Results of the independent radiological verification survey of the remedial action performed at 525 S. Main Street, Oxford, Ohio, (OXO002)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between October 1952 and February 1957, National Lead of Ohio (NLO), a primary contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), subcontracted certain uranium machining operations to Alba Craft Laboratory, Incorporated, located at 10-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio. In 1992, personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) confirmed the presence of residual radioactive materials from the AEC-related operations in and around the facility in amounts exceeding the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Above-guideline radiation levels were also found both indoors and outdoors at 525 S. Main Street, a private residential property in the immediate vicinity of the Alba Craft site. This document reports the findings at this private residence. Although the amount of uranium found on the properties posed little health hazard if left undisturbed, the levels were sufficient to require remediation to bring radiological conditions into compliance with current guidelines, thus ensuring that the public and the environment are protected. A team from ORNL conducted a radiological verification survey of the property at 525 S. Main Street, between November 1993 and December 1994. The survey was conducted at the request of DOE and included directly measured radiation levels, the collection and analysis of soil samples to determine concentrations of uranium and certain other radionuclides, and comparison of these data to the guidelines.

Kleinhans, K.R.; Rice, D.E.; Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The webinar on Nov. 18, 2014, continued the series on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits.

138

NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - High-Performance...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High-Performance Computing and Analytics High-performance computing and analytic capabilities at the Energy Systems Integration Facility enable study and simulation of material...

139

Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part I  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The webinar on Oct. 23, 2014 focused on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits.

140

Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT? Emission Control System...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT Emission Control System for NOx and PM Emission Reduction in Retrofit Applications Part 1 Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT Emission...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Sustainable Soil Remediation:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...wastes and creating new markets for the end products...study of the treatment of diesel-contaminated soil indicated...size and location of markets relative to waste production...remediation scenario for a diesel-contaminated site using...catabolic activity in diesel contaminated soil following...

David L. Jones; John R. Healey

142

Sustainable Soil Remediation:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...recognised since the birth of agriculture, the landspreading of industrial...full life cycle assessment (LCA). For example, blending high-nutrient-content...cradle-to-grave) of an LCA can also lead to misleading...remediation option is best. In LCA, impacts are classified as...

David L. Jones; John R. Healey

143

A Demonstration of the System Assessment Capability (SAC) Rev. 1 Software for the Hanford Remediation Assessment Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The System Assessment Capability (SAC) is a suite of interrelated computer codes that provides the capability to conduct large-scale environmental assessments on the Hanford Site. Developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Department of Energy, SAC models the fate and transport of radioactive and chemical contaminants, starting with the inventory of those contaminants in waste sites, simulating transport through the environment, and continuing on through impacts to the environment and humans. Separate modules in the SAC address inventory, release from waste forms, water flow and mass transport in the vadose zone, water flow and mass transport in the groundwater, water flow and mass transport in the Columbia River, air transport, and human and ecological impacts. The SAC supports deterministic analyses as well as stochastic analyses using a Monte Carlo approach, enabling SAC users to examine the effect of uncertainties in a number of key parameters. The initial assessment performed with the SAC software identified a number of areas where both the software and the analysis approach could be improved. Since that time the following six major software upgrades have been made: (1) An air pathway model was added to support all-pathway analyses. (2) Models for releases from glass waste forms, buried graphite reactor cores, and buried naval reactor compartments were added. (3) An air-water dual-phase model was added to more accurately track the movement of volatile contaminants in the vadose zone. (4) The ability to run analyses was extended from 1,000 years to 10,000 years or longer after site closure. (5) The vadose zone flow and transport model was upgraded to support two-dimensional or three-dimensional analyses. (6) The ecological model and human risk models were upgraded so the concentrations of contaminants in food products consumed by humans are produced by the ecological model. This report documents the functions in the SAC software and provides a number of example applications for Hanford problems. References to theory documents and user guides are provided as well as links to a number of published data sets that support running analyses of interest to Hanford cleanup efforts.

Eslinger, Paul W.; Kincaid, Charles T.; Nichols, William E.; Wurstner, Signe K.

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

144

Promotion of Mn(II) Oxidation and Remediation of Coal Mine Drainage in Passive Treatment Systems by Diverse Fungal and Bacterial Communities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Oxidation and Remediation of Coal Mine Drainage in Passive Treatment...concentrations of dissolved Mn(II) from coal mine drainage (CMD). Studies...and throughout the world. In Appalachia, centuries of coal mining has left thousands of abandoned...

Cara M. Santelli; Donald H. Pfister; Dana Lazarus; Lu Sun; William D. Burgos; Colleen M. Hansel

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

145

AL presents a remedy to duality gap encountered with the ordinary Lagrangian for nonconvex problems. It shapes the Lagrangian function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AL presents a remedy to duality gap encountered with the ordinary Lagrangian for nonconvex problems with pumped-storage units. An IEEE 24-bus test system is used for AL performance illustration. Com- putational models are all coded in C. The results ofthe test case show that the AL approach can provide better

Gross, George

146

ICDF Complex Remedial Action Work Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for operation of the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility Complex (ICDF). This facility includes (a) an engineered landfill that meets the substantial requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl landfill requirements; (b) centralized receiving, inspections, administration, storage/staging, and treatment facilities necessary for CERCLA investigation-derived, remedial, and removal waste at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prior to final disposition in the disposal facility or shipment off-Site; and (c) an evaporation pond that has been designated as a corrective action management unit. The ICDF Complex, including a buffer zone, will cover approximately 40 acres, with a landfill disposal capacity of approximately 510,000 yd3. The ICDF Complex is designed and authorized to accept INL CERCLA-generated wastes, and includes the necessary subsystems and support facilities to provide a complete waste management system. This Remedial Action Work Plan presents the operational approach and requirements for the various components that are part of the ICDF Complex. Summaries of the remedial action work elements are presented herein, with supporting information and documents provided as appendixes to this work plan that contain specific detail about the operation of the ICDF Complex. This document presents the planned operational process based upon an evaluation of the remedial action requirements set forth in the Operable Unit 3-13 Final Record of Decision.

W. M. Heileson

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

C++ programming techniques for High Performance Computing on systems with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C++ programming techniques for High Performance Computing on systems with non-uniform memory access (including NUMA) without sacrificing performance. ccNUMA In High Performance Computing (HPC), shared- memory

Fiebig, Peter

148

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer, LNT, and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirement Damodara Poojary, Jacques Nicole,...

149

Predicting Reservoir System Quality and Performance | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Predicting Reservoir System Quality and Performance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Predicting Reservoir System Quality and...

150

Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Remediation - July 2010 Remediation - July 2010 Independent Activity Report, Savannah River Remediation - July 2010 July 2010 Savannah River Operations Office Integrated Safety Management System Phase II Verification Review of Savannah River Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), participated in the DOE Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), Office of Safety and Quality Assurance (OSQA), Technical Support Division (TSD) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), Phase II Verification of Savannah River Remediation (SRR). The purpose of the DOE-SR Phase II ISMS Verification was to verify that the SRR ISMS Description that was submitted to and approved by the DOE-SR Manager is being effectively implemented at the Savannah

151

Promoting decision making through a Sustainable Remediation Assessment Matrix (SRAM)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the steps taken in a decision making process through a Sustainable Remediation Assessment Matrix (SRAM). The development of the SRAM deals with Complex, Large-scale Interconnected, Open, and Socio-technical System (CLIOS). For both large and small contaminated areas, considers potential impacts on neighbouring areas, the contribution to air emissions from the materials of the proposed project and the energy to be consumed. Along this line, the research focused on setting up a model under a systems perspective. A systemigram, from remedial investigation to project closeout, has been developed. For each stage of the remediation project, the process to identify stakeholders has been outlined. Moreover, and as an illustrative example, environmental, social, and economic aspects of remedial operations have been addressed on a specific case using the US Air Force Sustainable Remediation Tool (SRT).

Aspasia Kalomoiri; Washington Braida

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at 331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal for the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site remediation that would be performed at the Rock Springs site in Sweetwater County, Wyoming. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Final Environmental Assessment

153

DOE Awards Contract for Environmental Remediation Services at California  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Remediation Services at Environmental Remediation Services at California Santa Susana Field Laboratory DOE Awards Contract for Environmental Remediation Services at California Santa Susana Field Laboratory September 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor bill.taylor@srs.gov 803-952-8564 Cincinnati - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a task order (contract) to CDM, A Joint Venture, of Fairfax, Virginia, to provide environmental remediation services for the Energy Technology Engineering Center at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Canoga Park, California. The cost-plus incentive fee task order has a 36-month performance period and a value of $11.3 million. CDM will continue to assist DOE in chemical sampling, the preparation of a chemical data gap analysis and preparing a soils remediation action

154

CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic approach to closure planning is being implemented at the Hanford Site's Central Plateau to help achieve the goal of closure by the year 2035. The overall objective of Central Plateau remediation is to protect human health and the environment from the significant quantity of contaminated material that resulted from decades of plutonium production in support of the nation's defense. This goal will be achieved either by removing contaminants or placing the residual contaminated materials in a secure configuration that minimizes further migration to the groundwater and reduces the potential for inadvertent intrusion into contaminated sites. The approach to Central Plateau cleanup used three key concepts--closure zones, closure elements, and closure process steps--to create an organized picture of actions required to complete remediation. These actions were merged with logic ties, constraints, and required resources to produce an integrated time-phased schedule and cost profile for Central Plateau closure. Programmatic risks associated with implementation of Central Plateau closure were identified and analyzed. Actions to mitigate the most significant risks are underway while high priority remediation projects continue to make progress.

ROMINE, L.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Advanced fenestration systems for improved daylight performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

daylighting designs is a lack of systems perspective that accounts for, and provides an integrated solution

Selkowitz, S.; Lee, E.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Improving Steam System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Second Edition  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This sourcebook is designed to provide steam system users with a reference that describes the basic steam system components, outlines opportunities for energy and performance improvements, and discusses the benefits of a systems approach in identifying and implementing these improvement opportunities. The sourcebook is divided into three main sections: steam system basics, performance improvement opportunities, and where to find help.

157

Performance optimization for unmanned vehicle systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technological advances in the area of unmanned vehicles are opening new possibilities for creating teams of vehicles performing complex missions with some degree of autonomy. Perhaps the most spectacular example of these ...

Le Ny, Jerome

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

On the Energy Consumption and Performance of Systems Software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Energy Consumption and Performance of Systems Software Appears in the proceedings of the 4th,grosu,psehgal,sas,stoller,ezk}@cs.stonybrook.edu ABSTRACT Models of energy consumption and performance are necessary to understand and identify system. This paper considers the energy consumption and performance of servers running a relatively simple file

Zadok, Erez

159

CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

BERGMAN TB; STEFANSKI LD; SEELEY PN; ZINSLI LC; CUSACK LJ

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

160

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CHPlateau Remediation Contract Hanford Site- March 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether Plateau Remediation Contract Hanford Site is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Mexican Hat, Utah -- Monument Valley, Arizona, sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final audit report for remedial action at the Mexican Hat, Utah, Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and QA remedial action close-out inspections performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC); on-site construction reviews (OSCR) performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); and a surveillance performed by the Navajo Nation. This report refers to remedial action activities performed at the Mexican Hat, Utah--Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF INSULATING WINDOW SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient Use of Energy, New York (1975). Glaser, V.H.J. , "Energy Transport Control in Window Systems", Report ETR-1277-2, Stony Brook, New York, (

Selkowitz, Stephen E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Advanced Remediation Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for the cleanup of nation's nuclear weapons program legacy wastes, along with waste associated with nuclear energy programs and research. The EM cleanup efforts continue to progress, however the cleanup continues to be technologically complex, heavily regulated, long-term; and the effort also has a high life cycle cost estimate (LCCE) effort. Over the past few years, the EM program has undergone several changes to accelerate its cleanup efforts with varying degrees of success. This article will provide some insight into the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) projects that may enhance cleanup efforts and reduce life cycle costs. (authors)

Krahn, St.; Miller, C.E. [The United States Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Washington, D.C. (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Saxton soil remediation project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Facility (SNEF) consists of a 23-MW(thermal) pressurized light water thermal reactor located in south central Pennsylvania. The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Public Utilities (GPU) Corporation, is the licensee for the SNEF. Maintenance and decommissioning activities at the site are conducted by GPU Nuclear, also a GPU subsidiary and operator of the Three Mile Island and Oyster Creek nuclear facilities. The remediation and radioactive waste management of contaminated soils is described.

Holmes, R.D. [GPU Nuclear Corporation, Middletown, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Surfactants and subsurface remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of the limitations of pump-and-treat technology, attention is now focused on the feasibility of surfactant use to increase its efficiency. Surfactants have been studied for use in soil washing and enhanced oil recovery. Although similarities exist between the applications, there are significant differences in the objectives of the technologies and the limitations placed on surfactant use. In this article we review environmental studies concerned with the fate and transport of surface-active compounds in the subsurface environment and discuss key issues related to their successful use for in situ aquifer remediation, particularly with respect to nonaqueous-phase liquids.

West, C.C.; Harwell, J.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Performance Modeling and Access Methods for Temporal Database Management Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

implementation issues. Database systems with temporal support maintain history data on line together with current. Performance Modeling and Access Methods for Temporal Database Management Systems TR86-018 August. #12;Performance Modeling and Access Methods for Temporal Database Management Systems by Ilsoo Ahn

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

167

Improving Pumping System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry- Second Edition  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This sourcebook is designed to provide pump system users with a reference that outlines opportunities for improving system performance. It is not meant to be a comprehensive technical text on pumping systems; rather, it provides practical guidelines and information to make users aware of potential performance improvements. Guidance on how to find more information and assistance is also included.

168

Improving Fan System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This sourcebook is designed to provide fan system users with a reference outlining opportunities to improve system performance. It is not intended to be a comprehensive technical text on improving fan systems, but rather a document that makes users aware of potential performance improvements, provides some practical guidelines, and details where the user can find more help.

169

Sensors for Safety & Performance Stationary Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for PEM Fuel Cell Vehicles · Interfacial Stability of Thin Film H2 Sensors · Sensors for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems · Micro-Machined Thin Film H2 Gas Sensors · Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Fuel Cell Monitoring #12;Discussion Points Barriers ·Cost ·Application ·Lifetime ·Flexibility ·Public

170

Design and performance of an ammonia measurement system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions. The task cannot be completed without equipment that can efficiently and accurately compare emissions. To complete this task, a measurement system was developed and performance tested to measure ammonia. Performance tests included uncertainty...

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

171

Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part I  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The webinar will focus on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits. Presenters and specific topics for this webinar will be:

172

Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The webinar will continue our series on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits. Presenters and specific topics for this webinar...

173

Compiler-based Memory Optimizations for High Performance Computing Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Parallelism has always been the primary method to achieve higher performance. To advance the computational capabilities of state-of-the-art high performance computing systems, we continue to… (more)

Kultursay, Emre

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

175

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

176

Remedial Action Assessment System (RAAS): Evaluation of selected feasibility studies of CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) hazardous waste sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Congress and the public have mandated much closer scrutiny of the management of chemically hazardous and radioactive mixed wastes. Legislative language, regulatory intent, and prudent technical judgment, call for using scientifically based studies to assess current conditions and to evaluate and select costeffective strategies for mitigating unacceptable situations. The NCP requires that a Remedial Investigation (RI) and a Feasibility Study (FS) be conducted at each site targeted for remedial response action. The goal of the RI is to obtain the site data needed so that the potential impacts on public health or welfare or on the environment can be evaluated and so that the remedial alternatives can be identified and selected. The goal of the FS is to identify and evaluate alternative remedial actions (including a no-action alternative) in terms of their cost, effectiveness, and engineering feasibility. The NCP also requires the analysis of impacts on public health and welfare and on the environment; this analysis is the endangerment assessment (EA). In summary, the RI, EA, and FS processes require assessment of the contamination at a site, of the potential impacts in public health or the environment from that contamination, and of alternative RAs that could address potential impacts to the environment. 35 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Whelan, G. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Hartz, K.E.; Hilliard, N.D. (Beck (R.W.) and Associates, Seattle, WA (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes 1 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Buildings Technologies Program Date: September 30, 2011 ENERGY STAR ® Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 11:00 AM Eastern. There is no call in number. The audio will be sent through your computer speakers. All questions will be submitted via typing. Video of presenters Energy Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes 2 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Energy Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes 3 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Building America Program: Introduction Building Technologies Program Energy Star Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes

178

Performance testing of small interconnected wind systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a need for performance information on small windmills intended for interconnected operation with utility distribution service. The owner or prospective buyer needs the data to estimate economic viability and service reliability, while the utility needs it to determine interconnection arrangements, maintain quality of power delivered by its line, and to answer customer inquiries. No existing testing program provides all the information needed, although the Rocky Flats test site comes close. To fill this need for Michigan, Consumers Power Company and the Michigan Electric Cooperative Association helped support a two-year program at Michigan State University involving extensive performance testing of an Enertech 1500 and a 4-kW Dakota with a Gemini inverter. The performance study suggested measurements necessary to characterize SWECS for interconnected operation. They include SWECS energy output to a-c line, miles of wind passing the rotor, var-hour metering for average var consumption, and recording watt, current, and voltmeters to assess SWECS output variability. Added instruments for waveform measurement (to assess power quality) are also needed. Typical data taken at the MSU test site are used to illustrate the techniques and preliminary data from a current project is given. Finally, conclusions about SWECS performance are listed.

Park, G.L.; Krauss, O.; Miller, J.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Performance Metrics for Intelligent Systems Workshop March 20-22, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will be the eleventh in a series of workshops dedicated to defining measures and methodologies of evaluating) - Intelligent Systems and Robots for Hazardous Environments (e.g. nuclear remediation) - Smart Grid - Space measures to applied problems in commercial, industrial, homeland security, and military applications. Per

Perkins, Richard A.

180

Transfer and commercialisation of contaminated groundwater remediation technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High costs and poor performance of conventional groundwater remediation technologies have brought a call for the deployment of innovative technologies capable of attaining regulatory standards while satisfying time and budget constraints. To develop an innovative technology in the laboratory and ultimately transition it to full-scale commercialisation, presents challenges at various levels. Scientific and engineering problems and regulatory and legal issues exist that must be dealt with when moving a technology from the laboratory to the field. Importantly, cost and performance data must be presented in a manner that convinces stakeholders that the technology can accomplish remediation more economically, safely and efficiently than conventional technologies. The challenges of transferring and commercialising innovative groundwater remediation technologies and strategies that may be used to help overcome these challenges are discussed. Case studies of groundwater remediation technology transfer are presented.

Mark N. Goltz; Kenneth J. Williamson

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Thermal Performance of Ferrocement Green Building System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

System must not only cope with strengths and flexibility requirements, but the insulation value is of high importance. In summer heat must be kept outside as much as possible. The great demands of electric power ...

Wail N. Al-Rifaie; Waleed K. Ahmed…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High-performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:January 2015 All...

183

System Performance and Safety Government and Industry Collaboration  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

pnnl.gov Codes and Standards for Energy Storage System Performance and Safety Government and Industry Collaboration BRIEFING SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of...

184

Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT? Emission Control System...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2 Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT Emission Control System for NOx and PM Emission Reduction in Retrofit Applications Part 2 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Johnson Matthey...

185

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation gives an overview of the status and FY09 accomplishments for the NREL Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Project.

Bennion, K.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Performance characterization of integral imaging systems based on human vision  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The perceptual contrast threshold (PCT) surface is proposed for characterizing the systematic performance of integral imaging (InI) systems. The method to determine the PCT surface...

Wang, Xiaorui; He, Liyong; Bu, Qingfeng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the 1999 Operable Unit (OU) III Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study(RI/FS) and was designated as AreaOU III BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION FINAL Prepared by: Brookhaven REMEDIATION Executive Summary

188

Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT? Emission Control System...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Johnson Matthey Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT EGRT (tm) (tm) Emission Control System Emission Control System for for NOx NOx and PM Emission and PM Emission Reduction in...

189

Improving Compressed Air System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This sourcebook is designed to provide compressed air system users with a reference that outlines opportunities for system performance improvements. It is not intended to be a comprehensive technical text on improving compressed air systems, but rather a document that makes compressed air system users aware of the performance improvement potential, details some of the significant opportunities, and directs users to additional sources of assistance.

190

Sulfate Reduction in Groundwater: Characterization and Applications for Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulfate is ubiquitous in groundwater, with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Sulfate reduction reactions play a significant role in mediating redox conditions and biogeochemical processes for subsurface systems. They also serve as the basis for innovative in-situ methods for groundwater remediation. An overview of sulfate reduction in subsurface environments is provided, with a specific focus on implications for groundwater remediation. A case study presenting the results of a pilot-scale ethanol injection test illustrates the advantages and difficulties associated with the use of electron-donor amendments for sulfate remediation.

Miao, Z.; Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Carreon-Diazconti, C.; Johnson, B.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa) Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources

192

Operating Systems: The Problems Of Performance and Reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operating Systems: The Problems Of Performance and Reliability B. Randell University of Newcastle and reliability are amongst the most difficult that operating system designers and implementors have to face. This is particularly the case with generic operating systems, i.e., systems intended for use in many different versions

Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

193

Machine Maintenance Integrated Performance Support System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this partnership project were to develop a preventive maintenance checklist program, a troubleshooting system for the Vertical Turning Center (VTC)-5, an on-line manual, and to integrate these components with a custom browser that would run on the VTC-5 machine's controller and would support future internet/intranet delivery. Kingsbury provided subject matter experts from engineering, manufacturing, and technical support. They also provided photographs, schematics, and CAD drawings, which AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (ASFM and T) digitized for use in the final program. Information from The Kingsbury troubleshooting experts were interviewed regarding symptoms and root causes of system malfunctions This knowledge was captured and from it, fault trees were developed. These trees were then incorporated into the EPSS as a troubleshooting tool. The troubleshooting portion of the system presents simple questions to the machine operator in order to determine the likely cause or causes of malfunctions and then recommends systematic corrective actions. The on-line reference manual, covering operations and maintenance, provides text and illustrations to the machine operator in a traditional structure, but additionally offers the capability to search voluminous amounts of technical data and retrieve specific information on request. The maintenance portion of the EPSS includes checklists that are displayed daily, weekly, monthly, and annually, as appropriate, on the VTC-5 controller screen. The controller software is unavailable for machining parts until the machine tool operator goes through and checks off all of the checklist items. This project provided the team with a detailed understanding of the knowledge and information required to produce and support advanced machine tools. In addition, it resulted in the design and construction of a prototype VTC-5 EPSS containing all the logic and interfaces necessary to integrate operations and maintenance information from other Kingsbury machine tools.

Bohley, M.C.; Schwartz, M.E.

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

194

Daylighting performance of electrochromic glazing system  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

52E 52E Lighting energy savings potential of split- pane electrochromic windows controlled for daylighting with visual comfort L.L. Fernandes Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory E.S. Lee Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory G. Ward Anyhere Software Windows and Envelope Materials Group Building Technology and Urban Systems Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division February 2013 Published in Energy and Buildings 61 (2013) 8-20 10.1016/j.enbuild.2012.10.057 ! DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of

195

Experimental performance evaluation of aerogel glazing systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy savings for heating, air conditioning and illuminating plants could be improved by innovative Transparent Insulation Materials (TIMs), which aim to optimize two opposite requirements: transparency and thermal insulation. Aerogel is one of the most promising materials for use in highly energy-efficient windows: in addition to the low thermal conductivity (down to 0.010 W/(m K) in evacuated conditions), a high solar energy and daylight transmittance is achieved. Eight samples were manufactured, by assembling several types of glass with monolithic and granular aerogel in the interspace. U-values slightly higher than 1 W/m2 K were obtained for all the samples. The monolithic aerogel introduced a better light transmittance (?v = 0.60) than granular one (?v = 0.27), while U-values were comparable in non-evacuated conditions. With respect to a conventional window (double glazing with a low-e layer), 55% reduction in heat losses was achieved by monolithic aerogel, with only a 25% reduction in light transmittance; for the granular systems, the reduction was about 25% in heat losses, but 66% in light transmission. In order to evaluate the aerogel employing in buildings, a prototype of an aluminum frame window with granular aerogel in interspace was realized. Thermal and acoustic properties of the prototype were evaluated according to the standards. The thermal transmittance of the innovative glazing system was little lower than 1 W/(m2 K) and it showed also good acoustic properties: the Rw index was 3 dB higher than the one of a conventional window with air in interspace.

C. Buratti; E. Moretti

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

HPGMG 1.0: A Benchmark for Ranking High Performance Computing Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Ranking High Performance Computing Systems Mark F. Adamsmetric for ranking high performance computing systems. HPLmetric for ranking high performance computing systems. When

Adams, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

INTERIOR DUCT SYSTEM DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By removing air distribution and conditioning equipment from unconditioned spaces, homeowners stand to benefit substantially with respect to both energy savings and indoor air quality. Duct leakage introduces: Greater heating and cooling loads from air at extreme temperatures and humidity levels; Outside air and air from unconditioned spaces that may contain air borne contaminants, combustion gases, pollen, mold spores, and/or particles of building materials; and Higher whole-house infiltration/exfiltration rates. Exemplary studies conducted since 1990 have demonstrated the prevalence of duct leakage throughout the United States and measured energy savings of approximately 20% during both heating and cooling seasons from leakage reduction. These all dealt with duct leakage to and/or from unconditioned spaces. In the building science community, leakage within the conditioned space is generally presumed to eliminate the negative consequences of duct leakage with the exception of possibly creating pressure imbalances in the house which relates to higher infiltration and/or exfiltration. The practical challenges of isolating ducts and air handlers from unconditioned spaces require builders to construct an air-tight environment for the ducts. Florida Solar Energy Center researchers worked with four builders in Texas, North Carolina, and Florida who build a furred-down chase located either in a central hallway or at the edges of rooms as an architectural detail. Some comparison homes with duct systems in attics and crawl spaces were included in the test group of more than 20 homes. Test data reveals that all of the duct/AHU systems built inside the conditioned space had lower duct leakage to unconditioned spaces than their conventional counterparts; however, none of the homes was completely free of duct leakage to unconditioned spaces. Common problems included wiring and plumbing penetrations of the chase, failure to treat the chase as an air tight space, and misguided fresh air inlet design. Improvements were implemented by the Texas builder and retested in July. Results showed a 36% reduction in duct leakage, significant enough to warrant the builder adopting the new sealing procedure.

Janet E.R. Mcllvaine; David Beal; Philip Fairey

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

198

Extensibility, Safety and Performance in the SPIN Operating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extensibility, Safety and Performance in the SPIN Operating System Brian N. Bershad Stefan Savage the motivation, architecture and per- formance of SPIN, an extensible operating system. SPIN provides change the operating system's interface and implementation. Extensions allow an application to specialize

Savage, Stefan

199

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA UMore Park Remedial Investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA UMore Park Remedial Investigation Frequently Asked Questions What is a remedial investigation? A remedial investigation is a technical assessment that characterizes the soil. A remedial investigation includes the analysis of soil and water samples as well as evaluating existing data

Netoff, Theoden

200

The role of innovative remediation technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are currently over 1200 sites on the US Superfund's National Priorities List (NPL) of hazardous waste sites, and there are over 30, 000 sites listed by the Comprehensive Environmental Responsibility, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS). The traditional approach to remediating sites in the US has been to remove the material and place it in a secure landfill, or in the case of groundwater, pump and treat the effluent. These technologies have proven to be very expensive and don't really fix the problem. The waste is just moved from one place to another. In recent years, however, alternative and innovative technologies have been increasingly used in the US to replace the traditional approaches. This paper will focus on just such innovative remediation technologies in the US, looking at the regulatory drivers, the emerging technologies, some of the problems in deploying technologies, and a case study.

Doesburg, J.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The role of innovative remediation technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are currently over 1200 sites on the US Superfund`s National Priorities List (NPL) of hazardous waste sites, and there are over 30, 000 sites listed by the Comprehensive Environmental Responsibility, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS). The traditional approach to remediating sites in the US has been to remove the material and place it in a secure landfill, or in the case of groundwater, pump and treat the effluent. These technologies have proven to be very expensive and don`t really fix the problem. The waste is just moved from one place to another. In recent years, however, alternative and innovative technologies have been increasingly used in the US to replace the traditional approaches. This paper will focus on just such innovative remediation technologies in the US, looking at the regulatory drivers, the emerging technologies, some of the problems in deploying technologies, and a case study.

Doesburg, J.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Remedial design through effective electronic associations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black and Veatch Special Projects Corp. (BVSPC) used an environmental data management system (EDMS) to consolidate x-ray fluorescence (XRF), global positioning system (GPS), and laboratory analytical data into a unique and flexible electronic database. Cost savings were acknowledged in all phases of the remedial design due to the development and use of the EDMS and its distinct associations with various electronic software packages. The EDMS allowed effective and efficient completion of the remedial design investigation of the Oronogo-Duenweg Mining Belt Site. The Site is a 125-year old mining community in Jasper County, Missouri. Approximately 6,500 residences are now located within the 60 square-mile Superfund Site where lead and zinc were mined. Smelting and mining activities were conducted in several areas throughout the community. These operations left approximately 9 million tons of mine wastes at the Site upon completion of the mining activities. The purpose of the remedial design investigation was to quantify and identify the residential yards that were adversely affected by these activities.

Deis, J.L.; Wankum, R.D.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

International Space Station power module thermal control system hydraulic performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Space Station (ISS) uses four photovoltaic power modules (PVMs) to provide electric power for the US On-Orbit Segment. The PVMs consist of photovoltaic arrays (PVAs), orbit replaceable units (ORUs), photovoltaic radiators (PVRs), and a thermal control system (TCS). The PVM TCS function is to maintain selected PVM components within their specified operating ranges. The TCS consists of the pump flow control subassembly (PFCS), piping system, including serpentine tubing for individual component heat exchangers, headers/manifolds, fluid disconnect couplings (FQDCs), and radiator (PVR). This paper describes the major design requirements for the TCS and the results of the system hydraulic performance predictions in regard to these requirements and system component sizing. The system performance assessments were conducted using the PVM TCS fluid network hydraulic model developed for predicting system/component pressure losses and flow distribution. Hardy-Cross method of iteration was used to model the fluid network configuration. Assessments of the system hydraulic performance were conducted based on an evaluation of uncertainties associated with the manufacturing and design tolerances. Based on results of the analysis, it was concluded that all design requirements regarding system performance could be met. The hydraulic performance range, enveloping possible system operating parameter variations was determined.

Goldberg, V. [Boeing North American, Inc., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

ICDF Complex Remedial Action Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Remedial Action Report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Section 6.2 of the INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan. The agency prefinal inspection of the ICDF Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF) was completed in June of 2005. Accordingly, this report has been developed to describe the construction activities completed at the ICDF along with a description of any modifications to the design originally approved for the facility. In addition, this report provides a summary of the major documents prepared for the design and construction of the ICDF, a discussion of relevant requirements and remedial action objectives, the total costs associated with the development and operation of the facility to date, and identification of necessary changes to the Agency-approved INEEL CERCLA Disposal Facility Remedial Action Work Plan and the ICDF Complex Operations and Maintenance Plan.

W. M. Heileson

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

205

Managing variability in the IO performance of petascale storage systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant challenges exist for achieving peak or even consistent levels of performance when using IO systems at scale. They stem from sharing IO system resources across the processes of single large-scale applications and/or multiple simultaneous programs causing internal and external interference, which in turn, causes substantial reductions in IO performance. This paper presents interference effects measurements for two different file systems at multiple supercomputing sites. These measurements motivate developing a 'managed' IO approach using adaptive algorithms varying the IO system workload based on current levels and use areas. An implementation of these methods deployed for the shared, general scratch storage system on Oak Ridge National Laboratory machines achieves higher overall performance and less variability in both a typical usage environment and with artificially introduced levels of 'noise'. The latter serving to clearly delineate and illustrate potential problems arising from shared system usage and the advantages derived from actively managing it.

Wolf, Matthew; Zheng, Fang; Klasky, Scott; Schwan, Karsten; Oldfield, Ron A.; Lofstead, Gerald Fredrick, II; Liu, Qing; Kordenbrock, Todd

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

System Advisor Model: Flat Plate Photovoltaic Performance Modeling Validation Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The System Advisor Model (SAM) is a free software tool that performs detailed analysis of both system performance and system financing for a variety of renewable energy technologies. This report provides detailed validation of the SAM flat plate photovoltaic performance model by comparing SAM-modeled PV system generation data to actual measured production data for nine PV systems ranging from 75 kW to greater than 25 MW in size. The results show strong agreement between SAM predictions and field data, with annualized prediction error below 3% for all fixed tilt cases and below 8% for all one axis tracked cases. The analysis concludes that snow cover and system outages are the primary sources of disagreement, and other deviations resulting from seasonal biases in the irradiation models and one axis tracking issues are discussed in detail.

Freeman, J.; Whitmore, J.; Kaffine, L.; Blair, N.; Dobos, A. P.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) Contractor Performance Assessment Reporting System (CPARS) The CPAR assesses a contractor's performance, both positive and negative, and provides a record on a given contract during a specified period of time. Each assessment must be based on objective data (or measurable, subjective data when objective data is not available) supportable by program and contract management data. The CPARS process is designed with a series of checks-and-balances to facilitate the objective and consistent evaluation of contractor performance. Both Government and contractor perspectives are captured on the CPAR form. The opportunity to review/comment on the CPAR by the designated Government and contractor personnel together makes a complete CPAR.

208

Commissioning and Performance Diagnostics for HVAC Control Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commissioning and Performance Diagnostics for HVAC Control Systems Commissioning and Performance Diagnostics for HVAC Control Systems Speaker(s): Ashish Singhal Date: December 20, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Philip Haves The presentation will focus on practical aspects of commissioning control loops in commercial HVAC systems and evaluating their routine performance. Simple and theoretically sound methods for diagnosing control performance will be presented that detect serious performance issues associated with control loops in modern buildings. The discussion will center on a new control loop commissioning tool that helps field personnel to quickly test, tune and troubleshoot control loops. In addition to the active tests for commissioning control loops, a suite of diagnostic algorithms are used in a

209

Benchmarking and Performance Based Rating System for Commercial Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Benchmarking and Performance Based Rating System for Commercial Buildings Benchmarking and Performance Based Rating System for Commercial Buildings in India Speaker(s): Saket Sarraf Date: May 4, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Girish Ghatikar The Indian building sector has witnessed huge surge in interest in energy performance in the last decade. The 'intention' based codes like the national Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) and green building rating systems such as Leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED-India) and Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment (GRIHA) have been the prime mechanisms to design and assess energy efficient buildings. However, they do not rate the 'achieved' energy performance of buildings over time or reward their performance through a continuous evaluation process.

210

Analysis of Photovoltaic System Energy Performance Evaluation Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Documentation of the energy yield of a large photovoltaic (PV) system over a substantial period can be useful to measure a performance guarantee, as an assessment of the health of the system, for verification of a performance model to then be applied to a new system, or for a variety of other purposes. Although the measurement of this performance metric might appear to be straight forward, there are a number of subtleties associated with variations in weather and imperfect data collection that complicate the determination and data analysis. A performance assessment is most valuable when it is completed with a very low uncertainty and when the subtleties are systematically addressed, yet currently no standard exists to guide this process. This report summarizes a draft methodology for an Energy Performance Evaluation Method, the philosophy behind the draft method, and the lessons that were learned by implementing the method.

Kurtz, S.; Newmiller, J.; Kimber, A.; Flottemesch, R.; Riley, E.; Dierauf, T.; McKee, J.; Krishnani, P.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Guidelines for reporting parabolic trough solar electric system performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this activity is to develop a generic methodology which can be used to track and compare the performance of parabolic trough power plants. The approach needs to be general enough to work for all existing and future parabolic trough plant designs, provide meaningful comparisons of year to year performance, and allow for comparisons between dissimilar plant designs. The approach presented here uses the net annual system efficiency as the primary metric for evaluating the performance of parabolic trough power plants. However, given the complex nature of large parabolic trough plants, the net annual system efficiency by itself does not adequately characterize the performance of the plant. The approach taken here is to define a number of additional performance metrics which enable a more comprehensive understanding of overall plant performance.

Price, H.W.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Models Used to Assess the Performance of Photovoltaic Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization.

213

Terahertz imaging system performance model for concealed-weapon identification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory have developed a terahertz (THz) -band imaging system performance model...

Murrill, Steven R; Jacobs, Eddie L; Moyer, Steven K; Halford, Carl E; Griffin, Steven T; De Lucia, Frank C; Petkie, Douglas T; Franck, Charmaine C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity Announcement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy is hosting a webinar on Thursday, January 22, 2015 on the Systems Performance Advancement II: Component Metric Validation Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA)....

215

High Performance Computing Systems for Autonomous Spaceborne Missions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Future-generation space missions across the solar system to the planets, moons, asteroids, and comets may someday incorporate supercomputers both to expand the range of missions being conducted and to significantly reduce their cost. By performing science ...

Thomas Sterling; Daniel S. Katz; Larry Bergman

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Gas-Insulated Substation Performance in Brazilian System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work is based on a report developed in the Working Group 23–03 of CIGRÉ-Brazil [1], about gas-insulated substations performance in the Brazilian electric system from...

H. J. A. Martins; V. R. Fernandes; R. S. Jacobsen

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Performance of a boundary layer ingesting propulsion system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents an assessment of the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft propulsion system, with embedded engines, in the presence of aircraft fuselage boundary layer ingestion (BLI). The emphasis is on defining ...

Plas, Angélique (Angélique Pascale)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Improving Motor and Drive System Performance – A Sourcebook for Industry  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This sourcebook outlines opportunities to improve motor and drive systems performance, including practical guidelines, energy efficiency assessment instructions, and referrals to other information and assistance such as software, videos, and training opportunities.

219

LES SYSTEMES DE MESURE DE PERFORMANCE EN COLLECTIVITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 LES SYSTEMES DE MESURE DE PERFORMANCE EN COLLECTIVITES TERRITORIALES : UN ECLAIRAGE A LA LECTURE progressive de la LOLF depuis 2002 représente la déclinaison en France des principes du New Public Management

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

220

High Performance Computing in Electrical Energy Systems Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents a review of the main application areas of high performance computing in electrical energy systems and introduces some results obtained with ... obtained with tests conducted using actual mod...

Djalma M. Falcao; Carmen L. T. Borges…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Improves Cooling System Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Case study details Marshall Space Flight Center's innovative technologies to improve water efficiency and cooling performance for one of its problematic cooling systems. The program saved the facility more than 800,000 gallons of water in eight months.

222

Quantitative training system assessments using General Systems Performance Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provides an overview of the concept of situational awareness and identifies the characteristics that are usually associated ivith a situationally aivare person. A. CBT Systems As ivas mentioned in Chapter I, there is considerable evidence [3, 4...

Kashyap, Sujatha

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Strategy to develop and test a multi-function scarifier end effector with an integral conveyance system for waste tank remediation. Strategy plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This strategy plan describes a coupled analytical/experimental approach to develop a multi-functional scarifier end effector coupled with a pneumatic conveyance system to retrieve wastes from underground storage tanks. The scarifier uses ultra-high-pressure water jets to rubblize and entrain waste forms such as salt cake, sludge, and viscous liquid that can be transported pneumatically. The three waste types (hard, brittle, salt cake, viscous liquid, and deformable sludge) present increasingly complex challenges for scarification and pneumatic conveyance. Salt cake is anticipated to be the easiest to retrieve because (1) a theoretical model of hydraulic rock fracture can be applied to estimate jet performance to fracture salt cake, and (2) gas-solids transport correlations can be used to predict pneumatic transport. Deformable sludge is anticipated to be the most difficult to retrieve: no theories, correlations, or data exist to predict this performance. However order-of-magnitude gas-solid correlations indicate particulate wastes of prototypic density can be transported to a height of 20 m within allowable pressure limits provided that the volume fraction of the gaseous phase is kept above 95%. Viscous liquid is anticipated to be of intermediate complexity to retrieve. Phenomena that are expected to affect system performance are ranked. Experiments and analyses necessary to evaluate the effects of these phenomena are proposed. Subsequent strategies for experiment test plans, system deployment, and operation and control will need to be developed.

Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M.; Keska, J.K.; Elmore, M.R.; Lombardo, N.J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

On the Energy Consumption and Performance of Systems Software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Energy Consumption and Performance of Systems Software Zhichao Li, Radu Grosu, Priya Sehgal {zhicli,grosu,psehgal,sas,stoller,ezk}@cs.stonybrook.edu ABSTRACT Models of energy consumption that can balance out performance and energy use. This paper considers the energy consumption

Stoller, Scott

225

Use of a Machine Control & Guidance System Determination of Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Use of a Machine Control & Guidance System Determination of Performance Protection against. Dr. P. Rausch Why Machine Guidance? 1 Introduction Machine Guidance allows higher performance. Higher someone checking down below: 09.07.2008 3 ,,Machine control by shout and gesture". Planned Excavator Job

226

Analyzing and Improving MPI Communication Performance in Overcommitted Virtualized Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nowadays, it is an important trend in the system domain to use the software-based virtualization technology to build the execution environments (e.g., Clouds) and serve high performance computing (HPC) applications. However, with the extra virtualization ... Keywords: virtualization, cloud, MPI, performance

Zhiyuan Shao; Qiang Wang; Xuejiao Xie; Hai Jin; Ligang He

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Remediation of Uranium Impacted Sediments in a Watercourse - 12486  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2009, remediation was initiated for a non-operational fuel cycle facility previously used for government contract work. Between 2009 and the spring of 2011, remediation efforts were focused on demolition of contaminated buildings and removal of contaminated soil. In the late spring of 2011, the last phase of remediation commenced involving the removal of contaminated sediments from portions of a 1,200 meter long gaining stream. Planning and preparation for remediation of the stream began in 2009 with submittal of permit applications to undertake construction activities in a wetland area. The permitting process was lengthy and involved securing permits from multiple agencies. However, early and frequent communication with stakeholders played an integral role in efficiently obtaining the permit approvals. Frequent communication with stakeholders throughout the planning and remediation process also proved to be a key factor in timely completion of the project. The remediation of the stream involved the use of temporary bladder berms to divert surface water flow, water diversion piping, a sediment vacuum removal system, excavation of sediments using small front-end loaders, sediment dewatering, and waste packaging, transportation and disposal. Many safeguards were employed to protect several species of concern in the work area, water management during project activities, challenges encountered during the project, methods of Final Status Survey, and stream restoration. The planning and permitting effort for the Site Brook remediation began in May 2009 and permits were approved and in place by February 2011. The remediation and restoration of the Site Brook began in April 2011 and was completed in November 2011. The remediation of the Site Brook involved the use of temporary bladder berms to divert surface water flow, water diversion piping, a sediment vacuum removal system, excavation of sediments using small front-end loaders, sediment dewatering, and waste packaging, transportation, disposal, FSS, and restoration. Early and frequent communications with stakeholders proved to be a key factor in timely completion of the project. Challenges encountered during the remediation effort were overcome by proper planning and having preparedness procedures in place prior to executing the work. With the remediation and restoration successfully completed, the only remaining task is to monitor/maintain the restoration for 10 years. (authors)

Shephard, E.; Walter, N.; Downey, H.; Collopy, P. [AMEC E and I, Inc., 511 Congress Street, Suite 200, Portland, ME 04101 (United States); Conant, J. [ABB, Inc., 5 Waterside Crossing, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Residential photovoltaic flywheel storage system performance and cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A subscale prototype of a flywheel energy storage and conversion system for use with photovoltaic power systems of residential and intermediate load-center size has been designed, built and tested by MIT Lincoln Laboratory. System design, including details of such key components as magnetic bearings, motor generator, and power-conditioning electronics, are described. Performance results of prototype testing are given and indicate that this system is the equal of or superior to battery and inverter systems for the same application. Results of cost and user-worth analysis show that residential systems are economically feasible in stand-alone and in utility-interactive applications.

Hay, R.D.; Millner, A.R.; Jarvinen, P.O.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent trend in modern high performance computing (HPC) system architectures employs ''lean'' compute nodes running a lightweight operating system (OS). Certain parts of the OS as well as other system software services are moved to service nodes in order to increase performance and scalability. This paper examines the impact of this HPC system architecture trend on HPC ''middleware'' software solutions, which traditionally equip HPC systems with advanced features, such as parallel and distributed programming models, appropriate system resource management mechanisms, remote application steering and user interaction techniques. Since the approach of keeping the compute node software stack small and simple is orthogonal to the middleware concept of adding missing OS features between OS and application, the role and architecture of middleware in modern HPC systems needs to be revisited. The result is a paradigm shift in HPC middleware design, where single middleware services are moved to service nodes, while runtime environments (RTEs) continue to reside on compute nodes.

Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Ong, Hong Hoe [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Innovative mathematical modeling in environmental remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are two different ways to model reactive transport: ad hoc and innovative reaction-based approaches. The former, such as the Kd simplification of adsorption, has been widely employed by practitioners, while the latter has been mainly used in scientific communities for elucidating mechanisms of biogeochemical transport processes. It is believed that innovative mechanistic-based models could serve as protocols for environmental remediation as well. This paper reviews the development of a mechanistically coupled fluid flow, thermal transport, hydrologic transport, and reactive biogeochemical model and example-applications to environmental remediation problems. Theoretical bases are sufficiently described. Four example problems previously carried out are used to demonstrate how numerical experimentation can be used to evaluate the feasibility of different remediation approaches. The first one involved the application of a 56-species uranium tailing problem to the Melton Branch Subwatershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the parallel version of the model. Simulations were made to demonstrate the potential mobilization of uranium and other chelating agents in the proposed waste disposal site. The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium. The third example simulated laboratory experiments involving extremely high concentrations of uranium, technetium, aluminum, nitrate, and toxic metals (e.g., Ni, Cr, Co). The fourth example modeled microbially-mediated immobilization of uranium in an unconfined aquifer using acetate amendment in a field-scale experiment. The purposes of these modeling studies were to simulate various mechanisms of mobilization and immobilization of radioactive wastes and to illustrate how to apply reactive transport models for environmental remediation.

Gour-Tsyh Yeh; Jin-Ping Gwo; Malcolm D. Siegel; Ming-Hsu Li; Yilin Fang; Fan Zhang; Wensui Luo; Steve B. Yabusaki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Health Care Reform Challenge: Creating a High Performance Healthcare System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Care Reform Challenge: Creating a High Performance Healthcare System Tom Simmer, MD Chief;The Challenge of Reform: Accountable Care Organizations (ACO) · ACO's are provider organizations health care delivery Organized Systems of Care Population focus for primary care physicians, hospitals

Finley Jr., Russell L.

232

Performance Evaluation of BPM System in SSRF Using PCA Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The beam position monitor (BPM) system is of most importance in a light source. The capability of the BPM depends on the resolution of the system. The traditional standard deviation on the raw data method merely gives the upper limit of the resolution. Principal component analysis (PCA) had been introduced in the accelerator physics and it could be used to get rid of the actual signals. Beam related informations were extracted before the evaluation of the BPM performance. A series of studies had been made in Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) and PCA was proved as an effective and robust method in the performance evaluations of our BPM system.

Chen, Zhichu; Yan, Yingbing; Yuan, Renxian; Lai, Longwei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

An assessment of remediation measures and effects on groundwater quality at the Oneida County Sanitary Landfill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oneida County Sanitary Landfill has operated from 1979 to the present. The four existing landfill cells were constructed based on standards that existed at their time of development from 1979 to 1995. The landfill was initially permitted as a natural attenuation landfill with a silt soil base liner and top cover. Groundwater sampling at the site showed that many constituents exceeded Wisconsin Administrative Code Chapter NR 140 (NR 140) standards throughout the 1980s. Measures that were implemented to remediate landfill impacts on groundwater quality included installation of a leachate/gas extraction system in 1990 and construction of a composite final cover over completed cells in 1994. In 1994, an Environmental Contamination Assessment (ECA) was conducted in accordance with NR 140 to evaluate landfill performance, groundwater quality trends, and future monitoring/remediation measures. Since implementation of the gas/leachate extraction system, there has been a reduction in detected volatile organic compounds in leachate, gas, gas condensate, and groundwater quality samples. Continued monitoring is necessary to evaluate remediation measures.

McGuire, P.; Otterson, S. [Rust Environment & Infrastructure, Sheboygan, WI (United States); Welhouse, G. [Environmental Compliance Consultants, Oshkosh, WI (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Use of energy management systems for performance monitoring of industrial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use of energy management systems for performance monitoring of industrial Use of energy management systems for performance monitoring of industrial load-shaping measures Title Use of energy management systems for performance monitoring of industrial load-shaping measures Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 1988 Authors Akbari, Hashem, Mashuri Warren, Anibal De T. Almeida, Deborah J. Connell, and Jeffrey P. Harris Journal Energy Volume 13 Pagination 253-263 Abstract We have studied the use of industrial energy management and control systems (EMCSs) for monitoring the performance of electric load-shaping measures in three of California's most electricity-intensive and rapidly growing industrial sectors: food, plastics, and computing equipment and electronics. In this paper, we summarize current load-shaping strategies, report on the current use of EMCSs in selected industries, and recommend ways for electric utility companies to verify the potential of EMCSs for performance monitoring. We conclude that EMCSs can be used to collect and store data for evaluating industrial load shaping. Some sophisticated EMCSs are currently being used for this purpose, mostly in larger electronics firms. Most EMCSs now available need to be customized to monitor a particular facility. We also conclude that electric utility companies can encourage the use of EMCSs for performance monitoring by helping to educate their industrial customers about EMCSs, establishing protocols to standardize communication between EMCSs, and testing EMCSs with data-logging functions at demonstration sites.

235

Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

82-TAC 82-TAC U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy DE-AC13-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report September 2003 N0065200 GJO- 2003- 482- TAC GJO- PIN 13.12.10 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report Young - Rainey STAR Center September 2003 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13- 02GJ79491 Document Number N0065200 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Northeast Site Area A NAPL Remediation Final Report September 2003 Page iii

236

A New Model to Simulate Energy Performance of VRF Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a new model to simulate energy performance of variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems in heat pump operation mode (either cooling or heating is provided but not simultaneously). The main improvement of the new model is the introduction of the evaporating and condensing temperature in the indoor and outdoor unit capacity modifier functions. The independent variables in the capacity modifier functions of the existing VRF model in EnergyPlus are mainly room wet-bulb temperature and outdoor dry-bulb temperature in cooling mode and room dry-bulb temperature and outdoor wet-bulb temperature in heating mode. The new approach allows compliance with different specifications of each indoor unit so that the modeling accuracy is improved. The new VRF model was implemented in a custom version of EnergyPlus 7.2. This paper first describes the algorithm for the new VRF model, which is then used to simulate the energy performance of a VRF system in a Prototype House in California that complies with the requirements of Title 24 ? the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The VRF system performance is then compared with three other types of HVAC systems: the Title 24-2005 Baseline system, the traditional High Efficiency system, and the EnergyStar Heat Pump system in three typical California climates: Sunnyvale, Pasadena and Fresno. Calculated energy savings from the VRF systems are significant. The HVAC site energy savings range from 51 to 85percent, while the TDV (Time Dependent Valuation) energy savings range from 31 to 66percent compared to the Title 24 Baseline Systems across the three climates. The largest energy savings are in Fresno climate followed by Sunnyvale and Pasadena. The paper discusses various characteristics of the VRF systems contributing to the energy savings. It should be noted that these savings are calculated using the Title 24 prototype House D under standard operating conditions. Actual performance of the VRF systems for real houses under real operating conditions will vary.

Hong, Tianzhen; Pang, Xiufeng; Schetrit, Oren; Wang, Liping; Kasahara, Shinichi; Yura, Yoshinori; Hinokuma, Ryohei

2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Pilot-scale studies of soil vapor extraction and bioventing for remediation of a gasoline spill at Cameron Station, Alexandria, Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 10,000 gal of spilled gasoline and unknown amounts Of trichloroethylene and benzene were discovered at the US Army`s Cameron Station facility. Because the base is to be closed and turned over to the city of Alexandria in 1995, the Army sought the most rapid and cost-effective means of spill remediation. At the request of the Baltimore District of the US Army Corps of Engineers, Argonne conducted a pilot-scale study to determine the feasibility of vapor extraction and bioventing for resolving remediation problems and to critique a private firm`s vapor-extraction design. Argonne staff, working with academic and private-sector participants, designed and implemented a new systems approach to sampling, analysis and risk assessment. The US Geological Survey`s AIRFLOW model was adapted for the study to simulate the performance of possible remediation designs. A commercial vapor-extraction machine was used to remove nearly 500 gal of gasoline from Argonne-installed horizontal wells. By incorporating numerous design comments from the Argonne project team, field personnel improved the system`s performance. Argonne staff also determined that bioventing stimulated indigenous bacteria to bioremediate the gasoline spin. The Corps of Engineers will use Argonne`s pilot-study approach to evaluate remediation systems at field operation sites in several states.

Harrison, W.; Joss, C.J.; Martino, L.E. [and others

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Title Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3383E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords air flow measurement, air leakage, blower power measurement, blowers, energy performance of buildings group, forced air systems, furnaces, indoor environment department, other, public interest energy research (pier) program, residential hvac Abstract This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit - indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called "ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823 "Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

239

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Title Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-44331 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Xu, Tengfang T., François Rémi Carrié, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, William J. Fisk, Jennifer A. McWilliams, Duo Wang, and Mark P. Modera Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 34 Start Page Chapter Pagination 215-226 Abstract This paper presents major findings of a field study on the performance of five thermal distribution systems in four large commercial buildings. The five systems studied are typical single-duct or dual-duct constant air volume (CAV) systems and variable air volume (VAV) systems, each of which serves an office building or a retail building with floor area over 2,000 m2. The air leakage from ducts are reported in terms of effective leakage area (ELA) at 25 Pa reference pressure, the ASHRAE-defined duct leakage class, and air leakage ratios. The specific ELAs ranged from 0.7 to 12.9 cm2 per m2 of duct surface area, and from 0.1 to 7.7 cm2 per square meter of floor area served. The leakage classes ranged from 34 to 757 for the five systems and systems sections tested. The air leakage ratios are estimated to be up to one-third of the fan- supplied airflow in the constant-air-volume systems. The specific ELAs and leakage classes indicate that air leakage in large commercial duct systems varies significantly from system to system, and from system section to system section even within the same thermal distribution system. The duct systems measured are much leakier than the ductwork specified as "unsealed ducts" by ASHRAE. Energy losses from supply ducts by conduction (including convection and radiation) are found to be significant, on the scale similar to the losses induced by air leakage in the duct systems. The energy losses induced by leakage and conduction suggest that there are significant energy-savings potentials from duct-sealing and insulation practice in large commercial buildings

240

Evaluation of previous remedial construction along the Duquesne Bluff  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Boulevard of the Allies is a major four lane roadway in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania that is constructed atop a near vertical, 35 meter high rock slope known locally as the Duquesne Bluff. Stratigraphic relief observed on the bluff consists of alternating sequences of flat lying sedimentary deposits of sandstone, siltstone, shale, carbonaceous shale, claystone and limestone. Expsoure of alternating sequences of durable and less durable rock has resulted in differential weathering and the formation of precarious overhanging conditions. In the interest of motorist safety and roadway improvement, a major remedial program was undertaken by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) in the mid 1980s. Primary remedial activities included rock trimming, rock bolting, the construction of dental concrete buttressing for overhanging rock support and shotcrete slope facing to arrest continued weathering of less durable claystone and carbonaceous shale exposures. As part of a current roadway improvement project, PennDOT and their consultant, Gannett Fleming, Inc., are evaluating the performance of previous remedial construction and are developing preliminary alternatives for future remediation. This paper will discuss the slope geology, overall favorable performance of the previous remedial construction and unfavorable slope conditions that may have resulted from large scale trimming operations.

J.W. Kovacs; W.R. Adams Jr.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Exhibit 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Models used to assess the performance of photovoltaic systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the various photovoltaic (PV) performance models and software developed and utilized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in support of the Photovoltaics and Grid Integration Department. In addition to PV performance models, hybrid system and battery storage models are discussed. A hybrid system using other distributed sources and energy storage can help reduce the variability inherent in PV generation, and due to the complexity of combining multiple generation sources and system loads, these models are invaluable for system design and optimization. Energy storage plays an important role in reducing PV intermittency and battery storage models are used to understand the best configurations and technologies to store PV generated electricity. Other researcher's models used by SNL are discussed including some widely known models that incorporate algorithms developed at SNL. There are other models included in the discussion that are not used by or were not adopted from SNL research but may provide some benefit to researchers working on PV array performance, hybrid system models and energy storage. The paper is organized into three sections to describe the different software models as applied to photovoltaic performance, hybrid systems, and battery storage. For each model, there is a description which includes where to find the model, whether it is currently maintained and any references that may be available. Modeling improvements underway at SNL include quantifying the uncertainty of individual system components, the overall uncertainty in modeled vs. measured results and modeling large PV systems. SNL is also conducting research into the overall reliability of PV systems.

Stein, Joshua S.; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Four-axis micro measuring systems performance verification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article describes the performance verification of 3D optical measuring instruments integrating a rotational axis using an artifact. The goal is the performance verification of four-axis measuring systems for the full 3D acquisition of micro-geometric parts. This type of measurement has many potential applications, such as in micro-tool, micro-mold, or micro-device manufacturing. The artifact is as simple as possible to reduce manufacturing costs, ensure easy calibration, comply with the ISO 10360 standard and consider all volumetric error contributions. The artifact may be useful to both measuring system manufacturers and users to provide a measurement traceability path.

Giovanni Moroni; Stefano Petrò; Wahyudin P. Syam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Remediation of contaminated soils and sediments using Daramend bioremediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soils and sediments containing polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy oils, chlorinated phenols, pesticides, herbicides and phthalates, either individually or in combination, have been difficult to remediate in the past. Not only the species of contaminant, but contaminant concentrations were roadblocks to successful use of bioremediation. Daramend{sup Tm} remediation has removed many of these obstacles through extensive research. Bench-scale, pilot-scale and full-scale demonstrations have been conducted at a variety of industrial sites. At a manufactured gas site, 295 days of Daramend remediation reduced concentrations of chrysene and fluoranthene from 38.9 mg/kg to 5.9 mg/kg and 84.6 mg/kg to 7.8 mg/kg respectively. Elsewhere, the total PAH concentration in a silty soil was reduced from 1,442 mg/kg to 36 mg/kg. Concentrations of even the most refractory PAHs (e.g. pyrene, benzo(a)pyrene) were reduced to below the established clean-up guidelines. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel fuel) have also been reduced from 8,700 mg/kg to 34 mg/kg after 182 days of treatment. Similarly, in a clay soil contaminated by crude oil processing, the concentrations of high molecular weight aliphatic hydrocarbons were rapidly reduced (138 days) to below the remediation criteria. Demonstrations with wood treatment site soils have proven Daramend remediation effective in enhancing the target compound degradation rates. Soils containing 2170 mg PCP/kg were shown to contain only 11 mg PCP/kg after 280 days of Darmend remediation. The issue of toxicity of soil containing increased amounts of pentachlorophenols was solved. Performance data collected during these projects indicate that Daramend remediation provides a cost effective method for clean-up of soils and sediments containing a variety of organic compounds.

Burwell, S.W.; Bucens, P.G.; Seech, A.G.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Resilient Plant Monitoring System: Design, Analysis, and Performance Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resilient monitoring systems are sensor networks that degrade gracefully under malicious attacks on their sensors, causing them to project misleading information. The goal of this paper is to design, analyze, and evaluate the performance of a resilient monitoring system intended to monitor plant conditions (normal or anomalous). The architecture developed consists of four layers: data quality assessment, process variable assessment, plant condition assessment, and sensor network adaptation. Each of these layers is analyzed by either analytical or numerical tools, and the performance of the overall system is evaluated using simulations. The measure of resiliency of the resulting system is evaluated using Kullback Leibler divergence, and is shown to be sufficiently high in all scenarios considered.

Humberto E. Garcia; Wen-Chiao Lin; Semyon M. Meerkov; Maruthi T. Ravichandran

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Performance analysis of mixed passive solar heating systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The various situations in which interactions between south-facing systems serving a single thermal zone may affect the performance of the mixture are discussed. In particular, the nature of direct gain interactions with unvented Trombe walls was explored using a detailed thermal network computer program. The results are compared with predictions from the simple design analysis procedures which neglect interactions. This comparison showed that system interactions can significantly improve the peformance of a mixture under certain conditions.

Wray, W.O.; Best, E.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Performance Evaluation and Benchmarking of Next Intelligent Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance Evaluation and Benchmarking of Intelligent Systems presents research dedicated to the subject of performance evaluation and benchmarking of intelligent systems by drawing from the experiences and insights of leading experts gained both through theoretical development and practical implementation of intelligent systems in a variety of diverse application domains. This contributed volume offers a detailed and coherent picture of state-of-the-art, recent developments, and further research areas in intelligent systems. The chapters cover a broad range of applications, such as assistive robotics, planetary surveying, urban search and rescue, and line tracking for automotive assembly. Subsystems or components described in this book include human-robot interaction, multi-robot coordination, communications, perception, and mapping. Chapters are also devoted to simulation support and open source software for cognitive platforms, providing examples of the type of enabling underlying technologies that can help intelligent systems to propagate and increase in capabilities. Performance Evaluation and Benchmarking of Intelligent Systems serves as a professional reference for researchers and practitioners in the field. This book is also applicable to advanced courses for graduate level students and robotics professionals in a wide range of engineering and related disciplines including computer science, automotive, healthcare, manufacturing, and service robotics.

del Pobil, Angel [Jaume-I University; Madhavan, Raj [ORNL; Bonsignorio, Fabio [Heron Robots, Italy

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Streamline simulation of Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonaqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLS) are a recognized source of groundwater contamination. Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) shows promise in increasing the efficiency and effectiveness over traditional "pump and treat" NAPL remediation...

Tunison, Douglas Irvin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Use of Risk Analysis on Remedial Alternatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantitative risk assessment (RA) is a tool used in determining a remedial alternative’s effectiveness of reducing public health ... to occur at a site. Under the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) ...

Teresa A. Schuller; Denice H. Wardrop…

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Assessment of Remedial Actions for Contaminated Sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the investigation in the field of remedial actions on contaminated land, an appropriate concept ... site, an evaluation of the existing alternative remedial techniques is necessary. The comparative evaluat...

Th. Neteler; H. L. Jessberger

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Thermal performance of an ammonia-water refrigeration system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conservation and efficient use of energy has led to alternate methods for air conditioning in buildings. Presently, two types of absorption air conditioning systems are widely used: the lithium-bromide-water system and the ammonia-water system. The first type is typically a water fired absorption chiller while the second one is a gas fired chiller. Some of the lithium-bromide-water systems use as a source of heat a stream of hot water supplied from solar collectors at a temperature level of the order of 95-100 {degrees}C. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possibilities to use solar energy to operate an ammonia-water system and to predict its thermodynamic performance. The results indicate that it is feasible to use solar energy to operate an ammonia-water absorption-refrigeration system.

Manrique, J.A. (Inst. Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Dept. of Thermal Engineering, Monterrey, NL (MX))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Remediation plan for fluorescent light fixtures containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the remedial action to achieve compliance with 29 CFR 1910 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements of fluorescent light fixtures containing PCBs at K-25 site. This remedial action is called the Remediation Plan for Fluorescent Light Fixtures Containing PCBs at the K-25 Site (The Plan). The Plan specifically discusses (1) conditions of non-compliance, (2) alternative solutions, (3) recommended solution, (4) remediation plan costs, (5) corrective action, (6) disposal of PCB waste, (7) training, and (8) plan conclusions. The results from inspections by Energy Systems personnel in 2 buildings at K-25 site and statistical extension of this data to 91 selected buildings at the K-25 site indicates that there are approximately 28,000 fluorescent light fixtures containing 47,036 ballasts. Approximately 38,531 contain PCBs and 2,799 of the 38,531 ballasts are leaking PCBs. Review of reportable occurrences at K-25 for the 12 month period of September 1990 through August 1991 shows that Energy Systems personnel reported 69 ballasts leaking PCBs. Each leaking ballast is in non-compliance with 29 CFR 1910 - Table Z-1-A. The age of the K-25 facilities indicate a continued and potential increase in ballasts leaking PCBs. This report considers 4 alternative solutions for dealing with the ballasts leaking PCBs. The advantages and disadvantages of each alternative solution are discussed and ranked using cost of remediation, reduction of health risks, and compliance with OSHA as criteria.

NONE

1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

System-Level Virtualization for High Performance Computing Geoffroy Vallee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System-Level Virtualization for High Performance Computing Geoffroy Vall´ee Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37830, USA valleegr@ornl.gov Thomas Naughton Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37830, USA naughtont@ornl.gov Christian Engelmann Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN

Engelmann, Christian

256

High Performance Commercial Building Systems William L. Carroll  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy underHigh Performance Commercial Building Systems William L. Carroll Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley.2 ­ Retrofit Tools Task 2 HPBCS E2P2.2T3 LBNL - 57775 California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy

257

Methodology for assessing performance of waste management systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the methodology provided in this report is to select the optimal way to manage particular sets of waste streams from generation to disposal in a safe and cost-effective manner. The methodology described is designed to review the entire waste management system, assess its performance, ensure that the performance objectives are met, compare different LLW management alternatives, and select the optimal alternative. The methodology is based on decision analysis approach, in which costs and risk are considered for various LLW management alternatives, a comparison of costs, risks, and benefits is made, and an optimal system is selected which minimizes costs and risks and maximizes benefits. A ''zoom-lens'' approach is suggested, i.e., one begins by looking at gross features and gradually proceeds to more and more detail. Performance assessment requires certain information about the characteristics of the waste streams and about the various components of the waste management system. Waste acceptance criteria must be known for each component of the waste management system. Performance assessment for each component requires data about properties of the waste streams and operational and design characteristics of the processing or disposal components. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Meshkov, N.K.; Herzenberg, C.L.; Camasta, S.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Performance of Concurrent Rendezvous Systems with Complex Pipeline Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance of Concurrent Rendezvous Systems with Complex Pipeline Structures Real February 11, 1998 Abstract The term ``complex pipeline'' describes a set of tasks which process incoming data in a sequence, like a pipeline, but have various kinds of parallel execution steps coupled

Woodside, C. Murray

259

Performance Validation and Energy Analysis of HVAC Systems using Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that energy savings of between 15% and 40% could be made in commercial buildings by closer monitoring and supervision of energy-usage and related data. An earlier study by Kao and Pierce (1983) showed that sensor1 Performance Validation and Energy Analysis of HVAC Systems using Simulation Tim Salsbury and Rick

Diamond, Richard

260

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems: Third Edition Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.emt-india.net/Book4/Book4.htm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-performance-assessment-equipme Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: "Energy Standards,Upgrade Requirements" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,: /A (,) i_ - z ,: /A (,) i_ - z FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR FORMERLY UTILIZED PORTIONS OF THE WATERTOWN ARSENAL WATERTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decotwnissioning Projects CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS Findings and Recommendation 6 REFERENCES iii Page 1 1 1 3 4 7 "..*.w..,, -. ._ ..- ". --. AUTHORITY REVIEW WATERTOWN ARSENAL WATERTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS INTRODUCTION The purpose of this review is to present information pertaining to work performed under the sponsorship of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the facts and circum-

262

May 28, 2007 Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures 1/20 Middleware in Modern High Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 28, 2007 Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures 1/20 Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures Christian Engelmann1,2, Hong Ong1, Stephen L 28, 2007 Middleware in Modern High Performance Computing System Architectures 2/20 Talk Outline

Engelmann, Christian

263

Performances of photovoltaic water pumping systems: a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a mathematical motor-pump model for photovoltaic (PV) applications which allow us to contribute in the studies of PV pumping sizing. The modelled motor-pump characteristic is flow rate-power (Q, P). The model is established for centrifugal pump (CP) coupled to DC motor. The non-linear relation between flow rate and solar power has been obtained experimentally in a first step and then used for performance prediction. The model proposed enabled us to simulate the electric and hydraulic performances of CP pumps versus the total water heads for different PV array configuration. The experimental data are obtained with our pumping test facility. The performances are calculated using the measured meteorological data of different sites located in Saudi Arabia. The size of the PV array is varied to achieve the optimum performance of the proposed system.

M. Benghanem

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Bargaining over Remedies in Merger Bruce Lyons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the internationally standard 2-phase investigation structure and remedy negotiations of the form practiced by the EC jurisdictions, remedies can be agreed in either phase of investigation. In particular, both the EU and US merger regulations allow remedies to be agreed in either phase of the investigation. Either de jure (as in the EU

Feigon, Brooke

265

Review on electrical discharge plasma technology for wastewater remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As wastewater remediation becomes a global concern, the development of innovative advanced oxidation processes for wastewater treatment is still a major challenge. With regard to its fast removal rate and environmental compatibility, plasma technology is considered as a promising remediation technology for water remediation. The principles of electrical plasma with liquids for pollutant removal and the reactors of various electrical discharge types are outlined in this review. To improve energy efficiency, combination of plasma technology with catalysts has attracted significant attention. The present review is concerned about present understanding of the mechanisms involved in these combined processes. Further on, detailed discussions are given of the effects of various factors on the performance of pulsed electrical plasma technology in water treatment processes. Finally, special attention is paid to the future challenges of plasma technology utilized for industrial wastewater treatment.

Bo Jiang; Jingtang Zheng; Shi Qiu; Mingbo Wu; Qinhui Zhang; Zifeng Yan; Qingzhong Xue

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Standard Guide for Specifying Thermal Performance of Geothermal Power Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This guide covers power plant performance terms and criteria for use in evaluation and comparison of geothermal energy conversion and power generation systems. The special nature of these geothermal systems makes performance criteria commonly used to evaluate conventional fossil fuel-fired systems of limited value. This guide identifies the limitations of the less useful criteria and defines an equitable basis for measuring the quality of differing thermal cycles and plant equipment for geothermal resources. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field.

Yuen, C. R.; Martino, L. E.; Biang, R. P.; Chang, Y. S.; Dolak, D.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R. A.; Patton, T. L.; Prasad, S.; Quinn, J.; Rosenblatt, D. H.; Vercellone, J.; Wang, Y. Y.

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

268

Configurable Virtualized System Environments for High Performance Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing challenges for current terascale high performance computing (HPC) systems are increasingly hampering the development and deployment efforts of system software and scientific applications for next-generation petascale systems. The expected rapid system upgrade interval toward petascale scientific computing demands an incremental strategy for the development and deployment of legacy and new large-scale scientific applications that avoids excessive porting. Furthermore, system software developers as well as scientific application developers require access to large-scale testbed environments in order to test individual solutions at scale. This paper proposes to address these issues at the system software level through the development of a virtualized system environment (VSE) for scientific computing. The proposed VSE approach enables ''plug-and-play'' supercomputing through desktop-to-cluster-to-petaflop computer system-level virtualization based on recent advances in hypervisor virtualization technologies. This paper describes the VSE system architecture in detail, discusses needed tools for VSE system management and configuration, and presents respective VSE use case scenarios.

Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Ong, Hong Hoe [ORNL; Vallee, Geoffroy R [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Buildings Title Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-53605 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Wray, Craig P., and Nance Matson Abstract The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the air-handler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

270

High performance control of harmonic instability from HVDC link system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the usefulness of novel control method for HVDC link system which suffers from severe condition of low order harmonic. This control scheme is used the feedforward control method which is directly controlled dc current at dc link system. The studies of this paper are aimed to improving the dynamic response of HVdc link system in disturbances such as faults. To achieve those objectives, digital time domain simulations are employed by the electro magnetic transient program for dc system (EMTDC). This method results in stable recovery from faults at both rectifier and inverter terminal busbars for a HVdc system that is inherently unstable. It has been found to be robust and control performance has been enhanced.

Min, W.K.; Yoo, M.H. [Korea Electric Power Research Inst., Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation: Engineering Challenges and Solutions of Remedial Activities on an Active Industrial Facility - 13506  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Linde FUSRAP Site (Linde) is located in Tonawanda, New York at a major research and development facility for Praxair, Inc. (Praxair). Successful remediation activities at Linde combines meeting cleanup objectives of radiological contamination while minimizing impacts to Praxair business operations. The unique use of Praxair's property coupled with an array of active and abandoned utilities poses many engineering and operational challenges; each of which has been overcome during the remedial action at Linde. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) and CABRERA SERVICES, INC. (CABRERA) have successfully faced engineering challenges such as relocation of an aboveground structure, structural protection of an active water line, and installation of active mechanical, electrical, and communication utilities to perform remediation. As remediation nears completion, continued success of engineering challenges is critical as remaining activities exist in the vicinity of infrastructure essential to business operations; an electrical substation and duct bank providing power throughout the Praxair facility. Emphasis on engineering and operations through final remediation and into site restoration will allow for the safe and successful completion of the project. (authors)

Beres, Christopher M.; Fort, E. Joseph [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States)] [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States); Boyle, James D. [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)] [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Innovative mathematical modeling in environmental remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are two different ways to model reactive transport: ad hoc and innovative reaction-based approaches. The former, such as the Kd simplification of adsorption, has been widely employed by practitioners, while the latter has been mainly used in scientific communities for elucidating mechanisms of biogeochemical transport processes. It is believed that innovative mechanistic-based models could serve as protocols for environmental remediation as well. This paper reviews the development of a mechanistically coupled fluid flow, thermal transport, hydrologic transport, and reactive biogeochemical model and example-applications to environmental remediation problems. Theoretical bases are sufficiently described. Four example problems previously carried out are used to demonstrate how numerical experimentation can be used to evaluate the feasibility of different remediation approaches. The first one involved the application of a 56-species uranium tailing problem to the Melton Branch Subwatershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the parallel version of the model. Simulations were made to demonstrate the potential mobilization of uranium and other chelating agents in the proposed waste disposal site. The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium. The third example simulated laboratory experiments involving extremely high concentrations of uranium, technetium, aluminum, nitrate, and toxic metals (e.g.,Ni, Cr, Co).The fourth example modeled microbially-mediated immobilization of uranium in an unconfined aquifer using acetate amendment in a field-scale experiment. The purposes of these modeling studies were to simulate various mechanisms of mobilization and immobilization of radioactive wastes and to illustrate how to apply reactive transport models for environmental remediation.The second problem simulated laboratory-scale system to investigate the role of natural attenuation in potential off-site migration of uranium from uranium mill tailings after restoration. It showed inadequacy of using a single Kd even for a homogeneous medium.

Yeh, Gour T. [Taiwan Typhoon and Flood Research Institute (Taiwan); National Central Univ. (Taiwan); Univ. of Central Florida (United States); Gwo, Jin Ping (Jack) [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Rockville, MD (United States); Siegel, Malcolm D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Li, Ming-Hsu [National Central Univ. (Taiwan); ; Fang, Yilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhang, Fan [Inst. of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Luo, Wensui [Inst. of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Yabusaki, Steven B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

2013-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

273

Thermodynamic data management system for nuclear waste disposal performance assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermodynamic property values for use in assessing the performance of a nuclear waste repository are described. More emphasis is on a computerized data base management system which facilitates use of the thermodynamic data in sensitivity analysis and other studies which critically assess the performance of disposal sites. Examples are given of critical evaluation procedures; comparison of apparent equilibrium constants calculated from the data base, with other work; and of correlations useful in estimating missing values of both free energy and enthalpy of formation for aqueous species. 49 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

Phillips, S.L.; Hale, F.V.; Siegel, M.D.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Radioactive Tank Waste Remediation Focus Area. Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1991, DOE`s Office of Technology Development created the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID), to develop technologies for tank remediation. Tank remediation across the DOE Complex has been driven by Federal Facility Compliance Agreements with individual sites. In 1994, the DOE Office of Environmental Management created the High Level Waste Tank Remediation Focus Area (TFA; of which UST-ID is now a part) to better integrate and coordinate tank waste remediation technology development efforts. The mission of both organizations is the same: to focus the development, testing, and evaluation of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in USTs at DOE facilities. The ultimate goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. The TFA has focused on four DOE locations: the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho, the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification (January 1986) Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification (January 1986) More Documents & Publications Supplement No. 1 to the FUSRAP Summary Protocol - Designation/Elimination Protocol Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Radiological Data Demonstrate Protectiveness at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at

276

Soil & Groundwater Remediation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Soil & Groundwater Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil remediation effort in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris contaminated with radionuclides, metals, and organics. The Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation is working with DOE site managers around the country regarding specific technical issues. At the large sites such as Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge, the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation has conducted research and demonstration projects to test new technologies and remediation

277

Seawater feed reverse osmosis preheating appraisal, Part II: system performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present work evaluates the seawater feed Reverse Osmosis (RO) preheating system process. In this respect, the basic transport equations, which describe the system elements, are used for determining the performance of the process operating parameters and for assessing the feed preheating process. A seawater membrane, FTSW30HR-380, was used to perform this study. In Part I of the work, the leading element, which governs the whole system, was studied. Also, the limitations of the leading element operating parameters were determined. In the recent work, a computer program is developed using the RO-governing process equations to obtain the system design and projection for the seawater feed preheating assessment, which enabled the determination of the whole system by solving the system elements, one by one. Also, an evaluation of the power needed for freshwater production. The RO system feed preheating is studied for feed temperatures ranging from 15°C to 45°C. The study shows that the permeate salt concentration increases as the feed temperature increases and the system salt rejection decreases. The present study concluded that the permeate productivity decreases with the increase in the feed temperature. Results also show that the product's specific power consumption is dependent on the number of elements used, and energy recovery. In the case of the maximum available number of elements, it is found that the feed temperature increases as the specific power consumption increases, with or without brine pressure energy recovery. However, in the case of a constant number of elements, seven elements, the specific power consumption decreases as the feed temperature increases.

Aly Karameldin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Performance categorization of structures, systems & components and related issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Provisions of DOE-STD-1021-93 on performance categorization of structures, systems and components (SSCs) subjected to natural phenomena hazards (NPHs) are summarized. The interrelationship among safety classification of SSCs (per DOE 6430.1A and DOE 5480.30), facility hazard categorization/classification (per DOE 5481.1B and DOE 5480.23), and NPH performance categorization of SSCs (per DOE 5480.28 and DOE-STD-1021-93) is discussed. The compatibility between the safety goals in the Department of Energy Safety Policy, SEN-35-91, and the numerical NPH performance goals of DOE 5480.28, as presented in UCRL-ID-12612 (draft), is examined.

Hossain, Q.A.

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

Solar energy system performance evaluation, July 1979 through June 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Loudoun County site is the Charles S. Monroe Vocational Technical School in Leesburg, Virginia. The active solar energy system is designed to supply 26% of the domestic hot water demand. It is equipped with 1225 square feet of double glazed flat-plate collectors manufactured by Southwest Enertech, a 2056 gallon liquid storage tank located in the school's mechanical room, and a backup electric immersion heater, 2 stage, 20 kW per stage. The system performance for the period July 1979 through June 1980 is presented, and the meteorological conditions are included. (WHK)

Missal, D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Performance of solar assisted heatpump systems in residential applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this experimental study, several solar-assisted heating and cooling configurations have beenconsidered for a basic system comprised of a two-speed heat pump, photovoltaic (PV) arrays, solar thermal collectors, and thermal storage. The objective of the study was to determine the performance of the PV arrays at decreased insolation, the effects of air preheat by solar thermal energy on heat pump operation, and cooling system performance under two different configurations. During the entire operation, the PV arrays converted 4.7 per cent (9.5 MWh) of the incident solar insolation to d.c. power, of which 54.6 per cent was used by the residence. This contributed 23.4 per cent of the total house electrical demand. The remaining 45.4 per cent of the output was fed to the utility, indicating the arrays and the heat pump were not properly sized with each other. Based on results from the winter heating operation, it is shown that for the particular heating system consdered, the best performance is attained when the solar heating is used alone. By using the heat pump as a booster, the remaining available solar energy left in the storage tank can be used with good seasonal performance factor. Summer cooling operation consisted of two sequential cooling configurations. In the first cooling test, the heat pump was operated to either the house or storage when the PV array generation level was greater than the energy demand of the heat pump and associated equipment. When the array output level was less than the cooling system demand, the operating strategy was that of an off-peak cooling operation to chill the water storage. Utilization of chilled water storage was not realized in the first cooling test because of the inherent inefficient design of the Tri-X coil. The capacity at low-speed heat pump operation was too small to effect significant cooling of the water loop; whereas high-speed heat pump operation in attempting to chill water (fan operation absent) caused frosting of the coil. The heat pump was utilized only to maintain chilled water storage in the second cooling test, without heat transfer through the Tri-X coil. Cooling system performance obtained in cooling test 2 using the Ametex exchanger was considerably improved over the test 2 performance with the Tri-X coil.

S. Kugle; S. Green; A. Haji-Sheikh; D.Y.S. Lou

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Real-time performance monitoring and management system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A real-time performance monitoring system for monitoring an electric power grid. The electric power grid has a plurality of grid portions, each grid portion corresponding to one of a plurality of control areas. The real-time performance monitoring system includes a monitor computer for monitoring at least one of reliability metrics, generation metrics, transmission metrics, suppliers metrics, grid infrastructure security metrics, and markets metrics for the electric power grid. The data for metrics being monitored by the monitor computer are stored in a data base, and a visualization of the metrics is displayed on at least one display computer having a monitor. The at least one display computer in one said control area enables an operator to monitor the grid portion corresponding to a different said control area.

Budhraja, Vikram S. (Los Angeles, CA); Dyer, James D. (La Mirada, CA); Martinez Morales, Carlos A. (Upland, CA)

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

282

Total System Performance Assessment - License Application Methods and Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issues (KTIs) identified in agreements with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (YMRP), ''Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [163274]), and the NRC final rule 10 CFR Part 63 (NRC 2002 [156605]). This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are used in this document.

J. McNeish

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

283

KMS fusion system resource accounting and performance measurement system for RSX11M V3. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Version 3.2 of the KMS FUSION accounting system is aimed at providing the user of RSX11M V3.2 with a versatile tool for measuring the performance of the operating system, tuning the system, and providing sufficient usage statistics so that the system manager can implement chargeback accounting if it is required by the installation. Sufficient hooks are provided so that the intrepid user can expand the system substantially beyond what is currently provided.

Downward, J.G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming.

285

An innovative stabilization/solidification treatment For contaminated soil remediation: demonstration project results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An innovative stabilization/solidification (S/S) process using high-performance additivated concrete technology was developed for remediating soil contaminated by metals from abandoned industrial sites. In ord...

Petra Scanferla; Giorgio Ferrari; Roberto Pellay…

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

300-FF-1 operable unit remedial investigation phase II report: Physical separation of soils treatability study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the approach and results of physical separations treatability tests conducted at the Hanford Site in the North Process Pond of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. Physical separation of soils was identified as a remediation alternative due to the potential to significantly reduce the amount of contaminated soils prior to disposal. Tests were conducted using a system developed at Hanford consisting of modified EPA equipment integrated with screens, hoppers, conveyors, tanks, and pumps from the Hanford Site. The treatability tests discussed in this report consisted of four parts, in which an estimated 84 tons of soil was processed: (1) a pre-test run to set up the system and adjust system parameters for soils to be processed; (2) a baseline run to establish the performance of the system - Test No. 1; (3) a final run in which the system was modified as a result of findings from the baseline run - Test No. 2; and (4) water treatment.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Residential commissioning to assess envelope and HVAC system performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Houses do not perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict. For example, Walker et al. (1998a) found large variations in thermal distribution system efficiency, as much as a factor of two even between side-by-side houses with the same system design and installation crew. This and other studies (e.g., Jump et al. 1996) indicate that duct leakage testing and sealing can readily achieve a 25 to 30% reduction in installed cooling capacity and energy consumption. As another example, consider that the building industry has recognized for at least 20 years the substantial impact that envelope airtightness has on thermal loads, energy use, comfort, and indoor air quality. However, Walker et al. (1998a) found 50% variances in airtightness for houses with the same design and construction crews, within the same subdivision. A substantial reason for these problems is that few houses are now built or retrofitted using formal design procedures, most are field assembled from a large number of components, and there is no consistent process to identify problems or to correct them. Solving the problems requires field performance evaluations of houses using appropriate and agreed upon procedures. Many procedural elements already exist in a fragmented environment; some are ready now to be integrated into a new process called residential commissioning (Wray et al. 2000). For example, California's Title 24 energy code already provides some commissioning elements for evaluating the energy performance of new houses. A house consists of components and systems that need to be commissioned, such as building envelopes, air distribution systems, cooling equipment, heat pumps, combustion appliances, controls, and other electrical appliances. For simplicity and practicality, these components and systems are usually evaluated individually, but we need to bear in mind that many of them interact. Therefore, commissioning must not only identify the energy and non-energy benefits associated with improving the performance of a component, it must also indicate how individual components interact in the complete building system. For this paper, we limit our discussion to diagnostics in areas of particular concern with significant interactions: envelope and HVAC systems. These areas include insulation quality, windows, airtightness, envelope moisture, fan and duct system airflows, duct leakage, cooling equipment charge, and combustion appliance backdrafting with spillage. The remainder of this paper first describes what residential commissioning is, its characteristic elements, and how one might structure its process. Subsequent sections describe a consolidated set of practical diagnostics that the building industry can use now. Where possible, we also discuss the accuracy and usability of these diagnostics, based on recent laboratory work and field studies. We conclude by describing areas in need of research and development, such as practical field diagnostics for envelope thermal conductance and combustion safety. There are several potential benefits for builders, consumers, code officials, utilities, and energy planners of commissioning houses using a consistent set of validated methods. Builders and/or commissioning agents will be able to optimize system performance and reduce consumer costs associated with building energy use. Consumers will be more likely to get what they paid for and builders can show they delivered what was expected. Code officials will be better able to enforce existing and future energy codes. As energy reduction measures are more effectively incorporated into the housing stock, utilities and energy planners will benefit through greater confidence in predicting demand and greater assurance that demand reductions will actually occur. Performance improvements will also reduce emissions from electricity generating plants and residential combustion equipment. Research to characterize these benefits is underway.

Wray, Craig P.; Sherman, Max H.

2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Program management plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary mission of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Project is to effectively implement the risk-reduction strategies and technical plans to stabilize and prevent further migration of uranium within the MSRE facility, remove the uranium and fuel salts from the system, and dispose of the fuel and flush salts by storage in appropriate depositories to bring the facility to a surveillance and maintenance condition before decontamination and decommissioning. This Project Management Plan (PMP) for the MSRE Remediation Project details project purpose; technical objectives, milestones, and cost objectives; work plan; work breakdown structure (WBS); schedule; management organization and responsibilities; project management performance measurement planning, and control; conduct of operations; configuration management; environmental, safety, and health compliance; quality assurance; operational readiness reviews; and training.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of the investigations carried out during Phase 1 of the Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Generation Systems (Combustion 2000), the UTRC-led Combustion 2000 Team is recommending the development of an advanced high performance power generation system (HIPPS) whose high efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions will enable the US to use its abundant coal resources to satisfy current and future demand for electric power. The high efficiency of the power plant, which is the key to minimizing the environmental impact of coal, can only be achieved using a modern gas turbine system. Minimization of emissions can be achieved by combustor design, and advanced air pollution control devices. The commercial plant design described herein is a combined cycle using either a frame-type gas turbine or an intercooled aeroderivative with clean air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a coal-fired high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The best performance from the cycle is achieved by using a modern aeroderivative gas turbine, such as the intercooled FT4000. A simplified schematic is shown. In the UTRC HIPPS, the conversion efficiency for the heavy frame gas turbine version will be 47.4% (HHV) compared to the approximately 35% that is achieved in conventional coal-fired plants. This cycle is based on a gas turbine operating at turbine inlet temperatures approaching 2,500 F. Using an aeroderivative type gas turbine, efficiencies of over 49% could be realized in advanced cycle configuration (Humid Air Turbine, or HAT). Performance of these power plants is given in a table.

NONE

1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer, LNT, and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An advanced exhaust aftertreatment system developed to meet EPA 2010 and final Tier 4 emission regulations show substantial improvements in system performance while reducing system cost

291

High-performance Earth system modeling with NASA/GSFC’s Land Information System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Land Information System software (LIS; http://lis.gsfc.nasa.gov/, 2006) has been developed to support high-performance land surface modeling and data assimilation. LIS integrates parallel and distributed comp...

C. D. Peters-Lidard; P. R. Houser; Y. Tian…

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Thermal and Power Challenges in High Performance Computing Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the thermal and power challenges in emerging high performance computing platforms. The advent of new sophisticated applications in highly diverse areas such as health, education, finance, entertainment, etc. is driving the platform and device requirements for future systems. The key ingredients of future platforms are vertically integrated (3D) die-stacked devices which provide the required performance characteristics with the associated form factor advantages. Two of the major challenges to the design of through silicon via (TSV) based 3D stacked technologies are (i) effective thermal management and (ii) efficient power delivery mechanisms. Some of the key challenges that are articulated in this paper include hot-spot superposition and intensification in a 3D stack, design/optimization of thermal through silicon vias (TTSVs), non-uniform power loading of multi-die stacks, efficient on-chip power delivery, minimization of electrical hotspots etc.

Venkat Natarajan; Anand Deshpande; Sudarshan Solanki; Arun Chandrasekhar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Performance contracting for parabolic trough solar thermal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several applications of solar energy have proven viable in the energy marketplace, due to competitive technology and economic performance. One example is the parabolic trough solar collectors, which use focused solar energy to maximize efficiency and reduce material use in construction. Technical improvements are complemented by new business practices to make parabolic trough solar thermal systems technically and economically viable in an ever widening range of applications. Technical developments in materials and fabrication techniques reduce production cost and expand applications from swimming pool heating and service hot water, to higher-temperature applications such as absorption cooling and process steam. Simultaneously, new financing mechanisms such as a recently awarded US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) indefinite quantity Energy Savings Performance Contract (Super ESPC) facilitate and streamline implementation of the technology in federal facilities such as prisons and military bases.

Brown, H.; Hewett, R.; Walker, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Gee, R.; May, K. [Industrial Solar Technology, Golden, CO (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes Effect of System and Air Contaminants on PEMFC Performance and Durability.

Dinh, H.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

295

Diagnostics and performance evaluation of neutron monitoring system detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron monitoring detectors used in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) power range monitoring control systems are typically miniature fission chambers that remain in the core for many years. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) also utilize movable miniature fission chambers for neutron flux mapping during power operations. The baseline performance of the detectors must be established at the time of installation and retested periodically during the life of the detector to evaluate its suitability for continued use. This paper reports on the characteristics that the power range detectors typically exhibit at the beginning of life and describes the normal changes in characteristics that are expected to occur as the detector ages in the in-core environment. Deviations from the normal aging effects that may be revealed through periodic testing are described. Possible root causes for some deviations from the expected performance are discussed. In addition to the power range monitoring detectors, the neutron monitoring system also utilizes other fission chambers for source range or intermediate range neutron monitoring during startup, and neutron or gamma detectors for periodic sensitivity re-calibration of the power range monitoring detectors. Each of the detectors has function specific requirements that call for additional diagnostic testing methods to evaluate performance. Diagnostic tests such as Time Domain Reflectometry and Current vs. Voltage (IV) characterization provide useful information about the condition of the detector and the signal path that links the detector to the reactor monitoring and control system. Typical test results of properly functioning detectors are described and the significance of deviations from a normal result is discussed. (authors)

Kniss, T.; Doyle, J. [GE Energy, 8499 Darrow Rd., Twinsburg, OH 44087 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Inflow performance relationships for oil-water systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the wellbore. The inflow performance of the oil phase is therefore reduced by the evolution of free gas. The general flow equation foz saturated oil systems may be written as kh ro ~p 141. 2 [In(ze/rw) -0. 75+s+Dqo] )( B Pwf . . 10 Fetkovich5 suggested... in high rate wells. The empirical Eq. 11 was later substant. iated by Fetkovichs It can be written as [1- ( ? ) qo pwf 2 " qo max Pr 13 This equation contains two factors, qo max and n, that define the productivity of a particular well. These can...

Mukerji, Parijat

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Remediation of old environmental liabilities in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (NRI) is a leading institution in all areas of nuclear R and D in the Czech Republic. The NRI's activity encompasses nuclear physics, chemistry, nuclear power, experiments at research nuclear reactors and many other topics. The NRI operates two research nuclear reactors, many facilities as a hot cell facility, research laboratories, technology for radioactive waste (RAW) management, radionuclide irradiators, an electron accelerator, etc. After 50 years of activities in the nuclear field, there are some environmental liabilities that shall be remedied in the NRI. There are three areas of remediation: (1) decommissioning of old obsolete facilities (e.g. decay tanks, RAW treatment technology, special sewage system), (2) treatment of RAW from operation and dismantling of nuclear facilities, and (3) elimination of spent fuel from research nuclear reactors operated by the NRI. The goal is to remedy the environmental liabilities and eliminate the potential negative impact on the environment. Based on this postulate, optimal remedial actions have been selected and recommended for the environmental remediation. Remediation of the environmental liabilities started in 2003 and will be finished in 2012. Some liabilities have already been successfully remedied. The most significant items of environmental liabilities are described in the paper together with information about the history, the current state, the progress, and the future activities in the field of remediation of environmental liabilities in the NRI. (authors)

Podlaha, J. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

X-701B Groundwater Remedy Portsmouth Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

X-701B Groundwater Remediation X-701B Groundwater Remediation ETR Report Date: December 2008 ETR-20 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the X-701B Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) has responsibility for remediation of the X-701B ground water plume with the key contaminant of trichloroethene (TCE). The remedy has been divided into four phases: Phase I- Initial Source Area Treatment, Phase II-Expanded Source Area Treatment, Phase III-Evaluation and Reporting, and Phase IV- Downgradient Remediation and Confirmation of Source Area Treatment. Phase II treatment has injected

299

DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site June 19, 2008 - 1:29pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company has been selected as the plateau remediation contractor for DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $4.5 billion over ten years (a five-year base period with the option to extend it for another five years). CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company is a limited liability company formed by CH2M Hill Constructors, Inc. The team also includes AREVA Federal

300

Summary - Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and surface water Hg remediation strategy for adequacy in reducing Hg levels in the fish and to indentify opportunities to achieve cost and technical improvements andor to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Expanded Staff Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Savannah River Remediation Delivering the Mission Dave Olson President and Project Manager January 27, 2012 SRS Executive Management Community Discussion 2 * Liquid Waste Funding...

302

Recommendation 192: Comments on Remediation Effectiveness Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ORSSAB Recommendations and Comments on the Draft 2010 Remediation Effectiveness Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation.

303

A high-performance workflow system for subsurface simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subsurface modeling applications typically neglect uncertainty in the conceptual models, past or future scenarios, and attribute most or all uncertainty to errors in model parameters. In this contribution, uncertainty in technetium-99 transport in a heterogeneous, deep vadose zone is explored with respect to the conceptual model using a next generation user environment called Akuna. Akuna provides a range of tools to manage environmental modeling projects, from managing simulation data to visualizing results from high-performance computational simulators. Core toolsets accessible through the user interface include model setup, grid generation, parameter estimation, and uncertainty quantification. The BC Cribs site at Hanford in southeastern Washington State is used to demonstrate Akuna capabilities. At the BC Cribs site, conceptualization of the system is highly uncertain because only sparse information is available for the geologic conceptual model, the physical and chemical properties of the sediments, and the history of waste disposal operations. Using the Akuna toolset to perform an analysis of conservative solute transport, significant prediction uncertainty in simulated concentrations is demonstrated by conceptual model variation. This demonstrates that conceptual model uncertainty is an important consideration in sparse data environments such as BC Cribs. It is also demonstrated that Akuna and the underlying toolset provides an integrated modeling environment that streamlines model setup, parameter optimization, and uncertainty analyses for high-performance computing applications.

Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Xingyuan; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Freshley, Mark D.; Gorton, Ian; Gosink, Luke J.; Keating, Elizabeth; Lansing, Carina; Moeglein, William AM; Murray, Christopher J.; Pau, George Shu Heng; Porter, Ellen A.; Purohit, Sumit; Rockhold, Mark L.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Waichler, Scott R.

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fiscal Year 2010 Program of the U.S. DOE Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-32) is to perform assessments, establish technical criteria and promote cross-site integration. The Office provides guidance for the development and implementation of plans for remediation of groundwater and is responsible for development of technologies needed to reduce risk from groundwater contamination. It is also responsible for providing technical direction and/or assistance to sites in resolving difficult technical groundwater and soil remediation problems. This paper discusses the activities funded by EM-32 for FY-2010.

Chamberlain, G. M.; Skubal, Karen L.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

305

Final Report Northeast Site Area B NAPL Remediation Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Northeast Site Area B Northeast Site Area B NAPL Remediation Project at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Largo, Pinellas County, Florida April 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1457 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1457-2007 Final Report Northeast Site Area B NAPL Remediation Project at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Largo, Pinellas County, Florida April 2007 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado

306

Transient performance of substation structures and associated grounding systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When lightning strikes an electric substation, large currents generated by the stroke flow in the above ground structures and grounding system and dissipate in the soil. The electromagnetic fields generated by such high currents may cause damage to equipment and may be dangerous to personnel working nearby. In this paper, the frequency and time domain performance of a substation subjected to a lightning strike is described and discussed. The computed scalar potentials, electric fields, and magnetic fields are presented graphically as a function of spatial coordinates, as a function of time and as a function of both. Two cases are considered. The first case examines the substation grounding system only, while the second case includes an above-ground structure as well. It is believed that the results of the second case have not been published before. A double exponential lightning surge current is injected at one corner of the substation. The response of the grounding system to the frequency domain electromagnetic spectrum of this signal is computed by a frequency domain electromagnetic field analysis software package. The temporal and spatial distributions of the electromagnetic fields inside and near the substation are obtained by an inverse Fourier transformation of all these responses. The presence of a soil with an arbitrary resistivity and permittivity is accurately taken into account. The analysis sheds some new light on the understanding of the effects which take place at the higher frequencies.

Dawalibi, F.P.; Xiong, W.; Ma, J. [Safe Engineering Services and Technologies Ltd., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Safe Engineering Services and Technologies Ltd., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

FY-95 technology catalog. Technology development for buried waste remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program, which is now part of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area (LSFA), supports applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multitude of advanced technologies dealing with underground radioactive and hazardous waste remediation. These innovative technologies are being developed as part of integrated comprehensive remediation systems for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste sites throughout the DOE complex. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) and Waste Management (EM-30) needs and objectives. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development (EM-50), BWID and LSFA work with universities and private industry to develop technologies that are being transferred to the private sector for use nationally and internationally. This report contains the details of the purpose, logic, and methodology used to develop and demonstrate DOE buried waste remediation technologies. It also provides a catalog of technologies and capabilities with development status for potential users. Past FY-92 through FY-94 technology testing, field trials, and demonstrations are summarized. Continuing and new FY-95 technology demonstrations also are described.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine System Performance Studies  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

METC/C-97/7278 METC/C-97/7278 Title: Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine System Performance STudies Authors: George T. Lee (METC) Frederick A. Sudhoff (METC) Conference: Fuel Cells '96 Review Meeting Conference Location: Morgantown, West Virginia Conference Dates: August 20-21, 1996 Conference Sponsor: U.S. DOE, Morgantown Energy Technology Center Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

309

Performance Parameters for Grid-Connected PV Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 B. Marion, J. Adelstein, and K. Boyle National Renewable Energy Laboratory H. Hayden, B. Hammond, T. Fletcher, B. Canada, and D. Narang Arizona Public Service Co. D. Shugar, H. Wenger, A. Kimber, and L. Mitchell PowerLight Corporation G. Rich and T. Townsend First Solar Prepared for the 31 st IEEE Photovoltaics Specialists Conference and Exhibition Lake Buena Vista, Florida January 3-7, 2005 February 2005 * NREL/CP-520-37358 Performance Parameters for Grid-Connected PV Systems

310

Installation restoration program remedial investigation report. WK Kellogg, Battle Creek, MI, Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Remedial Investigation was performed at WK Kellogg to delineate the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination. The sites involved in this investigation include: Site 1- Fuel Tank Farm/AOC B-Motor Pool Drainage Ditch; Site 3-Fire Training Area; and Base Boundary Wells. The recommendations are that Site 1/AOC B and Site 3 continue on to a Feasibility Study and Remediation.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Groundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. DOI: 10.1061/ ASCE 0733-9496 2002 128:6 431 CE Database keywords: Ground water; Remedial action; Algorithms; Ground-water management. Introduction The contamination of groundwater is a widespread problemGroundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms Shreedhar Maskey1 ; Andreja

Neumaier, Arnold

312

Remediation of the Maxey Flats Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes issues associated with remedial action of Maxey Flats, a low-level radioactive waste disposal site from 1963-1977, located in Fleming County, Kentucky. Present remedial action alternatives being considered are discussed along with emergency plans, ground water monitoring plans, and budgets.

Not Available

1990-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

313

Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - 12189  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established in 1974 to address residual radiological contamination at sites where work was performed for the Manhattan Engineer District and U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Initially, FUSRAP activities began with a records search for sites that had the potential to contain residual radiological contamination; 46 sites were identified that were eligible for and required remediation. Remedial action began in 1979. In 1997, Congress assigned responsibility for the remediation of FUSRAP sites to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). DOE retains responsibility for determining if sites are eligible for FUSRAP remediation and for providing long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) of remediated FUSRAP sites. DOE LTS&M activities are designed to ensure that FUSRAP sites remain protective of human health and the environment and to preserve knowledge regarding FUSRAP sites. Additional elements include eligibility determinations, transition of remediated sites from USACE to DOE, LTS&M operations such as inspections and institutional controls management, stakeholder support, preservation of records, and real property and reuse. DOE maintains close coordination with USACE and regulators to ensure there is no loss of protectiveness when sites transition to DOE for LTS&M.

Clayton, Christopher [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC; Kothari, Vijendra [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia; Starr, Ken [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado; Gillespie, Joey [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado; Widdop, Michael [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado; none,

2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

314

Surface Radiation Survey at the Shepley’s Hill Remediation Site, Devens, Massachusettes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) provided technical support for ongoing environmental remediation activities at the Shepley’s Hill remediation site, near Devens, MA. The technical support included the completion of a radiation survey of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) at Shepley’s Hill, Shepley’s Hill landfill cover, and Red Cove areas. The objective of the radiation survey was to assess the ability of the INL backpack sodium iodide spectroscopy (BaSIS) system to detect elevated levels of NORM that may be associated with radon-222 emanation from near surface and subsurface fractures in the area. It is postulated that these fracture zones provide subsurface conduits for the transport of environmental contaminants. As such, location of these fracture sets will proved EPA Region 1 with the means for completing the development of an accurate site conceptual model. The results of the radiological survey show that some of the radiological anomalies correlate with currently mapped rock outcrops; however, not all of the rock outcrops in the surveyed area have been mapped. As such, it is not conclusive that all of the radiological anomalies correspond with surface rock outcrops. EPA Region 1 intends to perform a more comprehensive correlation of the radiation data collected with the BaSIS system with additional data sets such as detailed bedrock structural mapping, 2-dimensional resistivity profiling, and high-resolution topographic mapping. The results of this effort will be used in consideration of designing a potential follow-on effort for mapping of radon.

J. R. Giles; C. P. Oertel; L. G. Roybal

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have released a planning document that specifies how DOE will continue to remediate a landfill containing hazardous and transuranic waste at DOE's Idaho Site located in eastern Idaho. The Phase 1 Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Unit 7-13/14 document was issued after the September 2008 Record of Decision (ROD) and implements the retrieval of targeted waste at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The SDA began receiving waste in 1952 and contains radioactive and chemical waste in approximately 35 acres of disposal pits, trenches and soil vaults.

316

Vision 21 applications of high performance power systems (HIPPS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE/FETC-sponsored High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) program headed by United Technologies Research Center has defined an indirectly-fired, coal-based combined-cycle power system design that achieves over 47% efficiency (HHV) using current power system technology. Additionally, advanced technology HIPPS using Humid Air Turbine (HAT) cycle gas turbines have been projected to have efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV). The HIPPS uses a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) to preheat combustion turbine air to 925 C--1,150 C in a radiator section located in the furnace slagging zone and in a convection section located in the downstream portion. Additional heat for the turbine, if required in the cycle, is added by special low-NOx gas-fired combustors. A HITAF design has been successfully tested at the desired temperatures at the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND. The HIPPS concept with its advanced metallic air heater is a valuable technology candidate for Vision 21, the DOE's evolving plan to utilize coal and other fossil fuels in energy complexes producing power, chemicals, process heat and other byproducts. The HIPPS could be combined with other high efficiency components such as high temperature fuel cells, e.g., the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), resulting in hybrid power systems having overall electrical efficiencies greater than 60% (HHV) with significant energy input from coal or other solid fuel. These power plants would have near zero emissions with projected power costs below current coal-fired systems. Emissions of CO{sub 2}, an important greenhouse gas, will be drastically reduced by the higher efficiencies of HIPPS-based cycles. A very important early introduction application could result from the fact that HIPPS can be an attractive repowering technology. This would allow Vision 21 based technology to be applied to those plants that seek to continue using coal and other alternative solid fuels to capture the economic benefits of their low energy costs. Here, HIPPS adds high efficiency; increased capacity; load following and dispatching flexibility; as well as important environmental benefits to sites having existing fuel and transmission infrastructure.

Robson, F.L.; Ruby, J.D.; Seery, D.J.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative (RoMIC-AFRI) Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research...

318

Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation Full Document...

319

Groundwater remediation technologies for trichloroethylene and technetium-99.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??M. Eng. The Technical Advisory Group (TAG) of the Innovative Treatment Remediation Demonstration Program (ITRD) made technology recommendations after reviewing thirty in situ remediation technologies… (more)

Uhl, John Nicholas, 1960-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Concern over soil and groundwater contamination has created a demand for new and efficient remediation technologies. Surfactant-enhanced electrokinetic remediation is an innovative technique which has… (more)

Thomas, Steven P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Distribution System Voltage Performance Analysis for High-Penetration Photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the performance of commonly used distribution voltage regulation methods under reverse power flow.

Liu, E.; Bebic, J.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A System Degradation Study of 445 Systems Using Year-Over-Year Performance Index Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This graphic summarizes the results of a study conducted by the SunPower Corporation, to assess the median degradation of a large number of systems. This is important because solar investors need proof of low degradation. The study, a project under DOE's SunShot Initiative, makes use of year-over-year performance index change analysis, a powerful and practical technique for assessing the median degradation of a large fleet of systems, which in this case includes a sample of 445.

323

Operable Unit 3-14, Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater Remedial Design/Remedial Action Scope of Work  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Design/Remedial Action (RD/RA) Scope of Work pertains to OU 3-14 Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the Idaho National Laboratory and identifies the remediation strategy, project scope, schedule, and budget that implement the tank farm soil and groundwater remediation, in accordance with the May 2007 Record of Decision. Specifically, this RD/RA Scope of Work identifies and defines the remedial action approach and the plan for preparing the remedial design documents.

D. E. Shanklin

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

324

Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed.

Stula, R.T.; Albert, T.E.; Kirstein, B.E.; Lester, D.H.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Procedure for Measuring and Reporting the Performance of Photovoltaic Systems in Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedure provides a standard method for measuring and characterizing the long-term energy performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems in buildings and the resulting implications to the building's energy use. The performance metrics determined here may be compared against benchmarks for evaluating system performance and verifying that performance targets have been achieved. Uses may include comparison of performance with the design intent; comparison with other PV systems in buildings; economic analysis of PV systems in buildings; and the establishment of long-term performance records that enable maintenance staff to monitor trends in energy performance.

Pless, S.; Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.; Hayter, S.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system.

327

Railplug Ignition System for Enhanced Engine Performance and Reduced Maintenance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report discusses the progress that was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project. The primary objectives of the project were to (1) develop an improved understanding of the spark ignition process, and (2) develop the railplug as an improved ignitor for large bore stationary natural gas engines. We performed fundamental experiments on the physical processes occurring during spark ignition and used the results from these experiments to aid our development of the most complete model of the spark ignition process ever devised. The elements in this model include (1) the dynamic response of the ignition circuit, (2) a chemical kinetics mechanism that is suitable for the reactions that occur in the plasma, (3) conventional flame propagation kinetics, and (4) a multi-dimensional formulation so that bulk flow through the spark gap can be incorporated. This model (i.e., a Fortran code that can be used as a subroutine within an engine modeling code such as KIVA) can be obtained from Prof. Ron Matthews at rdmatt{at}mail.utexas.edu or Prof. DK Ezekoye at dezekoye{at}mail.utexas.edu. Fundamental experiments, engine experiments, and modeling tasks were used to help develop the railplug as a new ignitor for large bore natural gas engines. As the result of these studies, we developed a railplug that could extend the Lean Stability Limit (LSL) of an engine operating at full load on natural gas from {phi} = 0.59 for operation on spark plugs down to {phi} = 0.53 using railplugs with the same delivered energy (0.7 J). However, this delivered energy would rapidly wear out the spark plug. For a conventional delivered energy (<0.05 J), the LSL is {phi} = 0.63 for a spark plug. Further, using a permanent magnet to aid the plasma movement, the LSL was extended to {phi} = 0.54 for a railplug with a delivered energy of only 0.15 J/shot, a typical discharge energy for commercial capacitive discharge ignition systems. Here, it should be noted that railplugs and the associated ignition circuit should not cost much more than a conventional spark ignition system. Additionally, it is believed that the railplug performance can be further improved via continued research and development.

DK Ezekoye; Matt Hall; Ron Matthews

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Thermal and lighting performance of toplighting systems in the hot and humid climate of Thailand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance of three toplighting systems were compared. For the thermal performance, total cooling loads, heat gains and losses, and interior temperature were evaluated. The lighting performance parameters examined were daylight factor, illuminance level...

Harntaweewongsa, Siritip

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

Improve Chilled Water System Performance, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program Chilled Water System Analysis Tool (CWSAT) can help optimize the performance of of industrial chilled water systems.

Not Available

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A scalable silicon photonic chip-scale optical switch for high performance computing systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A scalable silicon photonic chip-scale optical switch for high performance computing systems-scale optical switch for scalable interconnect network in high performance computing systems. The proposed

Yoo, S. J. Ben

331

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit Ill Interim Remedial Action  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Site Operable Unit Ill Interim Remedial Action Mark Perfxmed Under DOE Contrici No. DE-AC13-96CJ873.35 for th3 U.S. De[:ar!menf of Energy app~oveJioi'ptiL#ic re1ease;dCinWlionis Unlimilra' This page intentionally left blank Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Interim Remedial Action Annual Status Report August 1999 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Project Number MSG-035-0011-00-000 Document Number Q0017700 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC99-03 This page intentionally blank Document Number Q0017700 Acronyms Contents Page ACRONYMS .............................................................................................................................. V

332

Parametric Investigation of the Performance of Solar Heating Systems with Rock Bed Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of solar air collector domestic heating systems with rock bed storage, as obtained from theoretical analysis, is...

W. L. Dutre; J. Vanheelen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Case Studies Comparing System Advisor Model (SAM) Results to Real Performance Data: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL has completed a series of detailed case studies comparing the simulations of the System Advisor Model (SAM) and measured performance data or published performance expectations. These case studies compare PV measured performance data with simulated performance data using appropriate weather data. The measured data sets were primarily taken from NREL onsite PV systems and weather monitoring stations.

Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Sather, N.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

U.S. Department of Energy Awards Portsmouth Remediation Contract To  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portsmouth Remediation Contract To Portsmouth Remediation Contract To LATA/Parallax U.S. Department of Energy Awards Portsmouth Remediation Contract To LATA/Parallax January 10, 2005 - 9:45am Addthis $141 Million Small Business Contract Runs Through September, 2009 WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that LATA-Parallax Portsmouth LLC, a small business joint venture between Los Alamos Technical Associates Inc. and Parallax Inc., was awarded a $141,261,897 small business contract to perform environmental remediation and waste management activities at the department's Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio. The contract will run through September 30, 2009, and provides incentives to the contractor for managing costs effectively while completing the cleanup work.

335

DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at Savannah River Site DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at Savannah River Site December 8, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the award to Savannah River Remediation, LLC as the liquid waste contractor for DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $3.3 billion over the entire contract, consisting of a base period of six years, plus an option to extend for up to two additional years. The base performance period of the contract will be from April 1, 2009 through March 31, 2015. A 90-day transition period will begin January 2, 2009.

336

U.S. Department of Energy Awards Paducah Remediation Contract | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contract Contract U.S. Department of Energy Awards Paducah Remediation Contract December 27, 2005 - 4:56pm Addthis Paducah Remediation Services, LLC wins $191 Million Small Business Contract Competition WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that Paducah Remediation Services, LLC (PRS) has been awarded a $191.6 million small business contract to perform environmental remediation and waste management activities at the Department's Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Ky. The contract, awarded as a result of a competition, will run through September 30, 2009 and provides incentives to the contractor for managing costs effectively while completing the cleanup work on schedule. "We are pleased to be moving forward with work that will reduce risk,

337

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site CH2M Hill Plateau Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - November 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - November 2012 November 2012 Review of the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Implementation Verification Review Processes This report documents the independent review of implementation verification review (IVR) processes at the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company that were conducted by the Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), which is within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). The onsite review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations from August 13 to17, 2012. The objective of this assessment was to evaluate

338

DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at Savannah River Site DOE Selects Savannah River Remediation, LLC for Liquid Waste Contract at Savannah River Site December 8, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the award to Savannah River Remediation, LLC as the liquid waste contractor for DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $3.3 billion over the entire contract, consisting of a base period of six years, plus an option to extend for up to two additional years. The base performance period of the contract will be from April 1, 2009 through March 31, 2015. A 90-day transition period will begin January 2, 2009.

339

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Remedial Investigation Addendum1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Remedial Investigation Addendum1 Focused Feasibility Study January 2004 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC1342GJ79491 DOE Task Order No. ST03-205 Document N u m b e r Q0029500 S i g t ~ a t u r e Page Signature Page Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit I11 Remedial Investigation Addendud Focused Feasibility Study January 2004 Submitted By: Arthur W. Kleinrath, Project Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado U.S. Department of Energyat Gmnd Junction MMTS OU 111 Remedial Investigation AddendutdFocuscd Feasibilily Study January 2004 Final iii This page intentionally left blank Document Number Q0029500 Contents U.S. Department of Energy at Grand Junction MMTS OU III Remedial Investigation Addendum/Focused Feasibility Study

340

Performance Evaluation of Surveillance Systems Under Varying Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/outdoor, different weather conditions (precipitation, wind, and brightness), different cameras of metrics. Visualization of the performance results has proven critical for understanding the weaknesses, as the weather varies, the seasons change, and the daily events unfold. Performance evaluation of automatic

Senior, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Performance of International Space Station Alpha electric power systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) will be an Earth-orbiting laboratory in space. It will house experimental payloads, distribute resource utilities, and support human habitation for conducting research and science experiments in a microgravity environment. Electrical power is a major utility to support successful achievement of the mission goal. The ISSA United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) Electric Power System (EPS) power generation capability will vary with orbital parameters, natural and induced environment, and hardware aging/replacement throughout the ISSA life. Power capability will be further restricted by various assembly configurations during ISSA buildup, by various flight attitudes, by shadowing on the solar arrays, by EPS operational constraints, such as pointing accuracy, battery charging, as well as operating voltage setpoints, and by ISSA operational constraints either to avoid long-term solar array shadowing from the adjacent solar array or to accommodate ISSA maneuver during proximity operations with other space vehicles, mating, and departing. Design of the ISSA USOS EPS takes into consideration the various equipment degradation modes, operation constraints, and orbital conditions to make it compatible with the environments and to meet power, lifetime, and performance requirements.

Hill, R.; Lu, C.Y.; Padhye, V.; Hajela, G.; Hague, L. [Rockwell International, Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Division

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Tracking performance characterization and improvement of a piezoactuated micropositioning system based on an empirical index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Motion tracking is an important problem in micropositioning systems dedicated to ultra-precision robotic micromanipulation. This paper investigates the periodic motion tracking performance of a micropositioning system based on an empirical tracking performance ... Keywords: Micromanipulator, Motion control, Performance characterization, Piezoelectric actuation, Robust control, System identification

Qingsong Xu; Yangmin Li

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

An AWGR based Low-Latency Optical Switch for Data Centers and High Performance Computing Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i An AWGR based Low-Latency Optical Switch for Data Centers and High Performance Computing Systems based optical switch for data centers and high performance computing systems that builds upon several for Data Centers and High Performance Computing Systems ..i ABSTRACT .....................................

Kolner, Brian H.

344

A Framework for Reliability and Performance Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Framework for Reliability and Performance Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems proposes a framework for reliability and dynamic performance assessment of wind energy conversion systems--Reliability, Dynamic Performance, Wind Power, Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS), Doubly-Fed Induction Generator

Liberzon, Daniel

345

Remediation of DNAPLs in Low Permeability Soils. Innovative Technology Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dense, non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) compounds like trichloroethene (TCE) and perchloroethene (PCE) are prevalent at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), other government, and industrial sites. Their widespread presence in low permeability media (LPM) poses severe challenges for assessment of their behavior and implementation of effective remediation technologies. Most remedial methods that involve fluid flow perform poorly in LPM. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of remediation methods such as vapor extraction, free-product recovery, soil flushing, steam stripping, bioremediation, bioventing, and air sparging in LPM by enhancing formation permeability through the creation of fractures filled with high-permeability materials, such as sand. Hydraulic fracturing can improve the performance of other remediation methods such as oxidation, reductive dechlorination, and bioaugmentation by enhancing delivery of reactive agents to the subsurface. Hydraulic fractures are typically created using a 2-in. steel casing and a drive point pushed into the subsurface by a pneumatic hammer. Hydraulic fracturing has been widely used for more than 50 years to stimulate the yield of wells recovering oil from rock at great depth and has recently been shown to stimulate the yield of wells recovering contaminated liquids and vapors from LPM at shallow depths. Hydraulic fracturing is an enabling technology for improving the performance of some remedial methods and is a key element in the implementation of other methods. This document contains information on the above-mentioned technology, including description, applicability, cost, and performance data.

None

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Preliminary Investigation into Solar Thermal Combi-system Performance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Solar thermal combi-systems use solar energy to provide thermal energy for space heating and domestic hot water. These systems come in many different designs and… (more)

Lee, Elizabeth

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Embrittlement Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation P. Sofronis, I. M. Robertson, D. D. Johnson University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Augusta, GA, August 30, 2005 Funding and Duration * Timeline - Project start date: 7/20/05 - Project end date: 7/19/09 - Percent complete: 0.1% * Budget: Total project funding: 300k/yr * DOE share: 75% * Contractor share: 25% * Barriers - Hydrogen embrittlement of pipelines and remediation (mixing with water vapor?) - Assessment of hydrogen compatibility of the existing natural gas pipeline system for transporting hydrogen - Suitable steels, and/or coatings, or other materials to provide safe and reliable hydrogen transport and reduced capital cost 2 Team and Collaborators 3 * Industrial Partners: SECAT

348

Clean option: An alternative strategy for Hanford Tank Waste Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plans for remediation of the Hanford underground storage tanks are currently undergoing reevaluation. As part of this process, many options are being considered for the Tank Waste Remediation System (MRS). The clean option'' described here proposes an aggressive waste processing strategy to achieve the three ma or objectives: Greatly reduce the volume of high-level waste (HLW) to lessen demands on geologic repository space; decrease by several orders of magnitude the amount of radioactivity and toxicity now in the waste tanks that will be left permanently onsite as low-level solid waste (LLW); and accomplish the first two objectives without significantly increasing the total amount of waste for disposal. The study discussed here focuses on process chemistry, as it provides the foundation for achieving the clean option objectives. Because demonstrated separation steps have been identified and connected in a way that meets these objectives, the study concludes that the process chemistry rests on a firm technical basis.

Straalsund, J.L.; Swanson, J.L.; Baker, E.G.; Jones, E.O.; Kuhn, W.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Holmes, J.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Fuels Performance Group: Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Describes R&D and analysis in advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum-based transportation fuels done by NREL's Fuels Performance Group.

Not Available

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Enhancing geothermal heat pump systems with parametric performance analyses.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Parametric performance analyses and comparison of a basic geothermal heat pump, a heat pump cycle with motor cooling/refrigerant preheating, and a heat pump cycle utilizing… (more)

Self, Stuart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Runtime Support For Maximizing Performance on Multicore Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

symposium on Computer architecture, ISCA ’86, pages 414–423,symposium on Computer architecture, ISCA ’10, pages 270–279,High-Performance Computer Architecture ( HPCA), Austin, TX,

Pusukuri, Kishore Kumar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Energy Performance Assessment for Equipment and Utility Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Website: www.emt-india.netBook4Book4.htm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentenergy-performance-assessment-equipme Language: English Policies: "Deployment...

353

Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recovery Act Workers Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint RICHLAND, Wash. - The Hanford Site is looking greener these days after American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers revegetated 166 acres across 12 waste sites, planting over 1,100 pounds of seeds and about 280,000 pounds of mulch. The largest of the sites, known as the BC Control Area, is an approximately 13-square-mile area associated with a waste disposal system used during Hanford operations. Recovery Act workers remediated and reseeded a densely contaminated 140- acre portion of that area after disposing of more than 370,000 tons of contaminated soil. Recovery Act workers employed by DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company have remediated 61 waste sites,

354

Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint The Hanford Site is looking greener these days after American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers revegetated 166 acres across 12 waste sites, planting over 1,100 pounds of seeds and about 280,000 pounds of mulch. The largest of the sites, known as the BC Control Area, is an approximately 13-square-mile area associated with a waste disposal system used during Hanford operations. Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of

355

Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PA00133 - March 2011 PA00133 - March 2011 Applied Field Research Initiative Attenuation Based Remedies in the Subsurface Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) was established to develop the tools, approaches and technologies that will be required to address the technical challenges associated characteriza- tion, remediation and long-term monitoring of recalcitrant compounds in the subsurface at Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) sites. The ABRS AFRI site provides a unique setting for researchers in both applied and basic science fields. A wealth of subsurface data is available to support research activities and remedial decision making.

356

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative is to control the flux of contaminants in soil and water environments for the purpose of...

357

SITE MAINTENANCE PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...............................................................................................................5 5.2 Ground and Surface Water MonitoringSITE MAINTENANCE PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION June 29, 2004 Prepared by: Colorado School of Mines .................................................................................................4 5.0 SITE AIR AND WATER MONITORING

358

Avoiding Destructive Remediation at DOE Sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Pollutants, Radioactive 0 Water Pollutants, Radioactive...States Government Agencies Water Pollutants, Radioactive...management government agencies ground water policy pollutants pollution...pumping radioactive waste remediation risk assessment soils...

F. W. Whicker; T. G. Hinton; M. M. MacDonell; J. E. Pinder III; L. J. Habegger

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

359

In situ Groundwater Remediation Using Treatment Walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of treatment wall technology for the clean up of contaminated ground-water resources has expanded in the past few...ex situ and other in situ ground-water remediation approaches is reduced operation a...

Radisav D. Vidic; Frederick G. Pohland

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Electrolytic remediation of chromated copper arsenate wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While chromated copper arsenate (CCA) has proven to be exceptionally effective in protecting wood from rot and infestation, its toxic nature has led to the problem of disposal of CCA-treated lumber and remediation of waters ...

Stern, Heather A. G. (Heather Ann Ganung)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PLAN CSMRI SITE REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Littleton, CO 80127 #12;CSMRI Site Remediation Quality Assurance Project Plan March 30, 2004 SAMPLING Environmental Consultants, Inc. Approved By: Date: Sally Cuffin Project Quality Assurance Manager New Horizons...................................................................................................................................3 2.5 Decision Rules

362

System Performance Measurement Supports Design Recommendations for Solar Ventilation Preheat System (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

System Performance System Performance Measurement Supports Design Recommendations for Solar Ventilation Preheat System The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored the installation of a data monitoring system to analyze the efficiency and performance of a large solar ventilation preheat (SVP) system. The system was installed at a Federal installation to reduce energy consumption and costs and to help meet Federal energy goals and mandates. SVP systems draw ventilation air in through a perforated metal solar collector with a dark color on the south side of a build-

363

WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, to separate petroleum-related contaminants and other hazardous pollutants from soil and sediments. In this process, water with added electrolytes (inexpensive and environmentally friendly) is used as the extracting solvent under subcritical conditions (150-300 C). The use of electrolytes allows us to operate reactors under mild conditions and to obtain high separation efficiencies that were hitherto impossible. Unlike common organic solvents, water under subcritical conditions dissolves both organics and inorganics, thus allowing opportunities for separation of both organic and inorganic material from soil. In developing this technology, our systematic approach was to (1) establish fundamental solubility data, (2) conduct treatability studies with industrial soils, and (3) perform a bench-scale demonstration using a highly contaminated soil. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise. The next step of the development process is the successful pilot demonstration of this technology. Once pilot tested, this technology can be implemented quite easily, since most of the basic components are readily available from mature technologies (e.g., steam stripping, soil washing, thermal desorption). The implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and will provide a stand-alone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

2001-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

364

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for defining the remedial design requirements, preparing the design documentation, and defining the remedial actions for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the design developed to support the remediation and disposal activities selected in the Final Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision.

D. E. Shanklin

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Environmental restoration and remediation technical data management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tasks performed in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) work plan for each Hanford Site operable unit must meet the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement, Ecology et. al 1992). An extensive amount of data will be generated in the evaluation and remediation of hazardous waste sites at the Site. The data must be of sufficient quality, as they will be used to evaluate the need, select the method(s), and support the full remediation of the waste sites as stipulated in the Tri-Party Agreement. In particular, a data management plan (DMP) is to be included in an RI/FS work plan for managing the technical data obtained during the characterization of an operable unit, as well as other data related to the study of the operable unit. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) sites are involved in the operable unit. Thus, the data management activities for the operable unit should be applied consistently to RCRA sites in the operable unit as well. This DMP provides common direction for managing-the environmental technical data of all defined operable units at the Hanford Site during the RI/FS activities. Details specific to an operable unit will be included in the actual work plan of that operable unit.

Key, K.T.; Fox, R.D.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Remediation of Groundwater Contaminated with Organics and Radionuclides - An Innovative Approach Eases Traditional Hurdles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditional approaches to the remediation of contaminated groundwater, such as pump-and-treat, have been used for many years for the treatment of groundwater contaminated with various organics. However the treatment of groundwater contaminated with organics and radionuclides has been considerably more challenging. Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC) was recently faced with these challenges while designing a remediation system for the remediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater and soil at the RMI Extrusion Plant in Ashtabula, OH. Under contract with RMI Environmental Services (RMIES), SEC teamed with Regenesis, Inc. to design, implement, and execute a bioremediation system to remove TCE and associated organics from groundwater and soil that was also contaminated with uranium and technetium. The SEC-Regenesis system involved the injection of Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC), a natural attenuation accelerant that has been patented, designed, and produced by Regenesis, to stimulate the reductive dechlorination and remediation of chlorinated organics in subsurface environments. The compound was injected using direct-push Geoprobe rods over a specially designed grid system through the zone of contaminated groundwater. The innovative approach eliminated the need to extract contaminated groundwater and bypassed the restrictive limitations listed above. The system has been in operation for roughly six months and has begun to show considerable success at dechlorinating and remediating the TCE plume and in reducing the radionuclides into insoluble precipitants. The paper will provide an overview of the design, installation, and initial operation phase of the project, focusing on how traditional design challenges of remediating radiologically contaminated groundwater were overcome. The following topics will be specifically covered: a description of the mechanics of the HRC technology; an assessment of the applicability of the HRC technology to contaminated groundwater plumes and other potential remediation opportunities; a discussion of how the implementation of the HRC technology eased permitting issues and other challenges of remediating groundwater contaminated with radionuclides and organics; an overview of the remedial design and installation of the design including the inputs required to design the remediation system; a summary of results achieved to date and a forecast of future results; and a discussion of future needs and lessons learned.

Scott, J.; Case, N.; Coltman, K.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

367

Review of the design and performance features of hvdc systems connected to low short circuit ratio ac systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and performance of an HVdc system is significantly impacted by the relative strength of the ac system to which it is connected. In this paper, design and performance features of ten HVdc systems are discussed. All of these systems are connected to ac systems that are relatively weak compared to the rating of the dc system. Six of these systems are back-to-back, two are overhead lines, and two are undersea cable connections. AC and dc system interaction problems and how they are addressed in the design and specification of each of these systems, are described.

Thallam, R.S. (Salt River Project, Phoenix, AZ (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Integrating GIS and GPS in environmental remediation oversight  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents findings on Ohio EPA Office of Federal Facilities Oversight`s (OFFO) use of GIS and GPS for environmental remediation oversight at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Fernald Site. The Fernald site is a former uranium metal production facility within DOE`s nuclear weapons complex. Significant uranium contamination of soil and groundwater is being remediated under state and federal regulations. OFFO uses GIS/GPS to enhance environmental monitoring and remediation oversight. These technologies are utilized within OFFO`s environmental monitoring program for sample location and parameter selection, data interpretation and presentation. GPS is used to integrate sample data into OFFO`s GIS and for permanently linking precise and accurate geographic data to samples and waste units. It is important to identify contamination geographically as all visual references (e.g., buildings, infrastructure) will be removed during remediation. Availability of the GIS allows OFFO to perform independent analysis and review of DOE contractor generated data, models, maps, and designs. This ability helps alleviate concerns associated with {open_quotes}black box{close_quotes} models and data interpretation. OFFO`s independent analysis has increased regulatory confidence and the efficiency of design reviews. GIS/GPS technology allows OFFO to record and present complex data in a visual format aiding in stakeholder education and awareness. Presented are OFFO`s achievements within the aforementioned activities and some reasons learned in implementing the GIS/GPS program. OFFO`s two years of GIS/GPS development have resulted in numerous lessons learned and ideas for increasing effectiveness through the use of GIS/GPS.

Kaletsky, K.; Earle, J.R.; Schneider, T.A. [Ohio EPA, Dayton, OH (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

DOE/NV

2001-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

370

Simulation of energy performance of underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system represents a fan coil unit (FCU) system, consistingEnergy use intensity EUI Fan coil unit F CU HVAC electricityarea Fan powered terminal unit (with heating coil) used for

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Improving Steam System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

in Industrial Steam Systems Insulate Steam Distribution and Condensate Return Lines Advanced Manufacturing Home Key Activities Research & Development Projects Facilities...

372

WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRI International is conducting experiments to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology or hot water extraction (HWE) technology for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. Most current remediation practices either fail to remove the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in petroleum-contaminated sites, are too costly, or require the use of organic solvents at the expense of additional contamination and with the added cost of recycling solvents. Hydrothermal extraction offers the promise of efficiently extracting PAHs and other kinds of organics from contaminated soils at moderate temperatures and pressures, using only water and inorganic salts such as carbonate. SRI has conducted experiments to measure the solubility and rate of solubilization of selected PAHs (fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, 9,10-dimethylanthracene) in water using SRI's hydrothermal optical cell with the addition of varying amounts of sodium carbonate to evaluate the efficiency of the technology for removing PAHs from the soil. SRI data shows a very rapid increase in solubility of PAHs with increase in temperature in the range 25-275 C. SRI also measured the rate of solubilization, which is a key factor in determining the reactor parameters. SRI results for fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, and 9,10-dimethylanthracene show a linear relationship between rate of solubilization and equilibrium solubility. Also, we have found the rate of solubilization of pyrene at 275 C to be 6.5 ppm/s, indicating that the equilibrium solubilization will be reached in less than 3 min at 275 C; equilibrium solubility of pyrene at 275 C is 1000 ppm. Also, pyrene and fluoranthene appear to have higher solubilities in the presence of sodium carbonate. In addition to this study, SRI studied the rate of removal of selected PAHs from spiked samples under varying conditions (temperature, pore sizes, and pH). We have found a higher removal of PAHs in the presence of sodium carbonate in both sand and bentonite systems. Also, sodium carbonate greatly reduces the possible reactor corrosion under hydrothermal conditions. Our results show that a water-to-sand ratio of at least 3:1 is required to efficiently remove PAH from soil under static conditions.

Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

2001-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

373

High Performance Interconnect System Design for Future Chip Multiprocessors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constraints of power and area, and provide ultra low latencies and high throughput. In this research, we explore different techniques to design high performance NOC. First, existing NOCs mostly use Dimension Order Routing (DOR) to determine the route taken...

Wang, Lei

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

374

Mercury contaminated sediment sites—An evaluation of remedial options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury (Hg) is a naturally-occurring element that is ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Though efforts have been made in recent years to decrease Hg emissions, historically-emitted Hg can be retained in the sediments of aquatic bodies where they may be slowly converted to methylmercury (MeHg). Consequently, Hg in historically-contaminated sediments can result in high levels of significant exposure for aquatic species, wildlife and human populations consuming fish. Even if source control of contaminated wastewater is achievable, it may take a very long time, perhaps decades, for Hg-contaminated aquatic systems to reach relatively safe Hg levels in both water and surface sediment naturally. It may take even longer if Hg is present at higher concentration levels in deep sediment. Hg contaminated sediment results from previous releases or ongoing contributions from sources that are difficult to identify. Due to human activities or physical, chemical, or biological processes (e.g. hydrodynamic flows, bioturbation, molecular diffusion, and chemical transformation), the buried Hg can be remobilized into the overlying water. Hg speciation in the water column and sediments critically affect the reactivity (i.e. conversion of inorganic Hg(II) to MeHg), transport, and its exposure to living organisms. Also, geochemical conditions affect the activity of methylating bacteria and its availability for methylation. This review paper discusses remedial considerations (e.g. key chemical factors in fate and transport of Hg, source characterization and control, environmental management procedures, remediation options, modeling tools) and includes practical case studies for cleaning up Hg-contaminated sediment sites. -- Highlights: ? Managing mercury-contaminated sediment sites are challenging to remediate. ? Remediation technologies are making a difference in managing these sites. ? Partitioning plays a dominant role in the distribution of mercury species. ? Mathematical models can be used to help us understand the chemistry and processes.

Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 West Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Chattopadhyay, Sandip, E-mail: Sandip.Chattopadhyay@tetratech.com [Tetra Tech, Inc., 250 West Court Street, Suite 200W, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States)] [Tetra Tech, Inc., 250 West Court Street, Suite 200W, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Improving Motor and Drive System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is one in a series of sourcebooks to assist industrial personnel in understanding and optimizing motors and motor-driven systems

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Improving Pumping System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Second Edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prepared for the DOE Industrial Technologies Program, this sourcebook contains the practical guidelines and information manufacturers need to improve the efficiency of their pumping systems.

Not Available

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Performance of Johnson Matthey EGRT? Emission Control System...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

* Doug Emig Emigd@JMUSA.com * Sougato Chatterjee Chatterjee@JMUSA.com * WWW.JMCSD.COM Johnson Matthey Diesel Emission Control Systems 380 Lapp Road Malvern, PA 19355...

378

Results of Remediation and Verification Sampling for the 600-270 Horseshoe Landfill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the 2005 remedial action and verification soil sampling conducted at the 600-270 waste site after removal of soil containing residual concentrations of dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane and its breakdown products dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethane. The remediation was performed in response to post-closure surface soil sampling performed between 1998 and 2003 that indicated the presence of residual DDT contamination exceeding the Record of Decision for the 1100 Area National Priorities List site cleanup criteria of 1 mg/kg that was established for the original 1994 cleanup activities.

W. S. Thompson

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

379

Co-simulation for performance prediction of integrated building and HVAC systems -An analysis of solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Co-simulation for performance prediction of integrated building and HVAC systems - An analysis performance simulation of buildings and heating, ventilation and air- conditioning (HVAC) systems can help, heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are responsible for 10%-60% of the total building

380

BLACK-BOX MODELLING OF HVAC SYSTEM: IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCES OF NEURAL NETWORKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BLACK-BOX MODELLING OF HVAC SYSTEM: IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCES OF NEURAL NETWORKS Eric FOCK Ile de La Réunion - FRANCE ABSTRACT This paper deals with neural networks modelling of HVAC systems of HVAC system can be modelled using manufacturer design data presented as derived performance maps

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Impact of forecasting error on the performance of capacitated multi-item production systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of forecasting error on the performance of capacitated multi-item production systems Jinxing multi-item production system under demand uncertainty and a rolling time horizon. The output from parameters, thus improving the performance of production systems. q 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

Xie, Jinxing

382

In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Remedy Evaluation Framework for Inorganic, Non-Volatile Contaminants in the Vadose Zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contaminants in the vadose zone may act as a potential long-term source of groundwater contamination and need to be considered in remedy evaluations. In many cases, remediation decisions for the vadose zone will need to be made all or in part based on projected impacts to groundwater. Because there are significant natural attenuation processes inherent in vadose zone contaminant transport, remediation in the vadose zone to protect groundwater is functionally a combination of natural attenuation and use of other remediation techniques, as needed, to mitigate contaminant flux to groundwater. Attenuation processes include both hydrobiogeochemical processes that serve to retain contaminants within porous media and physical processes that mitigate the rate of water flux. In particular, the physical processes controlling fluid flow in the vadose zone are quite different and generally have a more significant attenuation impact on contaminant transport relative to those within the groundwater system. A remedy evaluation framework is presented herein that uses an adaptation of the established EPA Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) evaluation approach and a conceptual model based approach focused on identifying and quantifying features and processes that control contaminant flux through the vadose zone. A key concept for this framework is to recognize that MNA will comprise some portion of all remedies in the vadose zone. Thus, structuring evaluation of vadose zone waste sites to use an MNA-based approach provides information necessary to either select MNA as the remedy, if appropriate, or to quantify how much additional attenuation would need to be induced by a remedial action (e.g., technologies considered in a feasibility study) to augment the natural attenuation processes and meet groundwater protection goals.

Truex, Michael J.; Carroll, Kenneth C.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Multi-Source Hydronic Heat Pump System Performance Test Bed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pump unit) with a central chilled water storage tank. The MSHHP system uses significantly less energy than a conventional HVAC system, and lowers peak demand by shifting required electrical energy consumption to lower-cost, off-peak and mid-peak rates...

Meckler, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Performance Projections of HPC Applications on Chip Multiprocessor (CMP) Based Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance projections of High Performance Computing (HPC) applications onto various hardware platforms are important for hardware vendors and HPC users. The projections aid hardware vendors in the design of future systems and help HPC users...

Shawky Sharkawi, Sameh Sh

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

386

Energy Performance Testing of Asetek's RackCDU System at NREL's High Performance Computing Data Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we report on the first tests of Asetek's RackCDU direct-to-chip liquid cooling system for servers at NREL's ESIF data center. The system was simple to install on the existing servers and integrated directly into the data center's existing hydronics system. The focus of this study was to explore the total cooling energy savings and potential for waste-heat recovery of this warm-water liquid cooling system. RackCDU captured up to 64% of server heat into the liquid stream at an outlet temperature of 89 degrees F, and 48% at outlet temperatures approaching 100 degrees F. This system was designed to capture heat from the CPUs only, indicating a potential for increased heat capture if memory cooling was included. Reduced temperatures inside the servers caused all fans to reduce power to the lowest possible BIOS setting, indicating further energy savings potential if additional fan control is included. Preliminary studies manually reducing fan speed (and even removing fans) validated this potential savings but could not be optimized for these working servers. The Asetek direct-to-chip liquid cooling system has been in operation with users for 16 months with no necessary maintenance and no leaks.

Sickinger, D.; Van Geet, O.; Ravenscroft, C.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

6 - Engine brake performance in diesel engine system design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter provides a comprehensive theory on engine brake performance. It first discusses vehicle braking requirement and the impact on engine–vehicle matching in engine brake operation, followed by a comparison between engine brakes and drivetrain retarders. It then introduces drivetrain retarders in detail including their torque and cooling characteristics. The performance characteristics of exhaust brakes and compression brakes are elaborated including their mechanisms and the interactions with valvetrain, variable valve actuation (VVA) and turbocharger. The principles of engine brake design are introduced through comprehensive simulation analysis on engine thermodynamic cycles in braking operation. A braking gas recirculation (BGR) theory is developed.

Qianfan Xin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Assessment of passive safety system performance under gravity driven cooling system drain line break accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A generation III+ Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) which relies on natural circulation has evolved from earlier BWR designs by incorporating passive safety features to improve safety and performance. Natural circulation allows the elimination of emergency injection pump and no operator action or alternating current (AC) power supply. The generation III+ BWR's passive safety systems include the Automatic Depressurization System (ADS), the Suppression Pool (SP), the Standby Liquid Control System (SLCS), the Gravity Driven Cooling System (GDCS), the Isolation Condenser System (ICS) and the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS). The ADS is actuated to rapidly depressurize the reactor leading to the GDCS injection. The large amount of water in the SP condenses steam from the reactor. The SLCS provides makeup water to the reactor. The GDCS injects water into the reactor by gravity head and provides cooling to the core. The ICS and the PCCS are used to remove the decay heat from the reactor. The objective of this paper is to analyze the response of passive safety systems under the Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). A GDCS Drain Line Break (GDLB) test has been conducted in the Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA) which is scaled to represent the generation III+ BWR. The main results of PUMA GDLB test were that the reactor coolant level was well above the Top of Active Fuel (TAF) and the reactor containment pressure has remained below the design pressure. In particular, the containment maximum pressure (266 kPa) was 36% lower than the safety limit (414 kPa). The minimum collapsed water level (1.496 m) before the GDCS injection was 8% lower than the TAF (1.623 m) but it was ensured that two-phase water level was higher than the TAF with no core uncovery.

J. Lim; J. Yang; S.W. Choi; D.Y. Lee; S. Rassame; T. Hibiki; M. Ishii

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Performance Enhancement of the Automated Concrete Evaluation System (ACES)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this proposed research is to improve and expand the detection and analysis capabilities of the automated, concrete evaluation (ACE) system. MoDOT and Honeywell jointly developed this system. The focus of this proposed research will be on the following: Coordination of concrete imaging efforts with other states, Validation and testing of the ACE system on a broad range of concrete samples, and Identification and development of software and hardware enhancements. These enhancements will meet the needs of diverse users in the field of concrete materials, construction, and research.

Baumgart,C.W.; Cave,S.P.; Linder,K.E.

2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

The Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management: Project performance study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy commissioned Independent Project Analysis, Inc. (IPA) to perform this Project Performance Study to provide a quantitative analysis determining how well EM develops and executes environmental remediation and waste management projects. The approach consisted of collecting detailed data on a sample of 65 completed and ongoing EM projects conducted since 1984. These data were then compared with key project characteristics and outcomes from 233 environmental remediation projects (excluding EM) in IPA`s Environmental Remediation Database and 951 projects In IPA`s Capital Projects Database. The study establishes the standing of the EM system relative to other organizations, and suggests areas and opportunities for improvement.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation is from the Building America research team BA-PIRC webinar on September 30, 2011 providing informationprovide information about how to achieve energy savings from solar water heating, electric dedicated heat pump water heating, and gas tankless systems.

392

A Human Performance Modeling System for Process Safety Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that system designers and safety professionals know about this required time frame before operations are initiated. Specific research goals for this project include the following: * Estimating the standard time data for operators to take corrective actions...

Harputlu, Emrah 1986-

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Impact of Software Structure and Policy on CPU and Memory System Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operating systems, when compared to application programs, have received disappointingly little benefit from the performance improvements of the most recent generation of microprocessors. This thesis used complete traces of software activity from a RISCbased uniprocessor to expose the dynamic behavior of operating system execution and explore the sources of poor performance. Traces from both Mach 3.0 and Ultrix implementations of UNIX permitted a study of performance differences between microkernel and monolithic implementations of the same operating system interface. The comparison showed that both system structure and policy implemented in the system have a significant impact on performance. Measurements of X11 workloads showed that memory system behavior for these large workloads differs significantly from the kinds of workloads traditionally used for performance analysis. Structural and behavioral similarities between large X11 workloads and the operating system are reflected in the...

J. Bradley Chen; Brian N. Bershad; Daniel P. Siewiorek; Thomas R. Gross

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hydrazine engine start system air start performance and controls sizing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrazine has been used as an energy source in many applications to fuel in-flight main engine starting. In a current application, an existing hydrazine engine start system (ESS) design was adapted to meet new fuel control requirements. This paper presents a brief system description, historical context, and the motivating factors for the hydrazine controls changes and three case studies of controls design and analysis from the ESS program. 4 refs.

Johnson, A.T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Multiscale modeling of surfactant phase behavior in the remediation of DNAPL contamination.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The brine barrier remediation technique (BBRT) has been proposed as a novel Brine barrier remediation techniques (BBRT) that use surfactants have been proposed for remediating… (more)

Fan, Xiangyu.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Remediation of water contamination using catalytic technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remediation of contaminated ground and underground water is becoming a critical issue in Europe and worldwide. We discuss here the role of catalysis in water remediation, with reference to two specific examples of catalytic water remediation technologies: (i) the elimination of nitrate and pesticides from water contaminated as a result of agricultural practices and (ii) the conversion of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in contaminated underground water. Of particular interest is a technology based on catalytic membranes for remediation of water contaminated by nitrate, which offers various advantages with respect to conventional technologies. Using a Pd-Cu-based catalytic membrane, a reaction temperature below 15 °C, a mixed 4:1 CO2:H2 feed and controlling bulk solution pH by \\{HCl\\} addition, it is possible to obtain a nitrate conversion higher than 80% even with ammonium ion formation below 0.5 ppm, i.e. the maximum concentration allowed to meet the requirements for drinking water quality. In MTBE conversion in contaminated underground water, acid zeolites with suitable pore structures (channel structure and pore openings) such as H-ZSM-5 and H-BEA can be used as catalytic permeable reactive barriers for in situ remediation. These zeolites not only act as adsorbents for both MTBE and its reaction products, but also effectively catalyze the hydrolysis of MTBE to t-butyl alcohol (TBA) and methanol (MeOH) which then can be rapidly biodegraded by indigenous microorganisms.

Gabriele Centi; Siglinda Perathoner

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Biomass pyrolysis processes: performance parameters and their influence on biochar system benefits.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study focuses on performance of biomass pyrolysis processes for use in biochar systems. Objectives are to understand the range of control of such processes… (more)

Brownsort, Peter A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

DETERMINING EMPLOYEE EXPOSURE TO ETHYLENE GLYCOL WHILE PERFORMING MAINTENANCE ON AN AIRCRAFT DEICING FLUID COLLECTION SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Air monitoring was performed on an aircraft deicing fluid collection system at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (CNKIA). The goal of the study was to… (more)

CHAPMAN, DONALD RIVERS

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

HPXML: A Standardized Home Performance Data Sharing System- Building America Top Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

NREL’s Standard for Home Performance-Related Data Transfer (known as HPXML) facilitates smooth communication between program tracking systems and energy upgrade analysis software.

400

Optimizing parameters for predicting the geochemical behavior and performance of discrete fracture networks in geothermal systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Optimizing parameters for predicting the geochemical behavior and performance of discrete fracture networks in geothermal systems presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Optimized remedial groundwater extraction using linear programming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater extraction systems are typically installed to remediate contaminant plumes or prevent further spread of contamination. These systems are expensive to install and maintain. A traditional approach to designing such a wellfield uses a series of trial-and-error simulations to test the effects of various well locations and pump rates. However, the optimal locations and pump rates of extraction wells are difficult to determine when objectives related to the site hydrogeology and potential pumping scheme are considered. This paper describes a case study of an application of linear programming theory to determine optimal well placement and pump rates. The objectives of the pumping scheme were to contain contaminant migration and reduce contaminant concentrations while minimizing the total amount of water pumped and treated. Past site activities at the area under study included disposal of contaminants in pits. Several groundwater plumes have been identified, and others may be present. The area of concern is bordered on three sides by a wetland, which receives a portion of its input budget as groundwater discharge from the pits. Optimization of the containment pumping scheme was intended to meet three goals: (1) prevent discharge of contaminated groundwater to the wetland, (2) minimize the total water pumped and treated (cost benefit), and (3) avoid dewatering of the wetland (cost and ecological benefits). Possible well locations were placed at known source areas. To constrain the problem, the optimization program was instructed to prevent any flow toward the wetland along a user-specified border. In this manner, the optimization routine selects well locations and pump rates so that a groundwater divide is produced along this boundary.

Quinn, J.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Register Closing Effects on Forced Air Heating System Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Closing registers in forced air heating systems and leaving some rooms in a house unconditioned has been suggested as a method of quickly saving energy for California consumers. This study combined laboratory measurements of the changes in duct leakage as registers are closed together with modeling techniques to estimate the changes in energy use attributed to closing registers. The results of this study showed that register closing led to increased energy use for a typical California house over a wide combination of climate, duct leakage and number of closed registers. The reduction in building thermal loads due to conditioning only a part of the house was offset by increased duct system losses; mostly due to increased duct leakage. Therefore, the register closing technique is not recommended as a viable energy saving strategy for California houses with ducts located outside conditioned space. The energy penalty associated with the register closing technique was found to be minimized if registers furthest from the air handler are closed first because this tends to only affect the pressures and air leakage for the closed off branch. Closing registers nearer the air handler tends to increase the pressures and air leakage for the whole system. Closing too many registers (more than 60%) is not recommended because the added flow resistance severely restricts the air flow though the system leading to safety concerns. For example, furnaces may operate on the high-limit switch and cooling systems may suffer from frozen coils.

Walker, Iain S.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Corrosion performance of materials for advanced combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conceptual designs of advanced combustion systems that utilize coal as a feedstock require high-temperature furnaces and heat transfer surfaces capable of operating at more elevated temperatures than those prevalent in current coal-fired power plants. The combination of elevated temperatures and hostile combustion environments necessitates development/application of advanced ceramic materials in these designs. This report characterizes the chemistry of coal-fired combustion environments over the wide temperature range that is of interest in these systems and discusses preliminary experimental results on several materials (alumina, Hexoloy, SiC/SiC, SiC/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, ZIRCONIA, INCONEL 677 and 617) with potential for application in these systems.

Natesan, K.; Yanez-Herrero, M.; Fornasieri, C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Analysis of the Diagnostic Methods of the Performance Failure of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Co ntrol Systems for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol. V-5-2 Analysis of the Diagnostic Methods of the Performance Failure of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems Lianyou LI Zhihong ZHANG Yong...

Li, L.; Zhang, Z.; Sun, Y.; Li, D.; Xie, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Modeling the Impact of Product Portfolio on the Economic and Environmental Performance of Recycling Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hrough the development of a general model of electronics recycling systems, the effect of product portfolio choices on economic and environmental system performance is explored. The general model encompasses the three main ...

Dahmus, Jeffrey B.

406

Conservation of Energy Through The Use of a Predictive Performance Simulator of Operating Cooling Water Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemical treatment program for the prevention of corrosion, scale and deposit accumulations. Calgon has made available a computerized performance simulator of operating cooling water systems which reliably predicts system corrosion rates, percent scale...

Schell, C. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Case Study- The Challenge: Improving Sewage Pump System Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This case study looks at how Trumbull, Connecticut increased the energy and operating efficiency of its Reservoir Avenue sewage pump station. With the help of ITT Flygt Corporation, the town altered the existing pump system by adding a smaller pump and modifying the system control scheme. The changes reduced annual electricity consumption by almost 44 percent, or nearly 31,900 kWh, saving more than $2,600 per year. The $12,000 project had a simple payback of 4.6 years.

408

Corrosion performance of materials for advanced combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conceptual designs of advanced combustion systems that utilize coal as a feedstock require high-temperature furnaces and heat transfer surfaces capable of operating at much higher temperatures than those in current coal-fired power plants. The combination of elevated temperatures and hostile combustion environments requires development and application of advanced ceramic materials for heat exchangers in these designs. This paper characterizes the chemistry of coal-fired combustion environments over the wide temperature range of interest in these systems and discusses some of the experimental results for several materials obtained from laboratory tests and from exposures in a pilot-scale facility.

Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Freeman, M.; Mathur, M. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Remediation of a uranium-contamination in ground water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The former production site of NUKEM where nuclear fuel-elements were developed and handled from 1958 to 1988 was situated in the centre of an industrial park for various activities of the chemical and metallurgical industry. The size of the industrially used part is about 300.000 m{sup 2}. Regulatory routine controls showed elevated CHC (Chlorinated Hydro-Carbons) values of the ground water at the beginning of the 1990's in an area which represented about 80.000 m{sup 2} down-gradient of locations where CHC compounds were stored and handled. Further investigations until 1998 proved that former activities on the NUKEM site, like the UF{sub 6} conversion process, were of certain relevance. The fact that several measured values were above the threshold values made the remediation of the ground water mandatory. This was addressed in the permission given by the Ministry for Nuclear Installations and Environment of Hesse according to chap. 7 of the German atomic law in October 2000. Ground water samples taken in an area of about 5.000 m{sup 2} showed elevated values of total Uranium activity up to between 50 and 75 Bq/l in 2002. Furthermore in an area of another 20.000 m{sup 2} the samples were above threshold value. In this paper results of the remediation are presented. The actual alpha-activities of the ground waters of the remediation wells show values of 3 to 9 Bq/l which are dominated by 80 to 90 % U-234 activity. The mass-share of total Uranium for this nuclide amounts to 0,05% on average. The authority responsible for conventional water utilisation defined target values for remediation: 20 {mu}g/l for dissolved Uranium and 10 {mu}g/l for CHC. Both values have not yet been reached for an area of about 10.000 m{sup 2}. The remediation process by extracting water from four remediation wells has proved its efficiency by reduction of the starting concentrations by a factor of 3 to 6. Further pumping will be necessary especially in that area of the site where the contaminations were found later during soil remediation activities. Only two wells have been in operation since July 2002 when the remediation technique was installed and an apparatus for direct gamma-spectroscopic measurement of the accumulated activities on the adsorbers was qualified. Two further remediation wells have been in operation since August 2006, when the installed remediation technique was about to be doubled from a throughput of 5 m{sup 3}/h to 10 m{sup 3}/h. About 20.000 m{sup 3} of ground water have been extracted since from these two wells and the decrease of their Uranium concentrations behaves similar to that of the two other wells being extracted since the beginning of remediation. Both, total Uranium-concentrations and the weight-share of the nuclides U-234, U-235 and U-238 are measured by ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry) besides measurements of Uranium-Alpha-Activities in addition to the measurement of CHC components of which PCE (Per-chlor-Ethene) is dominant in the contaminated area. CHC compounds are measured by GC (Gas Chromatography). Down-gradient naturally attenuated products are detected in various compositions. Overall 183.000 m{sup 3} of ground water have been extracted. Using a pump and treat method 11 kg Uranium have been collected on an ion-exchange material based on cellulose, containing almost 100 MBq U-235 activity, and almost 15 kg of CHC, essentially PCE, were collected on GAC (Granules of Activated Carbon). Less than 3% of the extracted Uranium have passed the adsorber-system of the remediation plant and were adsorbed by the sewage sludge of the industrial site's waste water treatment. The monthly monitoring of 19 monitoring wells shows that an efficient artificial barrier was built up by the water extraction. The Uranium contamination of two ground water plumes has drastically been reduced by the used technique dependent on the amounts of extracted water. The concentration of the CHC contamination has changed depending on the location of temporal pumping. Thereby maximum availability of this contaminan

Woerner, Joerg; Margraf, Sonja; Hackel, Walter [RD Hanau GmbH (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Work Plan for the Feasibility Study for Remedial Action at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the feasibility study is to gather sufficient information to develop and evaluate alternative remedial actions to address contamination at J-Field in compliance with the NCP, CERCLA, and SARA. This FS Work Plan summarizes existing environmental data for each AOC and outlines the tasks to be performed to evaluate and select remedial technologies. The tasks to be performed will include (1) developing remedial action objectives and identifying response actions to meet these objectives; (2) identifying and screening remedial action technologies on the basis of effectiveness, implementability, and cost; (3) assembling technologies into comprehensive alternatives for J-Field; (4) evaluating, in detail, each alternative against the nine EPA evaluation criteria and comparing the alternatives to identify their respective strengths and weaknesses; and (5) selecting the preferred alternative for each operable unit.

Benioff, P.; Biang, C.; Haffenden, R.; Goyette, M.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Yuen, C.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Performance Simulation of a Dependable Distributed System Yinong Chen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. Availability, reliability and risk analysis were studied under Markov models in [7]. This work describes, including · Reliability: The property of continuity regarding service delivery. Reliability is denoted by R in safety-critical control and monitoring systems like nuclear reactors, flight control and traffic

Chen, Yinong

412

Enhancing complex system performance using discrete-event simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we utilize discrete-event simulation (DES) merged with human factors analysis to provide the venue within which the separation and deconfliction of the system/human operating principles can occur. A concrete example is presented to illustrate ... Keywords: discrete event simulation, potential capacity, queuing model

Glenn O. Allgood; Mohammed M. Olama; Joe E. Lake

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

ICLS performance specification SECTION 16512 -CLASSROOM LIGHTING SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This section specifies an integrated classroom lighting and control system that provides: 1. Single source control sensors, photo sensors (if specified herein), Relay Control Interface with Modular receptacles - GENERAL 1.1 RELATED DOCUMENTS A. Drawings and general provisions of the Contract, including General

414

Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report, Appendix B (Part 2)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Salmon Site Remedial Investigation Report provides the results of activities initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to determine if contamination at the Salmon Site poses a current or future risk to human health and the environment. These results were used to develop and evaluate a range of risk-based remedial alternatives. Located in Lamar County, Mississippi, the Salmon Site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (predecessor to the DOE) between 1964 and 1970 for two nuclear and two gas explosions conducted deep underground in a salt dome. The testing resulted in the release of radionuclides into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, liquid and solid wastes containing radioactivity were generated resulting in surface soil and groundwater contamination. Most of the waste and contaminated soil and water were disposed of in 1993 during site restoration either in the cavities left by the tests or in an injection well. Other radioactive wastes were transported to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. Nonradioactive wastes were disposed of in pits at the site and capped with clean soil and graded. The preliminary investigation showed residual contamination in the Surface Ground Zero mud pits below the water table. Remedial investigations results concluded the contaminant concentrations detected present no significant risk to existing and/or future land users, if surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions are maintained. Recent sampling results determined no significant contamination in the surface or shallow subsurface. The test cavity resulting from the experiments is contaminated and cannot be economically remediated with existing technologies. The ecological sampling did not detect biological uptake of contaminants in the plants or animals sampled. Based on the current use of the Salmon Site, the following remedial actions were identified to protect both human health and the environment: (1) the installation of a water supply system that will provide potable water to the site and residence in the proximity to the site; (2) continued maintenance of surface institutional controls and subsurface restrictions; and (3) continue to implement the long-term hydrologic monitoring program. The Salmon Site will be relinquished the State of Mississippi as mandated by Public Law 104-201-September 23, 1996, to be used as a demonstration forest/wildlife refuge. Should the land use change in the future and/or monitoring information indicates a change in the site conditions, the DOE will reassess the risk impacts to human health and the environment.

USDOE /NV

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California solar energy system performance evaluation, July 1980-June 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory site is an office building in California with an active solar energy system designed to supply from 23 to 33% of the space heating load and part of the hot water load. The solar heating system is equipped with 1428 square feet of flat-plate collectors, a 2000-gallon water storage tank, and two gas-fired boilers to supply auxiliary heat for both space heating and domestic hot water. Poor performance is reported, with the solar fraction being only 4%. Also given are the solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and the coefficient of performance. The performance data are given for the collector, storage, solar water heating and solar space heating subsystems as well as the total system. Typical system operation and solar energy utilization are briefly described. The system design, performance evaluation techniques, weather data, and sensor technology are presented. (LEW)

Wetzel, P.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Achieving Energy Performance in spite of complex systems and dis-jointed design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these operational reviews consisted of investigation on site of anomalies found in the trend logs and issues raised by the occupants. This was followed with face to face meetings with the tuning team and occupant representatives in order to agree on remedial... actions. An action list was issued to relevant sub-contractors and followed up by the team leader. After implementation of the agreed remedial actions, independent verification was undertaken to confirm that the action had the desired effect. Thus...

Ardren, C.; Bannister, P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

How to accelerate the Fernald remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fernald Environmental Management Project is unique among Department of Energy (DOE) sites by virtue of successful efforts by the Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) and DOE-Fernald Area Office (FN) in securing a stak-eholder-assisted final site closure vision and all Record of Decisions (ROD) or Interim RODs required to set the stage for final remediation. DOE and FERMCO have agreed in principle on a Ten Year Plan which accelerates all activities to remediate the site in approximately half the target schedule. This paper presents the path that led to the current Ten Year Plan, the key elements of the plan and the implementation strategies.

Yates, M.K. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Fernald Environmental Management Project; Reising, J. [USDOE Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

Limiting factors in ground water remediation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If one is charged with restoring a contaminated aquifer today, the procedure of pumping contaminated water to the surface for treatment and discharge is most often the state-of-practice technology. The perceived success of pump-and-treat technology can be misleading if the hydrology and contaminant characteristics at the site are not adequately understood. A failure to understand the processes controlling contaminant transport can result in extremely long pumping periods and, consequently, costly and inefficient remediation. Effects of tailing, sorption, and residual immiscible fluids on time required for pump-and-treat remediation of ground water are discussed.

Clinton W. Hall; Jeffrey A. Johnson

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A key review on performance improvement aspects of geothermal district heating systems and applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with a comprehensive analysis and discussion of geothermal district heating systems and applications. In this regard, case studies are presented to study the thermodynamic aspects in terms of energy and exergy and performance improvement opportunities of three geothermal district heating systems, namely (i) Balcova geothermal district heating system (BGDHS), (ii) Salihli geothermal district heating system (SGDHS), and (iii) Gonen geothermal district heating system (GGDHS) installed in Turkey. Energy and exergy modeling of geothermal district heating systems for system analysis and performance evaluation are given, while their performances are evaluated using energy and exergy analysis method. Energy and exergy specifications are presented in tables. In the analysis, the actual system operational data are utilized. In comparison of the local three district heating systems with each other, it is found that the SGDHS has highest energy efficiency, while the GGDHS has highest exergy efficiency.

Leyla Ozgener; Arif Hepbasli; Ibrahim Dincer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

A comparative study of municipal performance measurement systems in Ontario and Quebec, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is an analysis of the municipal performance measurement systems in Ontario and Quebec affecting about 2/3 of all Canadian citizens. The article describes these two systems; how the systems came to be, their goals, types of indicators, accountability and reporting requirements, data analysis, and requirements for performance reporting. After a discussion of the broad literature related to municipal performance measurement both globally and in Canada, the two cases are described in terms of political background, system components, measurement requirements, and reporting requirements. Analysis of these systems then follows comparing the two systems which are similar but unique in significant ways. This analysis has implications for these provinces as well as other jurisdictions with, or considering, mandated municipal performance systems.

Alicia M. Schatteman; Etienne Charbonneau

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Effects of system cycling, evaporator airflow, and condenser coil fouling on the performance of residential split-system air conditioners  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF SYSTEM CYCLING, EVAPORATOR AIRFLOW, AND CONDENSER COIL FOULING ON THE PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL SPLIT-SYSTEM AIR CONDITIONERS A Thesis by JEFFREY BRANDON DOOLEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... COIL FOULING ON THE PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL SPLIT-SYSTEM AIR CONDITIONERS A Thesis by JEFFREY BRANDON DOOLEY Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

Dooley, Jeffrey Brandon

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

422

ViperVM: a Runtime System for Parallel Functional High-Performance Computing on Heterogeneous Architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.henry@labri.fr Abstract The current trend in high-performance computing is to use het- erogeneous architectures (i-performance computer design has shifted from high-frequency multi-core architectures to heterogeneous archi- tecturesViperVM: a Runtime System for Parallel Functional High-Performance Computing on Heterogeneous

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

423

Development of a Beowulf-Class High Performance Computing System for Computational Science Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Beowulf cluster computing technology, the Ateneo High Performance Computing Group has developed a high performance computing system consisting of eight compute nodes. Called the AGILA HPCS this Beowulf cluster computer is designed for computational science applications. In this paper, we present the motivation for the AGILA HPCS and some results on its performance evaluation.

Rafael Saldaña; Jerrold Garcia; Felix Muga Ii; William Yu

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Well Performance Analysis for Low to Ultra-low Permeability Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering Well Performance... Analysis for Low to Ultra-Low Permeability Reservoir Systems Copyright 2010 Dilhan Ilk WELL PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS FOR LOW TO ULTRA-LOW PERMEABILITY RESERVOIR SYSTEMS A Dissertation by DILHAN ILK Submitted to the Office...

Ilk, Dilhan

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

425

Computational performance of ultra-high-resolution capability in the Community Earth System Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the fourth release of the Community Climate System Model, the ability to perform ultra-high-resolution climate simulations is now possible, enabling eddy-resolving ocean and sea-ice models to be coupled to a finite-volume atmosphere model for a ... Keywords: Earth system modeling, Performance engineering, application optimization, climate modeling, high-resolution

John M. Dennis; Mariana Vertenstein; Patrick H. Worley; Arthur A. Mirin; Anthony P. Craig; Robert Jacob; Sheri Mickelson

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

PowerPack: Energy Profiling and Analysis of High-Performance Systems and Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based nodes, and then provide in-depth analyses of the energy consumption of parallel applications on clusters and energy are primary concerns in modern high- performance computing system design. Operational costs power and energy consumption in high-performance systems, including each component's electrical

427

Modeling and performance of a single-electron-beam two-FEL system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of a single electron beam to power a master oscillator and power amplifier was demonstrated in the Rocketdyne/Stanford experiment. This article concentrates on the performance of the downstream element under the assumption of higher performance upstream elements such as might be possible for the high-brightness systems being developed in the Los Alamos and Rocketdyne/Duke programs. The modeling covers the performance of the initial high-extraction efficiency system, the filtering, transport, and refocusing of electrons into a second wiggler, and the performance of the second system. The Rocketdyne 3D simulation code FELOPT was used in the FEL calculations.

Ralph A. Cover

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Design of a Multicriteria Performance Model for JIT systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

elimination of waste with the participation of all levels of the organization, fr om the shop floor throughout the manager ial str ucture. Its intent is to develop the management process for designing and manufactur ing products so that the least resources... up the items needed fr om an upstream section. This is prefer able to the traditional system where an upstream section usually makes some lots of items and pushes them to the downstream section regardless of the work status at that section; thus...

Coulibaly, Soma

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

429

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds. May 2004, Monterey, California. Charles Tabor, Randall Juhlin, Paul Darr, Julian Caballero, Joseph Daniel, David Ingle Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling More Documents & Publications Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center

430

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds. May 2004, Monterey, California. Charles Tabor, Randall Juhlin, Paul Darr, Julian Caballero, Joseph Daniel, David Ingle Nonaqueous-Phase Liquid Characterization and Post-Remediation Verification Sampling More Documents & Publications Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young - Rainey STAR Center Steam and ET-DSP Combined for DNAPL Remediation: Full-Scale Site Restoration at Young - Rainey STAR Center

431

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Mitigation and Remediation of Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge Full Document and...

432

Hydrocarbon pollution control and remediation of groundwater: a brief review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oil-contaminated sediments. There are two main remediation techniques: soil washing and bio- remediation. With soil washing, contaminated soil is leached with water containing a surfactant to assist in hydrocarbon removal. In situ washing is undertaken...

L. Clark

433

Remedial Costs for MTBE in Soil and Ground Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The contamination of MTBE in ground water has introduced concerns about the increased cost of remediating MTBE/BTEX releases compared to remediating sites with BTEX only contamination. In an attempt to evaluat...

Barbara H. Wilson; John T. Wilson Ph.D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Draft Final Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and Proposed Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Draft Final Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study and Proposed Plan Colorado School of Mines, Colorado 80021 #12;The S.M. Stoller Corporation Flood Plain Remedial Investigation / Feasibility Study ..................................................................................................... 1-8 1.6 Previous Investigations

435

REVIEW REPORT: BUILDING C-400 THERMAL TREATMENT 90 PERCENT REMEDIAL DESIGN REPORT AND SITE INVESTIGATION, PGDP, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On 9 April 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation (EM-22) initiated an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of the 90% Remedial Design Report (RDR) and Site Investigation (RDSI) for thermal treatment of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of Building C-400 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The general ITR goals were to assess the technical adequacy of the 90% RDSI and provide recommendations sufficient for DOE to determine if modifications are warranted pertaining to the design, schedule, or cost of implementing the proposed design. The ultimate goal of the effort was to assist the DOE Paducah/Portsmouth Project Office (PPPO) and their contractor team in ''removing'' the TCE source zone located near the C-400 Building. This report provides the ITR findings and recommendations and supporting evaluations as needed to facilitate use of the recommendations. The ITR team supports the remedial action objective (RAO) at C-400 to reduce the TCE source area via subsurface Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH). Further, the ITR team commends PPPO, their contractor team, regulators, and stakeholders for the significant efforts taken in preparing the 90% RDR. To maximize TCE removal at the target source area, several themes emerge from the review which the ITR team believes should be considered and addressed before implementing the thermal treatment. These themes include the need for: (1) Accurate and site-specific models as the basis to verify the ERH design for full-scale implementation for this challenging hydrogeologic setting; (2) Flexible project implementation and operation to allow the project team to respond to observations and data collected during construction and operation; (3) Defensible performance metrics and monitoring, appropriate for ERH, to ensure sufficient and efficient clean-up; and (4) Comprehensive (creative and diverse) contingencies to address the potential for system underperformance, and other unforeseen conditions These themes weave through the ITR report and the various analyses and recommendations. The ITR team recognizes that a number of technologies are available for treatment of TCE sources. Further, the team supports the regulatory process through which the selected remedy is being implemented, and concurs that ERH is a potentially viable remedial technology to meet the RAOs adjacent to C-400. Nonetheless, the ITR team concluded that additional efforts are needed to provide an adequate basis for the planned ERH design, particularly in the highly permeable Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA), where sustaining target temperatures present a challenge. The ERH design modeling in the 90% RDR does not fully substantiate that heating in the deep RGA, at the interface with the McNairy formation, will meet the design goals; specifically the target temperatures. Full-scale implementation of ERH to meet the RAOs is a challenge in the complex hydrogeologic setting at PGDP. Where possible, risks to the project identified in this ITR report as ''issues'' and ''recommendations'' should be mitigated as part of the final design process to increase the likelihood of remedial success. The ITR efforts were organized into five lines of inquiry (LOIs): (1) Site investigation and target zone delineation; (2) Performance objectives; (3) Project and design topics; (4) Health and safety; and (5) Cross cutting and independent cost evaluation. Within each of these LOIs, the ITR team identified a series of unresolved issues--topics that have remaining uncertainties or potential project risks. These issues were analyzed and one or more recommendations were developed for each. In the end, the ITR team identified 27 issues and provided 50 recommendations. The issues and recommendations are briefly summarized below, developed in Section 5, and consolidated into a single list in Section 6. The ITR team concluded that there are substantive unresolved issues and system design uncertainties, resulting in technical and financial risks to DOE.

Looney, B; Jed Costanza, J; Eva Davis, E; Joe Rossabi, J; Lloyd (Bo) Stewart, L; Hans Stroo, H

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Energy Performance Comparison of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems for Multi-Family Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The type of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system has a large impact on the heating and cooling energy consumption in multifamily residential buildings. This paper compares the energy performance of three HVAC systems: a direct expansion (DX) split system, a split air source heat pump (ASHP) system, and a closed-loop water source heat pump (WSHP) system with a boiler and an evaporative fluid cooler as the central heating and cooling source. All three systems use gas furnace for heating or heating backup. The comparison is made in a number of scenarios including different climate conditions, system operation schemes and applicable building codes. It is found that with the minimum code-compliant equipment efficiency, ASHP performs the best among all scenarios except in extremely code climates. WSHP tends to perform better than the split DX system in cold climates but worse in hot climates.

Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Surfactant-enhanced remediation of organic contaminated soil and water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surfactant based remediation technologies for organic contaminated soil and water (groundwater or surface water) is of increasing importance recently. Surfactants are used to dramatically expedite the process, which in turn, may reduce the treatment time of a site compared to use of water alone. In fact, among the various available remediation technologies for organic contaminated sites, surfactant based process is one of the most innovative technologies. To enhance the application of surfactant based technologies for remediation of organic contaminated sites, it is very important to have a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this process. This paper will provide an overview of the recent developments in the area of surfactant enhanced soil and groundwater remediation processes, focusing on (i) surfactant adsorption on soil, (ii) micellar solubilization of organic hydrocarbons, (iii) supersolubilization, (iv) density modified displacement, (v) degradation of organic hydrocarbon in presence surfactants, (vi) partitioning of surfactants onto soil and liquid organic phase, (vii) partitioning of contaminants onto soil, and (viii) removal of organics from soil in presence of surfactants. Surfactant adsorption on soil and/or sediment is an important step in this process as it results in surfactant loss reduced the availability of the surfactants for solubilization. At the same time, adsorbed surfactants will retained in the soil matrix, and may create other environmental problem. The biosurfactants are become promising in this application due to their environmentally friendly nature, nontoxic, low adsorption on to soil, and good solubilization efficiency. Effects of different parameters like the effect of electrolyte, pH, soil mineral and organic content, soil composition etc. on surfactant adsorption are discussed here. Micellar solubilization is also an important step for removal of organic contaminants from the soil matrix, especially for low aqueous solubility organic contaminants. Influences of different parameters such as single and mixed surfactant system, hydrophilic and hydrophobic chain length, HLB value, temperature, electrolyte, surfactant type that are very important in micellar solubilization are reviewed here. Microemulsion systems show higher capacity of organic hydrocarbons solubilization than the normal micellar system. In the case of biodegradation of organic hydrocarbons, the rate is very slow due to low water solubility and dissolution rate but the presence of surfactants may increase the bioavailability of hydrophobic compounds by solubilization and hence increases the degradation rate. In some cases the presence of it also reduces the rate. In addition to fundamental studies, some laboratory and field studies on removal of organics from contaminated soil are also reviewed to show the applicability of this technology.

Santanu Paria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Modeling the Performance of Engineered Systems for Closure and Near-Surface Disposal  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

performance cleanup closure performance cleanup closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange July 13-14, 2009 Modeling the Performance of Engineered Systems for Closure and Near-Surface Disposal - Overview and Focused Discussions David S. Kosson CRESP and Vanderbilt University Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting July 29, 2009 1 safety performance cleanup closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Agenda * Overview of DOE Performance Assessment Practices * Focused Discussions - Role of PA Process in Risk Communication and Decisions - Modeling Improvements - PA Assumption Validation - Uncertainty Evaluation - Evolving EPA Developments - Related IAEA Activities * Looking forward

439

groundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

producer profits. This will, in turn, benefit water bodies in the area that receive stream baseflow fromgroundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation The Seymour Aquifer is a shallow aquifer water withdraws are used for irrigation while the cities of Vernon, Burk- burnett and Electra and many

440

Gamma Ray Imaging for Environmental Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program is the development of germanium strip detectors for environmental remediation. It is a collaboration between the Naval Research Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. The goal is to develop detectors that are simultaneously capable of excellent spectroscopy and imaging of gamma radiation.

B.F. Philips; R.A. Kroeger: J.D. Kurfess: W.N. Johnson; E.A. Wulf; E. I. Novikova

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "remediation system performance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale in SITU Thermal NAPL Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) successfully completed a field-scale remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at the Northeast Site on the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center, Largo, Florida. The Young-Rainey STAR Center is a former DOE facility that was previously known as the Pinellas Plant and the Pinellas STAR Center. The remediation project encompassed an area of 10,000 ft2 and depths extending to 35 ft below ground surface. Prior to the remediation, DOE evaluated technologies that had the potential to remove NAPLs from the subsurface at the site. Because of site conditions (clay lenses and an underlying clay layer that were thought to be contaminated), steam injection and electrical heating were considered to be the only technologies that had the potential to remove these NAPLs. In July 2001, DOE’s contractor awarded a subcontract for removal of NAPLs from a portion of the Northeast Site. The technologies used for remediation were a combination of steam-enhanced extraction and Electro-Thermal Dynamic Stripping Process, an electrical resistive heating technology. Construction of the remediation system was completed in September 2002. Remedial operations began immediately after construction, and active heating ended in February 2003. After operations were completed, confirmatory sampling was conducted during a 6-month period to verify the level of cleanup achieved. Additional confirmatory sampling was conducted 18 months after operations ended. Analytical results of the confirmatory sampling showed that NAPL concentrations were reduced significantly below the required cleanup goals and, in most cases, below the regulatory maximum contaminant levels. Lessons learned relative to the design, construction, operation, confirmatory sampling approach, and subcontracting could benefit managers of similar remediation projects.

Butherus, Michael [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Ingle, David S. [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Juhlin, Randall [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Daniel, Joseph [S.M. Stoller Corporation; none,

2004-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

442

Geometric effect on cooling power and performance of an integrated thermoelectric generation-cooling system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Geometric design of an integrated thermoelectric generation-cooling system is performed numerically using a finite element method. In the system, a thermoelectric cooler (TEC) is powered directly by a thermoelectric generator (TEG). Two different boundary conditions in association with the effects of contact resistance and heat convection on system performance are taken into account. The results suggest that the characteristics of system performance under varying TEG length are significantly different from those under altering TEC length. When the TEG length is changed, the entire behavior of system performance depends highly on the boundary conditions. On the other hand, the maximum distributions of cooling power and coefficient of performance (COP) are exhibited when the TEC length is altered, whether the hot surface of TEG is given by a fixed temperature or heat transfer rate. The system performance will be reduced once the contact resistance and heat convection are considered. When the lengths of TEG and TEC vary, the maximum reduction percentages of system performance are 12.45% and 18.67%, respectively. The numerical predictions have provided a useful insight into the design of integrated TEG–TEC systems.

Wei-Hsin Chen; Chien-Chang Wang; Chen-I Hung

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Total Quality Commissioning for HVAC Systems to Assure High Performance Throughout the Whole Life Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL QUALITY COMMISSIONING FOR HVAC SYSTEMS TO ASSURE HIGH PERFORMANCE THROUGHOUT THE WHOLE LIFE CYCLE By: Grahame E. Maisey, P.E., and Beverly Milestone, LEED AP Building Services Consultants INTRODUCTION Current HVAC systems... are not coming close to approaching life cycle performance expectations for energy, operation and maintenance, occupant comfort and productivity and longevity. HVAC systems in buildings claiming to be sustainable, with integrated, energy conscious design...

Maisey, G.; Milestone, B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

VI.11 Innovative soil and groundwater remediation: the SITE program experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The superfund innovative technology evaluation (SITE) program of the United States environmental protection agency (EPA) has integrated the private sector, EPA, and other federal and state agencies to successfully address complex hazardous waste problems. The SITE program is a key element in EPA's efforts to increase the availability and use of innovative technologies for the remediation of the nation's hazardous waste sites. The SITE program has successfully promoted the development, commercialization, and implementation of innovative treatment technologies. The program provides environmental decision-makers with relevant data on new, viable remediation technologies that may have performance or cost advantages compared to conventional treatment technologies. The SITE program technology evaluations are used by the remediation community to choose cleanup technology options and that data is credible because of the rigorous quality assurance and careful planning of demonstrations. A number of promising technologies based on sound scientific principles being developed under the SITE program are bioremediation, phytotechnology, electroremediation techniques, and treatment trains.

Annette M. Gatchett; Robert A. Olexsey

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Spiral 2 cryogenic system overview: Design, construction and performance test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new particle accelerator project Spiral 2 at GANIL (“Grand Accélérateur d’Ions Lourds, i.e. National Large Heavy Ion Accelerator) in Caen (France) is a very large installation, intended to serve fundamental research in nuclear physics. The heart of the future machine features a superconductor linear accelerator, delivering a beam until 20Mev/A, which are then used to bombard a matter target. The resulting reactions, such as fission, transfer, fusion, etc. will generate billions of exotic nuclei. To achieve acceleration of the beam, 26 cavities which are placed inside cryomodules at helium cryogenic temperature will be used. AL-AT (Air Liquide Advanced Technologies) takes part to the project by supplying cryogenic plant. The plant includes the liquefier associated to its compressor station, a large dewar, a storage tank for helium gas and transfer lines. In addition, a helium recovery system composed of recovery compressor, high pressure storage and external purifier has been supplied. Customized HELIAL LF has been designed, manufactured and tested by AL-AT to match the refrigeration power need for the Spiral 2 project which is around 1300 W equivalent at 4.5 K.

Deschildre, C.; Bernhardt, J.; Flavien, G.; Crispel, S. [Air Liquide Advanced Technologies, Sassenage (France); Souli, M. [GANIL, Caen (France); Commeaux, C. [IPN, Orsay (France)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

446

Improving Steam System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Second Edition (Book) (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving Steam System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry was developed for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO), formerly the Industrial Technologies Program. AMO undertook this project as a series of sourcebook publications. Other topics in this series include: compressed air systems, pumping systems, fan systems, process heating and motor and drive systems. For more information about program resources, see AMO in the Where to Find Help section of this publication.

Not Available

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Development of a Model Specification for Performance MonitoringSystems for Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the development of a model specification for performance monitoring systems for commercial buildings. The specification focuses on four key aspects of performance monitoring: (1) performance metrics; (2) measurement system requirements; (3) data acquisition and archiving; and (4) data visualization and reporting. The aim is to assist building owners in specifying the extensions to their control systems that are required to provide building operators with the information needed to operate their buildings more efficiently and to provide automated diagnostic tools with the information required to detect and diagnose faults and problems that degrade energy performance. The paper reviews the potential benefits of performance monitoring, describes the specification guide and discusses briefly the ways in which it could be implemented. A prototype advanced visualization tool is also described, along with its application to performance monitoring. The paper concludes with a description of the ways in which the specification and the visualization tool are being disseminated and deployed.

Haves, Philip; Hitchcock, Robert J.; Gillespie, Kenneth L.; Brook, Martha; Shockman, Christine; Deringer, Joseph J.; Kinney,Kristopher L.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Systems, methods and computer-readable media to model kinetic performance of rechargeable electrochemical devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system includes an electrochemical cell, monitoring hardware, and a computing system. The monitoring hardware samples performance characteristics of the electrochemical cell. The computing system determines cell information from the performance characteristics. The computing system also analyzes the cell information of the electrochemical cell with a Butler-Volmer (BV) expression modified to determine exchange current density of the electrochemical cell by including kinetic performance information related to pulse-time dependence, electrode surface availability, or a combination thereof. A set of sigmoid-based expressions may be included with the modified-BV expression to determine kinetic performance as a function of pulse time. The determined exchange current density may be used with the modified-BV expression, with or without the sigmoid expressions, to analyze other characteristics of the electrochemical cell. Model parameters can be defined in terms of cell aging, making the overall kinetics model amenable to predictive estimates of cell kinetic performance along the aging timeline.

Gering, Kevin L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Impact of PHEV Loads on the Dynamic Performance of Power System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

additional load to the power systems [5]. According to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), PHEVsImpact of PHEV Loads on the Dynamic Performance of Power System F. R. Islam, H. R. Pota, M. A into the existing grid. This paper analyses the impact of PHEV loads on the dynamic behaviour of a power system

Pota, Himanshu Roy

450

A Framework for the Performance Evaluation of Operating System Emulators Joshua H. Shaffer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Framework for the Performance Evaluation of Operating System Emulators by Joshua H. Shaffer modern operating systems are capable of seamlessly coexisting in heterogeneous computing environments of an operating system, such as network protocols and file formats. However, application binaries remain

Perrone, Luiz Felipe

451

Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

R. P. Wells

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

452

CLASS DEVIATION FINDINGS AND DETERMINATION Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information Systems (FAPIIS) Requirement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information Systems (FAPIIS) Requirement Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information Systems (FAPIIS) Requirement at Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) 9.406-3(f)(1) and 9.407-3(e)(1) Findings 1. On March 23,2010, the FAR Council published a final rule in the Federal Register (75FR 14058), which amended FAR 9.4 to implement section 872 of the Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for FISCAL Year 2009. Section 872 requires the establishment of a data system containing specific information on the integrity and performance of covered Federal agency contractors and grantees. The data system created for this purpose is entitled Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information Systems (FAPIIS), and it can be located at www.ppirs.gov and www.cpars.csd.disa.mil.

453

Sensitivity Analysis of Wind Plant Performance to Key Turbine Design Parameters: A Systems Engineering Approach; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces the development of a new software framework for research, design, and development of wind energy systems which is meant to 1) represent a full wind plant including all physical and nonphysical assets and associated costs up to the point of grid interconnection, 2) allow use of interchangeable models of varying fidelity for different aspects of the system, and 3) support system level multidisciplinary analyses and optimizations. This paper describes the design of the overall software capability and applies it to a global sensitivity analysis of wind turbine and plant performance and cost. The analysis was performed using three different model configurations involving different levels of fidelity, which illustrate how increasing fidelity can preserve important system interactions that build up to overall system performance and cost. Analyses were performed for a reference wind plant based on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW reference turbine at a mid-Atlantic offshore location within the United States.

Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Veers, P.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

High Performance Computing Update, June 2009 1. A meeting was held with users and potential users of high performance computing systems in April and this  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Performance Computing Update, June 2009 1. A meeting was held with users and potential users of high performance computing systems in April and this considered a proposal from the Director and application "advice" and a core system to host and manage high performance computing nodes (or clusters

Sussex, University of

455

Task 11 - systems analysis of environmental management technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review was conducted of three systems analysis (SA) studies performed by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) on integrated thermal treatment systems (ITTs) and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTSs) for the remediation of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stored throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team led by the Energy & Environment Research Center (EERC), including Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), and Virginia Tech.

Musich, M.A.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Successful Field-Scale In Situ Thermal NAPL Remediation at the Young-Rainey Star Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) successfully completed a fieldscale remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at a site on the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center, Largo, Florida. The STAR Center is a former DOE facility. The remediation project covered an area of 930 m2 (10,000 ft2) and depths extending to 10.5 m (35 ft) below ground surface. In July 2001, DOE’s contractor awarded a subcontract to SteamTech Environmental Services for removal of NAPLs from a portion of the Northeast Site. The technologies used for remediation were steam-enhanced extraction and Electro-Thermal Dynamic Stripping Process, an electrical resistive heating technology. McMillan-McGee Corporation implemented the process. Construction of the remediation system was completed in September 2002. Operations began immediately after construction, and active heating ended in February 2003. After operations were completed, confirmatory sampling was conducted over a 6-month period to verify the level of cleanup achieved. Results of the sampling showed that NAPL concentrations were reduced significantly below the required cleanup goals and, in most cases, below the regulatory maximum contaminant levels. Lessons learned relative to the design, construction, operation, confirmatory sampling approach, and subcontracting could benefit managers of similar remediation projects

Gavaskar, A.R. [ed.; Chen, A.S.C. [ed.; none,

2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

457

Remediation of Trichloroethylene-Contaminated Soils by STAR Technology using Vegetable Oil Smoldering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Self-sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation (STAR) is an innovative soil remediation approach based on smoldering combustion that has been demonstrated to effectively destroy complex hydrocarbon nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) with minimal energy input. This is the first study to explore the smoldering remediation of sand contaminated by a volatile NAPL (Trichloroethylene, TCE) and the first to consider utilizing vegetable oil as supplemental fuel for STAR. Thirty laboratory-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the relationship between key outcomes (TCE destruction, rate of remediation) to initial conditions (vegetable oil type, oil:TCE mass ratio, neat versus emulsified oils). Several vegetable oils and emulsified vegetable oil formulations were shown to support remediation of TCE via self-sustaining smoldering. A minimum concentration of 14,000 mg/kg canola oil was found to treat sand exhibiting up to 80,000 mg/kg TCE. On average, 75% of the TCE mass was removed due to volatilization. This proof-of-concept study suggests that injection and smoldering of vegetable oil may provide a new alternative for driving volatile contaminants to traditional vapour extraction systems without supplying substantial external energy.

Madiha Salman; Jason I. Gerhard; David W. Major; Paolo Pironi; Rory Hadden

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Heating and cooling performance analysis of a ground source heat pump system in Southern Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper examines thermal performance of a ground source heat pump (GSHP) system. The GSHP system was installed in an office building in Nuremberg city of Germany. In order to evaluate system performance the GSHP system has been continuously monitored for 4 years. Heating and cooling performance of the GSHP system is analyzed based on the accumulated data. Major findings of this work include: (1) coefficient of performance (COP) is estimated to be 3.9 for a typical winter day and energy efficiency ratio (EER) is assessed to be 8.0 for a typical summer day. These results indicate that the GSHP system has a higher efficiency for building cooling than building heating. (2) For a long-term period, the seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) of the GSHP system is observed to increase by 8.7% annually, whereas the seasonal COP is decreased by 4.0% over a 4-year period. The heating and cooling performance of the GSHP system migrates in opposite trend is caused by the unevenly distributed heating and cooling load of the building. This phenomenon deserves serious attention in the design of future GSHP systems in order to avoid the reducing of energy efficiency over long-term operation.

Jin Luo; Joachim Rohn; Manfred Bayer; Anna Priess; Lucas Wilkmann; Wei Xiang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … HPXML: A Standardized Home Performance Data Sharing System  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

home performance program tracking home performance program tracking systems and energy upgrade analysis software. Many software platforms are available for recording the results of home energy audits for energy-efficiency upgrades and for analyzing home energy performance. Because states and utilities have adopted different tools for compiling and analyzing the data, home performance companies that participate in multiple utility programs or operate over multiple regions need proficiency in each of the reporting platforms used. The necessity of being fluent in multiple programs and of providing results in numerous platforms dramatically increases the home performance companies' information technology infrastructure and training costs. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has supported the

460

Solar energy system performance evaluation. Seasonal report for Fern Lansing, Lansing, Michigan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solar Energy System was designed by Fern Engineering Company, Bourne, Massachusetts to provide space heating and domestic hot water preheating for a 1300 square foot single-family residence located in Lansing, Michigan. The Solar Energy System consists of a 278 square foot flat-plate air collector subsystem, a three 120-gallon tank storage subsystem, a 40 gallon domestic hot water tank subsystem, a liquid/air heat exchanger, an energy transport module, pumps, controls and heat transfer medium lines. Natural gas provides the auxiliary energy for the space heating (100,000 Btu/h) and hot water (70,000 Btu/h) subsystems. The system is shown schematically and has five modes of operation. Typical system operation, system operating sequence, performance assessment, system performance, subsystems performance (collector array, storage, hot water, space heating), operating energy, energy savings, and maintenance are discussed. A brief summary of all pertinent parameters is presented.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Performance Tools and APIs on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Performance Tools and APIs Performance Tools and APIs Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) Rice HPC Toolkit IBM HPCT Mpip gprof Profiling Tools Darshan PAPI High Level UPC API Low Level UPC API UPC Hardware BG/P dgemm Performance Tuning MPI on BGP Performance FAQs IBM References Software and Libraries Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Performance Tools and APIs on BG/P Systems MPI and OpenMP Options Tuning MPI on BGP Performance Tools Tuning and Analysis Utilities (TAU) - Instruments applications and gathers information on timings, MPI activity, and hardware performance counter events Rice HPCToolkit- Performs sample based profiling of applications and

462

Recommendations for Remedial Action at Everest, Kansas.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 7, 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented a Scoping Memo (Argonne 2005) for preliminary consideration by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). This document suggested possible remedial options for the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Everest, Kansas. The suggested approaches were discussed by representatives of the KDHE, the CCC/USDA, and Argonne at the KDHE office in Topeka on September 8-9, 2005, along with other technical and logistic issues related to the Everest site. In response to these discussions, the KDHE recommended (KDHE 2005) evaluation of several remedial processes, either alone or in combination, as part of a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for Everest. The primary remedial processes suggested by the KDHE included the following: (1) Hydraulic control by groundwater extraction with aboveground treatment; (2) Air sparging-soil vapor extraction (SVE) in large-diameter boreholes; and (3) Phytoremediation. As a further outcome of the 2005 meeting and as a precursor to the proposed CAS, the CCC/USDA completed the following supplemental investigations at Everest to address several specific technical concerns discussed with the KDHE: (1) Construction of interpretive cross sections at strategic locations selected by the KDHE along the main plume migration pathway, to depict the hydrogeologic characteristics affecting groundwater flow and contaminant movement (Argonne 2006a); (2) A field investigation in early 2006 (Argonne 2006c), as follows: (a) Installation and testing of a production well and associated observation points, at locations approved by the KDHE, to determine the response of the Everest aquifer to groundwater extraction near the Nigh property; (b) Groundwater sampling for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the installation of additional permanent monitoring points at locations selected by the KDHE, to further constrain the existing contaminant plume; and (c) Resampling of all existing permanent monitoring points for VOCs and biodegradation parameter analyses, at the request of the KDHE. On the basis of these studies (Argonne 2006a,c) and the CCC/USDA's past investigations at Everest (Argonne 2006b), the CCC/USDA concluded that groundwater extraction is not an effective remedial option for this site, and the KDHE concurred (KDHE 2006). As outlined in the next section, the CCC/USDA also believes that air sparging does not represent a viable remedial alternative. The CCC/USDA therefore proposes to collect the technical data required to evaluate the potential viability of a phytoremediation approach for this site and, if appropriate, to support the development of a remedial design.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Risk assessment in the DOE Assurance Program for Remedial Action  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides information obtained during the performance of risk assessment tasks in support of the Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA) sponsored by the Office of Operational Safety of the Department of Energy. We have presented a method for the estimation of projected health effects at properties in the vicinity of uranium mill tailing piles due to transported tailings or emissions from the piles. Because radon and radon daughter exposure is identified as the principal factor contributing to health effects at such properties, the basis for estimating lung cancer risk as a result of such exposure is discussed in detail. Modeling of health risk due to a secondary pathway, ingestion of contaminated, home-grown food products, is also discussed since it is a potentially important additional source of exposure in certain geographic locations. Risk assessment methods used in various mill tailings reports are reviewed. The protocols for radiological surveys conducted in DOE-sponsored remedial action programs are critically reviewed with respect to their relevance to the needs of healt